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1

Distress and emotional well-being in breast cancer patients prior to radiotherapy: an expectancy-based model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding precursors to distress and emotional well-being (EWB) experienced in anticipation of radiotherapy would facilitate the ability to intervene with this emotional upset (i.e. higher distress, lower EWB). Thus, this study tested an expectancy-based model for explaining emotional upset in breast cancer patients prior to radiotherapy. Women affected by breast cancer (N?=?106) were recruited and participants completed questionnaires prior to

Stephanie J. Sohl; Julie B. Schnur; Madalina Sucala; Daniel David; Gary Winkel; Guy H. Montgomery

2012-01-01

2

Distress and emotional well-being in breast cancer patients prior to radiotherapy: an expectancy-based model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding precursors to distress and emotional well-being (EWB) experienced in anticipation of radiotherapy would facilitate the ability to intervene with this emotional upset (i.e. higher distress, lower EWB). Thus, this study tested an expectancy-based model for explaining emotional upset in breast cancer patients prior to radiotherapy. Women affected by breast cancer (N?=?106) were recruited and participants completed questionnaires prior to

Stephanie J. Sohl; Julie B. Schnur; Madalina Sucala; Daniel David; Gary Winkel; Guy H. Montgomery

2011-01-01

3

Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in Preschool Students: A Study of "Strong Start Pre-K"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inclusion of social and emotional learning (SEL) curricula in preschools may help prevent emotional and behavioral problems. This study evaluated the effects of a SEL curriculum, "Strong Start Pre-K," on the social and emotional competence of 52 preschool students using a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group design. Teachers rated…

Gunter, Leslie; Caldarella, Paul; Korth, Byran B.; Young, K. Richard

2012-01-01

4

Emotional Flooding--Using Empathy to Help Babies Manage Strong Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Often a young child's challenging behavior results from emotional flooding--being overwhelmed by one's emotions. The authors explain that in children, the "thinking brain," the cerebral cortex, is not fully developed, and children get emotionally overwhelmed more easily than adults because they process their experiences through the "emotional…

Gillespie, Linda; Hunter, Amy

2008-01-01

5

Emotion, Engagement and Meaning in Strong Experiences of Music Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the emotions connected with music performance. Performing music provides the potential to attain wellbeing via the hedonic and eudaimonic routes, appealing to pleasure, engagement and meaning (Seligman, 2002). To date, most research exploring emotions amongst performers has focused on these components separately, exploring…

Lamont, Alexandra

2012-01-01

6

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the Strong Start Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive\\u000a outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of\\u000a kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of Strong Start on the social and emotional competence of 67 kindergarten students, using a time-series design.

Thomas J. Kramer; Paul Caldarella; Lynnette Christensen; Ryan H. Shatzer

2010-01-01

7

Social and Emotional Learning in the Kindergarten Classroom: Evaluation of the "Strong Start" Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been increasing interest in the promotion of social and emotional learning in schools, and research has shown positive outcomes. However, relatively few studies have been conducted in kindergarten classrooms or considered the feasibility of kindergarten implementation. This study examined the effects of "Strong Start" on the social and…

Kramer, Thomas J.; Caldarella, Paul; Christensen, Lynnette; Shatzer, Ryan H.

2010-01-01

8

Physical Distress, Emotional Status, and Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Cancer Complicated by Post-Radiotherapy Endocrinopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To explore factors affecting quality of life (QOL) among patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) complicated by post-radiotherapy endocrinopathy. Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary medical center and involved a total of 43 post-radiotherapy, recurrence-free NPC patients with endocrinopathy. They performed self-assessment of their emotional status using the Beck Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory-II, and their QoL with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaire and the H and N35 cancer module. Results: Emotional and cognitive functioning of EORTC QLQ-C30 were the most affected. Fatigue, insomnia, and pain were the main concerns. Of the patients, 22 (51.2%) had anxiety and 19 (44.2%) had depression. Both depression and anxiety were negatively correlated with functional scales and global QoL but positively correlated with symptom scales. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that physical distress symptoms of QLQ-C30 and physical functioning were the significant predictors of global QoL. Emotional and social functioning could predict depression, whereas emotional and physical functioning were significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusions: NPC patients with post-radiotherapy endocrinopathy exhibit impaired cognitive function and negative emotions. Symptoms of physical distress play an important role in QoL perception. Measurement of EORTC QLQ-C30 can be a useful instrument for the early detection of patients' impaired cognitive function and psychological morbidity. The high psychological distress related to the endocrine disturbances or the impact of NPC itself needs further study.

Lue, B.-H. [Department of Family Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Social Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Family Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, T.-S. [Department of Social Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-J. [Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hsiujung@ntnu.edu.tw

2008-01-01

9

Modulation of corticospinal activity by strong emotions evoked by pictures and classical music: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.  

PubMed

Using transcranial magnetic stimulation and skin conductance responses, we sought to clarify if, and to what extent, emotional experiences of different valences and intensity activate the hand-motor system and the associated corticospinal tract. For that purpose, we applied a newly developed method to evoke strong emotional experiences by the simultaneous presentation of musical and pictorial stimuli of congruent emotional valence. We uncovered enhanced motor-evoked potentials, irrespective of valence, during the simultaneous presentation of emotional music and picture stimuli (Combined conditions) compared with the single presentation of the two modalities (Picture/Music conditions). In contrast, vegetative arousal was enhanced during both the Combined and Music conditions, compared with the Picture conditions, again irrespective of emotional valence. These findings strongly indicate that arousal is a necessary, but not sufficient, prerequisite for triggering the motor system of the brain. We offer a potential explanation for this discrepant, but intriguing, finding in the paper. PMID:17314668

Baumgartner, Thomas; Willi, Matthias; Jäncke, Lutz

2007-02-12

10

Promoting social emotional competency through quality teaching practices: The impact of consultation on a multidimensional treatment integrity model of the "Strong Kids" program ; Impact of consultation on a multidimensional treatment integrity model of the "Strong Kids" program .  

E-print Network

??This dissertation study investigated the impact of brief teacher consultation on teachers' implementation fidelity, quality of implementation, and student responsiveness during the Strong Kids social-emotional… (more)

Levitt, Verity Helaine, 1979-

2009-01-01

11

Lake Baikal in southeastern Siberia,the "Sacred Sea,"incites strong emotions and action in Russia. In March 2006,  

E-print Network

Articles Lake Baikal in southeastern Siberia,the "Sacred Sea,"incites strong emotions and action pipeline scheduled to pass within 800 me- ters (m) of Lake Baikal's shoreline, and, within days, President Putin announced the pipeline would be rerouted outside the lake's watershed (Cullison 2007).In July 2007

Dever, Jennifer A.

12

Social and Emotional Learning as a Universal Level of Student Support: Evaluating the Follow-up Effect of Strong Kids on Social and Emotional Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the initial and follow-up effect of Strong Kids, a social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, among a sample of 106 third- and fourth-grade students. Students were assigned to either the treatment or the wait-list condition and completed questionnaires on SEL knowledge and perceived use of SEL skills across 3 assessment periods (pretest, posttest, and follow-up). The classroom

Jason E. Harlacher; Kenneth W. Merrell

2010-01-01

13

Strong Teens--Grades 9-12: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.

2007-01-01

14

Strong Start--Grades K-2: A Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional competence--it is a critical part of every child's school success, and just like any academic subject, children need instruction in it. Developed by a top expert, these proven curricula will help promote the social-emotional competence and resilience of children and adolescents. Divided into four age levels from kindergarten…

Merrell, Kenneth W.; Parisi, Danielle M.; Whitcomb, Sara A.

2007-01-01

15

Building Strong Foundations: Practical Guidance for Promoting the Social-Emotional Development of Infants and Toddlers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Supportive relationships, especially those with primary caregivers, are crucial for both the physical survival and the healthy social-emotional development of infants and toddlers. This guide, the first in a series on infant mental health from the Center for Program Excellence, describes how supportive relationships promote the social-emotional…

Parlakian, Rebecca; Seibel, Nancy L.

16

Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was widely accepted that emotion such as fear, anger and pleasure could not be studied using a modern scientific tools. During the very early periods of emotion researches, psychologists, but not biologist, dominated in studying emotion and its disorders. Intuitively, one may think that emotion arises from brain first and then bodily responses follow. For example, we are sad first, and then cry. However, groups of psychologists suggested a proposal that our feeling follows bodily responses; that is, we feel sad because we cry! This proposal seems counterintuitive but became a popular hypothesis for emotion. Another example for this hypothesis is as follows. When you accidentally confront a large bear in a mountain, what would be your responses?; you may feel terrified first, and then run, or you may run first, and then feel terrified later on. In fact, the latter explanation is correct! You feel fear after you run (even because you run?). Or, you can imagine that you date with your girl friend who you love so much. Your heart must be beating fast and your body temperature must be elevated! In this situation, if you take a very cold bath, what would you expect? Your hot feeling is usually calmed down after this cold bath; that is, you feel hot because your heart and bodily temperature change. While some evidence supported this hypothesis, others do not. In the case of patients whose cervical vertebrae were severed with an accident, they still retained significant amount of emotion (feelings!) in some cases (but other patients lost most of emotional experience). In addition, one can imagine that there would be a specific set of physical responses for specific emotion if the original hypothesis is correct (e.g. fasten heart beating and redden face for anger etc.). However, some psychologists failed to find any specific set of physical responses for specific emotion, though others insisted that there existed such specific responses. Based on these controversial observations, another hypothesis was proposed; that is, we feel first, and then have physical responses. These two hypotheses seem contradictory to each other, but detailed examination on these hypotheses waited for the development of new analytical tools.

Choi, Sukwoo

17

The downside of strong emotional memories: how human memory-related genes influence the risk for posttraumatic stress disorder--a selective review.  

PubMed

A good memory for emotionally arousing experiences may be intrinsically adaptive, as it helps the organisms to predict safety and danger and to choose appropriate responses to prevent potential harm. However, under conditions of repeated exposure to traumatic stressors, strong emotional memories of these experiences can lead to the development of trauma-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This syndrome is characterized by distressing intrusive memories that can be so intense that the survivor is unable to discriminate past from present experiences. This selective review on the role of memory-related genes in PTSD etiology is divided in three sections. First, we summarize studies indicating that the likelihood to develop PTSD depends on the cumulative exposure to traumatic stressors and on individual predisposing risk factors, including a substantial genetic contribution to PTSD risk. Second, we focus on memory processes supposed to be involved in PTSD etiology and present evidence for PTSD-associated alterations in both implicit (fear conditioning, fear extinction) and explicit memory for emotional material. This is supplemented by a brief description of structural and functional alterations in memory-relevant brain regions in PTSD. Finally, we summarize a selection of studies indicating that genetic variations found to be associated with enhanced fear conditioning, reduced fear extinction or better episodic memory in human experimental studies can have clinical implications in the case of trauma exposure and influence the risk of PTSD development. Here, we focus on genes involved in noradrenergic (ADRA2B), serotonergic (SLC6A4), and dopaminergic signaling (COMT) as well as in the molecular cascades of memory formation (PRKCA and WWC1). This is supplemented by initial evidence that such memory-related genes might also influence the response rates of exposure-based psychotherapy or pharmacological treatment of PTSD, which underscores the relevance of basic memory research for disorders of altered memory functioning such as PTSD. PMID:24012801

Wilker, Sarah; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

2014-07-01

18

Parents' Beliefs about Emotions and Children's Recognition of Parents' Emotions  

PubMed Central

This study investigated parents’ emotion-related beliefs, experience, and expression, and children’s recognition of their parents’ emotions with 40 parent-child dyads. Parents reported beliefs about danger and guidance of children’s emotions. While viewing emotion-eliciting film clips, parents self-reported their emotional experience and masking of emotion. Children and observers rated videos of parents watching emotion-eliciting film clips. Fathers reported more masking than mothers and their emotional expressions were more difficult for both observers and children to recognize compared with mothers’ emotional expressions. For fathers, but not mothers, showing clearer expressions was related to children’s general skill at recognizing emotional expressions. Parents who believe emotions are dangerous reported greater masking of emotional expression. Contrary to hypothesis, when parents strongly believe in guiding their child’s emotion socialization, children showed less accurate recognition of their parents’ emotions. PMID:20160992

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Her, Pa; Halberstadt, Amy G.; Perez-Rivera, Marie B.

2009-01-01

19

Music, memory and emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either\\u000a about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

Lutz Jäncke

2008-01-01

20

Emotional Intelligence: Giving Computers Effective Emotional Skills to Aid Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why do computers need emotional intelligence? Science fiction often portrays emotional computers as dangerous and frightening,\\u000a and as a serious threat to human life. One of the most famous examples is HAL, the supercomputer onboard the spaceship Discovery,\\u000a in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. HAL could express, recognize and respond to human emotion, and generally had strong emotional skills

Chris Creed; Russell Beale

2008-01-01

21

Evolution, Emotions, and Emotional Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotions research is now routinely grounded in evolution, but explicit evolutionary analyses of emotions remain rare. This article considers the implications of natural selection for several classic questions about emotions and emotional disorders. Emotions are special modes of operation shaped by natural selection. They adjust multiple response…

Nesse, Randolph M.; Ellsworth, Phoebe C.

2009-01-01

22

Emotional Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a variety of ways. Patience, consistency, understanding, and love are some of the most important things you can provide to ensure the emotional health of your child. Parents of a ...

23

Weather and emotional state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions, while those who are emotionally unstable have a stronger dependence to the impacts of the weather.

Spasova, Z.

2010-09-01

24

Emotion Recognition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of expressive speech have shown that discrete emotions such as anger, fear, joy, and sadness can be accurately communicated, also cross-culturally, and that each emotion is associated with reasonably specific acoustic characteristics [8]. However, most previous research has been conducted on acted emotions. These certainly have something in common with naturally occurring emotions but may also be more intense and prototypical than authentic, everyday expressions [6, 13]. Authentic emotions are, on the other hand, often a combination of different affective states and occur rather infrequently in everyday life.

Neiberg, Daniel; Elenius, Kjell; Burger, Susanne

25

Emotion in Sport across Adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions make life worth living. They are essential to sporting life, whether experienced as a child or adult, player or spectator. Our sporting memories are dominated by strong emotion- al events. In the 2000 Olympics, many in the world rejoiced with Australia's Cathy Freeman as she captured gold in the 400 meters. At the other extreme, many Major League Baseball

Peter R. E. CrockerKent; C. KowalskiSharleen; D. Hoar; Meghan H. McDonough

26

Radiotherapy Accidents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major benefit of a Quality Assurance system in a radiotherapy centre is that it reduces the likelihood of an accident. For over 20 years I have been the interface in the UK between the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and the media — newspapers, radio and TV — and so I have learned about radiotherapy accidents from personal experience. In some cases, these accidents did not become public and so the hospital cannot be identified. Nevertheless, lessons are still being learned.

Mckenzie, Alan

27

Strong Libraries, Strong Scores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article talks about the first-ever Texas Conference on School Libraries on April 6, 2005 that was attended by one hundred thirty-five school administrators and trustees. The miniconference, entitled Strong Libraries, Strong Scores, was held at the Austin Hilton, Austin, Texas during the Texas Library Association's Annual Conference and was…

Gray, Carlyn

2006-01-01

28

Emotional maltreatment.  

PubMed

Child abuse is a problem that affects the lives of many American children. The public is often bombarded with information regarding horrific cases of physical and sexual abuse. Emotional maltreatment, however, has been slow to achieve recognition as a serious social problem for a variety of reasons. Compared with physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment is more difficult to identify and define, and good epidemiological data are not available. An erroneous perception also exists that the sequelae of emotional maltreatment are less severe than that of physical and/or sexual abuse. Prompt identification of emotional maltreatment, appropriate intervention and referral, and reporting of concerns to child protective services are essential to the health and well-being of the child. This article will define emotional maltreatment, discuss consequences of emotional maltreatment, and provide implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice. PMID:23099310

Hornor, Gail

2012-01-01

29

GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHORIECONOMIQUELYONSTTIENNE Emotions,SanctionsandCooperation  

E-print Network

the availability of costly punishment increases surplus through its strong positive effect on cooperation (Gaechter-reports of hedonic valence to study the emotional basis of cooperation and punishment in a social dilemma. Emotional cooperators relieve negative emotions when they punish free riders. In response, the free-riders experience

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Emotional Child Abuse  

MedlinePLUS

... control (after a child has been trained), and destructive or antisocial behavior (being constantly withdrawn and sad). Furthermore, poor relationships ... children, but a change in pattern of these behaviors is a strong indicator of emotional ... perpetrator. Parents, teachers, pastors, social workers, neighbors, lawyers, or judges ...

31

Developing Emotionally Intelligent Principals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transformational change in today's schools will require leaders with strong intrapersonal and interpersonal skills. A recent assessment program in South Carolina focused attention on the identification of the emotional intelligence of aspiring and newly appointed principals. A battery of personality and leadership assessments was used to develop…

Cox, Edward P.

2009-01-01

32

Emotional Display Rules and Emotional Labor: The Moderating Role of Commitment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined whether commitment to emotional display rules is a necessary condition for emotional display rules to affect behavior at work. Results using structural equation modeling revealed that display rule commitment moderated the relationships of emotional display rule perceptions with surface acting, deep acting, and positive affective delivery at work, such that the relationships were strong and positive when

Robin H. Gosserand; James M. Diefendorff

2005-01-01

33

Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.  

PubMed

Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. PMID:24552785

Koelsch, Stefan

2014-03-01

34

Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

Sabolch, Aaron [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent [Department of Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hammer, Gary [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Doherty, Gerard [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2011-08-01

35

Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

2011-01-01

36

Emotional and Non-Emotional Persuasion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A relevant issue in the domain of natural argumentation and persuasion is the interaction (synergic or conflicting) between “rational” or “cognitive” modes of persuasion and “irrational” or “emotional” ones. This work provides a model of general persuasion and emotional persuasion. We examine two basic modes for appealing to emotions, arguing that emotional persuasion does not necessarily coincide with irrational persuasion,

Maria Miceli; Fiorella De Rosis; Isabella Poggi

2006-01-01

37

Developing Emotionally Intelligent Leadership in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely accepted that the success of higher education institutions is dependent on effective competent leaders and leadership. There is also growing evidence to support the proposition that emotional intelligence is strongly linked to effective leadership in the higher education setting. Additionally, the premise that emotional intelligence…

Parrish, Dominique

2011-01-01

38

Emotion complexity and emotion regulation across adulthood  

PubMed Central

This research used data from a study on daily emotional experience in adulthood to examine the associations between age, emotion complexity, and emotion regulation. Data were drawn from a study of daily stress that included 239 participants ranging in age from 18 to 89 from North Central Florida. Two indicators of emotion complexity were considered: emotion differentiation and the co-occurrence of positive and negative affect. Emotion regulation was assessed in terms of individuals’ likelihood of maintaining adaptive emotion states. There were no age differences in adults’ co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions. In contrast to theories suggesting age would be associated with greater emotion complexity, the findings revealed that older adults had lower differentiation scores than younger adults. Age was also associated with more adaptive patterns of emotion regulation. Specifically, older adults persisted in low negative states and moved out of high negative states more readily than younger adults. Finally, neuroticism, self-concept incoherence, mean daily stress, and emotion complexity were associated with emotion regulation. Notably, adults who reported a greater mix of positive and negative affect moved out of high negative affect states more rapidly than adults with lower co-occurrence scores. This finding is in keeping with a growing body of work suggesting that positive affect promotes recovery from negative affect. Overall, the findings suggest that although emotion complexity is associated with emotion regulation, it does not appear to be a key factor underlying age differences in emotion regulation. PMID:21941465

Hay, Elizabeth L.; Diehl, Manfred

2011-01-01

39

Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS  

E-print Network

- changes that require us to regulate how emotions are experienced and expressed. But what do people do and adult literatures relevant to emotion regulation. Because a discussion of emotion regulation presupposes an understanding of what emotion is, we first consider emotion in the context of the larger family of affective pro

Gross, James J.

40

The Role of Emotions in Student Teachers' Professional Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings of a qualitative interview study of the role of emotions in the professional identity of student teachers. Strong positive and negative emotions (mostly related to pupils and supervisors) were expressed about personal teaching experiences. The results confirm that emotions play an important role in social learning and,…

Timostsuk, Inge; Ugaste, Aino

2012-01-01

41

Impaired Emotion Recognition in Music in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Music has the potential to evoke strong emotions and plays a significant role in the lives of many people. Music might therefore be an ideal medium to assess emotion recognition. We investigated emotion recognition in music in 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 20 matched healthy volunteers. The role of cognitive dysfunction…

van Tricht, Mirjam J.; Smeding, Harriet M. M.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Schmand, Ben A.

2010-01-01

42

Emotional experiences in everyday life: A survey approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a telephone survey, respondents were asked to report the most recent situation that evoked strong emotional feelings in them and to describe the pattern of their reactions. The majority of the situations reported had evoked negative emotions. Most of the emotion-antecedent events are connected to relationships with family and friends or to work-related situations. Only happiness and

Klaus R. Scherer; Percy H. Tannenbaum

1986-01-01

43

Emotional eating: Eating when emotional or emotional about eating?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the extent to which self-reported emotional eating is a predictor of unhealthy snack consumption or, alternatively, an expression of beliefs about the relation between emotions and eating derived from concerns about eating behaviour. Three studies were conducted. Study 1 (N = 151) and Study 2 (N = 184) investigated the predictive validity of emotional eating compared to

Marieke A. Adriaanse; Denise T. D. de Ridder; Catharine Evers

2011-01-01

44

Individual differences in emotion lateralisation and the processing of emotional information arising from social interactions.  

PubMed

Previous research examining the possible association between emotion lateralisation and social anxiety has found conflicting results. In this paper two studies are presented to assess two aspects related to different features of social anxiety: fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and emotion regulation. Lateralisation for the processing of facial emotion was measured using the chimeric faces test. Individuals with greater FNE were more strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere for the processing of anger, happiness and sadness; and, for the processing of fearful faces the relationship was found for females only. Emotion regulation strategies were reduced to two factors: positive strategies and negative strategies. For males, but not females, greater reported use of negative emotion strategies is associated with stronger right hemisphere lateralisation for processing negative emotions. The implications for further understanding the neuropsychological processing of emotion in individuals with social anxiety are discussed. PMID:24921427

Bourne, Victoria J; Watling, Dawn

2015-01-01

45

Social anxiety and interpretation biases for facial displays of emotion: Emotion detection and ratings of social cost  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study assessed the processing of facial displays of emotion (Happy, Disgust, and Neutral) of varying emotional intensities in participants with high vs. low social anxiety. Use of facial expressions of varying intensities allowed for strong external validity and a fine-grained analysis of interpretation biases. Sensitivity to perceiving negative evaluation in faces (i.e., emotion detection) was assessed at both

Casey A. Schofield; Meredith E. Coles; Brandon E. Gibb

2007-01-01

46

Radiotherapy and hyperthermia  

Microsoft Academic Search

72 patients with either unresectable or pelvic recurrence of colorectal cancer were treated with combined radiotherapy and locoregional hyperthermia. Radiation doses were 50 Gy or more in patients not previously treated with radiotherapy, and 32 Gy(8 × 4 Gy) in patients who had previously received radiotherapy. Hyperthermia was administered within 30 min of irradiation, and the aim was to give

D. Gonzalez Gonzalez; J. D. P van Dijk; L. E. C. M Blank

1995-01-01

47

Strong Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We will give here an overview of our theory of the strong interactions, Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and its properties. We will also briefly review the history of the study of the strong interactions, and the discoveries that ultimately led to the formulation of QCD. The strong force is one of the four known fundamental forces in nature, the others being the electromagnetic, the weak and the gravitational force. The strong force, usually referred to by scientists as the 'strong interaction', is relevant at the subatomic level, where it is responsible for the binding of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. To do this, it must overcome the electric repulsion between the protons in an atomic nucleus and be the most powerful force over distances of a few fm (1fm=1 femtometer=1 fermi=10{sup -15}m), the typical size of a nucleus. This property gave the strong force its name.

Karsch, F.; Vogelsang, V.

2009-09-29

48

Strong Decoherence  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a condition for the strong decoherence of a set of alternative histories of a closed quantum-mechanical system such as the universe. The condition applies, for a pure initial state, to sets of homogeneous histories that are chains of projections, generally branch-dependent. Strong decoherence implies the consistency of probability sum rules but not every set of consistent or even

Murray Gell-Mann; James B. Hartle

1995-01-01

49

A Multi-Agent Model for Emotion Contagion Spirals Integrated within a Supporting Ambient Agent Model  

E-print Network

Introduction The occurrence of emotion contagion spirals in groups is a social phenomenon, where levels such spirals for negative emotions and how to stimulate them for positive emotions can be a real challenge, and script our social behavior. Research on the idea that emotion also has a strong social component, which

Treur, Jan

50

Gender differences in parent-child conversations about past emotions: A longitudinal investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this longitudinal investigation, we examined the emotional content of 17 white middle-class parents' conversations about past events with their children at 40 and 70 months of age. Parents' use of emotion language did not differ depending upon parent gender, but strong differences were found in parents' use of emotion terms depending upon child gender. Parents' references to emotion were

Susan Adams; Janet Kuebli; Patricia A. Boyle; Robyn Fivush

1995-01-01

51

7?Emotion in Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion has become one of the most popular—and popularized—areas within organizational scholarship. This chapter attempts to review and bring together within a single framework the wide and often disjointed literature on emotion in organizations. The integrated framework includes processes detailed by previous theorists who have defined emotion as a sequence that unfolds chronologically. The emotion process begins with a focal

Hillary Anger Elfenbein

2007-01-01

52

Emotional state and efficiency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was made of the effect of emotional states-negative and positive- on work performance. Data cover intensity of emotional arousal, personality characteristics of person involved, typological features of person's nervous system, emotional stability of person, and past experience of person. Particular attention was given to emotional stress effects on efficiency, given modern working conditions.

Ovchinnikova, O. V.

1973-01-01

53

Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

2012-01-01

54

Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional intelligence (EI) involves the ability to carry out accu- rate reasoning about emotions and the ability to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. We discuss the origins of the EI concept, define EI, and describe the scope of the field today. We review three approaches taken to date from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. We find

John D. Mayer; Richard D. Roberts; Sigal G. Barsade

2008-01-01

55

Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working with couples who are both survivors of emotional abuse and are currently in an emotionally abusive relationship can be particularly challenging for the clinician. This article focuses on Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy as a recommended practice approach for clients who are caught in emotionally abusive patterns with one another. The article reviews relevant literature on this approach and illustrates

Nancy L. Beckerman; Michele Sarracco

2002-01-01

56

REPELLENT CRIMES AND RATIONAL DELIBERATION: EMOTION AND THE DEATH PENALTY  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is often assumed that the anger, outrage, and other strong emotions provoked by repellent crimes interfere with rational deliberation. There is some truth to the notion that heinous murders and other shocking crimes place an enormous strain on the criminal justice system and may exert a destructive influence on institutional process. Nevertheless, the argument that strong emotion interferes with

Susan A. Bandes

57

Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions.  

PubMed

Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

2014-01-01

58

Parental attachment and romantic relationships: Associations with emotional disturbance during late adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between late adolescents' parental attachment and emotional disturbance. Specifically, they investigated whether associations between parental attachment and emotional disturbance were less strong for adolescents with romantic partners. Links cross-sectionally, but not longitudinally, between parental attachment and emotional disturbance were less strong for youths with romantic partners.

Geertjan Overbeek; Wilma Vollebergh; Rutger C. M. E. Engels; W. H. J. Meeus

2003-01-01

59

Emotional intelligence and conflict resolution in nursing.  

PubMed

How nurses maintain relationships and resolve conflict in the workplace is considered an important skill in the nursing profession (Hillhouse & Adler, 1997). In this paper we explore the utility of emotional intelligence in predicting an individual's preferred style of conflict resolution. Theorists such as Goleman (1998) have proposed a strong link between emotional intelligence and successful conflict resolution. A preliminary analysis of our empirical study indicates that individuals with high emotional intelligence prefer to seek collaborative solutions when confronted with conflict. Implications for the nursing profession are discussed. PMID:16118974

Jordan, Peter J; Troth, Ashlea C

2002-08-01

60

[Stereotactic radiotherapy for prostate cancer].  

PubMed

Stereotactic radiotherapy is a new option in the treatment of prostate cancer. However, only retrospective series and a few prospective phase II trials are available at this moment, including a few thousands of patients with a short follow-up. Most of the protocols delivered 33 to 38 Gy in four or five fractions. Acute toxicity seems to be similar to the one observed after conventional radiotherapy. Late toxicity is less evaluable because of the short follow-up: the rate of radiation-induced proctitis seems low in the published series. Urinary toxicities are not properly evaluated: some series reported a high incidence of urinary complications grade or higher. Most of the patients belong to the D'Amico's favourable group: biochemical controls are equivalent to those observed after conventional irradiation, but the follow-up is often shorter than 5 years and no definitive conclusion could be made about the efficiency of the technique. Data for the intermediate and high risk groups are not mature. In conclusion, stereotactic radiotherapy could strongly modified the management of prostate cancer: some phase III trials have started to confirm the good results reported in preliminary series. PMID:24958683

Quero, L; Hennequin, C

2014-01-01

61

Enhancing Emotion-Regulation Skills in Police Officers: Results of a Pilot Controlled Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Police officers are routinely exposed to situations that elicit intense negative emotions; thus, officers have a particularly strong need for effective methods of regulating such emotions. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether a manualized emotion-regulation training (Integrative Training of Emotional Competencies; iTEC; Berking, 2010a) can improve the emotion-regulation skills of police officers. First, self-reports of 9

Matthias Berking; Caroline Meier; Peggilee Wupperman

2010-01-01

62

Managing Intergroup Emotions: How Intergroup Ideologies and Emotion Regulation Can Stifle Positive Emotions and Intergroup Friendships  

E-print Network

ideologies or motivations, some emotion regulation iswith emotion and self-regulatory motivation, the managementmotivations and values specific to those domains, which may influence how one manages emotions

O'Connor, Alexander

2012-01-01

63

Emotionally Colorful Reflexive Games  

E-print Network

This study addresses the matter of reflexive control of the emotional states by means of Reflexive Game Theory (RGT). It is shown how to build a bridge between RGT and emotions. For this purpose the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model is adopted. The major advantages of RGT are its ability to predict human behavior and unfold the entire spectra of reflexion in the human mind. On the other hand, PAD provides ultimate approach to model emotions. It is illustrated that emotions are reflexive processes and, consequently, RGT fused with PAD model is natural solution to model emotional interactions between people. The fusion of RGT and PAD, called Emotional Reflexive Games (ERG), inherits the key features of both components. Using ERG, we show how reflexive control can be successfully applied to model human emotional states. Up to date, EGR is a unique methodology capable of modeling human reflexive processes and emotional aspects simultaneously.

Tarasenko, Sergey

2011-01-01

64

Emotion and Facial Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Facial expression is usually synthesized or predicted on the basis of a given emotion. The prototypical expressions for basic\\u000a emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger, and fear) as postulated by discrete emotion psychologists are rather\\u000a consistently produced and interpreted among different cultures, and can be used as icons to represent a basic emotion. However,\\u000a these facial expressions are actually rarely

Thomas Wehrle; Susanne Kaiser

1999-01-01

65

Emotion Detection from Text  

E-print Network

Emotion can be expressed in many ways that can be seen such as facial expression and gestures, speech and by written text. Emotion Detection in text documents is essentially a content - based classification problem involving concepts from the domains of Natural Language Processing as well as Machine Learning. In this paper emotion recognition based on textual data and the techniques used in emotion detection are discussed.

Shivhare, Shiv Naresh

2012-01-01

66

Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emotion is central to the quality and range of everyday human experience. The neurobiological substrates of human emotion are now attracting increasing interest within the neurosciences motivated, to a considerable extent, by advances in functional neuroimaging techniques. An emerging theme is the question of how emotion interacts with and influences other domains of cognition, in particular attention, memory, and reasoning. The psychological consequences and mechanisms underlying the emotional modulation of cognition provide the focus of this article.

Dolan, R. J.

2002-11-01

67

Up with Emotional Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Daniel Goleman, author of the bestseller "Emotional Intelligence," spoke at the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development annual conference about children's declining emotional health indicators. He noted that emotional well-being predicts success in academic achievement, employment, marriage, and physical health; and that schools…

Pool, Carolyn R.

1997-01-01

68

Neuromodulatory Basis of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The neural basis of emotion can be found in both the neural computation and the neuromodulation of the neural substrate mediating behavior. I review the experimental evidence showing the involvement of the hypothalamus, the a mygdala and the prefrontal cortex in emotion. For each of these structures, I show the important role of various neuromodulatory systems in mediating emotional behavior.

Jean-Marc Fellous

1999-01-01

69

Self-referential emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to examine a special subgroup of emotion: self-referential emotions such as shame, pride and guilt. Self-referential emotions are usually conceptualized as (i) essentially involving the subject herself and as (ii) having complex conditions such as the capacity to represent others’ thoughts. I will show that rather than depending on a fully fledged ‘theory of

Alexandra Zinck

2008-01-01

70

Emotional Intelligence through Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children develop emotional intelligence during the early years of life, and according to some experts, emotional intelligence is a more reliable predictor of academic achievement than is IQ. However, today's children appear to be low on emotional well-being. This has potentially negative consequences, not only for academic achievement but also for…

Ghosn, Irma K.

71

Retrieval of Emotional Memories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Long-term memories are influenced by the emotion experienced during learning as well as by the emotion experienced during memory retrieval. The present article reviews the literature addressing the effects of emotion on retrieval, focusing on the cognitive and neurological mechanisms that have been revealed. The reviewed research suggests that the…

Buchanan, Tony W.

2007-01-01

72

Studying the dynamics of autonomic activity during emotional experience.  

PubMed

Recent theories emphasize the dynamic aspects of emotions. However, the physiological measures and the methodological approaches that can capture the dynamics of emotions are underdeveloped. In the current study, we investigated whether moment-to-moment changes in autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity are reliably associated with the unfolding of emotional experience. We obtained cardiovascular and electrodermal signals from participants while they viewed emotional movies. We found that the ANS signals were temporally aligned across individuals, indicating a reliable stimulus-driven response. The degree of response reliability was associated with the emotional time line of the movie. Finally, individual differences in ANS response reliability were strongly correlated with the subjective emotional responses. The current research offers a methodological approach for studying physiological responses during dynamic emotional situations. PMID:25039415

Golland, Yulia; Keissar, Kobi; Levit-Binnun, Nava

2014-11-01

73

Notes on emotional components of musical creativity and performance.  

PubMed

We explored emotional accompaniments to stages of a musician's cycle of creativity through interviews with musicians. Creativity was defined in terms of performance or composition. These musicians described strong emotional vacillations that occur across the creative cycle and discussed ways of dealing with emotional issues involved in moving from one work to the next. Parallels were drawn between emotional aspects of completing a performance or composition to emotional aspects of termination in psychotherapy. Suggestions were offered to musicians for means of dealing with naturally occurring but powerful emotional components of creativity. In addition, some of the musicians suggested that music educators consider teaching students about potential emotional issues that may accompany creative effort. An integration of these issues into music education programs might better prepare students for careers as professional musicians. PMID:7815377

Lund, N L; Kranz, P L

1994-11-01

74

How Is Emotional Awareness Related to Emotion Regulation Strategies and Self-Reported Negative Affect in the General Population?  

PubMed Central

Objective The Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS) as a performance task discriminates between implicit or subconscious and explicit or conscious levels of emotional awareness. An impaired awareness of one's feeling states may influence emotion regulation strategies and self-reports of negative emotions. To determine this influence, we applied the LEAS and self-report measures for emotion regulation strategies and negative affect in a representative sample of the German general population. Sample and Methods A short version of the LEAS, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ), assessing reappraisal and suppression as emotion regulation strategies, were presented to N?=?2524 participants of a representative German community study. The questionnaire data were analyzed with regard to the level of emotional awareness. Results LEAS scores were independent from depression, but related to self-reported anxiety. Although of small or medium effect size, different correlational patters between emotion regulation strategies and negative affectivity were related to implict and explict levels of emotional awareness. In participants with implicit emotional awareness, suppression was related to higher anxiety and depression, whereas in participants with explicit emotional awareness, in addition to a positive relationship of suppression and depression, we found a negative relationship of reappraisal to depression. These findings were independent of age. In women high use of suppression and little use of reappraisal were more strongly related to negative affect than in men. Discussion Our first findings suggest that conscious awareness of emotions may be a precondition for the use of reappraisal as an adaptive emotion regulation strategy. They encourage further research in the relation between subconsious and conscious emotional awareness and the prefarance of adaptive or maladaptive emotion regulation strategies The correlational trends found in a representative sample of the general population may become more pronounced in clinical samples. PMID:24637792

Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Beutel, Manfred E.; Brahler, Elmar; Stobel-Richter, Yve; Knebel, Achim; Lane, Richard D.; Wiltink, Jorg

2014-01-01

75

Cognitive approaches to emotions.  

PubMed

Cognitive approaches offer clear links between how emotions are thought about in everyday life and how they are investigated psychologically. Cognitive researchers have focused on how emotions are caused when events or other people affect concerns and on how emotions influence processes such as reasoning, memory, and attention. Three representative cognitive theories of emotion continue to develop productively: the action-readiness theory, the core-affect theory, and the communicative theory. Some principles are common to them and divergences can be resolved by future research. Recent explanations have included how emotions structure social relationships, how they function in psychological illnesses, and how they are central to music and fiction. PMID:24389368

Oatley, Keith; Johnson-Laird, P N

2014-03-01

76

The emotionally competent leader.  

PubMed

Aristotle once challenged man "to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way" (The Nicomachean Ethics). Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., a journalist for the New York Times, expands on this statement in his new book, "Emotional Intelligence." He defines emotional intelligence as the ability to rein in emotional impulses, to read another's innermost feelings and to handle relationships and conflict smoothly. This new model of intelligence puts emotions at the center of our aptitudes for living. Goleman asserts that these emotional aptitudes can preserve relationships, protect our health and improve our success at work. The following adaptation from "Emotional Intelligence" (Bantam Books, 1995) offers suggestions to managers and supervisors on how they can create a more cost-effective and healthier workplace for their employees by becoming more aware of their own emotional. intelligence. PMID:10177113

Goleman, D

1998-01-01

77

A Robot Emotion Generation Mechanism Based on PAD Emotion Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A robot emotion generation mechanism is presented in this paper, in which emotion is described in PAD emotion space. In this mechanism, emotion is affected by the robot personality, the robot task and the emotion origin, so the robot emotion will change naturally when it senses the extern stimuli. We also experiment on Fuwa robot, and demonstrate that this mechanism can make the robot's emotion change be more easily accepted by people and is good for human-robot interaction.

Qingji, Gao; Kai, Wang; Haijuan, Liu

78

Characterizing Student Experiences in Physics Competitions: The Power of Emotions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low enrolment and motivation are key issues in physics education and recently the affective dimension of learning is being studied for evidence of its influence on student attitudes towards physics. Physics Olympics competitions are a novel context for stimulating intense emotional experiences. In this study, one team of students and their teacher were interviewed and observed prior to and during the event to characterize their emotions and determine the connections between their experiences and learning and attitudes/motivation towards physics. Results showed that certain types of events stimulated strong emotions of frustration and ownership, and that students’ attitudes were that physics is fun, diverse and relevant. Analysis of these themes indicated that the nature of emotions generated was connected to their attitudes towards physics. This finding points to the potential and value of informal and novel contexts in creating strong positive emotions, which have a strong influence on student attitudes towards physics.

Moll, Rachel F.; Nashon, S.; Anderson, D.

2006-12-01

79

Brain Systems that Mediate both Emotion and Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurobiological research with animals strongly suggests that the brain systems which mediate emotion overlap with those that mediate cognition to such a degree that it is difficult, if not impossible, to maintain any clear distinction between them. Possible reasons for this overlap are discussed; and a model of brain systems that simultaneously subserve emotion and cognition is presented. The model

Jeffrey A. Gray

1990-01-01

80

Emotional Intelligence Is a Protective Factor for Suicidal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional intelligence is found to be a protective factor for suicidal behavior after examining the relations between childhood sexual abuse and suicidal ideation and attempts to emotional intelligence. Childhood sexual abuse is found to be a strong predictive of the results.

Cha, Christine B.; Nock, Matthew K.

2009-01-01

81

Emotional Descriptors for Map-based Access to Music Libraries  

E-print Network

and dominant ways of organizing and describing music collections usually follow genre- or artist that emotions share with genres as class labels for music or even text documents). Worse, and again similar piece of music. Even more strongly than with musical genres, the attribution of certain emotional

Rauber,Andreas

82

Emotions about Teaching about Human-Induced Climate Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Global climate change is receiving increasing attention as a classroom topic. At the same time, research has shown that individuals have strong emotions about the topic. Emotions about controversial topics and individuals' dispositions toward knowledge have been shown to influence judgments about these topics. This study examined the relationships…

Lombardi, Doug; Sinatra, Gale M.

2013-01-01

83

Emotions: An Indian perspective  

PubMed Central

The present paper is an attempt to understand emotions and the affect from Indian traditional point of view. In the Indian philosophical texts’ detailed descriptions of emotions are not available nor are dealt with as a separate concept. This view of emotions lays emphasis on desires as the root cause of emotional upheavals. They are seen as modification of desire and attachment. The desires are seen as arising from the contact and attachment of the ego or ahamkara with the external world and are caused by a sense of imperfection, incompleteness or non-fulfillment. Ego or ahamkara is differentiated from the true Self or atman. Emotions are viewed as springs of action and are bipolar in nature. According to Patanjali's Yoga Shastra, suffering is due to ignorance about one's true “self” (avidya). Hence, suffering or dukha arises from within and not from the outside world. Bhagvadgita traces all emotional experiences to the gunas, i.e., sattva, rajas, and tamas. Works of Bharathmuni have contributed to the understanding of emotional experiences. Concept of rasa or aesthetic relish is central to this approach to understanding affective experiences as dealt with in the Natyashastra of Bharathamuni. These views underline the recommended path for self-transformation. Regulating emotions, both emotional experience and emotional expression, is an integral part of the recommended “principles of living.” PMID:23858247

Ramaprasad, Dharitri

2013-01-01

84

Emotional intelligence: recognizing and regulating emotions.  

PubMed

Occupational health nurses are in the unique position to influence health in the work force. To maximize this positive health influence, occupational health nurses should develop the skills of emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence includes awareness of self and others and empathy. These behaviors are congruent with the mission of nursing because they improve health outcomes. Occupational health nurses who are emotionally intelligent have improved relationships with others, an important aspect of the nursing role. Emotional intelligence can be developed. The process begins with self-awareness, enhanced through self-care behaviors, such as exercise and journaling. Reading popular self-help literature also can improve self-awareness. After a nurse becomes self-aware, the next phase is to develop an awareness of others. This can be learned using the same type of techniques in the self-awareness stage. The final step is the development of empathy. This is the active step using the knowledge developed in the prior two stages. Through discipline and effort, an individual can learn to actively listen to others. This type of listening fosters empathy. By working in a positive, caring environment, personal growth in emotional intelligence can be enhanced (McMullen, 2003). Through the development of emotional intelligence, the nurse can improve personally and professionally, a win-win situation for all involved. PMID:15853293

Reeves, Amy

2005-04-01

85

The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION  

E-print Network

The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION The brain basis of emotion: A meta, Building 149 Charlestown, MA 02129 lindqukr@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;The Brain Basis of Emotions 2 Abstract Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

86

Recent advances in radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy has come a long way from treatment planning based on orthogonal radiographs with large margins around tumours. Advances in imaging and radiation planning software have led to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and, further, to intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT permits sparing of normal tissues and hence dose-escalation to tumours. IMRT is the current standard in treatment of head and prostate cancer and is being investigated in other tumour sites. Exquisitely sculpted dose distributions (increased geographical miss) with IMRT, plus tumour motion and anatomical changes during radiotherapy make image guided radiotherapy an essential part of modern radiation delivery. Various hardware and software tools are under investigation for optimal IGRT. PMID:20426851

2010-01-01

87

Using stimulants to treat ADHD-related emotional lability.  

PubMed

Emotional lability, or sudden strong shifts in emotion, commonly occurs in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Although these symptoms are impairing and disruptive, relatively little research has addressed their treatment, likely due to the difficulty of reliable and valid assessment. Promising signals for symptom improvement have come from recent studies using stimulants in adults, children and adolescents. Similarly, neuroimaging studies have begun to identify neurobiological mechanisms underlying stimulants' impact on emotion regulation capacities. Here, we review these recent clinical and neuroimaging findings, as well as neurocognitive models for emotional lability in ADHD, issues of relevance to prescribers and the important role of psychiatric comorbidity with treatment choices. PMID:25135778

Posner, Jonathan; Kass, Erica; Hulvershorn, Leslie

2014-10-01

88

Emotion and autobiographical memory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

2010-03-01

89

Disorders of emotional behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

After having stressed the distinction between general adaptive systems and specific functional systems, the author argues\\u000a that emotions constitute a general adaptive system distinct from, but interacting with, the cognitive system, considered as\\u000a the other (more evolved) adaptive system.\\u000a \\u000a The main characteristics of the emotional system are its componential nature and its hierarchical organization. These basic\\u000a features of the emotional

Guido Gainotti

2001-01-01

90

Parental Attachment and Romantic Relationships: Associations With Emotional Disturbance During Late Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the authors examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between late adolescents' parental attachment and emotional disturbance. Specifically, they investigated whether associations between parental attachment and emotional disturbance were less strong for adolescents with romantic partners, and whether the quality and duration of romantic relationships were related to adolescents' emotional disturbance. Data were collected from 568 adolescents, ages 15–19,

Geertjan Overbeek; Wilma Vollebergh; Rutger C. M. E. Engels; Wim Meeus

2003-01-01

91

Social and Emotional Competencies: Contributions to Young African-American Children's Peer Acceptance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored the relation between measures of emotional competence, behavioral regulation, and general social competence and African American preschoolers' peer acceptance and popularity. Found that gender, emotional knowledge, emotion regulation, and themes of violence in response to hypothetical situations of interpersonal conflict were strongly…

Smith, Maureen

2001-01-01

92

An fMRI Study of Personality Influences on Brain Reactivity to Emotional Stimuli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional imaging studies have examined which brain regions respond to emotional stimuli, but they have not determined how stable personality traits moderate such brain activation. Two personality traits, extraversion and neuroticism, are strongly associated with emotional experience and may thus moderate brain reactivity to emotional stimuli. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to directly test whether individual differences

Turhan Canli; Zuo Zhao; John E. Desmond; Eunjoo Kang; James Gross; John D. E. Gabrieli

2001-01-01

93

Relations between students' approaches to learning, experienced emotions and outcomes of learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative analyses conducted on the self-reports of first year university students suggest that there is a relationship between the ways they emotionally experience their course and the approach they take to the learning of that course. Students who more strongly experience positive emotions, such as hope and pride, and more weakly experience negative emotions (such as anger, boredom, anxiety and

Keith Trigwell; Robert A. Ellis; Feifei Han

2011-01-01

94

A Feeling for Books: Using Literature to Promote Social-Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social-emotional development is a fundamental part of a child's overall well-being. Healthy development forms a critical foundation for building positive relationships and a strong self-esteem. Social-emotional development includes the ability to express and manage emotions and to establish secure relationships. All children have a natural desire…

Tunks, Karen W.; Gilles, Rebecca M.

2013-01-01

95

Emotion and Autonomic Nervous System Activity in the Minangkabau of West Sumatra  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physiology and emotional experience were studied in the Minangkabau of West Sumatra, a matrilineal, Moslem, agrarian culture with strong proscriptions against public displays of negative emotion. Forty-six Minangkabau men were instructed to contract facial muscles into prototypical configurations of 5 emotions. In comparison with a group of 62 Ss from the United States, cross-cultural consistencies were found in (a) autonomic

Robert W. Levenson; Paul Ekman; Karl Heider; Wallace V. Friesen

1992-01-01

96

The Role of Positive and Negative Emotions in Life Satisfaction Judgment Across Nations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined how the frequency of positive and negative emotions is related to life satisfaction across nations. Participants were 8,557 people from 46 counties who reported on their life satisfaction and frequency of positive and negative emotions. Multilevel analyses showed that across nations, the experience of positive emotions was more strongly related to life satisfaction than the absence of

Peter Kuppens; Anu Realo; Ed Diener

2008-01-01

97

Expression of Emotion: When It Causes Trauma and When It Helps  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idea that clients should be encouraged to express strong emotion regarding the traumas they have suffered is widely assumed. This article asks whether the empirical literature supports the underlying assumption that emotional expression leads to positive outcomes (better health and dissipation of distress). Studies in which individuals who have been given an opportunity to express emotions about past traumas

Jill Littrell

2009-01-01

98

Pedagogies of strategic empathy: navigating through the emotional complexities of anti-racism in higher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper constructs an argument about the emotionally complicated and compromised learning spaces of teaching about anti-racism in higher education. These are spaces steeped in complex structures of feeling that evoke strong and often discomforting emotions on the part of both teachers and students. In particular, the author theorizes the notion of strategic empathy in the context of students' emotional

Michalinos Zembylas

2011-01-01

99

Pedagogies of strategic empathy: navigating through the emotional complexities of anti-racism in higher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper constructs an argument about the emotionally complicated and compromised learning spaces of teaching about anti-racism in higher education. These are spaces steeped in complex structures of feeling that evoke strong and often discomforting emotions on the part of both teachers and students. In particular, the author theorizes the notion of strategic empathy in the context of students' emotional

Michalinos Zembylas

2012-01-01

100

Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.  

PubMed

Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development. PMID:23949724

Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

2014-08-01

101

Increasing Organizational Productivity Through Heightened Emotional Intelligence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to psychologist Daniel Goleman, a strong IQ can set the baseline for success but does not guarantee prosperity. Goleman believes that factors contributing to "emotional intelligence" (for example, self-control, zeal and persistence, and ability to motivate oneself) are key to success in the corporate world. Howard Gardner has identified…

Maulding, Wanda S.

102

Teenage Sexuality: What Are the Emotional Effects?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much attention has been given to the physical ramifications of early sexual activity, but little has been said about emotional and psychological repercussions. The breakdown of the American family may be a contributing factor in causing premature sexual activity, along with the strong adolescent sex drive, the fear of loneliness and the media. An…

Kennedy, Bebe C.

103

EMOTIONAL EFFECTS OF MUSIC: PRODUCTION RULES  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is an ancient, and very pervasive, idea that music expresses emotion. Apart from the copious literature to this effect contributed by composers, musicologists, and philoso- phers, there is also solid empirical evidence from psychological research, reviewed in chapters of this book (e.g. Gabrielsson & Lindström, this volume; Juslin, this volume), that listeners often agree rather strongly about what type

KLAUS R. SCHERER

2001-01-01

104

Emotional expressions in voice and music: same code, same effect?  

PubMed

Scholars have documented similarities in the way voice and music convey emotions. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we explored whether these similarities imply overlapping processing substrates. We asked participants to trace changes in either the emotion or pitch of vocalizations and music using a joystick. Compared to music, vocalizations more strongly activated superior and middle temporal cortex, cuneus, and precuneus. However, despite these differences, overlapping rather than differing regions emerged when comparing emotion with pitch tracing for music and vocalizations, respectively. Relative to pitch tracing, emotion tracing activated medial superior frontal and anterior cingulate cortex regardless of stimulus type. Additionally, we observed emotion specific effects in primary and secondary auditory cortex as well as in medial frontal cortex that were comparable for voice and music. Together these results indicate that similar mechanisms support emotional inferences from vocalizations and music and that these mechanisms tap on a general system involved in social cognition. PMID:22505222

Escoffier, Nicolas; Zhong, Jidan; Schirmer, Annett; Qiu, Anqi

2013-08-01

105

Quantitative Analysis of Bloggers Collective Behavior Powered by Emotions  

E-print Network

Large-scale data resulting from users online interactions provide the ultimate source of information to study emergent social phenomena on the Web. From individual actions of users to observable collective behaviors, different mechanisms involving emotions expressed in the posted text play a role. Here we combine approaches of statistical physics with machine-learning methods of text analysis to study emergence of the emotional behavior among Web users. Mapping the high-resolution data from digg.com onto bipartite network of users and their comments onto posted stories, we identify user communities centered around certain popular posts and determine emotional contents of the related comments by the emotion-classifier developed for this type of texts. Applied over different time periods, this framework reveals strong correlations between the excess of negative emotions and the evolution of communities. We observe avalanches of emotional comments exhibiting significant self-organized critical behavior and tempo...

Mitrovi?, Marija; Tadi?, Bosiljka

2010-01-01

106

Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, and Emotion Control in the Externalizing Problems of School-Aged Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined the role of emotion and emotion control in children's externalizing problems. Third- to sixth-grade children were administered a self-report measure of positive emotion, negative emotion, and emotion control. Peer- and teacher-reported adjustment problems were assessed. Structural equations modeling revealed that…

Kim, Geunyoung; Walden, Tedra; Harris, Vicki; Karrass, Jan; Catron, Thomas

2007-01-01

107

The uncharted waters of emotion: Ethnicity, trait emotion and emotion expression in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions are central to contemporary theories of health, and a growingbody of psychological research has shown emotion and emotion regulatorystyles to be predictive of health outcomes. Yet despite these clear links andthe fact that patterns of emotion and expression are partially a product ofculture, there is a meager literature on the emotional characteristics ofdifferent ethnic groups. Even where ethnicity has

Nathan S. Consedine; Carol Magai

2002-01-01

108

EMCORE - Emotional Cooperative Groupware  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years considerable effort has been spent to develop groupware applications. Despite this, no general consenus has been met by groupware applications in computer field. Interdisciplinary approach could prove very useful to overcome these difficulties. A workgroup is not simply a set of people gathered together, working for a common goal. It can also be thought as a strong, hard mental reality. Actually, sociological and psychological definitions of group differ considerably. At sociological level a group is generally described in the view of the activities and events occurring inside the group itself. On the other hand, the psychological group approach considers not only the actions occurring inside the group, but also all the mental activities originated by belonging to the group, be they emotional or rational nature. Since early '60 simple work group (i.e. discussion group) has been analyzed in his psychological behavior. EMCORE is a prototype which aims to support computer science methods with psychological approach. The tool has been developed for a discussion group supported by heterogeneous distributed systems and has been implemented according to the CORBA abstraction augmented by the machine independent JAVA language. The tool allows all the common activities of a discussion group: discussion by voice or by chatting board if multimedia device are not present; discussion and elaboration of a shared document by text and/or graphic editor. At the same time, tools are provided for the psychoanalytic approach, according to a specific methodology.

Fasoli, N.; Messina, A.

109

The importance of being earnest: displayed emotions and witness credibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Participants viewed one of six video-recorded versions of a rape victim's testimony, role-played by a professional actress in one of six versions: Two versions of the testimony, representing a strong and a less strong rape scenario, were given in a free-recall manner with one of three kinds of emotions displayed, termed congruent, neutral and incongruent emotional expressions. Credibility judgements

Geir Kaufmann; Guri C. B. Drevland; Ellen Wessel; Geir Overskeid; Svein Magnussen

2003-01-01

110

Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration  

PubMed Central

Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is associated with a profound decline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific aspects of emotional functioning that are preserved and disrupted is limited. Objective To assess preservation of function and deficits in two aspects of emotional processing (emotional reactivity and emotion recognition) in FTLD. Methods Twenty-eight FTLD patients were compared with 16 controls in emotional reactivity (self-reported emotional experience, emotional facial behavior, and autonomic nervous system response to film stimuli) and emotion recognition (ability to identify a target emotion of fear, happy, or sad experienced by film characters). Additionally, the neural correlates of emotional reactivity and emotion recognition were investigated. Results FTLD patients were comparable to controls in 1) emotional reactivity to the fear, happy, and sad film clips and 2) emotion recognition for the happy film clip. However, FTLD patients were significantly impaired compared with controls in emotion recognition for the fear and sad film clips. Volumetric analyses revealed that deficits in emotion recognition were associated with decreased lobar volumes in the frontal and temporal lobes. Conclusions The socioemotional decline typically seen in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients may result more from an inability to process certain emotions in other people than from deficits in emotional reactivity. PMID:17620547

Werner, K.H.; Roberts, N.A.; Rosen, H.J.; Dean, D.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Weiner, M.W.; Miller, B.L.; Levenson, R.W.

2008-01-01

111

Emotional fit with culture: a predictor of individual differences in relational well-being.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence for emotional fit in couples and groups, but also within cultures. In the current research, we investigated the consequences of emotional fit at the cultural level. Given that emotions reflect people's view on the world, and that shared views are associated with good social relationships, we expected that an individual's fit to the average cultural patterns of emotion would be associated with relational well-being. Using an implicit measure of cultural fit of emotions, we found across 3 different cultural contexts (United States, Belgium, and Korea) that (1) individuals' emotional fit is associated with their level of relational well-being, and that (2) the link between emotional fit and relational well-being is particularly strong when emotional fit is measured for situations pertaining to relationships (rather than for situations that are self-focused). Together, the current studies suggest that people may benefit from emotionally "fitting in" to their culture. PMID:24364853

De Leersnyder, Jozefien; Mesquita, Batja; Kim, Heejung; Eom, Kimin; Choi, Hyewon

2014-04-01

112

Different brain activity in response to emotional faces alone and augmented by contextual information.  

PubMed

This study examined the extent to which emotional face stimuli differ from the neural reactivity associated with more ecological contextually augmented stimuli. Participants were scanned when they viewed contextually rich pictures depicting both emotional faces and context, and pictures of emotional faces presented alone. Emotional faces alone were more strongly associated with brain activity in paralimbic and social information processing regions, whereas emotional faces augmented by context were associated with increased and sustained activity in regions potentially representing increased complexity and subjective emotional experience. Furthermore, context effects were modulated by emotional intensity and valence. These findings suggest that cortical elaboration that is apparent in contextually augmented stimuli may be missed in studies of emotional faces alone, whereas emotional faces may more selectively recruit limbic reactivity. PMID:24964216

Lee, Kyung Hwa; Siegle, Greg J

2014-11-01

113

The architecture of emotion experience  

E-print Network

Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,

Damm, Lisa Marie

2009-01-01

114

Emotion Socialization in the Home  

E-print Network

emotional understanding in preschool children. Developmental Psychology,emotional adjustment: A birth-to-maturity perspective. Developmental Psychology,emotional life of families: Theoretical models and preliminary data. Journal of Family Psychology,

Sperling, Jacqueline

2012-01-01

115

Measuring the ability to perceive the emotional connotations of written language.  

PubMed

Emotionally laden writing is essential to our personal and professional lives. The purpose of this article was to design and evaluate a new test of the ability to decode the emotional connotations of written material. A series of 3 studies (totaling 457 participants) were used to demonstrate that the Metaphors Test measures a single construct, has strong internal consistency, has strong convergent validity with tests related to emotional and social intelligence, and has strong discriminant validity with vocabulary and personality. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the Metaphors Test is more closely associated with emotion perception than emotional understanding. Unlike most other tests that tap this skill, the stimuli for the Metaphors Test do not include any explicit emotion words; it is therefore a unique and valuable measure of emotion perception. PMID:23136950

Barchard, Kimberly A; Hensley, Spencer; Anderson, Emily D; Walker, Holly E

2013-01-01

116

Beware Emotional Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional maltreatment is a less visible form of abuse that frequently occurs in schools, but is often ignored or dismissed as an acceptable form of discipline or sanctioned classroom-management practice. The impact of emotional maltreatment on children is significant and impacts personality development, relationships, and learning. Principals, as…

King, Margaret A.; Janson, Gregory R.

2011-01-01

117

emotional brain without sleep  

E-print Network

evidence, reported here, that a lack of sleep inappropriately modulates the human emotional brain responseMagazine R877 The human emotional brain without sleep -- a prefrontal amygdala disconnect Seung-Schik Yoo1, Ninad Gujar2, Peter Hu2, Ferenc A. Jolesz1 and Matthew P. Walker2,* Sleep deprivation is known

Walker, Matthew P.

118

Emotion Vocabulary in Interlanguage.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines five factors that may impact the use of second language emotion vocabulary. Considers the impact of language proficiency, gender, and extroversion on the use of emotion words in the advanced French interlanguage of 29 native Dutch speakers, and examines influence of sociocultural competence, gender, and type of linguistic material on use…

Dewaele, Jean-Marc; Pavlenko, Aneta

2002-01-01

119

Denying Medical Students' Emotions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

USA Today, 1984

1984-01-01

120

EmoteMail  

Microsoft Academic Search

Email has become a central communication channel for private and professional exchange. Its format remains equally neutral regardless of the relation to the recipient. While writing remains an excellent vehicle to communicate tone and emotion, this can sometimes be a painstaking and tedious process, and requires considerable skill.EmoteMail is an email client that is augmented to convey aspects of the

Jussi Ängeslevä; Carson Reynolds; Sile O'Modhrain

2004-01-01

121

An Emotional Control Card for Inappropriate and Appropriate Emotions in Using Rational-Emotive Imagery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the emotional control card techniques developed by Sklare, Taylor, and Hyland (1985) to help clients more effectively use the rational-emotive imagery technique of Ellis (1974). Suggests a revision of the emotional control card technique. (NB)

Ellis, Albert

1986-01-01

122

Emotional complexity and the neural representation of emotion in motion.  

PubMed

According to theories of emotional complexity, individuals low in emotional complexity encode and represent emotions in visceral or action-oriented terms, whereas individuals high in emotional complexity encode and represent emotions in a differentiated way, using multiple emotion concepts. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants viewed valenced animated scenarios of simple ball-like figures attending either to social or spatial aspects of the interactions. Participant's emotional complexity was assessed using the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale. We found a distributed set of brain regions previously implicated in processing emotion from facial, vocal and bodily cues, in processing social intentions, and in emotional response, were sensitive to emotion conveyed by motion alone. Attention to social meaning amplified the influence of emotion in a subset of these regions. Critically, increased emotional complexity correlated with enhanced processing in a left temporal polar region implicated in detailed semantic knowledge; with a diminished effect of social attention; and with increased differentiation of brain activity between films of differing valence. Decreased emotional complexity was associated with increased activity in regions of pre-motor cortex. Thus, neural coding of emotion in semantic vs action systems varies as a function of emotional complexity, helping reconcile puzzling inconsistencies in neuropsychological investigations of emotion recognition. PMID:20207691

Tavares, Paula; Barnard, Philip J; Lawrence, Andrew D

2011-01-01

123

Challenge and Hope in Radiotherapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most critical global health issues. With frequent association of viral liver disease, HCC is highly complex, harboring both cancer and chronic liver disease. The tumor stage and underlying liver function are both major determinants of the treatment selection as well as prognosis in HCC patients, thus allowing no more than a 20% chance for potentially curative therapies. Radiotherapy technology has been evolved remarkably during the past decade, and radiation can be precisely delivered, thereby permitting higher doses to the tumour and reduced doses to surrounding normal tissues. There has been increasing interest in the merits of radiotherapy in HCC over the past few years, as indicated by a Pub Med search. Radiotherapy has been used as the definitive therapy with curative intent in early stage tumours. It has been used also in combination with TACE for intermediate stage tumours. In locally advanced tumours, radiotherapy has been combined with systemic agents. Despite its efficacy, radiotherapy has not yet been incorporated into the standard management guidelines of HCC. The lack of high evidence level data, especially randomized controlled trials, has posed an obstacle in including radiotherapy into the routine treatment schema of HCC. Therefore, well-designed prospective studies are strongly recommended using developing technology for radiotherapy alone or combination therapies. Also, many issues such as the optimal dose-fractionation, intra- or extrahepatic metastasis after radiotherapy, and radiation-induced hepatic dysfunction remain to be solved. In this review, current status of radiotherapy for HCC will be discussed with regard to technical consideration and combination strategy. The limitation and future perspectives will also be discussed. PMID:19881961

2009-01-01

124

Modeling the Experience of Emotion  

E-print Network

Affective computing has proven to be a viable field of research comprised of a large number of multidisciplinary researchers resulting in work that is widely published. The majority of this work consists of computational models of emotion recognition, computational modeling of causal factors of emotion and emotion expression through rendered and robotic faces. A smaller part is concerned with modeling the effects of emotion, formal modeling of cognitive appraisal theory and models of emergent emotions. Part of the motivation for affective computing as a field is to better understand emotional processes through computational modeling. One of the four major topics in affective computing is computers that have emotions (the others are recognizing, expressing and understanding emotions). A critical and neglected aspect of having emotions is the experience of emotion (Barrett, Mesquita, Ochsner, and Gross, 2007): what does the content of an emotional episode look like, how does this content change over time and wh...

Broekens, Joost

2009-01-01

125

[Radiotherapy and skin tumors].  

PubMed

Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of skin tumours. For skin carcinomas, external irradiation (kilovoltage X-rays or electrons according to clinical characteristics) is more valuable than interstitial brachytherapy, which is recommended for tumours of the lip and of the nasal vestibule. In mycosis fungoides, total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited superficial plaques. In the classical form of Kaposi's sarcoma, radiotherapy can achieve local control whereas it obtains good palliative results in the epidemic form. PMID:9868400

Calitchi, E; Kirova, Y; Le Bourgeois, J P

1998-01-01

126

An emotion model using emotional memory and consciousness occupancy ratio  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on general emotion model which can be used in cyber characters in VR. Our model shows the various kinds of emotional transition whose factors are ranged from single variable to multiple variables by emotional memory and Consciousness Occupancy Ratio (COR). This model also shows emotional memory recall which is an established theory in Psychology. In the last

Sung June Chang; In Ho Lee

2005-01-01

127

An Emotion Expression System for the Emotional Robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we presents an emotion expression system for expressing emotion for the emotional robot, which have a plurality of different sensors sense information about internal\\/external stimuli. In detail, we propose method for processing information that is collected through various sensors in an intelligent robot, a method for determining an emotion, and a method for expressing a corresponding action.

Jungwoo Ryu; Joochan Sohn; Hyunkyu Cho

2007-01-01

128

Definitive Radiotherapy versus Postoperative Radiotherapy for Tonsil Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study is to analyze treatment outcome of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with stage III-IV tonsil cancer managed by surgery followed by postoperative RT (SRT) and definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and to thereby evaluate the most feasible treatment modality. Materials and Methods Of 124 patients, 67 underwent CRT, and 57 underwent SRT. We compared survival and complication rates in both groups. Results The median follow-up time was 57 months (range, 19 to 255 months) for surviving patients. At five years, locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) were 88% and 80%, respectively. No significant difference in LRPFS (p=0.491) and OS (p=0.177) was observed between CRT and SRT. In multivariate analysis, old age and higher T stage showed a significant association with poor LRPFS, PFS, and OS; higher N stage showed an association with poor PFS and a trend of poor LRPFS, while no association with OS was observed; treatment modality (CRT and SRT) showed no association with LRFPS, PFS, and OS. Grade 3 or higher mucositis was observed in 12 patients (21%) in the SRT group, and 25 patients (37%) in the CRT group. Conclusion Definitive CRT and SRT have similar treatment outcomes for patients with stage III-IV tonsil cancer. Although acute complication rate appears to be higher in the CRT group, it should be noted that not all data on complications were included in this retrospective study. To determine the most feasible treatment modality, not only mucositis and xerostomia, but also emotional aspect and quality of life, should be considered. PMID:23341786

Koo, Tae Ryool; Hah, J. Hun; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Wan; Heo, Dae-Seog; Park, Charn Il

2012-01-01

129

Emotional triggers in myocardial infarction: do they matter?  

PubMed Central

Considerable excitement and interest have arisen recently concerning the role that acute emotional triggers may play in precipitating a myocardial infarction (MI). Observational studies have found repeatedly that patients report excessive anger, anxiety, sadness, grief, or acute stress immediately prior to onset of MI, and recent meta-analyses summarizing these findings reported strong associations between MI occurrence and many of these acute emotions. However, it is unclear whether and through what mechanisms acute emotional triggers might influence MI, and whether there is any clinical utility in knowing if or how emotions trigger MI. We debate whether emotional triggers matter by reviewing the recent evidence for the association between acute emotional triggers and MI and by describing the potential pathophysiological characteristics and mechanisms underlying this association and the preventive strategies that could be used to mitigate the risk of acute MI. We also examine whether the study of emotional triggers could influence clinical risk management or changes in clinical practice/management. We offer suggestions for research that might shed light on whether emotional triggers could initiate a paradigm shift in preventive cardiology, or whether acute emotional triggers are either intractable catalysts for, or merely an epiphenomenon of, some MIs. PMID:23178642

Edmondson, Donald; Newman, Jonathan D.; Whang, William; Davidson, Karina W.

2013-01-01

130

Phases of Social–Emotional Development from Birth to School Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Stages of social–emotional development are the subject of this chapter. Infants and toddlers live in a maelstrom of strong\\u000a emotions, most of which involve interactions with other people. But the social situations that induce strong emotions, and\\u000a the cognitive capacities children have for coping with them, change dramatically from one stage to the next. The timetable\\u000a of cognitive development helps

Marc D. Lewis; Isabela Granic

2010-01-01

131

Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

and how to display emotion in ways that enable the machine to appear empathetic or otherwise emotionally1 Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Laboratory Abstract pets, desktop computers, and more) skills of emotional intelligence. Machines have long been able

132

What good are positive emotions?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article opens by noting that positive emotions do not fit existing models of emotions. Consequently, a new model is advanced to describe the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment, and love. This new model posits that these positive emotions serve to broaden an individual's momentary thought-action repertoire, which in turn has the

Barbara L. Fredrickson

1998-01-01

133

Emotions in Pervasive Computing Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of an intelligent environment to connect and adapt to real internal sates, needs and behaviors' meaning of humans can be made possible by considering users' emotional states as contextual parameters. In this paper, we build on enactive psychology and investigate the incorporation of emotions in pervasive systems. We define emotions, and discuss the coding of emotional human markers

Nevin Vunka Jungum; Eric Laurent

2009-01-01

134

On dimensions in emotion psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Is the study of the dimensional space that is meant to represent human emotions helpful in understanding the mecha- nisms underlying emotional processes? Emotional experience is frequently described along a certain number of dimensions, often including valence and arousal. This paper argues that dimen- sional models may obfuscate the mechanisms underlying the genesis of emotions. A parallel is drawn to

Christian Kaernbach

2011-01-01

135

Imaging in radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of

Dirk L Van den Berge; Mark De Ridder; Guy A Storme

2000-01-01

136

Radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma.  

PubMed

Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of multidisciplinary management of patients with incompletely resected and recurrent craniopharyngioma. Advances in imaging and radiotherapy technology offer new alternatives with the principal aim of improving the accuracy of treatment and reducing the volume of normal brain receiving significant radiation doses. We review the available technologies, their technical advantages and disadvantages and the published clinical results. Fractionated high precision conformal radiotherapy with image guidance remains the gold standard; the results of single fraction treatment are disappointing and hypofractionation should be used with caution as long term results are not available. There is insufficient data on the use of protons to assess the comparative efficacy and toxicity. The precision of treatment delivery needs to be coupled with experienced infrastructure and more intensive quality assurance to ensure best treatment outcome and this should be carried out within multidisciplinary teams experienced in the management of craniopharyngioma. The advantages of the combined skills and expertise of the team members may outweigh the largely undefined clinical gain from novel radiotherapy technologies. PMID:22948229

Aggarwal, Ajay; Fersht, Naomi; Brada, Michael

2013-03-01

137

Crowdsourcing Collective Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

One of the hallmarks of emotional intelligence is the ability to regulate emotions. Research suggests that cognitive reappraisal - a technique that involves reinterpreting the meaning of a thought or situation - can down-regulate negative emotions, without incurring significant psychological or physiological costs. Habitual use of this strategy is also linked to many key indices of physical and emotional health. Unfortunately, this technique is not always easy to apply. Thinking flexibly about stressful thoughts and situations requires creativity and poise, faculties that often elude us when we need them the most. In this paper, we propose an assistive technology that coordinates collective intelligence on demand, to help individuals reappraise stressful thoughts and situations. In two experiments, we assess key features of our design and we demonstrate the feasibility of crowdsourcing empathetic reappraisals with on demand workforces, such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk.

Morris, Robert R

2012-01-01

138

Beyond Reason: Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A theoretical approach that aims to the identification of information processing that may be responsible for emotional dimensions of subjective experience is studied as an initial step in the construction of a neural net model of affective dimensions of psychological experiences. In this paper it is suggested that a way of orientated recombination of attributes can be present not only in the perceptive processing but also in cognitive ones. We will present an analysis of the most important emotion theories, we show their neural organization and we propose the neural computation approach as an appropriate framework for generating knowledge about the neural base of emotional experience. Finally, in this study we present a scheme corresponding to framework to design a computational neural multi-system for Emotion (CONEMSE).

Suárez Araujo, Carmen Paz; Barahona da Fonseca, Isabel; Barahona da Fonseca, José; Simões da Fonseca, J.

2004-08-01

139

Emotional signals in nonverbal interaction: dyadic facilitation and convergence in expressions, appraisals, and feelings.  

PubMed

We examined social facilitation and emotional convergence in amusement, sadness, and fear in dynamic interactions. Dyads of friends or strangers jointly watched emotion-eliciting films while they either could or could not communicate nonverbally. We assessed three components of each emotion (expressions, appraisals, and feelings), as well as attention to and social motives toward the co-participant. In Study 1, participants interacted through a mute videoconference. In Study 2, they sat next to each other and either were or were not separated by a partition. Results revealed that facilitation and convergence are not uniform across different emotions and emotion components. Particularly strong supporting patterns emerged for the facilitation of and convergence in smiling. When direct interaction was possible (Study 2), friends showed a general tendency for strong convergence, with the exception of fear-related appraisals. This suggests that underlying processes of emotional contagion and social appraisal are differentially relevant for different emotions. PMID:22471853

Bruder, Martin; Dosmukhambetova, Dina; Nerb, Josef; Manstead, Antony S R

2012-01-01

140

Teaching Emotion Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of this research was to assess whether it is possible to help children develop their general understanding of emotions. Thirty-six nine-year-old children divided in two groups were examined using a pre-test/train/post-test design. The emotion understanding of the two groups was measured in the pre- and post-test phases using the Test…

Pons, Francisco; Harris, Paul L.; Doudin, Pierre-Andre

2002-01-01

141

Emotion work: disclosing cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for all women in the US. Current research has focused\\u000a on the psychological relationship and not the sociological relationship between emotions and the experience of breast cancer\\u000a survivors. This paper focuses on the emotion work involved in self-disclosing a breast cancer diagnosis in a racially or ethnically\\u000a diverse

Grace J. Yoo; Caryn Aviv; Ellen G. Levine; Cheryl Ewing; Alfred Au

2010-01-01

142

"It's Been a Bit of a Rollercoaster": Special Educational Needs, Emotional Labour and Emotion Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an analysis of data collected--by semi-structured interviews and focus groups--from staff working with children with special educational needs (SEN) in England. The analysis highlighted the role of strong emotions, and how participants (unsurprisingly) experienced these differently, largely according to their position in…

Mackenzie, Suzanne

2012-01-01

143

Successful Contextual Integration of Loose Mental Associations As Evidenced by Emotional Conflict-Processing  

PubMed Central

Often we cannot resist emotional distraction, because emotions capture our attention. For example, in TV-commercials, tempting emotional voices add an emotional expression to a formerly neutral product. Here, we used a Stroop-like conflict paradigm as a tool to investigate whether emotional capture results in contextual integration of loose mental associations. Specifically, we tested whether the associatively connected meaning of an ignored auditory emotion with a non-emotional neutral visual target would yield a modulation of activation sensitive to emotional conflict in the brain. In an fMRI-study, nineteen participants detected the presence or absence of a little worm hidden in the picture of an apple, while ignoring a voice with an emotional sound of taste (delicious/disgusting). Our results indicate a modulation due to emotional conflict, pronounced most strongly when processing conflict in the context of disgust (conflict: disgust/no-worm vs. no conflict: disgust/worm). For conflict in the context of disgust, insula activity was increased, with activity correlating positively with reaction time in the conflict case. Conflict in the context of deliciousness resulted in increased amygdala activation, possibly due to the resulting “negative” emotion in incongruent versus congruent combinations. These results indicate that our associative stimulus-combinations showed a conflict-dependent modulation of activity in emotional brain areas. This shows that the emotional sounds were successfully contextually integrated with the loosely associated neutral pictures. PMID:24618674

Zimmer, Ulrike; Koschutnig, Karl; Ebner, Franz; Ischebeck, Anja

2014-01-01

144

Successful contextual integration of loose mental associations as evidenced by emotional conflict-processing.  

PubMed

Often we cannot resist emotional distraction, because emotions capture our attention. For example, in TV-commercials, tempting emotional voices add an emotional expression to a formerly neutral product. Here, we used a Stroop-like conflict paradigm as a tool to investigate whether emotional capture results in contextual integration of loose mental associations. Specifically, we tested whether the associatively connected meaning of an ignored auditory emotion with a non-emotional neutral visual target would yield a modulation of activation sensitive to emotional conflict in the brain. In an fMRI-study, nineteen participants detected the presence or absence of a little worm hidden in the picture of an apple, while ignoring a voice with an emotional sound of taste (delicious/disgusting). Our results indicate a modulation due to emotional conflict, pronounced most strongly when processing conflict in the context of disgust (conflict: disgust/no-worm vs. no conflict: disgust/worm). For conflict in the context of disgust, insula activity was increased, with activity correlating positively with reaction time in the conflict case. Conflict in the context of deliciousness resulted in increased amygdala activation, possibly due to the resulting "negative" emotion in incongruent versus congruent combinations. These results indicate that our associative stimulus-combinations showed a conflict-dependent modulation of activity in emotional brain areas. This shows that the emotional sounds were successfully contextually integrated with the loosely associated neutral pictures. PMID:24618674

Zimmer, Ulrike; Koschutnig, Karl; Ebner, Franz; Ischebeck, Anja

2014-01-01

145

Redox proteins and radiotherapy.  

PubMed

Although conventional radiotherapy can directly damage DNA and other organic molecules within cells, most of the damage and the cytotoxicity of such ionising radiation, comes from the production of ions and free radicals produced via interactions with water. This 'indirect effect', a form of oxidative stress, can be modulated by a variety of systems within cells that are in place to, in normal situations, maintain homeostasis and redox balance. If cancer cells express high levels of antioxidant redox proteins, they may be more resistant to radiation and so targeting such systems may be a profitable strategy to increase therapeutic efficacy of conventional radiotherapy. An overview, with exemplars, of the main systems regulating redox homeostasis is supplied and discussed in relation to their use as prognostic and predictive biomarkers, and how targeting such proteins and systems may increase radiosensitivity and, potentially, improve the radiotherapeutic response. PMID:24581945

Zhang, Y; Martin, S G

2014-05-01

146

Explicit semantic stimulus categorization interferes with implicit emotion processing.  

PubMed

Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging and event-related brain potential studies revealed that performing a cognitive task may suppress the preferential processing of emotional stimuli. However, these studies utilized simple and artificial tasks (i.e. letter, shape or orientation discrimination tasks), unfamiliar to the participants. The present event-related potential study examined the emotion-attention interaction in the context of a comparably more natural scene categorization task. Deciding whether a natural scene contains an animal or not is a familiar and meaningful task to the participants and presumed to require little attentional resources. The task images were presented centrally and were overlaid upon emotional or neutral background pictures. Thus, implicit emotion and explicit semantic categorization may compete for processing resources in neural regions implicated in object recognition. Additionally, participants passively viewed the same stimulus materials without the demand to categorize task images. Significant interactions between task condition and emotional picture valence were observed for the occipital negativity and late positive potential. In the passive viewing condition, emotional background images elicited an increased occipital negativity followed by an increased late positive potential. In contrast, during the animal-/non-animal-categorization task, emotional modulation effects were replaced by strong target categorization effects. These results suggest that explicit semantic categorization interferes with implicit emotion processing when both processes compete for shared resources. PMID:24194577

Schupp, Harald T; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias

2014-11-01

147

Impaired emotion recognition in music in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Music has the potential to evoke strong emotions and plays a significant role in the lives of many people. Music might therefore be an ideal medium to assess emotion recognition. We investigated emotion recognition in music in 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 20 matched healthy volunteers. The role of cognitive dysfunction and other disease characteristics in emotion recognition was also evaluated. We used 32 musical excerpts that expressed happiness, sadness, fear or anger. PD patients were impaired in recognizing fear and anger in music. Fear recognition was associated with executive functions in PD patients and in healthy controls, but the emotion recognition impairments of PD patients persisted after adjusting for executive functioning. We found no differences in the recognition of happy or sad music. Emotion recognition was not related to depressive symptoms, disease duration or severity of motor symptoms. We conclude that PD patients are impaired in recognizing complex emotions in music. Although this impairment is related to executive dysfunction, our findings most likely reflect an additional primary deficit in emotional processing. PMID:20633975

van Tricht, Mirjam J; Smeding, Harriet M M; Speelman, Johannes D; Schmand, Ben A

2010-10-01

148

STRONG FERTILITY CENTER Strong Fertility Center  

E-print Network

STRONG FERTILITY CENTER Strong Fertility Center Women's Lifestyle Center The Women's Lifestyle with the improved lifestyle. Also, we work together with the Strong Fertility Center to coordinate your fertility fertility treatments. · A complete nutritional consultation with our registered dietician, Tracy Cherry, RD

Goldman, Steven A.

149

Integrating Emotions and Knowledge in Aesthetics Designs Using Cultural Profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions have been described as complex organized states and some Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs) have been developed based\\u000a on them. TUIs using some kind of physical interfaces called Phidgets, have included a strong emphasis on touch and physicality\\u000a as well as on exploiting the meaning and cultural usage associated with everyday physical objects. However, there is a gap\\u000a between emotions

Rosa Gil; César A. Collazos

2007-01-01

150

The Ethiopian Lyre bagana : an instrument for emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bagana is a ten-stringed box-lyre of the Amhara of Ethiopia. Paraliturgical and solo instrument played only for religious and meditative purposes, it often creates immedi- ate and intense emotions for both players and listeners. Based on informations collected during four fieldworks held in Ethiopia (2002-2005), multidisciplinary analyses have showed that these strong emotional reactions are cre- ated by sonorous

Stéphanie Weisser

2006-01-01

151

Imaging in radiotherapy.  

PubMed

Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of complex 3-D dose distributions, MR based 3-D verificative dosimetry on irradiated phantoms has been described. As treatment delivery becomes increasingly refined, the need for accurate target definition increases as well and sophisticated imaging tools like image fusion and 3-D reconstruction are routinely used for treatment planning. While in the past patients were positioned on the treatment machines based exclusively on surface topography and the well-known skin marks, such approach is no longer sufficient for high-accuracy radiotherapy and special imaging tools like on-line portal imaging are used to verify and correct target positioning. Much of these applications rely on digital image processing, transmission and storage, and the development of standards, like DICOM and PACS have greatly contributed to these applications. Digital imaging plays an increasing role in many areas in radiotherapy and has been fundamental in new developments that have demonstrated impact on patient care. PMID:10996758

Van den Berge, D L; De Ridder, M; Storme, G A

2000-10-01

152

Radiotherapy for Kaposi's sarcoma  

SciTech Connect

Between 1954 and 1976, 60 patients with Kaposi's sarcoma were treated in the Department of Radiotherapy of the Lahey Clinic Foundation at the High Voltage Research Laboratory of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Only 2 patients were free of clinical disease in the lower extremities at the time of initial presentation, and 40 patients (69%) had cutaneous lesions involving areas extending above the knees. Eight patients (13%) also presented with mucous membrane involvement in addition to skin disease. Twenty-one patients were treated only with megavoltage electrons during the initial course of radiotherapy, and 12 patients were treated with supervoltage photons alone. The remaining 27 patients were treated with a combination of electrons and photons; in 17 patients, the same tumor sites were irradiated with both modalities. Eleven patients received whole-body surface electron irradiation. The choice of treatment modalities was based on the extent and distribution of cutaneous disease and depth of the lesions. The overall response rate was 93% after a single fractionated course of radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients achieved complete regression and 18 were in remission for 2 to 13 years. Response rates were also analyzed with respect to the three subgroups in terms of treatment modalities. A single dose of 800 to 1200 rads or its equivalent was required to control local cutaneous lesions. Widespread visceral metastasis was the most common cause of failure and death; the incidence of second malignancies was increased. Trial of systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy would seem to be a reasonable therapeutic adjunct.

Lo, T.C.; Salzman, F.A.; Smedal, M.I.; Wright, K.A.

1980-02-15

153

What Good Are Positive Emotions?  

PubMed Central

This article opens by noting that positive emotions do not fit existing models of emotions. Consequently, a new model is advanced to describe the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment, and love. This new model posits that these positive emotions serve to broaden an individual’s momentary thought–action repertoire, which in turn has the effect of building that individual’s physical, intellectual, and social resources. Empirical evidence to support this broaden-and-build model of positive emotions is reviewed, and implications for emotion regulation and health promotion are discussed. PMID:21850154

Fredrickson, Barbara L.

2011-01-01

154

The secret life of emotions.  

PubMed

The possibility of unconsciously evoked emotions is often denied because awareness of an emotion's cause is considered to be precisely what produces the emotion. However, we argue that because emotional responding is important for successful living, both global and specific emotional responses can be induced without awareness. The present research used quick and super-quick subliminal priming techniques, and cognitive, feelings, and behavioral measures, to test this hypothesis. Our results show that both global moods and specific emotions can be evoked without conscious awareness of their cause. PMID:18399892

Ruys, Kirsten I; Stapel, Diederik A

2008-04-01

155

Relationships among Facial Mimicry, Emotional Experience, and Emotion Recognition  

PubMed Central

Background The relationships between facial mimicry and subsequent psychological processes remain unclear. We hypothesized that the congruent facial muscle activity would elicit emotional experiences and that the experienced emotion would induce emotion recognition. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed data collected in two previous studies. We recorded facial electromyography (EMG) from the corrugator supercilii and zygomatic major and obtained ratings on scales of valence and arousal for experienced emotions (Study 1) and for experienced and recognized emotions (Study 2) while participants viewed dynamic and static facial expressions of negative and positive emotions. Path analyses showed that the facial EMG activity consistently predicted the valence ratings for the emotions experienced in response to dynamic facial expressions. The experienced valence ratings in turn predicted the recognized valence ratings in Study 2. Conclusion These results suggest that facial mimicry influences the sharing and recognition of emotional valence in response to others' dynamic facial expressions. PMID:23536774

Sato, Wataru; Fujimura, Tomomi; Kochiyama, Takanori; Suzuki, Naoto

2013-01-01

156

Developments in radiotherapy.  

PubMed

A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) in 2001. The assessment included a review of future developments in radiotherapy and an estimate of the potential benefits of improved radiotherapy in Sweden. The conclusions reached from this review can be summarized as: Successively better knowledge is available on dose-response relationships for tumours and normal tissues at different fractionation schedules and treated volumes. Optimization of dose levels and fractionation schedules should improve the treatment outcome. Improved treatment results may be expected with even more optimized fractionation schedules. The radiosensitivity of the tumour is dependent on the availability of free oxygen in the cells. The oxygen effect has been studied for a long time and new knowledge has emerged, but there is still no consensus on the best way to minimize its negative effect in the treatment of hypoxic tumours. Development in imaging techniques is rapid, improving accuracy in outlining targets and organs at risk. This is a prerequisite for advanced treatment planning. More accurate treatment can be obtained using all the computer techniques that are successively made available for calculating dose distributions, controlling the accelerator and multileaf collimator (MLC) and checking patient set-up. Optimized treatment plans can be achieved using inverse dose planning and intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT). Optimization algorithms based on biological data from clinical trials could be a part of future dose planning. New genetic markers might be developed that give a measure of the radiation responsiveness of tumours and normal tissue. This could lead to more individualized treatments. New types of radiation sources may be expected: protons, light ions, and improved beams (and compounds) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proton accelerators with scanned-beam systems and energy modulation give good dose distribution. The results reported with carbon ions from Japan and Germany are promising. An interesting development is to verify the dose and position for the irradiated volume with PET on line. Safer margins are obtained and the treatment volume can thus be limited. Very large accelerators are needed to accelerate the carbon ions. Still, it should be possible to keep the costs per patient at the same level as those for other types of advanced radiotherapy, since far fewer treatments per patient are needed. It might also be possible to treat new groups of patients. Increased resources are needed to introduce all the currently available techniques. New types of particle accelerators require large investments and a new structure of radiotherapy in Sweden. PMID:14596505

Svensson, Hans; Möller, Torgil R

2003-01-01

157

Socialization of emotion: Pathway to preschoolers' emotional and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aspects of 47 preschoolers'emotional competence—their patterns of emotional expressiveness and reactions to others' emotion displays—were observed in two settings, with mother and with peers, and their general social competence was rated by their preschool teachers. Intrapersonal and interpersonal (i.e., socialization correlates of children's emotional competence were identified, and a causal model incorporating direct and indirect influences on social competence was

Susanne A. Denham; Leslie Grout

1993-01-01

158

The Experience of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Experiences of emotion are content-rich events that emerge at the level of psychological description, but must be causally constituted by neurobiological processes. This chapter outlines an emerging scientific agenda for understanding what these experiences feel like and how they arise. We review the available answers to what is felt (i.e., the content that makes up an experience of emotion) and how neurobiological processes instantiate these properties of experience. These answers are then integrated into a broad framework that describes, in psychological terms, how the experience of emotion emerges from more basic processes. We then discuss the role of such experiences in the economy of the mind and behavior. PMID:17002554

Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Mesquita, Batja; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gross, James J.

2007-01-01

159

Prospective Effects of Emotion-Regulation Skills on Emotional Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deficits in emotion-regulation skills have widely been shown to be associated with poor emotional adjustment. However, it is still unclear whether these deficits are a cause or a consequence of poor adjustment. The purpose of the present research was to clarify the reciprocal effects between these 2 concepts. In 2 studies (Ns = 446 and 635), self-reports of emotion regulation

Matthias Berking; Ulrich Orth; Peggilee Wupperman; Laurenz L. Meier; Franz Caspar

2008-01-01

160

Resilience and Positive Emotions: Examining the Role of Emotional Memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resilience has been frequently associated with positive emo- tions, especially when experienced during taxing events. However, the psy- chological processes that might allow resilient individuals to self-generate those positive emotions have been mostly overlooked. In line with recent advances in memory research, we propose that emotional memories play an important role in the self-generation of positive emotions. The present re-

Frederick L. Philippe; Serge Lecours; Geneviève Beaulieu-Pelletier

2009-01-01

161

Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar  

E-print Network

to these aspects of emotional functioning. From the Department of Psychology, University of California-Berkeley, CAEmotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration K.H. Werner, Ph de- cline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific

Levenson, Robert W.

162

Solving the Emotion Paradox: Categorization and the Experience of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, I introduce an emotion paradox: People believe that they know an emo- tion when they see it, and as a consequence assume that emotions are discrete events that can be recognized with some degree of accuracy, but scientists have yet to pro- duce a set of clear and consistent criteria for indicating when an emotion is present

Lisa Feldman Barrett

2006-01-01

163

Spanish parents' emotion talk and their children's understanding of emotion  

PubMed Central

Relations between parent-child emotion talk and children's emotion understanding were examined in 63 Spanish mothers and fathers and their 4- (M = 53.35 months, SD = 3.86) and 6-year-old (M = 76.62 months, SD = 3.91) children. Parent-child emotion talk was analyzed during two storytelling tasks: a play-related storytelling task and a reminiscence task (conversation about past experiences). Children's emotion understanding was assessed twice through a standardized test of emotion comprehension (TEC; Pons et al., 2004), once before one of the two parent-child storytelling sessions and again 6 months later. Mothers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task predicted children's emotion understanding after controlling for children's previous emotion understanding. Whereas fathers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task was correlated with children's emotion understanding, it did not predict children's emotion understanding after controlling for previous emotion understanding. Implications of these findings for future research on children's socioemotional development are discussed. PMID:24069016

Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

2013-01-01

164

BRIEF REPORT Psychological Distance and Emotional Experience  

E-print Network

BRIEF REPORT Psychological Distance and Emotional Experience: What You See Is What You Get Joshua: emotional experience, psychological distance, mental imagery, mental representation, emotion regulation Many Columbia University Recent research suggests that perceiving negative emotion-eliciting scenes approaching

Ochsner, Kevin

165

Mining emotional profiles using e-mail messages for earlier warnings of potential terrorist activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a software system Text Scanner for Emotional Distress (TSED) for helping to detect email messages which are suspicious of coming from people under strong emotional distress. It has been confirmed by multiple studies that terrorist attackers have experienced a substantial emotional distress at some points before committing a terrorist attack. Therefore, if an individual in emotional distress can be detected on the basis of email texts, some preventive measures can be taken. The proposed detection machinery is based on extraction and classification of emotional profiles from emails. An emotional profile is a formal representation of a sequence of emotional states through a textual discourse where communicative actions are attached to these emotional states. The issues of extraction of emotional profiles from text and reasoning about it are discussed and illustrated. We then develop an inductive machine learning and reasoning framework to relate an emotional profile to the class "Emotional distress" or "No emotional distress", given a training dataset where the class is assigned by an expert. TSED's machine learning is evaluated using the database of structured customer complaints.

Galitsky, Boris; Kovalerchuk, Boris

2006-04-01

166

Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the results of seven studies that focused on the link between emotional intelligence and interpersonal relations. Tests emotional intelligence with empathy and self-monitoring, social skills, cooperation, relations with others, and marital satisfaction. Explores preference for emotionally intelligent partners in the final study. Includes…

Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.; Bobik, Chad; Coston, Tracie D.; Greeson, Cyndy; Jedlicka, Christina; Rhodes, Emily; Wendorf, Greta

2001-01-01

167

Linguistic Markers and Emotional Intensity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this experiment is to explore possible relationships between the intensity of emotions and the lexical modalities for expressing those emotions. In this experiment, 60 Hebrew-speaking subjects were asked to watch four short films that aroused emotion. Two of the films gave rise to different degrees of happiness, and two produced…

Argaman, Osnat

2010-01-01

168

Emotional Intelligence: A Stable Change?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent decades, emotional intelligence (EI) has emerged as one of the crucial components of emotional adjustment, personal well-being, interpersonal relationships, and overall success in life. Yet few professional curricula adequately address this subject. The results of this study indicate that the potential for enhanced emotional intelligence…

Goroshit, Marina; Hen, Meirav

2012-01-01

169

Emotional conflict in interpersonal interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facial displays of emotions can help to infer the mental states of other individuals. However, the expectations we generate on the basis of people's emotions can mismatch their actual behaviour in certain circumstances, which generates conflict. In the present study, we explored the neural mechanisms of emotional conflict during interpersonal interactions. Participants had to accept or reject economic offers made

María Ruz; Pío Tudela

2011-01-01

170

THE ROLE OF LEADERS’ EMOTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western cultures support the notion that the ideal ‘professional’ behaviour for a leader is primarily rational and carefully controlled emotionally. The relationship of reason and emotion is often played out as one of mutual exclusion, and moreover as one representing hierarchy of leaders and followers. Power positions in most organizations are ritually emphasized through strict emotional control\\/suppression. Thus this display

Kornelia Lazanyi

2009-01-01

171

Emotional and Motivational ITS Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Since emotional variations interfere in the production,of astudent, it is important making Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) able to cope ,with this issue. Although the Expert Overlay approach ,does ,consider ,pedagogic aspects, it does not deal with emotional and motivational questions. This paper proposes an emotional model, by specifying the variables to be captured from the cognitive structure,and ,suggests ,inferences

Lúbia Mara Lopes Rodrigues; Marco Carvalho

2003-01-01

172

Emotional and Motivational ITS Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considering that emotional variations interfere in the academic production of a student, it is paramount to make intelligent tutoring systems able to cope with this issue. Although the expert overlay student model approach does consider pedagogic and disciplinary aspects, it does not explicitly deal with emotional and motivational questions. This paper proposes an emotional model, by specifying the variables to

Lúbia Mara Lopes Rodrigues; Marco Carvalho

2004-01-01

173

Emotions Across Cultures and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants included 46 European American, 33 Asian American, 91 Japanese, 160 Indian, and 80 Hispanic students (N = 416). Discrete emotions, as well as pleasant and unpleasant emotions, were assessed: (a) with global self-report measures, (b) using an experience-sampling method for 1 week, and (c) by asking participants to recall their emotions from the experience sampling week. Cultural differences emerged

Christie N. Scollon; Ed Diener; Shigehiro Oishi; Robert Biswas-Diener

2004-01-01

174

Negative Emotion Enhances Memory Accuracy  

E-print Network

People experience many events that elicit emotional reactions: They greet loved ones at the airport, visit sick children at the hospital, and attend friends' weddings. Such events often are remembered-Eaton, & Schacter, 2006) compared the effects of emotion on memory for general item features with emotion's effects

Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

175

Modeling the Experience of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Affective computing has proven to be a viable field of research comprised of a large number of multidisciplinary researchers resulting in work that is widely published. The majority of this work consists of emotion recognition technology, computational modeling of causal factors of emotion and emotion expression in virtual characters and robots. A smaller part is concerned with modeling the effects

Joost Broekens

2009-01-01

176

Nurturing Emotional Intelligence through Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of literature in the English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom for enhancing development of children's emotional intelligence. Literature can foster emotional intelligence by providing vicarious emotional experiences that shape the brain circuits for empathy and help children gain insight into human behavior and can promote…

Ghosn, Irma K.

2001-01-01

177

A Review of Virtual Character's Emotion Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emotional virtual characters are essential to digital entertainment, an emotion is related to virtual environment and a virtual character's inner variables, emotion model of virtual character is a hot topic in many fields, domain knowledge is very important for modeling emotion, and the current research of emotion expression in the world was also summarized, and some new research directions of emotion model are presented.

Liu, Zhen

2008-11-01

178

Emotional Intelligence and the Career Choice Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional intelligence as conceptualized by Mayer and Salovey consists of perceiving emotions, using emotions to facilitate thoughts, understanding emotions, and managing emotions to enhance personal growth. The Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale has proven a valid and reliable measure that can be used to explore the implications of…

Emmerling, Robert J.; Cherniss, Cary

2003-01-01

179

Précis of The brain and emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topics treated in The Brain and Emotion include the definition, nature and functions of emotion (Chapter 3), the neural bases of emotion (Chapter 4), reward, punishment and emotion in brain design (Chapter 10), a theory of consciousness and its application to under- standing emotion and pleasure (Chapter 9), and neural networks and emotion-related learning (Appendix). The approach is that

Edmund T. Rolls

2000-01-01

180

Exploring the impact of positive and negative emotions on cooperative behaviour in a Prisoner's Dilemma Game  

PubMed Central

Objective. To explore the influences of discrete positive and negative emotions on cooperation in the context of a social dilemma game. Design. Two controlled studies were undertaken. In Study 1, 69 participants were randomly assigned to an essay emotion manipulation task designed to induce either guilt, joy or no strong emotion. In Study 2, 95 participants were randomly assigned to one of the same three tasks, and the impact of emotional condition on cooperation was explored using a repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma Game. Results. Study 1 established that the manipulation task was successful in inducing the specified emotions. The analysis from Study 2 revealed no significant main effects for emotions, in contrast to previous research. However, there was a significant effect for participants’ pre-existing tendency to cooperate (social value orientation; SVO). Conclusion. Methodological explanations for the result are explored, including the possible impact of trial-and-error strategies, different cooperation games and endogenous vs exogenous emotions. PMID:24432196

Thompson, Sam

2013-01-01

181

Computational Emotions Encourage Collective  

E-print Network

Computational Emotions Encourage Collective Behavior in Population Dynamics Megan Olsen University population to cooperate and improve their population's fitness. 196 #12;1 Introduction Collective behavior can refer to both human and animal tendencies to influence each other's behavior. In this paper we

Pollack, Jordan B.

182

Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

183

The Emotionally Sensitive Adolescent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a list of signs, symptoms, and indicators of emotionally sensitive adolescents includes clinging behavior, withdrawn behavior, shy/inhibited behavior, represses anger, poor reaction to criticism, makes self-disparaging statements, low self-esteem, "can't forgive self or others," ruined by a small critical comment, exploding…

Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Lehtonen, Kimmo

184

Emotional Subjects for Composition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Metaphors such as "gypsy academics,""freeway flyers," and "contingent laborers," ascribed by compositionists to their work and its conditions, comment on the low status of composition specialists and teachers in academic hierarchies. Work is the activity around which a profession forms, and, as such, it produces emotional dispositions compatible…

Micciche, Laura R.

185

Unconscious Emotions, Conscious Feelings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion is an innate, powerful, and principally unconscious process that is perceptible in body language, responds vigorously to high-contrast information concerning dangers and opportunities, and often biases the direction of our problem- solving responses. Curricular challenges involving the arts, play, and classroom management are discussed.…

Sylwester, Robert

2000-01-01

186

Emotion dysregulation and schizotypy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In schizophrenia, blunted affect has been argued to reflect difficulties with the amplification of emotion expressive behavior. The aim of the present study was to assess whether ostensibly healthy individuals vulnerable to schizophrenia present with similar difficulties. In the first component of the study, 843 non-clinical participants completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, of which 27 scoring in the upper 15%

Julie D. Henry; Melissa J. Green; Corinne Restuccia; Amber de Lucia; Peter G. Rendell; Skye McDonald; Jessica R. Grisham

2009-01-01

187

Managing Intergroup Emotions: How Intergroup Ideologies and Emotion Regulation Can Stifle Positive Emotions and Intergroup Friendships  

E-print Network

Emotional intelligence and social interaction. Personality and Social Psychologyemotional reactions in inter-ethnic relations. British Journal of Social Psychology,emotional suppression: A prospective study of the transition to college. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

O'Connor, Alexander

2012-01-01

188

Incidental emotions in moral dilemmas: The influence of emotion regulation.  

PubMed

Recent theories have argued that emotions play a central role in moral decision-making and suggested that emotion regulation may be crucial in reducing emotion-linked biases. The present studies focused on the influence of emotional experience and individual differences in emotion regulation on moral choice in dilemmas that pit harming another person against social welfare. During these "harm to save" moral dilemmas, participants experienced mostly fear and sadness but also other emotions such as compassion, guilt, anger, disgust, regret and contempt (Study 1). Fear and disgust were more frequently reported when participants made deontological choices, whereas regret was more frequently reported when participants made utilitarian choices. In addition, habitual reappraisal negatively predicted deontological choices, and this effect was significantly carried through emotional arousal (Study 2). Individual differences in the habitual use of other emotion regulation strategies (i.e., acceptance, rumination and catastrophising) did not influence moral choice. The results of the present studies indicate that negative emotions are commonly experienced during "harm to save" moral dilemmas, and they are associated with a deontological bias. By efficiently reducing emotional arousal, reappraisal can attenuate the emotion-linked deontological bias in moral choice. PMID:24611625

Szekely, Raluca D; Miu, Andrei C

2015-01-01

189

Situating emotional experience  

PubMed Central

Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake), but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking). Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation). In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multiple sensory modalities and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the “default mode” network) would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing emotional life. PMID:24324420

Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

2013-01-01

190

Sad music induces pleasant emotion  

PubMed Central

In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

2013-01-01

191

Emotion regulation, attention to emotion, and the ventral attentional network.  

PubMed

ACCOUNTS OF THE EFFECT OF EMOTIONAL INFORMATION ON BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE AND CURRENT MODELS OF EMOTION REGULATION ARE BASED ON TWO OPPOSED BUT INTERACTING PROCESSES: automatic bottom-up processes (triggered by emotionally arousing stimuli) and top-down control processes (mapped to prefrontal cortical areas). Data on the existence of a third attentional network operating without recourse to limited-capacity processes but influencing response raise the issue of how it is integrated in emotion regulation. We summarize here data from attention to emotion, voluntary emotion regulation, and on the origin of biases against negative content suggesting that the ventral network is modulated by exposure to emotional stimuli when the task does not constrain the handling of emotional content. In the parietal lobes, preferential activation of ventral areas associated with "bottom-up" attention by ventral network theorists is strongest in studies of cognitive reappraisal. In conditions when no explicit instruction is given to change one's response to emotional stimuli, control of emotionally arousing stimuli is observed without concomitant activation of the dorsal attentional network, replaced by a shift of activation toward ventral areas. In contrast, in studies where emotional stimuli are placed in the role of distracter, the observed deactivation of these ventral semantic association areas is consistent with the existence of proactive control on the role emotional representations are allowed to take in generating response. It is here argued that attentional orienting mechanisms located in the ventral network constitute an intermediate kind of process, with features only partially in common with effortful and automatic processes, which plays an important role in handling emotion by conveying the influence of semantic networks, with which the ventral network is co-localized. Current neuroimaging work in emotion regulation has neglected this system by focusing on a bottom-up/top-down dichotomy of attentional control. PMID:24223546

Viviani, Roberto

2013-01-01

192

Event-Related Potentials Elicited by Pre-Attentive Emotional Changes in Temporal Context  

PubMed Central

The ability to detect emotional change in the environment is essential for adaptive behavior. The current study investigated whether event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect emotional change in a visual sequence. To assess pre-attentive processing, we examined visual mismatch negativity (vMMN): the negative potentials elicited by a deviant (infrequent) stimulus embedded in a sequence of standard (frequent) stimuli. Participants in two experiments pre-attentively viewed visual sequences of Japanese kanji with different emotional connotations while ERPs were recorded. The visual sequence in Experiment 1 consisted of neutral standards and two types of emotional deviants with a strong and weak intensity. Although the results indicated that strongly emotional deviants elicited more occipital negativity than neutral standards, it was unclear whether these negativities were derived from emotional deviation in the sequence or from the emotional significance of the deviants themselves. In Experiment 2, the two identical emotional deviants were presented against different emotional standards. One type of deviants was emotionally incongruent with the standard and the other type of deviants was emotionally congruent with the standard. The results indicated that occipital negativities elicited by deviants resulted from perceptual changes in a visual sequence at a latency of 100–200 ms and from emotional changes at latencies of 200–260 ms. Contrary to the results of the ERP experiment, reaction times to deviants showed no effect of emotional context; negative stimuli were consistently detected more rapidly than were positive stimuli. Taken together, the results suggest that brain signals can reflect emotional change in a temporal context. PMID:23671693

Fujimura, Tomomi; Okanoya, Kazuo

2013-01-01

193

Integrating the emotional intelligence construct: the relationship between emotional ability and emotional competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper posits that the concept of emotional intelligence (EI) has not advanced as quickly and adroitly as it could have because of a lack of validity studies that combine the two most prevalent models, emotionality ability (EA) and emotional competency (EC). Although prior EI validations studies exist, none have examined the relationship between the primary EA and EC measurement

Craig R Seal; Mary D Sass; James R Bailey; Matthew Liao-Troth

2009-01-01

194

PASSIONATE MEN, EMOTIONAL WOMEN: Psychology Constructs Gender Difference in the Late 19th Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author examines British and American scientific psychology’s portrayal of natural and ideal masculinity and femininity in the late 19th century to show how purported differences in emotion and reason were critical to explaining the evolutionary foundation of existing social hierarchies. Strong emotion was identified with heterosexual manliness and men’s purportedly better capacity to harness the power of emotion in

Stephanie A. Shields

2007-01-01

195

Quantitative analysis of bloggers' collective behavior powered by emotions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large-scale data resulting from users' online interactions provide the ultimate source of information to study emergent social phenomena on the Web. From individual actions of users to observable collective behaviors, different mechanisms involving emotions expressed in the posted text play a role. Here we combine approaches of statistical physics with machine-learning methods of text analysis to study the emergence of emotional behavior among Web users. Mapping the high-resolution data from digg.com onto bipartite networks of users and their comments onto posted stories, we identify user communities centered around certain popular posts and determine emotional contents of the related comments by the emotion classifier developed for this type of text. Applied over different time periods, this framework reveals strong correlations between the excess of negative emotions and the evolution of communities. We observe avalanches of emotional comments exhibiting significant self-organized critical behavior and temporal correlations. To explore the robustness of these critical states, we design a network-automaton model on realistic network connections and several control parameters, which can be inferred from the dataset. Dissemination of emotions by a small fraction of very active users appears to critically tune the collective states.

Mitrovi?, Marija; Paltoglou, Georgios; Tadi?, Bosiljka

2011-02-01

196

HIPPOCAMPAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROCESSING OF SOCIAL EMOTIONS  

PubMed Central

Inducing and experiencing emotions about others’ mental and physical circumstances is thought to involve self-relevant processing and personal memories of similar experiences. The hippocampus is important for self-referential processing during recall and prospection; however, its contributions during social emotions have not been systematically investigated. We use event-related averaging and Granger causal connectivity mapping to investigate hippocampal contributions during the processing of varieties of admiration and compassion pertaining to protagonists’ mental versus physical circumstances (admiration for virtue, AV, versus for skill; compassion for social/psychological pain, CSP, versus for physical pain). Data were collected using a multistep emotion induction paradigm that included psychosocial interviews, BOLD fMRI and simultaneous psychophysiological recording. Given that mnemonic demands were equivalent among conditions, we tested whether: (1) the hippocampi would be recruited more strongly and for a longer duration during the processing of AV and CSP; (2) connectivity between the hippocampi and cortical systems involved in visceral somatosensation/emotional feeling, social cognitive, and self-related processing would be more extensive during AV and CSP. Results elucidate the hippocampus’ facilitative role in inducing and sustaining appropriate emotional reactions, the importance of self-related processing during social emotions, and corroborate the conception that varieties of emotional processing pertaining to others’ mental and physical situations engage at least partially distinct neural mechanisms. PMID:22012639

Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Singh, Vanessa

2012-01-01

197

Radiotherapy of intracranial germinomas.  

PubMed

Between 1980 and 1992, 32 patients with intracranial germinomas were treated with radiation. All patients were confirmed histopathologically prior to treatment. Of the 32 intracranial germinomas reviewed, 14 were located in the suprasellar region, 12 in the basal ganglia and thalamus, four in the pineal, and two in both the pineal and suprasellar regions. Three patients had subarachnoid seeding. Craniospinal irradiation was undertaken for 29 patients. The median dose of 54 Gy was delivered to the tumor bed, 36 Gy to the whole brain and 24 Gy to the spinal axis. Five and 10-year survival rates were 96.9 and 96.9%, respectively. Local control was achieved in all patients except one who died of persistent tumor after 2 months following radiotherapy. No intracranial recurrence or spinal metastasis were found. Tumor site did not relate to the prognosis. One patient developed severe intellectual deterioration, three patients had vertebral growth impairment. The present study confirms the excellent result with radiotherapy alone for patients with germinomas. PMID:8850422

Huh, S J; Shin, K H; Kim, I H; Ahn, Y C; Ha, S W; Park, C I

1996-01-01

198

Universal Emotional Health Screening at the Middle School Transition  

PubMed Central

This article describes the implementation of the Developmental Pathways Screening Program (DPSP) and an evaluation of program feasibility, acceptability, and yield. Using the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) and externalizing questions from the Youth Self Report (YSR; Achenbach, 2001), universal classroom-based emotional health screening was implemented with students as they began middle school. Of all sixth graders enrolled in four participating Seattle schools, 861 (83%) were screened. Students who screened positive for emotional distress (15% of students screened) received onsite structured clinical evaluations with children's mental health professionals. Seventy-one percent of students who were evaluated were found to be experiencing significant emotional distress, with 59% warranting referral to academic tutoring, school counselor, and/or community mental health services. Successful implementation of in-class screening was facilitated by strong collaboration between DPSP and school staff. Limitations of emotional health screening and the DPSP are discussed, and future steps are outlined. PMID:21430789

Stoep, Ann Vander; McCauley, Elizabeth; Thompson, Kelly A.; Herting, Jerald R.; Kuo, Elena S.; Stewart, David G.; Anderson, Cheryl A.; Kushner, Siri

2011-01-01

199

"Picturesque incisiveness": explaining the celebrity of James's Theory of Emotion.  

PubMed

William James is the name that comes to mind when asked about scientific explanations of emotion in the nineteenth century. However, strictly speaking James's theory of emotion does not explain emotions and never did. Indeed, James contemporaries pointed this out already more than a hundred years ago. Why could "James' theory" nevertheless become a landmark that psychologists, neuroscientists, and historians alike refer to today? The strong focus on James and Anglo-American sources in historiography has overshadowed all other answers given to the question of emotion at the time of James. For that reason, the article returns to the primary sources and places James's work back into the context of nineteenth century brain research in which it developed. PMID:24615670

Wassmann, Claudia

2014-01-01

200

Magical ideation, schizotypy and the impact of emotions.  

PubMed

Research indicates that emotions can interfere with basic cognitive functions such as attention and memory, and that schizotypal traits may be related to vulnerability to such interference, The schizotypal trait magical ideation, expressed as illogicality and tendencies to endorse peculiar or eccentric beliefs, has been reported to be related to impairments in social cognitive functioning as well risk for psychosis. This study examined the impact of emotionally arousing films on heart rate activity, affect ratings, and working memory. Participants were university students. Results indicated that high magical ideation scores were associated with impairments in short-term memory, higher post-film affect ratings, decreased clarity of affect awareness, and increased heart rate in response to emotionally arousing films. These results suggest that magical ideation may be an indicator of lower thresholds for arousal and increased vulnerability to disruption of cognitive processes by situations that elicit strong emotions. PMID:22417932

Karcher, Nicole; Shean, Glenn

2012-05-15

201

Emotion processing in the auditory modality : the time course and development of emotional prosody recognition  

E-print Network

auditory emotional material. Developmental Psychology, 20,auditory emotional material. Developmental Psychology, 20,emotional faces: Eye-movement assessment of component processes. Experimental Psychology,

Cornew, Lauren A.

2008-01-01

202

Beyond arousal and valence: The importance of the biological versus social relevance of emotional stimuli  

PubMed Central

The present study addressed the hypothesis that emotional stimuli relevant to survival or reproduction (biologically emotional stimuli) automatically affect cognitive processing (e.g., attention; memory), while those relevant to social life (socially emotional stimuli) require elaborative processing to modulate attention and memory. Results of our behavioral studies showed that: a) biologically emotional images hold attention more strongly than socially emotional images, b) memory for biologically emotional images was enhanced even with limited cognitive resources, but c) memory for socially emotional images was enhanced only when people had sufficient cognitive resources at encoding. Neither images’ subjective arousal nor their valence modulated these patterns. A subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed that biologically emotional images induced stronger activity in visual cortex and greater functional connectivity between amygdala and visual cortex than did socially emotional images. These results suggest that the interconnection between the amygdala and visual cortex supports enhanced attention allocation to biological stimuli. In contrast, socially emotional images evoked greater activity in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and yielded stronger functional connectivity between amygdala and MPFC than biological images. Thus, it appears that emotional processing of social stimuli involves elaborative processing requiring frontal lobe activity. PMID:21964552

Sakaki, Michiko; Niki, Kazuhisa; Mather, Mara

2012-01-01

203

The emotional power of music: how music enhances the feeling of affective pictures.  

PubMed

Music is an intriguing stimulus widely used in movies to increase the emotional experience. However, no brain imaging study has to date examined this enhancement effect using emotional pictures (the modality mostly used in emotion research) and musical excerpts. Therefore, we designed this functional magnetic resonance imaging study to explore how musical stimuli enhance the feeling of affective pictures. In a classical block design carefully controlling for habituation and order effects, we presented fearful and sad pictures (mostly taken from the IAPS) either alone or combined with congruent emotional musical excerpts (classical pieces). Subjective ratings clearly indicated that the emotional experience was markedly increased in the combined relative to the picture condition. Furthermore, using a second-level analysis and regions of interest approach, we observed a clear functional and structural dissociation between the combined and the picture condition. Besides increased activation in brain areas known to be involved in auditory as well as in neutral and emotional visual-auditory integration processes, the combined condition showed increased activation in many structures known to be involved in emotion processing (including for example amygdala, hippocampus, parahippocampus, insula, striatum, medial ventral frontal cortex, cerebellum, fusiform gyrus). In contrast, the picture condition only showed an activation increase in the cognitive part of the prefrontal cortex, mainly in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Based on these findings, we suggest that emotional pictures evoke a more cognitive mode of emotion perception, whereas congruent presentations of emotional visual and musical stimuli rather automatically evoke strong emotional feelings and experiences. PMID:16458860

Baumgartner, Thomas; Lutz, Kai; Schmidt, Conny F; Jäncke, Lutz

2006-02-23

204

Hamburger hazards and emotions.  

PubMed

Previous studies indicate that many consumers eat rare hamburgers and that information about microbiological hazards related to undercooked meat not necessarily leads to more responsible behavior. With this study we aim to investigate whether consumers' willingness to eat hamburgers depends on the emotions they experience when confronted with the food. A representative sample of 1046 Norwegian consumers participated in an online experiment. In the first part, participants were randomly divided into two groups. One group was confronted with a picture of a rare hamburger, whereas the other group was confronted with a picture of a well-done hamburger. The respondents were instructed to imagine that they were served the hamburger on the picture and then to indicate which emotions they experienced: fear, disgust, surprise, interest, pleasure, or none of these. In part two, all respondents were confronted with four pictures of hamburgers cooked to different degrees of doneness (rare, medium rare, medium well-done, well-done), and were asked to state their likelihood of eating. We analyzed the data by means of a multivariate probit model and two linear fixed-effect models. The results show that confrontation with rare hamburgers evokes more fear and disgust than confrontation with well-done hamburgers, that all hamburgers trigger pleasure and interest, and that a consumer's willingness to eat rare hamburgers depends on the particular type of emotion evoked. These findings indicate that emotions play an important role in a consumer's likelihood of eating risky food, and should be considered when developing food safety strategies. PMID:24656947

Olsen, Nina Veflen; Røssvoll, Elin; Langsrud, Solveig; Scholderer, Joachim

2014-07-01

205

Emotional gestures in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a study about the gestures of athletes while reporting emotions. The study was aimed at singling out possible\\u000a differences in gestural activity of athletes during the telling of their best and worst performances. To analyse the gestures\\u000a a manual annotation scheme was adopted that classifies each gesture in terms of handshape, motoric structure, meaning, goal,\\u000a and type.

Giorgio Merola

2007-01-01

206

Tactile-emotion synesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss experiments on two individuals in whom specific textures (e.g., denim, wax, sandpaper, silk, etc.) evoked equally distinct emotions (e.g., depression, embarrassment, relief, and contentment, respectively). The test\\/retest consistency after 8 months was 100%. A video camera recorded subjects' facial expressions and skin conductance responses (SCR) were monitored as they palpated different textures. Evaluators' ratings significantly correlated with the

V. S. Ramachandran; David Brang

2008-01-01

207

Emotional Valence is Body-Specific: Evidence from spontaneous gestures during US presidential debates  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is the relationship between motor action and emotion? Here we investigated whether people associate good things more strongly with the dominant side of their bodies, and bad things with the non-dominant side. To find out, we analyzed spontaneous gestures during speech expressing ideas with positive or negative emotional valence (e.g., freedom, pain, compassion). Samples of speech and gesture were

Daniel Casasanto; Kyle Jasmin

208

The Effects of BOTOX Injections on Emotional Experience Joshua Ian Davis and Ann Senghas  

E-print Network

The Effects of BOTOX Injections on Emotional Experience Joshua Ian Davis and Ann Senghas Barnard, Martin, & Step- per, 1988; for reviews, see McIntosh, 1996; Soussignan, 2004). In addition, strong also influence emotional reports through other channels. They may be distracting (Davis, 2009; Davis

Ochsner, Kevin

209

Predicting Smoking Intentions and Behaviors from Attitudes, Normative Beliefs, and Emotional Arousal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Smokers and nonsmokers were exposed to anti-smoking communications to compare the relationship of emotional arousal, attitudes, and subjective normative beliefs. Findings revealed that smoking-related intentions were more strongly associated with attitudes toward smoking than with subjective normative beliefs or emotional arousal. (RC)

Beck, Kenneth H.; Davis, Clive M.

1980-01-01

210

Using Humour as an Extrinsic Source of Emotion Regulation in Young and Older Adults  

E-print Network

or by the positive affect elicitation hypothesis. To this end, neutral, moderately and strongly negative pictures extrinsic humorous emotion regulation in young and older adults and to test whether the potential beneficial effect of humour on negative emotion is better explained by the cognitive distraction hypothesis

Jeanjean, Louis

211

Parental Attachment and Romantic Relationships: Associations with Emotional Disturbance during Late Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between late adolescents' parental attachment and emotional disturbance. Specifically, they investigated whether associations between parental attachment and emotional disturbance were less strong for adolescents with romantic partners. Links cross-sectionally, but not longitudinally, between…

Overbeek, Geertjan; Vollebergh, Wilma; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Meeus, Wim

2003-01-01

212

Emotions, care and particularity.  

PubMed

The main intention of this article is to illuminate the normative foundation of caring in nursing. I will focus on the debate between an ethics of care and an ethics of universal principles which has evolved both in nursing ethics and moral philosophy during the last decade. In spite of what a number of people have claimed, I shall argue that a care-based ethics is compatible with judgment based on universal, impartial principles. However, an ethics of care articulates other important aspects of morality and moral behavior than the justificational ones that are central to prevailing impartialist ethics. The paper explains why and how moral perception, sensitivity and emotional capacities are important for a modern professional nursing ethics. It focuses on capacities and preconditions for principle-based reflection and action by arguing that moral perception and certain emotional qualities are prerequisites for moral judgment and action. Achieving perceptual awareness and emotional sensitivity in understanding the situation and its particulars are genuine moral tasks in nursing. These qualities are essential in discovering the morally salient features of the situation. This perspective on an ethics of care also recognizes an important place to central positions in traditional nursing ethics, where developing personal qualities and altruistic capabilities have always been a fundamental normative claim. PMID:8488625

Nortvedt, P

1993-01-01

213

Drug Design and Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid." The old German proverb reflects the fact that sharing a bad emotion or feeling with someone else may lower the psychological strain of the person experiencing sorrow, mourning or anger. On the other hand the person showing empathy will take literally a load from its counterpart, up to physiological reaction of the peripheral and central nervous pain system. Though subjective, mental and physical states can be shared. Visual perception of suffering may be important but also narrative description plays a role, all our senses are mixing in. It is hypothetized that literature, art and humanities allow this overlap. A change of mental states can lead to empirically observable effects as it is the case for the effect of role identity or placebo on pain perception. Antidepressants and other therapeutics are another choice to change the mental and bodily states. Their development follows today's notion of "rationality" in the design of therapeutics and is characterized solely by an atomic resolution approach to understand drug activity. Since emotional states and physiological states are entangled, given the difficulty of a physical description of emotion, the future rational drug design should encompass mental states as well.

Folkers, Gerd; Wittwer, Amrei

2007-11-01

214

Language, Emotions, and Cultures: Emotional Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis  

E-print Network

An emotional version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis suggests that differences in language emotionalities influence differences among cultures no less than conceptual differences. Conceptual contents of languages and cultures to significant extent are determined by words and their semantic differences; these could be borrowed among languages and exchanged among cultures. Emotional differences, as suggested in the paper, are related to grammar and mostly cannot be borrowed. Conceptual and emotional mechanisms of languages are considered here along with their functions in the mind and cultural evolution. A fundamental contradiction in human mind is considered: language evolution requires reduced emotionality, but "too low" emotionality makes language "irrelevant to life," disconnected from sensory-motor experience. Neural mechanisms of these processes are suggested as well as their mathematical models: the knowledge instinct, the language instinct, the dual model connecting language and cognition, dynamic logic, neur...

Perlovsky, Leonid

2011-01-01

215

The psychology of emotion regulation: An integrative review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present article reviews modern research on the psychology of emotion regulation. Emotion regulation determines the offset of emotional responding and is thus distinct from emotional sensitivity, which determines the onset of emotional responding. Among the most viable categories for classifying emotion-regulation strategies are the targets and functions of emotion regulation. The emotion-generating systems that are targeted in emotion regulation

Sander L. Koole

2009-01-01

216

Emotional Expression and Growth Following Adversity: Emotional Expression Mediates Subjective Distress and is Moderated by Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional expression is hypothesised to be associated with growth following adversity. Two studies are described that test predictions made for emotional expression, first that it mediates the relation between event-related distress and growth, and second, that the relation between emotional expression and growth is moderated by emotional intelligence. In Study 1, college students (n = 148) completed measures of traumatic experiences, emotional

P. Alex Linley; Aimee Felus; Raphael Gillett; Stephen Joseph

2011-01-01

217

Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Context: Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. Case Report: We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. Conclusion: Post operative radiotherapy allows better local control and should be mandatory when histological features predictive of recurrence are present: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread. PMID:22540063

Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

2011-01-01

218

Systemic effects of local radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Radiotherapy is generally used to treat a localized target that includes cancer. Mounting evidence indicates that radiotherapy also recruits biological effectors outside the treatment field, and has systemic effects. The implications of this aspect are discussed in this review, in the context of understanding the role of the host’s immune system in cooperating with standard cytotoxic treatments. Since effects from both chemotherapy and radiotherapy are sensed by the immune system, their combination with immunotherapy presents a new therapeutic opportunity. Radiotherapy carries the advantage of directly interfering with the primary tumor site, and potentially reverting some of the established immuno-supressive barriers present within the tumor microenvironment, ideally recovering the role of the primary tumor as an effective immunogenic hub. Local radiation also triggers systemic effects that can be harnessed in combination with immunotherapy to induce responses outside the radiation field. This review will cover some of the preclinical and clinical evidence in this regard. PMID:19573801

Formenti, Silvia C.; Demaria, Sandra

2009-01-01

219

Preoperative Radiotherapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, researchers are testing whether radiotherapy before surgery will help patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma survive longer without relapse of their cancer than when treated with surgery alone.

220

Processing orientation and emotion recognition.  

PubMed

There is evidence that some emotional expressions are characterized by diagnostic cues from individual face features. For example, an upturned mouth is indicative of happiness, whereas a furrowed brow is associated with anger. The current investigation explored whether motivating people to perceive stimuli in a local (i.e., feature-based) rather than global (i.e., holistic) processing orientation was advantageous for recognizing emotional facial expressions. Participants classified emotional faces while primed with local and global processing orientations, via a Navon letter task. Contrary to previous findings for identity recognition, the current findings are indicative of a modest advantage for face emotion recognition under conditions of local processing orientation. When primed with a local processing orientation, participants performed both significantly faster and more accurately on an emotion recognition task than when they were primed with a global processing orientation. The impacts of this finding for theories of emotion recognition and face processing are considered. PMID:21842989

Martin, Douglas; Slessor, Gillian; Allen, Roy; Phillips, Louise H; Darling, Stephen

2012-02-01

221

Promoting the Emotional Development of Preschoolers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the emotional development of preschoolers, including the issues of emotional expression, emotional understanding, regulation of emotions, developmental significance, and the role of the caregiver-child relationship. Finds that caregivers influence the emotional development of children as they model, coach, and respond to children.…

Ashiabi, Godwin S.

2000-01-01

222

Promoting the Emotional Development of Preschoolers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at evidence pertaining to the emotional development of preschoolers. The issues talked about include a synopsis of emotional expression, emotional understanding, the regulation of emotions, and their developmental significance. Furthermore, the role of the caregiver–child relationship as indicated by the security of attachment is provided. It is argued that caregivers influence the emotional development of children as

Godwin S. Ashiabi

2000-01-01

223

Emotional content of true and false memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many people believe that emotional memories (including those that arise in therapy) are particularly likely to represent true events because of their emotional content. But is emotional content a reliable indicator of memory accuracy? The current research assessed the emotional content of participants’ pre-existing (true) and manipulated (false) memories for childhood events. False memories for one of three emotional childhood

Cara Laney; Elizabeth F. Loftus

2008-01-01

224

Emotion Regulation in Children with Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined emotion management skills in addition to the role of emotional intensity and self-efficacy in emotion regulation in 26 children with anxiety disorders (ADs) ages 8 to 12 years and their counterparts without any form of psychopathology. Children completed the Children's Emotion Management Scales (CEMS) and Emotion Regulation…

Suveg, Cynthia; Zeman, Janice

2004-01-01

225

The Theory of Emotions in Marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether a theory of emotions in marketing is needed, this article assesses the current theoretical status of emotions in marketing. The theoretical propositions and the characteristics of four major theories of emotions borrowed from psychology, as well as five marketing accounts for emotions are reviewed. The characteristics of emotions in marketing are specified and compared with the characteristics

Ming-Hui Huang

2001-01-01

226

Emotions Across Cultures and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants included 46 European American, 33 Asian American, 91 Japanese, 160 Indian, and 80 Hispanic students (N = 416). Discrete emotions, as well as pleasant and unpleasant emotions, were assessed: (a) with global self-report measures,\\u000a (b) using an experience-sampling method for 1 week, and (c) by asking participants to recall their emotions from the experience\\u000a sampling week. Cultural differences emerged

Christie Napa Scollon; Ed Diener; Shigehiro Oishi; Robert Biswas-Diener

227

Emotion Regulation in Childhood Anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The field of psychology is in the midst of an “emotion revolution,” reflecting the emerging role of emotion theory in clinical\\u000a research and practice (Samoilov & Goldfried, 2000; Southam-Gerow & Kendall, 2002). Although many researchers have commended\\u000a this trend, there is also an ongoing call for more clinical research that is founded on emotion theory and expands our understanding\\u000a of

Marni L. Jacob; Kristel Thomassin; Diana Morelen; Cynthia Suveg

228

Processing Words with Emotional Connotation: An fMRI Study of Time Course and Laterality in Rostral Frontal and Retrosplenial Cortices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Responses of rostral frontal and retrosplenial cortices to the emotional significance of words were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-six strongly righthanded participants engaged in a language task that alternated between silent word generation to categories with positive, negative, or neutral emotional connotation and a baseline task of silent repetition of emotionally neutral words. Activation uniquely associated with

M. Allison Cato; Bruce Crosson; Didem Gökçay; David Soltysik; Christina Wierenga; Kaundinya Gopinath; Nathan Himes; Heather Belanger; Russell M. Bauer; Ira S. Fischler; Leslie Gonzalez-Rothi; Richard W. Briggs

2004-01-01

229

Yugoslav strong motion network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response

Vladimir Mihailov

1985-01-01

230

Emotional function in dementia patients.  

PubMed

Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, which can be considered as hyperreactivity of the emotional functioning of dementia, can be alleviated or aggravated by the behavioural and psychological symptoms of the caregiver. Comfortable stimulations of emotional function through sensory stimulations are effective methods for alleviating behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Although cognitive function deteriorates with age, emotional function is often retained even in advanced years. Thus, it is recommended that care in patients with dementia be focused mainly on the stimulation of emotional function (e.g. sympathy and empathy, which are human traits), rather than relying solely on the stimulation of cognitive function. PMID:25250479

Fujii, Masahiko; Butler, James P; Sasaki, Hidetada

2014-09-01

231

Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer. The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches, based on recent technological advances, is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning), reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy), and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning target volume (intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy). Reduction of radiotherapy-related toxicity is fundamental to the improvement of clinical results in esophageal cancer, although the dose escalation concept is controversial. PMID:21105188

Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri; Sirak, Igor; Hodek, Miroslav; Paluska, Petr; Dolezal, Jiri; Kopacova, Marcela

2010-01-01

232

Visual search and emotion: how children with autism spectrum disorders scan emotional scenes.  

PubMed

This study assessed visual search abilities, tested through the flicker task, in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Twenty-two children diagnosed with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children were told to detect changes in objects of central interest or objects of marginal interest (MI) embedded in either emotion-laden (positive or negative) or neutral real-world pictures. The results showed that emotion-laden pictures equally interfered with performance of both ASD and TD children, slowing down reaction times compared with neutral pictures. Children with ASD were faster than TD children, particularly in detecting changes in MI objects, the most difficult condition. However, their performance was less accurate than performance of TD children just when the pictures were negative. These findings suggest that children with ASD have better visual search abilities than TD children only when the search is particularly difficult and requires strong serial search strategies. The emotional-social impairment that is usually considered as a typical feature of ASD seems to be limited to processing of negative emotional information. PMID:24898908

Maccari, Lisa; Pasini, Augusto; Caroli, Emanuela; Rosa, Caterina; Marotta, Andrea; Martella, Diana; Fuentes, Luis J; Casagrande, Maria

2014-11-01

233

Synesthesia: Strong and Weak  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this review, we distinguish strong and weak forms of synesthesia. Strong synesthesia is characterized by a vivid image in one sensory modality in response to stimulation in another one. Weak synesthesia is characterized by cross-sensory correspondences expressed through language, perceptual similarity, and perceptual interactions during information processing. Despite important phenomenological dissimilarities between strong and weak synesthesia, we maintain that

Gail Martino; Lawrence E. Marks

2001-01-01

234

How Does Context Affect Assessments of Facial Emotion? The Role of Culture and Age  

E-print Network

are due to differing intellectual histories, with Western culture strongly influenced by traditions dating: Asian vs. Western culture, aging, emotion recognition, context memory Other people's facial expressions North American participants (Mas- This article was published Online

Mather, Mara

235

Crises That Threaten Out-of-Home Placement of Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

E-print Network

Children with serious emotional and behavioral disorders present strong challenges to families and professionals who attempt to care for them at home. This longitudinal, exploratory study examines the placementthreatening crises ...

Petr, Christopher G.

1994-01-01

236

Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions  

E-print Network

Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions Julia by direct mapping on basic emotion display; secondary emotions like relief or gloating are considered and secondary emotions [2] can be recognized from the face of our emotional virtual human Max [1]. Primary

Becker-Asano, Christian

237

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

E-print Network

specified by Gross's (Review of General Psychology 2: 271­299, 1998) process model of emotion regulationAssessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview Kelly H to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. How- ever, the precise nature of the emotion

Gross, James J.

238

Modeling Motivations and Emotions as a Basis for Intelligent Behavior  

E-print Network

Modeling Motivations and Emotions as a Basis for Intelligent Behavior Dolores Ca � namero the first stage, the creature being a newborn whose behavior is strongly driven by motiva­ tional states---impulses by analogy with control systems. Motivations drive behavior selection and organization based on the notions

Cañamero, Lola

239

Human thalamic and amygdala modulation in emotional scene perception.  

PubMed

Emotional scene perception is associated with enhanced activity in ventral occipitotemporal cortex and amygdala. While a growing body of research supports the perspective that emotional perception is organized via amygdala feedback to rostral ventral visual cortex, the contributions of high-order thalamic structures strongly associated with visual attention, specifically the mediodorsal nucleus and pulvinar, have not been well investigated. Here we sample the activity of amygdala, MDN, pulvinar, and extrastriate ventral visual regions with fMRI as a group of participants view a mixed series of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant natural scenes, balanced for basic perceptual characteristics. The results demonstrate that all regions showed enhanced activity during emotionally arousing relative to neutral scene perception. Consistent with recent research, the latency of emotional discrimination across subcortical and visual cortical regions suggests a role for the amygdala in the early evaluation of scene emotion. These data support the perspective that higher order visual thalamic structures are sensitive to the emotional value of complex scene stimuli, and may serve in concert with amygdala and fusiform gyrus to modulate visual attention toward motivationally relevant cues. PMID:25173075

Frank, David W; Sabatinelli, Dean

2014-10-31

240

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs About Emotions, Mother–Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother–child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value\\/danger of children's emotions and parent\\/child roles in emotion socialization. Mother–child emotion talk was observed during a Lego storytelling task. Children's emotion understanding was

Marie Belle Perez Rivera; Julie C. Dunsmore

2011-01-01

241

Strong EAPEmployee Assistance Program January 2010 Fighting Depression  

E-print Network

Strong EAPEmployee Assistance Program January 2010 Fighting Depression in the Recession Recessions can take an emotional toll along with their financial impact. Keep an eye out for signs of depression-888-764-3456 www.urmc.rochester.edu/EAP If you wrestle with accomplishing exercise goals, getting things done

Goldman, Steven A.

242

Emotion regulation in spider phobia: role of the medial prefrontal cortex  

PubMed Central

Phobic responses are strong emotional reactions towards phobic objects, which can be described as a deficit in the automatic regulation of emotions. Difficulties in the voluntary cognitive control of these emotions suggest a further phobia-specific deficit in effortful emotion regulation mechanisms. The actual study is based on this emotion regulation conceptualization of specific phobias. The aim is to investigate the neural correlates of these two emotion regulation deficits in spider phobics. Sixteen spider phobic females participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which they were asked to voluntarily up- and down-regulate their emotions elicited by spider and generally aversive pictures with a reappraisal strategy. In line with the hypothesis concerning an automatic emotion regulation deficit, increased activity in the insula and reduced activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was observed. Furthermore, phobia-specific effortful regulation within phobics was associated with altered activity in medial prefrontal cortex areas. Altogether, these results suggest that spider phobic subjects are indeed characterized by a deficit in the automatic as well as the effortful regulation of emotions elicited by phobic compared with aversive stimuli. These two forms of phobic emotion regulation deficits are associated with altered activity in different medial prefrontal cortex subregions. PMID:19398537

Schäfer, Axel; Walter, Bertram; Stark, Rudolf; Vaitl, Dieter; Schienle, Anne

2009-01-01

243

Nonconscious emotional activation colors first impressions: a regulatory role for conscious awareness.  

PubMed

Emotions can color people's attitudes toward unrelated objects in the environment. Existing evidence suggests that such emotional coloring is particularly strong when emotion-triggering information escapes conscious awareness. But is emotional reactivity stronger after nonconscious emotional provocation than after conscious emotional provocation, or does conscious processing specifically change the association between emotional reactivity and evaluations of unrelated objects? In this study, we independently indexed emotional reactivity and coloring as a function of emotional-stimulus awareness to disentangle these accounts. Specifically, we recorded skin-conductance responses to spiders and fearful faces, along with subsequent preferences for novel neutral faces during visually aware and unaware states. Fearful faces increased skin-conductance responses comparably in both stimulus-aware and stimulus-unaware conditions. Yet only when visual awareness was precluded did skin-conductance responses to fearful faces predict decreased likability of neutral faces. These findings suggest a regulatory role for conscious awareness in breaking otherwise automatic associations between physiological reactivity and evaluative emotional responses. PMID:24317420

Lapate, Regina C; Rokers, Bas; Li, Tianyi; Davidson, Richard J

2014-02-01

244

Regional brain function, emotion and disorders of emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the neural substrates of emotion and its disorders. Neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize the circuitry underlying disorders of emotion. Particular emphasis has been placed on the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, parietal cortex, and the amygdala as critical components of the circuitry that may be dysfunctional in both depression and

Richard J Davidson; Heather Abercrombie; Jack B Nitschke; Katherine Putnam

1999-01-01

245

Prospective Effects of Emotion-Regulation Skills on Emotional Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deficits in emotion-regulation skills have widely been shown to be associated with poor emotional adjustment. However, it is still unclear whether these deficits are a cause or a consequence of poor adjustment. The purpose of the present research was to clarify the reciprocal effects between these 2 concepts. In 2 studies (Ns = 446 and 635),…

Berking, Matthias; Orth, Ulrich; Wupperman, Peggilee; Meier, Laurenz L.; Caspar, Franz

2008-01-01

246

Preschoolers' Understanding of Parents' Emotions: Implications for Emotional Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated preschoolers' understanding of three parental emotions: happiness, sadness, and anger. The study also examined relationships of these understandings to preschoolers' emotional competence. Subjects, 70 children with a mean age of 55 months, were presented with a dollhouse and were encouraged to imagine that the dollhouse…

Denham, Susanne A.; And Others

247

Learning Emotional Understanding and Emotion Regulation through Sibling Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Young children's relationships with their sisters and brothers offer unique and important opportunities for learning about emotions and developing emotional understanding. Through a critical analysis, this article examines sibling interaction in 3 different but normative contexts (conflict/conflict management, play, and…

Kramer, Laurie

2014-01-01

248

Emotion and Emotion-Laden Words in the Bilingual Lexicon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to draw on recent studies of bilingualism and emotions to argue for three types of modifications to the current models of the bilingual lexicon. The first modification involves word categories: I will show that emotion words need to be considered as a separate class of words in the mental lexicon, represented and…

Pavlenko, Aneta

2008-01-01

249

Emotion Telepresence: Emotion Augmentation through Affective Haptics and Visual Stimuli  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper focuses on a novel concept of emotional telepresence. The iFeel_IM! system which is in the vanguard of this technology integrates 3D virtual world Second Life, intelligent component for automatic emotion recognition from text messages, and innovative affective haptic interfaces providing additional nonverbal communication channels through simulation of emotional feedback and social touch (physical co-presence). Users can not only exchange messages but also emotionally and physically feel the presence of the communication partner (e.g., family member, friend, or beloved person). The next prototype of the system will include the tablet computer. The user can realize haptic interaction with avatar, and thus influence its mood and emotion of the partner. The finger gesture language will be designed for communication with avatar. This will bring new level of immersion of on-line communication.

Tsetserukou, D.; Neviarouskaya, A.

2012-03-01

250

Neural correlates of emotion processing: from emotional to social brain.  

PubMed

Different models of emotion highlight the role of strategic brain regions in emotion identification, response and regulation. Cortical, subcortical and limbic structures constitute the emotional brain. In this short review, we focus on the function of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. Both regions have reciprocal connections and are densely connected with cortical and subcortical structures. Beyond its classical role in fear processing, the amygdala is considered as a region that detects salient and personally relevant stimuli in cooperation with ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex are also engaged in the processing of socially relevant stimuli. Our review emphasized the overlap between the emotional and the social brain. Adopting a socio-affective neuroscience perspective is a promising perspective to identify new pathophysiological pathways in the study of emotion and mental disorders, especially major depressive disorder. PMID:22959113

Fossati, P

2012-01-01

251

Preschool Teachers' Emotional Experience Traits, Awareness of Their Own Emotions, and Their Emotional Socialization Practices.  

E-print Network

??Emotions are composed of three interrelated sets of processes, which are (a) neurophysiologic and biochemical processes, (b) motor and behavioral expressive processes, and (c) cognitive-experiential… (more)

ERSAY, EBRU

2007-01-01

252

Emotion socialization in formerly homeless families.  

E-print Network

??Emotional competence in children is increasingly understood as an outcome of parents? adaptive socialization behaviors. Parent?s socialization of children?s emotions and children?s emotion competence were… (more)

Davis, Karen Laurel

2012-01-01

253

Emotional event-related potentials are larger to figures than scenes but are similarly reduced by inattention  

PubMed Central

Background In research on event-related potentials (ERP) to emotional pictures, greater attention to emotional than neutral stimuli (i.e., motivated attention) is commonly indexed by two difference waves between emotional and neutral stimuli: the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP). Evidence suggests that if attention is directed away from the pictures, then the emotional effects on EPN and LPP are eliminated. However, a few studies have found residual, emotional effects on EPN and LPP. In these studies, pictures were shown at fixation, and picture composition was that of simple figures rather than that of complex scenes. Because figures elicit larger LPP than do scenes, figures might capture and hold attention more strongly than do scenes. Here, we showed negative and neutral pictures of figures and scenes and tested first, whether emotional effects are larger to figures than scenes for both EPN and LPP, and second, whether emotional effects on EPN and LPP are reduced less for unattended figures than scenes. Results Emotional effects on EPN and LPP were larger for figures than scenes. When pictures were unattended, emotional effects on EPN increased for scenes but tended to decrease for figures, whereas emotional effects on LPP decreased similarly for figures and scenes. Conclusions Emotional effects on EPN and LPP were larger for figures than scenes, but these effects did not resist manipulations of attention more strongly for figures than scenes. These findings imply that the emotional content captures attention more strongly for figures than scenes, but that the emotional content does not hold attention more strongly for figures than scenes. PMID:22607397

2012-01-01

254

Emotion down-regulation diminishes cognitive control: A neurophysiological investigation.  

PubMed

Traditional models of cognitive control have explained performance monitoring as a "cold" cognitive process, devoid of emotion. In contrast to this dominant view, a growing body of clinical and experimental research indicates that cognitive control and its neural substrates, in particular the error-related negativity (ERN), are moderated by affective and motivational factors, reflecting the aversive experience of response conflict and errors. To add to this growing line of research, here we use the classic emotion regulation paradigm-a manipulation that promotes the cognitive reappraisal of emotion during task performance-to test the extent to which affective variation in the ERN is subject to emotion reappraisal, and also to explore how emotional regulation of the ERN might influence behavioral performance. In a within-subjects design, 41 university students completed 3 identical rounds of a go/no-go task while electroencephalography was recorded. Reappraisal instructions were manipulated so that participants either down-regulated or up-regulated emotional involvement, or completed the task normally, without engaging any reappraisal strategy (control). Results showed attenuated ERN amplitudes when participants down-regulated their emotional experience. In addition, a mediation analysis revealed that the association between reappraisal style and attenuated ERN was mediated by changes in reported emotion ratings. An indirect effects model also revealed that down-regulation predicted sensitivity of error-monitoring processes (difference ERN), which, in turn, predicted poorer task performance. Taken together, these results suggest that the ERN appears to have a strong affective component that is associated with indices of cognitive control and behavioral monitoring. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25286068

Hobson, Nicholas M; Saunders, Blair; Al-Khindi, Timour; Inzlicht, Michael

2014-12-01

255

The Voice of Emotion: Acoustic Properties of Six Emotional Expressions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies in the perceptual identification of emotional states suggested that listeners seemed to depend on a limited set of vocal cues to distinguish among emotions. Linguistics and speech science literatures have indicated that this small set of cues included intensity, fundamental frequency, and temporal properties such as speech rate and duration. Little research has been done, however, to validate these cues in the production of emotional speech, or to determine if specific dimensions of each cue are associated with the production of a particular emotion for a variety of speakers. This study addressed deficiencies in understanding of the acoustical properties of duration and intensity as components of emotional speech by means of speech science instrumentation. Acoustic data were conveyed in a brief sentence spoken by twelve English speaking adult male and female subjects, half with dramatic training, and half without such training. Simulated expressions included: happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. The study demonstrated that the acoustic property of mean intensity served as an important cue for a vocal taxonomy. Overall duration was rejected as an element for a general taxonomy due to interactions involving gender and role. Findings suggested a gender-related taxonomy, however, based on differences in the ways in which men and women use the duration cue in their emotional expressions. Results also indicated that speaker training may influence greater use of the duration cue in expressions of emotion, particularly for male actors. Discussion of these results provided linkages to (1) practical management of emotional interactions in clinical and interpersonal environments, (2) implications for differences in the ways in which males and females may be socialized to express emotions, and (3) guidelines for future perceptual studies of emotional sensitivity.

Baldwin, Carol May

256

Networks of Emotion Concepts  

PubMed Central

The aim of this work was to study the similarity network and hierarchical clustering of Finnish emotion concepts. Native speakers of Finnish evaluated similarity between the 50 most frequently used Finnish words describing emotional experiences. We hypothesized that methods developed within network theory, such as identifying clusters and specific local network structures, can reveal structures that would be difficult to discover using traditional methods such as multidimensional scaling (MDS) and ordinary cluster analysis. The concepts divided into three main clusters, which can be described as negative, positive, and surprise. Negative and positive clusters divided further into meaningful sub-clusters, corresponding to those found in previous studies. Importantly, this method allowed the same concept to be a member in more than one cluster. Our results suggest that studying particular network structures that do not fit into a low-dimensional description can shed additional light on why subjects evaluate certain concepts as similar. To encourage the use of network methods in analyzing similarity data, we provide the analysis software for free use (http://www.becs.tkk.fi/similaritynets/). PMID:22276099

Toivonen, Riitta; Kivela, Mikko; Saramaki, Jari; Viinikainen, Mikko; Vanhatalo, Maija; Sams, Mikko

2012-01-01

257

Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

Pachkoria, Ketevan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Zhang Hong [Department of Dermatology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Adell, Gunnar [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Jarlsfelt, Ingvar [Department of Pathology and Cytology, Joenkoeping Hospital, Joenkoeping (Sweden); Sun Xiaofeng [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

2005-11-01

258

The emotional impact of malpractice.  

PubMed

Nurses rarely think they will be named as defendants in malpractice suits, and when they are named, they almost never envision the emotional impact that will occur regardless of the outcome of the suit. This article explores the lived experience of a nurse named as a defendant in a malpractice lawsuit and the use of strategies for emotional and professional survival. PMID:20462075

Larson, Kristin; Elliott, Rowena

2010-01-01

259

Music Emotion Identification from Lyrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very large online music databases have recently been created by vendors, but they generally lack content-based retrieval methods. One exception is Allmusic.com which offers browsing by musical emotion, using human experts to classify several thousand songs into 183 moods. In this paper, machine learning techniques are used instead of human experts to extract emotions in Music. The classification is based

Dan Yang; Won-Sook Lee

2009-01-01

260

Measures of emotion: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A consensual, componential model of emotions conceptualises them as experiential, physiological, and behavioural responses to personally meaningful stimuli. The present review examines this model in terms of whether different types of emotion-evocative stimuli are associated with discrete and invariant patterns of responding in each response system, how such responses are structured, and if such responses converge across different response systems.

Iris B. Mauss; Michael D. Robinson

2009-01-01

261

Emotional Intelligence: Components and Correlates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no accepted definition and no adequate measure for the concept of Emotional Intelligence (EI). Some of the myriad issues surrounding EI are discussed here. One problem in the consideration of EI is the confusion between the terms "feelings" and "emotions." Differences between the two are examined and a working definition of feelings is…

Bernet, Michael

262

Toddlers' Understanding of Peers' Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants' ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, the authors used a social-referencing paradigm to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children could use a peer's positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their…

Nichols, Sara R.; Svetlova, Margarita; Brownell, Celia A.

2010-01-01

263

The Emotions and Reproductive Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is surprising that social demography has so little to say on the emotional underpinnings of demographic behavior. The central proposition of this essay is that emotions are particularly important for understanding the problems of reproductive health. This understanding allows one to consider the usual determinants of personal autonomy, or access to knowledge or services, but also to take into

Alaka Malwade Basu

2006-01-01

264

On the Nature of Emotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay argues that humans are capable of a large number of affect states; a distinction should be made among acute emotions, chronic moods, and temperamental vulnerabilities to a particular emotion state; and research on human effects will profit from a return to, and reinterpretation of, Sigmund Freud's suggestion of unconscious affect…

Kagan, Jerome

1994-01-01

265

Emotive qualities in robot speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the expression of emotion in synthesized speech for an anthropomorphic robot. We adapted several key emotional correlates of human speech to the robot speech synthesizer to allow the robot to speak in either an angry, calm, disgusted, fearful, happy, sad, or surprised manner. We evaluated our approach thorough an acoustic analysis of the speech patterns for each

Cynthia Breazeal

2001-01-01

266

Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.  

PubMed

Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice. PMID:25219193

Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

2014-01-01

267

Finance organizations, decisions and emotions.  

PubMed

Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology ('exuberance' or 'panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than 'individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to 'herd' behaviour in economics, and 'system trust' applied to finance and money as a 'medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to 'think' or 'feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial 'manias' in aggregate or 'system trust'. PMID:11958678

Pixley, Jocelyn

2002-03-01

268

The importance of emotional intelligence.  

PubMed

Nurse managers who exhibit high emotional intelligence (EI) can elicit higher nurse-retention rates, better patient satisfaction and optimal organisational outcomes, and those who are emotionally intelligent tend consistently to model the positive behaviour that is expected of healthcare staff. PMID:25428315

Clancy, Cheri

2014-11-27

269

Emotional Intelligence and Educational Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the notion of educational reform and discusses Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the context of the modernist-postmodernist debate. It is argued that through the application of EI into contemporary societies a new wave of reform emerges that provides science with normative power over the emotional world of individuals. This…

Neophytou, Lefkios

2013-01-01

270

Contradictions of emotion in schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers contradictory features of emotional or affective experience and expression in schizophrenia in light of the “Kretschmerian paradox”—the fact that schizophrenia-spectrum patients can simultaneously experience both exaggerated and diminished levels of affective response. An attempt is made to explain the paradox and explore its implications. Recent research on emotion in schizophrenia is reviewed, including subjective reports, psychophysiological measures

Louis Sass

2007-01-01

271

Emotional facial expressions capture attention  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the emotional significance of stimuli can influence spatial attention. BACKGROUND: Motivational and emotional factors may affect attention toward stimuli. However, this has never been examined in brain-damaged patients who present with unilateral inattention due to left spatial neglect. METHODS: The authors studied three patients with chronic left neglect and visual extinction after right parietal stroke. Shapes

Patrik Vuilleumier; Sophie Schwartz

2001-01-01

272

Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

2012-01-01

273

Measuring Emotion Socialization in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Understanding how school personnel can best support students' development of communication skills around feelings is critical to long-term health outcomes. The measurement of emotion socialization in schools facilitates future research in this area; we review existing measures of emotion socialization to assess their applicability…

Horner, Christy G.; Wallace, Tanner L.

2013-01-01

274

Medical & Emotional Emergency Policy & Protocol  

E-print Network

Medical & Emotional Emergency Policy & Protocol The College of William and Mary Contact: Dean is the College's response to cases that might involve violation of the Medical and Emotional Emergencies section when a student attempts suicide or makes a threat or gesture of suicide, harms or attempts to harm him

Shaw, Leah B.

275

Emotional response to musical repetition.  

PubMed

Two experiments examined the effects of repetition on listeners' emotional response to music. Listeners heard recordings of orchestral music that contained a large section repeated twice. The music had a symmetric phrase structure (same-length phrases) in Experiment 1 and an asymmetric phrase structure (different-length phrases) in Experiment 2, hypothesized to alter the predictability of sensitivity to musical repetition. Continuous measures of arousal and valence were compared across music that contained identical repetition, variation (related), or contrasting (unrelated) structure. Listeners' emotional arousal ratings differed most for contrasting music, moderately for variations, and least for repeating musical segments. A computational model for the detection of repeated musical segments was applied to the listeners' emotional responses. The model detected the locations of phrase boundaries from the emotional responses better than from performed tempo or physical intensity in both experiments. These findings indicate the importance of repetition in listeners' emotional response to music and in the perceptual segmentation of musical structure. PMID:21707165

Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline; Schubert, Emery

2012-06-01

276

[Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].  

PubMed

Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

2014-10-01

277

Controversies in radiotherapy for meningioma.  

PubMed

Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial tumour. Although external beam radiotherapy and radiosurgery are well-established treatments, affording local control rates of 85-95% at 10 years, the evidence base is mainly limited to single institution case series. This has resulted in inconsistent practices. It is generally agreed that radiotherapy is an established primary therapy in patients requiring treatment for surgically inaccessible disease and postoperatively for grade 3 tumours. Controversy exists surrounding whether radiotherapy should be upfront or reserved for progression for incompletely excised and grade 2 tumours. External beam radiotherapy and radiosurgery have not been directly compared, but seem to offer comparable rates of control for benign disease. Target volume definition remains contentious, including the inclusion of hyperostotic bone, dural tail and surrounding brain, but pathological studies are shedding some light. Most agree that doses around 50-54 Gy are appropriate for benign meningiomas and ongoing European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group studies are evaluating dose escalation for higher risk disease. Here we address the 'who, when and how' of radiotherapy for meningioma. PMID:24207113

Maclean, J; Fersht, N; Short, S

2014-01-01

278

A REVIEW OF SCHEDULING PROBLEMS IN RADIOTHERAPY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the radiotherapy patient scheduling problem of minimising waiting times. Like many other service industry problems, radiotherapy patient scheduling may be solved by first modelling and formulating it into a shop scheduling problem. Over the years, these shop scheduling models have been researched and solved using various approaches. This paper typifies radiotherapy patient scheduling into a job shop

T. Kapamara; K. Sheibaniy; D. Petrovic; Coventry CV

279

Pelvic radiotherapy, sex hormones, and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiotherapy for malignant and benign gynecologic disease in middle age has been found to be associated inversely with the risk of breast cancer in several published studies. The ovaries received substantial doses of radiation from such treatments, in the tens of Gray (Gy) from radiotherapy for cervical cancer and one to 10 Gy from radiotherapy for benign gynecologic disease (BGD).

Peter D. Inskip

1994-01-01

280

Postmastectomy Radiotherapy of the Chest Wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose: Different radiotherapy techniques are being used for postmastectomy irradiation. A retrospective analysis of patterns of locoregional failure (LRF) after modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by locoregional radiotherapy with or without systemic treatment was performed. Main emphasis was focused on the comparison of two postmastectomy radiotherapy techniques. Patients and Methods: 287 evaluable patients with

Thomas Hehr; Johannes Classen; Marco Huth; Ilona Durst; Gunter Christ; Michael Bamberg; Wilfried Budach

2004-01-01

281

Importance of emotional competence in designing an antidrug education curriculum for junior secondary school students in Hong Kong.  

PubMed

Adolescent substance abuse is a serious problem in Hong Kong. Antidrug education campaigns should aim at enhancing students' understanding of the effects of illegal drugs to themselves. Moreover, life skill training is important in helping adolescents face life's challenges without attempting to do drugs. A major component of life skill training is the promotion of emotional competence. The present study outlines the importance of emotional competence and adolescent development. For an antidrug education campaign to be effective, adolescents should be able to identify their emotions and understand their own emotion regulation mechanism. Likewise, they should be made aware of the consequences of their emotions and emotion-driven behaviors. Finally, the use of an inspirational story with a strong message against substance abuse to trigger emotions is recommended for designing an antidrug education curriculum. All these components are integrated in the newly developed curriculum of the P.A.T.H.S. Project in Hong Kong. PMID:22125472

Law, Ben M F; Lee, Tak Yan

2011-01-01

282

Emotion Regulation Deficits in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease  

E-print Network

Emotion Regulation Deficits in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease Madeleine), which presents with profound emotional and personality changes; patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, N in the emotional realm. Keywords: emotion, emotion regulation, frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Levenson, Robert W.

283

Preoccupied Attachment and Emotional Dysregulation: Specific Aspects of Borderline Personality Disorder or General Dimensions of Personality Pathology?  

PubMed Central

Emotional dysregulation and impaired attachment are seen by many clinical researchers as central aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Alternatively, these constructs may represent general impairments in personality that are nonspecific to BPD. Using multitrait-multimethod models, we examined the strength of associations among preoccupied attachment, difficulties with emotion regulation, BPD features, and features of two other personality disorders (i.e., antisocial and avoidant) in a combined psychiatric outpatient and community sample of adults. Results suggested that preoccupied attachment and difficulties with emotion regulation shared strong positive associations with each other and with each of the selected personality disorders. However, preoccupied attachment and emotional dysregulation were more strongly related to BPD features than to features of other personality disorders. Our findings suggest that although impairments in relational and emotional domains may underlie personality pathology in general, preoccupied attachment and emotional dysregulation also have specificity for understanding core difficulties in those with BPD. PMID:23586934

Scott, Lori N.; Kim, Yookyung; Nolf, Kimberly A.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

2013-01-01

284

Showing and telling about emotions: Interrelations between facets of emotional competence and associations with classroom adjustment in Head Start preschoolers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study of low income preschoolers (N?=? 60), we examined relations between three facets of emotional competence: emotion knowledge, level of negative emotion expression, and emotion regulation; and their associations with indicators of classroom adjustment. Emotion knowledge was positively related to positive emotion regulation but was not related to negative emotion expression or negative dysregulation. Negative emotion expression related

Alison L. Miller; Sarah E. Fine; Kathleen Kiely Gouley; Ronald Seifer; Susan Dickstein; Ann Shields

2006-01-01

285

Palliative radiotherapy for prostate cancer.  

PubMed

Radiotherapy is an effective tool for the palliation of symptoms commonly caused by prostate cancer. The majority of painful bone metastases respond equally well to single or multiple fractions of external radiotherapy. Retreatment with a second course of radiation induces pain responses in approximately 50% of patients. For more diffuse metastases, either hemibody radiation or systemic radiopharmaceuticals can reduce pain, and radium-223 is associated with improved survival in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Hematuria, bladder outlet obstruction, and rectal compression are all improved with palliative radiotherapy. The ability of stereotactic body radiation therapy to reduce pain compared with standard external radiation is being investigated, as is its role in treating those with limited metastatic disease. PMID:24839802

Boyer, Matthew J; Salama, Joseph K; Lee, W Robert

2014-04-01

286

Strongly correlated electron systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August–3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and

Siddharth S Saxena; P B Littlewood

2012-01-01

287

Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.  

PubMed

Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2?Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

2013-02-01

288

Superficial radiotherapy for multiple keratoacanthomas.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 76-year-old Caucasian woman who attended our clinic with multiple keratoacanthomas. Radiotherapy was considered a viable and effective option in such an old patient, who could not be a good surgical candidate for number and distribution of the lesions, and for the age. After a 12-month follow-up, we observed the complete and global disappearance of the lesions; the patient was therefore very satisfied especially in view of the clinical outcome. According to our point of view, radiotherapy allows the physician to obtain a good oncological radicality and excellent cosmetic results too. PMID:25032245

Bruscino, N; Corradini, D; Campolmi, P; Massi, D; Palleschi, G M

2014-01-01

289

Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

Kumar, Sanath

2012-01-01

290

Contextualizing Emotional Exhaustion and Positive Emotional Display: The Signaling Effects of Supervisors’ Emotional Exhaustion and Service Climate  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we investigated how supervisors’ emotional exhaustion and service climate jointly influence the relationship between subordinates’ emotional exhaustion and their display of positive emotions at work. Using data from frontline sales employees and their immediate supervisors in a fashion retailer, we hypothesized and found that under the condition of a less positive service climate, subordinates’ emotional exhaustion was

Catherine K. Lam; Xu Huang; Onne Janssen

2010-01-01

291

The Dark Side of Emotion in the Classroom: Emotional Processes as Mediators of Teacher Communication Behaviors and Student Negative Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on emotional response theory (ERT), recent researchers have observed connections between teachers' communication behaviors and students' emotional reactions. In the present study, we further elaborated ERT by exploring the effects of teacher communication behaviors and emotional processes on discrete negative emotions, including…

Mazer, Joseph P.; McKenna-Buchanan, Timothy P.; Quinlan, Margaret M.; Titsworth, Scott

2014-01-01

292

Compound facial expressions of emotion  

PubMed Central

Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

2014-01-01

293

Emotion regulation meets emotional attention: the influence of emotion suppression on emotional attention depends on the nature of the distracters.  

PubMed

Recent evidence has suggested a crucial role of people's current goals in attention to emotional information. This asks for research investigating how and what kinds of goals shape emotional attention. The present study investigated how the goal to suppress a negative emotional state influences attention to emotion-congruent events. After inducing disgust, we instructed participants to suppress all feelings of disgust during a subsequent dot probe task. Attention to disgusting images was modulated by the sort of distracter that was presented in parallel with disgusting imagery. When disgusting images were presented together with neutral images, emotion suppression was accompanied by a tendency to attend to disgusting images. However, when disgusting images were shown with positive images that allow coping with disgust (i.e., images representing cleanliness), attention tended away from disgusting images and toward images representing cleanliness. These findings show that emotion suppression influences the allocation of attention but that the successful avoidance of emotion-congruent events depends on the availability of effective distracters. PMID:25046243

Vogt, Julia; De Houwer, Jan

2014-10-01

294

Moral Emotions and Moral Behavior  

PubMed Central

Moral emotions represent a key element of our human moral apparatus, influencing the link between moral standards and moral behavior. This chapter reviews current theory and research on moral emotions. We first focus on a triad of negatively valenced “self-conscious” emotions—shame, guilt, and embarrassment. As in previous decades, much research remains focused on shame and guilt. We review current thinking on the distinction between shame and guilt, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of these two moral emotions. Several new areas of research are highlighted: research on the domain-specific phenomenon of body shame, styles of coping with shame, psychobiological aspects of shame, the link between childhood abuse and later proneness to shame, and the phenomena of vicarious or “collective” experiences of shame and guilt. In recent years, the concept of moral emotions has been expanded to include several positive emotions—elevation, gratitude, and the sometimes morally relevant experience of pride. Finally, we discuss briefly a morally relevant emotional process—other-oriented empathy. PMID:16953797

Stuewig, Jeff; Mashek, Debra J.

2011-01-01

295

Attentional interference effects of emotional pictures: threat, negativity, or arousal?  

PubMed

Attentional interference arising from emotional pictures was examined. Participants had to ignore emotional pictures while solving math problems (Study 1, N = 126) or detecting the location of a line (Study 2, N = 60). Data analyses tested predictions of 3 theories. Evolutionary threat theory predicts interference by snake pictures. Categorical negativity theory predicts interference by negative pictures regardless of their intensity. According to arousal theory, arousal level predicts interference effects. The results supported arousal theory, with the most arousing pictures (strong unpleasant pictures, oppositesex models) producing the strongest interference. The findings are interpreted in the context of process models of emotions that postulate an initial relevance check before further processing of valence and other appraisal dimensions. PMID:15755219

Schimmack, Ulrich; Derryberry, Douglas

2005-03-01

296

Mother's home healthcare: emotion work when a child has cancer.  

PubMed

Home healthcare work, involving physical labor, nursing care, medical monitoring, administrative, planning and accounting, advocacy and emotion work, is unpaid and largely invisible. This article, based on focus group interviews with mothers whose children have had cancer, describes one part of their home healthcare labor, their emotion work. Specifically, it examines how mothers: manage the moral imperatives of mothering; think about and try to manage the strong feelings, particularly of fear and uncertainty that they often have when their children are ill with cancer; work to understand and maintain their marital relationships; the strategies that seemed to help; and finally, the self-transformation that many mothers experience. The article concludes with a discussion of the substantive, theoretical, research, and policy implications of emotion work in the provision of home healthcare work. PMID:16557122

Clarke, Juanne N

2006-01-01

297

Brain, emotion and decision making: the paradigmatic example of regret.  

PubMed

Human decisions cannot be explained solely by rational imperatives but are strongly influenced by emotion. Theoretical and behavioral studies provide a sound empirical basis to the impact of the emotion of regret in guiding choice behavior. Recent neuropsychological and neuroimaging data have stressed the fundamental role of the orbitofrontal cortex in mediating the experience of regret. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data indicate that reactivation of activity within the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala occurring during the phase of choice, when the brain is anticipating possible future consequences of decisions, characterizes the anticipation of regret. In turn, these patterns reflect learning based on cumulative emotional experience. Moreover, affective consequences can induce specific mechanisms of cognitive control of the choice processes, involving reinforcement or avoidance of the experienced behavior. PMID:17475537

Coricelli, Giorgio; Dolan, Raymond J; Sirigu, Angela

2007-06-01

298

Emotional stimulation alters olfactory sensitivity and odor judgment.  

PubMed

Emotions have a strong influence on the perception of visual and auditory stimuli. Only little is known about the relation between emotional stimulation and olfactory functions. The present study investigated the relationship between the presentation of affective pictures, olfactory functions, and sex. Olfactory performance was assessed in 32 subjects (16 male). Olfactory sensitivity was significantly reduced following unpleasant picture presentation for all subjects and following pleasant picture presentation for male subjects only. Pleasantness and intensity ratings of a neutral suprathreshold odor were related to the valence of the pictures: After unpleasant picture presentation, the odor was rated as less pleasant and more intense, whereas viewing positive pictures induced a significant increase in reported odor pleasantness. We conclude that inducing a negative emotional state reduces olfactory sensitivity. A relation to functional deviations within the primary olfactory cortices is discussed. PMID:17495172

Pollatos, Olga; Kopietz, Rainer; Linn, Jennifer; Albrecht, Jessica; Sakar, Vehbi; Anzinger, Andrea; Schandry, Rainer; Wiesmann, Martin

2007-07-01

299

Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder  

PubMed Central

We assessed linkages of mothers’ emotion coaching and children’s emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children’s adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Dyads completed questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching was associated with children’s emotion regulation, which in turn was related to higher mother-reported adaptive skills, higher child-reported internalizing symptoms, and lower child-reported adjustment. When children were high in emotion lability/negativity, mothers’ emotion coaching was associated with lower mother and child reports of externalizing behavior. Results suggest the role of emotion regulation and emotion lability in child awareness of socio-emotional problems and support the potential of maternal emotion coaching as a protective factor for children with ODD, especially for those high in emotion lability. PMID:24187441

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

2012-01-01

300

An Integrated Approach to Emotion Recognition for Advanced Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion identification is beginning to be considered as an essential feature in human-computer interaction. However, most\\u000a of the studies are mainly focused on facial expression classifications and speech recognition and not much attention has been\\u000a paid until recently to physiological pattern recognition. In this paper, an integrative approach is proposed to emotional\\u000a interaction by fusing multi-modal signals. Subjects are exposed

Panagiotis D. Bamidis; Christos A. Frantzidis; Evdokimos I. Konstantinidis; Andrej Luneski; Chrysa D. Lithari; Manousos A. Klados; Charalampos Bratsas; Christos L. Papadelis; Costas Pappas

2009-01-01

301

Emotion Chat: A Web Chatroom with Emotion Regulation for E-Learners  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to compensate for lack of emotion communication between teachers and students in e-learning systems, we have designed and implemented the EmotionChat -- a web chatroom with emotion regulation. EmotionChat perceives e-learners’ emotional states based on interactive text. And it recommends resources such as music, cartoons, and mottos to an e-learner when it detects negative emotional states. Meanwhile, it recommends emotion regulation cases to the e-learner's listeners and teachers. The result of our initial experiment shows that EmotionChat can recommend valuable emotion regulation policies for e-learners.

Zheng, Deli; Tian, Feng; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qinghua; Qin, Jiwei

302

Age and Emotional Experience During Mutual Reminiscing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present article, the authors examined age differences in the emotional experiences involved in talking about past events. In Study 1, 129 adults in an experience-sampling study reported whether they were engaged in mutual reminiscing and their concurrent experience of positive and negative emotion. Their experiences of positive and negative emotion during mutual reminiscing were compared with emotional experience

Monisha Pasupathi; Laura L. Carstensen

2003-01-01

303

Building Emotional Literacy: Groundwork to Early Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of social and emotional development is a child's emotional literacy. Numerous strategies exist for the development of children's emotional and social development, and for their emotional readiness for school. Teachers might arrange a classroom environment that is not overly structured or regimented. The environment should reflect who the…

Figueroa-Sanchez, Magali

2008-01-01

304

Accounting for Immediate Emotional Memory Enhancement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Memory for emotional events is usually very good even when tested shortly after study, before it is altered by the influence of emotional arousal on consolidation. Immediate emotion-enhanced memory may stem from the influence of emotion on cognitive processes at encoding and retrieval. Our goal was to test which cognitive factors are necessary and…

Talmi, Deborah; McGarry, Lucy M.

2012-01-01

305

Moment-to-Moment Emotions during Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Moment-to-moment emotions are affective states that dynamically change during reading and potentially influence comprehension. Researchers have recently identified these emotions and the emotion trajectories in reading, tutoring, and problem solving. The primary learning-centered emotions are boredom, frustration, confusion, flow (engagement),…

Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney

2012-01-01

306

Young Children's Emotional Development and School Readiness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current emphasis on children's academic preparedness continues to overshadow the importance of children's social and emotional development for school readiness (Raver & Zigler, 1997). Research, however, indicates that young children's emotional adjustment matters—children who are emotionally well adjusted have a significantly greater chance of early school success, while children who experience serious emotional difficulty face grave risks of early

C. Cybele Raver; ERIC DIGEST

307

A Neurobiological Approach to Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

of emotion, and how can disorders of emotion be understood? What motivates us to work for particular rewards operate to ensure that we eat approximately the correct amount of food to maintain our body weight we have emotions? What are the rules by which emotion operates? What are the brain mechanisms

Rolls, Edmund T.

308

‘Keeping it real’ with an emotional curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students’ emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an ‘emotional curriculum’ was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course expectations and group dynamics. Attention to emotions enhanced my ability to address

Debbie Storrs

2012-01-01

309

‘Keeping it real’ with an emotional curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students’ emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an ‘emotional curriculum’ was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course expectations and group dynamics. Attention to emotions enhanced my ability to address

Debbie Storrs

2011-01-01

310

Adult attachment, emotional control, and marital satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends previous research into the relations among attachment style, emotional experience, and emotional control. Questionnaire measures of these variables were completed by a broad sample of 238 married couples. Continuous measures of attachment showed that insecure attachment (low Comfort with closeness; high Anxiety over relationships) was related to greater control of emotion, regardless of whether the emotion was

JUDITH A. FEENEY

1999-01-01

311

Indentifying Emotional Characteristics from Short Blog Texts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion is at the core of understanding ourselves and others, and the automatic expression and detection of emotion could enhance our experience with technologies. In this paper, we explore the use of computational linguistic tools to derive emotional features. Using 50 and 200 word samples of naturally-occurring blog texts, we find that some emotions are more discernible than others. In

Alastair J. Gill; Darren Gergle

2008-01-01

312

African American and European American Mothers' Beliefs About Negative Emotions and Emotion Socialization Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined mothers’ beliefs about their children's negative emotions and their emotion socialization practices. Design. A total of 65 African American and 137 European American mothers of 5-year-old children reported their beliefs and typical responses to children's negative emotions, and mothers’ emotion teaching practices were observed. Results. African American mothers reported that the display of negative emotions was

Jackie A. Nelson; Esther M. Leerkes; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Stuart Marcovitch

2012-01-01

313

The experience of positive emotion is associated with the automatic processing of positive emotional words  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examines the relationship between attention bias for positive emotional words and self-reported emotional experience. Previous research suggests that the experience of positive emotion momentarily broadens cognitive processes, potentially allowing individuals to build an array of enduring personal resources. However, it is unknown whether the experience of positive emotion also broadens emotional information processing. Participants included 60 healthy

Gregory P. Strauss; Daniel N. Allen

2006-01-01

314

The emotional feeling as a combination of two qualia: A neurophilosophical-based emotion theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is argued that the emotional feeling comprises the following two emotional qualia. (1) A nucleus feeling or primary emotional quale, which is the phenomenological counterpart of the end product of appraisal by the central nervous system. (2) The experience of being urged to emotion-related reflection or secondary emotional quale, which is the phenomenological counterpart of the brain's decision to

Bob Bermond

2008-01-01

315

Emotional dysregulation in dysphoria: Support for emotion context insensitivity in response to performance-based feedback  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Emotion Context Insensitivity (ECI) hypothesis predicts that individuals experiencing a sad mood will show diminished reactivity to emotionally evocative stimuli and will not differentiate emotional responses across contexts. Previous work has primarily been limited to studying depressed individuals' emotional responses to film clips, images, and autobiographical memories. The current study builds upon this work by examining emotional reactivity of

Alissa J. Ellis; Christopher G. Beevers; Tony T. Wells

2009-01-01

316

The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions? Comment on Lench,  

E-print Network

COMMENT The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions with the alternative (a psychological constructionist approach to emotion). We close by appealing for a construct to finally resolve the emotion debate. Keywords: emotion, natural kinds, psychological construction

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

317

Managing Emotions in Teaching: Toward an Understanding of Emotion Displays and Caring as Nonprescribed Role Elements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Much research has sought to investigate emotions and forms of emotion management among teachers worldwide, including the connection between educational change and teacher emotion; the association between the culture of teaching and teachers' emotional experience within parent-teacher interactions; the link between teacher emotion and…

Oplatka, Izhar

2007-01-01

318

From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: Towards a unified theory of musical emotions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a ‘paradox’, namely that music - an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life - can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both ‘everyday emotions’ and ‘aesthetic emotions’. The revised framework - referred to as BRECVEMA - includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a ‘musical event’ (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical ‘appreciation emotions’ such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either ‘everyday emotions’ or ‘aesthetic emotions’.

Juslin, Patrik N.

2013-09-01

319

From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: towards a unified theory of musical emotions.  

PubMed

The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a 'paradox', namely that music--an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life--can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both 'everyday emotions' and 'aesthetic emotions'. The revised framework--referred to as BRECVEMA--includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a 'musical event' (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical 'appreciation emotions' such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either 'everyday emotions' or 'aesthetic emotions'. PMID:23769678

Juslin, Patrik N

2013-09-01

320

Possible pion sources for radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

From second meeting on fundamental and practical aspects of the ; application of fast neutrons in clinical radiotherapy; The Hague, Netherlands (3 ; Oct 1973). Recently great interest has been shown in pi-meson irradiation as a ; possible modality for cancer radiation therapy. In order for this short-lived ; particle to be more than an idle laboratory curiosity, it must

1973-01-01

321

[Adding the perspective of emotion on cognitive rehabilitation].  

PubMed

Cognitive rehabilitation has been gradually disseminated in Japan lately. Cognitive rehabilitation is distinct from other psychosocial rehabilitation methods, which aims to enhance cognitive function per se, by various training tools, using paper and pencil tasks, computer games, etc. It stands on the hypothesis that enhancing cognitive function should lead to improvement in social functioning. However, it is becoming clear that cognitive rehabilitation on its own is not strongly effective on social functioning, but rather it appears effective when combined with other methods of rehabilitation. Moreover, it does not treat the emotional problems, which is essential considering the treatment endpoint, to enhance "subjective well-being". Emotional problems arise much often at social interaction in patients with schizophrenia, which can be amended by improving their social cognition as well as social skills. Recently, one of the social cognition training programs has been developed in USA by Penn and his colleagues, named SCIT (Social Cognition and Interaction Training) . The program treats a number of factors involved in social cognition, a) emotion perception, b) attributional style, and c) theory of mind, using various techniques such as Socrates quotes. In previous studies, SCIT showed good effectiveness in various aspects of social cognition for inpatients, whereas the finding was not as clear for outpatients. It may be assumed that integrating SCIT into a cognitive rehabilitation program should alleviate emotional stress the patients often encounter at social interaction in their daily activities. Presumably the next candidate target for psychosocial treatments coming after cognition and emotion should be "intrinsic motivation". PMID:22250444

Nakagome, Kazuyuki

2011-01-01

322

Back Pain and Emotional Distress  

MedlinePLUS

North American Spine Society Public Education Series Back Pain and Emotional Distress Common Reactions to Back Pain Four out of five adults will experience an episode of significant back pain sometime during ...

323

Emotional Issues and Bathroom Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... be unearthed by considering any changes in your child’s life or emotional development, observing her other behaviors, and listening carefully to what she says. Major change in a child's life can cause her to regress during toilet ...

324

Sleep and Emotional Memory Processing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive neuroscience continues to build meaningful connections between affective behavior and human brain function. Within the biological sciences, a similar renaissance has taken place, focusing on the role of sleep in various neurocognitive processes, and most recently, the interaction between sleep and emotional regulation. In this article, we survey an array of diverse findings across basic and clinical research domains, resulting in a convergent view of sleep-dependent emotional brain processing. Based on the unique neurobiology of sleep, we outline a model describing the overnight modulation of affective neural systems and the (re)processing of recent emotional experiences, both of which appear to redress the appropriate next-day reactivity of limbic and associated autonomic networks. Furthermore, a REM sleep hypothesis of emotional-memory processing is proposed, the implications of which may provide brain-based insights into the association between sleep abnormalities and the initiation and maintenance of mood disturbances.

van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P.

2011-01-01

325

Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds  

MedlinePLUS

... 1 Year Olds Ages & Stages Listen Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds Article Body Throughout her second year, ... for shelter. She may seem to change from one moment to the next, or she may seem ...

326

The emotional effects of disruption  

E-print Network

Disruption is something that we must negotiate as part of our everyday lives. The context of disruption can vary in nature from being positive to being negative in nature. However, the emotional effects of the disruption have not been investigated...

Adcock, Christina Annie Lee

2004-11-15

327

Emotions in economic action and interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do emotions influence economic action? Current literature recognizes the importance of emotions for economy because they\\u000a either help individuals perform economic roles through emotion management or enhancement of emotional intelligence, or because\\u000a they aid rationality through their influence on preference formation. All these strands of research investigate the link between\\u000a emotions and economy from an atomistic\\/individualistic perspective. I argue

Nina Bandelj

2009-01-01

328

Performance and learning goals for emotion regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal orientation theory is concerned with performance and learning goals in academic, athletic, and other ability areas. Here\\u000a we examine performance and learning goals for emotion regulation. We define performance goals for emotion regulation as seeking\\u000a to prove one’s ability to manage emotions; learning goals for emotion regulation are defined as seeking to improve one’s ability to manage emotions. In

Natalie RuskMaya TamirFred Rothbaum; Maya Tamir; Fred Rothbaum

329

Toddlers’ Understanding of Peers’ Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants’ ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, the authors used a social-referencing paradigm to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children could use a peer's positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their own behavior with the toys. They found

Sara R. Nichols; Margarita Svetlova; Celia A. Brownell

2010-01-01

330

"Pluto Has Been a Planet My Whole Life!" Emotions, Attitudes, and Conceptual Change in Elementary Students' Learning about Pluto's Reclassification  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning about certain scientific topics has potential to spark strong emotions among students. We investigated whether emotions predicted students' attitudes after engaging in independent rereading and/or rereading plus discussion about Pluto's reclassification. Fifth and sixth grade students read a refutation text on Pluto's reclassification.…

Broughton, Suzanne H.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Nussbaum, E. Michael

2013-01-01

331

The Relative Power of an Emotion's Facial Expression, Label, and Behavioral Consequence to Evoke Preschoolers' Knowledge of Its Cause  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lay people and scientists alike assume that, especially for young children, facial expressions are a strong cue to another's emotion. We report a study in which children (N=120; 3-4 years) described events that would cause basic emotions (surprise, fear, anger, disgust, sadness) presented as its facial expression, as its label, or as its…

Widen, Sherri C.; Russell, James A.

2004-01-01

332

The influence of caregiver singing and background music on vocally expressed emotions and moods in dementia care: A qualitative analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Music and singing are considered to have a strong impact on human emotions. Such an effect has been demonstrated in caregiving contexts with dementia patients. Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate vocally expressed emotions and moods in the communication between caregivers and persons with severe dementia during morning care sessions. Design: Three types of caring sessions

Eva Gotell; Steven Brown; Sirkka-Liisa Ekman

333

Emotion and the motivational brain.  

PubMed

Psychophysiological and neuroscience studies of emotional processing undertaken by investigators at the University of Florida Laboratory of the Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention (CSEA) are reviewed, with a focus on reflex reactions, neural structures and functional circuits that mediate emotional expression. The theoretical view shared among the investigators is that expressed emotions are founded on motivational circuits in the brain that developed early in evolutionary history to ensure the survival of individuals and their progeny. These circuits react to appetitive and aversive environmental and memorial cues, mediating appetitive and defensive reflexes that tune sensory systems and mobilize the organism for action and underly negative and positive affects. The research reviewed here assesses the reflex physiology of emotion, both autonomic and somatic, studying affects evoked in picture perception, memory imagery, and in the context of tangible reward and punishment, and using the electroencephalograph (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), explores the brain's motivational circuits that determine human emotion. PMID:19879918

Lang, Peter J; Bradley, Margaret M

2010-07-01

334

Emotion and the motivational brain  

PubMed Central

Psychophysiological and neuroscience studies of emotional processing undertaken by investigators at the University of Florida Laboratory of the Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention (CSEA) are reviewed, with a focus on reflex reactions, neural structures and functional circuits that mediate emotional expression. The theoretical view shared among the investigators is that expressed emotions are founded on motivational circuits in the brain that developed early in evolutionary history to ensure the survival of individuals and their progeny. These circuits react to appetitive and aversive environmental and memorial cues, mediating appetitive and defensive reflexes that tune sensory systems and mobilize the organism for action and underly negative and positive affects. The research reviewed here assesses the reflex physiology of emotion, both autonomic and somatic, studying affects evoked in picture perception, memory imagery, and in the context of tangible reward and punishment, and using the electroencephalograph (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), explores the brain’s motivational circuits that determine human emotion. PMID:19879918

Lang, Peter J.; Bradley, Margaret M.

2013-01-01

335

[Emotional impact of facial palsy].  

PubMed

Facial palsy is not only a movement disorder but leads also to an emotional and communicative disorder in chronic stage but also in some patients already during the acute phase of the disease. The present review describes the current knowledge of the neurobiological and psychological fundamentals on the relation of facial movement and its emotional context. So far there is not much knowledge on the impact of a facial palsy on the interaction between facial movement, emotional processing and communicative skills of the patient. The emotional contagion seems to be reduced in patients with facial palsy. The ability to express emotions seems also to be reduced. Moreover, the patients feel to be perceived negatively. In fact, most of the expressions of patients with facial palsy are allocated with a negative affect even when the patients are smiling. Patients with facial palsy react with negative stress, anxiety and depression. The patients avoid social contacts. In turn, this reinforces the communicative disorder. The otorhinolaryngologist can use the Facial Disability Index as a simple questionnaire to detect such dysfunctions. Diagnostics that are necessary to develop a therapy program are presented in this review. Standardized therapy concepts that are not only treat the movement disorder but also the emotional context is missing so far. Finally, the review will give an outlook on potential therapy strategies. PMID:23065673

Dobel, C; Miltner, W H R; Witte, O W; Volk, G F; Guntinas-Lichius, O

2013-01-01

336

Cultural Specific Effects on the Recognition of Basic Emotions: A Study on Italian Subjects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present work reports the results of perceptual experiments aimed to investigate if some of the basic emotions are perceptually privileged and if the cultural environment and the perceptual mode play a role in this preference. To this aim, Italian subjects were requested to assess emotional stimuli extracted from Italian and American English movies in the single (either video or audio alone) and the combined audio/video mode. Results showed that anger, fear, and sadness are better perceived than surprise, happiness in both the cultural environments (irony instead strongly depend on the language), that emotional information is affected by the communication mode and that language plays a role in assessing emotional information. Implications for the implementation of emotionally colored interactive systems are discussed.

Esposito, Anna; Riviello, Maria Teresa; Bourbakis, Nikolaos

337

The Role of Emotions in Contributors Activity: A Case Study on the GENTOO Community  

E-print Network

We analyse the relation between the emotions and the activity of contributors in the Open Source Software project Gentoo. Our case study builds on extensive data sets from the project's bug tracking platform Bugzilla, to quantify the activity of contributors, and its mail archives, to quantify the emotions of contributors by means of sentiment analysis. The Gentoo project is known for a considerable drop in development performance after the sudden retirement of a central contributor. We analyse how this event correlates with the negative emotions, both in bilateral email discussions with the central contributor, and at the level of the whole community of contributors. We then extend our study to consider the activity patters on Gentoo contributors in general. We find that contributors are more likely to become inactive when they express strong positive or negative emotions in the bug tracker, or when they deviate from the expected value of emotions in the mailing list. We use these insights to develop a Bayes...

Garcia, David; Schweitzer, Frank

2013-01-01

338

[Radiotherapy of soft tissue sarcoma--part of a multidisciplinary strategy].  

PubMed

The management of soft tissue sarcoma has evolved from a solitary surgical treatment to an interdisciplinary multimodal approach including radiotherapy. These fundamental changes are the result of increased knowledge in tumor biology, radiation sensitivity and the improvement in modern radiation therapy techniques. A successful effective therapy regimen strongly depends on distinct preoperative diagnostics, preoperative conception of the surgical intervention and an experienced oncological team. Of significant importance for the prognosis is early diagnosis as well as tumor excision with a wide negative margin. However, even after complete wide resection in sano, the use of postoperative radiotherapy can further improve local control and should therefore be applied to the majority of patients. Consequently, radiotherapy should only be omitted in cases in which the tumor has been excised with a very wide negative margin; this implies, however, high quality of surgery and distinct histopathological analysis. Patients with non- or questionable resectable tumors, should be referred for pre-operative radiotherapy in order to improve the surgical results. Recent studies have underlined the efficiency of modern radiotherapy regimens. The different radiotherapy regimens will be highlighted against the background of tumor stage and tumor resectibility. PMID:19122982

Pape, Hildegard; Orth, Klaus; Engers, Rainer; Matuschek, Christiane; Müller, Anja; Hartmann, Karl-Axel; Gerber, Peter Arne; Lammering, Guido; Habermehl, Daniel; Fenk, Roland; Budach, Wilfried; Gripp, Stephan; Peiper, Matthias; Bölke, Edwin

2008-01-01

339

Do You Know How I Feel? Evaluating Emotional Display of Primary and Secondary Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on an empirical study on how well different facial expressions of primary and secondary emotions [2]\\u000a can be recognized from the face of our emotional virtual human Max [1]. Primary emotions like happiness are more primitive,\\u000a onto-genetically earlier types of emotions, which are expressed by direct mapping on basic emotion display; secondary emotions\\u000a like relief

Julia Tolksdorf; Christian Werner Becker-asano; Stefan Kopp

2008-01-01

340

Living Emotions, Avoiding Emotions: Behavioral Investigation of the Regulation of Socially Driven Emotions  

PubMed Central

Emotion regulation is important for psychological well-being. Although it is known that alternative regulation strategies may have different emotional consequences, the effectiveness of such strategies for socially driven emotions remains unclear. In this study we investigated the efficacy of different forms of reappraisal on responses to the selfish and altruistic behavior of others in the Dictator Game. In Experiment 1, subjects mentalized the intentions of the other player in one condition, and took distance from the situation in the other. Emotion ratings were recorded after each offer. Compared with a baseline condition, mentalizing led subjects to experience their emotions more positively when receiving both selfish and altruistic proposals, whereas distancing decreased the valence when receiving altruistic offers, but did not affect the perception of selfish behavior. In Experiment 2, subjects played with both computer and human partners while reappraising the meaning of the player’s intentions (with a human partner) or the meaning of the situation (with a computer partner). Results showed that both contexts were effectively modulated by reappraisal, however a stronger effect was observed when the donor was a human partner, as compared to a computer partner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that socially driven emotions can be successfully modulated by reappraisal strategies that focus on the reinterpretation of others’ intentions. PMID:23349645

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

341

Radiotherapy capacity in European countries: an analysis of the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database.  

PubMed

Radiotherapy is used for cure or palliation in around half of patients with cancer. We analysed data on radiotherapy equipment in 33 European countries registered in the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) database, managed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. As of July, 2012, Europe had 1286 active radiotherapy centres. The average number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy centre ranged from 1·2 to 7·0 in different countries. Nordic countries, the UK, the Netherlands, and Slovenia all have large centres with four to ten teletherapy machines. Most western and southern European countries have several small centres with one or two machines, with few larger centres. The fragmentation in radiotherapy services that prevails in many European countries might affect the economic burden of radiotherapy and its quality. Eastern and southeastern European countries need to expand and modernise their radiotherapy equipment. PMID:23352499

Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Anacak, Yavuz; Pynda, Yaroslav; Scalliet, Pierre; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe

2013-02-01

342

Strong Autonomy and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that the possibilities available to autonomy- oriented educators may be quite limited and fall far short of what they think them to be, discussing independence and autonomy, knowledge and autonomy, weak and strong autonomy, and autonomy and education, and concluding that the anti-perfectionist liberal policy is not committed to the…

Winch, Christopher

2002-01-01

343

Strong Colorings of Hypergraphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A strong vertex coloring of a hypergraph assigns distinct col- ors to vertices that are contained in a common hyperedge. This captures many previously studied graph coloring problems. We present nearly tight upper and lower bound on approximating general hypergraphs, both oine and online. We then consider various parameters that make coloring easier, and give a unied treatment. In particular,

Geir Agnarsson; Magnús M. Halldórsson

2004-01-01

344

An emotion-differentiated perspective on empathy with the emotion specific empathy questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Empathy refers to the thoughts and feelings of one individual in response to the observed (emotional) experiences of another individual. Empathy, however, can occur toward persons experiencing a variety of emotions, raising the question of whether or not empathy can be emotion specific. This paper discusses theoretical and empirical support for the emotion specificity of empathy. We present a new measure, the Emotion Specific Empathy questionnaire, which assesses affective and cognitive empathy for the six basic emotions. This paper presents the measure's psychometric qualities and demonstrates, through a series of models, the discriminant validity between emotion specific empathies suggesting empathy is emotion specific. Results and implications are discussed. PMID:25071632

Olderbak, Sally; Sassenrath, Claudia; Keller, Johannes; Wilhelm, Oliver

2014-01-01

345

Forgetting of emotional information is hard: an fMRI study of directed forgetting.  

PubMed

Strong evidence suggests that memory for emotional information is much better than for neutral one. Thus, one may expect that forgetting of emotional information is difficult and requires considerable effort. The aim of this item-method directed forgetting functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate this hypothesis both at behavioral and neural levels. Directed forgetting effects were observed for both neutral and emotionally negative International Affective Picture System images. Moreover, recognition rate of negative to-be-forgotten images was higher than in case of neutral ones. In the study phase, intention to forget and successful forgetting of emotionally negative images were associated with widespread activations extending from the anterior to posterior regions mainly in the right hemisphere, whereas in the case of neutral images, they were associated with just one cluster of activation in the right lingual gyrus. Therefore, forgetting of emotional information seems to be a demanding process that strongly activates a distributed neural network in the right hemisphere. In the test phase, in turn, successfully forgotten images--either neutral or emotionally negative--were associated with virtually no activation, even at the lowered P value threshold. These results suggest that intentional inhibition during encoding may be an efficient strategy to cope with emotionally negative memories. PMID:20584747

Nowicka, Anna; Marchewka, Artur; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Tacikowski, Pawel; Brechmann, André

2011-03-01

346

Mixed emotional appeals in emotional and danger control processes.  

PubMed

Negative emotional appeals do not always help to reduce risk behaviors. We report two studies about a new strategy based on the presentation of appeals with mixed sequential emotions (e.g., sadness/fear-joy/relief). Study 1 shows that a mixed message generates lower post-message discomfort than an exclusively negative message; moreover, in this first study, reported probability of performing the risk behavior, binge drinking, in the future is also lower in the mixed condition. Study 2 replicates these results and relates them to the extended parallel process model (EPPM) (Witte, 1992). Here, the mixed emotional message again generates lower post-message discomfort than the negative one, and participants are motivated to control the danger (response efficacy is evaluated more positively in the mixed condition). PMID:21153989

Carrera, Pilar; Muñoz, Dolores; Caballero, Amparo

2010-12-01

347

Overcoming the loss of a love: preventing love addiction and promoting positive emotional health.  

PubMed

Counseling and clinical observations clarify views commonly made about the pain of breaking-up a love relationship. Anecdotal reports as presented in popular music, novels, movies, and television programs illustrate the public's general awareness of the emotional dilemma of ending a relationship. Love is a strong pleasurable emotional state. Behavioral and emotional problems can result from rejection and the pain due to the loss of a love. The term "love addiction" has been applied to persons who obsessively seek to regain the pleasurable love state which existed with a former love relationship. Dysfunctional emotional conditions such as distrust, feelings of rejection, loss of self-worth, deep-seated anger, feelings of failure, loss, and an array of other emotional distress and self-defeating behaviors arise in the emotionally hurt person. Emotional distress must be dealt with. Rational self-counseling and psychotherapy can be effective in helping a jilted person work through periods of distress and may help to reestablish emotional well being and good mental health. Counseling can assist the person in moving into new relationships, help the hurt person abandon dysfunctional behaviors and feelings, and aid the client in resuming a normal life. PMID:2190254

Timmreck, T C

1990-04-01

348

The role of mood and personality in the perception of emotions represented by music.  

PubMed

Neuroimaging studies investigating the processing of emotions have traditionally considered variance between subjects as statistical noise. However, according to behavioural studies, individual differences in emotional processing appear to be an inherent part of the process itself. Temporary mood states as well as stable personality traits have been shown to influence the processing of emotions, causing trait- and mood-congruent biases. The primary aim of this study was to explore how listeners' personality and mood are reflected in their evaluations of discrete emotions represented by music. A related aim was to investigate the role of personality in music preferences. An experiment was carried out where 67 participants evaluated 50 music excerpts in terms of perceived emotions (anger, fear, happiness, sadness, and tenderness) and preference. Current mood was associated with mood-congruent biases in the evaluation of emotions represented by music, but extraversion moderated the degree of mood-congruence. Personality traits were strongly connected with preference ratings, and the correlations reflected the trait-congruent patterns obtained in prior studies investigating self-referential emotional processing. Implications for future behavioural and neuroimaging studies on music and emotions are raised. PMID:21612773

Vuoskoski, Jonna K; Eerola, Tuomas

2011-10-01

349

Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood  

PubMed Central

Background Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS), the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts) tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks) used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events. PMID:25317255

Ceschi, Grazia; Billieux, Joel; Hearn, Melissa; Furst, Guillaume; Van der Linden, Martial

2014-01-01

350

Between-domain relations of students' academic emotions and their judgments of school domain similarity  

PubMed Central

With the aim to deepen our understanding of the between-domain relations of academic emotions, a series of three studies was conducted. We theorized that between-domain relations of trait (i.e., habitual) emotions reflected students' judgments of domain similarities, whereas between-domain relations of state (i.e., momentary) emotions did not. This supposition was based on the accessibility model of emotional self-report, according to which individuals' beliefs tend to strongly impact trait, but not state emotions. The aim of Study 1 (interviews; N = 40; 8th and 11th graders) was to gather salient characteristics of academic domains from students' perspective. In Study 2 (N = 1709; 8th and 11th graders) the 13 characteristics identified in Study 1 were assessed along with academic emotions in four different domains (mathematics, physics, German, and English) using a questionnaire-based trait assessment. With respect to the same domains, state emotions were assessed in Study 3 (N = 121; 8th and 11th graders) by employing an experience sampling approach. In line with our initial assumptions, between-domain relations of trait but not state academic emotions reflected between-domain relations of domain characteristics. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:25374547

Goetz, Thomas; Haag, Ludwig; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Keller, Melanie M.; Frenzel, Anne C.; Collier, Antonie P. M.

2014-01-01

351

Mammography findings following electron intraoperative radiotherapy or external radiotherapy for breast cancer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiotherapy following breast cancer conserving surgery decreases the risks of local recurrence. Because 85% of breast cancers relapse in or around the surgical bed there has been some debate on the need for irradiating the whole breast. Electron intraoperative radiotherapy (ELIOT) has been used as a viable alternative for conventional external radiotherapy (RT). While the former requires a single dose

B. P. S. A. Carvalho; A. L. Frasson; M. M. Santos; N. de Barros

2011-01-01

352

Extraversion and Emotional Reactivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six mood induction studies and a meta-analysis were conducted to test 2 models of the extraversion-pleasant affect relation. The affect-level model suggests that extraverts should be happier than introverts in both neutral and positive mood conditions. The reactivity model posits that extraverts react particularly strongly to pleasant stimuli and that they should be happier than introverts only in positive conditions.

Richard E. Lucas; Brendan M. Baird

2004-01-01

353

Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

Williams, Norman R; Pigott, Katharine H; Brew-Graves, Chris; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S

2014-05-01

354

Radiation Pneumonitis after Radiotherapy of Neck Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is still one of the effective means for treatment of malignant tumors up to now. Particularly, it is an indispensable effective measure for treatment of some lymphoma patients. In routine work, radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer; however, serious radioactive pneumonia is rare for the radiotherapy of neck lymphoma because the volume of the lungs affected by radiation dose was very small. We report a lymphoma case, where the patient had undergone radiotherapy for the bilateral neck and bilateral supraclavicular/infraclavicular area. Following completion of radiotherapy, the patient developed severe radiation pneumonitis.

Wei, Min; Cai, Jun; Tong, Tao; Yu, Shihua; Yang, Yonghua; Zhang, Weijia; Yang, Jiyuan

2014-01-01

355

Strong Imbalanced Turbulence  

E-print Network

We consider stationary, forced, imbalanced, or cross-helical MHD Alfvenic turbulence where the waves traveling in one direction have higher amplitudes than the opposite waves. This paper is dedicated to so-called strong turbulence, which cannot be treated perturbatively. Our main result is that the anisotropy of the weak waves is stronger than the anisotropy of a strong waves. We propose that critical balance, which was originally conceived as a causality argument, has to be amended by what we call a propagation argument. This revised formulation of critical balance is able to handle the imbalanced case and reduces to old formulation in the balanced case. We also provide phenomenological model of energy cascading and discuss possibility of self-similar solutions in a realistic setup of driven turbulence.

A. Beresnyak; A. Lazarian

2007-09-05

356

Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking  

E-print Network

Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

Grinstein, Benjamin

2011-01-01

357

Strongly interacting Higgs bosons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensitivity of present-energy weak interactions to a strongly interacting heavy-Higgs-boson sector is discussed. The gauged nonlinear sigma model, which is the limit of the linear model as the Higgs-boson mass goes to infinity, is used to organize and catalogue all possible heavy-Higgs-boson effects. As long as the SU(2)L×SU(2)R symmetry of the Higgs sector is preserved, these effects are found

Thomas Appelquist; Claude Bernard

1980-01-01

358

Living Bones, Strong Bones  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about engineering, nutrition, and physical activity, learners design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increasing amounts of weight. This activity contains several engaging mini-activities and stresses the importance of the scientific method. Learners can complete this activity as part of NASA's Fit Explorer Challenge, in which learners train like astronauts, set goals, track their progress, and accumulate points to progress through Exploration Levels and earn certificates.

Center, Nasa J.

2012-06-26

359

Strong-motion seismology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although this is the first review on this topic to appear in a quadrennial report, the roots of strong-motion seismology extend back to at least 1932, when far-sighted engineers in the Seismological Field Survey of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey installed rugged, fieldworthy instruments designed to make on-scale recordings of large earthquakes (Carder, 1964); these instruments are called

David M. Boore

1983-01-01

360

Proton radiobiology, radiosurgery and radiotherapy.  

PubMed

This review briefly traces the historical developments of proton radiobiology, radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the benefit of young researchers and clinicians entering into this field. In preparing to use protons in radiosurgery and radiotherapy, radiobiological effects of protons were studied extensively by various groups, including the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Uppsala, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Considerable work on proton radiobiology was also done because protons are a major component of the radiation environment in space. The biological effects of proton beams were found to be quantitatively and qualitatively similar to conventional radiations used in radiotherapy. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons suitable for large-field radiotherapy, compared with 60Co gamma-rays, is generally in the range 1.0-1.25, and remains the same with depth of penetration, except for the descending portion of the depth-dose curve. Also, unlike other heavier charged particles and neutrons, the RBE of high-energy protons, which are suitable for large-field radiotherapy, compared with 60Co gamma-rays, is generally found to be independent of the fraction size in in vivo experiments. The oxygen enhancement ratio for high-energy protons is not significantly different from that of X-rays. An RBE = 1.1, compared with 60Co gamma-rays, is generally used in the clinical application of protons; however, the radiobiological data on mouse, rat, rabbit and primate suggest that the gastrointestinal tissues may be relatively more sensitive to protons. About 13,000 patients have been treated with protons at about 15 facilities around the world. Nearly half of these patients were neurosurgical patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. The pioneering efforts at the Harvard Cyclotron in collaboration with the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary were responsible for the development of proton treatment for choroidal melanoma and for the tumours of the skull base and spine. There has been extensive confirmation of these results by other groups, especially the groups at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Paul Scherrer Institute. The first medically dedicated proton facility is in operation at Loma Linda University in California. The construction in the USA of another proton treatment facility at Massachusetts General Hospital has been decided upon, and there are plans for many more worldwide. PMID:7897273

Raju, M R

1995-03-01

361

Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in psychological and neuroimaging research are reviewed.

Perlovsky, Leonid

2010-03-01

362

Musical emotions: functions, origins, evolution.  

PubMed

Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in psychological and neuroimaging research are reviewed. PMID:20374916

Perlovsky, Leonid

2010-03-01

363

Reappraising social emotions: the role of inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction and insula in interpersonal emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have reported the effect of emotion regulation (ER) strategies on both individual and social decision-making, however, the effect of regulation on socially driven emotions independent of decisions is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the neural effects of using reappraisal to both up- and down-regulate socially driven emotions. Participants played the Dictator Game (DG) in the role of recipient while undergoing fMRI, and concurrently applied the strategies of either up-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as more negative), down-regulation (reappraising the proposer's intentions as less negative), as well as a baseline “look” condition. Results showed that regions responding to the implementation of reappraisal (effect of strategy, that is, “regulating regions”) were the inferior and middle frontal gyrus, temporo parietal junction and insula bilaterally. Importantly, the middle frontal gyrus activation correlated with the frequency of regulatory strategies in daily life, with the insula activation correlating with the perceived ability to reappraise the emotions elicited by the social situation. Regions regulated by reappraisal (effect of regulation, that is, “regulated regions”) were the striatum, the posterior cingulate and the insula, showing increased activation for the up-regulation and reduced activation for down-regulation, both compared to the baseline condition. When analyzing the separate effects of partners' behavior, selfish behavior produced an activation of the insula, not observed when subjects were treated altruistically. Here we show for the first time that interpersonal ER strategies can strongly affect neural responses when experiencing socially driven emotions. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed to understand how the way we interpret others' intentions may affect the way we emotionally react. PMID:24027512

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

364

Principles of Emotional Development and Children's Pretend Play.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the links between emotional development and pretend play in young children using basic foundations of psychoanalytic and learning theories. Explains emotional development and pretend play through interactive levels of expression, control and modeling of emotion, and emotional intelligence. (JPB)

Kwon, Jeong Yoon; Yawkey, Thomas D.

2000-01-01

365

Cognitive Emotion Regulation 1 Thinking makes it so  

E-print Network

in emotion and emotion regulation, the development of emotion regulation skills, and psychopathology. #12 that resonates throughout the history of Western culture. According to the Hebrew Bible, our emotion regulatory

Ochsner, Kevin

366

DESCRIBING THE EMOTIONAL STATES EXPRESSED IN SPEECH Roddy Cowie  

E-print Network

DESCRIBING THE EMOTIONAL STATES EXPRESSED IN SPEECH Roddy Cowie Psychology, Queen's University that somebody's voice is tinged with emotion. Research on emotion in psychology and biology has tended, Belfast ABSTRACT Describing relationships between speech and emotion depends on identifying appropriate

Hirschberg, Julia

367

Cultural and Temperamental Variation in Emotional Response Jeanne L. Tsai  

E-print Network

events. Given the fundamental role that emotion plays in psychological and social functioningCultural and Temperamental Variation in Emotional Response Jeanne L. Tsai Stanford University influence of cultural and temperamental factors on emotional response, we compared the emotional behavior

Levenson, Robert W.

368

The pragmatics of emotion language  

E-print Network

- versity of Virginia, Gilmer Hall 102, Charlottesville, VA 22904. E-mail: schnall@virginia.edu References Abu-Lughod, L., & Lutz, C. A. (1990). Introduction: Emotion, dis- course, and the politics of everyday life. In C. A. Lutz & L. Abu-Lughod (Eds... . The main difference between those two emotions lies in whether the existence of the shortcom- ing is real or not. Regardless, however, as long as both speaker and audience share, to use Sperber and Wil- son’s (1995) terms, the same cognitive environment...

Schnall, Simone

2005-01-01

369

Common Emotional Problems of Adolescence  

PubMed Central

Common emotional problems of adolescence are discussed under three headings: those specific to adolescence; common psychiatric problems of adolescence, and those complicating physical illness in adolescence. Adolescence is a phase of emotional sensitivity and self-centeredness. The whole family is affected and may require professional support. As the adolescent moves towards greater independence, some turbulence and acting out is normal. Some make an impulsive break from their family by running away, others gradually gain their independence and some remain overly dependent. The latter group often become dependent on and demanding of their physician. PMID:20469172

Froese, A. P.

1975-01-01

370

Blocking HIF-1? Following Radiotherapy to Prolong and Enhance the Immune Effects of Radiotherapy: A Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Tumor local immune escape is one of the “hallmarks” of cancer leading to poor prognosis. The effects of local radiotherapy on tumors are rapidly emerging as opportunities to remodel and enhance immunity against cancer. However, this immunity remodeling and enhancing are not permanent after local radiotherapy. High expression of HIF-1? following local radiotherapy for tumor cell reoxygenation has been confirmed, and recently accumulating evidence shows the tumor immune suppression effects. These research findings suggest a new direction in the investigation of methods to enhance the efficacy of local radiotherapy. We speculate that by blocking HIF-1?, the immune effects of radiotherapy might be prolonged and enhanced. PMID:25358601

Wei, Luo; Wei, Ge; Jing, Song; Cong, Chen; Huilin, Xu; Pingpo, Ming

2014-01-01

371

The Role of Emotion in Parent-Child Relationships: Children's Emotionality, Maternal Meta-Emotion, and Children's Attachment Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was intended to examine the relationship among children's emotionality, parental meta-emotion, and parent-child attachment. The sample consisted of 546 5th and 6th grade children and their mothers. The test instruments used in this study were the Emotionality subscale of the EAS Temperament Survey (mothers' ratings only), the Parental…

Chen, Fu Mei; Lin, Hsiao Shih; Li, Chun Hao

2012-01-01

372

Influence of children's emotional states on the recognition of emotion in peers and social motives to change another's emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment addressed the question of whether children's own emotional states influence their accuracy in recognizing emotional states in peers and any motives they may have to intervene in order to change their peers' emotional states. Happiness, sadness, anger, or a neutral state were induced in preschool children, who then viewed slides of other 4-year-old children who were actually experiencing

Charles R. Carlson; Elyse Schwartz Felleman; John C. Masters

1983-01-01

373

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2011-01-01

374

Intact Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 Complex Predicts Good Response to Radiotherapy in Early Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the expression and predictive role of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) for the outcome of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The protein expression of ATM and the DNA repair proteins in the MRN complex were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 224 women with early breast cancer, who were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Compared with normal breast tissue, the staining intensity of Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1, and ATM was reduced in a majority of the tumors. Weak expression of the MRN complex was correlated with high histologic grade and estrogen receptor negativity (p = 0.01 and p 0.0001, respectively). Radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence as compared with chemotherapy (p = 0.04). The greatest benefit of radiotherapy was seen in patients with moderate/strong expression of the MRN complex (relative risk = 0.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.098-0.72, p 0.009), whereas patients with negative/weak MRN expression had no benefit of radiotherapy compared with adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that an intact MRN complex is important for the tumor cell eradicating effect of radiotherapy. Conclusions: Reduced expression of the MRN complex predicts a poor effect of radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer.

Soederlund, Karin [Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Oncology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: karin.soderlund@ibk.liu.se; Stal, Olle [Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Oncology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Skoog, Lambert [Department of Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Rutqvist, Lars Erik [Department of Medicine/Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordenskjoeld, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Oncology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Askmalm, Marie Stenmark [Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of Oncology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden)

2007-05-01

375

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for  

E-print Network

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for: Managers who want to increase intelligence in leading employees to optimal performance. Course Description: Current research in organizations intelligence. Emotional intelligence can be learned and improved over time, as opposed to traditional

Gleeson, Joseph G.

376

The empirical themes of five maternal emotions  

E-print Network

hypotheses proposed by Lazarus (1991) concerning the expected themes of emotional events. Mothers were asked to produce narratives about actual emotional events that they had experienced, and then to rate each event across cognitive dimensions. Comparisons...

Krause, Matthew David

2012-06-07

377

Mental Health: Keeping Your Emotional Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotional health can sometimes have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause, such as a ... with family, work or school can sometimes trigger mental illness or make it worse. However, people who are ...

378

Beyond Describing Affect: Reconceptualizing Emotions in Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several research that examine emotions as a way to diagnose and treat pediatric depression are discussed. The growing research into this field may one day elevate emotion to be included in the standard diagnostic and clinical interview.

Horner, Michelle S.

2009-01-01

379

Fundamentals of Mathematical Theory of Emotional Robots  

E-print Network

In this book we introduce a mathematically formalized concept of emotion, robot's education and other psychological parameters of intelligent robots. We also introduce unitless coefficients characterizing an emotional memory of a robot. Besides, the effect of a robot's memory upon its emotional behavior is studied, and theorems defining fellowship and conflicts in groups of robots are proved. Also unitless parameters describing emotional states of those groups are introduced, and a rule of making alternative (binary) decisions based on emotional selection is given. We introduce a concept of equivalent educational process for robots and a concept of efficiency coefficient of an educational process, and suggest an algorithm of emotional contacts within a group of robots. And generally, we present and describe a model of a virtual reality with emotional robots. The book is meant for mathematical modeling specialists and emotional robot software developers.

Pensky, Oleg

2010-01-01

380

Culture and the Emotion Socialization of Preschoolers.  

E-print Network

??Objective:The present study examined mothers’ emotion socialization of 3-year–old children with behavior problems, to determine whether emotion socialization practices, as well as the relation between… (more)

Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I

2012-01-01

381

Are emotional intelligent workers also more empathic?  

PubMed

This paper analyzes whether emotional intelligence and self-monitoring are related to empathy among a sample of workers in both the public and private employment sectors. Two hundred and forty-two employees (42.5% men and 57.5% women) with a mean age of 35.21 years (SD = 10.07, range 18-61) completed a questionnaire that measured the variables of interest. The results showed that emotion regulation, a dimension of emotional intelligence, accounts for most of the variance of empathy, followed by the ability to understand emotions and the management of others' emotions. Furthermore, gender did not yield any moderator effect on the relations among emotional intelligence, self-monitoring and empathy. We conclude that the intrapersonal aspects of emotional intelligence, in particular, emotion regulation, help explain the empathy of workers. The implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:23786638

Martos, Maria Pilar Berrios; Lopez-Zafra, Esther; Pulido-Martos, Manuel; Augusto, José María

2013-10-01

382

Strong interaction and QFD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ?I = {1}/{2} rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) × U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the ?-meson transformation as a triplet under SU(2) W, and this is the origin of the ?-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons.

Ebata, Takeshi

1981-08-01

383

Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the “emotionally charged” healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investigating the relationships, direct and/or indirect, between emotional intelligence, the surface acting component of emotional labor, and job satisfaction in medical staff working in tertiary healthcare. Methods Data were collected from 130 physicians in Greece, who completed a series of self-report questionnaires including: a) the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, which assessed the four dimensions of emotional intelligence, i.e. Self-Emotion Appraisal, Others’ Emotion Appraisal, Use of Emotion, and Regulation of Emotion, b) the General Index of Job Satisfaction, and c) the Dutch Questionnaire on Emotional Labor (surface acting component). Results Emotional intelligence (Use of Emotion dimension) was significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction (r=.42, p<.001), whereas a significant negative correlation between surface acting and job satisfaction was observed (r=?.39, p<.001). Furthermore, Self-Emotion Appraisal was negatively correlated with surface acting (r=?.20, p<.01). Self-Emotion Appraisal was found to influence job satisfaction both directly and indirectly through surface acting, while this indirect effect was moderated by gender. Apart from its mediating role, surface acting was also a moderator of the emotional intelligence-job satisfaction relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that surface acting could predict job satisfaction over and above emotional intelligence dimensions. Conclusions The results of the present study may contribute to the better understanding of emotion-related parameters that affect the work process with a view to increasing the quality of service in the health sector. PMID:23244390

2012-01-01

384

The Quest to Control Emotion(s): A Critical Integral Fearanalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although emotion(s) have been of long interest to humans, they have particularly captivated the attention of many people and scholarly disciplines in the last 20 years. This paper critiques mainstream psychology of emotions and in particular, what Daniel Goleman has labeled the "collective emotional crisis" of our times and its relationship with…

Fisher, R. Michael

2009-01-01

385

Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Emotion regulation plays a crucial role in adaptive functioning and mounting evidence suggests that some emotion regulation strategies are often more effective than others. However, little attention has been paid to the different ways emotions can be generated: from the ‘bottom-up’ (in response to inherently emotional perceptual properties of the stimulus) or ‘top-down’ (in response to cognitive evaluations). Based on a process priming principle, we hypothesized that mode of emotion generation would interact with subsequent emotion regulation. Specifically, we predicted that top-down emotions would be more successfully regulated by a top-down regulation strategy than bottom-up emotions. To test this hypothesis, we induced bottom-up and top-down emotions, and asked participants to decrease the negative impact of these emotions using cognitive reappraisal. We observed the predicted interaction between generation and regulation in two measures of emotional responding. As measured by self-reported affect, cognitive reappraisal was more successful on top-down generated emotions than bottom-up generated emotions. Neurally, reappraisal of bottom-up generated emotions resulted in a paradoxical increase of amygdala activity. This interaction between mode of emotion generation and subsequent regulation should be taken into account when comparing of the efficacy of different types of emotion regulation, as well as when reappraisal is used to treat different types of clinical disorders. PMID:21296865

Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya K.; Pereira, Sean C.; Gross, James J.

2012-01-01

386

Memory for emotional and neutral information: Gender and individual differences in emotional sensitivity  

E-print Network

Memory for emotional and neutral information: Gender and individual differences in emotional. A measure of emotional sensitivity mediated the gender difference in emotional recall suggesting that memory in the relation between gender and memory. A number of studies demonstrate that men and women's memories

Johnson, Marcia K.

387

Emotion as a Thermostat: Representing Emotion Regulation Using a Damped Oscillator Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present in this study a damped oscillator model that provides a direct mathematical basis for testing the notion of emotion as a self-regulatory thermostat. Parameters from this model reflect individual differences in emotional lability and the ability to regulate emotion. The authors discuss concepts such as intensity, rate of change, and acceleration in the context of emotion, and

Sy-Miin Chow; Nilam Ram; Steven M. Boker; Frank Fujita; Gerald Clore

2005-01-01

388

Emotional responding in depression: Distinctions in the time course of emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current studies were designed to investigate if the emotion context insensitivity hypothesis (ECI; Rottenberg & Gotlib, 2004) is applicable across the time course of emotion. Recent affective science research has pointed to the importance of considering anticipation and maintenance of emotion. In the current studies, we assessed emotion responses among college students with depression symptoms in anticipation of, during,

Erin K. Moran; Neera Mehta; Ann M. Kring

2012-01-01

389

The Development of Emotion-Processing in Children: Effects of Age, Emotion, and Intensity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study examined the effects of age and two novel factors (intensity and emotion category) on healthy children's developing emotion-processing from 4 to 15 years using two matching paradigms. Methods: An explicit emotion-matching task was employed in which children matched the emotion of a target individual, and an implicit task…

Herba, Catherine M.; Landau, Sabine; Russell, Tamara; Ecker, Christine; Phillips, Mary L.

2006-01-01

390

A Developmental Sequence in the Comprehension of Emotions: Multiple Emotions, Intensity, and Valence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether varying intensity of emotions can be employed in conjunction with multiple emotion responses and valence of emotion to describe a scalable developmental sequence for young children. Eighty children between the ages of 4 and 8 years were interviewed individually. A version of the Emotions Situations Questionnaire was…

Wintre, Maxine Gallander; Vallance, Denise D.

391

The relation of young children's vicarious emotional responding to social competence, regulation, and emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation of preschool and kindergarten children's vicarious emotional responding to their social competence, regulation (attentional and coping styles), and emotionality (negative emotional intensity and dispositional negative affect) was examined. Vicarious responding was assessed by means of facial reactions to a film about a peer in a social conflict and children's reported negative affect to viewing peers' real-life negative emotion.

Nancy Eisenberg; Richard A. Fabes

1995-01-01

392

Emotional Intelligence and Emotion Work: Examining Constructs from an Interdisciplinary Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional intelligence and emotion work are two research areas traditionally presented as distinct. This article reviews their definitions, examines their intersections, and illustrates the advantage of approaching emotion research from an interdisciplinary framework. Conclusions address the following: (a) An employee's emotional intelligence or…

Opengart, Rose

2005-01-01

393

Exploring the Relationships between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Objective Socio-Emotional Outcomes in Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Trait emotional intelligence ("trait EI" or "trait emotional self-efficacy") is a constellation of emotion-related self-perceptions and dispositions located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. This paper examines the validity of this construct, as operationalized by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Child Form…

Mavroveli, Stella; Petrides, K. V.; Sangareau, Yolanda; Furnham, Adrian

2009-01-01

394

The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a,  

E-print Network

The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a, , Deanna Schizophrenia Face recognition Individuals with schizophrenia show deficits both in facial emotion recognition­1644). Thus, individuals with schizophrenia may have deficits in facial emotion processing, at least in part

395

Emotional complexity and emotional well-being in older adults: Risks of high neuroticism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older and midlife adults tend to report greater emotional complexity and greater emotional well-being than younger adults but there is variability in these factors across the lifespan. This study determined how the personality trait of neuroticism at baseline predicts emotional complexity and emotional well-being 10 years later; a goal was to determine if neuroticism is a stronger predictor of these

Rebecca E. Ready; Anna M. Åkerstedt; Daniel K. Mroczek

2012-01-01

396

Emotional complexity and emotional well-being in older adults: Risks of high neuroticism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older and midlife adults tend to report greater emotional complexity and greater emotional well-being than younger adults but there is variability in these factors across the lifespan. This study determined how the personality trait of neuroticism at baseline predicts emotional complexity and emotional well-being 10 years later; a goal was to determine if neuroticism is a stronger predictor of these

Rebecca E. Ready; Anna M. Åkerstedt; Daniel K. Mroczek

2011-01-01

397

Emotion Dysregulation Mediates the Link between Childhood Emotional Maltreatment and Young Adult Romantic Relationship Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the mediating role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between retrospective reports of childhood emotional maltreatment and current satisfaction in a romantic relationship. Participants included 492 (135 male, 357 female) young adults in current romantic relationships. Results indicated that total emotion regulation difficulties mediated the relation between childhood emotional maltreatment and romantic relationship satisfaction. Multiple mediator analyses

Laura L. Bradbury; Anne Shaffer

2012-01-01

398

Family Expressiveness and Parental Emotion Coaching: Their Role in Children's Emotion Regulation and Aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we explored the relations between positive and negative family expressiveness, parental emotion coaching, child emotion regulation, and child aggression. The sample included 120 fourth-grade children and their mothers. Mothers completed the Emotion Regulation Checklist, the Family Expressiveness Questionnaire, and a portion of the meta-emotion interview to assess their awareness and acceptance of, and instruction in managing their

Sally R. Ramsden; Julie A. Hubbard

2002-01-01

399

The automatic access of emotion: Emotional Stroop effects in Spanish–English bilingual speakers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emotional Stroop task provides an experimental measure of selective attention to emotional information. In the current study, the emotional Stroop effect was examined in a Spanish–English bilingual speaking population. The results revealed that the emotional Stroop effect is a robust phenomenon and replicable within a bilingual population. Furthermore, highly proficient bilinguals demonstrated equal interference effects in both their first

Tina M. Sutton; Jeanette Altarriba; Jennifer L. Gianico; Dana M. Basnight-Brown

2007-01-01

400

Creating Emotional Resonance: Interpersonal Emotion Work and Motivational Framing in a Transgender Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we examine how interpersonal emotion work in a transgender support group and motiva- tional framing of transgender social movement organizations together constructed favorable conditions for emo- tional resonance. We define emotional resonance as the emotional harmony and\\/or disjuncture between collective action frames and the emotional lives of potential recruits. Data derive from fieldwork, interviews, online e-mail lists

DOUGLAS SCHROCK; DAPHNE HOLDEN; LORI REID

2004-01-01

401

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

402

Face to face with emotion: Holistic face processing is modulated by emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative emotions are linked with a local, rather than global, visual processing style, which may preferentially facilitate feature-based, relative to holistic, processing mechanisms. Because faces are typically processed holistically, and because social contexts are prime elicitors of emotions, we examined whether negative emotions decrease holistic processing of faces. We induced positive, negative, or neutral emotions via film clips and measured

Kim M. Curby; Kareem J. Johnson; Alyssa Tyson

2012-01-01

403

Face to face with emotion: Holistic face processing is modulated by emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative emotions are linked with a local, rather than global, visual processing style, which may preferentially facilitate feature-based, relative to holistic, processing mechanisms. Because faces are typically processed holistically, and because social contexts are prime elicitors of emotions, we examined whether negative emotions decrease holistic processing of faces. We induced positive, negative, or neutral emotions via film clips and measured

Kim M. Curby; Kareem J. Johnson; Alyssa Tyson

2011-01-01

404

The effects of emotional responsiveness in marriage  

E-print Network

be as dysfunctional for the relationship as those relationships low in ezmtional linkage. The second hypothesis involved an asyzmetry in emotional responsiveness: those couples in which one spouse is nnre responsive than the other spouse will display more... of enmeshment and disengagement, and Krokoff's concept of emotional linkage, the hypothesis that interactions characterized by either high emotional linkage or low emotional linkage will display more negativity than those characterized by a nnderate degree...

Hass, Sally Duffin

2012-06-07

405

Emotion and Cognition Processes in Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The core processes of emotion understanding, emotion control, cognitive understanding, and cognitive control and their association with early indicators of social and academic success were examined in a sample of 141 3-year-old children. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized four-factor model of emotion and cognition in early childhood. A subsequent structural model indicated that emotion understanding processes were significantly positively

Esther M. Leerkes; Matthew John. Paradise; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Garrett. Lange

2008-01-01

406

Affective Computing Model Based on Emotional Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the basic emotions theory, the paper presents personality,mood, and emotion space. The mapping relationship among\\u000a personality , mood and emotion is built. The equations for updating the affective and mood states are induced and a generic\\u000a computing model for personality ,mood and emotion simulation for virtual human is constructed. The simulation results demonstrate\\u000a that the affective model can

Yang Guoliang; Wang Zhiliang; Wang Guojiang; Chen Fengjun

2006-01-01

407

Emotion-Focused Therapy: A Synopsis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic principles of an emotion-focused approach to therapy (EFT) are presented. In this view, emotion is seen as foundational in the construction of the self and is a key determinant of self-organization. As well as simply having emotion, people also live in a constant process of making sense of their emotions. Personal meaning emerges by the self-organization and explication

Leslie Greenberg

2006-01-01

408

The influence of cognitive control over emotional re-sponses has been labeled emotion regulation and has been  

E-print Network

The influence of cognitive control over emotional re- sponses has been labeled emotion regulation, and modifying emotional reactions, especially their intensity and temporal features" (Thompson, 1994). Understanding emotion regulation is especially important insofar as the inability to success- fully regulate

Nieuwenhuis, Sander

409

Identity Crises and Strong Compactness II: Strong Cardinals  

E-print Network

the general field of "identity crisis studies", there has been additional, extensive resear* *ch done Identity Crises and Strong Compactness II: Strong Cardinals of Magidor, that the class of strongly compact cardinals can assume yet another identity. Specifically, we

Cummings, James

410

Strongly correlated materials.  

PubMed

Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO? and Fe?O?, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials. PMID:22893361

Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

2012-09-18

411

Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking  

E-print Network

Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor, that technivector mesons are light, narrow and decay readily into electroweak vector mesons and photons. While walking technicolor is popular among practitioners, alternatives exist and the Straw Man may not lead to their discovery.

Benjamin Grinstein

2011-02-19

412

Emotional context enhances auditory novelty processing: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence.  

PubMed

Viewing emotionally negative pictures has been proposed to attenuate brain responses towards sudden auditory events, as more attentional resources are allocated to the affective visual stimuli. However, peripheral reflexes have been shown intensified. These observations have raised the question of whether an emotional context actually facilitates or attenuates processing in the auditory novelty system. Using scalp event-related potentials we measured brain responses induced by novel sounds when participants responded to visual stimuli displaying either threatening or neutral sceneries. We then tested the modulatory effect of the emotional task conditions on auditory responses. Novel sounds yielded a stronger behavioural disruption on subjects' visual task performance when responding to negative pictures compared with when responding to the neutral ones. Accordingly, very early novelty-P3 responses to novel sounds were enhanced in negative context. These results provide strong evidence that the emotional context enhances the activation of neural networks in the auditory novelty system, gating acoustic novelty processing under potentially threatening conditions. PMID:18783376

Domínguez-Borràs, Judith; Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Escera, Carles

2008-09-01

413

Emotionally challenging learning situations: medical students' experiences of autopsies  

PubMed Central

Objectives To explore medical students’ experiences of an emotionally challenging learning situation: the autopsy. Methods Qualitative data were collected by means of written accounts from seventeen students after their first and third autopsies and a group interview with seven students after their first autopsy. Data was interpreted using inductive thematic analysis. Results Students experienced the autopsy in three ways: as an unnatural situation, as a practical exercise, and as a way to learn how pathologists work. Most students found the situation unpleasant, but some were overwhelmed. Their experiences were characterised by strong unpleasant emotions and closeness to the situation. The body was perceived as a human being, recently alive. Students who experienced the autopsy as a practical exercise saw it mainly as a part of the course and their goal was to learn anatomy and pathology. They seemed to objectify the body and distanced themselves from the situation. Students who approached the autopsy as a way to learn how pathologists work concentrated on professional aspects of the autopsy. The body was perceived as a patient rather than as a biological specimen. Conclusions Autopsies are emotionally challenging learning situations. If students attend autopsies, they need to participate in several autopsies in order to learn about procedures and manifestations of pathological changes. Students need opportunities to discuss their experiences afterwards, and teachers need to be aware of how different students perceive the autopsies, and guide students through the procedure. Our findings emphasize the importance of investigating emotional aspects of medical education.

Scheja, Max; Hult, Hakan; Wernerson, Annika

2012-01-01

414

Emotional reactions to learning in cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that during instrumental learning, animals are likely to react emotionally to the reinforcer. They may in addition react emotionally to their own achievements. These reactions are of interest with regard to the animals’ capacity for self-awareness. Therefore, we devised a yoked control experiment involving the acquisition of an operant task. We aimed to identify the emotional

Kristin Hagen; Donald M Broom

2004-01-01

415

Extended Speech Emotion Recognition and Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humans are considered to reason and act rationally and that is believed to be their fundamental factor that differentiates them from the rest of living entities. Furthermore, modern approaches in the science of psychology underlying that human except of thinking creatures are also sentimental and emotional organisms. There are fifteen universal extended emotions plus neutral emotion, that is: hot anger,

Christos Skourlas

2014-01-01

416

Bimodal Emotion Recognition from Speech and Text  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an approach to emotion recognition from speech signals and textual content. In the analysis of speech signals, thirty-seven acoustic features are extracted from the speech input. Two different classifiers Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and BP neural network are adopted to classify the emotional states. In text analysis, we use the two-step classification method to recognize the emotional

Weilin Ye; Xinghua Fan

2014-01-01

417

Teachers' Emotion Regulation and Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a series of studies on teachers' attempts to modify the intensity and duration of their emotions, and how their emotions are expressed in the classroom. Among the important findings is that teachers practice emotion regulation because they believe it makes them more effective in management, discipline, and their…

Sutton, Rosemary E.; Mudrey-Camino, Renee; Knight, Catharine C.

2009-01-01

418

Social and Emotional Education in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' social and emotional development is vital in today's education, especially in light of changing family structures. This paper examines implications of recent cultural changes which have resulted in positive and negative changes in students' social and emotional needs, then describes and presents approaches to social and emotional…

Burke, Robert W.

2002-01-01

419

Dynamical Systems Approaches to Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 20 years, transitions in the conceptualization of emotion and its development have given rise to calls for an explanatory framework that captures emotional development in all its organizational complexity and variability. Recent attempts have been made to couch emotional development in terms of a dynamical systems approach through…

Camras, Linda A.; Witherington, David C.

2005-01-01

420

Emotional Awareness and Couples' Relationship Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the role of emotional awareness in couples' relationships and the effects of a tendency to respond to difficult couples' situations with "soft" emotions (including sadness and fear) versus "hard" emotions (including anger and resentment). Participants were 56 heterosexual couples who completed a measure of relationship…

Croyle, Kristin L.; Waltz, Jennifer

2002-01-01

421

The Role of Emotion in Word Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The way in which emotion interacts with cognition has been of great interest to researchers for hundreds of years. Emotion has been shown to play an important role in attention, learning and memory. However, the way in which emotion influences the basic process of word learning in infancy has largely been ignored. In the current paper, the…

Doan, S. N.

2010-01-01

422

"Red Eyes": Engaging Emotions in Multicultural Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging emotions in multicultural education is an important but a relatively neglected issue in teacher education. This essay calls for pedagogical attention to the role of emotions and attempts to analyze how teaching autobiographies and films sheds light on the emotional dynamics of multicultural education. Two films, "The Color of Fear", and…

Wang, Hongyu

2008-01-01

423

Behavior generation in robots by emotional motivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions are necessary in robotic system to get some extra benefits especially in intelligence and autonomy with the motivational mechanism for behavior generation. A robot needs to be intelligent enough to adjust with dynamic and flexible environment. Benefits can be amplified if emotional intelligence can be incorporated with the available control methods. We describe an emotion model to be used

Kiyoaka Izumi; Sajal Chandra Banik; Keigo Watanabe

2009-01-01

424

Emotion Regulation in Children with Down Syndrome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents a preliminary exploration of emotion regulation in a sample of 20 children (ages 3-18 years) with Down Syndrome. Three aspects of emotion regulation (modulation, organization, flexibility) were predicted from emotion variables (affect intensity, affective expression, and autonomy-curiosity and motivation) in backward regression…

Smith, Maureen C.; Walden, Tedra A.

425

Emotion Comprehension: The Impact of Nonverbal Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A substantial body of research has established that emotion understanding develops throughout early childhood and has identified three hierarchical developmental phases: external, mental, and reflexive. The authors analyzed nonverbal intelligence and its effect on children's improvement of emotion understanding and hypothesized that cognitive level is a consistent predictor of emotion comprehension. In all, 366 children (182 girls, 184 boys) between the

Ottavia Albanese; Simona De Stasio; Carlo Di Chiacchio; Caterina Fiorilli; Francisco Pons

2010-01-01

426

Do Readers Mentally Represent Characters' Emotional States?  

PubMed Central

Subjects read stories that described concrete actions, such as a main character stealing money from a store where his best friend worked and later learning that his friend had been fired. Following each story, subjects read a target sentence that contained an emotion word that either matched the emotional state implied by the story (e.g. guilt) or mismatched that emotional state. In Experiment 1, target sentences were read more slowly when the mismatched emotion words were the perceived opposites of the emotional states implied by the stories (e.g. pride). In Experiment 2, target sentences were read more slowly when the mismatched emotion words shared the affective valence of the implied emotional state; therefore, readers must represent more than simply the affective valence of the emotional states. Instead of reading target sentences that contained matching versus mismatching emotion words, subjects in Experiment 3 simply pronounced matching versus mismatching emotion words. Mismatching emotion words were pronounced more slowly. These experiments suggest that readers form explicit, lifelike, mental representations of fictional characters’ emotional states, and readers form these representations as a normal part of reading comprehension.

Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Robertson, Rachel R.W.

2014-01-01

427

Expressions of Emotion as Mediated by Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In her thoughtful work regarding various aspects of emotion and emotion related words, Pavlenko explores a variety of perspectives on how we might characterize and conceptualize expressions of emotion. It is a work that is quite rich in breadth--one that leads to a variety of different thoughts on this topic, many of which are amenable to…

Altarriba, Jeanette

2008-01-01

428

"Keeping It Real" with an Emotional Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an "emotional curriculum" was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course…

Storrs, Debbie

2012-01-01

429

Emotional Intelligence and Education: A Critical Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years there has been an increased interest in the role of emotional intelligence in both the academic success of students and their emotional adjustment in school. However, promotion of emotional intelligence in schools has proven a controversial pursuit, challenging as it does traditional "rationalist" views of education. Furthermore,…

Humphrey, Neil; Curran, Andrew; Morris, Elisabeth; Farrell, Peter; Woods, Kevin

2007-01-01

430

Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

2010-01-01

431

Representing Face Images for Emotion Classi cation  

E-print Network

" smile. The quality of the displayed emotion is one of the reasons cited by Cottrell and MetcalfeRepresenting Face Images for Emotion Classi cation Curtis Padgett Department of Computer Science of three distinct rep- resentation schemes for facial emotions using a single classi cation strategy neural

Cottrell, Garrison W.

432

Emotional body language displayed by artificial agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex and natural social interaction between artificial agents (computer-generated or robotic) and humans necessitates the display of rich emotions in order to be believable, socially relevant, and accepted, and to generate the natural emotional responses that humans show in the context of social interaction, such as engagement or empathy. Whereas some robots use faces to display (simplified) emotional expressions, for

Aryel Beck; Brett Stevens; Kim A. Bard; Lola Cañamero

2012-01-01

433

Bimodal Emotion Recognition , Erwin Bakker2  

E-print Network

of the speech and display of emotions. As a consequence, the new interface technologies are steadily drivingBimodal Emotion Recognition Nicu Sebe1 , Erwin Bakker2 , Ira Cohen3 , Theo Gevers1 , and Thomas for natural interaction is still missing - emotions. This paper describes the challenging problem of bimodal

Sebe, Nicu

434

The Lateralisation of Emotion: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent experimental investigations on patients with unilateral brain lesions and on neurologically intact people are reviewed with a view to appreciating the role of lateralised processes in emotion. Distinctions are drawn between the perception of emotion, the expression of emotion and the interaction of these two factors in studies of lateralisation. In spite of a mass of contradictory findings, and

Ruth Campbell

1982-01-01

435

Emotional Storytelling Kristopher J. Blom Steffi Beckhaus  

E-print Network

Emotional Storytelling Kristopher J. Blom Steffi Beckhaus interactive media/virtual environments a concept we feel can help to enable such experiences, Emotional Storytelling. Storytelling has long been centered on emotions. Whether a break room anecdote or a well crafted drama, the storyteller is hoping

Beckhaus, Steffi

436

Discourse Comprehension and Simulation of Positive Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research has suggested that emotional sentences are understood by constructing an emotion simulation of the events being described. The present study aims to investigate whether emotion simulation is also involved in online and offline comprehension of larger language segments such as discourse. Participants read a target text describing…

Horchak, Oleksandr V.; Giger, Jean-Christophe; Pochwatko, Grzegorz

2014-01-01

437

Emotion and Morality in Psychopathy and Paraphilias  

PubMed Central

Understanding the role of emotion in moral judgment has been an active area of investigation and debate. Here we comment on this topic by examining the interaction between emotion and moral judgment in certain psychopathological groups that are characterized by abnormalities in emotion processing, such as psychopaths and sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders. PMID:24899928

Harenski, Carla L.; Kiehl, Kent A.

2014-01-01

438

Emotion Understanding in Children with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies suggest that children with ADHD tend to perform worse than typically developing children on emotion recognition tasks. However, most of these studies have focused on the recognition of facial expression, while there is evidence that context plays a major role on emotion perception. This study aims at further investigating emotion…

Da Fonseca, David; Seguier, Valerie; Santos, Andreia; Poinso, Francois; Deruelle, Christine

2009-01-01

439

A Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation  

E-print Network

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Artificial Intelligence, De Boelelaan 1081a, 1081 HVA Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation Tibor Bosse, Matthijs Pontier, and Jan Treur} Abstract. Emotion regulation describes how a subject can use certain strategies to affect emotion response

Treur, Jan

440

Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

2012-01-01

441

The Emotional Life of the Toddler.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that parenting a toddler can be both exhilarating and frustrating, this book draws on lifelong research into children's emotional development to provide parents with a better understanding of toddlers' emotional range and how it affects toddler behavior. The 10 chapters and the conclusion cover the following areas: (1) the emotional…

Lieberman, Alicia F.

442

Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some individuals have a greater capacity than others to carry out sophisticated information processing about emotions and emotion-relevant stimuli and to use this information as a guide to thinking and behavior. The authors have termed this set of abilities emotional intelligence (EI). Since the introduction of the concept, however, a schism has…

Mayer, John D.; Salovey, Peter; Caruso, David R.

2008-01-01

443

Emotions and their expression in Chinese culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper attempts to integrate the scattered studies on Chinese emotion and proposes some methodological and substantive suggestions for future work. Emotions are construed as interpretations of physiological response to important social events with these interpretations guiding behavior. Concerning interpretation, the dimensions used by Chinese to understand emotion-eliciting events are the same as those found in many other cultures. Which

Michael Harris Bond

1993-01-01

444

Transnationalism, migration and emotions: implications for education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is concerned with the emotional dynamics of transnationalism and migration and the impact on education. This impact is discussed in terms of how the movement of people involves complex emotional processes that have important consequences for educational policy, practice and research. The purpose of the author is to theorise how emotions in the context of an increasingly globalised

Michalinos Zembylas

2012-01-01

445

The role of emotion in moral psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work in the cognitive and neurobiological sciences indicates an important relationship between emotion and moral judgment. Based on this evidence, several researchers have argued that emotions are the source of our intuitive moral judgments. However, despite the richness of the correlational data between emotion and morality, we argue that the current neuro- logical, behavioral, developmental and evolutionary evi- dence

Bryce Huebner; Susan Dwyer; Marc Hauser

2008-01-01

446

The Role of Emotion in Teaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associated with the recent research results of emotion psychology, the paper addresses the role of emotion in teaching from five aspects. The author presents that emotion plays a primary role of internalization and regulation in the process of teaching and directly restricts the accepting of course contents, the mastery of academic knowledge, the internalization of learning motivation, the regulation of

Jianzhong Qiao

447

Arnold's Theory of Emotion in Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magda B. Arnold's theory of emotion is examined from three historical viewpoints. First, I look backward from Arnold to precursors of her theory of emotion in 19th century introspectionist psychology and in classical evolutionary psychology. I try to show that Arnold can be regarded as belonging intellectually to the cognitive tradition of emotion theorizing that originated in Brentano and his

Rainer Reisenzein

448

Arnold's theory of emotion in historical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magda B. Arnold's theory of emotion is examined from three historical viewpoints. First, I look backward from Arnold to precursors of her theory of emotion in 19th century introspectionist psychology and in classical evolutionary psychology. I try to show that Arnold can be regarded as belonging intellectually to the cognitive tradition of emotion theorising that originated in Brentano and his

Rainer Reisenzein

2006-01-01

449

Understanding Schemas and Emotion in Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book makes explicit connections between young children's spontaneous repeated actions and their representations of their emotional worlds. Drawing on the literature on schemas, attachment theory and family contexts, the author takes schema theory into the territory of the emotions, making it relevant to the social and emotional development…

Arnold, Cath

2010-01-01

450

Do Suicides' Characteristics Influence Survivors' Emotions?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The suicide of a related person can often induce severe negative emotional reactions. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between sociodemographic and diagnostic data of suicides and survivors' emotions and to close this substantial gap. The main outcome of this study was that survivors' severity of emotional disturbance…

Schneider, Barbara; Grebner, Kristin; Schnabel, Axel; Georgi, Klaus

2011-01-01

451

Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

2007-01-01

452

Japanese and American Folk Vocabularies for Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigated how emotions are labeled and conceptualized by individuals representing widely varying ages and educational backgrounds, who live in rural areas of Japan and the United States. The authors gathered data in 2 phases: 30 participants in each country first produced emotion terms, and another 2 groups of 28 (1 group from each country) sorted out those emotion

Futoshi Kobayashi; Diane L. Schallert; Holly A. Ogren

2003-01-01

453

Expressing emotion in text-based communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our ability to express and accurately assess emotional states is central to human life. The present study examines how people express and detect emotions during text-based communication, an environment that eliminates the nonverbal cues typically associated with emotion. The results from 40 dyadic interactions suggest that users relied on four strategies to express happiness versus sadness, including disagreement, negative affect

Jeffrey T. Hancock; Christopher Landrigan; Courtney Silver

2007-01-01

454

State and Trait Emotions in Delinquent Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the structure of emotions and affective dysregulation in juvenile delinquents. Method: Fifty-six juvenile delinquents from a local juvenile hall and 169 subjects from a local high school were recruited for this study. All participants completed psychometric testing for trait emotions followed by measurements of state emotions…

Plattner, Belinda; Karnik, Niranjan; Jo, Booil; Hall, Rebecca E.; Schallauer, Astrid; Carrion, Victor; Feucht, Martha; Steiner, Hans

2007-01-01

455

Robust Recognition of Emotion from Speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents robust recognition of selected emotions from salient spoken words. The prosodic and acoustic features were used to extract the intonation patterns and correlates of emotion from speech samp les in order to develop and evaluate models of emotion. The computed features are projected using a combination of linear projection techniques for compact and clu stered representation of

Mohammed E. Hoque; Mohammed Yeasin; Max M. Louwerse

2006-01-01

456

Stereotypical Portrayals of Emotionality in News Photos  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research content analyzed the news photographs of a major U.S. daily newspaper to examine the emotional portrayals of individuals in different gender, age, and ethnic subgroups. A multidimensional measure of emotion (pleasure, arousal, dominance) was used. A total of 1,595 individuals were coded. The results demonstrate that emotionality was stereotyped to some degree, particularly in relation to women, ethnic

Shelly Rodgers; Linda Jean Kenix; Esther Thorson

2007-01-01

457

Emotion Regulation and Childhood Aggression: Longitudinal Associations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accumulating evidence suggests that emotion dysregulation is associated with psychopathology. This paper provides a review of recent longitudinal studies that investigate the relationship between emotion regulation and aggressive behavior in childhood age. While there is substantial evidence for assuming a close relation of emotion regulation and…

Roll, Judith; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

2012-01-01

458

Emotionally Handicapped Pupils: Developing Appropriate Educational Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is designed to assist local school systems as they plan, develop, and improve programs for emotionally handicapped students. Sections cover the following areas: definition of emotionally handicapped students; pre-planninq for emotionally handicapped programs; identification, referral, screening, assessment, and placement; service…

North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. for Exceptional Children.

459

Emotional Development, Intellectual Ability, and Gender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

K. Dabrowski's Theory of Emotional Development was used to compare 41 gifted adults (mean age 37) and 42 graduate students (mean age 29). Greater overexcitability scores by the gifted adults suggested substantially greater potential for emotional development, but no significant differences between groups were found for actual level of emotional…

Miller, Nancy B.; And Others

1994-01-01

460

Vocal cues in emotion encoding and decoding  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the correspondence between theoretical predictions on vocal expression patterns in naturally occurring emotions (as based on the component process theory of emotion; Scherer, 1986) and empirical data on the acoustic characteristics of actors' portrayals. Two male and two female professional radio actors portrayed anger, sadness, joy, fear, and disgust based on realistic scenarios of emotion-eliciting events. A

Klaus R. Scherer; Rainer Banse; Harald G. Wallbott; Thomas Goldbeck

1991-01-01

461

The effect of weather and its changes on emotional state - individual characteristics that make us vulnerable  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychological and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio tone, working ability, and concentration; hence their significance in various domains of economic life such as health care, education, transportation, and tourism. The present pilot study was conducted in Sofia, Bulgaria over a period of eight months, using five psychological methods: Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state, Test for evaluation of moods and Test ''Self-confidence-Activity-Mood''. The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions in order to include a maximal number of meteorological elements in the analysis. Sixteen weather types are defined depending on the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were also considered. The results obtained by t-test showed that the different categories of weather led to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effects on human emotions - but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as ''unfavorable'', has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension ''neuroticism'', has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more ''resistant'' to the weather influence on their emotions, while those who are emotionally unstable have a stronger dependence on the impacts of weather.

Spasova, Z.

2011-03-01

462

Color planner for designers based on color emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the color perception process, an associated feeling or emotion is induced in our brains, and this kind of emotion is termed as 'color emotion.' The researchers in the field of color emotions have put many efforts in quantifying color emotions with the standard color specifications and evaluating the influence of hue, lightness and chroma to the color emotions of

Ka-Man Cheng; John H. Xin; Gail Taylor

2002-01-01

463

How Emotions Develop and How they Organise Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts from functional theories of emotions are integrated with principles of skill development to produce a theory of emotional development. The theory provides tools for predicting both the sequences of emotional development and the ways emotions shape development. Emotions are characterised in terms of three component models: (a) the process of emotion generation from event appraisal, (b) a hierarchy of

Kurt W. Fischer; Phillip R. Shaver; Peter Carnochan

1990-01-01

464

Perception of Blended Emotions: from Video Corpus to Expressive Agent  

E-print Network

. A masked emotion may leak over the displayed emotion [17]; while superposi- tion of two emotions was displaying expressions of felt emotion or expression of fake emotion. Video corpora of TV interviews enablePerception of Blended Emotions: from Video Corpus to Expressive Agent Stéphanie Buisine1, Sarkis

Pelachaud, Catherine

465

The Couples Emotion Rating Form: Psychometric Properties and Theoretical Associations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Couples Emotion Rating Form assesses 3 types of negative emotion that are salient during times of relationship conflict. Hard emotion includes feeling angry and aggravated, soft emotion includes feeling hurt and sad, and flat emotion includes feeling bored and indifferent. In Study 1, scales measuring hard and soft emotion were validated by…

Sanford, Keith

2007-01-01

466

Parental Contributions to Preschoolers' Emotional Competence: Direct and Indirect Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the contributions of (1) parental socialization of emotion and preschoolers' emotional interaction with parents to their emotional competence, and (2) parental socialization and child emotional competence to their general social competence. Both observational and self-report techniques were used to measure emotion socialization, emotional competence, and social competence of preschoolers (average age = 49.8 months) from 60

Susanne A. Denham; Jennifer Mitchell-Copeland; Katherine Strandberg; Sharon Auerbach; Kimberly Blair

1997-01-01

467

Emotion Regulation and Emotion Work: Two Sides of the Same Coin?  

PubMed Central

This contribution links psychological models of emotion regulation to sociological accounts of emotion work to demonstrate the extent to which emotion regulation is systematically shaped by culture and society. I first discuss a well-established two-factor process model of emotion regulation and argue that a substantial proportion of emotion regulatory goals are derived from emotion norms. In contrast to universal emotion values and hedonic preferences, emotion norms are highly specific to social situations and institutional contexts. This specificity is determined by social cognitive processes of categorization and guided by framing rules. Second, I argue that the possibilities for antecedent-focused regulation, in particular situation selection and modification, are not arbitrarily available to individuals. Instead, they depend on economic, cultural, and social resources. I suggest that the systematic and unequal distribution of these resources in society leads to discernible patterns of emotion and emotion regulation across groups of individuals. PMID:23181041

von Scheve, Christian

2012-01-01

468

Emotion elicitor or emotion messenger? Subliminal priming reveals two faces of facial expressions.  

PubMed

Facial emotional expressions can serve both as emotional stimuli and as communicative signals. The research reported here was conducted to illustrate how responses to both roles of facial emotional expressions unfold over time. As an emotion elicitor, a facial emotional expression (e.g., a disgusted face) activates a response that is similar to responses to other emotional stimuli of the same valence (e.g., a dirty, nonflushed toilet). As an emotion messenger, the same facial expression (e.g., a disgusted face) serves as a communicative signal by also activating the knowledge that the sender is experiencing a specific emotion (e.g., the sender feels disgusted). By varying the duration of exposure to disgusted, fearful, angry, and neutral faces in two subliminal-priming studies, we demonstrated that responses to faces as emotion elicitors occur prior to responses to faces as emotion messengers, and that both types of responses may unfold unconsciously. PMID:18578850

Ruys, Kirsten I; Stapel, Diederik A

2008-06-01

469

Radiotherapy in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) are rare. High local control rates are reported with radiotherapy, although the optimal dose and extent of radiotherapy portals remains controversial. Between 1983 and 1993, 30 patients with solitary plasmacytoma were seen at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India. 23 patients had SPB and seven EMP. The mean age was 52

R JYOTHIRMAYI; V P GANGADHARAN; M K NAIR; B RAJAN

1997-01-01

470

Dose contribution from ?-electrons in proton radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract With the increasing number of cancer patients in the world today, there is a need for improved treatment methods. Proton radiotherapy is a promising field and there is an increasing interest in this treatment modality. Therefore the need for accurate treatment planning tools for proton radiotherapy is growing. When protons traverse matter they induce secondary electrons, so-called ?-electrons, via

Elanor Bäckman

471

[Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].  

PubMed

Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer. PMID:23719541

Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

2013-06-01

472

A randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis intervention on positive and negative affect during breast cancer radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer radiotherapy can be an emotionally difficult experience. Despite this, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological interventions to reduce negative affect, and none to date have explicitly examined interventions to improve positive affect among breast cancer radiotherapy patients. The present study examined the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach, combining cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis (CBTH), to reduce negative affect and increase positive affect in 40 women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either CBTH or standard care. Participants completed weekly self-report measures of positive and negative affect. Repeated and univariate analyses of variance revealed that the CBTH approach reduced levels of negative affect [F (1, 38) = 13.49; p = .0007], and increased levels of positive affect [F (1, 38) = 9.67; p = .0035, ?2 = .48], during the course of radiotherapy. Additionally, relative to control group, the CBTH group demonstrated significantly more intense positive affect [F (1,38) = 7.09; p = .0113, d = .71] and significantly less intense negative affect [F (1,38) = 10.30; p = .0027, d = .90] during radiotherapy. The CBTH group also had a significantly higher frequency of days where positive affect was greater than negative affect (85% of days assessed for the CBTH group versus 43% of the Control group) [F (1,38) = 18.16; p = .0001, d = 1.16]. Therefore, the CBTH intervention has the potential to improve the affective experience of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19226611

Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Kangas, Maria; Green, Sheryl; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

2009-01-01

473

SERT Models of Emotional Dysregulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The serotonin system plays a key modulatory role in central nervous system processes that appear to be dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Specifically, the serotonin transporter (SERT) is thought to be critical to many aspects of emotional dysregulation, and has been a successful target for medications that treat several psychiatric disorders. Here, we narrowly focused on two psychiatric conditions, anxiety and

Adam Tripp; Etienne Sibille

474

Emotion, Memory, and Religious Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work has shown that 'minimally counterintuitive' (MCI) concepts are more memorable than both normal and bizarre concepts in ways that may explain why supernatural ideas lie at the heart of religious systems. However, such investigations have ignored other factors, including especially emotional loadings, that may also be relevant. The present study replicated previous findings of an MCI effect on

Peter F. Alfaro

475

Emodiversity and the emotional ecosystem.  

PubMed

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 143(6) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2014-49316-001). There is a color coding error in Figure 2. The correct color coding is explained in the erratum.] Bridging psychological research exploring emotional complexity and research in the natural sciences on the measurement of biodiversity, we introduce-and demonstrate the benefits of-emodiversity: the variety and relative abundance of the emotions that humans experience. Two cross-sectional studies across more than 37,000 respondents demonstrate that emodiversity is an independent predictor of mental and physical health-such as decreased depression and doctor's visits-over and above mean levels of positive and negative emotion. These results remained robust after controlling for gender, age, and the 5 main dimensions of personality. Emodiversity is a practically important and previously unidentified metric for assessing the health of the human emotional ecosystem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25285428

Quoidbach, Jordi; Gruber, June; Mikolajczak, Moïra; Kogan, Alexsandr; Kotsou, Ilios; Norton, Michael I

2014-12-01

476

State Definitions of Emotional Disturbance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines definitions state education agencies use to describe the federal education disability called "emotional disturbance." State definitions were collected so that various aspects of them could be analyzed and compared with results of similar studies completed in the 1970s and 1980s. Among results are that state definitions have…

Wery, Jessica J.; Cullinan, Douglas

2013-01-01

477

Emotional adjustment in infertile couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study assessed emotional adjustment of infertile couples and the psychological outcomes of infertility (depression, anxiety, relationship and sexual problems, and personality disorders) in different phases of treatment. References used include studies which have been performed within the last two decades. The articles were invested on data bases at Pub med, Scholar, Google, Scpous and Amazon and key words

Fatemeh Ramazanzadeh; Ahmad Ali Noorbala; Nasrin Abedinia; Mohammad Mehdi Naghizadeh

2009-01-01

478

Boosting Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

Beland, Kathy

2007-01-01

479

Emotion regulation and sport performance.  

PubMed

This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested. PMID:25226609

Wagstaff C, R D

2014-08-01

480

Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

2011-01-01

481

The Importance of Emotional Usability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As technology evolves rapidly, users of technology products and interactive computing systems are no longer only satisfied with the levels of product efficiency and effectiveness. Users are also looking for emotional satisfaction from using and interacting with the products. With powerful interactive features technology can potentially deliver…

Shih, Yi-Hsuen; Liu, Min

2008-01-01

482

____________________________________________ -:-_----,-'~\\t~ Emotion Regulation and Psychopathology  

E-print Network

and Psychopathology A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Kelly Werner and James J. Gross A person with social anxiety clenches her% of the diagnostic categories of psychopathology in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Youth types of psychopathology and may be a key to their treat- which may not be present in every emotional

Gross, James J.

483

Emotional Giftedness: An Expanded View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses an expanded definition of the concept of emotional giftedness in children as defined by Annemarie Roeper. In contrast to examples of academic and artistic prodigies, cases are reviewed that illustrate less tangibly measured examples of children's giftedness, such as expressions of compassion, moral sensitivity, positive…

Piechowski, Michael M.

484

Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic disorder like dystonia is similar to grieving a loss, such as a death or divorce. Common phases of dealing with dystonia include denial, ...

485

Spatial frequencies and emotional perception.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that, during evolution, specific mechanisms developed in order to optimize the detection of threats and opportunities even in perceptually degraded conditions. A naturalistic example of perceptual degradation can be found in blurry images, which contain the coarsest elements of a scene (low spatial frequencies) but lack the fine-grained details (high spatial frequencies). In the past decade, several studies have examined the relation between spatial frequencies and emotions, using a variety of methods, stimuli, and rationales. Here, we conduct a literature survey on the studies that have examined the relation between emotion and spatial frequencies. Some studies have suggested that the low spatial frequencies of emotional stimuli may be processed by a subcortical neural pathway, eventually eliciting emotional responses. However, the evidence provided by the reviewed studies does not support this possibility, for conceptual and methodological reasons (e.g., mistaking the processing of a fuzzy stimulus for subcortical processing). Here, the conceptual and methodological problems present in the reviewed studies are analyzed and discussed, along with suggestions for future research. PMID:23183741

De Cesarei, Andrea; Codispoti, Maurizio

2013-01-01

486

Believable Social and Emotional Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the key steps in creating quality interactive drama is the ability to create quality interactive characters (or believable agents). Two important aspects of such characters will be that they appear emotional and that they can engage in social inter...

W. S. Reilly

1996-01-01

487

Attentional bias in emotional disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research has suggested that anxiety may be associated with processing biases that favor the encoding of emotionally threatening information. However, the available data can be accommodated by alternative explanations, including response bias accounts. The current study introduces a novel paradigm that circumvents such interpretative problems by requiring subjects to make a neutral response (button press) to a neutral stimulus

Colin MacLeod; Andrew Mathews; Philip Tata

1986-01-01

488

Mothers’ Socialization of Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Children’s Negative Emotional Reactivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the toddler period, children begin to shift from being primarily dependent on parents to regulate their emotions to\\u000a managing their emotions independently. The present study considers how children’s propensity towards negative emotional arousal\\u000a interacts with mothers’ efforts to socialize emotion regulation. Fifty-five low income mothers and their 2-year-old children\\u000a completed observational assessments measuring mothers’ socialization of emotion regulation, children’s

Scott P. Mirabile; Laura V. Scaramella; Sara L. Sohr-Preston; Sarah D. Robison

2009-01-01

489

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. However, the precise\\u000a nature of the emotion dysregulation in SAD has not been well characterized. In the present study, the Emotion Regulation Interview\\u000a (ERI) was developed to quantify the frequency and self-efficacy of five emotion regulation strategies specified by Gross’s\\u000a (Review of General Psychology 2: 271–299, 1998)

Kelly H. Werner; Philippe R. Goldin; Tali M. Ball; Richard G. Heimberg; James J. Gross