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Sample records for ragworm nereis diversicolor

  1. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution and toxicity of sediment-associated copper in the ragworm Nereis diversicolor: The relative importance of aqueous copper, copper oxide nanoparticles and microparticles.

    PubMed

    Thit, Amalie; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette

    2015-07-01

    The sediment-dwelling ragworm, Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediment spiked with aqueous Cu (CuAq, CuCl2), CuO nanoparticles (CuONP) or CuO microparticles (CuOMicro) at 150 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment for 10d. Exposures to CuAq and CuOMicro caused mortality (62.5 and 37.5%, respectively), whereas mean burrowing time increased during exposure to CuAq and CuONP from 0.12 h (controls) to 19.3 and 12.2 h, respectively. All Cu treatments bioaccumulated, especially CuAq (up to 4 times more than the other treatments). Cu was roughly equally distributed among the five subcellular fractions in controls and worms exposed to CuONP or CuOMicro. In contrast, ≈50% of accumulated Cu in CuAq exposed worms was found in metal rich granules and significantly more Cu was present in heat-denatured proteins and organelles than in worms exposed to CuOMicro or in controls. Our results suggest that Cu form affects its bioaccumulation and subsequent toxicity and detoxification in a polychaete like N. diversicolor. PMID:25800937

  2. Bioaccumulation and oxidative stress responses measured in the estuarine ragworm (Nereis diversicolor) exposed to dissolved, nano- and bulk-sized silver.

    PubMed

    Cozzari, Margherita; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Pacini, Nicole; Smith, Brian D; Boyle, David; Rainbow, Philip S; Khan, Farhan R

    2015-03-01

    The impact of Ag NPs on sediment-dwelling organisms has received relatively little attention, particularly in linking bioaccumulation to oxidative injury. The polychaete Nereis diversicolor was exposed to sediments spiked with dissolved Ag (added as AgNO3), Ag NPs (63 ± 27 nm) and larger bulk Ag particles (202 ± 56 μm), for up to 11 days at sublethal concentrations (nominally 2.5, 5, 10 μg Ag g(-1) sediment (dw)). There were concentration- and time-dependent differences in the accumulation of the three Ag forms, but all three forms elicited an oxidative stress response. In the cases of Ag NPs and bulk Ag particles, changes in antioxidant markers (glutathione, SOD, CAT, GPx, SeGPx, GST and GR) occurred without significant Ag accumulation. Differences in biomarker profiles between the three Ag forms suggest that the mechanism of oxidative stress caused by particulate Ag is distinct from that of dissolved Ag. PMID:25549865

  3. Smelling Danger – Alarm Cue Responses in the Polychaete Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor (Müller, 1776) to Potential Fish Predation

    PubMed Central

    Schaum, C. Elisa; Batty, Robert; Last, Kim S.

    2013-01-01

    The harbour ragworm, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor is a common intertidal marine polychaete that lives in burrows from which it has to partially emerge in order to forage. In doing so, it is exposed to a variety of predators. One way in which predation risk can be minimised is through chemical detection from within the relative safety of the burrows. Using CCTV and motion capture software, we show that H. diversicolor is able to detect chemical cues associated with the presence of juvenile flounder (Platichthys flesus). Number of emergences, emergence duration and distance from burrow entrance are all significantly reduced during exposure to flounder conditioned seawater and flounder mucous spiked seawater above a threshold with no evidence of behavioural habituation. Mucous from bottom-dwelling juvenile plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and pelagic adult herring (Clupea harengus) elicit similar responses, suggesting that the behavioural reactions are species independent. The data implies that H. diversicolor must have well developed chemosensory mechanisms for predator detection and is consequently able to effectively minimize risk. PMID:24155953

  4. Smelling danger - alarm cue responses in the polychaete Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor (Müller, 1776) to potential fish predation.

    PubMed

    Schaum, C Elisa; Batty, Robert; Last, Kim S

    2013-01-01

    The harbour ragworm, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor is a common intertidal marine polychaete that lives in burrows from which it has to partially emerge in order to forage. In doing so, it is exposed to a variety of predators. One way in which predation risk can be minimised is through chemical detection from within the relative safety of the burrows. Using CCTV and motion capture software, we show that H. diversicolor is able to detect chemical cues associated with the presence of juvenile flounder (Platichthys flesus). Number of emergences, emergence duration and distance from burrow entrance are all significantly reduced during exposure to flounder conditioned seawater and flounder mucous spiked seawater above a threshold with no evidence of behavioural habituation. Mucous from bottom-dwelling juvenile plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and pelagic adult herring (Clupea harengus) elicit similar responses, suggesting that the behavioural reactions are species independent. The data implies that H. diversicolor must have well developed chemosensory mechanisms for predator detection and is consequently able to effectively minimize risk. PMID:24155953

  5. Intersite variations of a battery of biomarkers at different levels of biological organisation in the estuarine endobenthic worm Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta, Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Fossi Tankoua, O; Buffet, P E; Amiard, J C; Amiard-Triquet, C; Méléder, V; Gillet, P; Mouneyrac, C; Berthet, B

    2012-06-15

    The ragworm Nereis diversicolor has been proposed as a sentinel species for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality. The aim of this study was to test the responsiveness of the worms using a battery of biomarkers in specimens from a moderately contaminated site (Loire estuary, Fr.) and a comparatively cleaner site (Bay of Bourgneuf, Fr.) as a reference site. Ragworms were collected on 7 occasions from April 2008 to October 2009 for the determination of biochemical (GST, AChE, digestive enzymes), physiological (energy reserves (glycogen, lipids and proteins), relationship between length and weight), and behavioural (feeding and burrowing) biomarkers. The biomarker responses were tentatively interpreted in terms of the concept of cascading events potentially responsible for local depletion/extinction of populations submitted to chemical stress. Impairments of AChE and amylase activities, feeding rate, energy reserve concentrations (glycogen and lipids), and the relationship between length and weight showed up differences between the reference site and the Loire estuary despite the latter being far from the most contaminated estuary in France or internationally. However, no links could be established in the Loire estuary ragworms between effects at infra-individual and individual levels, nor with worm population density, even though a small oil spill had occurred in the Loire estuary only one month before the beginning of sampling. PMID:22417766

  6. Grazing effects by Nereis diversicolor on development and growth of green algal mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsen, Anna; Pihl, Leif

    2008-08-01

    Nereis diversicolor is generally considered to be a predator and deposit feeder, but have also been found to graze on benthic algae in shallow coastal areas. In this study we investigated the grazing effects on the development and growth of green algae, Ulva spp. Algal growth was studied in an experiment including two levels of sediment thickness; 100 mm sediment including macrofauna and 5 mm sediment without macrofauna, and three treatments of varying algal biomass; sediment with propagules, sediment with low algal biomass (120 g dry weight (dwt) m - 2 ) and sediment with high algal biomass (240 g dwt m - 2 ). In the 100 mm sediment, with a natural population of macrofauna, N. diversicolor was the dominating (60% of total biomass) species. After three weeks of experimentation the result showed that N. diversicolor was able to prevent initial algal growth, affect growth capacity and also partly reduce full-grown algal mats. The weight of N. diversicolor was significantly higher for polychaetes in treatments with algae added compared to non-algal treatments. There were also indications that a rich nutrient supply per algae biomass counteracted the grazing capacity of N. diversicolor.

  7. Effects of Nereis diversicolor O. F. Muller abundance on the dissolved phosphate exchange between sediment and overlying water in Palmones River estuary (southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavero, V.; Niell, F. X.; Fernandez, J. A.

    1991-08-01

    Annual variations in dissolved phosphate gradient, sediment porosity, abundance of Nereis diversicolor and phosphate flux were measured in order to determine the pattern of phosphate exchange between the sediment and overlying water in an estuarine system. N. diversicolor abundance is inversely related to the dissolved phosphate gradient while the ratio, measured flux/calculated diffusion flux, increases as does N. diversicolor abundance.

  8. The effect of organic pollution on local distribution of Nereis diversicolor and Corophium volutator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselink, P.; van Belkum, J.; Essink, K.

    Distribution patterns of Nereis diversicolor and Corophium volutator in the SE-Dollard, a 92 km 2 tidal flat area in the NE Netherlands are described. Body condition as well as the maximal size of juvenile worms correlated positively with elevation of the mudflat, probably caused by a better food supply on the higher mudflats. No spatial variation in size was found for C. volutator. N. diversicolor disappeared from ˜1 km 2 of the intertidal mudflats in the autumn of 1985 as a consequence of the seasonal waste discharges, whereas C. volutator disappeared from an area of ˜4 km 2. Though the discharges decreased by almost 50% from 1982 to 1985, N. diversicolor disappeared from about the same area in the 2 years. N. diversicolor is the main prey species of the avocet Recurvirostra avosetta, large flocks of which stay in the Dollard during autumn migration. Though the avocets lost ˜30% of their potential feeding area in the Dollard in the 1970s because of the high waste discharges, against only 5 to 10% in 1982 and thereafter (at significant lower discharges), the numbers of the avocets did not respond to the decrease of the discharges.

  9. Uptake pathways and subcellular fractionation of Cd in the polychaete Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianzhen; Liu, Xiaoli; You, Liping; Zhang, Linbao; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2012-01-01

    Polychaetes have often been utilized as indicator species to investigate the impacts of pollutants, such as heavy metals. The uptake of Cd by the polychaete Nereis diversicolor was determined at varying Ca concentrations and with pre-exposure to Ca ion channel blockers and metabolic inhibitors in simulated sea water over 1 week period. The supply of Ca in simulated sea water inhibited Cd uptake and increased Ca concentration in N. diversicolor after 10 μM Cd exposure. Pre-exposure to a Ca-channel blocker (Lanthanum) significantly inhibited Cd uptake, suggesting that the uptake of Cd was exerted at a Ca channel. N-ethylmaleimide, which specifically binds to sulfhydryl groups, inhibited Cd uptake at 10 μM, implying that the transport of Cd is carrier-mediated by proteins or other SH-containing compounds. Subcellular Cd distribution analysis showed that more than 60% of the total Cd associated with the cytosolic fraction. The presence of higher concentration of Ca in simulated sea water did not impact the proportional subcellular distribution of Cd in N. diversicolor. Nevertheless, the supply of Ca could significantly lower Cd concentration in cytosol and cellular debris. The present study provides evidence that Cd transport by N. diversicolor was mediated mainly through lanthanum- sensitive Ca ion channels and accumulated by SH-containing compounds. These results help to understand the uptake mechanism and subcellular distribution of Cd in polychaetes. PMID:21858512

  10. Nereis diversicolor and copper contamination effect on the erosion of cohesive sediments: A flume experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, S.; Sobral, P.; Alcântara, F.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of bioturbation on the erodability of natural and manipulated copper spiked sediments (3 μmol Cu g -1 dw) was investigated using sediments collected in the Tagus estuary and Nereis diversicolor (900 ind m -2). The input of particulate matter and Cu into the water column as a result of erosion was quantified in an annular flume at 7 shear velocities (1-13 cm s -1). The biogeochemical characteristics of the sediment were analysed in depth down to 8 cm. Cu contamination elicited lower levels of eroded matter and lower shear strength profiles. Eroded matter and sediment shear strength values were higher (up to 1.7 kg m -2) in the presence of N. diversicolor, whose effect was less pronounced under contamination. Sediment erodability was not only related to hydrodynamics but was highly affected by the biogeochemical characteristics and contamination of the sediments.

  11. The effects of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor on the distribution and transplanting success of Zostera noltii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. G.; Lloyd, D.; Ball, L.; Emson, D.

    2000-07-01

    Loss of saltmarsh vegetation in south-east England is a significant problem for conservation and coastal defence. The losses of vegetation began in the 1930s with the loss of intertidal Zostera marina and have continued more recently. Some preliminary trials at re-establishing Zostera in some estuaries of Essex have not been successful. This paper addresses the hypothesis that the infauna, particularly the polychaete Nereis diversicolor, may restrict natural colonisation by Zostera and reduce the success of transplanting trials. In field experiments, Z. noltii were transplanted into areas where Nereis were common, close to an established seagrass bed and into two other estuaries. The transplants protected from the effects of the polychaetes by netting had a higher survival rate, lower index of root damage and greater biomass at the end of the experiments than those that were unprotected. In laboratory experiments, Nereis reduced the survival of Z. noltii. They were observed grasping the leaves and pulling them into their burrows. These results indicate that herbivory and disturbance by N. diversicolor is responsible, at least in part, for the restriction of the distribution of Z. noltii and may have been important in limiting the success of previous transplanting experiments. A hypothesis is proposed which states that there are two stable states on the upper mud-flats. One state is dominated by plants, including Zostera spp., which prevent colonisation by burrowing infauna, and the other is dominated by infauna which prevent colonisation by plants. Managing these two states could be the key to re-establishing the early successional stages of saltmarsh development.

  12. Response of Nereis diversicolor population (Polychaeta, Nereididae) to the pollution impact - Authie and Seine estuaries (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillet, P.; Mouloud, M.; Durou, C.; Deutsch, B.

    2008-01-01

    A survey within the French National Programme of Ecotoxicology was carried out in 2002, 2003 and 2004 to study the response of Nereis diversicolor populations (Polychaeta, Nereididae) to the impact of pollution in the Authie estuary (non-contaminated site) and in the Seine estuary (contaminated site). In the period studied, the density varied from 672 ind. m -2 to 3584 ind. m -2 in the Authie estuary and from 80 ind. m -2 to 920 ind. m -2 in the Seine estuary. Biomass varied from 3.94 g m -2 (dry weight) in February 2004 to 38.0 g m -2 in August 2003 in the Authie estuary and from 3.4 g m -2 in February 2002 to 0.6 g m -2 in February 2004 in the Seine estuary. Density and biomass of the populations of N. diversicolor were consistently lower in the Seine estuary than in the Authie estuary. Size frequency histograms permit the analysis of the cohorts as well as the elaboration of the growth curves. For the individuals from the Authie estuary, the relation between dry weight (DW) and length L3 (prostomium, peristomium and chaetiger 1) was DW = 4.2205 L3 2.9832. For those from the Seine estuary, the relation between dry weight and L3 was DW = 0.4697e 1.7209L3. The individuals of N. diversicolor should belong to eight cohorts in Authie estuary (two cohorts each year) instead of six cohorts for those from the Seine estuary. These differences can be attributed to the effect of pollution on the population of N. diversicolor.

  13. The polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor increases mercury lability and methylation in intertidal mudflats.

    PubMed

    Sizmur, Tom; Canário, João; Edmonds, Samuel; Godfrey, Adam; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2013-08-01

    The polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor engineers its environment by creating oxygenated burrows in anoxic intertidal sediments. The authors carried out a laboratory microcosm experiment to test the impact of polychaete burrowing and feeding activity on the lability and methylation of mercury in sediments from the Bay of Fundy, Canada. The concentration of labile inorganic mercury and methylmercury in burrow walls was elevated compared to worm-free sediments. Mucus secretions and organic detritus in worm burrows increased labile mercury concentrations. Worms decreased sulfide concentrations, which increased Hg bioavailability to sulfate-reducing bacteria and increased methylmercury concentrations in burrow linings. Because the walls of polychaete burrows have a greater interaction with organisms, and the overlying water, the concentrations of mercury and methylmercury they contain is more toxicologically relevant to the base of a coastal food web than bulk samples. The authors recommend that researchers examining Hg in marine environments account for sediment dwelling invertebrate activity to more fully assess mercury bioavailability. PMID:23633443

  14. Ultrastructural aspects of Ellipsomyxa mugilis (Myxozoa: Ceratomyxidae) spores and developmental stages in Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta: Nereidae).

    PubMed

    Rangel, Luis Filipe; Azevedo, Carlos; Casal, Graça; Santos, Maria João

    2012-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the spores and developmental stages of Ellipsomyxa mugilis in Nereis diversicolor were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructure features and the developmental stages show many similarities with the general pattern described for other actinospores. However, several new features are definitely worth noting. For example, tetranucleated cells precede the formation of the initial pansporocyst, which preserves the 2 original enveloping cells until the end of sporogony. In the initial stages of sporogony, the future sporoplasm cell acquires the first secondary cell by an engulfment process. In the final stage of sporogony, spores are formed by a sporoplasm with 2 secondary cells and 1 somatic nucleus, and the polar capsule has a polar filament with a helicoidal arrangement possessing 7-8 coils. PMID:22263603

  15. Toxic effects and bioaccumulation of nano-, micron- and ionic-Ag in the polychaete, Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing concern about the toxicities and potential risks, both still poorly understood, of silver nanoparticles for the aquatic environment after their eventual release via wastewater discharges. In this study, the toxicities of sediment associated nano (<100 nm)-, micron (2-3.5 μm)- and ionic (AgNO(3))-Ag on the sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor, were compared after 10 days of sediment exposure, using survival, DNA damage (comet assay) and bioaccumulation as endpoints. The nominal concentrations used in all exposure scenarios were 0, 1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 μg Ag/g dry weight (dw) sediment. Our results showed that Ag was able to cause DNA damage in Nereis coelomocytes, and that this effect was both concentration- and Ag form-related. There was significantly greater genotoxicity (higher tail moment and tail DNA intensities) at 25 and 50 μg/g dw in nano- and micron-Ag treatments and at 50 μg/g dw in the ionic-Ag treatment compared to the controls (0μg/g dw). The nano-Ag treatment had the greatest genotoxic effect of the three tested Ag forms, and the ionic-Ag treatment was the least genotoxic. N. diversicolor did accumulate sediment-associated Ag from all three forms. Ag body burdens at the highest exposure concentration were 8.56 ± 6.63, 6.92 ± 5.86 and 9.86 ± 4.94 μg/g dw for worms in nano-, micron- and ionic-Ag treatments, respectively, but there was no significant difference in Ag bioaccumulation among the three treatments. PMID:21831346

  16. Cellular internalization of silver nanoparticles in gut epithelia of the estuarine polychaete Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, Javier; Khan, Farhan R; Misra, Superb K; Turmaine, Mark; Smith, Brian D; Rainbow, Philip S; Luoma, Samuel N; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2011-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used which may result in environmental impacts, notably within aquatic ecosystems. As estuarine sediments are sinks for numerous pollutants, but also habitat and food for deposit feeders such as Nereis diversicolor, ingested sediments must be investigated as an important route of uptake for NPs. N. diversicolor were fed sediment spiked with either citrate capped AgNPs (30 ± 5 nm) or aqueous Ag for 10 days. Postexposure AgNPs were observed in the lumen of exposed animals, and three lines of evidence indicated direct internalization of AgNPs into the gut epithelium. With TEM, electron-dense particles resembling AgNPs were observed associated with the apical plasma membrane, in endocytotic pits and in endosomes. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) confirmed the presence of Ag in these particles, which were absent in controls. Subcellular fractionation revealed that Ag accumulated from AgNPs was predominantly associated with inorganic granules, organelles, and the heat denatured proteins; whereas dissolved Ag was localized to the metallothionein fraction. Collectively, these results indicate separate routes of cellular internalization and differing in vivo fates of Ag delivered in dissolved and NP form. For AgNPs an endocytotic pathway appears to be a key route of cellular uptake. PMID:21517067

  17. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints after 10 d of exposure. Both Ag NP types were characterized in parallel to the toxicity studies and found to be polydispersed and overlapping in size. Burrowing activity decreased (marginally) with increasing Ag concentration and depended on the form of Ag added to sediment. All worms accumulated Ag regardless of the form in which it was added to the sediment, and worm size (expressed as dry weight) was found to significantly affect bioaccumulation such that smaller worms accumulated more Ag per body weight than larger worms. Lysosomal membrane permeability (neutral red retention time, NRRT) and DNA damage (comet assay tail moment and tail DNA intensity %) of Nereis coelomocytes increased in a concentration-dependent manner in all three Ag treatments. Ag NP treatments were more toxic than aqueous Ag for all toxicity endpoints, even though bioaccumulation did not differ significantly among Ag forms. No significant difference in toxicity was observed between the two Ag NP treatments which was attributed to their overlap in particle size. PMID:25179147

  18. The metabolic and fitness costs associated with metal resistance in Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Pook, Chris; Lewis, Ceri; Galloway, Tamara

    2009-07-01

    The population of Nereis diversicolor inhabiting the upper reaches of Restronguet Creek, Cornwall, UK is highly resistant to acute zinc and copper toxicity. Here we employ bioenergetic accounting and fecundity counts to demonstrate the energetic costs associated with this phenomenon in terms of the worms' allocation of metabolic resources and reproductive output [P(r)]. Metal-resistant animals exhibited a scope for growth that was 46-62% less than that of animals from two non-resistant reference populations, corresponding to a mean metabolic cost of 1.31 mJ h(-1)mg DW(-1). The resistant population also contained 13% less lipid than animals from the reference populations and 73-81% less carbohydrates. Consequently, mass-specific fecundity was reduced in resistant animals by 39-45%, although material investment in individual gametes did not appear to vary. This demonstrates fitness costs associated with metal resistance in this ecologically important polychaete and adds to our understanding of phenotypic trade-offs associated with resistance. PMID:19285693

  19. Factors in the distribution of intertidal, estuarine polychaetes: a field experiment with Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor and Nephtys hombergi in the Tamar at Plymouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, J. T.; George, C. L.

    1986-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted over 10 weeks from July to mid-September, 1984, on a mudflat in the lower reaches of the Tamar Estuary at Plymouth, to test the relative importance of environmental factors and species interactions in controlling the distribution of two polychaete species. Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor from an upper shore site were transplanted into a lower shore site nearby which was characterized by the presence of Nephtys hombergi. 65-71% of N. diversicolor which were transplanted in their own sediments, with no contact with N. hombergi, survived the experimental period. The appearance of some small stages of N. diversicolor in these treatments was attributed in part to recruitment from the overlying water. N. diversicolor transplanted directly into N. hombergi-sediment survived in inverse proportion to their numbers and only the lowest densities (equivalent to 480 m -2) survived as well as those in their own sediment. Given the choice to invade the other species' sediment, more N. hombergi than N. diversicolor finally made the change, and there was some evidence that the smallest N. diversicolor suffered predation in consequence. Otherwise there was little evidence for inter-species interaction. There appeared to be some disruption of oocyte maturation of the N. diversicolor which may have been due to changes in tidal rhythm and salinity at the experimental site.

  20. Remedial habitat creation: does Nereis diversicolor play a confounding role in the colonisation and establishment of the pioneering saltmarsh plant, Spartina anglica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerson, M.

    2000-07-01

    Increasing concerns over global warming and expected sea level rises have led to the adoption of new coastal management strategies around the south-east coast of England. This paper explores the role played by the estuarine invertebrate Nereis diversicolor in limiting the colonisation and establishment of the invasive pioneering salt marsh plant, Spartina anglica. The biology of N. diversicolor is briefly reviewed and data from field experiments are presented demonstrating significant negative effects of worm abundance on transplanted S. anglica biomass. Laboratory-based experiments demonstrated significant negative effects of N. diversicolor abundance on the survival of S. anglica seeds transplanted to sediment cores. The importance of estuarine invertebrates in engineering the mudflat habitat may confound the foreseen ecosystem services and function provided by saltmarsh management schemes.

  1. Fate of isotopically labeled zinc oxide nanoparticles in sediment and effects on two endobenthic species, the clam Scrobicularia plana and the ragworm Hediste diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Valsami-Jones, Eugénia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Although it is reported that metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, which are among the most rapidly commercialized materials, can cause toxicity to organisms, their fate in the environment and toxicity to marine organisms are not well understood. In this study, we used a stable isotope labelling approach to trace the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in sediments and also investigated bio-uptake in two estuarine intra-sedimentary invertebrates Scrobicularia plana and Nereis diversicolor. We selected exposure to 3 mg kg(-1) sediment ZnO NPs since this level is a realistic prediction of the environmental concentration in sediments. 67ZnO NPs (DLS: 21-34 nm, positively charged: 31.3 mV) suspensions were synthesised in diethylene glycol (DEG). We explored the fate of 67ZnO NPs in sediment, 67Zn bioaccumulation and the biochemical (biomarkers of defence and damage) and behavioural (burrowing kinetics and feeding rates) biomarkers in both species to 67ZnO NPs and DEG on its own during a 16 d laboratory exposure. After exposure, 67Zn concentrations in sediment showed higher levels in the upper section (1cm: 2.59 mg kg(-1)) decreasing progressively (2 cm: 1.63 mg kg(-1), 3 cm: 0.90 mg kg(-1), 4 cm: 0.67 mg kg(-1)) to a minimum value at the bottom (5 cm: 0.31 mg kg(-1)). 67Zn bioaccumulation was observed in both organisms exposed to 67ZnO NPs in DEG but no major inter-species differences were found. At the biochemical level, 67ZnO NPs exposure significantly induced increased glutathione-S-transferase activity in worms and catalase activity in clams whereas superoxide dismutase activity and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels were not affected in any species. Exposure to DEG on its own leads to a significant increase of metallothionein-like protein levels in clams compared with those exposed to 67ZnO NPs or controls. Burrowing behaviour as well as feeding rate were significantly impaired in both species exposed to 67ZnO NPs. Concerning exposure to DEG on its own

  2. Response of Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta, Nereidae) populations to reduced wastewater discharge in the polluted estuary of Oued Souss, Bay of Agadir, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Alla, A.; Gillet, P.; Deutsch, B.; Moukrim, A.; Bergayou, H.

    2006-12-01

    Field investigations on the population dynamics of Nereis diversicolor were carried out from January 2002 to December 2003 in the estuary of Oued Souss (southwestern Morocco) to determine the changes caused by setting up of a domestic and industrial wastewater purification plant (M'zar) before and after by the end of wastewater discharges in November 2002 on the structure of the ecosystem. Samples of N. diversicolor were collected monthly in the intertidal zone at low tide before (during 2002) and after (during 2003) the end of wastewater discharges. Separation of cohorts using the Algorithm EM method (McLachlan, G.J., Krishnan, T., 1997. The EM algorithm and extensions. Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics. Wiley, New York, 274 pp.) allowed determination of the growth rate (mm day -1) by cohort and the annual production. The data showed significant differences between populations of Nereis diversicolor before and after the end of wastewater discharges. During the wastewater discharge period (2002), the population had a mean annual density of 1992 ind m -2, a mean annual biomass of 75.52 g DW m -2 and an annual secondary production of 141.3 g DW m -2 with a P/ B ratio of 1.87. After the end of discharges (2003), density, biomass and secondary production decreased significantly. The annual averages for these parameters were 740 ind m -2, 14.16 g DW m -2 and 23.83 g DW m -2, respectively, with a P/ B ratio of 1.68. The important decrease observed in density, biomass and secondary production of Nereis diversicolor may be attributed (a) to the environmental changes observed after the end of wastewater discharges in the estuary of Oued Souss, namely the increase of salinity and the decrease of organic matter content, and (b) to the migration of this species towards other areas.

  3. The regulation of copper stress response genes in the polychaete Nereis diversicolor during prolonged extreme copper contamination.

    PubMed

    McQuillan, Jonathan S; Kille, Peter; Powell, Kate; Galloway, Tamara S

    2014-11-18

    Polychaetes are frequented in toxicological studies, one reason being that some members occupy shallow burrows in sediments and are maximally exposed to the contaminants that accumulate within them. We have been studying one population of the polychaete Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor exhibiting inheritable tolerance to extreme copper contamination in estuarine sediment. Using transcriptome sequencing data we have identified a suite of genes with putative roles in metal detoxification and tolerance, and measured their regulation. Copper tolerant individuals display significantly different gene expression profiles compared to animals from a nearby population living without remarkable copper levels. Gene transcripts encoding principle copper homeostasis proteins including membrane copper ion transporters, copper ion chaperones and putative metallothionein-like proteins were significantly more abundant in tolerant animals occupying contaminated sediment. In contrast, those encoding antioxidants and cellular repair pathways were unchanged. Nontolerant animals living in contaminated sediment showed no difference in copper homeostasis-related gene expression but did have significantly elevated levels of mRNAs encoding Glutathione Peroxidase enzymes. This study represents the first use of functional genomics to investigate the copper tolerance trait in this species and provides insight into the mechanism used by these individuals to survive and flourish in conditions which are lethal to their conspecifics. PMID:25337783

  4. A statistical study of environmental factors controlling concentrations of heavy metals in the burrowing bivalve Scrobicularia plana and the polychaete Nereis diversicolor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Bryan, G. W.

    1982-07-01

    Multiple regression analyses indicate that the most important factors controlling Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the estuarine bivalve Scrobicularia plana and the polychaete Nereis diversicolor are the concentrations of these metals in surface sediments and the partitioning of sediment-bound metals between different sediment constituents. Extraction of the sediments with 1-N HCl provides more information about the bioavailability of the metals than do extractions with five other techniques. Biologically available Cd and Co in solution contribute significantly to Cd and Co concentrations in both Scrobicularia and Nereis. Concentrations of Ag in Scrobicularia are reduced where Cu concentrations in sediments are high. An unexplained increase in concentrations of Cu in Scrobicularia at specific stations in six estuaries suggests that under certain very anoxic conditions the availability of copper may be exceptionally high.

  5. Mechanism of fluorescence and conformational changes of the sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding.

    PubMed

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-09-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of these mutants show a limited decrease of the affinity for calcium, but no alterations of the cooperativity. Upon adding calcium, Trp170 shows a strong fluorescence increase, Trp57 an extensive fluorescence decrease, and Trp4 shows no fluorescence change. Therefore mutant W4F/W170F is ideally suited to analyze the fluorescence titrations and to study the binding mechanism. Mutations of the calcium ligands at the z-position in the three binding sites show no effect at site I and a total loss of cooperativity at sites III and IV. The quenching of Trp57 upon calcium binding is dependent on the presence of arginine R25, but this residue is not just a simple dynamic quencher. The role of the salt bridge R25-D58 is also investigated. PMID:12944301

  6. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  7. In vivo measurements of the internal pH of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor (Annelida, Polychaeta) exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions using pH microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Stefan; Jahn, Andreas; Funke, Friederike; Brenke, Nils

    The effect of different ambient sulphide concentrations on the internal pH regime of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor was studied under in vivo conditions using liquid membrane pH microelectrodes, a method which is new to marine sciences. As a case study, the hypothesis was tested whether organisms exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions are able to lower their internal pH which, in effect, would reduce sulphide influx into the animals and thus could represent an effective detoxification mechanism. It was shown that a significant lowering of the internal pH occurred within only 20min after adding sulphide. This pH lowering appeared to be dependent on the external sulphide concentration of the ambient medium and showed a saturation beyond a threshold level of about 130μM. It is discussed whether this sulphide-induced pH drop is an active regulatory mechanism and acts as an effective protection mechanism against sulphide during short-term exposures.

  8. Effects of Nereis diversicolor on the transformation of 1-methylpyrene and pyrene: transformation efficiency and identification of phase I and II products.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Christensen, Jan H; Selck, Henriette

    2013-05-21

    Transformation of nonsubstituted and alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the benthic invertebrate Nereis diversicolor was compared in this study. Pyrene and 1-methylpyrene were used as model compounds for nonsubstituted and alkyl-substituted PAHs, respectively. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of metabolites and parent compounds in worm tissue, water, and sediment were performed. Transformation of 1-methylpyrene generated the benzylic hydroxylated phase I product, 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid that comprised 90% of the total metabolites of 1-methylpyrene, and was mainly found in water extracts. We tentatively identified 1-methylpyrene glucuronides and 1-carbonylpyrene glycine as phase II metabolites not previously reported in literature. Pyrene was biotransformed to 1-hydroxypyrene, pyrene-1-sulfate, pyrene-1-glucuronide, and pyrene glucoside sulfate, with pyrene-1-glucuronide as the most prominent metabolite. Transformation of 1-methylpyrene (21% transformed) was more than 3 times as efficient as pyrene transformation (5.6% transformed). Because crude oils contain larger amounts of C₁-C₄-substituted PAHs than nonsubstituted PAHs, the rapid and efficient transformation of sediment-associated 1-methylpyrene may result in a high exposure of water-living organisms to metabolites of alkyl-substituted PAHs, whose toxicities are unknown. This study demonstrates the need to consider fate and effects of substituted PAHs and their metabolites in risk assessments. PMID:23611659

  9. Ecology of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor in the Canal de Mira (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal): Population dynamics, production and oogenic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, António; Pinto, Fátima; Moreira, Maria Helena

    1999-07-01

    The population of Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller was studied in 1993 and 1994 at three intertidal areas along the estuarine gradient in the Canal de Mira (Ria de Aveiro). The population dynamics, secondary production and growth were followed for the 2-year period, whereas in the second year, a study on the oogenic cycle was also carried out. For the population dynamics and production studies, core samples were collected monthly at each site, and for the study of the oogenic cycle, medium size and large individuals were sampled from the sediment. Mean annual densities were higher (573-718 ind.m -2) at a station located in the middle zone of the channel, followed by the outer (190-275 ind.m -2) and the innermost (43-94 ind.m -2) stations. A cohort analysis by `Bhatta' software enabled the separation of the cohorts present at each date, and two cohorts were followed from recruitment to extinction. The secondary production ranged from 15.9 to 74.2 g ash free dry weight.m -2.year -1 and the P/ overlineBratio from 4.4 to 7.9. The average body growth rate varied between 0.16 and 0.20 mm.d -1 for worms longer than 2 cm. Two recruitment seasons were detected each year. Two spawning periods were also observed, one in the spring and the other in early autumn.

  10. Influence of copper oxide nanoparticle shape on bioaccumulation, cellular internalization and effects in the estuarine sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Thit, Amalie; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Købler, Carsten; Kennaway, Gabrielle; Selck, Henriette

    2015-10-01

    CuO nanoparticles (NPs) released into the aquatic environment will likely accumulate in the sediment. Here we synthesized and characterized CuO NPs with different shapes and thus sizes: spheres, rods and spindles. Nereis diversicolor were exposed for 10 days to control sediment or sediment spiked with CuO NPs or aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq, CuCl2) at 7, 70 and 140 μg Cu g(-1) dw sediment. Cu from all Cu treatments accumulated in worms in a concentration-dependent manner. Only Cu-Aq decreased burrowing, suggesting that worms avoid Cu when added to sediment as Cu-Aq, but not CuO NPs. Transmission Electron Microscopy of gut sections indicated limited presence of CuO NP-like objects in the gut lumen, but evidence on whether accumulated Cu from CuO NP exposure was internalized as particles was not conclusive. Overall, bioavailability and avoidance was not influenced by particle shape or size, whereas Cu form (Cu-Aq vs particulate) and exposure concentration had significant impact. PMID:26149327

  11. Restriction of Spartina anglica (C.E. Hubbard) marsh development by the infaunal polychaete Nereis diversicolor (O.F. Müller)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramor, O. A. L.; Hughes, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    Spartina anglica has been planted around the coast of SE England, and throughout the world, to help stabilise sediments and reduce wave erosion of sea defences. Recently the areas of S. anglica have declined on this coast, contributing to the overall loss of saltmarsh area, in contrast to the north and west coasts of the UK where expanding S. anglica marshes have had to be controlled to maintain mudflat feeding areas for birds. Field experiments were established in two old coastal realignment areas in the Blythe Estuary (Suffolk) and on open mudflats in the Blackwater Estuary (Essex), in which surface deposit feeding by Nereis diversicolor was prevented by laying porous mats on the mudflat surface. These mats promoted sediment deposition and quickly became buried. S. anglica colonised these infauna exclusion areas by growth of rhizomes from adjacent plants, to a significantly higher degree than in control areas. In one of the Blythe sites this occurred when the adjacent S. anglica marsh was retreating. These results support the conclusions of Paramor and Hughes (2004, 2005), that the infauna are responsible for much of the loss of saltmarsh in SE England, and that managed coastal realignment will not necessarily lead to saltmarsh creation. The experiments point to an alternative means of managing saltmarsh creation and sediment accretion on existing mudflats, with consequent benefits for coastal defence and conservation.

  12. Characterization of specificity of bacterial community structure within the burrow environment of the marine polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Pischedda, Laura; Militon, Cécile; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Bioturbation is known to stimulate microbial communities, especially in macrofaunal burrows where the abundance and activities of bacteria are increased. Until now, these microbial communities have been poorly characterized and an important ecological question remains: do burrow walls harbor similar or specific communities compared with anoxic and surface sediments? The bacterial community structure of coastal sediments inhabited by the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor was investigated. Surface, burrow wall and anoxic sediments were collected at the Carteau beach (Gulf of Fos, Mediterranean Sea). Bacterial diversity was determined by analyzing small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) sequences from three clone libraries (168, 179 and 129 sequences for the surface, burrow wall and anoxic sediments, respectively). Libraries revealed 306 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to at least 15 bacterial phyla. Bioinformatic analyses and comparisons between the three clone libraries showed that the burrow walls harbored a specific bacterial community structure which differed from the surface and anoxic environments. More similarities were nevertheless found with the surface assemblage. Inside the burrow walls, the bacterial community was characterized by high biodiversity, which probably results from the biogeochemical heterogeneity of the burrow system. PMID:21946148

  13. The effect of sewage pollution on the feeding behaviour and diet of Hediste (Nereis diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776)) in three estuaries in south-east England, with implications for saltmarsh erosion.

    PubMed

    Aberson, M J R; Bolam, S G; Hughes, R G

    2016-04-15

    Stable isotope analyses of the abundant infaunal polychaete Hediste diversicolor, recognised as an indicator of sewage pollution, support the hypothesis that nutrient enrichment promotes surface deposit feeding, over suspension feeding and predation. At sewage-polluted sites in three estuaries in SE England Hediste mainly consumed microphytobenthos, sediment organic matter and filamentous macroalgae Ulva spp. At cleaner sites Hediste relied more on suspension feeding and consumption of Spartina anglica. There were no consistent differences in Hediste densities between the polluted and cleaner sites, probably because of increased densities at the cleaner sites too, facilitated by the planting of Spartina and nitrogen enrichment there too, including from agricultural run-off. Increased nutrient enrichment and the artificial availability of Spartina have probably increased densities of, and deposit-feeding by, Hediste in the past half-century and contributed indirectly to saltmarsh losses, since deposit-feeding by Hediste has been implicated in recent saltmarsh erosion in SE England. PMID:26902686

  14. Application of silicone rubber passive samplers to investigate the bioaccumulation of PAHs by Nereis virens from marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Kyari; Pollard, Pat; Davies, Ian M; Webster, Lynda; Moffat, Colin F

    2011-12-01

    The availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from marine sediments to the ragworm (Nereis virens) was studied. Concentrations of PAHs in pore waters were determined using silicone rubber passive samplers. Calculated bioconcentration factors confirmed that partitioning of PAHs between the lipid phase of the polychaetes and pore water is a passive process. Low biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF) calculated using total sediment concentration suggested a fraction of the total PAH burden in the sediment may be strongly sorbed to organic carbon and not available to the polychaete. Organic carbon normalised concentrations of the potentially exchangeable fractions of contaminants and freely dissolved concentrations (measured using silicone rubber samplers) provide a better description of the observed bioaccumulation by the ragworms. These data indicate that the concept of availability should be included in environmental risk assessments based upon equilibrium partitioning models, and that silicone rubber samplers can provide the necessary information for these models. PMID:21906858

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Acids Are Primary Metabolites of Alkyl-PAHs-A Case Study with Nereis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Selck, Henriette; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-05-01

    Although concentrations of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (alkyl-PAHs) in oil-contaminated sediments are higher than those of unsubstituted PAHs, only little attention has been given to metabolism and ecotoxicity of alkyl-PAHs. In this study we demonstrated that metabolism of alkyl-PAHs primarily forms polycyclic aromatic acids (PAAs). We generalize this to other alkyl-PAHs, based on literature and the present study of the metabolism of 1-methylphenanthrene, 3,6-dimethylphenanthrene, and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-methylchrysene related to their unsubstituted parent PAHs. Also, we observed that body burdens and production of PAAs was related to the position of the methyl group, showing the same isomer specific preferences as for microbial degradation of alkyl-PAHs. We detected a high production of PAAs, and larger metabolism of alkyl-PAHs than their unsubstituted parent PAHs. We therefore propose that carboxylic acid metabolites of alkyl-PAHs have the potential of constituting a new class of contaminants in marine waters that needs attention in relation to ecological risk assessments. PMID:25827176

  16. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in Hediste diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776), Mugil cephalus (Linnaeus, 1758), and surface sediments of Bafa Lake (Eastern Aegean).

    PubMed

    Aydin-Onen, S; Kucuksezgin, F; Kocak, F; Açik, S

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the bioaccumulation of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) in Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776) and also in the muscle and liver of Mugil cephalus (Linnaeus, 1758) collected from seven stations in the Bafa Lake was investigated. Sediment samples were also collected in each site to assess heavy metal levels and to provide additional information on pollution of the lake. The mean concentrations of heavy metals in sediment, H. diversicolor, and muscle and liver of the fish were found to be in the magnitude of Cr>Pb>Zn>Cu>Cd>Hg, Zn>Cu>Cr>Pb>Hg>Cd, Zn>Cu>Pb>Cr >Hg>Cd, and Cu>Zn>Cr>Cd>Pb>Hg, respectively. Hg, Cu, and Zn in H. diversicolor and Hg and Zn in muscle and also Hg, Cd, Cu, and Zn in liver of fish accumulated in a higher degree than in sediment. There was no clear relationship between metal concentrations in sediments, polychaetes, and fish, except Cr. According to international criteria and Turkish regulations, Pb and Zn values in edible muscle of the fish collected from stations S6 and S5 exceeded the food safety limits, respectively. The results of this study suggest that these sentinel species can be considered as good anthropogenic biological indicators for heavy metal pollution along the Bafa Lake. PMID:25567060

  17. Ellipsomyxa gobii (Myxozoa: Ceratomyxidae) in the common goby Pomatoschistus microps (Teleostei: Gobiidae) uses Nereis spp. (Annelida: Polychaeta) as invertebrate hosts.

    PubMed

    Køie, Marianne; Whipps, Christopher M; Kent, Michael L

    2004-03-01

    Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller and N. succinea Frey et Leuckart (Polychaeta, Nereidae) living in brackish shallow areas in Denmark are naturally infected with tetractinomyxon actinospores. Infected Nereis spp. were experimentally fed to various potential fish hosts, and the actinosporean stages developed into myxosporean stages of Ellipsomyxa gobii Køie, 2003 (Ceratomyxidae) in the gallbladder of the common goby Pomatoschistus microps (Krøyer) (Gobiidae). The European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.), three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus L., small sand eel Ammodytes tobianus L., flounder Platichthys flesus (L.), European plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. and common sole Solea solea (L.) did not become experimentally infected. In Danish shallow brackish areas P. microps is naturally infected with E. gobii, in some areas with a prevalence >90%. We compared small subunit ribosomal DNA sequences of the actinosporean with E. gobii from P. microps. Sequences were identical, which further verifies that both forms belong to the same organism. This is the first myxozoan two-host life cycle in the marine environment. PMID:15139372

  18. Revealing polychaetes invasion patterns: Identification, reproduction and potential risks of the Korean ragworm, Perinereis linea (Treadwell), in the Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Andrés; Richter, Alexandra; Anadón, Nuria; Glasby, Christopher J.

    2013-10-01

    An established population of the polychaetous annelid Perinereis linea (Treadwell) is reported for the first time outside its native distribution range (NW Pacific). This exotic worm has reached the Western Mediterranean (Mar Menor lagoon) via importing live fishing-bait as it is commonly used by anglers in Mar Menor lagoon, an area largely used for recreational fishing. To avoid confusion with other related species, and because the scientific name has been in synonymy for many years, P. linea is redescribed and illustrated. We focus on the reproductive biology and ecology of P. linea to help to understand its introduction, naturalization and spread along this coastal lagoon. Comparison between the Mediterranean population with a native population from South Korea revealed that the species exhibits a great reproductive plasticity and adaptability, which depends on the environmental conditions. Perinereis linea can reproduce after acquiring the epitokous form or prior to complete epitokal modification. In the Mar Menor lagoon population females release eggs asynchronically without completing epitokal modifications. However, under particular laboratory conditions females produce eggs synchronically and release them after complete epitokal transformations. Fertilization can occur internally in the female coelom, and females release zygotes and larvae through openings in their body walls; they are then incubated in gelatinous masses attached to the female parapodia. The sperm morphology is of the ent-aquasperm type. The eggs and larvae are attacked by symbiotic ciliate protozoa that feed on their yolk reserves. These foreign ciliates may act as carriers of disease in native beachworms and constitute an important risk for the ecosystem health. Finally, we provide recommendations on the prevention of the adverse effects that this exotic ragworm can cause in receiving ecosystems.

  19. NMR-based metabolomic analysis of Haliotis diversicolor exposed to thermal and hypoxic stresses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Shi, Yanyan; Wang, Shuhong; Chen, Hao; Cai, Shuhui; Feng, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Haliotis diversicolor is a commercially important cultured shellfish. It is also an important marine model organism for environmental science. High temperature accompanied with hypoxia frequently induces diseases or even death to abalones. In present study, (1)H NMR spectroscopy together with pattern recognition methods was used to investigate the responses of muscle and gill of H. diversicolor to thermal and hypoxic stresses. It was found that obvious gender-, time- and tissue-specific metabolic responses were induced by thermal and hypoxic stresses. In combination with the changes of H. diversicolor in physiological features, the dual-modal stresses were suggested to mainly cause the disturbance in energy metabolism and osmotic balance in muscle and gill tissues with different mechanisms. Further, the corresponding correlation networks and metabolic pathways derived from the characteristic metabolites were used to assess the major metabolic functions of these characteristic metabolites. These findings shed some lights on the metabolic influences of environmental stresses on marine organisms. PMID:26747992

  20. Biochemical alterations induced in Hediste diversicolor under seawater acidification conditions.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rosa; Pires, Adília; Moreira, Anthony; Wrona, Frederick J; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2016-06-01

    Seawater pH is among the environmental factors controlling the performance of marine organisms, especially in calcifying marine invertebrates. However, changes in non-calcifying organisms (including polychaetes) may also occur due to pH decrease. Polychaetes are often the most abundant group of organisms in estuarine systems, representing an important ecological and economic resource. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impacts of seawater acidification in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, a species commonly used as bioindicator. For this, organisms were exposed to different pH levels (7.9, 7.6 and 7.3) during 28 days and several biochemical markers were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that pH decrease negatively affected osmotic regulation and polychaetes metabolism, with individuals under low pH (7.6 and 7.3) presenting higher carbonic anhydrase activity, lower energy reserves (protein and glycogen content) and higher metabolic rate (measured as Electron transport system activity). The increase on CA activity was associated to organisms osmoregulation capacity while the increase on ETS and decrease on energy reserves was associated to the polychaetes capacity to develop defense mechanisms (e.g. antioxidant defenses). In fact, despite having observed higher lipid peroxidation at pH 7.6, in polychaetes at the lowest tested pH (7.3) LPO levels were similar to values recorded in individuals under control pH (7.9). Such findings may result from higher antioxidant enzyme activity at the lowest tested pH, which prevented organisms from higher oxidative stress levels. Overall, our study demonstrated how polychaetes may respond to near-future ocean acidification conditions, exhibiting the capacity to develop biochemical strategies which will prevent organisms from lethal injuries. Such defense strategies will contribute for polychaetes populations maintenance and survival under predicted seawater acidification scenarios. PMID:27088614

  1. Biochemical and mechanical characterization of Nereis worm jaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomell, Christopher C.

    The ultimate goal of biomimetics is to elucidate the design principles governing performance in biological materials and apply them to engineering systems. Successful transfer of these principles will require a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between molecular composition, organization and mechanical properties of the material. This dissertation describes the mechanical and biochemical characterization of jaws from the marine polychaete Nereis virens. Nereid jaws possess remarkable mechanical properties considering their predominantly organic composition. Hardness and stiffness are comparable to human dentin. However, in stark contrast to dentin, in Nereis these properties are achieved without mineralization. The role of metal ions in jaw sclerotization is addressed. In the pristine state, Zn ions are concentrated at the tip and toothed-edge of the jaw and are critical for hardness and modulus; both properties are reduced by ˜70% following Zn removal by treatment with EDTA. Furthermore, metal content in the jaw can be manipulated by soaking Zn-depleted samples in metal solutions; the comparative effects of treatment with alternative transition metals under both dry and hydrated conditions are described. The molecular composition of the jaw is also addressed. Protein comprises ˜90% of the jaw mass; amino acid analysis indicates that histidine is increased in the hardened, Zn-rich tip. The major protein component in Nereid jaw extracts is purified and characterized by partial peptide mapping and isolation of a partial clone from a jaw pulp cDNA library. Nvjp-1 is a 38 kDa glycine- histidine-rich protein and is believed to be the principle structural protein in the hardened jaw tip. The effects of selected environmental factors on Nvjp-1 structure and assembly are described. Transition from low to high pH is accompanied by changes in secondary structure and a significant molecular elongation. Furthermore, exposure to transition metals, notably Zn and

  2. Identification and involvement of ferritin in the response to pathogen challenge in the abalone, Haliotis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Jiang, Jingzhe; Gu, Lu; Zhao, Manman; Wang, Ruixuan; Ye, Lingtong; Yao, Tuo; Wang, Jiangyong

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating data has demonstrated that ferritin plays an important role in host defense responses against infection by pathogens in many organisms. In this study, ultracentrifugation was used to isolate ferritin from abalone, Haliotis diversicolor, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed that this ferritin consisted of two subunits (designated as HdFer1 and HdFer2). There are no disulfide bonds between the HdFer1 and HdFer2 subunits; however, these subunits co-assemble to form heteropolymers. A novel ferritin subunit (HdFer2) was cloned from H. diversicolor by 5' and 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. The full-length HdFer2 cDNA sequence consists of 878 bp with an open reading frame of 513 bp that encodes a protein that is 170 amino acids in length. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that HdFer1 and HdFer2 were transcribed in various tissues, such as the mantle, gill and hepatopancreas, with the highest levels of expression in the hepatopancreas. Following a challenge with the pathogen, Vibrio harveyi, the expression of HdFer1 and HdFer2 were markedly induced at different times. This study has identified a novel ferritin subunit in H. diversicolor which will contribute to further exploration of the role of ferritin in mollusk innate immune defense against invading pathogens. PMID:26875633

  3. Pyrosequencing of Haliotis diversicolor Transcriptomes: Insights into Early Developmental Molluscan Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zi-Xia; Chen, Zhi-Sen; Ke, Cai-Huan; Zhao, Jing; You, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Wei-Ting; Chen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background The abalone Haliotis diversicolor is a good model for study of the settlement and metamorphosis, which are widespread marine ecological phenomena. However, information on the global gene backgrounds and gene expression profiles for the early development of abalones is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, eight non-normalized and multiplex barcode-labeled transcriptomes were sequenced using a 454 GS system to cover the early developmental stages of the abalone H. diversicolor. The assembly generated 35,415 unigenes, of which 7,566 were assigned GO terms. A global gene expression profile containing 636 scaffolds/contigs was constructed and was proven reliable using qPCR evaluation. It indicated that there may be existing dramatic phase transitions. Bioprocesses were proposed, including the ‘lock system’ in mature eggs, the collagen shells of the trochophore larvae and the development of chambered extracellular matrix (ECM) structures within the earliest postlarvae. Conclusion This study globally details the first 454 sequencing data for larval stages of H. diversicolor. A basic analysis of the larval transcriptomes and cluster of the gene expression profile indicates that each stage possesses a batch of specific genes that are indispensable during embryonic development, especially during the two-cell, trochophore and early postlarval stages. These data will provide a fundamental resource for future physiological works on abalones, revealing the mechanisms of settlement and metamorphosis at the molecular level. PMID:23236463

  4. Freshwater springs on intertidal sand flats cause a switch in dominance among polychaete worms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipperle, Andreas; Reise, Karsten

    2005-08-01

    Effects of freshwater seepage on benthic macrofauna were investigated on the sandy tidal flats near the island of Sylt (German Wadden Sea) in 2002. Several permanent seepage areas (50 to 200 m offshore; up to 200 m 2 in area) were examined, in which salinity ranged from 22-29 outside to 0-16 psu inside seepage areas in the upper 20 cm of sediment during summer low tides. The freshwater seepage areas were characterised by an absence of lugworms ( Arenicola marina) and a twelve-fold increase in nereid polychaetes ( Nereis diversicolor and N. virens) relative to non-seepage areas. Lugworms and ragworms were scarce in a transition zone, which was colonised by juvenile lugworms. We suggest that nereid polychaetes avoid competition with bioturbating lugworms by adapting to areas of low salinity (freshwater seepage).

  5. Redescriptions of Nereis oligohalina (Rioja, 1946) and N. garwoodi González-Escalante & Salazar-Vallejo, 2003 and description of N. confusa sp. n. (Annelida, Nereididae)

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Vela, Víctor M.; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type material of several polychaete species described by Enrique Rioja from Mexican coasts are lost, and the current status of some species is doubtful. Nereis oligohalina (Rioja, 1946) was described from the Gulf of Mexico, but it has been considered a junior synonym of Nereis occidentalis Hartman, 1945, or regarded as a distinct species with an amphiamerican distribution. On the other hand, Nereis garwoodi González-Escalante & Salazar-Vallejo, 2003, described from Chetumal Bay, Caribbean coasts, could be confused with Nereis oligohalina. In order to clarify these uncertainties, Nereis oligohalina is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican Gulf of Mexico, including a proposed neotype; further, Nereis garwoodi is redescribed including the selection of lectotype and paralectotypes, and Nereis confusa sp. n. is described with material from the Gulf of California. A key for the identification of similar species and some comments about speciation in nereidid polychaetes are also included. PMID:26448699

  6. Redescriptions of Nereis oligohalina (Rioja, 1946) and N. garwoodi González-Escalante & Salazar-Vallejo, 2003 and description of N. confusa sp. n. (Annelida, Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Conde-Vela, Víctor M; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2015-01-01

    Type material of several polychaete species described by Enrique Rioja from Mexican coasts are lost, and the current status of some species is doubtful. Nereis oligohalina (Rioja, 1946) was described from the Gulf of Mexico, but it has been considered a junior synonym of Nereis occidentalis Hartman, 1945, or regarded as a distinct species with an amphiamerican distribution. On the other hand, Nereis garwoodi González-Escalante & Salazar-Vallejo, 2003, described from Chetumal Bay, Caribbean coasts, could be confused with Nereis oligohalina. In order to clarify these uncertainties, Nereis oligohalina is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican Gulf of Mexico, including a proposed neotype; further, Nereis garwoodi is redescribed including the selection of lectotype and paralectotypes, and Nereis confusa sp. n. is described with material from the Gulf of California. A key for the identification of similar species and some comments about speciation in nereidid polychaetes are also included. PMID:26448699

  7. ORGANIC CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION IN SEDIMENTS, POLYCHAETES (NEREIS VIRENS) AND THE AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS IN A LABORATORY FOOD CHAIN EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the transfer of organic contaminants from an environmentally contaminated marine sediment through a simple marine food chain. The infaunal polychaete, Nereis virens, was exposed to contaminated sediment collected from the Passa...

  8. The hydrogen peroxide impact on larval settlement and metamorphosis of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangjing; Yang, Zhihui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2008-08-01

    Abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta is an important economic mollusk. The settlement and metamorphosis are two critical stages during its development period, which has direct influence on abalone survival and production. The influence of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) on abalone embryo and juvenile development were examined in this study. Larvae of Haliotis diversicolor supertexta were induced to settlement and metamorphose by exposure to seawater supplemented with hydrogen peroxide. They had the best performance at 800 μmol/L. The concentration of 1 000 μmol/L or higher was toxic to the larvae, as the larvae could settle down only at benthic diatom plates without complete metamorphosis. In addition, H2O2 adding time was critical to the larval performance. 24h after two-day post-fertilization was proved to be the optimal adding time. In this paper, two action mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide are discussed: (1) hydrogen peroxide has direct toxicity to ciliated cells, thus cause apoptosis; (2) hydrogen peroxide, as a product from catecholamines’ autoxidation process in vivo, can reverse this process to produce neuro-transmitters to induce abalone metamorphosis.

  9. Involvement of Antizyme Characterized from the Small Abalone Haliotis diversicolor in Gonadal Development

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Wen-Gang; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Ming-Hui; Li, Xiang-Min; Wang, Rong-Xia; Ke, Cai-Huan

    2015-01-01

    The small abalone Haliotis diversicolor is an economically important mollusk that is widely cultivated in Southern China. Gonad precocity may affect the aquaculture of small abalone. Polyamines, which are small cationic molecules essential for cellular proliferation, may affect gonadal development. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and antizyme (AZ) are essential elements of a feedback circuit that regulates cellular polyamines. This paper presents the molecular cloning and characterization of AZ from small abalone. Sequence analysis showed that the cDNA sequence of H. diversicolor AZ (HdiODCAZ) consisted of two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) and conformed to the +1 frameshift property of the frame. Thin Layer chromatography (TLC) analysis suggested that the expressed protein encoded by +1 ORF2 was the functional AZ that targets ODC to 26S proteasome degradation. The result demonstrated that the expression level of AZ was higher than that of ODC in the ovary of small abalone. In addition, the expression profiles of ODC and AZ at the different development stages of the ovary indicated that these two genes might be involved in the gonadal development of small abalone. PMID:26313647

  10. Uptake and excretion of organochlorine pesticides by Nereis virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Haya, K.; Burridge, L.E.

    1988-02-01

    The marine polychaete worm, Nereis virens, is resistant to organochlorine pesticides. When exposed to each of five pesticides (endosulfan, chlordane, endrin, dieldrin, and DDT) in concentrations ranging from 0.03 mg/L (DDT) to 22.0 mg/L (chlordane), only endosulfan and chlordane killed Nereis. In comparison, the same compounds were much more toxic to another marine invertebrate, Crangon septemspinosa. The authors wondered if the resistance of N. virens to organochlorines was related to their response to hypoxia. N. virens is a sediment dweller often found in intertidal regions and consequently may experience periods of severe oxygen deprivation; varying degrees of hypoxia can initiate a switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. When N. virens encounter hypoxic conditions, they can also exhibit a compensatory ventilation response. In the present study, the authors measured the bioaccumulation of endosulfan, dieldrin, and DDT by N. virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  11. A novel methodology for the determination of biomarker baseline levels in the marine polychaete Hediste diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Barrick, A; Châtel, A; Marion, J-M; Perrein-Ettajani, H; Bruneau, M; Mouneyrac, C

    2016-07-15

    Identifying environmental damage due to anthropogenic activities is a focal point for scientists and policy makers like those involved in the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Many of these approaches focus on ecological endpoints for assessing environmental perturbations, which lead to policies emphasizing mitigation rather than prevention. Biomarkers provide early-warning indicators of stress but it is necessary to distinguish their natural variations from those induced by chemical stress. The global aim of this study was to establish a baseline assessment criterion (BAC) using historical data in a reference site to define toxicity thresholds. We have developed a multiple polynomial regression model (MPR) accounting the influence of salinity, temperature and size of individual on energetic reserves (glycogen and lipids) in the marine polychaete Hediste diversicolor. The model identified a complex, orthogonal relationship between confounding factors and glycogen and a linear relationship between lipids and size of individuals. PMID:27184131

  12. Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Likun; You, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Yanliang; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Zixia; Chen, Baohua; Zhao, Yunfeng; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Ke, Caihuan; Xu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33%. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor. PMID:26438131

  13. Identification and characterization of Vibrio harveyi associated with diseased abalone Haliotis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qingru; Shi, Liuyang; Ke, Caihuan; You, Weiwei; Zhao, Jing

    2013-03-26

    Mass mortality of farmed small abalone Haliotis diversicolor occurred in Fujian, China, from 2009 to 2011. Among isolates obtained from moribund abalones, the dominant species AP37 exhibited the strongest virulence. After immersion challenge with 106 CFU ml-1 of AP37, abalone mortalities of 0, 53 and 67% were induced at water temperatures of 20°C, 24°C, and 28°C, respectively. Following intramuscular injection, AP37 showed a low LD50 (median lethal concentration) value of 2.9 × 102 CFU g-1 (colony forming units per gram abalone wet body weight). The LT50 (median lethal time) values were 5.2 h for 1 × 106 CFU abalone-1, 8.4 h for 1 × 105 CFU abalone-1, and 21.5 h for 1 × 104 CFU abalone-1. For further analysis of virulence, AP37 was screened for the production of extracellular factors. The results showed that various factors including presence of flagella and production of extracellular enzymes, such as lipase, phospholipase and haemolysin, could be responsible for pathogenesis. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain AP37 showed >98.8% similarity to Vibrio harveyi, V. campbellii, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. natriegens and V. rotiferianus, so it could not be identified by this method. However, multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of concatenated sequences, including the rpoD, rctB, gyrB, toxR and pyrH genes, identified strain AP37 as V. harveyi. Phenotypic characters of AP37 were identified by API 20E. In antibiotic susceptibility tests, strain AP37 exhibited susceptibility to 7 antibiotics and resistance to 13. This is the first report of a V. harveyi-related species being linked with the mass mortality of adult abalone H. diversicolor in southern China. PMID:23548363

  14. Phylogeography of the Sponge Suberites diversicolor in Indonesia: Insights into the Evolution of Marine Lake Populations

    PubMed Central

    Becking, Leontine E.; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; de Voogd, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of multiple independently derived populations in landlocked marine lakes provides an opportunity for fundamental research into the role of isolation in population divergence and speciation in marine taxa. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea and could be regarded as the marine equivalents of terrestrial islands. The sponge Suberites diversicolor (Porifera: Demospongiae: Suberitidae) is typical of marine lake habitats in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Four molecular markers (two mitochondrial and two nuclear) were employed to study genetic structure of populations within and between marine lakes in Indonesia and three coastal locations in Indonesia, Singapore and Australia. Within populations of S. diversicolor two strongly divergent lineages (A & B) (COI: p = 0.4% and ITS: p = 7.3%) were found, that may constitute cryptic species. Lineage A only occurred in Kakaban lake (East Kalimantan), while lineage B was present in all sampled populations. Within lineage B, we found low levels of genetic diversity in lakes, though there was spatial genetic population structuring. The Australian population is genetically differentiated from the Indonesian populations. Within Indonesia we did not record an East-West barrier, which has frequently been reported for other marine invertebrates. Kakaban lake is the largest and most isolated marine lake in Indonesia and contains the highest genetic diversity with genetic variants not observed elsewhere. Kakaban lake may be an area where multiple putative refugia populations have come into secondary contact, resulting in high levels of genetic diversity and a high number of endemic species. PMID:24098416

  15. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Schöberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen D.

    2003-01-01

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc–chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc–chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented. PMID:12886017

  16. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Schoberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2003-08-05

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc-chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc-chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented.

  17. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Schoberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2003-08-05

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc– chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc– chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented.

  18. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm.

    PubMed

    Lichtenegger, Helga C; Schöberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T; Cross, Julie O; Heald, Steve M; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J Herbert; Stucky, Galen D

    2003-08-01

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc-chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc-chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented. PMID:12886017

  19. Nereis alacranensis, a new species of polychaete (Annelida, Nereididae) from Alacranes Reef, southern Gulf of Mexico, with a key to Nereis from the Grand Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hernández, Adriana; Hernández-Alcántara, Pablo; Solís-Weiss, Vivianne

    2015-01-01

    A new species of polychaete, Nereis alacranensis n. sp., was found in dead coral rocks in the intertidal zone of Alacranes reef, southern Gulf of Mexico. N. alacranensis n. sp. can be included in a group of nereidids characterized by the absence of paragnaths in areas I and V of the pharynx, the presence of cones in a single row or absent in areas VII-VIII, and short blades in notopodial homogomph falcigers. The new species can be separated from the other species of the group by the presence of 3-7 cones in area VI and 7 cones arranged in a row in areas VII-VIII, finely dentate blades in notopodial homogomph falcigers, but most of all, by the presence of an unusual brown coarse arc shaped plate on the external ventral region of the peristomium. This structure has not yet been reported, at least in this genus. A taxonomic key of the species of Nereis recorded from the Grand Caribbean region is included. PMID:26623850

  20. Functional annotation of an expressed sequence tag library from Haliotis diversicolor and analysis of its plant-like sequences.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Zhe; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zhi-Xun; Cai, Chen-Chen; Su, You-Lu; Wang, Rui-Xuan; Wang, Jiang-Yong

    2011-09-01

    The small abalone, Haliotis diversicolor, is a widely distributed and cultured species in the subtropical coastal area of China. To identify and classify functional genes of this important species, a normalized expressed sequence tag (EST) library, including 7069 high quality ESTs from the total body of H. diversicolor, was analyzed. A total of 4781 unigenes were assembled and 2991 novel abalone genes were identified. The GC content, codon and amino acid usage of the transcriptome were analyzed. For the accurate annotation of the abalone library, different influencing factors were evaluated. The gene ontology (GO) database provided a higher annotation rate (69.6%), and sequences longer than 800bp were easily subjected to a BLAST search. The taxonomy of the BLAST results showed that lancelet and invertebrates are most closely related to abalone. Sixty-seven identified plant-like genes were further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing, only seven of these were real transcripts in abalone. Phylogenic trees were also constructed to illustrate the positions of two Cystatin sequences and one Calmodulin protein sequence identified in abalone. To perform functional classification, three different databases (GO, KEGG and COG) were used and 60 immune or disease-related unigenes were determined. This work has greatly enlarged the known gene pool of H. diversicolor and will have important implications for future molecular and genetic analyses in this organism. PMID:21867971

  1. Environmental effects of dredging. A chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the marine polychaete nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, T.M.; Moore, D.W.; Bridges, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    This note provides a general overview of a new 28-day chronic sublethal sediment bioassay designed for the regulatory evaluation of dredged material. The bioassay uses survival and growth rate endpoints with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. The primary technical reference for this new bioassay is Dillon, Moore, and Reish (in press), upon which this overview is based. Sediment bioassays are used to assess the aggregate toxicity of sediment associated anthropogenic chemicals. Historically, these bioassays have measured survival of highly sensitive species following acute exposures (10 days). A new generation of sediment bioassays is being developed in which the subtle, sublethal response of test species is measured following chronic sediment exposures (Dillon 1993).

  2. Behavioural and biochemical responses of two marine invertebrates Scrobicularia plana and Hediste diversicolor to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tankoua, Olivia Fossi; Pan, Jin-Fen; Berhanu, Deborah; Herrenknecht, Christine; Poirier, Laurence; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Bérard, Jean-Baptiste; Risso, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Roméo, Michèle; Reip, Paul; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nano-sized Cu oxide particles are extensively used in diverse applications. Because aquatic environments are the ultimate "sink" for all contaminants, it is expected that nanoparticles (NP) will follow the same fate. In this study, two marine invertebrates Scrobicularia plana and Hediste diversicolor were chosen as ecotoxicological models. The aim was to evaluate behavioural (burrowing kinetics, feeding rate) and biochemical (biomarkers) responses of S. plana and H. diversicolor exposed in the laboratory to Cu (10 μg L(-1)) added in natural seawater either in the form of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) of CuO or as dissolved Cu in 2% HNO(3). Exposure was characterized by considering (i) the physico-chemical fate of NP (ii) the fraction of labile Cu in experimental media and (iii) Cu bioaccumulation. Results showed high aggregation of CuO NPs in seawater and no additional bioavailable Cu concentrations. Behavioural impairments were observed in S. plana exposed to CuO NPs or soluble Cu whereas in H. diversicolor, only the exposure to soluble Cu led to a burrowing decrease. No obvious neurotoxicity effects were revealed since in both species, no changes in cholinesterasic activity occurred in response to both forms of Cu exposure. Biomarkers of oxidative-stress catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were enhanced in both species whereas superoxide dismutase was increased only in S. plana exposed to CuO NPs. Metallothionein-like protein was increased in bivalves exposed to both forms of Cu. Since, no detectable release of soluble Cu from CuO NPs occurred during the time of experiment, ecotoxicity effects seem to be related to CuO NPs themselves. PMID:21354594

  3. Biological characterisation of Sarcocystis neurona isolated from a Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Dubey, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona was isolated from the brain of a juvenile, male southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) suffering from CNS disease. Schizonts and merozoites in tissue sections of the otter's brain reacted with anti-S. neurona antiserum immunohistochemically. Development in cell culture was by endopolyogeny and mature schizonts were first observed at 3 days postinoculation. PCR of merozoite DNA using primer pairs JNB33/JNB54 and restriction enzyme digestion of the 1100 bp product with Dra I indicated the organism was S. neurona. Four of four interferon-γ gene knockout mice inoculated with merozoites developed S. neurona-associated encephalitis. Antibodies to S. neurona but not Sarcocystis falcatula, Toxoplasma gondii, or Neospora caninum were present in the serum of inoculated mice. This is the first isolation of S. neurona from the brain of a non-equine host.

  4. Modified-closed castration: a novel technique for sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) orchiectomies.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Alexa J; Clauss, Tonya; Sakals, Sherisse; Mejia, Johanna; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G

    2013-09-01

    A novel surgical technique was used in the routine castrations of two intact male southern sea otters, Enhydra lutris nereis, housed at the Georgia Aquarium (Atlanta, Georgia, USA). This technique involved incising the parietal vaginal tunic to allow placement of double ligation of the ductus deferens, testicular artery, and pampiniform plexus en masse. After ligating and transecting these structures, they were introduced back into the tunic, which was closed with a circumferential ligature. The incision site was closed in a routine manner. Both otters recovered well from the procedure. One otter had mild cutaneous dehiscence postoperatively, and the other had no obvious complications. Benefits of this procedure include reduced risk of ligature slippage or loosening and resultant hemorrhage, as provided by the traditional open portion of the castration, and decreased postoperative swelling, as provided by the closed part of the castration. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time this technique has been described for use in sea otters. PMID:24063115

  5. Bioaccumulation kinetics of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from estuarine sediments to the marine polychaete, Nereis virens.

    PubMed

    Klosterhaus, Susan L; Dreis, Erin; Baker, Joel E

    2011-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame-retardant chemicals that have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Polybrominated diphenyl ether no-uptake rates from estuarine or marine sediments to deposit-feeding organisms have not yet been reported. In the present study, the marine polychaete worm Nereis virens was exposed to field-contaminated and spiked sediments containing the penta- and deca-BDE commercial mixtures in a 28-d experiment to characterize the relative bioavailability of PBDE congeners from estuarine sediments. A time series sampling regimen was conducted to estimate uptake rate constants. In both field-collected and laboratory-spiked sediment exposures, worms selectively accumulated congeners in the penta-BDE mixture over BDE 209 and other components of the deca-BDE mixture, supporting the prevalence of these congeners in higher trophic level species. Brominated diphenyl ether 209 was not bioavailable to N. virens from field sediment and was only minimally detected in worms exposed to spiked sediments in which bioavailability was maximized. Chemical hydrophobicity was not a good predictor of bioavailability for congeners in the penta-BDE mixture. Direct comparison of bioavailability from the spiked and field sediments for the predominant congeners in the penta-BDE mixture was confounded by the considerable difference in exposure concentration between treatments. Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for N. virens after 28 d of exposure to the field sediment were lower than the BSAFs for Nereis succinea collected from the field site, indicating that 28-d bioaccumulation tests using N. virens may underestimate the in situ concentration of PBDEs in deposit-feeding species. The bioavailability of PBDEs to N. virens indicates that these chemicals can be remobilized from estuarine sediments and transferred to aquatic food webs. PMID:21337608

  6. Hediste diversicolor as bioindicator of pharmaceutical pollution: Results from single and combined exposure to carbamazepine and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Pires, Adília; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Schneider, Rudolf J; Esteves, Valdemar I; Wrona, Frederick J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Several environmental stressors have been identified as key and/or emerging drivers of habitat change that could significantly influence marine near-shore ecosystems. These include increasing discharges of pharmaceutical contaminants into the aquatic coastal systems. Pharmaceutical drugs are often detected in aquatic environments but still information on their toxicity impacts on inhabiting species is scarce, especially when acting in combination. Furthermore, almost no information is available on the impacts of pharmaceuticals in polychaetes, often the most abundant taxon in benthic communities and commonly used as indicator species of environmental conditions. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the biochemical alterations induced in the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, from a low contaminated area at the Ria de Aveiro lagoon (Portugal), by the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (0.0 - control, 0.3, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0μg/L) and the stimulant caffeine (0.0 - control, 0.5, 3.0, and 18.0μg/L), acting alone and in combination (0.3 CBZ+0.5 CAF and 6.0 CBZ+3.0 CAF). Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was determined in Hediste diversicolor from each condition. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione reduced and oxidized (GSH and GSSG), glycogen and electron transport system (ETS) were also measured. The results obtained clearly revealed that both drugs induced oxidative stress in H. diversicolor, shown by the increase on LPO levels and decrease on total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio with the increase of exposure concentrations. Furthermore, the present findings demonstrated that polychaetes biotransformation capacity as well as antioxidant defense mechanisms were not sufficiently efficient to fight against the excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to LPO when organisms were exposed to both drugs. Our results also demonstrated that polychaetes tended to decrease the activity of ETS when exposed to

  7. The accumulation of metals and toxic effects in Nereis virens exposed to pulverised fuel ash.

    PubMed

    Jenner, H A; Bowmer, T

    1992-05-01

    The marine polychaete worm Nereis virens was used to study the bioaccumulation patterns of metal exposures with pulverised fuel ash (PFA). Juvenile N. virens were exposed for 12 weeks to sediments comprised of 100% PFA, 50% PFA-50% clean sand, a reference sediment (contaminated harbour-dredged material) and a clean sand control. Mortality after the first 4 weeks was high at 32-45% in the four sediments. However, this declined to a few percent during the following 8 weeks. Growth expressed as biomass (wet weight) was reduced in bout PFA treatments and the reference sediment. Heavy metal accumulation in the tissues of N. virens was characterised as follows: a group of elements showed negligible to low accumulation (Cd, Cr, Ni, and Zn), As and Cu wich showed a definite, but moderate accumulation: and finally Se, which showed a low accumulation rate, where an uptake equilibrium was not reached after 9 weeks. It is concluded that acute toxic effects did not occur but a population of N. virens inhabiting a PFA dumping site could be affected by high Se concentrations. PMID:24234402

  8. Osteosarcoma of the maxilla with concurrent osteoma in a southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, J. Rodriguez-Ramos; Thomas, N.J.; Dubielzig, R.R.; Drees, R.

    2012-01-01

    Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) are threatened marine mammals that belong to the family Mustelidae and are native to the coast of Central California. Neoplasia is reported infrequently in seaotters. An adult female free-ranging southern sea otter was found alive at Pebble Beach, Monterey County, California, on January 1st, 1994 and died soon after capture. The carcass was submitted to the US Geological Survey – National Wildlife Health Center for necropsy examination. Grossly, a mass with rubbery texture was firmly attached to the left maxillary region of the skull and the nasopharynx was occluded by soft neoplastic tissue. Post-mortem skull radiographs showed an oval, smoothly marginated mineralized opaque mass centered on the left maxilla, extending from the canine tooth to caudal to the molar and replacing portions of the zygomatic arch and palatine and temporal bones. The majority of the mass protruded laterally from the maxilla and was characterized by central homogeneous mineral opacity. Microscopically, the mass was characterized by fully differentiated lamellar non-osteonal bone that expanded beyond the margins of the adjacent normal osteonal bone. Sections of the nasopharyngeal mass were comprised of moderately pleomorphic cells with bony stroma. Gross, microscopical and radiological findings were compatible with maxillary osteosarcoma with concurrent osteoma.

  9. Butyltin residues in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found dead along California coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Guruge, K.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Tanabe, S.; Giesy, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and its degradation products, mono- (MBT) and dibutyltin (DBT), were determined in liver, kidney, and brain tissues of adult southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found dead along the coast of California during 1992a??1996. Hepatic concentrations of butyltin compounds (BTs = MBT + DBT + TBT) ranged from 40 to 9200 ng/g wet wt, which varied depending on the sampling location and gender. Concentrations of BTs in sea otters were comparable to those reported in stranded bottlenose dolphins from the U.S. Atlantic Coast during 1989a??1994. Greater accumulation of butyltins in sea otters was explained by their bottom-feeding habit and the diet that consists exclusively of invertebrates such as mollusks and gastropods. Livers of female sea otters contained approximately 2-fold greater concentrations of BTs than did those of males. The composition of butyltin compounds in sea otter tissues was predominated by TBT in most cases and suggestive of recent exposure. Large harbors such as Monterey Harbor that handle ships legally painted with TBT-containing antifouling paints continued to experience ecotoxicologically significant butyltin contamination. Sea otters, which were affected by infectious diseases, contained greater concentrations of BTs in their tissues than those that died from trauma and other unknown causes.

  10. Joint toxicity of sediment-associated DDT and copper to a polychaete, Nereis succinea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Hong-Xue; You, Jing

    2015-03-01

    As major components in antifouling paints, both dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and copper are ubiquitous in estuarine sediment and have been detected at high concentrations in the harbors in South China. In the present study joint toxicity between DDT and copper to an estuarine polychaete, Nereis succinea, was examined using bioaccumulation potential, growth impairment and change in lipid peroxidation contents as sub-lethal endpoints. In general, the toxicity of DDXs (DDT and its metabolites) and copper acted independently and copper was more toxic to the lugworms at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nevertheless, co-exposure to copper led to a significant reduction in the bioaccumulation of DDXs when the concentrations of DDXs in sediment were high. The inhibition of DDX bioaccumulation by copper may be partially explained by the decrease in the bioavailability of sediment-associated DDXs which were estimated by biomimetic gut fluid extraction. The saturation of the solubilization agents or the inhibition of protease activity in gut fluid of N. succinea by copper limited the DDX bioavailability and the subsequent bioaccumulation. PMID:25424350

  11. Chronic toxicity of phenanthrene to the marine polychaete worm, Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.L. Jr.; Dillon, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment. While environmental concentrations are generally below acutely, lethal levels, chronic, low level exposures may result in subtle sublethal effects. PAHs accumulate in bottom sediments and may represent a hazard to the benthos. Polychaetes are important members of this community. The objective of this study is to evaluate the chronic sublethal effects of one PAH, phenanthrene (PHN), on the polychaete worm, Nereis arenaceodentata. PHN was selected because of its high toxicity to marine invertebrates relative to other PAHs. The response of bivalves to heavy metals and other toxins has usually been determined by observing valve position. Since mussels close their valves to avoid noxious stimuli, experimental delivery of chemicals is uncertain. To obtain constant results. Preston employed plastic spacers to hold the valves apart. This obviates the observation of valve position as an index of response, and some other method is required. Electromyography of intact mussels is one such index, and is shown to be a simple, effective and quantitative measurement of activity. Experiments are reported on the effects of added mercury on salt water and fresh water species. Parts of this Nvork have appeared in brief form.

  12. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals. PMID:23721871

  13. Development and maturation in the nereidid polychaetes Platynereis dumerilii and Nereis succinea exposed to xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, J; Ayoola, J A O; Crompton, J; Rebscher, N; Hardege, J D

    2011-09-01

    Few studies link biochemical, cellular and whole animal effects of toxic compounds with growth and reproductive output on invertebrate model organisms. Thus, we explore the effects of xenoestrogens on nereid worms. Larvae of Platynereis dumerilii exposed to estradiol (E(2)) ethynylestradiol (EE(2)) and nonyplhenol (NP) observing the effects on growth, primordial germ cell (PGC) proliferation and maturation. In addition, a single exposure study was performed with a 50 days latency period on adult worms of Nereis succinea. Since reduced glutathione (GSH) is required in detoxification of NP and is the precursor of the spawning pheromone nereithione (CSSG) in N. succinea, we analysed how the estrogenic chemical NP affects GSH concentrations. PGC were not affected by exposure to E(2) and EE(2) from 24hpf to 6 days. Chronic exposure of P. dumerilii with NP over the full life cycle did not influence segment proliferation. Mature females that developed, even at high concentrations, were able to spawn and successful fertilization occurred. However, at high NP levels no P. dumerilii males matured. A significant decline of GSH can be seen in N. succinea males upon treatment with NP, but not in females, indicating that females stabilize GSH levels even in stress situations. This study shows some results that link the foundation to causally integrate toxic exposure to xenoestrogens with development, growth and reproductive outputs in nereidid polychaetes. PMID:21642012

  14. Glutathione-S-transferase in Nereis succinea (Polychaeta) and its induction by xeno-estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ayoola, James A O; García-Alonso, Javier; Hardege, Jörg D

    2011-10-01

    The need to replace or at least to reduce the use of vertebrates in toxicity tests is a timely major concern in research and industry but to date, efforts made to minimize their use are still far from complete. Increasing demands for toxicity tests put considerable pressures upon the development of future fast and efficient test methods using invertebrates. In fact, to date, few studies provide links between biochemical and cellular effects of xeno-estrogens in aquatic invertebrates. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, as a biomarker of stress exposure, was measured in the population of clamworms (Nereis succinea) from Cardiff Bay. In addition, we examined the effect of single exposure to nonylphenol (NP) on this enzymatic activity. Field study results showed a relationship between the worm's size, reproductive status, and GST activity from the field population. In addition, we show a significant increase in the GST activity at 100 μg/L NP with sex-specific responses. The xeno-estrogens, which could affect reproduction of nereid by interfering in normal endocrinological pathways, are eliminated through GST by conjugation with glutathione. This work shows for the first time that GST activity depends on sex and stage of the clamworms and also that the xeno-estrogen NP induces its activity. This study supports the use of this species as a bioindicator of aquatic pollution and lays the foundation to causally link toxic exposure with reproductive output. PMID:20549611

  15. Osteosarcoma of the maxilla with concurrent osteoma in a southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, J; Thomas, N J; Dubielzig, R R; Drees, R

    2012-01-01

    Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) are threatened marine mammals that belong to the family Mustelidae and are native to the coast of Central California. Neoplasia is reported infrequently in sea otters. An adult female free-ranging southern sea otter was found alive at Pebble Beach, Monterey County, California, on January 1st, 1994 and died soon after capture. The carcass was submitted to the US Geological Survey - National Wildlife Health Center for necropsy examination. Grossly, a mass with rubbery texture was firmly attached to the left maxillary region of the skull and the nasopharynx was occluded by soft neoplastic tissue. Post-mortem skull radiographs showed an oval, smoothly marginated mineralized opaque mass centered on the left maxilla, extending from the canine tooth to caudal to the molar and replacing portions of the zygomatic arch and palatine and temporal bones. The majority of the mass protruded laterally from the maxilla and was characterized by central homogeneous mineral opacity. Microscopically, the mass was characterized by fully differentiated lamellar non-osteonal bone that expanded beyond the margins of the adjacent normal osteonal bone. Sections of the nasopharyngeal mass were comprised of moderately pleomorphic cells with bony stroma. Gross, microscopical and radiological findings were compatible with maxillary osteosarcoma with concurrent osteoma. PMID:22520807

  16. Bioaccumulation kinetics of sediment-associated DE-83 in benthic invertebrates (Nereis succinea, polychaete).

    PubMed

    Tian, Shengyan; Zhu, Lingyan

    2011-06-01

    Polychaetes (Nereis succinea) were exposed to DE-83 contaminated sediments to investigate the bioaccumulation and bioavailability of nona- and deca-BDEs in sediment. All the major congeners in DE-83 were bioavailable to the lugworms. The uptake coefficients (K(s)) of nona- and deca-BDE congeners in lugworms were in the range of 0.18-0.65 (d(-1)), with the values of BDE-207 and -208 slightly higher than those of BDE-206 and -209. Elimination of nona- and deca-BDE congeners from lugworms was very fast. The estimated half-lives of nona- and deca-BDE congeners in the lugworms were at 0.7d. The bioavailability of nona- and deca-BDE congeners was very low, with BSAF of 0.017 for BDE-206 and -209 and 0.054 for BDE-207 and -208. These may be due to the large molecular size and high affinity of PBDEs to sediment particles. The contribution of BDE-206 in the profile of nona-BDEs in lugworm tissue decreased with exposure time while those of BDE-207 and -208 increased, which could be the result of the biotransformation of BDE-209 to BDE-207 and -208. PMID:21356541

  17. Effects of estuarine sediment contamination on feeding and on key physiological functions of the polychaete Hediste diversicolor: Laboratory and in situ assays.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Lima, Inês; Ribeiro, Rui; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2006-06-15

    This study aimed at integrating postexposure feeding and some biochemical parameters in the responses of the estuarine polychaeta, Hediste diversicolor, to controlled laboratory exposure conditions and to in situ exposures scenario of sediment contamination. Since H. diversicolor feeding may be considered as a major rate-limiting step in the processing of detritus in European estuaries, a reduction in feeding activity may have implications not only at the individual and population level of the species but also in detritus processing and in organic matter decomposition rates at the ecosystem level. The biochemical parameters were chosen as indicators of four key physiological functions: neurotransmission, metabolic condition, detoxification processes and antioxidant defences. The Mira and Sado estuaries, located in the Southwest coast of Portugal and classified as undisturbed and impacted, respectively, were selected as sites for this study. A significant depression in H. diversicolor postexposure feeding (from 30 to 70%) was consistently detected in all impacted sediments, supporting the sensitivity and responsiveness of feeding as a sublethal toxicity endpoint. Alongside with a reduced energy intake, an increased rate of organisms' anaerobic metabolism, as evidenced by an enhancement of lactate dehydrogenase activity (up to 1.5-fold), suggested a rapid need of additional energy to ameliorate chemical stress. Moreover, oxidative stress was shown to be an important mechanism of toxicity of the impacted sediments in H. diversicolor, as evidenced by a marked reduction in the glutathione redox status (up to 6.5-fold) and an increase in lipid peroxides levels (up to 2.3-fold) in organisms exposed to the most impacted sediments. Results of the in situ assay, conducted to assess the ecological relevance of sediment laboratory toxicity estimates and their application to make valid field extrapolations, revealed a lack of agreement in the response of catalase in organisms

  18. ParaHox gene expression in larval and postlarval development of the polychaete Nereis virens (Annelida, Lophotrochozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Kulakova, Milana A; Cook, Charles E; Andreeva, Tatiana F

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors that encode ANTP-class homeobox genes play crucial roles in determining the body plan organization and specification of different organs and tissues in bilaterian animals. The three-gene ParaHox family descends from an ancestral gene cluster that existed before the evolution of the Bilateria. All three ParaHox genes are reported from deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but not to date from any ecdysozoan taxa, and there is evidence that the ParaHox genes, like the related Hox genes, were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. However, unlike the Hox genes, there is as yet no strong evidence that the ParaHox genes are expressed in spatial and temporal order during embryogenesis. Results We isolated fragments of the three Nereis virens ParaHox genes, then used these as probes for whole-mount in situ hybridization in larval and postlarval worms. In Nereis virens the ParaHox genes participate in antero-posterior patterning of ectodermal and endodermal regions of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells in the segment ganglia. The expression of these genes occurs in larval development in accordance with the position of these cells along the main body axis and in postlarval development in accordance with the position of cells in ganglia along the antero-posterior axis of each segment. In none of these tissues does expression of the three ParaHox genes follow the rule of temporal collinearity. Conclusion In Nereis virens the ParaHox genes are expressed during antero-posterior patterning of the digestive system (ectodermal foregut and hindgut, and endodermal midgut) of Nereis virens. These genes are also expressed during axial specification of ventral neuroectodermal cell domains, where the expression domains of each gene are re-iterated in each neuromere except for the first parapodial segment. These expression domains are probably predetermined and may be directed on the antero-posterior axis by the Hox genes, whose

  19. Influence of an elevated cadmium level in the food on growth and food conversion of Nereis succinea

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhoff, H.-G.

    1983-11-01

    In recent times increasing amounts of cadmium have been introduced into the aquatic environment as could be traced in sediments. Cadmium, however, has various negative physiological effects among which sublethal Cd pollution is reported to affect reproduction, development and growth. Growth and reproduction, however, are the premise for the existence of a population. In order to analyze effects of Cd on growing organisms, in this study the polychaete Nereis succinea was exposed to sublethal Cd concentrations in the food. As growth related parameters were carried out in spring (April to June) and summer/autumn (August to October).

  20. Relationship between the lability of sediment-bound metals (Cd, Cu, Zn) and their bioaccumulation in benthic invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiard, J.-C.; Geffard, A.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Crouzet, C.

    2007-04-01

    The present study has investigated metal contamination at nine sites (10 sampling stations) from the English Channel to the Mediterranean Sea, including low level and highly contaminated sediments. Both total and labile concentrations of metals were determined in superficial sediments. The influence of different pHs was tested and metal lability at pHs encountered in the gut of invertebrates (the ragworm Nereis diversicolor, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas) was compared with the distribution of metals in various operationally defined geochemical fractions. Cd showed the highest lability and Cu the lowest, whereas Zn lability was intermediate. Metal concentrations were determined in bivalves at six sites and in worms at three sites. Cd in living organisms and labile Cd in sediments increased in proportion over the gradient of contamination. This relationship did not always hold for Cu and Zn and these exceptions are discussed. Even if sediments are not the only source of metal contamination in marine invertebrates, the procedure proposed here to assess metal bioavailability by remobilising sediment-bound metals at physiological pHs, seems a significant improvement of the existing methodologies of risk assessment.

  1. Genotoxic and oxidative responses in coelomocytes of Eisenia fetida and Hediste diversicolor exposed to lipid-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and CdCl2.

    PubMed

    Saez, Gladys; Aye, Mélanie; De Meo, Michel; Aimé, Ahissan; Bestel, Isabelle; Barthélémy, Philippe; Di Giorgio, Carole

    2015-07-01

    The emerging of Quantum Dots utilization in industrial or medicinal fields involved a potentially increase of these nanoparticles in environment. In this work, the genotoxic (comet assay) and oxidative effects (SOD activity, TBARS) of functionalized-QDs and cadmium chloride were investigated on Hediste diversicolor and Eisenia fetida coelomocytes. Results demonstrated that functionalized-QDs (QDNs) and cadmium chloride induced DNA damages through different mechanisms that depended on the nano- or ionic nature of Cd. The minimal genotoxic concentrations for H. diversicolor (<0.001ng/g for QDNs and CdCl2 ) were lower than for E. fetida (between 0.01 and 0.1 ng/g for QDNs, and between 0.001 and 0.01 ng/g for CdCl2 ). These results showed that H. diversicolor was more sensitive than E. fetida. The two contaminants had a low impact on the oxidative stress markers. PMID:24500942

  2. Ontogenetic Scaling of Theoretical Bite Force in Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Law, Chris J; Young, Colleen; Mehta, Rita S

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism attributed to niche divergence is often linked to differentiation between the sexes in both dietary resources and characters related to feeding and resource procurement. Although recent studies have indicated that southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) exhibit differences in dietary preferences as well as sexual dimorphism in skull size and shape, whether these intersexual differences translate to differentiation in feeding performances between the sexes remains to be investigated. To test the hypothesis that scaling patterns of bite force, a metric of feeding performance, differ between the sexes, we calculated theoretical bite forces for 55 naturally deceased male and female southern sea otters spanning the size ranges encountered over ontogeny. We then used standardized major axis regressions to simultaneously determine the scaling patterns of theoretical bite forces and skull components across ontogeny and assess whether these scaling patterns differed between the sexes. We found that positive allometric increases in theoretical bite force resulted from positive allometric increases in physiological cross-sectional area for the major jaw adductor muscle and mechanical advantage. Closer examination revealed that allometric increases in temporalis muscle mass and relative allometric decreases in out-lever lengths are driving these patterns. In our analysis of sexual dimorphism, we found that scaling patterns of theoretical bite force and morphological traits do not differ between the sexes. However, adult sea otters differed in their absolute bite forces, revealing that adult males exhibited greater bite forces as a result of their larger sizes. We found intersexual differences in biting ability that provide some support for the niche divergence hypothesis. Continued work in this field may link intersexual differences in feeding functional morphology with foraging ecology to show how niche divergence has the potential to reinforce sexual

  3. Comparison of the ecological energetics of the polychaetes capitella capitata and nereis succinea in experimental systems receiving similar levels of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenore, K. R.

    The ecological energetics, including specific growth rate, population production and trophic transfer, was measured for the polychaetes Capitella capitata and Nereis succinea in laboratory systems receiving similar detritus food rations (1500 mg C · m -2 · d -1). The opportunistic Capitella species more effectively exploited the available food because of a higher specific growth rate and a higher population density. The metabolic cost was high (production : respiration 0.66, versus 2.50 for Nereis), but a greater proportion of the available detritus went into production in Capitella (trophic transfer efficiency is the ratio between worm production and food supplied; 27% for Capitella and 3% for Nereis). Opportunistic species such as Capitella capitata can exploit high organic conditions as in these laboratory growth studies. They effectively exploit not only by fast population increase when food levels increase, but also by achieving high population densities. The more typical, larger, benthic deposit feeders, such as Nereis succinea, not only have a shower population response to increasing food, but behavioural interactions due to crowding ( i.e., increased mortality) may limit population density to levels that do not maximally exploit available food.

  4. DNA alterations triggered by environmentally relevant polymetallic concentrations in marine clams Ruditapes philippinarum and polychaete worms Hediste diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Dedeh, Amina; Ciutat, Aurélie; Tran, Damien; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2014-11-01

    We exposed marine clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) and aquatic worms (Hediste diversicolor) to environmentally relevant concentrations of two metal mixtures each containing three divalent metals [(C₁ in µg/L) cadmium (Cd) 1, mercury (Hg) 0.1, and lead (Pb) 4] and [C₂ in µg/L) Cd 17, Hg 1.1, and Pb 55]. Animals collected in the Arcachon Bay were exposed for 8 days in microcosms made up of a mixed biotope consisting of a water column and natural marine sediment both taken up from the Arcachon Bay. Bioaccumulation analysis showed a significant increase of Cd, Hg, and Pb in clams, particularly at C₂ concentration in the water column reaching, in soft body, 2.3 ± 0.3 µg Cd/g, 0.7 ± 0.2 µg Hg/g, and 45 µg Pb/g dry weight (dw). DNA alterations and upregulation of the cox1 mitochondrial gene were also observed in clam gill after exposure to the metal blend. For worms exposed to the C₂ metal blend, DNA alterations and significant increase of Cd and Hg concentrations were observed reaching 0.5 ± 0.1 µg Cd/g and 2 ± 0.6 µg Hg/g dw. PMID:24998356

  5. Isolation and characterization of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from diseased post-larvae of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junpeng; Li, Juan; Thompson, Kim D; Li, Chuanxia; Han, Hongcao

    2007-02-01

    Mass mortality among the post-larvae of cultured abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta has occurred on the south coast of China since 2002. The diseased abalone are generally 10 to 30 days old, and typical signs of the disease include them turning white in colour and falling off the diatom films on which they were cultured. Among sixteen different motile bacteria isolated from the diseased post-larvae, four were identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus on the basis of biochemical characteristics when compared with those of a V. parahaemolyticus type strain ATCC 17802(T). Isolate 25, a representative isolate of V. parahaemolyticus recovered from diseased abalone, was virulent for the post-larvae with an LD(50) value of 3.5 x 10(5) CFU (colony forming units)/ml. All moribund post-larvae artificially infected with the bacterium turned white and fell off the diatom films on which they were cultured as seen to occur during natural outbreaks of the disease, and it was possible to recover the bacterium from artificially infected post-larvae. The results of the study indicate that V. parahaemolyticus is a pathogenic bacterium to abalone post-larvae. PMID:17304623

  6. Using stable isotopes to investigate individual diet specialization in California sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, S.D.; Tinker, M.T.; Monson, D.H.; Oftedal, O.T.; Ralls, K.; Staedler, M.M.; Fogel, M.L.; Estes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Differences in diet composition among conspecifics (dietary specialization) have been documented across a broad range of taxonomic groups and habitats, and such variation at the individual level is increasingly recognized as an important component of diversity in trophic interactions. Accurate identification of individual dietary specialization, however, requires longitudinal dietary records that are labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive to obtain for many species. Here we explore the use of stable isotopes (??13C and ??15N) as a promising technique for detecting and quantifying patterns of individual dietary specialization. Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) offer a unique opportunity for testing this approach because (1) they consume a wide variety of prey that span multiple trophic levels, habitats, and ecologically defined functional groups: and (2) individual diet specialization can be validated with existing observational data. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sea otter vibrissae (n = 31) in order to characterize inter- and intra-individual variation in sea otter diets at Monterey Bay, California, USA. At the population level, sea otters showed substantial variation in both ??13C and ??15N values, occupying nearly all of the "isotopic space" created by the diversity of isotopic signatures of potential prey taxa. Most of the variation in sea otter vibrissae was accounted for by differences between individuals, with much less contributed by within-individual variation. A majority of sea otters (???80%) showed relatively little temporal variability in isotopic composition, suggesting that the proportional composition of most individuals' diets is relatively constant over time; a few individuals (???20%) exhibited a high degree of intra-vibrissa isotopic variability, suggesting seasonal shifts in diet composition. These results and our interpretation of them were supported by long-term observational data on the diets of radio-tagged sea otters from

  7. Impact of polychaetes (Nereis spp. and Arenicola marina) on carbon biogeochemistry in coastal marine sediments†

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Known effects of bioturbation by common polychaetes (Nereis spp. and Arenicola marina) in Northern European coastal waters on sediment carbon diagenesis is summarized and assessed. The physical impact of irrigation and reworking activity of the involved polychaete species is evaluated and related to their basic biology. Based on past and present experimental work, it is concluded that effects of bioturbation on carbon diagenesis from manipulated laboratory experiments cannot be directly extrapolated to in situ conditions. The 45–260% flux (e.g., CO2 release) enhancement found in the laboratory is much higher than usually observed in the field (10–25%). Thus, the faunal induced enhancement of microbial carbon oxidation in natural sediments instead causes a reduction of the organic matter inventory rather than an increased release of CO2 across the sediment/water interface. The relative decrease in organic inventory (Gb/Gu) is inversely related to the relative increase in microbial capacity for organic matter decay (kb/ku). The equilibrium is controlled by the balance between organic input (deposition of organic matter at the sediment surface) and the intensity of bioturbation. Introduction of oxygen to subsurface sediment and removal of metabolites are considered the two most important underlying mechanisms for the stimulation of carbon oxidation by burrowing fauna. Introduction of oxygen to deep sediment layers of low microbial activity, either by downward irrigation transport of overlying oxic water or by upward reworking transport of sediment to the oxic water column will increase carbon oxidation of anaerobically refractory organic matter. It appears that the irrigation effect is larger than and to a higher degree dependent on animal density than the reworking effect. Enhancement of anaerobic carbon oxidation by removal of metabolites (reduced diffusion scale) may cause a significant increase in total sediment metabolism. This is caused by three possible

  8. Influences of DMP on the Fertilization Process and Subsequent Embryogenesis of Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor supertexta) by Gametes Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Di-methyl phthalate (DMP), a typical endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC), is ubiquitously distributed in aquatic environments; yet studies regarding its impact on gametes and the resulting effects on embryogenesis in marine gastropods are relatively scarce. In this study, the influences of DMP on the gametes and subsequent developmental process of abalone (Haliotis diversicolor supertexta, a representative marine benthic gastropod) were assessed. Newborn abalone eggs and sperm were exposed separately to different DMP concentrations (1, 10 or 100 ppb) for 60 min. At the end-point of exposure, the DMP-treated eggs and sperm were collected for analysis of their ultra-structures, ATPase activities and total lipid levels, and the fertilized gametes (embryos) were collected to monitor related reproductive parameters (fertilization rate, abnormal development rate and hatching success rate). Treatment with DMP did not significantly alter the structure or total lipid content of eggs at any of the doses tested. Hatching failures and morphological abnormalities were only observed with the highest dose of DMP (100 ppb). However, DMP exposure did suppress sperm ATPase activities and affect the morphological character of their mitochondria. DMP-treated sperm exhibited dose-dependent decreases in fertilization efficiency, morphogenesis and hatchability. Relatively obvious toxicological effects were observed when both sperm and eggs were exposed to DMP. Furthermore, RT-PCR results indicate that treatment of gametes with DMP changed the expression patterns of physiologically-regulated genes (cyp3a, 17β-HSD-11 and 17β-HSD-12) in subsequent embryogenesis. Taken together, this study proofed that pre-fertilization exposure of abalone eggs, sperm or both to DMP adversely affects the fertilization process and subsequent embryogenesis. PMID:22028799

  9. Acute toxicity of nonylphenols and bisphenol A to the embryonic development of the abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Tam, Nora F Y; Guan, Yuntao; Yasojima, Makoto; Zhou, Jin; Gao, Baoyu

    2011-08-01

    Acute toxic effects and mechanisms of two typical endocrine disrupting chemicals, nonylphenols (NPs) and bisphenol A (BPA), to the embryonic development of the abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta, were investigated by the two-stage embryo toxicity test. The 12-h median effective concentrations (EC(50)) of NPs and BPA to the trochophore development were 1016.22 and 30.72 μg L(-1), respectively, and the respective 96-h EC(50) values based on the completion of metamorphosis (another experimental endpoint) were reduced to 11.65 and 1.02 μg L(-1). Longer exposure time and magnified exposure concentrations in the benthic diatom, that serves as both food source and settlement substrate during the metamorphosis, via bioaccumulation, led to the higher sensitivity of metamorphosis to target EDCs compared with the trochophore development. The hazard concentrations for 5% of the species (HC(5)) could be employed as the safety thresholds for the embryonic development of the abalone. The 12-h HC(5) values of NPs and BPA were 318.68 and 13.93 μg L(-1), respectively, and the respective 96-h HC(5) values were 0.99 and 0.18 μg L(-1), which were at environmentally relevant levels. Results of proteomic responses revealed that NPs and BPA altered various functional proteins in the abalone larvae with slight differences between each chemical and affected various physiological functions, such as energy and substance metabolism, cell signalling, formation of cytoskeleton and cilium, immune and stress responses at the same time, leading to the failure of metamorphosis. PMID:21479784

  10. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on Nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata: Non treatment factors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Dillon, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    Initial development of a chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata is described. The test was initiated with 2 to 3-week-old postemergent juvenile worms and terminated after 21 days. The sublethal test end point was estimated individual somatic growth rate (milligrams dry weight/day). The potential bias due to selected nontreatment factors on polychaete survival and growth was evaluated. For example, grain size had no effect, while the number of worms added to each exposure vessel was critical. Direct transfer from 30 ppt to salinities < or = ppt had a highly significant and adverse effect on survival and growth. Both survival and growth of juvenile worms may be adversely affected if test conditions involve exposures to > or = mg/L ammonia or > or = mg/L hydrogen sulfide.... Chronic, Growth, Neanthes, Sediment, Sublethal.

  11. Metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation in the polychaete Nereis (Alitta) virens (Sars): The effects of site-specific sediment characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pini, J M; Richir, J; Watson, G J

    2015-06-30

    The present study investigates the relationships between copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) concentrations in sediment, pore water and their bioaccumulation in the polychaete Nereis (Alitta) virens, as well as the importance of site-specific sediment characteristics in that process. Sediment, pore water and N. virens were sampled from seven sites with different pollution histories along the English Channel coast. Results showed that site-specific metal levels and sediment characteristics were important in determining the bioavailability of metals to worms. Significant correlations were found between Cu in the sediment and in the pore water and between Zn in the pore water and in N. virens. Zn from the pore water was thus more readily available from a dissolved source to N. virens than Cu. Data also showed that metal concentrations in N. virens were lower than those found in other closely related polychaetes, indicating that it may regulate tissue concentrations of Cu and Zn. PMID:25935802

  12. Effect of cooling rate and cryoprotectant concentration on intracellular ice formation of small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) eggs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chiang-Yi; Yeh, Yu-Hui Flora; Lee, Po-Ting; Lin, Ta-Te

    2013-08-01

    The intracellular ice formation (IIF) behavior of Haliotis diversicolor (small abalone) eggs is investigated in this study, in relation to controlling the cooling rate and the concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The IIF phenomena are monitored under a self-developed thermoelectric cooling (TEC) cryomicroscope system which can achieve accurate temperature control without the use of liquid nitrogen. The accuracy of the isothermal and ramp control is within ±0.5 °C. The IIF results indicate that the IIF of small abalone eggs is well suppressed at cooling rates of 1.5, 3, 7 and 12 °C/min with 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0M DMSO in sea water. As 2.0M DMSO in sea water is the minimum concentration that has sufficient IIF suppression, it is selected as the suspension solution for the cryopreservation of small abalone eggs in order to consider the solution's toxicity effect. Moreover, IIF characteristics of the cumulative probability of IIF temperature distribution are shown to be well fitted by the Weibull probabilistic distribution. According to our IIF results and the Weibull distribution parameters, we conclude that cooling at 1.5 °C/min from 20 to -50 °C with 2.0M DMSO in sea water is more feasible than other combinations of cooling rates and DMSO concentrations in our experiments. Applying this protocol and observing the subsequent osmotic activity, 48.8% of small abalone eggs are osmotically active after thawing. In addition, the higher the cooling rate, the less chance of osmotically active eggs. A separate fertility test experiment, with a cryopreservation protocol of 1.5 °C/min cooling rate and 2.0M DMSO in sea water, achieves a hatching rate of 23.7%. This study is the first to characterize the IIF behavior of small abalone eggs in regard to the cooling rate and the DMSO concentration. The Weibull probabilistic model fitting in this study is an approach that can be applied by other researchers for effective cryopreservation variability estimation and

  13. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata; bioaccumulation from bedded sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    In previous studies with San Francisco Bay sediments, minimal chronic sublethal effects were detected (Miscellaneous Paper D-93-1 and another Miscellaneous Paper in preparation by Moore and Dillon). To ensure that the lack of effects was not due to a lack of contaminant uptake, a bioaccumulation experiment was conducted. Bioaccumulation from bedded sediments was evaluated following a 9-week exposure with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Two sediments were evaluated, a contaminated San Francisco Bay test sediment and a clean control sediment from Sequim, WA. Animals were exposed as early juveniles through adulthood. Tissues were analyzed for metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pesticides. Worms exposed to the contaminated San Francisco Bay sediment had significantly higher tissue residues of silver (0.30 mg/kg dry weight) and tributyltin (0.298 mg/kg dry weight). Conversely, tissue residues of control animals were significantly higher in cadmium (0.67 mg/kg dry weight) and lead (1.89 mg/kg dry weight). Small Amounts (0.02 mg/kg dry weight) of aldrin and dieldrin were measured in worms exposed to the contaminated sediment, while dieldrin and 8-BHC were found in Bioaccumulation, Neanthes, Chronic sublethal, San Francisco Bay, Dredged, Material, Sediment.

  14. Development of a chronic sublethal bioassay for evaluating contaminated sediment with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, T.M.; Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B. )

    1993-03-01

    Development of a chronic sublethal sediment bioassay with the polychaete Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata is described. The sublethal test end point was estimated individual somatic growth rate. The test was initiated with two-to three-week-old post-emergent juvenile worms and continued for 28 d. The potential bias due to selected nontreatment factors on polychaete survival and growth was evaluated. For example, grain size has no significant effect, whereas the number of worms placed in each exposure vessel was critical. Direct transfer from 30[per thousand] seawater to salinites [<=] 15[per thousand] had a highly significant and adverse effect on survival and growth. Both survival and growth of juvenile worms may be adversely affected if test conditions involve exposures to [>=] 0.7 mg/L un-ionized ammonia or [>=] 5 mg/L hydrogen sulfide. Survival of juvenile worms to concentrations of the reference toxicant, cadmium chloride, approximating the 96-h LC50 (5 mg/L) was used as a quality control measure. Results are expressed in control chart format analogous to methods used in analytical chemistry.

  15. Behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Heather S.; Oates, Stori C.; Staedler, Michelle M.; Tinker, M. Tim; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, James T.; Miller, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneu-moperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  16. PREVALENCE, PATHOLOGY, AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH STREPTOCOCCUS PHOCAE INFECTION IN SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS), 2004-10.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Georgina; Smith, Woutrina; Dominik, Clare; Batac, Francesca; Dodd, Erin; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer; Jessup, David; Chantrey, Julian; Miller, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated beta-hemolytic streptococci as opportunistic pathogens of marine mammals, including southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), but little is known about their prevalence or pathophysiology. Herein, we focus on risk factors for sea otter infection by a single beta-hemolytic streptococcal species, Streptococcus phocae. Streptococcus phocae was first identified as a marine mammal pathogen in 1994, and the first report in southern sea otters was in 2009. Its broad host range encompasses fish, pinnipeds, cetaceans, and mustelids, with S. phocae now recognized as an important pathogen of marine species worldwide. We assessed risk factors and lesion patterns for S. phocae infection in southern sea otters. Using archival necropsy data, S. phocae prevalence was 40.5% in fresh dead otters examined 2004-10. Skin trauma of any type was identified as a significant risk factor for S. phocae infection. The risk of infection was similar regardless of the cause and relative severity of skin trauma, including mating or fight wounds, shark bite, and anthropogenic trauma. Streptococcus phocae-infected sea otters were also more likely to present with abscesses or bacterial septicemia. Our findings highlight the importance of S. phocae as an opportunistic pathogen of sea otters and suggest that the most likely portal of entry is damaged skin. Even tiny skin breaks appear to facilitate bacterial colonization, invasion, abscess formation, and systemic spread. Our data provide important insights for management and care of marine species. PMID:26555115

  17. Exposure to copper and a cytotoxic polyunsaturated aldehyde induces reproductive failure in the marine polychaete Nereis virens (Sars).

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Gary S; Lewis, Ceri; Pickavance, Georgia; Taylor, Rebecca L; Bentley, Matthew G

    2011-07-01

    A number of metabolites from microalgae, including polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs), have been implicated as inducers of reproductive failure in aquatic invertebrates. Current work describes the impacts of the model PUA 2E, 4E-decadienal and copper sulphate applied in isolation and combination on the reproductive performance of the infaunal polychaete, Nereis virens (Sars). The reproductive and life cycle parameters investigated were; fertilisation success, larval survival, sperm motility (percent motility and curvilinear velocity) and sperm DNA damage. Exposure to decadienal and copper sulphate in isolation resulted in dose- and time-dependent reductions for each evaluated endpoint. Fertilisation success was heavily impacted at concentrations of up to 10μM for both compounds. Copper sulphate was more toxic in larval survival assays. Sperm motility impacts, although variable, exhibited rapid onset with pronounced reductions in sperm swimming performance observed within 3min of exposure. The extent of DNA damage was dose-dependent, and in the case of decadienal, rapid in onset. Dual compound exposures resulted in enhanced overall toxicity in all assays. Logistic regression analysis of fertilisation and larval survival assays showed significant synergistic interactions between decadienal and copper sulphate; an increase in concentration of either compound resulted in enhanced toxicity of the other. Longer exposure durations during larval survival assays demonstrated a further increase in both toxicity and synergism. The results indicate that the effects of additional environmental stressors must be considered when attempting to extrapolate laboratory-derived single compound exposures to field situations. PMID:21570935

  18. Reproduction, population dynamics and production of Nereis falsa (Nereididae: Polychaeta) on the rocky coast of El Kala National Park, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daas, Tarek; Younsi, Mourad; Daas-Maamcha, Ouided; Gillet, Patrick; Scaps, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    The polychaete Nereis falsa Quatrefages, 1866 is present in the area of El Kala National Park on the East coast of Algeria. Field investigations were carried out from January to December 2007 to characterize the populations' reproductive cycle, secondary production and dynamics. Reproduction followed the atokous type, and spawning occured from mid-June to the end of August/early September when sea temperature was highest (20-23°C). The diameter of mature oocytes was approximately 180 μm. Mean lifespan was estimated to about one year. In 2007, the mean density was 11.27 ind. m-2 with a minimum of 7.83 ind. m-2 in April and a maximum of 14.5 ind. m-2 in February. The mean annual biomass was 1.36 g m-2 (fresh weight) with a minimum of 0.86 g m-2 in December and a maximum of 2.00 g m-2 in June. The population consisted of two cohorts distinguishable from size frequency distributions. One cohort corresponded to the recruitment of 2006 and the other appeared during the study period in September 2007. The annual production of N. falsa was 1.45 g m-2 year-1, and the production/biomass ratio was 1.07 year-1.

  19. Comparison of marine sediment toxicity test protocols for the amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius and the polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Phillips, B.M. |

    1998-05-01

    The 10-d amphipod survival toxicity test protocol using Rhepoxynius abronius was compared to the 20-d polychaete worm growth and survival protocol using Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Of the 341 sediment samples collected in California and tested over a 2-year period. 78% significantly inhibited R. abronius survival, whereas 2 and 26% significantly inhibited N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass, respectively. Statistical power associated with each protocol endpoint was determined by calculating the minimum significant difference (MSD) for each test protocol for this data set. The 90th percentile MSDs for R. abronius survival and N. arenaceodentata survival and biomass were 16, 36, and 56%, respectively. Survival of R. abronius was significantly negatively correlated with a number of toxicants including metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls. No significant correlations were determined between N. arenaceodentata survival or biomass and contaminants measured. Amphipod survival was also negatively correlated with sediment total organic carbon and grain size, but when samples with a high percent fine grain size (>90% fines) were eliminated from consideration, the overall conclusions of the study were not altered. The 10-d amphipod survival protocol using R. abronius was a more sensitive indicator of toxicity, but the results indicate that this was due to greater statistical power rather than greater sensitivity of the test organisms or endpoints.

  20. Accumulation and elimination of14C-γ-HCH (lindane) in Nereis virens (Polychaeta) with consideration of metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerke, H.; Ernst, W.

    1980-03-01

    In two experiments, conducted at 6° and 16 °C, 43 Nereis virens were exposed to14C-labelled γ-HCH (lindane) at a concentration of 1 µg/l, which was maintained by intermittent monitoring and redosing. A closed system with individuals living in glass tubes was used. At equilibrium and during the subsequent phase of elimination, both γ-HCH and metabolites were determined in individual worms as well as in the water and faeces throughout the entire experiment. The bioconcentration factors of γ-HCH were 480 and 440 at 6° and 16 °C, respectively; those based on total radioactivity were 500 and 410. These factors were in the upper range of those known for other aquatic animals. The elimination may be described by an exponential function. The initial 50% decrease of γ-HCH and γ-HCH+metabolites in the worms occurred at both temperatures in 2 and 3 days, respectively. The percentage of γ-HCH metabolites in worms increased considerably during the elimination period. At least four metabolites were detected in worms and water. If pollutants are evaluated by accumulation and elimination kinetics, metabolization has to be taken into account.

  1. Coastal freshwater runoff is a risk factor for Toxoplasma gondii infection of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Gardner, I A; Kreuder, C; Paradies, D M; Worcester, K R; Jessup, D A; Dodd, E; Harris, M D; Ames, J A; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    2002-07-01

    The association among anthropogenic environmental disturbance, pathogen pollution and the emergence of infectious diseases in wildlife has been postulated, but not always well supported by epidemiologic data. Specific evidence of coastal contamination of the marine ecosystem with the zoonotic protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, and extensive infection of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) along the California coast was documented by this study. To investigate the extent of exposure and factors contributing to the apparent emergence of T. gondii in southern sea otters, we compiled environmental, demographic and serological data from 223 live and dead sea otters examined between 1997 and 2001. The T. gondii seroprevalence was 42% (49/116) for live otters, and 62% (66/107) for dead otters. Demographic and environmental data were examined for associations with T. gondii seropositivity, with the ultimate goal of identifying spatial clusters and demographic and environmental risk factors for T. gondii infection. Spatial analysis revealed clusters of T. gondii-seropositive sea otters at two locations along the coast, and one site with lower than expected T. gondii seroprevalence. Risk factors that were positively associated with T. gondii seropositivity in logistic regression analysis included male gender, older age and otters sampled from the Morro Bay region of California. Most importantly, otters sampled near areas of maximal freshwater runoff were approximately three times more likely to be seropositive to T. gondii than otters sampled in areas of low flow. No association was found between seropositivity to T. gondii and human population density or exposure to sewage. This study provides evidence implicating land-based surface runoff as a source of T. gondii infection for marine mammals, specifically sea otters, and provides a convincing illustration of pathogen pollution in the marine ecosystem. PMID:12076629

  2. Novel control and steady-state correction method for standard 28-day bioaccumulation tests using Nereis virens.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Erin R; Steevens, Jeffery A; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Paterson, Gord; Drouillard, Ken G

    2011-06-01

    Evaluation of dredged material for aquatic placement requires assessment of bioaccumulation potentials for benthic organisms using standardized laboratory bioaccumulation tests. Critical to the interpretation of these data is the assessment of steady state for bioaccumulated residues needed to generate biota sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and to address control correction of day 0 contaminant residues measured in bioassay organisms. This study applied a novel performance reference compound approach with a pulse-chase experimental design to investigate elimination of a series of isotopically labeled polychlorinated biphenyl ((13)C-PCBs) in the polychaete worm Nereis virens while simultaneously evaluating native PCB bioaccumulation from field-collected sediments. Results demonstrated that all (13)C-PCBs, with the exception of (13)C-PCB209 (> 80%), were eliminated by more than 90% after 28 d. The three sediment types yielded similar (13)C-PCB whole-body elimination rate constants (k(tot)) producing the following predictive equation: log k(tot)  =  - 0.09 × log K(OW)  - 0.45. The rapid loss of (13)C-PCBs from worms over the bioassay period indicated that control correction, by subtracting day 0 residues, would result in underestimates of bioavailable sediment residues. Significant uptake of native PCBs was observed only in the most contaminated sediment and proceeded according to kinetic model predictions with steady-state BSAFs ranging from 1 to 3 and peaking for congeners of log K(OW) between 6.2 and 6.5. The performance reference compound approach can provide novel information about chemical toxicokinetics and also serve as a quality check for the physiological performance of the bioassay organism during standardized bioaccumulation testing. PMID:21381091

  3. Temporal association between land-based runoff events and California sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) protozoal mortalities.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Karen; Miller, Melissa; Mazet, Jonna

    2012-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona have caused significant morbidity and mortality in threatened Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) along the central California coast. Because only terrestrial animals are known to serve as definitive hosts for T. gondii and S. neurona, infections in otters suggest a land to sea flow of these protozoan pathogens. To better characterize the role of overland runoff in delivery of terrestrially derived fecal pathogens to the near shore, we assessed the temporal association between indicators of runoff and the timing of sea otter deaths due to T. gondii and S. neurona. Sea otter stranding records 1998-2004, from Monterey and Estero bays were reviewed and cases identified for which T. gondii or S. neurona were determined to be a primary or contributing cause of death. Precipitation and stream flow data from both study sites were used as indicators of land-based runoff. Logistic regression was applied to determine if a temporal association could be detected between protozoal mortalities and runoff indicators that occur in the 2 mo preceding mortality events. A significant association was found between S. neurona otter deaths at Estero Bay and increased stream flow that occurred 30-60 days prior to mortality events. At this site, the cause of otter mortality following increased river flows was 12 times more likely to be S. neurona infection compared with nonprotozoal causes of death. There were no significant associations between the timing of T. gondii otter deaths and indicators of overland runoff. Our results indicate that the association between overland runoff and otter mortalities is affected by geography as well as parasite type, and highlight the complex mechanisms that influence transmission of terrestrially derived pathogens to marine wildlife. Policy and management practices that aim to mitigate discharges of contaminated overland runoff can aid conservation efforts by reducing pathogen pollution of coastal

  4. Influence of bioturbation by the amphipod Corophium volutator on fluoranthene uptake in the marine polychaete Nereis virens

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarelli, S.; Kater, B.J.; Straalen, N.M. van

    2000-06-01

    The uptake kinetics of fluoranthene in the polychaete worm Nereis virens were investigated in the presence and in the absence of amphipods to examine the effects of sediment bioturbation by the benthic amphipod Corophium volutator on the uptake in worms. Worms only and worms together with two different densities of amphipods were exposed to fluoranthene-spiked sediment for 12 d. Worms and overlying water samples for fluoranthene analyses were taken and total suspended solids in water column were measured after 1, 2, 5, 8, and 12 d. Results showed that in all treatments fluoranthene was rapidly accumulated by N. virens during the first two days and a steady state was reached within five days of exposure. Biota to sediment accumulation factors normalized to lipid concentration and to sediment organic carbon (BAF{sub ioc}) or worms exposed with the highest number of amphipods were significantly higher (two to three times) compared to worms exposed with fewer or without amphipods after one and two days of exposure. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs), calculated as the ratio between the uptake (k{sub 1}) and elimination (k{sub 2}) rate constants were not significantly different among treatments. When BCFs were calculated on the basis of dissolved fluoranthene concentrations (BCF{sub diss}), values of the treatments where worms were exposed with 100 and 300 amphipods were slightly higher than those calculated on the basis of total (dissolved + particle-bound) aqueous fluoranthene (BCF{sub tot}). However, the presence of fluoranthene bound to dissolved organic matter could have accounted for lower than expected BCF{sub diss} values. The results suggest that bioturbation by amphiopoc, affected the concentration of fluoranthene in the worms not by changing the worm to water partitioning (k{sub 1}/k{sub 2}) but by changing the worm to sediment partitioning (BAF{sub ioc}). In the treatments with worms a higher mortality of amphipods was found compared to those without worms. The

  5. Implications for oxygen, nutrient fluxes and denitrification rates during the early stage of sediment colonisation by the polychaete Nereis spp. in four estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizzoli, Daniele; Bartoli, Marco; Cooper, Martin; Welsh, David T.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2007-10-01

    In this work, bioturbation effects by the polychaete Nereis spp. on oxygen demand, denitrification and solute fluxes in four European coastal areas (Goro lagoon in Italy, Tagus estuary in Portugal, Colne estuary in England and Tjärnö bay in Sweden) are compared. The studied areas are very heterogeneous with respect to tidal regimes, primary producers communities, sediment composition and organic matter content and nutrient concentrations in the water column. At each site, with the same methodological approach, undisturbed sediment cores and cores with different numbers of polychaetes added were incubated in the dark. Oxygen, inorganic nutrients (NH 4+, NO 3-, Dissolved Reactive Silica-SiO 2 and Soluble Reactive Phosphorous-SRP) fluxes and coupled-uncoupled denitrification rates were quantified on the same set of cores. Nereis bioturbation had a considerable effect on biogeochemical processes and, at all sites, resulted in an immediate stimulation (from 1.5- to 4-fold higher) of oxygen and ammonium fluxes between the sediment and the water column; on the contrary bioturbation had site specific effects on reactive silica and phosphorus fluxes. Bioturbation also stimulated denitrification of water column nitrate ( Dw, from 1.3 to 3 times higher than in control sediments); this process removed a major fraction (>50%) of the nitrogen lost through denitrification. Overall, the strong relationship between benthic macrofauna activity and sediment biogeochemistry is confirmed by this study. Comparison of the relative stimulation of processes in different geographical areas reveals that the degree by which processes and fluxes (intensity and direction) are affected are site specific and influenced by initial macrofauna densities and sediment and water chemistry.

  6. The marine myxosporean Sigmomyxa sphaerica (Thélohan, 1895) gen. n., comb. n. (syn. Myxidium sphaericum) from garfish (Belone belone (L.)) uses the polychaete Nereis pelagica L. as invertebrate host.

    PubMed

    Karlsbakk, Egil; Køie, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Sigmomyxa sphaerica (Thélohan, 1892) gen. n. (Myxozoa, Myxosporea) with myxosporean stages in the gall bladder of Belone belone (L.) (Teleostei, Belonidae) uses the polychaete Nereis pelagica L. (Nereidae) from shallow water in the northern Øresund, Denmark, as invertebrate host. The nearly spherical tetractinomyxon-type actinospores of S. sphaerica differ from those of two species of Ellipsomyxa which also use Nereis spp. as invertebrate host. Pansporocysts of S. sphaerica were not seen. S. sphaerica is redescribed on the basis of myxospore stages from B. belone and actinospores from N. pelagica, and the phylogenetic affinities examined on the basis of ribosomal small subunit gene sequences. S. sphaerica is closest related to Ellipsomyxa spp., and is not congeneric with morphologically similar Myxidium spp. from gadids. This is the fifth elucidated two-host life cycle of a marine myxozoan. PMID:21674297

  7. Chronic sublethal effects of San Francisco Bay sediments on nereis (neanthes) arenaceodentata; effect of food ration on sediment toxicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report is designed to address concerns regarding the effect of food ration on toxicity during chronic sublethal sediment bioassays. To this end, a contaminated San Francisco Bay sediment and a clean control sediment were evaluated in a chronic sublethal test under a series of different food rations, with the marine polychaete worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata. Animals were exposed from early juvenile stage through the onset of gametogenesis. Treatments were 2.OX, 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X where X is the recommended food ration for laboratory cultures. Test end points were survival, growth, and reproduction. The contaminated sediment was a composite of several cores taken to project depth (38 ft (11.6 m) below mean low water mark) from an area in Oakland Inner Harbor known to be contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals. Comparisons were made with a clean control sediment. The control sediment is used in the laboratory cultures of N. arenaceodentata and was collected from Sequim, WA. Mean percent survival of Neanthes was high (>90 percent) in both the contaminated and control sediment across all food ration treatments. Individual wet weights were significantly reduced with decreasing food ration in both contaminated and control sediments. Significant differences in wet weight between sediment types were observed at the 1.OX, 0.5X, and 0.25X rations. Reproduction (fecundity and emergent juvenile (EJ) production) was also Chronic sublethal, Neanthes, Dredged material, San Francisco Bay, Food ration, Sediment.

  8. Interaction between photoperiod and an endogenous seasonal factor in influencing the diel locomotor activity of the benthic polychaete Nereis virens Sars.

    PubMed

    Last, Kim S; Olive, Peter J W

    2004-04-01

    The locomotor activity of Nereis virens Sars associated with food prospecting was investigated in response to photoperiod and season using an actograph. Experimental animals which had been reared under natural photoperiods were exposed to two constant photoperiodic treatments, LD 16:8 and LD 8:16, in both the autumn and winter and in the absence of tidal entrainment. Autocorrelation analysis of rhythmicity showed that during the autumn, animals under the LD 16:8 photoperiod displayed a strong nocturnal rhythm of activity, whereas animals under the LD 8:16 photoperiod showed only a weak nocturnal activity rhythm. This is believed to represent an autumn feeding cessation that is triggered when the animals pass through a critical photoperiod LD(crit) <12:>12. Later in the winter, however, animals exposed to both photoperiodic treatments showed strong rhythms of foraging activity irrespective of the imposed photoperiod. It is suggested that the autumn cessation may maximize the fitness of N. virens, a spring-breeding semelparous organism, by reducing risk during gamete maturation, while spontaneous resurgence of activity after the winter solstice permits animals that are not physiologically competent to spawn to accrue further metabolic reserves. This response is believed to be initiated by a seasonal (possibly circannual) endogenous oscillator or interval timer. PMID:15111365

  9. Accumulation pattern of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in sourthern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found stranded along coastal California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakata, H.; Kannan, K.; Jing, L.; Thomas, N.J.; Tanabe, S.; Giesy, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Concentrations of PCBs, DDTs (p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT), HCHs (α-, β-, γ-isomers), chlordanes (trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor and oxychlordane) and HCB (hexachlorobenzene were measured in liver, kidney and brain tissues of adult southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found stranded along coastal California, USA, during 1992–96. The contamination pattern of organochlorines in sea otters from several locations was in the order of DDTs > PCBs > > CHLs > HCHs > > HCB, whereas those from Monterey Harbor contained greater concentrations of PCBs than of DDTs. Hepatic concentrations of PCBs and DDTs were in the ranges of 58–8700 and 280–5900 ng/g, wet weight, respectively, which varied depending on the geographic location. Sea otters collected from Monterey Harbor contained the greatest concentrations of PCBs and DDTs. In general, accumulation of DDTs, CHLs and PCBs was greater in kidney than in liver, whereas that of HCHs was similar in both the tissues. The gender difference in organochlorine concentrations was less than those reported in cetaceans. The composition of DDTs, HCHs and CHLs compounds in sea otter tissues indicated no recent inputs of these compounds in coastal California. Sea otters that died from infectious diseases, neoplasia and emaciation contained higher concentrations of DDTs than those that died from trauma.

  10. Oral papillomatosis caused by Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1) in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Miller, Melissa A; Kondov, Nikola O; Dodd, Erin M; Batac, Francesca; Manzer, Mike; Ives, Sarah; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) is a threatened marine sentinel. During postmortem investigations of stranded sea otters from 2004 to 2013 in California, US, papillomas were detected in the oral cavity of at least seven otters via necropsy and histopathology. Next-generation sequencing of viral particles purified from a single papilloma revealed a novel papillomavirus, Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1). The genome of ElPV-1 was obtained, representing the first fully sequenced viral genome from southern sea otters. Phylogenetic analysis of the entire L1 gene, as well as a concatenated protein identities plot of all papillomaviral genes revealed that ElPV-1 is a λ-papillomavirus, related to a raccoon papillomavirus (Procyon lotor papillomavirus type 1) and a canine oral papillomavirus. Immunohistochemical staining, using a cross-reactive bovine papillomavirus antibody, suggested that ElPV-1 is present in intranuclear inclusions and intracytoplasmic keratin granules. Virus-infected cells were scattered throughout the stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum of the gingival and buccal papillomas. Using ElPV-1-specific PCR, we confirmed viral DNA in oral papillomas from all seven stranded sea otters, with identical L1 sequences. This virus is associated with the development of oral papillomatosis in southern sea otters. PMID:25647597

  11. Dual congenital transmission of Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona in a late-term aborted pup from a chronically infected southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Karen; Miller, Melissa A; Packham, Andrea E; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia A; Vanwormer, Elizabeth; Murray, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona are protozoan parasites with terrestrial definitive hosts, and both pathogens can cause fatal disease in a wide range of marine animals. Close monitoring of threatened southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California allowed for the diagnosis of dual transplacental transmission of T. gondii and S. neurona in a wild female otter that was chronically infected with both parasites. Congenital infection resulted in late-term abortion due to disseminated toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii and S. neurona DNA was amplified from placental tissue culture, as well as from fetal lung tissue. Molecular characterization of T. gondii revealed a Type X genotype in isolates derived from placenta and fetal brain, as well as in all tested fetal organs (brain, lung, spleen, liver and thymus). This report provides the first evidence for transplacental transmission of T. gondii in a chronically infected wild sea otter, and the first molecular and immunohistochemical confirmation of concurrent transplacental transmission of T. gondii and S. neurona in any species. Repeated fetal and/or neonatal losses in the sea otter dam also suggested that T. gondii has the potential to reduce fecundity in chronically infected marine mammals through parasite recrudescence and repeated fetal infection. PMID:26494610

  12. Ontogeny of Oxygen Storage Capacity and Diving Ability in the Southern Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris nereis): Costs and Benefits of Large Lungs.

    PubMed

    Thometz, Nicole M; Murray, Michael J; Williams, Terrie M

    2015-01-01

    Small body size, large lungs, and dense pelage contribute to the unique challenges faced by diving sea otters (Enhydra lutris) when compared to other marine mammals. Here we determine the consequences of large lungs on the development of diving ability in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) by examining the ontogeny of blood, muscle, and lung oxygen stores and calculating aerobic dive limits (cADL) for immature and mature age classes. Total oxygen storage capacity matures rapidly in sea otters, reaching adult levels by 2 mo postpartum. But this result is driven by exceptional lung capacity at birth, followed by a decrease in mass-specific lung volume with age. Blood and muscle oxygen stores remain well below adult values before weaning, with large pups exhibiting 74% and 54% of adult values, respectively. Slow muscle development limits the capacity of immature sea otters to dive against high positive buoyancy due to comparatively large lungs. Immature sea otters diving with total lung capacity (TLC) experience up to twice the mass-specific positive buoyancy as adults diving with TLC but can reduce these forces to comparable adult levels by using a smaller diving lung volume (DLV). The cADL of a juvenile with DLV is 3.62 min, while the cADL of an adult with TLC is 4.82 min. We find that the magnitude of positive buoyancy experienced by sea otters changes markedly with age and strongly influences the ontogeny of diving ability in this species. PMID:25860829

  13. Lesions and behavior associated with forced copulation of juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) by southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, H.S.; Oates, S.C.; Staedler, M.M.; Tinker, M.T.; Jessup, David A.; Harvey, J.T.; Miller, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen occurrences of interspecific sexual behavior between male southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and juvenile Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) were reported in Monterey Bay, California, between 2000 and 2002. At least three different male sea otters were observed harassing, dragging, guarding, and copulating with harbor seals for up to 7 d postmortem. Carcasses of 15 juvenile harbor seals were recovered, and seven were necropsied in detail by a veterinary pathologist. Necropsy findings from two female sea otters that were recovered dead from male sea otters exhibiting similar behavior are also presented to facilitate a comparison of lesions. The most frequent lesions included superficial skin lacerations; hemorrhage around the nose, eyes, flippers, and perineum; and traumatic corneal erosions or ulcers. The harbor seals sustained severe genital trauma, ranging from vaginal perforation to vagino-cervical transection, and colorectal perforations as a result of penile penetration. One harbor seal developed severe pneumoperitoneum subsequent to vaginal perforation, which was also observed in both female sea otters and has been reported as a postcoital lesion in humans. This study represents the first description of lesions resulting from forced copulation of harbor seals by sea otters and is also the first report of pneumoperitoneum secondary to forced copulation in a nonhuman animal. Possible explanations for this behavior are discussed in the context of sea otter biology and population demographics.

  14. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls from contaminated sediment by Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): direct accumulation from resuspended sediment and dietary accumulation via the polychaete Nereis virens.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Daae, Ingrid Aarre; Hylland, Ketil

    2012-11-01

    Bioaccumulation of sediment-associated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was examined in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) through direct diffusion from the sediment (via the water phase) and through the food chain (dietary exposure). To facilitate direct accumulation from the sediment, it was continuously resuspended. To study the dietary bioaccumulation of PCBs, cod were fed benthic polychaetes (Nereis virens) previously exposed to test sediments, which were naturally polluted sediments from the inner Oslofjord (Norway). Both exposure experiments had a duration of 129 d. Furthermore, the role of sediments as a source of PCBs accumulated in Oslofjord cod was elucidated, using results from environmental monitoring as a reference. Generally, the results suggest that the contaminated sediments of the inner Oslofjord are an important source of legacy PCBs for accumulation in resident cod, although additional contributions may also be important. Crude estimates of assimilation efficiency of ingested PCBs (through diet) were found to be 30 to 50%; the highest was for the lower chlorinated congeners (PCB-28 and -52). Challenges for applying trophic magnification factors for determining biomagnification in laboratory experiments, in terms of preventive environmental safety, are indicated. The results provide useful information for parameterization of models describing the behavior of hydrophobic persistent contaminants in the foodweb of the Oslofjord and elsewhere. PMID:22865726

  15. Long-term incubation of adult Nereis virens (Annelida: Polychaeta) in copper-spiked sediment: the effects on adult mortality, gametogenesis, spawning and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Watson, G J; Pini, J; Leach, A; Fones, G

    2013-03-15

    Late gametogenic Nereis virens were incubated for up to 2.5 months in environmentally relevant concentrations of copper-spiked sediment. Sequential extraction confirmed that much more labile copper (in actual and percentage terms) was present as spiked concentrations increased, although the residual fractions contained similar amounts across concentrations. This is also reflected in the tissue concentration of the worms which increased in line with the sediment concentrations. Adult mortality was not dependent on the exposure time, but higher concentrations usually induced greater mortality for both sexes. Oocytes were significantly smaller at higher concentrations although pairwise comparisons did not show specific differences. Spawning of males occurred a number of days earlier in the higher concentrations. Differences in the number of embryos developing normally after in vitro fertilizations of oocytes fertilized with sperm from exposed males and non-exposed males showed that sperm were more susceptible to toxicity, but oocytes were also affected at the highest concentration. These results show that there are direct and indirect reproductive consequences of parental exposure to copper with implications for recruitment and subsequent colonization of polluted sediments for this ecologically and commercially important species. PMID:23261667

  16. The high cost of motherhood: End-lactation syndrome in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) on the central California, USA, coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chinn, Sarah S; Miller, Melissa A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Staedler, Michelle M.; Batac, Francesca I.; Dodd, Erin M.; Henkel, Laird A.

    2016-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, US, 2005–12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation.

  17. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Patricia A.; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, Spencer L.; Packham, Andrea E.; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C.; Murray, Michael A.; Gulland, Frances M.; Grigg, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    During April, 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n = 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. PMID:20615616

  18. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa A; Conrad, Patricia A; Harris, Michael; Hatfield, Brian; Langlois, Gregg; Jessup, David A; Magargal, Spencer L; Packham, Andrea E; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Melli, Ann C; Murray, Michael A; Gulland, Frances M; Grigg, Michael E

    2010-09-20

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n=14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti-S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. PMID:20615616

  19. A protozoal-associated epizootic impacting marine wildlife: Mass-mortality of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.A.; Conrad, P.A.; Harris, M.; Hatfield, B.; Langlois, G.; Jessup, David A.; Magargal, S.L.; Packham, A.E.; Toy-Choutka, S.; Melli, A.C.; Murray, M.A.; Gulland, F.M.; Grigg, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    During April 2004, 40 sick and dead southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were recovered over 18 km of coastline near Morro Bay, California. This event represented the single largest monthly spike in mortality ever recorded during 30 years of southern sea otter stranding data collection. Because of the point-source nature of the event and clinical signs consistent with severe, acute neurological disease, exposure to a chemical or marine toxin was initially considered. However, detailed postmortem examinations revealed lesions consistent with an infectious etiology, and further investigation confirmed the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona as the underlying cause. Tissues from 94% of examined otters were PCR-positive for S. neurona, based on DNA amplification and sequencing at the ITS-1 locus, and 100% of tested animals (n= 14) had elevated IgM and IgG titers to S. neurona. Evidence to support the point-source character of this event include the striking spatial and temporal clustering of cases and detection of high concentrations of anti- S. neurona IgM in serum of stranded animals. Concurrent exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid may have enhanced susceptibility of affected otters to S. neurona and exacerbated the neurological signs exhibited by stranded animals. Other factors that may have contributed to the severity of this epizootic include a large rainstorm that preceded the event and an abundance of razor clams near local beaches, attracting numerous otters close to shore within the affected area. This is the first report of a localized epizootic in marine wildlife caused by apicomplexan protozoa. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. THE HIGH COST OF MOTHERHOOD: END-LACTATION SYNDROME IN SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) ON THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA COAST, USA.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Sarah M; Miller, Melissa A; Tinker, M Tim; Staedler, Michelle M; Batac, Francesca I; Dodd, Erin M; Henkel, Laird A

    2016-04-28

    Sea otters ( Enhydra lutris ) have exceptionally high energetic requirements, which nearly double during lactation and pup care. Thus, females are extremely vulnerable to caloric insufficiency. Despite a number of compensatory strategies, the metabolic challenge of reproduction culminates in numerous maternal deaths annually. Massive depletion of energy reserves results in a case presentation that we define as end-lactation syndrome (ELS), characterized by moderate to severe emaciation not attributable to a concurrent, independent disease process in females dying during late pup care or postweaning. We compiled detailed data for 108 adult female southern sea otters ( Enhydra lutris nereis) examined postmortem that stranded in California, US, 2005-12, and assessed pathology, reproductive status, and the location and timing of stranding. We introduce simple, grossly apparent, standardized physical criteria to assess reproductive stage for female sea otters. We also describe ELS, examine associated risk factors, and highlight female life history strategies that likely optimize reproduction and survival. Our data suggest that females can reset both the timing and energetic demands of reproduction through fetal loss, pup abandonment, or early weaning as part of specific physiologic checkpoints during each reproductive cycle. Females appear to preload nutritionally during delayed implantation and gestation to increase fitness and reproductive success. We found that ELS was a major cause of death, affecting 56% of enrolled adult females. Peak ELS prevalence occurred in late spring, possibly reflecting the population trend toward fall/winter pupping. Increasing age and number of pregnancies were associated with a higher risk of ELS. Although the proportion of ELS females was highest in areas with dense sea otter populations, cases were recovered throughout the range, suggesting that death from ELS is associated with, but not solely caused by, population resource limitation

  1. Biotransformation of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane in the benthic polychaete, Nereis succinea: quantitative estimation by analyzing the partitioning of chemicals between gut fluid and lipid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Pei, Yuan-yuan; You, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Biotransformation plays an important role in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of a chemical in biota. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) commonly co-occurs with its metabolites (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane [DDD] and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene [DDE]), in the environment; thus it is a challenge to accurately quantify the biotransformation rates of DDT and distinguish the sources of the accumulated metabolites in an organism. The present study describes a method developed to quantitatively analyze the biotransformation of p,p'-DDT in the benthic polychaete, Nereis succinea. The lugworms were exposed to sediments spiked with DDT at various concentrations for 28 d. Degradation of DDT to DDD and DDE occurred in sediments during the aging period, and approximately two-thirds of the DDT remained in the sediment. To calculate the biotransformation rates, residues of individual compounds measured in the bioaccumulation testing (after biotransformation) were compared with residues predicted by analyzing the partitioning of the parent and metabolite compounds between gut fluid and tissue lipid (before biotransformation). The results suggest that sediment ingestion rates decreased when DDT concentrations in sediment increased. Extensive biotransformation of DDT occurred in N. succinea, with 86% of DDT being metabolized to DDD and <2% being transformed to DDE. Of the DDD that accumulated in the lugworms, approximately 70% was the result of DDT biotransformation, and the remaining 30% was from direct uptake of sediment-associated DDD. In addition, the biotransformation was not dependent on bulk sediment concentrations, but rather on bioaccessible concentrations of the chemicals in sediment, which were quantified by gut fluid extraction. The newly established method improved the accuracy of prediction of the bioaccumulation and toxicity of DDTs. PMID:25470143

  2. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephanie L; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J; Thomas, Kevin V; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692

  3. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephanie L.; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J.; Thomas, Kevin V.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692

  4. Beta-1,3-1,6-glucan modulate the non-specific immune response to enhance the survival in the Vibrio alginolyticus infection of Taiwan abalone (Haliotis diversicolor supertexta).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Sheng; Tseng, Tzu-Yu; Nan, Fan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    This research aims to investigate the non-specific immune response of Taiwan abalone (Haliotis diversicolor supertexta) which was treated with the beta-1,3-1,6-glucan to be observed in the survival impact after the Vibrio alginolyticus infection. The non-specific immune and physiological response of superoxide anion radical (O2(-)), phenoloxidase (PO), phagocytic index (PI), phagocytic rate (PR) and lucigenin-chemiluminescence for reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) were enhanced via in-vitro experiment. In the in-vivo experiment, the observed data presented that the haemolymph lysate supernatant (HLS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) were not significant enhanced, but the total haemocyte count (THC), O2(-), PO, phagocytic index (PI), phagocytic ratio (PR) and other parameters of immune were significantly promoted after treated with beta-1,3-1,6-glucan. In the challenge experiment, the survival rates of abalone in the 40 and 80 μl/ml groups of beta-1,3-1,6-glucan were observed from 6.67% up to 33.33% and 36.67% after injection with Vibrio alginolyticus, respectively. PMID:27150049

  5. Identification and expression analysis of immune-related genes linked to Rel/NF-κB signaling pathway under stresses and bacterial challenge from the small abalone Haliotis diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Huang, Yitao; Cai, Xiuhong; Zou, Zhihua; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Yilei; Zhang, Ziping

    2014-12-01

    Inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and Akirin2 are all important members of Rel/NF-κB signaling pathway, which plays a pivotal role in regulating the innate immune response of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the IκB (SaIκB) and Akirin2 (SaAkirin2) cDNAs of small abalone Haliotis diversicolor were cloned and characterized. The full length cDNA of SaIκB and SaAkirin2 were 1748 bp and 1452 bp respectively, encoding a protein of 401 aa and 187 aa respectively. A conserved degradation motif (DS56GIYS60) and six ankyrin repeats were identified in the SaIκB by SMART analysis. Meanwhile, a typical nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found at the N-terminal region of the SaAkirin2 protein. Also, the mRNA expression level of SaIκB, SaAkirin2, and AbNF-κB were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. The results revealed that all these three genes were ubiquitously expressed in 7 selected tissues. The expression level of SaIκB in gills was higher than that in other tissues (P < 0.05) while the expression level of AbNF-κB was significantly higher in hepatopancreas and haemocytes. The highest expression level of SaAkirin2 was detected in hepatopancreas, followed by mantle. The mRNA expression levels in either gills or haemocytes of SaIκB, SaAkirin2, and AbNF-κB were significantly up-regulated (P < 0.05) post thermal stress, hypoxia exposure, thermal plus hypoxia stress and the injection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. These results indicated that these three NF-κB signaling pathway-related genes are involved in response to bacterial infection and play essential roles in response to thermal and hypoxia stress. PMID:25158315

  6. Trophic relationships in the community of the upper Tagus estuary (Portugal): A preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, F.; Assis, C. A.; Almeida, P. R.; Costa, J. L.; Costa, M. J.

    1992-06-01

    The diet of 25 invertebrate and fish species occurring in the upper Tagus estuary are compared. Multivariate methods are used to define trophic groups and identify key prey species, fundamental links in the understanding of the estuarine food web. Four trophic groups are described: microalgae, macroinfauna, mysid and fish and decapod eaters. It was found that the food web of this area heavily relies on the polychaete Nereis diversicolor and the crustacean Crangon crangon.

  7. Destabilization of Cohesive Intertidal Sediments by Infauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Deckere, E. M. G. T.; Tolhurst, T. J.; de Brouwer, J. F. C.

    2001-11-01

    Bioturbation activity was reduced in four plots on an intertidal mudflat in the Humber estuary (UK) during 4 days, by spraying the sediment with an insecticide, namely vydate. Macrofaunal, especially Nereis diversicolor and oligochaeta, and meiofaunal densities decreased, while the diatom biomass did not change. This resulted in a 300% increase in sediment stability, caused by a reduction in bioturbation and grazing pressure and a decrease in the water content.

  8. Bioavailability of a natural lead-contaminated invertebrate diet to zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David; Amlund, Heidi; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Hogstrand, Christer; Bury, Nic R

    2010-03-01

    Dietary metals are increasingly recognized as key determinants of total metal burdens in fish, yet their ecotoxicological significance remains unclear. In this study, a pairwise experimental design was used to assess reproductive performance of zebrafish (Danio rerio) fed diets supplemented with a natural Pb-enriched polychaete, Nereis diversicolor. Zebrafish were fed 1% flake food (dry wt diet/wet wt fish/d), 1% brine shrimp, and 1% N. diversicolor collected from either Gannel estuary, Cornwall, United Kingdom (UK), an estuary with legacy Pb contamination, or Blackwater estuary, Essex, UK, a reference site with low background metal concentrations, for 63 d. Mean daily dietary doses of Pb were 0.417 and 0.1 mg/kg/d (dry wt feed:wet wt fish) for fish fed N. diversicolor from Gannel and Blackwater estuaries, respectively. With the exception of Ag, which was higher for fish fed N. diversicolor from Gannel estuary, there were no differences in daily dietary exposures to other metals (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Zn) between treatment groups. Fish fed Pb-enriched Gannel N. diversicolor exhibited no significant impairment to incidence of spawning, numbers of eggs per breeding pair or hatch rate of embryos compared with pre-exposure levels, when N. diversicolor was omitted from the dietary regimen. Nevertheless, metal analysis revealed significant increases in whole-body Pb burdens of male fish fed polychaetes from Gannel estuary, Ag in female fish fed Gannel worms, and Ag and Cd in male fish fed the Blackwater worms. These data demonstrate that Pb naturally incorporated in N. diversicolor is bioavailable to fish, and fish exhibit sex-dependent dietary metal accumulation patterns, but after 63 d of the experimental feeding regimen, reproductive performance was unaffected. PMID:20821498

  9. Metals in sediments and benthic organisms in the Mersey estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, W. J.

    1986-08-01

    Concentrations of twelve metals were determined in sediments, seaweed ( Fucus vesiculosus), winkles ( Littorina littorea), polychaetes ( Nereis diversicolor), suspension feeding bivalves ( Mytilus edulis, Cerastoderma edule) and deposit feeding bivalves ( Macoma balthica, Scrobicularia plana) collected from the Mersey estuary between April 1980 and June 1984. Sediments and organisms in the Mersey are moderately contaminated with most of the metals measured, but mercury concentrations are consistently higher than in other United Kingdom estuaries. Comparisons with other sites in the North West of England indicate that mercury residues in organisms, though primarily dependent on sediment concentrations, are also influenced by complexation with particulate organic matter which reduces the availability of mercury. The biological availability of arsenic in Mersey sediments is similarly influenced by complexation with iron oxyhydroxides. Nereis diversicolor and Macoma balthica are the most suitable indicator species in terms of abundance and widespread distribution along the estuary, and, for the majority of metals, tissue concentrations increase upstream, reflecting corresponding gradients in sediment contamination. However mid-estuarine peaks for tin, chromium copper and nickel in Nereis indicate more localised inputs to the estuary. Correlations between lead in sediments and organisms are poor; it is suggested that hydrophilic alkyl lead compounds may be the predominant biologically available forms. Progressive reductions in mercury contamination in sediments and mercury and lead in organisms have occurred in recent years, which coincide with efforts to reduce inputs of these metals to teh Mersey estuary.

  10. Natural arsenic contaminated diets perturb reproduction in fish.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David; Brix, Kevin V; Amlund, Heidi; Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Hogstrand, Christer; Bury, Nic R

    2008-07-15

    The toxicological effect of natural diets elevated in metals on reproduction in fish is poorly understood. The reproductive output of zebrafish fed the polychaete Nereis diversicolor collected from a metal-impacted estuary, Restronguet Creek, Cornwall, UK, was compared to fish fed N. diversicolor collected from a nonmetal impacted estuary, Blackwater, Essex, UK. Fish fed the metal laden N. diversicolorfor 68 days showed reduced reproductive output, characterized by reduced cumulative egg production (47%), cumulative number of spawns (30%), as well as reduced average number of eggs produced per spawn and % hatch rate. The mRNA transcript levels of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin was also reduced 1.5 fold in the livers of female fish fed metal-laden N. diversicolor. No difference was seen between the lipid, protein, or moisture content of the two diets and no difference in growth was seen between the two fish populations. The Restronguet Creek polychaetes have elevated arsenic, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, and silver body burdens, but the only element found to accumulate in the tissues of zebrafish fed this diet was As. The As in these N. diversicolor was found to be predominantly potentially toxic inorganic As species, 58% of total As content, which is unusual for aquatic organisms where arsenic is typically biotransformed into less toxic organoarsenical compounds. These results demonstrate that reproduction in fish is a sensitive target of exposure to a natural diet contaminated with As and this exposure route could be of significance to the health of fish populations. PMID:18754393

  11. Polychaete burrows harbour distinct microbial communities in oil-contaminated coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joe D; Cunliffe, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the bioturbating polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor can affect the composition of bacterial communities in oil-contaminated sediments, but have not considered diversity specifically within bioturbator burrows or the impact on microbial eukaryotes. We tested the hypothesis that H. diversicolor burrows harbour different eukaryotic and bacterial communities compared with un-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbation stimulates oil degradation. Oil-contaminated sediment was incubated with or without H. diversicolor for 30 days, after which sediment un-affected by H. diversicolor and burrow DNA/RNA samples were analysed using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and high-throughput sequencing. Fungi dominated both burrow and un-bioturbated sediment sequence libraries; however, there was significant enrichment of bacterivorous protists and nematodes in the burrows. There were also significant differences between the bacterial communities in burrows compared with un-bioturbated sediment. Increased activity and relative abundance of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the burrows coincided with the significant reduction in hydrocarbon concentration in the bioturbated sediment. This study represents the first detailed assessment of the effect of bioturbation on total microbial communities in oil-contaminated sediments. In addition, it further shows that bioturbation is a significant factor in determining microbial diversity within polluted sediments and plays an important role in stimulating bioremediation. PMID:25858418

  12. Effect of experimental crude oil contamination on abundance, mortality and resettlement of representative mud flat organisms in the mesohaline area of the elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bernem, K. H.

    After repeated experimental contamination with small doses of the crude oils Arabian light, Kuwait crude and Iranian light on a silty mud flat in the Elbe estuary, neither an increased mortality nor emigration was found in Macoma balthica or Nereis diversicolor. Oligochaetes increased in abundance. The entire population of Corophium volutator tried to leave the contaminated sediment. Most specimens came into contact with the oil coating of the sediment and were killed. Twelve weeks after the beginning of the contaminations the original community structure had reestablished. Different effects between the 3 crude oils tested were not significant.

  13. Ecological consequence of the introduction of the polychaete Marenzelleria cf. viridis into a shallow-water biotope of the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotta, Jonne; Orav, Helen; Sandberg-Kilpi, Eva

    2001-12-01

    Effects of the North American polychaete Marenzelleria cf. viridis on a simple shallow-water benthic community of the northern Baltic Sea were studied in a field experiment combining natural densities of dominating macrofaunal species. The presence of M. cf. viridis increased benthic production (chlorophyll a) and reduced the survival of the native polychaete Nereis diversicolor. Adult Macoma balthica caused a significant mortality on M. cf. viridis whereas adult Cerastoderma glaucum had no effect on M. cf. viridis. We suggest that the competitive interactions between M. cf. viridis and M. balthica are a possible key factor determining the distribution pattern of M. cf. viridis in the Baltic Sea.

  14. Determination and localization of oil components in living benthic organisms by fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeck, E.

    1980-03-01

    Microspectrofluorometric measurements are made to determine uptake and distribution of oil in marine organisms after exposure to crude oil. Equipment combining fluorescence microscopy with spectral analysis of the fluorescence emission is described. After contamination with oil, the intestine content of Lumbricillus lineatus, Nereis diversicolor and Anaitides mucosa shows a fluorescence emission at long wavelengths with a maximum at about 550 nm; this is in contrast to the fluorescence emission of these organisms without oil contamination. There is evidence that aromatic hydrocarbons are metabolized in the intestine of the worms studied.

  15. The Effect of Macrofauna on Porewater Profiles and Nutrient Fluxes in the Intertidal Zone of the Humber Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, R. J. G.; Davey, J. T.; Krom, M. D.; Watson, P. G.; Frickers, P. E.; Clifton, R. J.

    1999-06-01

    Macrofauna, nutrient fluxes, porewater chemistry and sediment characteristics were measured at six intertidal mudflat sites in the Humber Estuary, U.K., during the different seasons. Nereis diversicolor , Macoma balthica and Corophium volutator were found to be the dominant macrofauna. Salinity was the baseline control on macrofauna distribution but this was overprinted by periodic impoverishment due to sediment mobilization. High resolution gel probe porewater samplers provided direct evidence for the impact of burrows on porewater chemistry. The macrofauna modified nutrient fluxes during periods of mud flat stability. Nereis caused a decrease in silicate and phosphate effluxes but enhanced ammonia release and nitrate uptake. Macoma enhanced ammonia and nitrite release. The impact of Corophium was not possible to discern. The Humber is a large, highly dynamic macrotidal estuary in which sediment resuspension has a large impact on porewater profiles, nutrient fluxes and macrofaunal communities. Simple patterns and inter-relationships which are seen in small sheltered estuaries are not observed in the Humber.

  16. Food supply for waders (Aves: Charadrii) in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masero, José A.; Pérez-González, Maite; Basadre, Marta; Otero-Saavedra, Mónica

    1999-07-01

    We studied the composition, density, size distribution and biomass of the food supply for waders in an estuarine area in the Bay of Cádiz (SW Iberian Peninsula), in winter (January-February) and in the pre-migratory period (late March). The estuarine area comprises an intertidal mudflat and an adjacent salina or salt-pan. On the intertidal mudflat, the biomass was 53 and 37 g AFDW .m -2in winter and the pre-migratory period, respectively. The main food source on mudflat was the polychaete Nereis diversicolor (44-54 % of the total biomass). On the other hand, the biomass in the salina was comparatively very poor, ranging from 0.008 to 0.079 g AFDW .m -2in winter and ranging from 0.011 to 0.09 g AFDW in late March. The main source of food in the salina was the crustacean Artemia. The total biomass on the mudflat during the pre-migratory period was 1.4 times lower than in February. This depletion could be caused by wader predation, mainly by Nereis diversicolor consumption. Although the potential food on the mudflats could allow high intertidal densities of waders, the availability of high tide foraging areas in the salina seems to contribute to the maintenance of these high intertidal densities.

  17. Predation of intertidal infauna on juveniles of the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiddink, J. G.; ter Hofstede, R.; Wolff, W. J.

    2002-03-01

    Juveniles of the bivalve Macoma balthica live on tidal flats in the Wadden Sea. This study examined the interaction of Macoma with the infaunal polychaetes Arenicola marina and Nereis diversicolor and the gastropod Retusa obtusa. The distribution of M. balthica spat on the flats, shortly after settlement in April, showed a positive correlation with the Arenicola distribution and a negative correlation with Nereis distribution. There were no locations where Macoma spat and Retusa occurred together. In August, Macoma spat had grown too large for predation by intertidal infauna. Small individuals of Macoma spat were found in stomachs of Arenicola (0.14 worm -1) and Nereis (0.05 worm -1). Laboratory experiments showed that Nereis and Retusa could reduce Macoma spat abundance, both in the absence and presence of sediment and alternative prey. Arenicola reduced the abundance of small Macoma (<1 mm) in sediment without, but not with, alternative prey. In field experiments, we manipulated the density of Arenicola in 0.25-1 m 2 plots and of Nereis in 0.03 m 2 cages and examined the effect on Macoma density several weeks later. We found a significant negative relation between densities of polychaetes and Macoma spat for both polychaete species in these experimental plots. Peculiarly, we found a significant positive relation between manipulated Nereis density and adult Macoma density in the cages; we cannot explain this. Consumption rates, calculated both from stomach contents and from field experiments, were 45 to 102 Macoma m -2 d -1 for Arenicola and 5 to 116 Macoma m -2 d -1 for Nereis. These values are higher than recorded consumption rates by epibenthic predators in the same area. Nevertheless, between-year differences in year-class strength could not be explained by differential abundance of these polychaetes. In conclusion, Arenicola and Nereis had a negative effect on the abundance of Macoma <1.5 mm, which was at least partly caused by direct consumption. Retusa

  18. Impact of oil on bacterial community structure in bioturbated sediments.

    PubMed

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Jézéquel, Ronan; Barantal, Sandra; Cuny, Philippe; Gilbert, Franck; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cécile; Amouroux, David; Mahdaoui, Fatima; Bouyssiere, Brice; Stora, Georges; Merlin, François-Xavier; Duran, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Oil spills threaten coastlines where biological processes supply essential ecosystem services. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how oil influences the microbial communities in sediments that play key roles in ecosystem functioning. Ecosystems such as sediments are characterized by intensive bioturbation due to burrowing macrofauna that may modify the microbial metabolisms. It is thus essential to consider the bioturbation when determining the impact of oil on microbial communities. In this study, an experimental laboratory device maintaining pristine collected mudflat sediments in microcosms closer to true environmental conditions--with tidal cycles and natural seawater--was used to simulate an oil spill under bioturbation conditions. Different conditions were applied to the microcosms including an addition of: standardized oil (Blend Arabian Light crude oil, 25.6 mg.g⁻¹ wet sediment), the common burrowing organism Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor and both the oil and H. diversicolor. The addition of H. diversicolor and its associated bioturbation did not affect the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons. After 270 days, 60% of hydrocarbons had been removed in all microcosms irrespective of the H. diversicolor addition. However, 16S-rRNA gene and 16S-cDNA T-RFLP and RT-PCR-amplicon libraries analysis showed an effect of the condition on the bacterial community structure, composition, and dynamics, supported by PerMANOVA analysis. The 16S-cDNA libraries from microcosms where H. diversicolor was added (oiled and un-oiled) showed a marked dominance of sequences related to Gammaproteobacteria. However, in the oiled-library sequences associated to Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also highly represented. The 16S-cDNA libraries from oiled-microcosms (with and without H. diversicolor addition) revealed two distinct microbial communities characterized by different phylotypes associated to known hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and dominated by Gammaproteobacteria

  19. The influence of four macrozoobenthic species on the abundance of the amphipod Corophium volutator on tidal flats of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, E. C.

    On the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea, a zonation pattern can be found with Corophium volutator and Nereis diversicolor as the dominating species of the upper intertidal zone and Arenicola marina and Cerastoderma edule as the dominating species of the lower zone. As C. volutator can live under a great variety of physical conditions, its restriction to higher areas might result from biotic interactions. This was investigated by field experiments on a tidal flat in the westernmost part of the Wadden Sea. Within large depopulated areas, small plots were recolonized with different densities of N. diversicolor, A. marina, C. edule and Macoma balthica and the subsequent settlement and dynamics of C. volutator were studied. In addition, A. marina and/or C. edule were added to or removed from small plots within a natural benthic community. Neither the presence of M. balthica not that of N. diversicolor significantly affected the abundance of C. volutator. A strongly negative effect was found of C. edule when present in high densities, whereas A. marina negatively affected C. volutator abundance already at relatively low densities. Local removals of A. marina and C. edule from their own zone resulted in increases of Corophium numbers at these locations and local additions of these species within the Corophium zone resulted in decreases of Corophium numbers at these locations. It is suggested that the major species to restrict C. volutator effectively to the upper tidal zone is A. marina.

  20. Dietary toxicity of field-contaminated invertebrates to marine fish: effects of metal doses and subcellular metal distribution.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fei; Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-09-15

    There is growing awareness of the toxicological effects of metal-contaminated invertebrate diets on the health of fish populations in metal-contaminated habitats, yet the mechanisms underlying metal bioaccumulation and toxicity are complex. In the present study, marine fish Terapon jurbua terepon were fed a commercial diet supplemented with specimens of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor or the clam Scrobicularia plana, collected from four metal-impacted estuaries (Tavy, Restronguet Creek, West Looe, Gannel) in southwest England, as environmentally realistic metal sources. A comparative toxicological evaluation of both invertebrates showed that fish fed S. plana for 21 d exhibited evident mortality compared to those fed N. diversicolor. Furthermore, a spatial effect on mortality was observed. Differences in metal doses rather than subcellular metal distributions between N. diversicolor and S. plana appeared to be the cause of such different mortalities. Partial least squares regression was used to evaluate the statistical relationship between multiple-metal doses and fish mortality, revealing that Pb, Fe, Cd and Zn in field-collected invertebrates co-varied most strongly with the observed mortality. This study provides a step toward exploring the underlying mechanism of dietary toxicity and identifying the potential causality in complex metal mixture exposures in the field. PMID:22579710

  1. The dental pathology of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Liong, S M; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-01-01

    Skulls (n = 1,205) of southern sea otters were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria. The museum specimens, acquired from strandings, varied in age from juvenile to adult, with an equal sex distribution. The results from all young adult and adult specimens were pooled according to tooth type. Ninety-two percent of teeth were available for examination, with 6.5% artifactually absent, 0.6% deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 0.03% deemed congenitally absent. All teeth were normal in morphology, except for three pairs of fused teeth, including two instances of fused maxillary first incisor teeth. Supernumerary teeth were associated with 97 normal teeth (most commonly maxillary canine teeth) in 68 specimens. At least one persistent deciduous tooth was present in six skulls, two of which were from adults. The majority (94.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, were not associated with bony changes consistent with periodontitis; however, the majority (74.4%) of specimens did have at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. The mesial root of the mandibular third premolar tooth was the most common location at which periodontal hard tissue lesions were observed (56.6%). Ten sea otters had lesions consistent with focal enamel hypoplasia. Approximately half of the teeth (52.0%) were abraded; almost all adult specimens (98.1%) contained at least one abraded tooth, while fewer young adults were affected (76.4%). Tooth fractures were uncommon, affecting 1,343 teeth (4.5%). Periapical lesions were associated with 409 teeth (1.3%) in a total of 176 specimens, and these would likely have caused considerable morbidity while the animals were alive. PMID:23348015

  2. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. PMID:16002194

  3. [Experimental study of vibrio parahaemolyticus (biotype 2) transfer from water and sediments to benthic marine food chain organisms].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M J; Clement, R

    1979-04-01

    Transfer of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (biotype 2) from sediments to water and from water to benthic marine organisms was studied experimentally using a streptomycin-resistant strain. Transmission by trophic pathways was also studied using reconstituted marine food chains (Mytilus edulis, Nereis diversicolor, Carcinus maenas, Scorpaena porcus, Mus musculus). Water colonization by sediments could be observed only at temperatures above 16 degrees C. Sediments could well constitute a disseminating reservoir for these germs, their cycle in water being dependent of the cycle followed in the sediments. Contamination of animal organisms is essentially effected by a direct mean, either water or sediments; transfer by trophic pathways being negligible. Infection of land consumers (mice) is linked quantitatively to the nature of the last marine organism of the food chain since bacteria can flourish in the digestive tract of certain animals (Carcinus maenas). PMID:487292

  4. Chemical monitoring in the Dutch Wadden Sea by means of benthic invertebrates and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essink, Karel

    1989-09-01

    In monitoring, it is of utmost importance to carefully define the purpose, the sampling strategy, as well as the analytical chemical and statistical requirements. Surveys are appropriate for describing the geographical variation in environmental contaminant levels. Repeated surveys and recurrentdata collection at permanent locations provide means of detecting temporal trends. Results are presented here of surveys on pollution by trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in the Ems Estuary and Dutch Wadden Sea using Mytilus edulis, Mya arenaria, Arenicoia marina, Nereis diversicolor and Crangon crangon as test organisms. Trends towards decreasing pollution by mercury are illustrated by monitoring data on Mytilus edulis and Zoarces viviparus. It is stressed that the results of chemical monitoring in organisms may be interpreted only in termser the biological effects on the basis of relevant toxicological knowledge and/or additional bio-assays.

  5. Environmental effects of the growth rate of intertidal invertebrates and some implications for foraging waders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanink, Jan H.; Zwarts, Leo

    The paper describes effects of intertidal height and sediment type on growth rate of the bivalves Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica, Mya arenaria, Mytilus edulis and Scrobicularia plana, and of the worms Arenicola marina, Nephtys hombergii and Nereis diversicolor in the eastern part of the Dutch Wadden Sea. In most species, exposure time was negatively correlated with length growth, although interfering effects of sediment type could not be ruled out. When controlled for the effects of exposure time, clay content of the sediment appeared to affect the growth of all species, but in different ways. The variation was related to the foraging methods of the invertebrates. Foraging waders may use the spatial variation in growth rate of the invertebrates to optimize the exploitation of individual cohorts.

  6. Impact of a novel protein meal on the gastrointestinal microbiota and the host transcriptome of larval zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Rurangwa, Eugene; Sipkema, Detmer; Kals, Jeroen; ter Veld, Menno; Forlenza, Maria; Bacanu, Gianina M.; Smidt, Hauke; Palstra, Arjan P.

    2015-01-01

    Larval zebrafish was subjected to a methodological exploration of the gastrointestinal microbiota and transcriptome. Assessed was the impact of two dietary inclusion levels of a novel protein meal (NPM) of animal origin (ragworm Nereis virens) on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Microbial development was assessed over the first 21 days post egg fertilization (dpf) through 16S rRNA gene-based microbial composition profiling by pyrosequencing. Differentially expressed genes in the GIT were demonstrated at 21 dpf by whole transcriptome sequencing (mRNAseq). Larval zebrafish showed rapid temporal changes in microbial colonization but domination occurred by one to three bacterial species generally belonging to Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The high iron content of NPM may have led to an increased relative abundance of bacteria that were related to potential pathogens and bacteria with an increased iron metabolism. Functional classification of the 328 differentially expressed genes indicated that the GIT of larvae fed at higher NPM level was more active in transmembrane ion transport and protein synthesis. mRNAseq analysis did not reveal a major activation of genes involved in the immune response or indicating differences in iron uptake and homeostasis in zebrafish fed at the high inclusion level of NPM. PMID:25983694

  7. Impact of a novel protein meal on the gastrointestinal microbiota and the host transcriptome of larval zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Rurangwa, Eugene; Sipkema, Detmer; Kals, Jeroen; Ter Veld, Menno; Forlenza, Maria; Bacanu, Gianina M; Smidt, Hauke; Palstra, Arjan P

    2015-01-01

    Larval zebrafish was subjected to a methodological exploration of the gastrointestinal microbiota and transcriptome. Assessed was the impact of two dietary inclusion levels of a novel protein meal (NPM) of animal origin (ragworm Nereis virens) on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Microbial development was assessed over the first 21 days post egg fertilization (dpf) through 16S rRNA gene-based microbial composition profiling by pyrosequencing. Differentially expressed genes in the GIT were demonstrated at 21 dpf by whole transcriptome sequencing (mRNAseq). Larval zebrafish showed rapid temporal changes in microbial colonization but domination occurred by one to three bacterial species generally belonging to Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The high iron content of NPM may have led to an increased relative abundance of bacteria that were related to potential pathogens and bacteria with an increased iron metabolism. Functional classification of the 328 differentially expressed genes indicated that the GIT of larvae fed at higher NPM level was more active in transmembrane ion transport and protein synthesis. mRNAseq analysis did not reveal a major activation of genes involved in the immune response or indicating differences in iron uptake and homeostasis in zebrafish fed at the high inclusion level of NPM. PMID:25983694

  8. In vivo bioaccumulation of contaminants from historically polluted sediments - relation to bioavailability estimates.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Allan, Ian J; Oxnevad, Sigurd; Schaanning, Morten T; Borgå, Katrine; Bakke, Torgeir; Næs, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    Many contaminants are recalcitrant against degradation. Therefore, when primary sources have been discontinued, contaminated sediments often function as important secondary pollution sources. Since the management and potential remediation of contaminated marine sediments may be very costly, it is important that the environmental risks of contaminants present in these sediments and benefits of remediation are evaluated as accurately as possible. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of common organochlorine contaminants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in selected polluted sediments from Norway by simple generic sorption models (free energy relationships), as well as by pore water concentration measurements. Furthermore, the aim was to predict bioaccumulation from these bioavailability estimates for comparison with in vivo bioaccumulation assessments using ragworm (Nereis virens) and netted dogwhelk (Hinia reticulata). Predicted biota-to-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) derived from pore water concentration estimates were in better agreement with the bioaccumulation observed in the test organisms, than the generic BSAFs expected based on linear sorption models. The results therefore support that site-specific evaluations of bioaccumulation provide useful information for more accurate risk assessments. A need for increased knowledge of the specific characteristics of benthic organisms, which may influence the exposure, uptake and elimination of contaminants, is however emphasized. PMID:23178838

  9. Gene structure and molecular phylogeny of the linker chains from the giant annelid hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Chabasse, Christine; Bailly, Xavier; Sanchez, Sophie; Rousselot, Morgane; Zal, Franck

    2006-09-01

    Giant extracellular hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (HBL-Hb), found only in annelids, is an approximately 3500-kDa heteropolymeric structure involved in oxygen transport. The HBL-Hbs are comprised of globin and linker chains, the latter being required for the assembly of the quaternary structure. The linker chains, varying in size from 225 to 283 amino acids, have a conserved cysteine-rich domain within their N-terminal moiety that is homologous to the cysteine-rich modules constituting the ligand binding domain of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein family found in many metazoans. We have investigated the gene structure of linkers from Arenicola marina, Alvinella pompejana, Nereis diversicolor, Lumbricus terrestris, and Riftia pachyptila. We found, contrary to the results obtained earlier with linker genes from N. diversicolor and L. terrestris, that in all of the foregoing cases, the linker LDL-A module is flanked by two phase 1 introns, as in the human LDLR gene, with two more introns in the 3' side whose positions varied with the species. In addition, we obtained 13 linker cDNAs that have been determined experimentally or found in the EST database LumbriBASE. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the linker primary sequences demonstrated that they cluster into two distinct families of linker proteins. We propose that the common gene ancestor to annelid linker genes exhibited a four-intron and five-exon structure and gave rise to the two families subsequent to a duplication event. PMID:16838215

  10. Evaluation of protein extraction protocols for 2DE in marine ecotoxicoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huifeng; Ji, Chenglong; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Jianmin

    2013-11-01

    In ecotoxicoproteomics, an accurate and reproducible extraction of proteins is a critical step for 2DE analysis and further protein identification using MS. The criteria for the assessment of protein extraction quality include protein yield, protein spots resolved in a 2DE gel, matched protein spots in replicate gels, reproducibility, and compatibility with MS. In this work, we evaluated three protein extraction systems, straightforward lysis buffer, trichloroacetic acid-acetone, and TRIzol reagent with some modifications, for the protein extraction from three animal species including mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, flounder Paralichthys olivaceus, and polychaete Nereis diversicolor used in marine ecotoxicology. Our results indicated that these methods could extract significantly different protein profiles. The method using TRIzol reagent resulted in the most matched protein spots resolved in four replicate 2DE gels and highest reproducibilities for the gill of M. galloprovincialis and liver of P. olivaceus. However, a modified trichloroacetic acid-acetone solvent system was best for the whole soft tissue of N. diversicolor. This work provides the fundamental information of the extraction quality of protein extraction protocols from different marine animals, which may facilitate the selection of a suitable protein extraction protocol for ecotoxicoproteomics. PMID:24106175

  11. Effect of temperature on biogeochemistry of marine organic-enriched systems: implications in a global warming scenario.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Valdemarsen, Thomas; Marín, Arnaldo; Holmer, Marianne

    2011-10-01

    Coastal biogeochemical cycles are expected to be affected by global warming. By means of a mesocosm experiment, the effect of increased water temperature on the biogeochemical cycles of coastal sediments affected by organic-matter enrichment was tested, focusing on the carbon, sulfur, and iron cycles. Nereis diversicolor was used as a model species to simulate macrofaunal bioirrigation activity in natural sediments. Although bioirrigation rates of N. diversicolor were not temperature dependent, temperature did have a major effect on the sediment metabolism. Under organic-enrichment conditions, the increase in sediment metabolism was greater than expected and occurred through the enhancement of anaerobic metabolic pathway rates, mainly sulfate reduction. There was a twofold increase in sediment metabolism and the accumulation of reduced sulfur. The increase in the benthic metabolism was maintained by the supply of electron acceptors through bioirrigation and as a result of the availability of iron in the sediment. As long as the sediment buffering capacity toward sulfides is not surpassed, an increase in temperature might promote the recovery of organic-enriched sediments by decreasing the time for mineralization of excess organic matter. PMID:22073651

  12. Interaction of nemertines and their prey on tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Martin; Reise, Karsten

    Two common nemertines of the European Wadden Sea, Lineus viridis and Amphiporus lactifloreus, occur preferentially in clusters of mussels, spread over sedimentary flats in the upper intertidal near the island of Sylt. The heteronemertine L. viridis preys mainly on the polychaete Nereis diversicolor. The hoplonemertine A. lactifloreus feeds almost exclusively on the amphipod Gammarus locusta. Abundance of both predators and their respective prey in the field showed inverse relationships. Experimentally increased numbers of L. viridis in clusters of mussels caused a gradual decrease of nereid abundance in the sediment underneath over a period of 1 month, suggesting that losses of individuals were caused by prey capture. Experimentally increased numbers of A. lactifloreus were followed by an escape response of gammarids from clusters of mussels within 2 d. In aquaria, both prey species exhibited prolonged swimming activity when their respective predators lurked at the bottom. We conclude that escape behaviour in N. diversicolor may be only effective during its migrant phases, while G. locusta is permanently on the alert to avoid encounters with its predator. This refuging behaviour in response to endobenthic predators has strong implications on prey distribution, while the actual consumption of prey may be relatively modest. Enclosure experiments in the field and in aquaria lead to overestimates of prey capture when refuging behaviour is not accounted for.

  13. Biomixing generated by benthic filter feeders: a diffusion model for near-bottom phytoplankton depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsena, Poul S.; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    1997-05-01

    Transient concentration distributions of flagellate cells ( Rhodomonas sp.) previously measured by Riisgård and co-workers in laboratory experiments have been examined to develop a diffusion model for the process of phytoplankton depletion in stagnant seawater above populations of benthic filter feeders, the polychaete Nereis diversicolor and the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, respectively. The model is based on sinks located at inhalant openings and Fick's law with an effective diffusivity that decreases with distance above the bottom due to the biomixing generated by exhalant and inhalant feeding currents. For N. diversicolor, having inhalant and exhalant openings flush with the sediment surface and a moderate exhalant jet velocity of ˜0.01 m s -1, concentration boundary layer growth is retarded and limited by the low values of diffusivity prevailing at heights greater >˜0.05 m above the bottom. For C. intestinalis, having inhalant and exhalant openings situated ˜0.05-0.1 m above the bottom and a higher and inclined exhalant jet velocity of ˜0.1-0.2 m s -1, the concentration distributions show a nearly uniform depletion over a layer reaching a thickness of 0.2-0.3 m above the bottom due to high biomixing in this layer. Numerical predictions of concentration distributions reproduce essential features of experiments, and suggest near-bottom values of effective diffusivity of 0.3 x 10 -6 and 150 x 10 -6 m 2 s -1, for N. diversicolor and C. intestinalis, respectively. It is suggested that the latter value is so large that the induced mixing should be accounted for in modelling benthic concentration boundary layers under flow conditions.

  14. Temporal variability of denitrification in estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. S.; Rees, A. P.; Owens, N. J. P.

    1991-07-01

    Sediment denitrification rates and fluxes of nitrous oxide, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium were determined at two intertidal sites in the Tamar estuary (S.W. England). High sediment nitrate uptake rates were recorded throughout the year, whereas the nitrite and ammonium fluxes were positive (from sediment to water column), with the former resulting from nitrification. Nitrous oxide flux was also positive, being largely attributable to denitrification with some contribution from nitrification or nitrification-denitrification coupling. No relationship was apparent between denitrification rate and nitrate concentration in the overlying water, invalidating the notion that denitrification automatically regulates nitrate during periods of elevated ambient concentration. However, denitrification exhibited a strong covariance with the degree of sediment bioturbation ( Nereis diversicolor), which was considered to be attributable to increased transport and supply of nitrate via Nereis burrows. Denitrification accounted for 8·5% of the annual total nitrate loading to the Tamar estuary, although a maximum of 100% was observed in summer when the phytoplankton nutrient requirement would also be highest.

  15. High abundance of small zoobenthos around biogenic structures in tidal sediments of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, K.

    1981-12-01

    On the tidal flats of the island of Sylt (eastern part of the North Sea) the quantity of micro- and meiofauna associated with shoots of seagrass (Zostera noltii), with infaunal bivalves (Macoma balthica), and with tubes and burrows of polychaetes (Pygospio elegans, Pectinaria koreni, Nereis diversicolor, Nereis virens, Arenicola marina) was found to add up to 5 to 33 % of the overall abundance. These structures, taken together, account for 10 to 50 % of the faunal abundance on an average tidal flat at Sylt. The quantitative effect of biogenic structures at the sediment surface (casts and funnels) is small compared to that of tubes and burrows penetrating the anaerobic subsurface layer. In providing stable oxic microenvironments these elite structures frequently bring together more individuals than occur in the entire reducing sediment below surface. Faunal composition of irrigated dwellings of large infauna is different from that of the oxic surface sediment. The common denominator of all elite structures of the subsurface is an oxic halo. Burrows without such a halo are unattractive. There is no evidence that owners of burrows prey on their smaller inmates.

  16. Macroalgal mats and species abundance: a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, S. C.

    1987-11-01

    A field experiment was carried out whereby the density of macroalgae ( Enteromorpha spp.) was manipulated and the resultant changes in sediment infaunal density were monitored. Four densities of Enteromorpha spp. were used: 0,0·3, 1, and 3 kg FW m -2, corresponding to control, low-, medium-, and high-density plots. The experiment ran from May to October 1985 and was sampled on three occasions. By July, the density of Corophium volutator was reduced at all weed levels when compared to control plots, whereas densities of Hydrobia ulvae, Macoma balthica, Nereis diversicolor, and Capitella capitata, all increased. Samples taken in October when the weed mats were buried in the sediment showed fewer differences than in July. Macoma, Nereis, and Capitella were still significantly more abundant at medium and high weed densities. Corophium showed no significant treatment effect. There was, however, a highly significant difference in population size structure for Corophium. Measurements of sediment redox potential and silt content under medium- and high-density plots revealed rapid anoxia with a significant increase in siltation.

  17. Bioaccumulation surveillance in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Langston, W J; O'Hara, S; Pope, N D; Davey, M; Shortridge, E; Imamura, M; Harino, H; Kim, A; Vane, C H

    2012-01-01

    Biomonitoring of contaminants (metals, organotins, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs) was undertaken in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) and a reference site in the Tywi Estuary (St Ishmael/Ferryside) during 2007-2008. Bioindicator species encompassed various uptake routes-Fucus vesiculosus (dissolved contaminants); Littorina littorea (grazer); Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule (suspension feeders); and Hediste (=Nereis) diversicolor (sediments). Differences in feeding and habitat preference have subtle implications for bioaccumulation trends though, with few exceptions, contaminant burdens in MHW were higher than the Tywi reference site, reflecting inputs. Elevated metal concentrations were observed at some MHW sites, whilst As and Se (molluscs and seaweed) were consistently at the higher end of the UK range. However, for most metals, distributions in MH biota were not exceptional. Several metal-species combinations indicated increases in bioavailability upstream, which may reflect the influence of geogenic/land-based sources-perhaps enhanced by lower salinity. TBT levels in MH mussels were below OSPAR toxicity thresholds and in the Tywi were close to zero. Phenyltins were not accumulated appreciably in M. edulis, whereas some H. diversicolor populations appear subjected to localized (historical) sources. PAHs in H. diversicolor were distributed evenly across most of MHW, although acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene were highest at one site near the mouth; naphthalenes in H. diversicolor were enriched in the mid-upper Haven (a pattern seen in M. edulis for most PAHs). Whilst PAH (and PCB) concentrations in MH mussels were mostly above reference and OSPAR backgrounds, they are unlikely to exceed ecotoxicological thresholds. Bivalve Condition indices (CI) were highest at the Tywi reference site and at the seaward end of MH, decreasing upstream-giving rise to several significant (negative) relationships between CI and body burdens

  18. Physiological response to a metal-contaminated invertebrate diet in zebrafish: importance of metal speciation and regulation of metal transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David; Hogstrand, Christer; Bury, Nicolas R

    2011-09-01

    Dietary metal uptake in fish is determined by metal bioavailability in prey and the metal requirements of the fish. In this study zebrafish were fed the intertidal polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor (3% wet weight day(-1)) collected from Ag, Cd and Cu-impacted Restronguet Creek (RC) or a reference site, Blackwater estuary (BW), for 21 days. On days 0, 7, 14 and 21 fish were fed a single meal of RC or BW N. diversicolor labeled with (110m)Ag or (109)Cd for measurements of metal assimilation efficiency (AE). Zebrafish intestines were also taken for mRNA expression analysis of copper transporter 1 (ctr1), divalent metal transporter 1 (dmt1) and metallothionein 2 (mt2). No significant difference was observed in the AE of (109)Cd in metal naïve fish at day 0 between RC and BW worms, 11.8±2.1 and 15.3±2.8%, respectively. However, AE of (110m)Ag was significantly greater in fish fed worms from BW compared to RC, 5±1.2% and 1.6±0.5%, respectively at day 0. Fractionation analysis of radiolabeled metal partitioned in N. diversicolor from RC revealed a greater proportion of Ag (40±1.1%) in a fraction containing protein and organelle bound metal, associated with high trophic availability, compared to BW polychaetes (24±2.5%). Lower AE of (110m)Ag from RC polychaetes is therefore unlikely due to speciation of (110m)Ag in N. diversicolor from RC, but to the high concentration of Cu, a potential Ag antagonist. Exposure to RC polychaetes significantly increased the AE of (110m)Ag (6.2±1%), but not (109)Cd, from RC worms, after 21 days. AE of (110m)Ag and (109)Cd was unaffected by pre-exposure to BW. Elevated concentration of intestinal Cu and increased expression of ctr1, dmt1 and mt2 after 14 days exposure in fish fed worms from RC suggest altered Cu handling strategy of these fish which may increase AE of Ag via shared Ag and Cu transport pathways. These data suggest metal exposure history of invertebrates may affect metal bioavailability to fish, and fish may alter

  19. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  20. Novel Bartonella infection in northern and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni and Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Chomel, Bruno B; Gill, Verena A; Kasten, Rickie W; Maggi, Ricardo G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Byrne, Barbara A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Miller, Melissa A; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2014-06-01

    Since 2002, vegetative valvular endocarditis (VVE), septicemia and meningoencephalitis have contributed to an Unusual Mortality Event (UME) of northern sea otters in southcentral Alaska. Streptococcal organisms were commonly isolated from vegetative lesions and organs from these sea otters. Bartonella infection has also been associated with bacteremia and VVE in terrestrial mammals, but little is known regarding its pathogenic significance in marine mammals. Our study evaluated whether Streptococcus bovis/equinus (SB/E) and Bartonella infections were associated with UME-related disease characterized by VVE and septicemia in Alaskan sea otter carcasses recovered 2004-2008. These bacteria were also evaluated in southern sea otters in California. Streptococcus bovis/equinus were cultured from 45% (23/51) of northern sea otter heart valves, and biochemical testing and sequencing identified these isolates as Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. One-third of sea otter hearts were co-infected with Bartonella spp. Our analysis demonstrated that SB/E was strongly associated with UME-related disease in northern sea otters (P<0.001). While Bartonella infection was also detected in 45% (23/51) and 10% (3/30) of heart valves of northern and southern sea otters examined, respectively, it was not associated with disease. Phylogenetic analysis of the Bartonella ITS region allowed detection of two Bartonella species, one novel species closely related to Bartonella spp. JM-1, B. washoensis and Candidatus B. volans and another molecularly identical to B. henselae. Our findings help to elucidate the role of pathogens in northern sea otter mortalities during this UME and suggested that Bartonella spp. is common in sea otters from Alaska and California. PMID:24629902

  1. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  2. Sound production and reception in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Ghoul, Asila; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Because of their dependence on a highly restricted coastal habitat, Enhydra lutris is especially vulnerable to a variety of different environmental and anthropogenic threats. This species is presently listed as threatened and is protected throughout the northern and southern portions of its range.Resource managers are presently faced with uncertainty when responding to and prioritizing potential threats to these animals due to insufficient understanding of the factors that may disturb or disrupt normal behavior patterns both above and below the water's surface. The objective of these studies was to obtain direct measurements of the source characteristics of vocalizations and the limits of auditory reception in Enhydra lutris. These data are necessary to form a basic but essential under-standing of bioacoustics in this species. To further develop this knowledge base, psychoacoustic profiles of aerial and underwater hearing sensitivity as a function of sound frequency are imperative to adequately consider sea otters alongside other marine mammals within the issue of anthropogenic impacts. These studies are presently ongoing i n our laboratory. A s these coastal-living carnivores have only recently transitioned to a marine lifestyle, an improved understanding of their acoustic communication and auditory adaptations will also provide insight into their evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology as well as the evolutionary pressures shaping underwater perception in marine mammals. PMID:22278472

  3. Conditioned water affects pair formation behaviour in the marine polychaete Neanthes (Nereis) acuminata.

    PubMed

    Storey, Ellen J; Reish, Don J; Hardege, Jörg D

    2013-01-01

    Assessing cues from conspecifics is paramount during mate choice decisions. Neanthes acuminata is a marine polychaete with a unique life cycle: pair formation, female death following reproduction, male parental care and male ability to mate again after egg care. Males completing such egg care are 'experienced'. Females have been shown to prefer experienced males over all others, including aggressively dominant males. As the female dies following reproduction, the reproductive success of her offspring depends upon successful parental care by the male. It is therefore vital that the female makes a good mate choice decision. This paper shows that the use of conditioned water from males caring for eggs and newly experienced males caused the female to alter her choice to a previously undesired male. However, conditioned water from males, which had reproduced but were isolated for 2 weeks, did not have the same effect on pairing behaviour. This indicates that the smell of experience is short lived. PMID:22941305

  4. Effects of repeated field applications of two formulations of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis on non-target saltmarsh invertebrates in Atlantic coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Caquet, Thierry; Roucaute, Marc; Le Goff, Pierre; Lagadic, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) is commonly used for selective control of larval populations of mosquitoes in coastal wetlands. A two year-study was implemented to investigate whether repeated treatments with Bti applied either as a liquid (VectoBac® 12AS) or a water-dispersible granule (VectoBac® WG) formulation may affect the abundance and diversity of non-target aquatic invertebrates in saltmarsh pools. Taxonomic composition of the invertebrate communities was typical of brackishwater intermittent ecosystems, with a dominance of annelids, crustaceans and nematocerans. Conditions were contrasted between the two years of the survey, both in terms of annual cumulative rainfall and rainfall distribution throughout the year. As a consequence, the hydroperiod and some other environmental characteristics associated with pool drying played a major role in the dynamics of the invertebrate community. In summer 2006, pool drying reduced the abundance of the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor, of the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator and of chironomid larvae. These taxa were able to recolonize rapidly the pools after flooding in September 2006. In 2007, rainfall was more regularly distributed across the year, and the pools did not get dry. Hydrozoans, Chironomini and Orthocladiinae larvae, and oligochaetes were more abundant in treated than in control pools, especially in VectoBac® WG-treated pools. No adverse effects of the treatments were shown on the abundance of N. diversicolor, C. volutator and midge larvae, suggesting that the availability of these food sources for birds was not negatively affected by Bti applications. It is concluded that, as currently performed in Western France coastal wetlands, land-based treatments of saltmarsh pools for larval mosquito control with Bti, used either as VectoBac® 12AS or VectoBac® WG, did not adversely impact non-target aquatic invertebrate communities. PMID:21592573

  5. Influence of benthic macroinvertebrates on the erodability of estuarine cohesive sediments: Density- and biomass-specific responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Erik; Neto, João Magalhães; Lundkvist, Morten; Frederiksen, Lars; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Valdemarsen, Thomas; Flindt, Mogens Rene

    2013-12-01

    The impact of three dominating benthic invertebrates on sediment stability and erosion conditions of cohesive sediments in the Mondego Estuary, Portugal, was examined in laboratory annular flume experiments. The purpose was to test how the life habits and body size of the three involved species (Hydrobia ulvae, Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana) in terms of density or biomass influence sediment erosion. All three species decreased the free-stream erosion threshold (uc) and increased erosion rate (E), since their feeding activities diminished the surface stabilizing effect of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microphytobenthos. S. plana had the highest and H. ulvae the lowest impact when related to density (factor of 29 for uc and factor of 19 for E), while H. ulvae was more important than S. plana when related to biomass (factor of 4 for uc and factor of 6 for E). N. diversicolor had intermediate density-specific (4-6 times higher than H. ulvae) and lowest biomass-specific (2-3 times lower than S. plana) effects on erosion. It appears that faunal erosion impacts preferably should be reported in biomass units for comparative purposes because individual behavioural effects of a small-bodied species like H. ulvae functionally can be relatively more important than those of a 100 times heavier S. plana individual. This is clearly evidenced from the strongly diminished response in suspended Chlorophyll-a content in the presence of the former than the latter species, which is caused by an efficient microphytobenthos grazing by H. ulvae. It is also important to emphasize that the total faunal impact on erosion threshold in a certain area is dictated by combination of contributions from individual species. The total outcome is unpredictable and controlled by synergistic and antagonistic species-specific effects, species interactions as well as environmental and sediment conditions.

  6. Trophic transfer of trace metals: Subcellular compartmentalization in a polychaete and assimilation by a decapod crustacean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical form of accumulated trace metal in prey is important in controlling the bioavailataility of dietary metal to a predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of radiolabelled Ag, Cd and Zn from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians. We used 2 populations of worms with different proportions of accumulated metals in different subcellular fractions as prey, and loaded the worms with radiolabelled metals either from sediment or from solution. Accumulated radiolabelled metals were fractionated into 5 components : metal-rich granules (MRG), cellular debris, organelles, metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP), and other (heat-sensitive) proteins (HSP). Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of the metals by P. varians were measured from the 4 categories of prey (i.e. 2 populations, radiolabelled from sediment or solution). There were significant differences for each metal between the AEs from the different prey categories, confirming that origin of prey and route of uptake of accumulated trace metal will cause intraspecific differences in subsequent metal assimilation. Correlations were sought between AEs and selected fractions or combinations of fractions of metals in the prey-MRG, Trophically Available Metal (TAM = MTLP + HSP + organelles) and total protein (MTLP + HSP). TAM explained 28% of the variance in AEs for Ag, but no consistent relationships emerged between AEs and TAM or total protein when the metals were considered separately. AEs did, however, show significant positive regressions with both TAM and total protein when the 3 metals were considered together, explaining only about 21 % of the variance in each case. A significant negative relationship was observed between MRG and AE for all metals combined. The predator (P. varians) can assimilate dietary metal from a range of the fractions binding metals in the prey (N. diversicolor), with different assimilation efficiencies summated across these

  7. Biogeochemical studies of technetium in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Progress report, 1 July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reported in research dealing with the biogeochemical behavior of technetium in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Studies were planned to elaborate the biokinetic behavior of Tc as TcO/sub 4//sup -/ in selected marine and estuarine organisms and to determine the affinity of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ for different marine sediments under oxygenated conditions. It is concluded that concentration factors for TcO/sub 4//sup -/ in bivalve molluscs (oysters and mussels) do not exceed 2 when calculated for whole animals and when uptake is directly from water. Direct uptake from water by limpets (archeogastropod) are very much lower than have been reported for red abalone (archeogastropod). Whole body concentration factors for TcO/sub 4//sup -/ in the plaice, Pleuronectes platessa, where uptake is directly from labeled seawater, do not exceed 10 at equilibrium. Both the lobster, Homarus gammaris and the polychaete, Nereis diversicolor appear to concentrate Tc efficiently from water labelled intially with TcO/sub 4//sup -/. Both plaice and rays (Raja clavata) fed /sup 95m/Tc labeled Nereis show an initial rapid loss of the isotope for approximately five days. Thereafter, loss is much reduced. Shrimp (Palaemon elegans), Cragnon sp.) and Crab (Cancer pagurus) show concentration factors similar to plaice (C.F. is less than 10). Isopods, however, have concentration factors of only 3 following four weeks exposure to labeled seawater. Uptake of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ by phytoplankton is extremely low, which precludes experiments in which TcO/sub 4//sup -/ labeled phytoplankton can be fed to either bivalve molluscs or microzooplankton. Sediment distribution coefficients for TcO/sub 4//sup -/ are essentially zero and are independent of sediment type in well oxygenated seawater. Experiments to date have shown that it is not possible to make generalizations concerning the bioavailability of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ to marine organisms.

  8. Burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediment inhabited by three polychaetes: Laboratory and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delefosse, M.; Kristensen, E.

    2012-07-01

    The large number of seeds produced by eelgrass, Zostera marina, provides this plant with a potential to disperse widely and colonise new areas. After dispersal, seeds must be buried into sediment for assuring long-term survival, successful germination and safe seedling development. Seeds may be buried passively by sedimentation or actively through sediment reworking by benthic fauna. We evaluated the effect of three polychaetes on the burial rate and depth of eelgrass seeds. Burial was first measured in controlled laboratory experiments using different densities of Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor (400-3200 ind m- 2), Arenicola marina (20-80 ind m- 2), and the invasive Marenzelleria viridis (400-1600 ind m- 2). The obtained results were subsequently compared with burial rates of seed mimics in experimental field plots (1 m2) dominated by the respective polychaetes. High recovery of seeds in the laboratory (97-100%) suggested that none of these polychaetes species feed on eelgrass seeds. N. diversicolor transported seeds rapidly (< 1 day) into its burrow, where they remained buried at a median depth of 0.5 cm. A. marina and M. viridis buried seeds by depositing their faeces on top of the sediment. At their highest abundance, A. marina and M. viridis buried seeds to a median depth of 6.7 cm and 0.5 cm, respectively, after a month. The burial efficiency and depth of these species were, in contrast to N. diversicolor, dependent on animal abundance. Only 2% of seed mimics casted in the field plots were recovered, suggesting that physical dispersion by waves and currents was considerably important for horizontal distribution. However, polychaete affected significantly the vertical distribution of seeds. Overall the effects of these three polychaetes indicate that benthic macroinvertebrates may significantly impact eelgrass seed bank at the ecosystem scale. Some species have a positive effect by burying seeds to shallow depths and thereby reducing seed predation and

  9. DIVERGENCE BETWEEN POPULATIONS OF A MONOGAMOUS POLYCHAETE WITH MALE PARENTAL CARE: PREMATING ISOLATION AND CHROMOSOME VARIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low dispersal and sexual selection are characteristic of the coastal polychaete Nereis acuminata Ehlers 1868 [also known as Nereis arenaceodentata Moore 1903 and Nereis (Neanthes) caudata elle Chiaje 1841]. e assessed levels of premating isolation between populations of this poly...

  10. Benthic grazers and suspension feeders: Which one assumes the energetic dominance in Königshafen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, H.

    1994-06-01

    Size-frequency histograms of biomass, secondary production, respiration and energy flow of 4 dominant macrobenthic communities of the intertidal bay of Königshafen were analysed and compared. In the shallow sandy flats ( Nereis-Corophium-belt [ N.C.-belt], seagrass-bed and Arenicola-flat) a bimodal size-frequency histogram of biomass, secondary production, respiration and energy flow was found with a first peak formed by individuals within a size range of 0.10 to 0.32 mg ash free dry weight (AFDW). In this size range, the small prosobranch Hydrobia ulvae was the dominant species, showing maximal biomass as well as secondary production, respiration and energy flow in the seagrass-bed. The second peak on the size-frequency histogram was formed by the polychaete Nereis diversicolor with individual weights of 10 to 18 mg AFDW in the N.C.-belt, and by Arenicola marina with individual weights of 100 to 562 mg AFDW in both of the other sand flats. Biomass, productivity, respiration and energy flow of these polychaetes increased from the Nereis-Corophium-belt, to the seagrass-bed, and to the Arenicola-flat. Mussel beds surpassed all other communities in biomass and the functional parameters mentioned above. Size-frequency histograms of these parameters were distinctly unimodal with a maximum at an individual size of 562 to 1000 mg AFDW. This size group was dominated by adult specimens of Mytilus edulis. Averaged over the total area, the size-frequency histogram of energy flow of all intertidal flats of Königshafen showed one peak built by Hydrobia ulvae and a second one, mainly formed by M. edulis. Assuming that up to 10% of the intertidal area is covered by mussel beds, the maximum of the size-specific energy flow will be formed by Mytilus. When only 1% is covered by mussel beds, then the energy flow is dominated by H. ulvae. Both animals represent different trophic types and their dominance in energy flow has consequences for the food web and the carbon flow of the

  11. Structural comparison of cuticle and interstitial collagens from annelids living in shallow sea-water and at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Gaill, F; Mann, K; Wiedemann, H; Engel, J; Timpl, R

    1995-02-17

    Two types of annelid collagens of different sizes were purified, one from acetic acid extracts of the cuticle (length 2.5 microns) and the other, after pepsin digestion, from interstitial spaces of the body wall (0.3 micron). They were obtained from Alvinella pompejana, Alvinella caudata and Paralvinella grasslei collected at 2600 m depth around anoxic hydrothermal vents and from Arenicola marina and Nereis diversicolor living in shallow sea-water habitats. The length of the corresponding collagens from different species and their amino acid compositions including the hydroxylation of proline were remarkably similar. The melting point of the triple helix, however, differed between the Alvinella species (approximately 45 degrees C), Paralvinella (approximately 35 degrees C) and the shallow sea-water annelids (approximately 28 degrees C), indicating adaption to habitats with different temperatures. The cuticle collagens of the annelids possess a globular domain, which is apparently involved in oligomer formation, and show similar fragment pattern. Almost identical cross-striation patterns of segment-long-spacing segments of the interstitial collagens indicated sequence similarity, which was confirmed by partial Edman degradation of alpha-chains. These data showed almost complete identity between the two Alvinella species and a lower sequence identity with Paralvinella (approximately 95%), Arenicola (67 to 72%) and the vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila (64 to 71%). The data suggest a close evolutionary relationship between these worms, despite a clear separation of habitat preference and thermal stability of the collagens. PMID:7869380

  12. Bioavailability of PAHs in aluminum smelter affected sediments: evaluation through assessment of pore water concentrations and in vivo bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Bøyum, Olav; Grung, Merete; Næs, Kristoffer

    2010-12-15

    Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coal tar pitch polluted sediments was predicted by (1) a generic approach based on organic carbon-water partitioning and Gibbs linear free energy relationship (between K(OW) and K(OC)), and (2) measurements of freely dissolved concentrations of PAHs in the sediment pore water, using passive samplers and solid phase extraction. Results from these predictions were compared with those from in vivo bioaccumulation experiments using Nereis diversicolor (Polychaeta), Hinia reticulata (Gastropoda), and Nuculoma tenuis (Bivalvia). Measured sediment/water partition coefficients were higher than predicted by the generic approach. Furthermore, predicted biota-to-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) derived from measured pore water concentrations were more in agreement with the bioaccumulation observed for two of the three species. Discrepancies associated with the third species (N. tenuis) were likely a result of particles remaining in the intestine (as shown by microscopic evaluation). These results indicate the importance of conducting site-specific evaluations of pore water concentrations and/or bioaccumulation studies by direct measurements to accurately provide a basis for risk assessment and remediation plans. The importance of knowledge regarding specific characteristics of model organisms is emphasized. PMID:21077669

  13. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A.; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T.; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtained from triple resonance experiments HNCACB, HN(CO)CACB, HNCO, CC(CO)NH, and [15N]-edited TOCSY, and HCCH-TOCSY. Secondary structure was determined by using secondary chemical shifts and characteristic NOEs. In addition, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings were measured from a spin-state selective [1H, 15N] correlation spectrum acquired from a sample dissolved in a dilute liquid crystal. Four EF-hand motifs with characteristic helix-loop-helix patterns were observed. Three of these are typical calcium-binding EF-hands, whereas site 2 is an atypical nonbinding site. The global fold of calerythrin was assessed by dipolar couplings. Measured dipolar couplings were compared with values calculated from four crystal structures of proteins with sequence homology to calerythrin. These data allowed us to recognize an overall similarity between the folds of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from the sandworm Nereis diversicolor and the amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. PMID:10631973

  14. The use of lipid markers to define sources of organic matter in sediment and food web of the intertidal salt-marsh-flat ecosystem of Mont-Saint-Michel Bay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Tarik; Bodineau, Laurent; Retiere, Christian; Thoumelin, Guy

    1997-12-01

    Salt marsh plants and seven surface sediment samples along a transect in the intertidal flat area of Mont-Saint-Michel Bay were analysed for fatty acids and sterols. The presence of lipid markers of halophytes (long-chain fatty acids, 18:3ω3, and phytosterols) in the surface layers of the sediment confirms the export of organic matter from the salt marsh to the intertidal flat. The spatial distribution of this organic matter over the tidal-flat area was controlled by the tidal currents and the presence of mussel beds. Lipid markers of diatoms (20:5ω3 and brassicasterol) and bacteria (18:1ω7 and odd, linear and branched, fatty acids) were also found in the surface sediments. Diatoms and benthic bacteria as well as organic matter from the salt marsh were the significant food sources available to the macrozoobenthos on the intertidal flat. The ingestion of these food types by the dominant species of the macrozoobenthos was confirmed by the presence of their respective lipid markers in the animals. The presence of these markers in animals subjected to a starvation experiment confirmed that these food types are really assimilated. The lipid composition of the starved animals indicated that the species studied were able to accumulate the fatty acid 20:5ω3 (considered to be a diatom marker), and that the annelid Nereis diversicolor supported an internal bacterial population.

  15. New Insights into Polychaete Traces and Fecal Pellets: Another Complex Ichnotaxon?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Kantimati G.; Panchang, Rajani

    2015-01-01

    Neoichnological observations help refine paleoichnological records. The present study reports extensive observations on the distribution, morphology, occurrence and association of burrows and fecal pellets of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor in the Kundalika Estuary on the west coast of India. Our holistic study of these modern-day traces suggests it to be a complex trace arising from domichnial, fodinichnial and possibly pascichnial behavior of polychaetes. The study for the first time reports extensive fecal pellet production, distribution and their preservation as thick stacks in modern estuarine environment. These observations testify the fossilization potential of pellets and provide an explanation to their origin in the geological record. Their occurrence as strings associated with mounds not only suggests pascichnial behaviour of polychaetes but also allows the assignment of post-Paleozoic Tomaculum to the activity of polychaete worms. The production of fecal pellets in such large quantities plays a major role in increasing the average grain size of the substrate of these estuarine tidal flats, thereby improving aeration within the substrate. PMID:26439262

  16. Factors Affecting the Distribution of the Amphipod Corophium volutatorin Two Estuaries in South-east England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. G.; Gerdol, V.

    1997-05-01

    The distribution of Corophium volutator(Pallas) in the estuaries of the Rivers Blackwater and Crouch in South-east England was examined by taking samples of mud from 137 sites at approximately 0·5 m below mean high water of neap tidal level. Corophium volutatorwere approximately twice as abundant in creeks and semi-enclosed bays than on the open mud flats, a difference that was significant statistically. There was no correlation between the abundance of C. volutatorand the median particle size of the sediment nor the mud content. There was a significant but weak negative correlation between the abundance of C. volutatorand the polychaete Nereis diversicolor. The aggregation of C. volutatorin the creeks and bays was attributed to their dispersal behaviour of swimming on the flood tide, which would sweep the amphipods into such areas where the tide rises but does not flow laterally. On the open mud flats, displacement of swimming amphipods by the flood tide further upstream and into semi-enclosed areas would occur. Their dispersal behaviour places C. volutatorin the creeks and bays within the saltmarsh vegetation, where their bioturbatory feeding habits may be responsible, in part, for the significant loss of pioneer zone vegetation that occurs there.

  17. The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms in brackish waters (SW Finland); an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, J.; Bonsdorff, E.

    The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms was studied by field and laboratory experiments. The field manipulations (caging experiments) were carried out in 2 shallow (1.5 m) bays in the northern Baltic Sea. An a priori hypothesis that fish do not structure macrozoobenthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas was tested. Short-term aquarium experiments clearly showed that perch ( Perca fluviatilis L.), roach ( Rutilus rutilus L.) and ruffe ( Acerina cernua (L.)) are all effective predators on benthic macroinvertebrates ( Corophium volutator) Pallas and Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller) under laboratory conditions. Thus fish can be considered a potential structuring force on benthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas. Caging experiments of one to two month's duration (partial and total exclosure of fish and enclosure with perch) induced only minor changes in the benthic community. These results support the a priori hypothesis. One of our main conclusions is, however, that fish predation and other biotic interactions (competition, disturbance, etc.) together with abiotic factors play some role in the structuring processes. Multilevel testing is needed in studies on biotic interactions in the marine environment. Results from a specific environment should not automatically be applied to other kinds of habitats.

  18. Disturbance of benthic infauna by sediment-reworking activities of the lugworm Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, E. C.

    The influence of the lugworm Arenicola marina on the abundance of other benthic species was studied in the westernmost part of the Wadden Sea. Small squares (1 m 2) within depopulated 144-m 2 plots were recolonized with various (naturally-occurring) lugworm densities (0-10-20-40-80 and 0-25-50-75-100 per m 2). These plots were sampled during the summer. Lugworms were found to have a strongly negative effect on the densities of C. volutator. At 0-density lugworms, the numbers of C. volutator were high. These were halved at 17 lugworms per m 2 ( i.e. the mean density on the tidal flats of the Dutch Wadden Sea), and were further reduced at higher lugworm densities ( e.g. 20% remained at 40 lugworms per m 2). Laboratory observations of Corophium behaviour in the presence of Arenicola suggest that sediment-reworking lugworms stimulate Corophium to emigrate. Effects of lugworms on other benthic species were also studied in the same way. Lugworms were found to have strongly negative effects on the juvenile densities of various worm and bivalve species ( Nereis diversicolor, Nephtys hombergii, Heteromastus filiformis, Scoloplos armiger, Pygospio elegans, Capitella capitata and Mya arenaria, Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica, Angulus tenuis, respectively).

  19. Biological impact of eutrophication in the bay of somme and the induction and impact of anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desprez, M.; Rybarczyk, H.; Wilson, J. G.; Ducrotoy, J. P.; Sueur, F.; Olivesi, R.; Elkaim, B.

    The first effects of eutrophication in the Bay of Somme became apparent in the years 1982-1985, when the cockle population collapsed. Areas of high mortality were mapped. Following exceptionally high summer temperatures, other effects were seen in 1982, 1983 and 1989, notably a mass mortality of the benthos. It appeared that the mortality of the benthos was a direct result of anoxia in the water promoted by phytoplankton blooms which were due to high nitrogen levels (nitrates from river and land runoff; ammonium from estuarine bivalve populations). Effects from the change in the benthic community (the disappearance of Cerastoderma edule and the proliferation of Pygospio elegans) were also apparent higher up in the food chain, viz. changes in the diet of the two main predators of the bivalve, the oystercatcher ( Haematopus ostralegus) and the common gull ( Larus canus). Following respirometry measurements of the water, sediment and the major macrobenthic species ( Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica, Nereis diversicolor, Hydrobia ulvae), a model for anoxia was constructed.

  20. Effects of bioturbation on the fate of oil in coastal sandy sediments--an in situ experiment.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Karen; Banta, Gary T; Klinge, Lars; Andersen, Ole

    2011-03-01

    Effects of bioturbation by the common lugworm Arenicola marina on the fate of oil hydrocarbons (alkanes and PAHs) were studied in situ during a simulated oil spill in a shallow coastal area of Roskilde fjord, Denmark. The fate of selected oil compounds was monitored during 120 d using GC-MS and bioturbation activity (feces production and irrigation) was measured regularly during the experiment and used as input parameters in a mechanistic model describing the effects of A. marina on the transport and degradation of oil compounds in the sediment. The chemical analytical data and model results indicated that A. marina had profound and predictable effects on the distribution, degradation and preservation of oil and that the net effect depended on the initial distribution of oil. In sediment with an oil contaminated subsurface-layer A. marina buried the layer deeper in the sediment which clearly enhanced oil persistence. Conversely, A. marina stimulated both the physical removal and microbial degradation of oil compounds in uniformly oil contaminated sediments especially in deeper sediment layers (10-20 cm below the surface), whereas the fate of oil compounds deposited in surface layers (0-5 cm) mainly was affected by removal processes induced by wave actions and other bioturbating infauna such as Nereis diversicolor, Corophium volutator and Hydrobia spp. present in the experimental plots. PMID:21186046

  1. Interactions between macro-algal mats and invertebrates in the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelli, D.

    2000-07-01

    Blooms of opportunistic green macro-algae are a common feature of coastal areas and their effects on mudflat invertebrates can be dramatic. On the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, we have carried out a number of manipulative field experiments designed to evaluate the effects on invertebrates of different species of macro-algae with contrasting ecologies, and the effects of invertebrates on the development of the blooms. Macro-algal mats were found to have dramatic nega- tive effects on the density of the amphipod Corophium volutator, with higher algal biomasses having greater impact. The mechanism for this interaction seems to be interference by the algal filaments with the feeding behaviour of the amphipod. In contrast, the polychaete Capitella spp. increases in abundance under macro-algal mats due to enrichment of the sediment with organic material. These two interactions are seen at all scales, in areas of less than 1 m2 to the scale of the entire estuary, irrespective of the species composition of the macro- algal mats. Bioturbation by Corophium and grazing by the snail Hydrobia ulvae had little effect on macro-algal biomass, but there were less algae when the polychaete Nereis diversicolor was present. The most significant interaction in this system is the pronounced negative impact of algal mats on the abundance of Corophium, probably the most important invertebrate species in the diets of the estuary's shorebirds, fish and epibenthic crustaceans.

  2. Interplay between filter-feeding zoobenthos and hydrodynamics in the shallow Odense Fjord (Denmark) - Earlier and recent studies, perspectives and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Lassen, J.; Kortegaard, M.; Møller, L. F.; Friedrichs, M.; Jensen, M. H.; Larsen, P. S.

    2007-11-01

    The shallow Odense Fjord (Denmark) is characterized by a large biomass of filter-feeding polychaetes ( Nereis diversicolor), clams ( Mya arenaria), cockles ( Cerastoderma glaucum), and amphipods ( Corophium volutator). The present paper summarizes studies on zoobenthic filter-feeding in Odense Fjord from the last 10 years. The general principles discovered are extracted and compared to available tools for modelling of the primary characteristics of interplay between benthic filter-feeders and hydrodynamics. Earlier works have been supplemented with data from a recent field study conducted in the shallow inner part of the fjord. Based on data from this study site, the reduction in phytoplankton for fully mixed and incompletely mixed flows has been modelled. It was found that fully mixed flow results in a potential half-life for phytoplankton of only 1.3 h, whereas for the incompletely mixed water the half-life is 2.7 times longer. The field measurements clearly demonstrate the presence of a strong interplay between filter-feeders and hydrodynamics, but although a certain grazing impact is evident from vertical chlorophyll a profiles with often strongly reduced near-bottom concentrations it is not straightforward to identify and model even the main bio-physical processes that prevent the dense populations of filter-feeders to completely control the phytoplankton biomass in Odense Fjord.

  3. Enteric bacterial pathogen detection in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) is associated with coastal urbanization and freshwater runoff

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa A.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Jang, Spencer S.; Dodd, Erin M.; Dorfmeier, Elene; Harris, Michael D.; Ames, Jack; Paradies, David; Worcester, Karen; Jessup, David A.; Miller, Woutrina A.

    2009-01-01

    Although protected for nearly a century, California’s sea otters have been slow to recover, in part due to exposure to fecally-associated protozoal pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona. However, potential impacts from exposure to fecal bacteria have not been systematically explored. Using selective media, we examined feces from live and dead sea otters from California for specific enteric bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and pathogens endemic to the marine environment (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and Plesiomonas shigelloides). We evaluated statistical associations between detection of these pathogens in otter feces and demographic or environmental risk factors for otter exposure, and found that dead otters were more likely to test positive for C. perfringens, Campylobacter and V. parahaemolyticus than were live otters. Otters from more urbanized coastlines and areas with high freshwater runoff (near outflows of rivers or streams) were more likely to test positive for one or more of these bacterial pathogens. Other risk factors for bacterial detection in otters included male gender and fecal samples collected during the rainy season when surface runoff is maximal. Similar risk factors were reported in prior studies of pathogen exposure for California otters and their invertebrate prey, suggesting that land-sea transfer and/or facilitation of pathogen survival in degraded coastal marine habitat may be impacting sea otter recovery. Because otters and humans share many of the same foods, our findings may also have implications for human health. PMID:19720009

  4. Enteric bacterial pathogen detection in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) is associated with coastal urbanization and freshwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa A; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer S; Dodd, Erin M; Dorfmeier, Elene; Harris, Michael D; Ames, Jack; Paradies, David; Worcester, Karen; Jessup, David A; Miller, Woutrina A

    2010-01-01

    Although protected for nearly a century, California's sea otters have been slow to recover, in part due to exposure to fecally-associated protozoal pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona. However, potential impacts from exposure to fecal bacteria have not been systematically explored. Using selective media, we examined feces from live and dead sea otters from California for specific enteric bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and pathogens endemic to the marine environment (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and Plesiomonas shigelloides). We evaluated statistical associations between detection of these pathogens in otter feces and demographic or environmental risk factors for otter exposure, and found that dead otters were more likely to test positive for C. perfringens, Campylobacter and V. parahaemolyticus than were live otters. Otters from more urbanized coastlines and areas with high freshwater runoff (near outflows of rivers or streams) were more likely to test positive for one or more of these bacterial pathogens. Other risk factors for bacterial detection in otters included male gender and fecal samples collected during the rainy season when surface runoff is maximal. Similar risk factors were reported in prior studies of pathogen exposure for California otters and their invertebrate prey, suggesting that land-sea transfer and/or facilitation of pathogen survival in degraded coastal marine habitat may be impacting sea otter recovery. Because otters and humans share many of the same foods, our findings may also have implications for human health. PMID:19720009

  5. Trophic resource partitioning within a shorebird community feeding on intertidal mudflat habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocher, Pierrick; Robin, Frédéric; Kojadinovic, Jessica; Delaporte, Philippe; Rousseau, Pierre; Dupuy, Christine; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-09-01

    In ecological systems, it is necessary to describe the trophic niches of species and their segregation or overlap to understand the distribution of species in the community. In oceanic systems, the community structure of top predators such as seabird communities has been well documented with many studies in several biogeographical areas. But for coastal habitats, very few investigations on the trophic structure have been carried out in avian communities. In this study, the trophic resource partitioning was investigated on eight of the most abundant species of a shorebird community on the central Atlantic coast of France. Our work comprised a comprehensive sample of birds with different ecomorphogical patterns and data on their main prey to encompass potential sources of overlap and segregation in this community. We examined the stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic composition of blood to investigate the trophic structure (1) on a temporal scale by comparing migration and wintering periods; (2) on a spatial scale through inter-site comparisons; and (3) on the community level within groups of phylogenetically related species. Diets appeared different in several cases between periods, between sites and between juveniles and adults for the same sites. A clear trophic partitioning was established with four functional groups of predators in winter inside the community. The Grey Plover, the Bar-tailed Godwit, the Curlew and a majority of the dunlins were worm-eaters mainly feeding on Nereis diversicolor or Nephtys hombergii. Two species were predominantly deposit-suspensivorous mollusc-eaters, including the Red Knot and the Black-tailed Godwit feeding mainly on Macoma balthica. The Oystercatcher fed mainly on suspensivorous molluscs like Cerastodrema edule and two species including the Redshank and some dunlins adopted opportunistic behaviours feeding on mudflat and/or in marshes.

  6. Disposition of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in two Norwegian epibenthic marine food webs.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Berge, John Arthur; Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Knutsen, Jan Atle; Hylland, Ketil

    2006-03-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are a group of halogenated hydrocarbons, comprising 210 different, theoretically possible congeners. They are relatively hydrophobic and persistent to biodegradation, thereby rendering them subject to bioaccumulation. This study was conducted in Frierfjord and Eidangerfjord in the Grenland fjord system, Norway, heavily polluted by PCDD/PCDF discharges from the 16,600,859 magnesium production at Herøya from 1951 to 2001. Pooled samples of surface-sediments and the following organisms were collected for the Frierfjord and Eidangerfjord study areas: common shrimp (Crangon crangon), polychaetes (mainly Nereis diversicolor), shore crab (Carcinus maenas), cod (Gadus morhua), flounder (Platichthys flesus), trout (Salmo trutta), herring (Clupea harengus), benthic amphipods and zooplankton. Concentrations of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs were quantified in pooled samples for all species. The relative abundances of stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta(15)N) were evaluated in the organisms as a measure of chemically-derived trophic level. Contrary to earlier studies on other persistent organochlorines, it was found that the concentrations of PCDD/Fs declined with increasing trophic level. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) also showed differences between species in the pattern of PCDD/Fs. Higher chlorinated congeners constituted lower percentages of the PCDD/F-concentrations higher in the food chain as compared to lower trophic levels. In general, congener patterns did not differ between fjords. Infauna (polychaetes) and zooplankton had congener patterns most similar to the pollution source. The results indicate lower accumulation of higher chlorinated congeners in species at higher trophic levels (fish), presumably due to low membrane permeability (high molecular size) and possibly slow transport through intestinal aqueous phases because of low aqueous solubility. PMID:16169571

  7. Macrofaunal communities in the habitats of intertidal marshes along the salinity gradient of the Schelde estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Henrietta; Elliott, M.; Cattrijsse, A.

    2009-08-01

    The macrobenthos is important in benthic remineralization processes; it represents a trophic link and is also often used as a bio-indicator in monitoring programs. Variations of the environmental parameters strongly influence the structure of the macrobenthic communities in the marshes and since macrobenthos is the most important food item for marsh-visiting fish species in the Schelde, the variation in food resources can have a strong effect on the higher trophic level. The present study deals with the variation in macrobenthic communities in different habitats of intertidal marshes along the salinity gradient and the differences between the marsh creeks and the intertidal part of the estuary. The study measured density and species richness together with the biomass, and sampled a large intertidal channel and a smaller creek within five marshes along the salinity gradient of the Schelde estuary every six weeks between May and October in 2000. The small creeks had a smaller grain size and higher organic matter content than those in the large channel although the differences in the environmental parameters did not explain the different communities in the two habitats. Marshes had distinct macrobenthic communities but the abundance of macrofauna fluctuated along the estuary without an identifiable spatial trend. In contrast, the total biomass increased towards the euhaline area due to the domination of Nereis diversicolor. Diversity showed a significant positive correlation with the salinity. Comparison of the macrofaunal communities in the marsh with those on the intertidal flats of the estuary indicated similar trends in density, biomass and diversity along the salinity gradient. The density was similar in both habitats whereas biomass was much higher in the intertidal habitats of the estuary, partly due to the higher biomass of molluscs and annelids. Diversity indices were higher in the marsh, and the freshwater area had more species than in the estuary.

  8. Quantifying bioirrigation using ecological parameters: a stochastic approach†

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Carla M; Meile, Christof; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Irrigation by benthic macrofauna has a major influence on the biogeochemistry and microbial community structure of sediments. Existing quantitative models of bioirrigation rely primarily on chemical, rather than ecological, information and the depth-dependence of bioirrigation intensity is either imposed or constrained through a data fitting procedure. In this study, stochastic simulations of 3D burrow networks are used to calculate mean densities, volumes and wall surface areas of burrows, as well as their variabilities, as a function of sediment depth. Burrow networks of the following model organisms are considered: the polychaete worms Nereis diversicolor and Schizocardium sp., the shrimp Callianassa subterranea, the echiuran worm Maxmuelleria lankesteri, the fiddler crabs Uca minax, U. pugnax and U. pugilator, and the mud crabs Sesarma reticulatum and Eurytium limosum. Consortia of these model organisms are then used to predict burrow networks in a shallow water carbonate sediment at Dry Tortugas, FL, and in two intertidal saltmarsh sites at Sapelo Island, GA. Solute-specific nonlocal bioirrigation coefficients are calculated from the depth-dependent burrow surface areas and the radial diffusive length scale around the burrows. Bioirrigation coefficients for sulfate obtained from network simulations, with the diffusive length scales constrained by sulfate reduction rate profiles, agree with independent estimates of bioirrigation coefficients based on pore water chemistry. Bioirrigation coefficients for O2 derived from the stochastic model, with the diffusion length scales constrained by O2 microprofiles measured at the sediment/water interface, are larger than irrigation coefficients based on vertical pore water chemical profiles. This reflects, in part, the rapid attenuation with depth of the O2 concentration within the burrows, which reduces the driving force for chemical transfer across the burrow walls. Correction for the depletion of O2 in the burrows

  9. Influence of trophic position on organochlorine concentrations and compositional patterns in a marine food web.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Ugland, Karl Inne; Skaare, Janneche Utne

    2002-11-01

    The accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDTs (p,p'-DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], o,p'-DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], p,p'-DDD [1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], o.p'-DDD [1,1-dichloro-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], and p,p'-DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethene]), chlordanes (trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, trans-nonachlor, cis-nonachlor and oxychlordane), hexachlorocyclohexanes (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-isomers), hexachlorobenzene, and mirex was investigated in a marine food web from southeastern Norway. The food web consisted of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor, lesser sandeel (Ammodytes tobianus), three species of gobys (Gobiusculus flavescens, Pomatoschistus sp., and Gobius niger), bullrout (Myoxocephalus scorpius), cod (Gadus morhua), herring gull (Larus argentatus), and harbor seal (Phoca vitulina). The results show that interspecies differences in organochlorine (OC) compositional patterns in the food web depend on several factors (allometric, biochemical, physical, and physicochemical) specific to both the chemicals and the organisms. The importance of dietary accumulation and metabolic capacity increases toward higher trophic levels, while the OC patterns are to a larger extent determined by the lipophilicity and water solubility of the compounds at lower trophic levels. Furthermore, stable nitrogen isotopes provided a continuous measure of trophic position, rendering us capable of quantifying the increases in the concentrations of sigma PCB, sigma dichorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and sigma chlordane (CHL) and the percentages of highly chlorinated PCBs through the food web. The information provided may be important for future modeling of the fate of organochlorine contaminants in marine food webs. PMID:12389914

  10. Nursery fidelity, food web interactions and primary sources of nutrition of the juveniles of Solea solea and S. senegalensis in the Tagus estuary (Portugal): A stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Salgado, J.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2008-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were used to assess site fidelity of Solea solea and Solea senegalensis juveniles, to investigate food web interactions and to determine the dominant nutrient pathways in two nursery areas in the Tagus estuary, Portugal. Samples of water from the main sources and from the nursery areas and respective saltmarsh creeks were collected for isotope analysis, as well as sediment, benthic microalgae, saltmarsh halophytes, S. solea, S. senegalensis and its main prey, Nereis diversicolor, Scrobicularia plana and Corophium spp. While site fidelity was high in 0-group juveniles, it was lower for 1-group juveniles, possibly due to an increase in mobility and energy demands with increasing size. Analysis of the food web revealed a complex net of relations. Particulate organic matter from the freshwater sources, from each nursery's waters and saltmarsh creeks presented similar isotopic composition. Sediment isotopic composition and saltmarsh halophytes also did not differentiate the two areas. All components of the food web from the benthic microalgae upwards were isotopically different between the nursery areas. These components were always more enriched in δ13C and δ15N at the lower nursery area than at the nursery located upstream, appearing as if there were two parallel trophic chains with little trophic interaction between each other. A mixture of carbon and nitrogen sources is probably being incorporated into the food web. The lower nursery area is more dependent upon an isotopically enriched energy pathway, composed of marine particulate organic matter, marine benthic microalgae and detritus of the C 4 saltmarsh halophyte Spartina maritima. The two nursery areas present a different level of dependence upon the freshwater and marine energy pathways, due to hydrological features, which should be taken into account for S. solea and S. senegalensis fisheries and habitat management.

  11. Is porewater an important route of metals to macrobenthic organisms? Example of an estuarine field study

    SciTech Connect

    Srinetr, V.; Baeyens, W.; Ysebaert, T.; Meire, P.

    1995-12-31

    Porewater is recently hypothesized as a direct and important route of metal exposure to benthic organisms. However, only a few research studies clearly indicate its usefulness in monitoring and assessment of metal pollution. This study aims to answer whether porewater is really a significant route of metals to macrobenthic organisms in a natural sediment environment. Therefore, seven intertidal locations along the salinity gradient of the Schelde estuary (Belgium-The Netherlands) were investigated during a one year period (1993--1994). Metal analysis was performed on monthly samples of dominant macrobenthic species including the bivalves Macoma balthica, Scrobicularia plana, Cerastodema edule and Mya arenaria, the amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Nereis diversicolor. Metal analysis includes manganese, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, cadmium and lead. The results show temporal and spatial variation of metals in both macrobenthic organisms and porewater. Levels of some metals in porewater, for example cadmium, lead, and copper are higher in winter months than in summer months in coherence with higher levels found in some benthic species. For some benthic species, metal contents were directly related to metal concentrations in porewater. However, no firm conclusion can be drawn that porewater is the only main source of bioavailable metals to benthic organisms and all metal species in porewater are bioavailable. In order to understand metal bioavailability in the sediment environment, a combination of information from a multidisciplinary approach (geochemistry, benthic ecology and toxicology) is needed. In fact, this study fits within the framework of a Triad-approach, conducted on sediments of the Schelde estuary.

  12. Have the bioavailabilities of trace metals to a suite of biomonitors changed over three decades in SW England estuaries historically affected by mining?

    PubMed

    Rainbow, P S; Kriefman, S; Smith, B D; Luoma, S N

    2011-03-15

    Many estuaries of southwest England were heavily contaminated with toxic metals associated with the mining of copper and other metals, particularly between 1850 and 1900. The question remains whether the passage of time has brought remediation to these estuaries. In 2003 and 2006 we revisited sites in 5 metal-contaminated estuaries sampled in the 1970s and 1980s - Restronguet Creek, Gannel, West Looe, East Looe and Tavy. We evaluate changes in metal contamination in sediments and in metal bioavailabilities in sediments and water to local organisms employed as biomonitors. We find that the decline in contamination in these estuaries is complex. Differences in bioavailable contamination in the water column were detectable, as were significant detectable changes in at least some estuaries in bioavailable metal contamination originating from sediments. However, in the 100 years since mining activities declined, bioavailable contamination has not declined to the regional baseline in any estuary affected by the mine wastes. The greatest decline in contamination occurred in the one instance (East Looe) where a previous industrial source of (Ag) contamination was considered. We used the macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum as biomonitors of dissolved metal bioavailabilities and the deposit feeders Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana as biomonitors of bioavailable metal in sediments. We found no systematic decrease in the atypically high Ag, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the estuarine sediments over a 26 year period. Accumulated metal (Ag, As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the deposit feeders are similarly still atypically high in at least one estuary for each metal, and there is no consistent evidence for general decreases in sediment metal bioavailabilities over time. We conclude that the legacy of mining in sheltered estuaries of southwest England is the ongoing presence of sediments rich in metals bioavailable to deposit feeders, while

  13. On the ecology of meiofauna in an organically polluted estuarine mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, Lucas A.; Romeijn, Karin; Admiraal, Wim

    1984-12-01

    The structure, distribution and seasonal changes of the benthic meiofauna in an organically polluted, tidal, brackish-water mudflat in the Ems-Dollart estuary were analysed. Towards the outfall of polluted fresh water, macrofauna disappeared, numbers of meiofauna increased but the diversity of the meiofauna decreased. In the area surrounding the outfall the numbers and biomass of nematodes and oligochaetes increased rapidly in spring and remained high until autumn ( c. 13 × 10 6 individuals m -2; c. 2gCm -2). The benthic fauna comprised small numbers of species, dominated by a few fast-growing diatom-feeding nematodes ( Eudiplogaster pararmatus and Dichromadora geophila) and oligochaetes ( Amphichaeta sannio and Paranais litoralis). Eudiplogaster pararmatus exhibits brood care and it tolerates low salinities. Dichromadora geophila which is oviparous, behaved similarly regarding tolerances, life cycle and feeding but this species was less successful than Eudiplogaster in colonizing the mudflats near the outfall. The success of the two naidid oligochaete species results from their method of reproduction by means of binary fission. Most organisms fed on benthic diatoms. In spite of intensive mineralization in the mudflat, only one bacteria-feeding organism was found in abundance (the nematode Leptolaimus papilliger). The absence of macrofaunal organisms, e.g. Nereis diversicolor, is probably also responsible for the development of high densities of meiofauna in the upper sediment layers of the mudflats in the vicinity of the outfall. The heavy load of organic waste entering the Dollart reduced the diversity within the benthic ecosystem, but nevertheless a simple system remained, based on the recurrent reoxidation of the sediment surface.

  14. Benthic biodiversity patterns in Ria de Aveiro, Western Portugal: Environmental-biological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor; Sampaio, Leandro; Freitas, Rosa; Neves, Ramiro

    2011-12-01

    This study characterizes the macrobenthic gradients in Ria de Aveiro, Western Portugal. Ria de Aveiro is the meeting place of a number of river basins, resulting in a transition system of complex geometry, with channels running parallel to the coast line, north and south of the entrance, but also inland, creating an intricate system of navigation channels, islands and intertidal sand and mudflats. This renders unique characteristics to this system within the framework of transitional waters. The study was based on the analysis of samples from 248 sites, covering the full salinity gradient and the entire channel system. A total of 120 taxa in more than 76,350 specimens were identified. The most abundant and frequent taxa were all annelids, namely Alkmaria romijni, Streblospio shrubsolii, Tharyx sp., Tubificoides benedii, Nereis diversicolor, Capitella sp., Pygospio elegans, Polydora ligni and an unidentified oligochaete. The spatial distribution of the fauna was found to be mainly related to hydrodynamics and the salinity gradient, whereas sediment grain-size characteristics were much less important. Shear stress, flux, current velocity, salinity and sediment redox potential were the environmental variables which best related to the biological data. Benthic assemblages succeed from the euhaline pole, at the entrance, to the limnetic poles, located in the inner parts of the channels. In this succession, mean abundance increased from the outward to the inward assemblages but species richness and diversity were higher in intermediate assemblages. These descriptors decrease abruptly in the limnetic areas. Using the M-AMBI index, the ecological quality of Ria de Aveiro revealed moderate, poor and bad status. However, the ecological status spatial trend closely followed the benthic assemblages succession, their species richness and diversity, indicating the need for proper reference conditions and inter-calibration exercises in the transition waters before final

  15. Distribution pattern of benthic invertebrates in Danish estuaries: The use of Taylor's power law as a species-specific indicator of dispersion and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Erik; Delefosse, Matthieu; Quintana, Cintia O.; Banta, Gary T.; Petersen, Hans Christian; Jørgensen, Bent

    2013-03-01

    The lack of a common statistical approach describing the distribution and dispersion pattern of marine benthic animals has often hampered the comparability among studies. The purpose of this study is therefore to apply an alternative approach, Taylor's power law, to data on spatial and temporal distribution of 9 dominating benthic invertebrate species from two study areas, the estuaries Odense Fjord and Roskilde Fjord, Denmark. The slope (b) obtained from the power relationship of sample variance (s2) versus mean (μ) appears to be species-specific and independent of location and time. It ranges from a low of ~ 1 for large-bodied (> 1 mg AFDW) species (e.g. Marenzelleria viridis, Nereis diversicolor) to a high of 1.6-1.9 for small-bodied (< 1 mg AFDW) species (e.g. Pygospio elegans and Tubificoides benedii). Accordingly, b is apparently a valuable species-specific dispersion index based on biological factors such as behavior and intraspecific interactions. Thus, at the examined spatial scale, the more intense intraspecific interactions (e.g. territoriality) cause less aggregated distribution patterns among large- than small-bodied invertebrates. The species-specific interactions seem sufficiently strong to override environmental influences (e.g. water depth and sediment type). The strong linear relationship between the slope b and intercept log(a) from the power relationship is remarkably similar for all surveys providing a common slope of - 1.63 with the present sampling approach. We suggest that this relationship is an inherent characteristic of Taylor's power law, and that b as a dispersion index may be biased by e.g. sampling errors when this relationship is weak. The correlation strength between b and log(a) could therefore be envisioned as a data quality check.

  16. Characterization of the putatively introduced red alga Acrochaetium secundatum (Acrochaetiales, Rhodophyta) growing epizoically on the pelage of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentall, Gena B.; Rosen, Barry H.; Kunz, Jessica M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Saunders, Gary W.; LaRoche, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological associations between epibionts (organisms that live on the surface of another living organism) and vertebrates have been documented in both marine and terrestrial environments, and may be opportunistic, commensal, or symbiotic (Lewin et al. 1981, Holmes 1985, Allen et al. 1993, Bledsoe et al. 2006, Pfaller et al. 2008, Suutari et al. 2010). Although epibiont proliferation is frequently reported on slow-moving, sparsely haired organisms such as manatees and sloths, reports from densely furred, highly mobile mammals are much less common. There are reports of epizoic algae for several species of pinnipeds (Kenyon and Rice 1959, Scheffer 1962, Baldridge 1977, Allen et al. 1993), which rely to varying degrees on both pelage and blubber for thermoregulation, but the phenomenon has not been widely described. Scheffer (1962) noted that red algae was fairly common on the pelage of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), pinnipeds for which fur likely makes a comparatively high contribution to thermoregulation (Donohue et al. 2000). For species with pelage that plays a critical role of thermal insulation, it seems implausible that an epibiont would persist on healthy individuals that devote significant energy resources toward grooming and actively maintaining their coat. Biological characteristics of epibiont settlement and attachment, and physiological requirements of epizoic species play key roles in their successful colonization and potential host impacts. To investigate this relationship, we explore a novel discovery of an epizoic alga from southern sea otters, including describing algal development on sea otter hair and molecular identification of the algae.

  17. Ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of Sarcocystis neurona tissue cysts in the central nervous system of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.A.; Barr, B.C.; Nordhausen, R.; James, E.R.; Magargal, S.L.; Murray, M.; Conrad, P.A.; Toy-Choutka, S.; Jessup, D.A.; Grigg, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, three wild sea otters were diagnosed with putative Sarcocystis neurona-associated meningoencephalitis by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Schizonts, free merozoites and tissue cysts were observed in the brains of all three infected animals. Tissue cysts from sea otter 1 (SO1) stained positively using anti-S. neurona polyclonal antiserum. However, positive staining does not preclude infection by closely related or cross-reactive tissue cyst-forming coccidian parasites. Two immature tissue cysts in the brain of SO1 were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Ultrastructural features included cyst walls with thin villous projections up to 1 μm long with tapered ends and a distinctive, electron-dense outer lining layer composed of linearly-arranged, semi-circular structures with a “hobnailed” surface contour. Small numbers of microtubules extended down through the villi into the underlying granular layer. Metrocytes were short and plump with an anterior apical complex, 22 subpellicular microtubules, numerous free ribosomes and no rhoptries. Some metrocytes appeared to be dividing, with two adjacent nuclear profiles. Collectively these ultrastructural features were compatible with developing protozoal cysts and were similar to prior descriptions of S. neurona tissue cysts. Panspecific 18S rDNA primers were utilized to identify protozoa infecting the brains of these otters and DNA amplification and additional sequencing at the ITS1 locus confirmed that all three otters were infected with S. neurona. No other Sarcocystis spp. were detected in the brains or skeletal muscles of these animals by immunohistochemistry or PCR. We believe this is the first ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of S. neurona tissue cysts in the CNS of any animal. PMID:19527725

  18. Ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of Sarcocystis neurona tissue cysts in the central nervous system of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Barr, B C; Nordhausen, R; James, E R; Magargal, S L; Murray, M; Conrad, P A; Toy-Choutka, S; Jessup, D A; Grigg, M E

    2009-10-01

    In 2004, three wild sea otters were diagnosed with putative Sarcocystis neurona-associated meningoencephalitis by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Schizonts, free merozoites and tissue cysts were observed in the brains of all three infected animals. Tissue cysts walls from sea otter 1 (SO1) stained positively using anti-S. neurona polyclonal antiserum. However, positive staining does not preclude infection by closely related or cross-reactive tissue cyst-forming coccidian parasites. Two immature tissue cysts in the brain of SO1 were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Ultrastructural features included cyst walls with thin villous projections up to 1 microm long with tapered ends and a distinctive, electron-dense outer lining layer composed of linearly-arranged, semi-circular structures with a "hobnailed" surface contour. Small numbers of microtubules extended down through the villi into the underlying granular layer. Metrocytes were short and plump with an anterior apical complex, 22 sub-pellicular microtubules, numerous free ribosomes and no rhoptries. Some metrocytes appeared to be dividing, with two adjacent nuclear profiles. Collectively these ultrastructural features were compatible with developing protozoal cysts and were similar to prior descriptions of S. neurona tissue cysts. Panspecific 18S rDNA primers were utilized to identify protozoa infecting the brains of these otters and DNA amplification and additional sequencing at the ITS1 locus confirmed that all three otters were infected with S. neurona. No other Sarcocystis spp. were detected in the brains or skeletal muscles of these animals by immunohistochemistry or PCR. We believe this is the first ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of S. neurona tissue cysts in the CNS of any animal. PMID:19527725

  19. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part I: Amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2012-01-01

    Of the factors which control the quantity and composition of organic matter (OM) buried in marine sediments, the links between infaunal ingestion and gut passage and sediment geochemistry have received relatively little attention. This study aimed to use feeding experiments and novel isotope tracing techniques to quantify amino acid net accumulation and loss during polychaete gut passage, and to link this to patterns of selective preservation and decay in sediments. Microcosms containing either Arenicolamarina or Hediste (formerly Nereis) diversicolor were constructed from defaunated sediment and filtered estuarine water, and maintained under natural temperature and light conditions. They were fed with 13C-labelled diatoms daily for 8 days, and animals were transferred into fresh, un-labelled sediment after ∼20 days. Samples of fauna, microcosm sediment and faecal matter were collected after 8, ∼20 and ∼40 days, and analysed for their bulk isotopic signatures and 13C-labelled amino acid compositions. Bulk isotopic data showed that, consistent with their feeding modes, Hediste assimilated added 13C more quickly, and attained a higher labelling level than Arenicola. Both species retained the added 13C in their biomass even after removal from the food. A principal component analysis of 13C-labelled amino acid mole percentages showed clear differences in composition between the algae, faunal tissues, and sediment plus faecal matter. Further, the two species of polychaete showed different compositions in their tissues. The amino acids phenylalanine, valine, leucine, iso-leucine, threonine and proline showed net accumulation in polychaete tissues. Serine, methionine, lysine, aspartic and glutamic acids and tyrosine were rapidly lost through metabolism, consistent with their presence in easily digestible cell components (as opposed to cell walls which offer physical protection). All sample types (polychaete tissues, sediments and faecal matter) were enriched in

  20. Impact of Macrofaunal Recolonization on Benthic Metabolism and Nutrient Fluxes in a Shallow Marine Sediment Previously Overgrown with Macroalgal Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Kristensen, E.

    1997-11-01

    The impact of bioturbation by the polychaeteNereis diversicoloron sediment metabolism and exchange of dissolved inorganic nitrogen across the sediment-water interface was studied in different sediment types from a shallow estuary, Kertinge Nor, Denmark. In addition, potential effects of a possible recolonization of benthic infauna to previously defaunated organic-rich sediment was evaluated. Three study sites were situated along a transect, representing a distinct gradient in sedimentary organic content and faunal composition within a relatively short distance. The inner location was rich in benthic infauna, and composed of sandy sediment of relatively low organic content (<1·4% LOI) originating mainly from benthic microalgae. The outer location was muddy and organic rich (5-14% LOI) due to frequent coverage and deposition of filamentous macroalgae. The benthic infauna was sparse here as a result of poor oxygen conditions below dense algal mats. Another intermediate location was situated in the transition zone between the others. Variations in sediment C:N ratios of the bulk organic pool and in C:N stoichiometry of organic matter mineralization, estimated from porewater profiles of CO2and NH4+, indicated distinctly different sources of organic matter input to the sediments, and differences in the nutritional quality of detritus available for decomposers. A recolonization event was simulated by introducingN. diversicolorto laboratory microcosms, followed by measurements of O2, CO2and inorganic nitrogen fluxes across the sediment-water interface regularly over a 35-day period. Presence ofN. diversicolorincreased sediment O2uptake and CO2production by 2·1-2·6 and 1·5-1·9 times, respectively. Release of total inorganic nitrogen was stimulated 1·5-2·4 times due toN. diversicolor. Worm respiration accounted for only 32-46% of the increase, indicating enhanced microbial activity in the sediment; the stimulation being highest in the organic-rich sediment. Burrow

  1. Survivability of Kudoa septempunctata in human intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Marina; Tomaru, Akiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate whether Kudoa septempunctata was able to live in the human intestine, we assessed viability of K. septempunctata sporoplasms under conditions that mimicked human and ragworm digestive tracts. To study the effect of osmotic pressure on viability, sporoplasms were incubated in 0.9 or 3.4 % sodium chloride solutions, which roughly corresponded to the osmotic pressure in human or ragworm tissues, respectively. While viability in 3.4 % sodium chloride did not change after 72 h, it dropped to 21 % in 0.9 % sodium chloride. To study the effect of temperature on viability, sporoplasms were incubated at 37, 15, or 25 °C, which were representative of human, winter ragworm, or summer ragworm temperatures, respectively. Viability decreased sharply to 8.4 % after 48 h at 37 °C, but remained essentially unchanged at 15 and 25 °C. In addition, sporoplasms showed strong susceptibility to bile. These results indicate that K. septempunctata could not live in the human intestine for a long time. PMID:27038250

  2. Spatial patterns of benthic macrofauna in relation to environmental variables in an intertidal habitat in the Humber estuary, UK: Developing a tool for estuarine shoreline management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.

    2007-10-01

    Spatial variations in benthic macrofaunal species composition, abundance and biomass in estuarine intertidal habitats have been often related to such environmental variables as salinity, sediment types and tidal depth. However, there have been few attempts to investigate the relations between such macrobenthic parameters and intertidal beach width gradient in order to predict their likely responses to coastal squeeze induced by accelerating sea-level rise in an estuarine environment. This article investigates the linkages between environmental variables and patterns in the distribution, abundance and biomass of estuarine intertidal macrobenthos in order to provide a basis for describing the effect of future sea-level rise in the Humber estuary, UK. Field surveys were conducted in September 2003 and 2004 over a variety of spatial scales based on a hierarchically scaled field study (system: 10 5 m; region: 10 5-10 4 m; local 10 4-10 3 m; transect: 10 3-10 2 m; station; 10 2-10 1 m) along two focal environmental gradients: (1) the longitudinal gradient (length of the estuary) over an entire estuarine system and (2) the beach width gradient (varying beach width altered by historic land-claim) over a sub-area of the estuary. Statistical analysis was carried out in order to identify key environmental variables and the most relevant spatial scales that best explain the observed spatial variability in macrobenthic biomasses. At the system scale, the dominant species were two bivalves Cerastoderma edule and Macoma balthica and a polychaete Nereis diversicolor, which accounted for 51.7%, 25.0% and 12.1%, respectively, of the total biomass. At the regional scale, univariate analysis showed clear trends in species richness, abundance and biomass along the longitudinal and beach width gradient. At the transect scale, multiple regression analysis revealed that the variances in biomass of M. balthica, C. edule and other remaining species as well as total macrobenthic biomass were

  3. How the food supply harvestable by waders in the Wadden Sea depends on the variation in energy density, body weight, biomass, burying depth and behaviour of tidal-flat invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwarts, Leo; Wanink, Jan H.

    For several reasons, waders in the Wadden Sea face a large seasonal and annual variation in their food supply. Observations on a tidal flat in the Dutch Wadden Sea have shown that: - (1) The average energy density of ten invertebrate prey species varies between 21 and 23 kJ·g -1 AFDW. In Scrobicularia plana and Mya arenaria, but not in Macoma balthica, the energy density is 10% lower in winter than in summer. - (2) Depending on the species, body weights of prey of similar size are 30 to 60% lower in winter than in summer. - (3) The year-to-year fluctuation in standing-crop biomass is larger in some species than in others, the difference depending mainly on the frequency of successful recruitment. The overall biomass of the macrobenthos in winter is half of that in summer, but the timing of the peak biomass differs per species. - (4) The burying depth varies per species: Cerastoderma edule live just beneath the surface, while M. balthica, S. plana, M. arenaria, Arenicola marina and Nereis diversicolor bury more deeply and the majority of these prey live out of reach of the bird's bill. In all six species, burying depth increases with size. There is no seasonal variation in depth of C. edule and M. arenaria, but the four other species live at most shallow depth in early summer and most deeply in midwinter. Burying depths in winter vary from year to year, but are unrelated to temperature. Neither has temperature any effect on depth within months. For knot Calidris canutus feeding on M. balthica, the fluctuation in the accessible fraction was the main source of variation in the biomass of prey that is actually harvestable, i.e. the biomass of prey of suitable size that is accessible. Accordingly, the paper reviews the available data on the temporal variations in accessibility, detectability, ingestibility, digestibility and profitability of prey for waders. Only a small part of the prey is harvestable since many accessible prey are ignored because of their low

  4. INFLUENCE OF SOOT CARBON ON THE BIOACCULUMATION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY MARINE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES: AN INTERSPECIES COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soot carbon in marine sediments has been hypothesized to reduce PAH bioavailability. This hypothesis was tested for eight species of marine benthic invertebrates (four polychaete worms, Clymenella torquata, Nereis virens,...

  5. Effects of Hypoxia on Animal Burrow Constraction and Consequent Effects on Sediment Redox Profiles (SETAC08)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of mild hypoxia on the burrowing behavior of three marine species (the hard clam Mercenaria mercenaria, the polychaete worm Nereis virens, and the amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus) and consequent effects on sediment redox profiles. Animals were introdu...

  6. ACCUMULATION OF POLYCHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM SEDIMENT BY THREE BENTHIC MARINE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to measure the accumulation of selected polychlorinated compounds by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment. andworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sedim...

  7. SPORULATION AND SURVIVAL OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII OOCYSTS IN SEA WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1992, we have been collaborating in studies on southern sea otters (Enhdyra lutris nereis) as part of a program to define factors which may be responsible for limiting the growth of the southern sea otter population. We previously demonstrated Toxoplasma gondii in sea otter...

  8. BIOAVAILABILITY OF 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF AND PCBS TO MARINE BENTHOS FROM PASSAIC RIVER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioaccumulation and depuration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and polychlorinated biphenyls by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment were measured in a laboratory study. andworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macom...

  9. HUMAN HEALTH RISK SCREEN FOR THE PROPOSED OPEN WATER DISPOSAL OF CONTAMINATED DREDGED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The laboratory bioaccumulation test has been a standard testing requirement to evaluate the open water disposal dredged materials since the late 1970's. Heretofore, the interpretation of these test results, using the clam, Macoma nasuta, and worm, Nereis virens, has been an ass...

  10. A Study of the Impact of a Pipeline Construction on Estuarine Benthic Invertebrate Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, L. J.; Davenport, J.; Kelly, T. C.

    2002-08-01

    The effects of a pipeline construction on benthic invertebrates were investigated using a Before/After impact protocol at Clonakilty Bay, West Cork, Ireland. Benthic invertebrates were sampled once before the excavation and at one, two, three and six months after the completion of the work. Analysis was designed to compare natural variation over time within control sites with the variation that occurred in the disturbed site from before to after construction. Invertebrate samples were dominated by Hediste diversicolor, Scrobicularia plana and Tubifex spp. An impact was obvious in the construction site in that no live invertebrates were found at one month after disturbance, but there followed a gradual recolonization by Hediste diversicolor. Scrobicularia plana failed to recolonize the impacted area during the study. At six months after the disturbance there was no significant difference in the mean number of total individuals (of all species) per core sample amongst all study sites, but the apparent ' recovery ' in the impacted area was due to two taxa only, namely Hediste diversicolor and Tubifex spp. The process of recovery of the benthic community within the impacted area is thus dependent on the species within the surrounding area. Their respective life cycle characteristics and mobilities will have been major factors in determining recovery.

  11. Development of a monoclonal antibody detection assay for species-specific identification of abalone.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Andreas L; Luijx, Thomas; Fenemore, Bartha; Sweijd, Neville A; Cook, Peter A

    2002-10-01

    Species identification based on biochemical and molecular techniques has a broad range of applications. These include compliance enforcement, the management and conservation of marine organisms, and commercial quality control. Abalone poaching worldwide and illegal trade in abalone products have increased mainly because of the attractive prices obtained and caused a sharp decline in stocks. Alleged poachers have been acquitted because of lack of evidence to correctly identify species. Therefore, a robust method is required that would identify tissue of abalone origin to species level. The aim of this study was to develop immunologic techniques, using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, to identify 10 different abalone species and subspecies from South Africa, the United States, Australia, and Japan. The combination of 3 developed monoclonal antibodies to South African abalone (Haliotis midae) enabled differentiation between most of the 10 species including the subspecies H. diversicolor supertexta and H. diversicolor diversicolor. In a novel approach, using antibodies of patients with allergy to abalone, the differentiation of additional subspecies, H. discus discus and H. discus hannai, was possible. A field-based immunoassay was developed to identify confiscated tissue of abalone origin. PMID:14961238

  12. The role of two sediment-dwelling invertebrates on the mercury transfer from sediments to the estuarine trophic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, J. P.; Nunes, M.; Dolbeth, M.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A. C.; Pardal, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    The annual total and organic mercury bioaccumulation pattern of Scrobicularia plana and Hediste diversicolor was assessed to evaluate the potential mercury transfer from contaminated sediments to estuarine food webs. S. plana was found to accumulate more total and organic mercury than H. diversicolor, up to 0.79 mg kg -1 and 0.15 mg kg -1 (wet weight) respectively, with a maximum annual uptake of 0.21 mg kg -1 y -1, while for methylmercury the annual accumulation was similar between species and never exceeded 0.045 mg kg -1 y -1. The higher organic mercury fraction in H. diversicolor is related to the omnivorous diet of this species. Both species increase methylmercury exposure by burrowing activities and uptake in anoxic, methylmercury rich sediment layers. Integration with the annual biological production of each species revealed mercury incorporation rates that reached 28 μg m -2 y -1, and to extract as much as 11.5 g Hg y -1 (of which 95% associated with S. plana) in the 0.4 km 2 of the most contaminated area, that can be transferred to higher trophic levels. S. plana is therefore an essential vector in the mercury biomagnification processes, through uptake from contaminated sediments and, by predation, to transfer it to economically important and exploited estuarine species.

  13. Sea otter health: challenging a pet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission.

  14. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  15. Sea otter health: Challenging a pet hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-12-01

    A recent series of studies on tagged sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) challenges the hypothesis that sea otters are sentinels of a dirty ocean, in particular, that pet cats are the main source of exposure to Toxoplasma gondii in central California. Counter to expectations, sea otters from unpopulated stretches of coastline are less healthy and more exposed to parasites than city-associated otters. Ironically, now it seems that spillover from wildlife, not pets, dominates spatial patterns of disease transmission. PMID:26155464

  16. ACUTE TOXICITIES OF CD2+, CR+6, HG2+, NI2+, AND ZN2+ TO ESTUARINE MACROFAUNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Static acute toxicity bioassays were conducted at 20 C and 20 o/oo salinity with CdCl2-2 and one half H2O, K2CrO4, HgCl2, NiCl2-6H2O, and ZnCl2 using adults of starfish, Asterias forbesi; sandworm, Nereis virens; hermit crab, Pagurus longicarpus; softshell clam, Mya arenaria; mud...

  17. Capping efficiency of various carbonaceous and mineral materials for in situ remediation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran contaminated marine sediments: sediment-to-water fluxes and bioaccumulation in boxcosm tests.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Sarah; Schaanning, Morten; Samuelsson, Göran S; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Olofsson, Ida; Eek, Espen; Wiberg, Karin

    2012-03-20

    The efficiency of thin-layer capping in reducing sediment-to-water fluxes and bioaccumulation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, hexachlorobenzene, and octachlorostyrene was investigated in a boxcosm experiment. The influence of cap thickness (0.5-5 cm) and different cap materials was tested using a three-factor experimental design. The cap materials consisted of a passive material (coarse or fine limestone or a marine clay) and an active material (activated carbon (AC) or kraft lignin) to sequester the contaminants. The cap thickness and the type of active material were significant factors, whereas no statistically significant effects of the type of passive material were observed. Sediment-to-water fluxes and bioaccumulation by the two test species, the surface-dwelling Nassarius nitidus and the deep-burrowing Nereis spp., decreased with increased cap thickness and with addition of active material. Activated carbon was more efficient than lignin, and a ~90% reduction of fluxes and bioaccumulation was achieved with 3 cm caps with 3.3% AC. Small increases in fluxes with increased survival of Nereis spp. indicated that bioturbation by Nereis spp. affected the fluxes. PMID:22339559

  18. The importance of grazing food chain for energy flow and production in three intertidal sand bottom communities of the northern Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild

    1985-09-01

    In three intertidal sand bottom communities of the “Königshafen” (Island of Sylt, North Sea), the biomass production and respiration of phytobenthos, phytoplankton, macrozoobenthos, and in situ community metabolism were measured monthly during 1980. The study sites were characterized by different communities ( Nereis-Corophium-belt, seagrass-bed, Arenicola-flat) and by a high abundance of the mollusc Hydrobia ulvae. Benthic diatoms are the major constituents of plant biomass in the Arenicola-flat. In this community, gross primary productivity amounts to 148 g C m-2 a-1. 82 % of this productivity is caused by microbenthos, whereas phytoplankton constitutes only 18 %. In the seagrass-bed, gross primary productivity amounts to 473 g C m-2 a-1. 79 % of this is generated by seagrass and its epiphytes, whereas microphytobenthos contributes 19 %. In the Nereis-Corophium-belt, only microphytobenthos is important for biomass and primary productivity (gross: 152 g C m-2 a-1). Annual production of macrofauna proved to be similar in the Arenicola-flat (30 g C m-2 a-1) to that in the seagrass-bed (29 g C m-2 a-1). Only one third of this amount is produced in the Nereis-Corophium-belt (10 g C m-2 a-1). The main part of secondary production and animal respiration is contributed by grazing H. ulvae. In the seagrass-bed, 83 % of the energy used for production is obtained from the grazing food chain. In the Arenicola-flat and the Nereis-Corophium-belt, the importance of non-grazing species is greater. A synchrony of seasonal development of plant biomass and monthly secondary production was observed. In the Arenicola-flat and the seagrass-bed, where density and production of macrofauna are high, a conspicuous decrease in biomass of microbenthos occurs during the warmer season, whereas in the Nereis-Corophium-belt primary production causes an increase in microphytobenthic biomass in summer and autumn. Energy flow through the macrofauna amounts to 69 g C m-2 a-1 in the Arenicola

  19. Does the introduced polychaete Alitta succinea establish in the Caspian Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Amir Faraz; Taheri, Mehrshad; Jam, Armin

    2013-12-01

    Members of the polychaete family Nereididae do not occur naturally in the Caspian Sea but are documented intentional human introductions that commenced in 1939. However, the identity of the species involved has been uncertain; material has been identified as both Alitta succinea and Hediste diversicolor. In this study, we confirm the presence of both species in the Caspian Sea. We discuss the distribution of both species, based on tolerance to physical factors, especially salinity. Although establishment of this partially predatory Nereidid, as a food reservoir could facilitate the recreation of commercially exploited fish stock, the consequences for native benthic communities are unclear and may be subject to unforeseen negative impacts.

  20. Habitat- and host-related variation in sponge bacterial symbiont communities in Indonesian waters.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel F R; Becking, Leontine E; de Voogd, Nicole J; Pires, Ana C C; Polónia, Ana R M; Egas, Conceição; Gomes, Newton C M

    2013-09-01

    Marine lakes are unique ecosystems that contain isolated populations of marine organisms. Isolated from the surrounding marine habitat, many lakes house numerous endemic species. In this study, microbial communities of sponges inhabiting these lakes were investigated for the first time using barcoded pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Our main goals were to compare the bacterial richness and composition of two sponge species (Suberites diversicolor and Cinachyrella australiensis) inhabiting both marine lakes and adjacent open coastal systems. Host species and habitat explained almost 59% of the variation in bacterial composition. There was a significant difference in composition between both host species. Within S. diversicolor, there was little discernible difference between bacterial communities inside and outside lakes. The bacterial community of this species was, furthermore, dominated (63% of all sequences) by three very closely related alphaproteobacterial taxa identified as belonging to the recently described order Kiloniellales. Cinachyrella australiensis, in contrast, hosted markedly different bacterial communities inside and outside lakes with very few shared abundant taxa. Cinachyrella australiensis in open habitat only shared 9.4% of OTUs with C. australiensis in lake habitat. Bacteria were thus both highly species specific and, in the case of C. australiensis, habitat specific. PMID:23607753

  1. Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Baeta, Alexandra; Marques, João C.

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Müller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40° 08″ N, 8° 50‧ W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (δ13C and δ15N) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The δ15N of H. diversicolor was 3‰ higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. plana assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs.

  2. Bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF and PCBs to marine benthos from passaic river sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, N.I.; Pruell, R.J.; Taplin, B.K.; LiVolsi, J.A.; Norwood, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    The bioaccumulation and depuration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and polychlorinated biphenyls by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment were measured in a laboratory study. Sandworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta) and shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sediment from the Passaic River, New Jersey for up to 180 days. Worms accumulated the highest concentrations of these compounds. Uptake and depuration rates were slowest in the worms and most rapid in the clams.

  3. Biological and molecular characterizations of Toxoplasma gondii strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, R.A.; Lindsay, D.S.; Howe, D.K.; Roderick, Constance L.; Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.; Baeten, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from brain or heart tissue from 15 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in cell cultures. These strains were used to infect mice that developed antibodies to T. gondii as detected in the modified direct agglutination test and had T. gondii tissue cysts in their brains at necropsy. Mouse brains containing tissue cysts from 4 of the strains were fed to 4 cats. Two of the cats excreted T. gondii oocysts in their feces that were infectious for mice. Molecular analyses of 13 strains indicated that they were all type II strains, but that they were genetically distinct from one another.

  4. The Impact of Sewage Discharge in a Marine Embayment: A Stable Isotope Reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, S.; Tatner, P.; Jack, I.; Arnott, C.

    2001-01-01

    Stable isotope analyses, δ 13C and δ 15N, of sewage tolerant benthic invertebrates seaward of a sewage effluent discharged in a marine embayment, the Firth of Forth, East Scotland, suggest that the polychaete worm Nereis virens is a suitable species for identifying biological assimilation of sewage derived organic matter. The sewage isotopic signal is not strongly recorded in the sediment due to the combined action of tidal movement, wind-induced wave action and benthic invertebrate grazing of particulate matter on the sea-bed. δ 13C of the plankton is significantly different from the effluent, but δ 15N is not which precludes its use as a trace.

  5. Application of microPIXE and STIM in analyses of fossil and Recent polychaete jaws (scolecodonts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfman, Mikael; Eriksson, Mats; Kristiansson, Per; Malmqvist, Klas; Pallon, Jan

    1999-10-01

    MicroPIXE and STIM analysis of the chemistry of fossil and Recent polychaete jaws (scolecodonts) demonstrates that they, apart from their protein composition, constitute inorganic components. The PIXE images reveal that the elemental distribution is generally homogeneous for some elements while it is heterogeneous, especially for zinc and iron. The jaw of the Recent polychaete Nereis sp. has zinc concentrated in the tip, probably for hardening purposes. Similar accumulations were revealed in fossil scolecodonts; zinc in Kettnerites ( K.) martinssonii and iron and titanium in Hadoprion cervicornis.

  6. Accumulation of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead from two contaminated sediments by three marine invertebrates: a laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S.; McLeese, D.W.; Peterson, M.R.

    1981-03-01

    Animals from areas with contaminated sediments have been shown in some cases to contain high levels of trace metals. In other cases, the tissue levels of contaminants were relatively constant regardless of the metal contents of the sediments. The availability of sediment-bound metals to bottom-dwelling organisms has been the subject of a few studies. This study describes the uptake of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead from natural, highly contaminated sediments by three marine invertebrates: Nereis virens, Macoma balthica and Crangon septemspinosa.

  7. Influence of mode of exposure and the presence of a tubiculous polychaete on the fate of benz(a)anthracene in the benthos

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, A.E.; Farrington, J.W.; Teal, J.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The distribution and metabolism of ({sup 14}C-12)benz(a)-anthracene (BA) was followed in benthic microcosms in the presence and absence of the polychaete Nereis virens for periods of 4-25 days to simultaneously assess the effects of mode of introduction and the presence of large burrowing organisms on the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their metabolites in the benthos. Radiolabeled BA was added to the chambers in three ways: already sorbed to the entire sediment reservoir, directly into the water column, or incorporated into food for the worms. BA added to the water column was more available for uptake and metabolism by worms and microbial mineralization to CO{sub 2} than BA previously sorbed to the entire sediment reservoir. In experiments with the sediment reservoir uniformly labeled with BA, worms increased flux of BA from the sediment, and with time, their presence led to increased rates of microbial mineralization of BA to CO{sub 2}. Dietary BA was most rapidly metabolized by Nereis.

  8. The microphytobenthos of Königshafen—spatial and seasonal distribution on a sandy tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, R. M.; Bauerfeind, E.

    1994-06-01

    A microphytobenthic species composition of a tidal flat in the northern Wadden Sea was analysed regarding cell numbers and biomass (in carbon units). The three sampling sites differed in tidal inundation from 15 cm to about 90 cm water depth at high tide. The sediment was sandy at all three stations. A cluster analysis revealed a separation of the benthic diatoms into three areas: a Nereis-Corophium-belt, a seagrass-bed and the Arenicola-flat. Small epipsammic diatoms were most abundant and dominated the microalgal biomass. A microphytobenthic “spring bloom” even started beneath the ice cover of the flat in January. Lowest values of cell numbers and biomass of benthic microalgae were found in summer. Highest values were measured in the uppermost area ( Nereis-Corophium-belt), and only here was an autumnal increase of benthic microalgae found. Further cluster analysis within each of the three areas revealed seasonal differences although the majority of species were present all year round. Many species were most abundant in spring, and some showed a bimodal distribution (spring-autumn) in the year of investigation.

  9. Biogeochemical Control on the Flux of Trace Elements from Estuarine Sediments: Water Column Oxygen Concentrations and Benthic Infauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Gerhardt F.; Sanders, James G.; Osman, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Trace element (arsenic, copper and manganese) fluxes between sediment and water were examined for approximately 2 months in replicated sediment/water microcosms. Treatments consisted of three oxygen levels in the water column (saturated, 10% saturation and anaerobic) and three different organism treatments (control, Macoma balthicaand Nereis succinea). Both arsenic and manganese were released from the sediment in the anoxic treatment, while copper was lost from the water. With the water column either saturated or at 10% oxygen saturation, both arsenic and manganese fluxes were negligible. In contrast, copper fluxes out of the sediment increased with increasing oxygen concentrations. The effect of organisms on the trace element fluxes were greatest immediately after their introduction to the microcosms, and declined substantially thereafter. Nereiscaused a substantial initial increase in manganese fluxes, but caused a negative flux (out of the water column) for arsenic. Macomahad a much smaller effect on flux than Nereis. Neither organism had a substantial effect on copper fluxes. Porewater profiles gave good predictions of arsenic and manganese fluxes in the anoxic treatment, but not in the 10% or saturated-oxygen treatments. Porewater profiles underestimated copper fluxes in the oxygenated treatments somewhat, and predicted copper flux in the opposite direction in the anoxic treatment. These results suggest that the annual cycle of anoxia in systems like Chesapeake Bay, and the resulting annual cycle of organism death and recruitment, can significantly alter the cycling of trace elements between the sediment and water column.

  10. The effect of biological and physical disturbances on the transport of arsenic from contaminated estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Gerhardt F.; Sanders, James G.; Osman, Richard W.

    1987-12-01

    From the distribution of dissolved and solid arsenic species in a contaminated estuarine sediment and measured rates of flux of the various arsenic species we propose an empirical model for the cycling of arsenic between sediments and water column. The chemical form of arsenic in the sediment was largely determined by the redox state of the sediment. Arsenite was the dominant dissolved and solid species in the deeper reduced sediment, and arsenate was dominant in the oxidized surface layer. Arsenite in the interstitial water diffused toward the surface layer, where it was mostly oxidized to arsenate prior to leaving the sediments. Some arsenate adsorbed to the surface sediments and produced a surface layer enriched in arsenic. Small concentrations of methyl and dimethyl arsenic were produced in the sediments, and these also diffused into the overlying water. Nereis succinea, a burrowing polychaete, affected distribution and flux of arsenic from the sediments by its production of irrigated burrows. These burrows increased both the effective surface area of the sediment and the diffusion of arsenic by a factor of five. When the relative effects of the activities of Nereis succinea and physical resuspension are compared, results indicate that although physical resuspension can produce large pulses of materials from contaminated sediments, continuous biological activity is likely to be more important in the mobilization of contaminants from sediments in many estuarine environments.

  11. Burrow extension with a proboscis: mechanics of burrowing by the glycerid Hemipodus simplex.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth A K; Dorgan, Kelly M

    2011-03-15

    Burrowing marine infauna are morphologically diverse and ecologically important as ecosystem engineers. The polychaetes Nereis virens and Cirriformia moorei extend their burrows by crack propagation. Nereis virens does so by everting its pharynx and C. moorei, lacking an eversible pharynx or proboscis, uses its hydrostatic skeleton to expand its anterior. Both behaviors apply stress to the burrow wall that is amplified at the tip of the crack, which extends by fracture. That two species with such distinct morphologies and life histories both burrow by fracturing sediment suggests that this mechanism may be widespread among burrowers. We tested this hypothesis with the glycerid polychaete Hemipodus simplex, which has an eversible proboscis that is much longer and everts more rapidly than the pharynx of N. virens. When the proboscis is fully everted, the tip flares out wider than the rest of the proboscis, creating a shape and applying a stress distribution similar to that of N. virens and resulting in relatively large forces near the tip of the crack. These forces are larger than necessary to extend the crack by fracture and are surprisingly uncorrelated with the resulting stress amplification at the crack tip, which is also larger than necessary to extend the burrow by fracture. These large forces may plastically deform the mud, allowing the worm to build a semi-permanent burrow. Our results illustrate that similar mechanisms of burrowing are used by morphologically different burrowers. PMID:21346130

  12. Trophic relationships in tidal flat areas: To what extent are tidal flats dependent on imported food?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild M.

    In four intertidal areas of 'Königshafen' (island of Sylt, FRG), biomass and production of macrozoobenthos were measured monthly in 1980 and 1984. The areas were characterized by different macrofauna assemblages ( Nereis-Corophium belt, seagrass bed, Arenicola flat and mussel bed). Biomass and production of macrofauna were partitioned with regard to food preference of single species as well as to the food availability within their habitat. In the Nereis-Corophium belt, seagrass bed and the Arenicola flat, most of the secondary production of the macrofauna was formed by grazing animals. Secondary production of mussel beds was nearly 10 times higher than in the other three assemblages. The suspension feeder assemblage depended on planktonic food imported from outside the bay. Considering the secondary production of the total tidal flat area, suspension feeders dominated the other trophic groups, indicating a key position of this group relative to the other macrofaunal assemblages. Mussel beds regulate the seston input to other communities situated further landward. Because of this dominance of the suspension feeder group, the energy and material flow of the total tidal flat is strongly dependent on the seston input from the coastal waters of the North Sea or from other parts of the Wadden Sea.

  13. Alterations in the macrobenthic fauna from Guadarranque River (Southern Spain) associated with sediment-seawater acidification deriving from CO2 leakage.

    PubMed

    Almagro-Pastor, V; Conradi, M; DelValls, T A; Riba, I

    2015-07-15

    Nowadays, Carbon Storage in Sub-Seabed Geological Structures (CS-SSGS) is having much interest. Nonetheless, these technologies are still under development, especially the leakage of the stored CO2 and the consequent acidification of the environment. Therefore, the goal of this study is to test the impact of CO2-induced acidification on a macrobenthic community due to leakages from CS-SSGS using a mesocosm-based experiment. Results confirmed the significant correlation between the abundance of the species and the pH (positively), and the alkalinity (negatively). Additionally, the BIOENV analysis showed that the majority of the variability in the abundance of the total species was explained for the alkalinity. The correlation analysis showed differential vulnerabilities of different species, especially Cyathura carinata and a non-calcifier species as Hediste diversicolor. Nevertheless, these results showed the importance of taking into account the indirect effect associated with acidification processes, as metal release from sediment. PMID:26021290

  14. Feeding habits of Solea senegalensis in earthen ponds in Sado estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo Branco, Maria Ana; Arruda, Marco A.; Gamito, Sofia

    2010-11-01

    The senegale sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is a commercially valuable fish and it is beginning to be cultured in a semi-intensive way in fish farms in southern European countries. The present study was initiated to investigate the diet of S. senegalensis under semi-extensive conditions. The feeding habits of sole were studied in two earthen ponds of a fish farm in the Sado estuary. In one earthen pond, artificial fish ration was given. S. senegalensis feeds on few prey items, its diet is mainly composed of insect larvae ( Chironomus salinarus) and polychaeta ( Hediste diversicolor). The diet composition of this species suggests feeding specialization, by consuming mainly annelids and insect larvae and by avoiding other items, extremely abundant in the environment, such as gastropods. In the water reservoir where ration was given, some fish consumed simultaneously benthic organism together with ration. However, benthic organisms seem to be the most important component of S. senegalensis diet.

  15. Coccidioidomycosis in southern sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Nancy J.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Creekmore, Lynn; Duncan, Ruth M.

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated coccidioidomycosis was diagnosed postmortem in six southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found dying or dead along the Pacific Coast of California at San Luis Obispo County.  These otters were found during winter or summer 1992, 1993, and 1994.  Coccidioides immitis was identified by its morphology in tissue impression smears and by histopathology, and was confirmed by culture.  Positive serologic results were obtained from four of five sea otters tested.  The lungs, pleura, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, liver, and spleen were involved in each case.  There was meningeal involvement in half of the affected animals.  Coccidioidomycosis has been reported in a wild sea otter only once previously, in 1976, and that otter was also found on the coast of San Luis Obispo County.

  16. Intertidal and nearshore Nereididae (Annelida) of the Falkland Islands, southwestern Atlantic, including a new species of Gymnonereis

    PubMed Central

    Darbyshire, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intertidal and nearshore Nereididae of the Falkland Islands are detailed and a new species of Gymnonereis described. The new species, Gymnonereis tenera sp. n., is the first record of the genus for the Falkland Islands. It is, so far, only known from a few intertidal locations in fine and muddy sands. Main distinguishing characters are: jaw teeth absent (in adults), 3 papillae in Area V–VI, falcigers absent, second ventral cirrus present throughout. Nereis atlantica McIntosh, 1885, known only from the description of a single specimen and one doubtful record from the Falkland Islands, is reviewed and transferred to Perinereis on the basis of the presence of shield-shaped bars in Area VI of the proboscis and the absence of notopodial falcigers. A key to all seven species discussed is provided. PMID:25147465

  17. Burrowing mechanics: burrow extension by crack propagation.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M; Jumars, Peter A; Johnson, Bruce; Boudreau, B P; Landis, Eric

    2005-02-01

    Until now, the analysis of burrowing mechanics has neglected the mechanical properties of impeding, muddy, cohesive sediments, which behave like elastic solids. Here we show that burrowers can progress through such sediments by using a mechanically efficient, previously unsuspected mechanism--crack propagation--in which an alternating 'anchor' system of burrowing serves as a wedge to extend the crack-shaped burrow. The force required to propagate cracks through sediment in this way is relatively small: we find that the force exerted by the annelid worm Nereis virens in making and moving into such a burrow amounts to less than one-tenth of the force it needs to use against rigid aquarium walls. PMID:15690029

  18. Estimating cause-specific mortality rates using recovered carcasses.

    PubMed

    Joly, Damien O; Heisey, Dennis M; Samuel, Michael D; Ribic, Christine A; Thomas, Nancy J; Wright, Scott D; Wright, Irene E

    2009-01-01

    Stranding networks, in which carcasses are recovered and sent to diagnostic laboratories for necropsy and determination of cause of death, have been developed to monitor the health of marine mammal and bird populations. These programs typically accumulate comprehensive, long-term datasets on causes of death that can be used to identify important sources of mortality or changes in mortality patterns that lead to management actions. However, the utility of these data in determining cause-specific mortality rates has not been explored. We present a maximum likelihood-based approach that partitions total mortality rate, estimated by independent sources, into cause-specific mortality rates. We also demonstrate how variance estimates are derived for these rates. We present examples of the method using mortality data for California sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) and Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). PMID:19204341

  19. Physiological responses of estuarine animals to cadmium pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theede, H.

    1980-03-01

    Toxic effects of cadmium contamination may be observed at all levels of organismic organization. In estuarine areas the sensitivity of euryhaline species to acute Cd toxicity is strongly modified by various abiotic factors, whereas long-term threshold values are less dependent on environmental parameters. Experiments with larval stages of the mollusc Mytilus edulis reveal that Cd effects on life functions such as development and growth are differentially modified by temperature and salinity. High Cd concentrations can be accumulated by adult bivalves of coastal areas without signs of physiological damage. Mechanisms of heavy-metal detoxication in these molluscs seem to be quite different from those known to exist in vertebrates. Among decapod crustaceans, stenoecous species tend to exhibit higher rates of Cd uptake than euryoecous ones. Rates of Cd uptake and of accumulation depend on external and internal factors. In adult Nereis succinea individuals sublethal Cd effects have been recorded on growth and food conversion (in terms of energy content).

  20. Accumulation of polychlorinated organic contaminants from sediment by three benthic marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Pruell, R.J.; Rubinstein, N.I.; Taplin, B.K.; LiVolsi, J.A.; Bowen, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to measure the accumulation of selected polychlorinated compounds by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment. Sandworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sediment collected from the Passaic River, New Jersey. All three species accumulated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the sediment. In addition, a recently identified sulfur containing analog of tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans. The objectives of the study were to determine the relative bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and selected PCB congeners from bottom sediments as well as to examine the relationship between contaminant concentrations in sediments and biota.

  1. Intertidal and nearshore Nereididae (Annelida) of the Falkland Islands, southwestern Atlantic, including a new species of Gymnonereis.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The intertidal and nearshore Nereididae of the Falkland Islands are detailed and a new species of Gymnonereis described. The new species, Gymnonereis tenera sp. n., is the first record of the genus for the Falkland Islands. It is, so far, only known from a few intertidal locations in fine and muddy sands. Main distinguishing characters are: jaw teeth absent (in adults), 3 papillae in Area V-VI, falcigers absent, second ventral cirrus present throughout. Nereis atlantica McIntosh, 1885, known only from the description of a single specimen and one doubtful record from the Falkland Islands, is reviewed and transferred to Perinereis on the basis of the presence of shield-shaped bars in Area VI of the proboscis and the absence of notopodial falcigers. A key to all seven species discussed is provided. PMID:25147465

  2. Authorship of some polychaete (Annelida) names derived from the works of Renier and Savigny.

    PubMed

    Muir, Alexander I; Petersen, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full citations of animal specific or generic names ultimately derived from unpublished manuscripts should commemorate the work of the person who described the new species as well as the person who eventually validly published the name. We suggest that biologists should use the following authorships when citing these names: Terebella infundibulum Renier in Meneghini, 1847 (now used in the genus Myxicola); Nereis coccinea Renier in Meneghini, 1847 (now used in the genus Lumbrineris); Thalassema scutatum Renier in Ranzani, 1817 (now known as Sternaspis scutata); Polynoe Savigny in Lamarck, 1818. The case of Myxicola infundibulum is further complicated by a possible homonymy, and to avoid confusion we suggest that the name is used for the Myxicola species found in the Adriatic. PMID:26176114

  3. TCDD/TCDF levels in bioaccumulation test tissues and their corresponding sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, M.E.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from eight highly urbanized, industrial areas were analyzed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDD/TCDF) contamination. The polychaete Nereis virens was exposed to the contaminated sediment for 28 days and then analyzed for TCDD/TCDF to evaluate the potential bioaccumulation of these contaminants, Levels of TCDD/TCDF accumulated in N. virens in general increased as the amount of sediment contamination increased and were significantly greater than levels in N. virens exposed to uncontaminated sediment. In addition, accumulation factors were calculated based on the levels of TCDD/TCDF in the test organisms and sediments, the organism lipid content, and the sediment total organic carbon content to predict the maximum amount of TCDD/TCDF likely to be accumulated from the sediments.

  4. Contemporary condition of macrozoobenthos in ultrashallow zone of Taman Bay, Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, V. A.; Kolyuchkina, G. A.; Belyaev, N. A.; Basin, A. B.; Kozlovsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The distribution of macrozoobenthic communities was studied in a vast ultrashallow (0-1.2 m deep) zone of northwestern Taman Bay (separated from the Kerch Strait by Chushka spit) in 2008-2009. Fifty-two species of benthic invertebrates were recorded. The species number, as well as Shannon and Pielou diversity indices, increased along Chushka spit from base to tip. The usual inhabitants of lagoons and estuaries of the Mediterranean Basin and the open Sea of Azov dominated in benthic communities: mollusks Abra segmentum and Hydrobia acuta and polychaetes Heteromastus filiformis and Hediste diversicolor (the latter only in summer). Changes in the community structure were largely determined by the seasonal dynamics of dominant species populations, which was similar to their dynamics in certainother transitional water bodies of the Mediterranean Basin. These changes indicate normal running of seasonal processes in the macrobenthic communities of Taman Bay in 2008 rather than the consequences of a catastrophic black oil spill in the Kerch Strait in November 2007.

  5. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  6. Patterns in estuarine macrofauna body size distributions: The role of habitat and disturbance impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbeth, Marina; Raffaelli, Dave; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo

    2014-01-01

    Schwinghamer's (1981) habitat architecture hypothesis for body mass spectra in marine sediments predicts a single macrofauna mode in response to the bulk nature of the sediment. This proposition was examined for intertidal macrofauna from a well-studied estuarine system, using kernel density estimation to define modality and the locations of peaks and troughs. Three sedimentary environments and habitats were examined along a disturbance gradient related to eutrophication. Our results indicate that bimodality is likely to occur within the macrofauna size range, which weakens the habitat architecture model and casts doubts on the mechanisms behind other modes in benthic size spectra. The location of the modes and intervening trough were not conservative and not apparently related to sediment grain size or habitat structure, but somewhat dependent on the presence of particular species: the presence or absence of large numbers of individuals of Hydrobia ulvae and larger-bodied taxa such as Scrobicularia plana and Hediste diversicolor. Alternative competing hypotheses are explored for the observed results, including Warwick's (1984) phylogenetic explanation, but taking into consideration both species composition and disturbance impact, it seems most likely Holling's (1992) textural discontinuity hypothesis, as a measure of resilience, could be a plausible explanation.

  7. Selenium in sediments and biota from estuaries of southwest England.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew

    2013-08-15

    Selenium concentrations have been measured in sediment, fucoid macroalgae and macroinvertebrates from four estuaries of SW England (Yealm, Plym, Looe, Fal). Sediment concentrations ranged from about 0.4 μg g(-1) in the Yealm to 1.49 μg g(-1) at one site in the Plym. Concentrations in Fucus vesiculosus (0.05-0.31 μg g(-1)) and F. ceranoides (0.05-0.51 μg g(-1)) were significantly lower than corresponding concentrations in sediment but there was no correlation between algal and sediment concentrations. Selenium concentrations in Littorina littorea (~4 μg g(-1)), Hediste diversicolor (2.82-12.68 μg g(-1)), Arenicola marina (~17 μg g(-1)) and Scrobicularia plana (1.18-6.85 μg g(-1)) were considerably higher than concentrations in macroalga or sediment, suggesting that Se is effectively accumulated from the diet. Although Se concentrations in some invertebrates exceed toxicity thresholds for the diet of predacious birds and fish, no specific evidence for Se toxicity exists in these estuaries. PMID:23773950

  8. Disturbance caused by freshwater releases of different magnitude on the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities of two coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel; Rieradevall, Maria

    2010-06-01

    The response of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities to freshwater releases of different magnitude and persistence was investigated in two Mediterranean coastal lagoons (Ca l'Arana and Ricarda). The study was carried out during 14 months (June 2004-July 2005) in which different environmental variables and the macroinvertebrate communities associated with two different habitats, the Phragmites australis belt and the deep area of the lagoons, were sampled monthly. Additionally, potential colonizing sources were identified through the analysis of Chironomidae pupal exuviae. The initial response of the communities to the freshwater releases was similar, being characterized by a peak of opportunistic taxa (mainly Naididae), but the late response was different for each lagoon. In the Ca l'Arana, the magnitude of the freshwater release was higher (salinity dropped below five, which is the limit commonly established for most freshwater species) and its persistence was also higher, allowing the colonization of the lagoon by new insect taxa, which replaced the brackish water species. In the Ricarda, the salinity never dropped beyond five and pre-disturbance conditions were rapidly re-established. This, together with the acclimatizing mechanisms showed by the species Chironomus riparius and Hediste diversicolor, permitted the recovery of the pre-disturbance macroinvertebrate community.

  9. Fluoxetine Exhibits Pharmacological Effects and Trait-Based Sensitivity in a Marine Worm.

    PubMed

    Hird, Cameron M; Urbina, Mauricio A; Lewis, Ceri N; Snape, Jason R; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-08-01

    Global production of pharmacologically active compounds exceeds 100 000 tons annually, a proportion of which enters aquatic environments through patient use, improper medicine disposal, and production. These compounds are designed to have mode-of-action (MoA) effects on specific biological pathways, with potential to impact nontarget species. Here, we used MoA and trait-based approaches to quantify uptake and biological effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in filter and deposit feeding marine worms (Hediste diversicolor). Worms exposed to 10 μg L(-1), accumulated fluoxetine with a body burden over 270 times greater than exposure concentrations, resulting in ∼10% increased coelomic fluid serotonin, a pharmacological effect. Observed effects included weight loss (up to 2% at 500 μg L(-1)), decreased feeding rate (68% at 500 μg L(-1)), and altered metabolism (oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and O/N from 10 μg L(-1)). Bioconcentration of fluoxetine was dependent on route of uptake, with filter feeding worms experiencing up to 130 times greater body burden ratios and increased magnitudes of effects than deposit feeders, a trait-based sensitivity likely as a consequence of fluoxetine partitioning to sediment. This study highlights how novel approaches such as MoA and trait-based methods can supplement environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. PMID:27379928

  10. Macrobenthic communities of saltpans from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Maria José; Costa, Maria Helena

    1999-07-01

    A 1-year study on the evolution of benthic communities of saltpans from the Sado estuary was carried out in order to evaluate its density, biomass and diversity, and to understand its trophic-dynamic structure under harsh environmental conditions. Physical and chemical parameters of the water column and sediments were also studied. Salinity and redox potential fluctuated sharply. Of eighteen taxa observed, a few occurred in significant numbers Chironomus salinarius (99 %) at crystallisation ponds where Artemia is present in the water column at salinities ranging from 23 to 249 g .L -1, Hydrobia (95 %) at evaporation pond (salinities between 29 and 112 g .L -1), while the reservoir, with salinities from 22 to 45 g .L -1, showed higher diversity nevertheless lower than in the estuary itself. It is colonised all year by Abra ovata, Cerastoderma glaucum, Hedistes diversicolor, Capitella sp., Microspio mecznikowianus, Mellina palmata, Polydora ciliata, Capitellidae and Microdeutopus gryllotalpa. The diversity of macrobenthic communities decreases with increasing salinity. Among trophic dynamic groups, surface detritivores burrowers, which are present at 85 % of the samples, are the dominant group at evaporation and crystallisation ponds and appears as an isolated group linked to organic matter of sediments and nutrients.

  11. Variation in volatile leaf oils of seven eucalyptus species harvested from Zerniza arboreta (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Elaissi, Ameur; Medini, Hanène; Simmonds, Monique; Lynen, Frederic; Farhat, Farhat; Chemli, Rachid; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi

    2011-02-01

    Leaves of seven species of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér., viz., E. cladocalyx F. Muell., E. citriodora Hook., E. diversicolor F. Muell., E. fasciculosa F. Muell., E. grandis W. Hill, E. ovata Labill., and E. botryoides Sm., were harvested from Zerniza arboreta (region of Sejnene, northwest of Tunisia) in June 2007. Of the latter species, leaves were collected from trees having two origins, Morocco and Italy. Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves provided essential oils in yields varying from 0.4±0.0 to 3.3±0.1%, according to the species. E. citriodora had the highest mean percentage of essential oil amongst the species examined, whereas the lowest one was obtained for E. botryoides originating from Morocco. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 140 compounds, representing 92.5 to 99.4% of the total oil composition. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (2), followed by α-pinene (1), p-cymene, borneol, α-terpineol, cryptone, spathulenol, trans-pinocarveol (4), bicyclogermacrene (5), caryophyllene oxide, and β-phellandrene. Principal components analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis separated the eight Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into five groups, each constituting a chemotype. PMID:21337508

  12. Capping in situ with activated carbon in Trondheim harbor (Norway) reduces bioaccumulation of PCBs and PAHs in marine sediment fauna.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Göran S; Hedman, Jenny E; Elmquist Kruså, Marie; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2015-08-01

    Three types of thin-layer caps with activated carbon (AC) were tested in situ in experimental plots (10 × 10 m) in Trondheim harbor, Norway, using AC + clay, AC-only or AC + sand. One year after capping, intact sediment cores were collected from the amended plots for ex situ surveys of the capping efficiency in reducing the PAH and PCB aqueous concentrations and bioaccumulation by the polychaete Hediste diversicolor and the clam Abra nitida. Reduced pore water concentrations were observed in all AC treatments. The capping efficiency was in general AC + clay > AC-only > AC + sand. AC + clay reduced bioaccumulation of PAH and PCB congeners between 40% and 87% in the worms and between 67% and 97% in the clams. Sediment capped with AC-only also led to reduced bioaccumulation of PCBs, while AC + sand showed no reduction in bioaccumulation. Thus the best thin-layer capping method in this study was AC mixed with clay. PMID:26121661

  13. Molecular characterization of Sarcocystis neurona strains from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and intermediate hosts from Central California

    PubMed Central

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Miller, Melissa A.; Grigg, Michael E.; Crosbie, Paul R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a significant cause of neurological disease in horses and other animals, including the threatened Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). Opossums (Didelphis virginiana), the only known definitive hosts for S. neurona in North America, are an introduced species in California. S. neurona DNA isolated from sporocysts and/or infected tissues of 10 opossums, 6 horses, 1 cat, 23 Southern sea otters, and 1 harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) with natural infections was analyzed based on 15 genetic markers, including the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region; the 25/396 marker; S. neurona surface antigen genes (snSAGs) 2, 3, and 4; and 10 different microsatellites. Based on phylogenetic analysis, most of the S. neurona strains segregated into three genetically distinct groups. Additionally, fifteen S. neurona samples from opossums and several intermediate hosts, including sea otters and horses, were found to be genetically identical across all 15 genetic markers, indicating that fatal encephalitis in Southern sea otters and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) in horses is strongly linked to S. neurona sporocysts shed by opossums. PMID:20226596

  14. Taxonomy of reproductive Nereididae (Annelida) in multispecies swarms at Ambon Island, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pamungkas, Joko; Glasby, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multispecies, or mass, spawning of different invertebrate species is well known for coral reef systems; however, incidences involving polychaetes are poorly documented. In this study we report on mass swarming, prior to spawning, of Nereididae at Ambon Island, Maluku, on three occasions: in 1866, inferred from an historical sample deposited in Naturalis, Leiden, and in March, 2009 and 2014, based on newly collected samples. The 2009 and 2014 events co-occurred with spawning of other polychaetes, known locally as wawo and including the widespread Indo-Pacific eunicid, Palola viridis (Gray in Stair). Ten species of reproductive Nereididae are described, including Composetia marmorata (Horst) new combination, formerly Ceratonereis marmorata; epitokous modifications are described for both sexes of each species including taxonomically important features such as body colour and number of pre-natatory chaetigers. Three distinct types of natatory region morphologies are recognized, which appear to characterise groups of genera. The ten new records brings to 13 the total number of nereidid species known to undergo mass swarming at Ambon Island; a key to the 13 species is provided. Species composition varies slightly between the three time periods: four species were common between all three periods, five species were in common between 1866 and 2014, and four species were in common between 1995 and 2009/14. Two species of Neanthes and one of Nereis are identified as potentially new and will be described in subsequent papers. PMID:26448711

  15. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North Atlantic): Sandworm and bloodworm

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.H., Jr.; Ruff, R.E.; Moran, D.

    1988-04-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessment. The sandworm (Nereis virens) is a commercially valuable baitworm, reaching lengths of 30 cm. Most worms live 4 or 5 years. Males swarm in the water column before spawning in the females' burrows. Both males and females die after spawning. A planktonic larval phase is either brief or lacking. Sandworms are omnivorous. They can significantly reduce the abundance of smaller infaunal organisms. Predators on sandworms include bloodworms and gulls. Physiological tolerances are broad although most worms are found in fine sand with water of high salinity. Sandworms have been the subject of much toxicological research and readily adapt to laboratory conditions. The bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata), attaining lengths of 40 cm, is also an important baitworm. Its maximum life span is 5 years. Spawning occurs in the water column with both males and females dying after spawning. Bloodworms are primarily predators, preying on certain species of polychaetes and crustaceans, although they are capable of digesting detritus. Bloodworms appear to have few predators. Bloodworms possess at least two types of hemoglobin, permitting them to tolerate a wide range of oxygen tensions. 177 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Vasa, PL10, and Piwi gene expression during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Alitta virens.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Vitaly V; Kostyuchenko, Roman P

    2015-06-01

    Polychaetes are famous for their outstanding ability to regenerate lost body parts. Moreover, these worms possess a number of ancestral features in anatomy, development, and genetics, making them particularly suitable for comparative studies. Thus, fundamental as well as new undisclosed so far features of regenerative processes may be revealed, using polychaetes as a model. In the present work, we aimed to analyze the molecular basis of caudal regeneration in the nereid polychaete Alitta virens (formerly Nereis virens). We focused on homologues genes of RNA helicases Vasa and PL10 and ncRNA-binding proteins Piwi. These markers are suggested to play a significant role in maintenance of undifferentiated state of primordial germ cells and multipotent stem cells across invertebrates. In normal conditions, A. virens homologues of Vasa, PL10, and Piwi were differentially expressed in the subterminal growth zone and germline cells. Caudal amputation induced expression of studied genes de novo, which further accompanies all steps of regeneration. An early appearance of the transcripts in wound epithelium and internal blastemal cells suggests involvement of these genes in the well-known cell dedifferentiation events that assure polychaete regeneration. Provided interpretation of the gene expression dynamics implies the primary restoration of the pygidium and growth zone, which promotes following segment formation. Obtained results are valuable as a molecular fingerprint of the alterations occurring in regulatory state of locally regenerating tissues. PMID:25772273

  17. Mitochondrial-DNA variation among subspecies and populations of sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Bodkin, J.L.; Ballachey, B.E.; Estes, J.A.; Patton, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We used restriction-enzyme analysis of polymerase-chain reaction-amplified, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to assess genetic differentiation of subspecies and populations of sea otters throughout the range of the species. There were several haplotypes of mtDNA in each subspecies and geographically separate populations. MtDNA sequence divergence of haplotypes of sea otters was 0.0004-0.0041 base substitutions per nucleotide. E. l. nereis appears to have monophyletic mitochondrial DNA, while E. l. lutris and E. l. kenyoni do not. Different frequencies of haplotypes of mtDNA among populations reflect current restriction of gene flow and the unique histories of different populations. There are two or three haplotypes of mtDNA and diversity of haplotypes is 0.1376-0.5854 in each population of otters. This is consistent with theoretical work, which suggests that population bottlenecks of sea otters probably did not result in major losses of genetic variation for individual populations, or the species as a whole.

  18. Redescription of Alitta succinea (Leuckart, 1847) and reinstatement of A. acutifolia (Ehlers, 1901) n. comb. based upon morphological and molecular data (Polychaeta: Nereididae).

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Guerrero, Tulio F; Carrera-Parra, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    The nereidid worm Alitta succinea (Leuckart, 1847), described from Western Germany, has been considered by some authors as a widespread and alien invasive species, or else as a group of morphologically indistinguishable species. Neither idea has yet been supported by critical taxonomic revisions of relevant material. Most characterizations of A. succinea were based upon a mixture of morphological features from specimens from the type locality and from other regions. Moreover, four species described from America are considered junior synonyms of A. succinea, including Nereis acutifolia Ehlers, 1901, described from the eastern tropical Pacific. The type material of the latter species has not been reviewed since its description. We re-examined type and topotype materials of A. succinea and N. acutifolia including atokous and epitokous specimens. In addition, newly collected specimens were used to evaluate genetic divergence between both species using the mitochondrial gene COI. Alitta succinea is redescribed from type material and specimens from Germany. We rejected the recent placement of the species in Neanthes and we transferred it to Alitta. Further, we refuse the synonymy of N. acutifolia with A. succinea due to morphological and molecular differences. Consequently, we regard Alitta acutifolia n. comb. as a valid species, and the supposed introduction and the alien status of A. succinea along the Mexican and Central American Pacific shores are rejected. PMID:25781122

  19. Evaluating potential conservation conflicts between two listed species: Sea otters and black abalone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimondi, Peter T.; Jurgens, Laura J.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Population consequences of endangered species interacting as predators and prey have been considered theoretically and legally, but rarely investigated in the field. We examined relationships between spatially variable populations of a predator, the California sea otter, Enhydra lutris nereis, and a prey species, the black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii. Both species are federally listed under the Endangered Species Act and co-occur along the coast of California. We compared the local abundance and habitat distribution of black abalone at 12 sites with varying densities of sea otters. All of the populations of abalone we examined were in the geographic area currently unaffected by withering disease, which has decimated populations south of the study area. Surprisingly, our findings indicate that sea otter density is positively associated with increased black abalone density. The presence of sea otters also correlated with a shift in black abalone to habitat conferring greater refuge, which could decrease illegal human harvest. These results highlight the need for a multi-species approach to conservation management of the two species, and demonstrate the importance of using field-collected data rather than simple trophic assumptions to understand relationships between jointly vulnerable predator and prey populations.

  20. Molecular characterization of Sarcocystis neurona strains from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and intermediate hosts from Central California.

    PubMed

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Miller, Melissa A; Grigg, Michael E; Crosbie, Paul R; Conrad, Patricia A

    2010-05-28

    Sarcocystis neurona is a significant cause of neurological disease in horses and other animals, including the threatened Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). Opossums (Didelphis virginiana), the only known definitive hosts for S. neurona in North America, are an introduced species in California. S. neurona DNA isolated from sporocysts and/or infected tissues of 10 opossums, 6 horses, 1 cat, 23 Southern sea otters, and 1 harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) with natural infections was analyzed based on 15 genetic markers, including the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region; the 25/396 marker; S. neurona surface antigen genes (snSAGs) 2, 3, and 4; and 10 different microsatellites. Based on phylogenetic analysis, most of the S. neurona strains segregated into three genetically distinct groups. Additionally, fifteen S. neurona samples from opossums and several intermediate hosts, including sea otters and horses, were found to be genetically identical across all 15 genetic markers, indicating that fatal encephalitis in Southern sea otters and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) in horses is strongly linked to S. neurona sporocysts shed by opossums. PMID:20226596

  1. Limited genetic diversity among Sarcocystis neurona strains infecting southern sea otters precludes distinction between marine and terrestrial isolates.

    PubMed

    Wendte, J M; Miller, M A; Nandra, A K; Peat, S M; Crosbie, P R; Conrad, P A; Grigg, M E

    2010-04-19

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite identified as a cause of fatal neurological disease in the threatened southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). In an effort to characterize virulent S. neurona strains circulating in the marine ecosystem, this study developed a range of markers relevant for molecular genotyping. Highly conserved sequences within the 18S ribosomal gene array, the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (RPOb) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (CO1) were assessed for their ability to distinguish isolates at the genus and species level. For within-species comparisons, five surface antigens (SnSAG1-SnSAG5) and one high resolution microsatellite marker (Sn9) were developed as genotyping markers to evaluate intra-strain diversity. Molecular analysis at multiple loci revealed insufficient genetic diversity to distinguish terrestrial isolates from strains infecting marine mammals. Furthermore, SnSAG specific primers applied against DNA from the closely related species, Sarcocystis falcatula, lead to the discovery of highly similar orthologs to SnSAG2, 3, and 4, calling into question the specificity of diagnostic tests based on these antigens. The results of this study suggest a population genetic structure for S. neurona similar to that reported for the related parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, dominated by a limited number of successful genotypes. PMID:20071081

  2. Prey choice and habitat use drive sea otter pathogen exposure in a resource-limited coastal system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine K; Tinker, Martin T; Estes, James A; Conrad, Patricia A; Staedler, Michelle; Miller, Melissa A; Jessup, David A; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2009-02-17

    The processes promoting disease in wild animal populations are highly complex, yet identifying these processes is critically important for conservation when disease is limiting a population. By combining field studies with epidemiologic tools, we evaluated the relationship between key factors impeding southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population growth: disease and resource limitation. This threatened population has struggled to recover despite protection, so we followed radio-tagged sea otters and evaluated infection with 2 disease-causing protozoal pathogens, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, to reveal risks that increased the likelihood of pathogen exposure. We identified patterns of pathogen infection that are linked to individual animal behavior, prey choice, and habitat use. We detected a high-risk spatial cluster of S. neurona infections in otters with home ranges in southern Monterey Bay and a coastal segment near San Simeon and Cambria where otters had high levels of infection with T. gondii. We found that otters feeding on abalone, which is the preferred prey in a resource-abundant marine ecosystem, had a very low risk of infection with either pathogen, whereas otters consuming small marine snails were more likely to be infected with T. gondii. Individual dietary specialization in sea otters is an adaptive mechanism for coping with limited food resources along central coastal California. High levels of infection with protozoal pathogens may be an adverse consequence of dietary specialization in this threatened species, with both depleted resources and disease working synergistically to limit recovery. PMID:19164513

  3. Prey choice and habitat use drive sea otter pathogen exposure in a resource-limited coastal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christine K.; Tinker, M. Tim; Estes, James A.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Staedler, Michelle M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Jessup, David A.; Mazet, Jonna A.K.

    2014-01-01

    The processes promoting disease in wild animal populations are highly complex, yet identifying these processes is critically important for conservation when disease is limiting a population. By combining field studies with epidemiologic tools, we evaluated the relationship between key factors impeding southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population growth: disease and resource limitation. This threatened population has struggled to recover despite protection, so we followed radio-tagged sea otters and evaluated infection with 2 disease-causing protozoal pathogens, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, to reveal risks that increased the likelihood of pathogen exposure. We identified patterns of pathogen infection that are linked to individual animal behavior, prey choice, and habitat use. We detected a high-risk spatial cluster of S. neurona infections in otters with home ranges in southern Monterey Bay and a coastal segment near San Simeon and Cambria where otters had high levels of infection with T. gondii. We found that otters feeding on abalone, which is the preferred prey in a resource-abundant marine ecosystem, had a very low risk of infection with either pathogen, whereas otters consuming small marine snails were more likely to be infected with T. gondii. Individual dietary specialization in sea otters is an adaptive mechanism for coping with limited food resources along central coastal California. High levels of infection with protozoal pathogens may be an adverse consequence of dietary specialization in this threatened species, with both depleted resources and disease working synergistically to limit recovery.

  4. Spatial and diurnal distribution of invertebrate and fish fauna of a Zostera marina bed and nearby unvegetated sediments in Damariscotta River, Maine (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, Johanna; Chaplin, Glen; Eilers, Michele R.; Heck, Kenneth L.; O'Neal, Jonathan P.; Valentine, John F.

    1999-06-01

    Fish, epibenthos and macroinfauna were collected in a Zostera marina bed and nearby unvegetated sediments in the estuary of the Damariscotta River, on the mid-coast of Maine. Samples of epibenthic fauna and fish were collected at low tides both during day and night, and samples of infauna at low tides during the day. The mean density of Zostera shoots in the study area was 335 m -2. Abundance and species number of fish were greater at night than during the day and greater in eelgrass beds ( Z. marina) than in unvegetated habitats. Daytime fish collections were dominated by Atlantic silversides ( Medinia medinia), while juvenile winter flounder ( Pseudopleuronectes americanus) dominated night collections. Also Zostera-associated epifaunal abundances and number of species were significantly higher at night than during the day. Mysis stenolepis, Idotea balthica and Littorina obtusata were dominant species in the epifauna samples. Of the total of 37 invertebrate species encountered, only five occurred both in the infaunal and epifaunal samples. Nineteen different taxa were collected from the benthic core samples. The most abundant invertebrate infaunal taxa were sipunculids, the polychaete Nereis virens, and oligochaetes. Infaunal invertebrate abundances and species diversity were significantly higher in eelgrass beds than in unvegetated sediments. The abundance and number of species of benthic invertebrates were also positively correlated to seagrass biomass. Community diversity values ( H') were relatively low but fit well in the general pattern of decreasing diversity towards northern latitudes.

  5. Changes in contaminant distributions with trophic level in a marine food chain study

    SciTech Connect

    Pruell, R.J.; Johnson, M.W.; Taplin, B.K.; McGovern, D.G.; Montmarquet, B.T.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory study was designed to investigate the transfer of chlorinated organic contaminants from sediments to marine biota in a simplified marine food chain. Sediments collected from the Passaic River, NJ, which contained high concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), PCBs and chlorinated pesticides, were used as the contamination source. Polychaete worms (Nereis virens) were exposed to Passaic River sediment for 70 days to allow steady-state concentrations to be achieved and then these organisms were fed to a crustacean, the American lobster (Homarus americanus). Contaminant distributions were altered significantly as they passed from sediments to polychaetes and then to the lobster. PCDDs and PCDFs containing four or five chlorines were accumulated by the polychaetes and lobster; however, the highly chlorinated congeners were not accumulated. PCB patterns in lobsters indicated that these organisms metabolized many PCB congeners. Coplanar PCBs did not appear to be metabolized and therefore became enriched relative to total PCB levels in the lobsters. Lobsters also greatly altered the ratios of chlordane and DDT series compounds relative to those in the sediments and polychaetes.

  6. The biomagnification of PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs in a simplified laboratory food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Taplin, B.; Pruell, R.; McGovern, D.; McKinney, R.

    1995-12-31

    The trophic transfer and biomagnification potential of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), were investigated in a simplified marine benthic food chain. Polychaetes, Nereis virens were exposed to contaminated sediment and fed to juvenile lobsters, Homarus americanus exposed to the same sediment for 112 days. Time series uptake and depuration measurements were made for lobster muscle and hepatopancreas. A nonlinear model (BIOFAC) was used to calculate uptake and depuration rate constants, bioaccumulation factors, and steady state concentrations for PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs. Biomagnification factors (BMFs), on a lipid weight basis, were calculated for both tissues. Lobsters accumulated PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs from contaminated sediment and food (polychaetes). Of the two tissues, lobster hepatopancreas, showed the highest concentrations for all compounds analyzed. Of the PCDDs and PCDFs studied, only 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, and 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran were detected in lobster muscle and hepatopancreas tissues. Of the PCB congeners studied, 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime} hexachlorobiphenyl reached the highest concentration in lobster muscle and hepatopancreas. Lobsters also accumulated non-ortho substituted PCBs in both tissues.

  7. A comparative analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls in southern sea otters that died of infectious diseases and noninfectious causes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Perrota, E.; Thomas, N.J.; Aldous, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) from the California coast continue to exhibit a slower population regrowth rate than the population in Alaska. Infectious diseases have been identified as a frequent cause of death. Infectious diseases caused by varied pathogens including bacteria, fungi, and parasites were suggestive of compromised immunological health of mature animals in this population. To test the hypothesis that elevated exposure to immunotoxic contaminants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contribute to disease susceptibility via immunosuppression, we determined concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in livers of 80 adult female sea otters that died of infectious diseases, noninfectious causes, or emaciation. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in sea otter livers varied widely (10a??26,800 ng/g and 81a??210,000 ng/g, lipid weight, respectively). Concentrations of PBDEs in sea otters were some of the highest values reported for marine mammals so far. Although PCB concentrations in sea otters have declined during 1992a??2002, the mean concentration was at the threshold at which adverse health effects are elicited. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs were significantly correlated, suggesting co-exposure of these contaminants in sea otters. No significant association was found between the concentrations of PBDEs and the health status of sea otters. Concentrations of PCBs were significantly higher in otters in the infectious disease category than in the noninfectious category, suggesting an association between elevated PCB concentrations and infectious diseases in Southern sea otters.

  8. Jumbo squid beaks: inspiration for design of robust organic composites.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Li, Youli; Waite, J Herbert; Zok, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The hard tissues found in some invertebrate marine organisms represent intriguing paradigms for robust, lightweight materials. The present study focuses on one such tissue: that comprising the beak of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). Its main constituents are chitin fibers (15-20wt.%) and histidine- and glycine-rich proteins (40-45%). Notably absent are mineral phases, metals and halogens. Despite being fully organic, beak hardness and stiffness are at least twice those of the most competitive synthetic organic materials (notably engineering polymers) and comparable to those of Glycera and Nereis jaws. Furthermore, the combination of hardness and stiffness makes the beaks more resistant to plastic deformation when in contact with blunt abrasives than virtually all metals and polymers. The 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine and abundant histidine content in the beak proteins as well as the pigmented hydrolysis-resistant residue are suggestive of aromatic cross-linking. A high cross-linking density between the proteins and chitin may be the single most important determinant of hardness and stiffness in the beak. Beak microstructure is characterized by a lamellar arrangement of the constituents, with a weak interface that promotes crack deflection and endows the structure with high fracture toughness. The susceptibility of this microstructure to cracking along these interfaces from contact stresses at the external surface is mitigated by the presence of a protective coating. PMID:17113369

  9. California mussels (Mytilus californianus) as sentinels for marine contamination with Sarcocystis neurona.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Lauren; Rejmanek, Daniel; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia; Shapiro, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a terrestrial parasite that can cause fatal encephalitis in the endangered Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). To date, neither risk factors associated with marine contamination nor the route of S. neurona infection to marine mammals has been described. This study evaluated coastal S. neurona contamination using California mussels (Mytilus californianus) as sentinels for pathogen pollution. A field investigation was designed to test the hypotheses that (1) mussels can serve as sentinels for S. neurona contamination, and (2) S. neurona contamination in mussels would be highest during the rainy season and in mussels collected near freshwater. Initial validation of molecular assays through sporocyst spiking experiments revealed the ITS-1500 assay to be most sensitive for detection of S. neurona, consistently yielding parasite amplification at concentrations ⩾5 sporocysts/1 mL mussel haemolymph. Assays were then applied on 959 wild-caught mussels, with detection of S. neurona confirmed using sequence analysis in three mussels. Validated molecular assays for S. neurona detection in mussels provide a novel toolset for investigating marine contamination with this parasite, while confirmation of S. neurona in wild mussels suggests that uptake by invertebrates may serve as a route of transmission to susceptible marine animals. PMID:27003262

  10. Food intake of young cod and flounder in a shallow bay on the Swedish west coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihl, L.

    The importance of shallow soft bottom areas as nursery grounds for I-ground cod, Gadus morhua, and I- to IV-group flounder, Platichthys flesus, was investigated in a 20 000 m 2 bay, 0 to 1 m deep, on the Swedish west coast. To estimate the amount of visiting fish and their food intake the bay was enclosed with a net once a month from July to November 1979 and from April to November 1980. At each occasion about 60 cods and 8 to 50 flounders were caught. The total biomass of the cod and flounder was 1 to 14 kg and 2 to 13 kg wet weight, respectively. The cod preyed on mobile epifauna such as Carcinus maenas, Crangon crangon and Pomatoschistus spp., whereas the flounder was eating infauna mainly Mya arenaria, Cardium spp. and Nereis spp. The food intake within the area was calculated to approximate 35 and 10 kg wet weight from April to November for cod and flounder, respectively.

  11. Incorporating diverse data and realistic complexity into demographic estimation procedures for sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M.T.; Doak, D.F.; Estes, J.A.; Hatfield, B.B.; Staedler, M.M.; Bodkin, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable information on historical and current population dynamics is central to understanding patterns of growth and decline in animal populations. We developed a maximum likelihood-based analysis to estimate spatial and temporal trends in age/sex-specific survival rates for the threatened southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis), using annual population censuses and the age structure of salvaged carcass collections. We evaluated a wide range of possible spatial and temporal effects and used model averaging to incorporate model uncertainty into the resulting estimates of key vital rates and their variances. We compared these results to current demographic parameters estimated in a telemetry-based study conducted between 2001 and 2004. These results show that survival has decreased substantially from the early 1990s to the present and is generally lowest in the north-central portion of the population's range. The greatest temporal decrease in survival was for adult females, and variation in the survival of this age/sex class is primarily responsible for regulating population growth and driving population trends. Our results can be used to focus future research on southern sea otters by highlighting the life history stages and mortality factors most relevant to conservation. More broadly, we have illustrated how the powerful and relatively straightforward tools of information-theoretic-based model fitting can be used to sort through and parameterize quite complex demographic modeling frameworks. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. It's tough to be small: dependence of burrowing kinematics on body size.

    PubMed

    Che, James; Dorgan, Kelly M

    2010-04-01

    Burrowing marine infauna are morphologically diverse and range in size over several orders of magnitude. Whilst effects of ontogenetic and morphological differences on running, flying and swimming are relatively well understood, similar analyses of burrowing mechanics and kinematics are lacking. The polychaete Nereis virens Sars extends its burrow by fracture, using an eversible pharynx to exert force on the walls of the burrow. The resulting stress is amplified at the anterior tip of the burrow, which extends when the stress exceeds the fracture toughness of the material. Here we show that the polychaete Cirriformia moorei extends its burrow by a similar mechanism, but by using its hydrostatic skeleton rather than an eversible pharynx. Based on the dimensionless wedge number, which relates work of fracture to work to maintain body shape against the elasticity of sediment, we predicted that smaller worms would exhibit behaviors characteristic of tougher sediments and that scaling of kinematics would reflect decreasing difficulty in fracturing sediment with increasing body size. We found that smaller worms were relatively blunter and thicker, and had a greater variation of thickness than larger worms as they burrowed. Although these kinematic differences increase the stress amplification at the crack tip, smaller worms still generate lower stress intensity factors. The greater relative body thickness and shape changes of smaller worms are consistent with ontogenetic changes in forces exerted by earthworms, and are likely driven by the challenge of exerting enough stress to extend a crack with a small body size. PMID:20348335

  13. Novel poxvirus infection in northern and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni and Enhydra lutris neiris), Alaska and California, USA.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Pamela A; Murray, Michael J; Garner, Michael M; Goertz, Caroline E C; Nordhausen, Robert W; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Getzy, David M; Nielsen, Ole; Archer, Linda L; Maness, Heather T D; Wellehan, James F X; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2014-07-01

    Small superficially ulcerated skin lesions were observed between October 2009 and September 2011 during captive care of two orphaned sea otter pups: one northern (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska and one southern (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California. Inclusions consistent with poxviral infection were diagnosed by histopathology in both cases. Virions consistent with poxvirus virions were seen on electron microscopy in the northern sea otter, and the virus was successfully propagated in cell culture. DNA extraction, pan-chordopoxviral PCR amplification, and sequencing of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene revealed that both cases were caused by a novel AT-rich poxvirus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses found that the virus is divergent from other known poxviruses at a level consistent with a novel genus. These cases were self-limiting and did not appear to be associated with systemic illness. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a poxvirus in a mustelid species. The source of this virus, mode of transmission, zoonotic potential, and biological significance are undetermined. PMID:24807180

  14. Timescales alter the inferred strength and temporal consistency of intraspecific diet specialization.

    PubMed

    Novak, Mark; Tinker, M Tim

    2015-05-01

    Many populations consist of individuals that differ substantially in their diets. Quantification of the magnitude and temporal consistency of such intraspecific diet variation is needed to understand its importance, but the extent to which different approaches for doing so reflect instantaneous vs. time-aggregated measures of individual diets may bias inferences. We used direct observations of sea otter individuals (Enhydra lutris nereis) to assess how: (1) the timescale of sampling, (2) under-sampling, and (3) the incidence- vs. frequency-based consideration of prey species affect the inferred strength and consistency of intraspecific diet variation. Analyses of feeding observations aggregated over hourly to annual intervals revealed a substantial bias associated with time aggregation that decreases the inferred magnitude of specialization and increases the inferred consistency of individuals' diets. Time aggregation also made estimates of specialization more sensitive to the consideration of prey frequency, which decreased estimates relative to the use of prey incidence; time aggregation did not affect the extent to which under-sampling contributed to its overestimation. Our analyses demonstrate the importance of studying intraspecific diet variation with an explicit consideration of time and thereby suggest guidelines for future empirical efforts. Failure to consider time will likely produce inconsistent predictions regarding the effects of intraspecific variation on predator-prey interactions. PMID:25656583

  15. Evaluating potential conservation conflicts between two listed species: sea otters and black abalone.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Peter; Jurgens, Laura J; Tinker, M Tim

    2015-11-01

    Population consequences of endangered species interacting as predators and prey have been considered theoretically and legally, but rarely investigated in the field. We examined relationships between spatially variable populations of a predator, the California sea otter, Enhydra lutris nereis, and a prey species, the black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii. Both species are federally listed under the Endangered Species Act and co-occur along the coast of California. We compared the local abundance and habitat distribution of black abalone at 12 sites with varying densities of sea otters. All of the populations of abalone we examined were in the geographic area currently unaffected by withering disease, which has decimated populations south of the study area. Surprisingly, our findings indicate that sea otter density is positively associated with increased black abalone density. The presence of sea otters also correlated with a shift in black abalone to habitat conferring greater refuge, which could decrease illegal human harvest. These results highlight the need for a multi-species approach to conservation management of the two species, and demonstrate the importance of using field-collected data rather than simple trophic assumptions to understand relationships between jointly vulnerable predator and prey populations. PMID:27070027

  16. Characterization and Recombinant Expression of Terebrid Venom Peptide from Terebra guttata

    PubMed Central

    Moon, John; Gorson, Juliette; Wright, Mary Elizabeth; Yee, Laurel; Khawaja, Samer; Shin, Hye Young; Karma, Yasmine; Musunri, Rajeeva Lochan; Yun, Michelle; Holford, Mande

    2016-01-01

    Venom peptides found in terebrid snails expand the toolbox of active compounds that can be applied to investigate cellular physiology and can be further developed as future therapeutics. However, unlike other predatory organisms, such as snakes, terebrids produce very small quantities of venom, making it difficult to obtain sufficient amounts for biochemical characterization. Here, we describe the first recombinant expression and characterization of terebrid peptide, teretoxin Tgu6.1, from Terebra guttata. Tgu6.1 is a novel forty-four amino acid teretoxin peptide with a VI/VII cysteine framework (C–C–CC–C–C) similar to O, M and I conotoxin superfamilies. A ligation-independent cloning strategy with an ompT protease deficient strain of E. coli was employed to recombinantly produce Tgu6.1. Thioredoxin was introduced in the plasmid to combat disulfide folding and solubility issues. Specifically Histidine-6 tag and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography were applied as a purification method, and enterokinase was used as a specific cleavage protease to effectively produce high yields of folded Tgu6.1 without extra residues to the primary sequence. The recombinantly-expressed Tgu6.1 peptide was bioactive, displaying a paralytic effect when injected into a Nereis virens polychaete bioassay. The recombinant strategy described to express Tgu6.1 can be applied to produce high yields of other disulfide-rich peptides. PMID:26950153

  17. Nereididae (Annelida: Phyllodocida) of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Glasby, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Nereididae is one of the most ubiquitous of polychaete families, yet knowledge of their diversity in the northern Great Barrier Reef is poor; few species have been previously reported from any of the atolls or islands including Lizard Island. In this study, the diversity of the family from Lizard Island and surrounding reefs is documented based on museum collections derived from surveys conducted mostly over the last seven years. The Lizard Island nereidid fauna was found to be represented by 14 genera and 38 species/species groups, including 11 putative new species. Twelve species are newly reported from Lizard Island; four of these are also first records for Australia. For each genus and species, diagnoses and/or taxonomic remarks are provided in addition to notes on their habitat on Lizard Island, and general distribution; the existence of tissue samples tied to vouchered museum specimens is indicated. Fluorescence photography is used to help distinguish closely similar species of Nereis and Platynereis. A key is provided to facilitate identification and encourage further taxonomic, molecular and ecological studies on the group. PMID:26624071

  18. Timescales alter the inferred strength and temporal consistency of intraspecific diet specialization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novak, Mark; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Many populations consist of individuals that differ substantially in their diets. Quantification of the magnitude and temporal consistency of such intraspecific diet variation is needed to understand its importance, but the extent to which different approaches for doing so reflect instantaneous vs. time-aggregated measures of individual diets may bias inferences. We used direct observations of sea otter individuals (Enhydra lutris nereis) to assess how: (1) the timescale of sampling, (2) under-sampling, and (3) the incidence- vs. frequency-based consideration of prey species affect the inferred strength and consistency of intraspecific diet variation. Analyses of feeding observations aggregated over hourly to annual intervals revealed a substantial bias associated with time aggregation that decreases the inferred magnitude of specialization and increases the inferred consistency of individuals’ diets. Time aggregation also made estimates of specialization more sensitive to the consideration of prey frequency, which decreased estimates relative to the use of prey incidence; time aggregation did not affect the extent to which under-sampling contributed to its overestimation. Our analyses demonstrate the importance of studying intraspecific diet variation with an explicit consideration of time and thereby suggest guidelines for future empirical efforts. Failure to consider time will likely produce inconsistent predictions regarding the effects of intraspecific variation on predator–prey interactions.

  19. Dramatic increase in sea otter mortality from white sharks in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M. Tim; Hatfield, Brian B.; Harris, Michael D.; Ames, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Although southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) are not considered prey for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias), sharks do nonetheless bite sea otters. We analyzed spatial and temporal trends in shark bites on sea otters in California, assessing the frequency of shark bite wounds in 1,870 carcasses collected since 1985. The proportion of stranded sea otters having shark bites has increased sharply since 2003, and white shark bites now account for >50% of recovered carcasses. The trend was most pronounced in the southern part of the range, from Estero Bay to Point Conception, where shark bite frequency has increased eightfold. Seasonal trends were also evident: most shark-bitten carcasses are recovered in late summer and fall; however, the period of elevated shark bite frequency has lengthened. The causes of these trends are unclear, but possible contributing factors include increased white shark abundance and/or changes in white shark behavior and distribution. In particular, the spatiotemporal patterns of shark-bitten sea otters match increases in pinniped populations, and the increased availability of marine mammal prey for white sharks may have led to more sharks spending more time in nearshore waters utilized by both sea otters and pinnipeds.

  20. A passive sampler based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) for sediment-associated organic pollutants: Comparing freely-dissolved concentration with bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Keith A; Lao, Wenjian; Tsukada, David; Diehl, Dario W

    2015-10-01

    The elevated occurrence of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and legacy organchlorine pesticides (e.g. chlordane and DDT) in estuarine sediments continues to poses challenges for maintaining the health of aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts to develop and apply protective, science-based sediment quality regulations for impaired waterbodies are hampered by non-concordance between model predictions and measured bioaccumulation and toxicity. A passive sampler incorporating commercially available solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers was employed in lab and field studies to measure the freely dissolved concentration of target HOCs (Cfree) and determine its suitability as a proxy for bioaccumulation. SPME deduced Cfree for organochlorines was highly correlated with tissue concentrations (Cb) of Macoma and Nereis spp. co-exposed in laboratory microcosms containing both spiked and naturally contaminated sediments. This positive association was also observed in situ for endemic bivalves, where SPME samplers were deployed for up to 1 month at an estuarine field site. The concordance between Cb and Cfree for PAH was more variable, in part due to likely biotransformation by model invertebrates. These results indicate that SPME passive samplers can serve as a proxy for bioaccumulation of sediment-associated organochlorines in both lab and field studies, reducing the uncertainty associated with model predictions that do not adequately account for differential bioavailability. PMID:26246043

  1. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability of PCBs in field-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Parks, Ashley N; Chandler, G Thomas; Portis, Lisa M; Sullivan, Julia C; Perron, Monique M; Cantwell, Mark G; Burgess, Robert M; Ho, Kay T; Ferguson, P Lee

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to black carbon is a well-studied phenomenon. One emerging class of engineered black carbon materials are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Little research has investigated the potential of SWNT to adsorb and sequester HOCs in complex environmental systems. This study addressed the capacity of SWNT, amended to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated New Bedford Harbor (NBH) sediment, to reduce the toxicity and bioaccumulation of these HOCs to benthic organisms. Overall, SWNT amendments increased the survival of two benthic estuarine invertebrates, Americamysis bahia and Ampelisca abdita, and reduced the accumulation of PCBs to the benthic polychaete, Nereis virens. Reduction in PCB bioaccumulation by SWNT was independent of Kow. Further, passive sampling-based estimates of interstitial water concentrations indicated that SWNT reduced PCB bioavailability. Results from this study suggest that SWNT are a good adsorbent for PCBs and might be useful for remediation in the future once SWNT manufacturing technology improves and costs decrease. PMID:24266834

  2. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  3. Characterization and Recombinant Expression of Terebrid Venom Peptide from Terebra guttata.

    PubMed

    Moon, John; Gorson, Juliette; Wright, Mary Elizabeth; Yee, Laurel; Khawaja, Samer; Shin, Hye Young; Karma, Yasmine; Musunri, Rajeeva Lochan; Yun, Michelle; Holford, Mande

    2016-03-01

    Venom peptides found in terebrid snails expand the toolbox of active compounds that can be applied to investigate cellular physiology and can be further developed as future therapeutics. However, unlike other predatory organisms, such as snakes, terebrids produce very small quantities of venom, making it difficult to obtain sufficient amounts for biochemical characterization. Here, we describe the first recombinant expression and characterization of terebrid peptide, teretoxin Tgu6.1, from Terebra guttata. Tgu6.1 is a novel forty-four amino acid teretoxin peptide with a VI/VII cysteine framework (C-C-CC-C-C) similar to O, M and I conotoxin superfamilies. A ligation-independent cloning strategy with an ompT protease deficient strain of E. coli was employed to recombinantly produce Tgu6.1. Thioredoxin was introduced in the plasmid to combat disulfide folding and solubility issues. Specifically Histidine-6 tag and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography were applied as a purification method, and enterokinase was used as a specific cleavage protease to effectively produce high yields of folded Tgu6.1 without extra residues to the primary sequence. The recombinantly-expressed Tgu6.1 peptide was bioactive, displaying a paralytic effect when injected into a Nereis virens polychaete bioassay. The recombinant strategy described to express Tgu6.1 can be applied to produce high yields of other disulfide-rich peptides. PMID:26950153

  4. Taxonomy of reproductive Nereididae (Annelida) in multispecies swarms at Ambon Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pamungkas, Joko; Glasby, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Multispecies, or mass, spawning of different invertebrate species is well known for coral reef systems; however, incidences involving polychaetes are poorly documented. In this study we report on mass swarming, prior to spawning, of Nereididae at Ambon Island, Maluku, on three occasions: in 1866, inferred from an historical sample deposited in Naturalis, Leiden, and in March, 2009 and 2014, based on newly collected samples. The 2009 and 2014 events co-occurred with spawning of other polychaetes, known locally as wawo and including the widespread Indo-Pacific eunicid, Palola viridis (Gray in Stair). Ten species of reproductive Nereididae are described, including Composetia marmorata (Horst) new combination, formerly Ceratonereis marmorata; epitokous modifications are described for both sexes of each species including taxonomically important features such as body colour and number of pre-natatory chaetigers. Three distinct types of natatory region morphologies are recognized, which appear to characterise groups of genera. The ten new records brings to 13 the total number of nereidid species known to undergo mass swarming at Ambon Island; a key to the 13 species is provided. Species composition varies slightly between the three time periods: four species were common between all three periods, five species were in common between 1866 and 2014, and four species were in common between 1995 and 2009/14. Two species of Neanthes and one of Nereis are identified as potentially new and will be described in subsequent papers. PMID:26448711

  5. Status of macrobenthic communities in the hypersaline waters of the Gulf of Salwa, Arabian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joydas, T. V.; Qurban, Mohammad A.; Manikandan, K. P.; Ashraf, T. T. M.; Ali, S. M.; Al-Abdulkader, Khaled; Qasem, Ali; Krishnakumar, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    The spatial extent of hypersaline marine ecosystems is very limited and therefore they have received only little scientific study. Here, we present the status of macrobenthic communities in a hypersaline water body, the Gulf of Salwa (Saudi Arabia part), in the Arabian Gulf and assess the natural stress, if any, in the communities. The Gulf of Salwa is nearly isolated from the main water body of the Arabian Gulf and shows a progressive southward increases in salinity (up to 63 during summer) and temperature (up to 40 °C during summer) due to the southward decrease in tidal flushing. The study reveals that the benthic communities in the southern region (south of 25° 10‧ N) of the Gulf of Salwa are under natural stress, while the deeper, the northern, and the inner bay regions have healthier benthic communities than the south. In the southern region, there were 87 to 93% reduction in polychaete species, 49 to 57% reduction in species diversity of polychaetes and 70 to 71% in non-polychaete taxa compared to the northern region. The present study identified some opportunistic taxa such as Fabricia sp., Heteromastus filiformis, Platynereis insolita and Nereis sp. 1 and non-polychaetes such as chironomid larvae, podocops and cumaceans capable of adapting to the hypersaline environment in the Gulf of Salwa when salinity exceeded 60 and temperature exceeded 35 °C during summer.

  6. The Geometrinae of Ethiopia II: Tribus Hemistolini, genus Prasinocyma
    (Lepidoptera: Geometridae, Geometrinae).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Axel; Sciarretta, Andrea; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a checklist and integrative revision for the genus Prasinocyma (Geometridae, Geometrinae, Hemistolini). With this contribution the checklist for the genus Prasinocyma in Ethiopia increases from eight to 40 species. Nineteen species and five subspecies are described as new for the science: Prasinocyma pedicata aethiopica subsp. n., Prasinocyma angolica pseudopedicata subsp. n., Prasinocyma bongaensis sp. n., Prasinocyma getachewi sp. n., Prasinocyma baumgaertneri sp. n., Prasinocyma robusta sp. n., Prasinocyma shoa yabellensis subsp. n., Prasinocyma amharensis sp. n., Prasinocyma magica sp. n., Prasinocyma batesi distans subsp. n., Prasinocyma monikae sp. n., Prasinocyma fusca sp. n., Prasinocyma leveneorum sp. n., Prasinocyma aquamarina sp. n., Prasinocyma beryllaria sp. n., Prasinocyma lutulenta sp. n., Prasinocyma septentrionalis sp. n., Prasinocyma fallax sp. n., Prasinocyma trematerrai sp. n., Prasinocyma trematerrai simienensis subsp. n., Prasinocyma angulifera sp. n., Prasinocyma stefani sp. n., Prasinocyma gemmifera sp. n., Prasinocyma discipuncta sp. n. Prasinocyma thiaucourti Herbulot, 1993 is downgraded from species rank to subspecies of P. immaculata (Thunberg, 1784) (stat. n.). Prasinocyma unipuncta Warren, 1897 is downgraded from species rank to synonymy of P. immaculata (Thunberg, 1784) (syn. n.). Prasinocyma nereis Townsend, 1952 (comb.n.) is transferred from genus Eretmopus to Prasinocyma. Thalassodes camerunalta Herbulot, 1986 (comb.n.) is transferred from genus Thalassodes to Prasinocyma. Thalassodini (syn.n.) are downgraded to synonymy of Hemistolini, here. PMID:27395526

  7. The use of Monte Carlo analysis for exposure assessment of an estuarine food web

    SciTech Connect

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Shear, N.M.; Harrington, N.W.; Henning, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    Despite apparent agreement within the scientific community that probabilistic methods of analysis offer substantially more informative exposure predictions than those offered by the traditional point estimate approach, few risk assessments conducted or approved by state and federal regulatory agencies have used probabilistic methods. Among the likely deterrents to application of probabilistic methods to ecological risk assessment is the absence of ``standard`` data distributions that are considered applicable to most conditions for a given ecological receptor. Indeed, point estimates of ecological exposure factor values for a limited number of wildlife receptors have only recently been published. The Monte Carlo method of probabilistic modeling has received increasing support as a promising technique for characterizing uncertainty and variation in estimates of exposure to environmental contaminants. An evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of estuarine organisms was conducted in order to identify those variables that most strongly influence uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values for polychaetes (Nereis sp.), mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in east coast estuaries were identified. Understanding the variation in such factors, which include feeding rate, growth rate, feeding range, excretion rate, respiration rate, body weight, lipid content, food assimilation efficiency, and chemical assimilation efficiency, is critical to the understanding the mechanisms that control the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in aquatic organisms, and to the ability to estimate bioaccumulation from chemical exposures in the aquatic environment.

  8. CYP4 mRNA expression in marine polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis in response to petroleum hydrocarbon and deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Zhou, Yibing; Yang, Dazuo; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Lili; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-09-01

    A CYP4 cDNA was cloned and characterized to identify the relationship between persistent organic pollutants and stress response in marine polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis. The full length of PaCYP4 cDNA is 1857bp and encodes 481 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 73% identity with CYP4BB1 from polychaete Nereis virens and shared high homology to other known CYP4 sequences. The expression level of PaCYP4 under petroleum hydrocarbon (PH) and deltamethrin (DM) exposure was detected using Real-time PCR. PH and combined toxicity treatments elevated the mRNA level of PaCYP4 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The mRNA transcripts of PaCYP4 increased at the beginning of DM exposure and then eventually decreased, and the expression level of PaCYP4 down-regulated with increasing concentration of DM. CYP4 in P. aibuhitensis plays an important role in the metabolism of petroleum hydrocarbon and organochlorine pesticide. PMID:22768804

  9. Distribution and role of trace transition metals in Glycera worm jaws studied with synchrotron microbeam techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Birkedal, Henrik; Casa, Deigo M.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2005-05-31

    A combination of position-resolved synchrotron microbeam techniques was used to explore the distribution and role of trace transition metals in the jaws of Glycera dibranchiata. The mandibles of this marine sediment worm have recently been found to be reinforced by the copper-based biomineral atacamite [Cu2(OH)3Cl]. Here we show that the system is more complex, containing zinc and iron and unmineralized copper compounds as well. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies showed that a fraction of copper is present in oxidation state, Cu(I), in contrast to the mineral that exclusively contains Cu(II). X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed traces of copper also in the jaw base devoid of mineral. Traces of iron were found as well, but occurred spatially correlated with the copper mineral, suggesting a substitution of copper atoms by iron in the atacamite mineral. Zinc was evenly dispersed throughout the jaw matrix, quite in analogy to zinc in Nereis jaw, a related worm species, where nonmineralized zinc serves to cross-link and harden the proteinaceous matrix.

  10. An untargeted gas chromatography mass spectrometry metabolomics platform for marine polychaetes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varela, R; Tomasi, G; Christensen, J H

    2015-03-01

    The development of an appropriate extraction method for untargeted environmental metabolomic analysis of marine polychaetes could promote their use for environmental monitoring purposes. To this end, we compared four extraction methods on the marine polychaete Nereis virens both exposed to crude oil and non-exposed. XCMS was used for feature detection and preprocessing; different normalization and scaling approaches were tested; and principal component analysis (PCA) was used together with basic statistical tests to ascertain common metabolic patterns and determine the most suitable extraction method. We conclude that a two-step extraction procedure with 80:20 (v/v) methanol:water on freeze dried polychaete tissue provides the best trade-off between analysis time, and extraction efficiency and intermediate reproducibility. No definitive conclusions could be drawn about the ability of the method to discriminate controls and crude oils in actual biological replicates because the experiment was carried out by design on analytical replicates only. We show that the normalization to the sum of all the common features, and the use of a weighted least squares criterion to fit the PCA by means of scaling to the median absolute deviation (MAD) of the pooled quality control samples significantly improved the clustering of controls and crude oil exposed samples. The scaling alone led to an increase of 19% in explained variance compared to ordinary PCA. PMID:25660527

  11. In situ quantification of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers of a marine invertebrate with low aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Pichaud, Nicolas; Rioux, Pierre; Blier, Pierre U

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to design a protocol to allow the assessment of normal and alternative pathways for electron transport in mitochondria using an in situ approach (on permeabilized fibers) in high-resolution respirometry. We measured the oxygen consumption of permeabilized fibers from Nereis (Neanthes) virens with different substrates and the presence of ADP. To estimate the alternative oxidase (AOX) activity, antimycin A was introduced in order to inhibit complex III. Moreover, the apparent complex IV (COX) excess capacity was evaluated using different substrates to assess the implication of this complex in the partitioning of electrons during its progressive inhibition. Our in situ method enabled to quantify the activity of the normal COX pathway as well as the AOX pathway when different substrates were oxidized by either complex I, complex II or both. Using this approach, we confirmed that according to the substrates used, each pathway has a different role and consequently is otherwise involved in the partitioning of electrons through the electron transport system, and suggested that the AOX activity is triggered not only by the redox state of the cell but also by the type of substrates provided to mitochondria. PMID:22244894

  12. Modeling of Bioaccumulation in Marine Benthic Invertebrates Using a Multispecies Experimental Approach.

    PubMed

    Diepens, Noël J; Van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine J; Koelmans, Albert A

    2015-11-17

    The causal links between species traits and bioaccumulation by marine invertebrates are poorly understood. We assessed these links by measuring and modeling polychlorinated biphenyl bioaccumulation by four marine benthic species. Uniformity of exposure was achieved by testing each species in the same aquarium, separated by enclosures, to ensure that the observed variability in bioaccumulation was due to species traits. The relative importance of chemical uptake from pore water or food (organic matter, OM) ingestion was manipulated by using artificial sediment with different OM contents. Biota sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) ranged from 5 to 318, in the order Nereis virens < Arenicola marina ≈ Macoma balthica < Corophium volutator. Calibration of a kinetic model provided species-specific parameters that represented the key species traits, thus illustrating how models provide an opportunity to read across benthic species with different feeding strategies. Key traits included species-specific differentiation between (1) ingestion rates, (2) ingestion of suspended and settled OM, and (3) elimination rates. The high BSAF values and their concomitant variability across the species challenges approaches for exposure assessment based on pore water concentration analysis and equilibrium partition theory. We propose that combining multienclosure testing and modeling will substantially improve exposure assessment in sediment toxicity tests. PMID:26465976

  13. Spatial distribution of PAHs and associated laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment core samples from New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Sediment was also collected from a reference site in the New York Bight as a comparison. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for PAHs, sediment grain size, and total organic carbon. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples, as well as for lipid content. The results highlight the range and magnitude of PAH concentrations in sediments of NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from undetected to 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations as much as 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated compounds, along with benthic toxicity data, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  14. Interactions among contaminants and nutritional lipids during mobilization by digestive fluids of marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Voparil, Ian M; Mayer, Lawrence M; Place, Allen R

    2003-07-15

    Coastal sediments contain complex mixtures of hydrophobic compounds including organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and biogenic compounds such as cholesterol and phospholipids. Within the guts of benthic invertebrates, these mixtures are subjected to digestive, chemical conditions that can be rich in surfactants and proteinaceous material. Using in vitro incubations as proxy for digestive exposure, we studied the solubilization of binary mixtures of nutritional and contaminant lipids into artificial seawater and six marine invertebrate gut fluids (Molpadia intermedia, Cucumaria frondosa, Arenicola marina, Arenicola brasiliensis, Parastichopus californicus, and Nereis virens). For animals with surfactant micelles or high protein concentrations, solubilization interactions were frequent. For example, in Arenicola marina gut fluid, benzo(a)pyrene enhanced the solubilization of hexadecane (491% of the compound alone) and palmitic acid (130%) but hindered cholesterol (83%). Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations increased in gut fluids in the presence of cholesterol (137% of BaP alone), phenanthrene (154%), lecithin (140%), and hexadecanol (232%). In A. marina gut fluid, dilution with seawater indicated that these enhancements occur only when micelles are present. Sediment-water partitioning models, used to predict the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals, do not account for such interactions between solubilizates (compounds solubilized in micelles). However, for animals exposed via a digestive tract containing micelles or high protein concentrations, digestive bioavailability and perhaps bioaccumulation are likely influenced by these interactions. PMID:12901659

  15. Passive immune-protection of small abalone against Vibrio alginolyticus infection by anti-Vibrio IgY-encapsulated feed.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Jer; Wang, Hang; Chan, Yi-Lin; Li, Tsung-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor supertexta) is a high value-added shellfish. It however has been suffering Vibrio alginolyticus infections, which cause mass death of small abalone and thus great economic losses, particularly in artificial aquaculture. In this study, we attempted to treat small abalone with anti-Vibrio IgY to elicit a passive immunity directly against V. alginolyticus infections. Anti-Vibrio IgY was alginate encapsulated in egg powders as feed, which may avoid antibody inactivation in the gastrointestinal tract of small abalone. The feed was tested for the stability of anti-Vibrio IgY in a gastrointestinal mimic environment. The result showed anti-Vibrio IgY retained activity as high as 90% after 4 h exposure to pancreatic enzymes. Addition of 0, 5 or 10% anti-Vibrio IgY-encapsulated egg powders into a basal diet to form abalone diet formulae. Small abalones fed with the anti-Vibrio IgY formulae showed a relatively high respiratory burst activity than those without anti-Vibrio IgY treatments. The survival rates of small abalones fed with 5 or 10% anti-Vibrio IgY egg powders were in the range of 65-70% 14 days post-V. alginolyticus challenge (1 x 10⁶ c.f.u.), which was significantly higher than 0% of those fed without anti-Vibrio IgY. The anti-Vibrio IgY-encapsulated formulae were thus concluded to be an effective means to prevent small abalone from V. alginolyticus infection, and may be practical in use in abalone aquaculture. PMID:21300158

  16. Abalone withering syndrome: distribution, impacts, current diagnostic methods and new findings.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Lisa M; Wight, Nate; VanBlaricom, Glenn R; Kiryu, Ikunari; Moore, James D; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2014-04-01

    Withering syndrome (WS) is a fatal disease of abalone caused by a Rickettsiales-like organism (WS-RLO). The causative agent, 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', occurs along the eastern Pacific margin of North America in California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico. However, as infected abalones have been transported to Chile, China, Taiwan, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Spain, Thailand and Japan, the geographical range of the etiological agent is suspected to be broad, especially where California red abalones Haliotis rufescens are cultured or in areas where native species have been exposed to this species. Susceptibility varies among species, with up to 99% losses of black abalone H. cracherodii in laboratory and field studies in the USA to no losses among the small abalone H. diversicolor supertexta in Thailand. Some populations that have suffered catastrophic losses due to WS have developed resistance to the disease. In addition, a newly identified phage hyperparasite of the WS-RLO may reduce pathogenicity and dampen associated losses. Diagnosis of WS requires the identification of infection with the pathogen (WS-RLO detected via in situ hybridization or histology coupled with PCR and sequence analysis) accompanied by morphological changes that characterize this disease (e.g. pedal and digestive gland atrophy, and digestive gland metaplasia). A quantitative PCR assay was developed and may be useful in quantifying pathogen DNA. Confirmation of infection cannot be done by PCR analysis alone but can be used as a proxy for infection in areas where the agent is established and is recommended for inclusion in health examinations. Avoidance of WS is best accomplished by the establishment of a health history and multiple health examinations prior to movement of animals. PMID:24695239

  17. Starting a DNA barcode reference library for shallow water polychaetes from the southern European Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Jorge; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Borges, Luisa M S; Ferreira, Maria S G; Hollatz, Claudia; Gomes, Pedro T; Sousa, Ronaldo; Ravara, Ascensão; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2016-01-01

    Annelid polychaetes have been seldom the focus of dedicated DNA barcoding studies, despite their ecological relevance and often dominance, particularly in soft-bottom estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we report the first assessment of the performance of DNA barcodes in the discrimination of shallow water polychaete species from the southern European Atlantic coast, focusing on specimens collected in estuaries and coastal ecosystems of Portugal. We analysed cytochrome oxidase I DNA barcodes (COI-5P) from 164 specimens, which were assigned to 51 morphospecies. To our data set from Portugal, we added available published sequences selected from the same species, genus or family, to inspect for taxonomic congruence among studies and collection location. The final data set comprised 290 specimens and 79 morphospecies, which generated 99 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) within Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD). Among these, 22 BINs were singletons, 47 other BINs were concordant, confirming the initial identification based on morphological characters, and 30 were discordant, most of which consisted on multiple BINs found for the same morphospecies. Some of the most prominent cases in the latter category include Hediste diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776) (7), Eulalia viridis (Linnaeus, 1767) (2) and Owenia fusiformis (delle Chiaje, 1844) (5), all of them reported from Portugal and frequently used in ecological studies as environmental quality indicators. Our results for these species showed discordance between molecular lineages and morphospecies, or added additional relatively divergent lineages. The potential inaccuracies in environmental assessments, where underpinning polychaete species diversity is poorly resolved or clarified, demand additional and extensive investigation of the DNA barcode diversity in this group, in parallel with alpha taxonomy efforts. PMID:26129849

  18. Impact of biodiversity-climate futures on primary production and metabolism in a model benthic estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the effects of anthropogenically-driven changes in global temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide and biodiversity on the functionality of marine ecosystems is crucial for predicting and managing the associated impacts. Coastal ecosystems are important sources of carbon (primary production) to shelf waters and play a vital role in global nutrient cycling. These systems are especially vulnerable to the effects of human activities and will be the first areas impacted by rising sea levels. Within these coastal ecosystems, microalgal assemblages (microphytobenthos: MPB) are vital for autochthonous carbon fixation. The level of in situ production by MPB mediates the net carbon cycling of transitional ecosystems between net heterotrophic or autotrophic metabolism. In this study, we examine the interactive effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (370, 600, and 1000 ppmv), temperature (6°C, 12°C, and 18°C) and invertebrate biodiversity on MPB biomass in experimental systems. We assembled communities of three common grazing invertebrates (Hydrobia ulvae, Corophium volutator and Hediste diversicolor) in monoculture and in all possible multispecies combinations. This experimental design specifically addresses interactions between the selected climate change variables and any ecological consequences caused by changes in species composition or richness. Results The effects of elevated CO2 concentration, temperature and invertebrate diversity were not additive, rather they interacted to determine MPB biomass, and overall this effect was negative. Diversity effects were underpinned by strong species composition effects, illustrating the importance of individual species identity. Conclusions Overall, our findings suggest that in natural systems, the complex interactions between changing environmental conditions and any associated changes in invertebrate assemblage structure are likely to reduce MPB biomass. Furthermore, these effects would be

  19. Lethal effects on different marine organisms, associated with sediment-seawater acidification deriving from CO2 leakage.

    PubMed

    Basallote, M D; Rodríguez-Romero, A; Blasco, J; DelValls, A; Riba, I

    2011-08-01

    CO(2) leakages during carbon capture and storage in sub-seabed geological structures could produce potential impacts on the marine environment. To study lethal effects on marine organisms attributable to CO(2) seawater acidification, a bubbling CO(2) system was designed enabling a battery of different tests to be conducted, under laboratory conditions, employing various pH treatments (8.0, 7.5, 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5). Assays were performed of three exposure routes (seawater, whole sediment, and sediment elutriate). Individuals of the clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) and early-life stages of the gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata, were exposed for 10 days and 72 h, respectively, to acidified clean seawater. S. aurata larvae were also exposed to acidified elutriate samples, and polychaete organisms of the specie Hediste diversicolor and clams R. philippinarum were also exposed for 10 days to estuarine whole sediment. In the fish larvae elutriate test, 100 % mortality was recorded at pH 6.0, after 48 h of exposure. Similar results were obtained in the clam sediment exposure test. In the other organisms, significant mortality (p < 0.05) was observed at pH values lower than 6.0. Very high lethal effects (calculating L[H(+)]50, defined as the H(+) concentration that causes lethal effects in 50 % of the population exposed) were detected in association with the lowest pH treatment for all the species. The implication of these results is that a severe decrease of seawater pH would cause high mortality in marine organisms of several different kinds and life stages. The study addresses the potential risks incurred due to CO(2) leakages in marine environments. PMID:22828884

  20. Trade-offs between energy maximization and parental care in a central place forager, the sea otter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thometz, N M; Staedler, M.M.; Tomoleoni, Joseph; Bodkin, James L.; Bentall, G.B.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2016-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2014, 126 archival time–depth recorders (TDRs) were used to examine the foraging behavior of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) off the coast of California, in both resource-abundant (recently occupied, low sea otter density) and resource-limited (long-occupied, high sea otter density) locations. Following predictions of foraging theory, sea otters generally behaved as energy rate maximizers. Males and females without pups employed similar foraging strategies to optimize rates of energy intake in resource-limited habitats, with some exceptions. Both groups increased overall foraging effort and made deeper, longer and more energetically costly dives as resources became limited, but males were more likely than females without pups to utilize extreme dive profiles. In contrast, females caring for young pups (≤10 weeks) prioritized parental care over energy optimization. The relative importance of parental care versus energy optimization for adult females with pups appeared to reflect developmental changes as dependent young matured. Indeed, contrary to females during the initial stages of lactation, females with large pups approaching weaning once again prioritized optimizing energy intake. The increasing prioritization of energy optimization over the course of lactation was possible due to the physiological development of pups and likely driven by the energetic deficit incurred by females early in lactation. Our results suggest that regardless of resource availability, females at the end of lactation approach a species-specific ceiling for percent time foraging and that reproductive females in the central portion of the current southern sea otter range are disproportionately affected by resource limitation.

  1. Relationships among Sarcocystis species transmitted by New World opossums (Didelphis spp.).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, B M; Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P

    2001-02-26

    At least three species of Sarcocystis (S. neurona, S. falcatula, S. speeri) have recently been shown to use opossums of the genus Didelphis as their definitive host. In order to evaluate the evolutionary relationships among Sarcocystis spp. isolates from the Americas, and to determine whether organisms representing the same parasite lineages are transmitted north and south of the Panamanian isthmus, we inferred the phylogenetic relationships from nucleotide sequence variation in parasites isolated from three opossum species (D. virginiana, D. albiventris, D. marsupialis). In particular, we used variation in the 25/396 marker to compare several isolates from Brazil, Argentina, and the United States to each other and to cloned S. neurona and S. falcatula whose morphology and host affinities have been defined in the laboratory. S. neurona was identified from a Brazilian D. albiventris, as well as from North American D. virginiana. Parasites resembling the Cornell isolate of S. falcatula are transmitted both south and north of the Panamanian isthmus by D. albiventris and D. virginiana, respectively. Distinct attributes at two genetic loci differentiated a Brazilian isolate of S. falcatula from all other known parasite lineages. We confirm S. neurona as the causative agent of recently reported neurologic disease in Southern sea otters, Enhydra lutris nereis. And we found that S. speeri could not be compared to the other opossum-derived Sarcocystis isolates on the basis of nucleotide variation at the 25/396 locus. The widespread distribution of certain species of Sarcocystis may derive from their ability to parasitize migratory bird hosts in their intermediate stage. PMID:11223194

  2. Isolation of Surfactant-Resistant Bacteria from Natural, Surfactant-Rich Marine Habitats▿

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Craig J.; Coe, Kieran M.; Plante, Rebecca G.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental remediation efforts often utilize either biodegradative microbes or surfactants, but not in combination. Coupling both strategies holds the potential to dramatically increase the rate and extent of remediation because surfactants can enhance the bioavailability of contaminants to microbes. However, many surfactants permeabilize bacterial cell membranes and are effective disinfectants. An important goal then is to find or genetically modify microorganisms that possess both desirable degradative capabilities and the ability to thrive in the presence of surfactants. The guts of some marine invertebrates, particularly deposit feeders, have previously been shown to contain high levels of biosurfactants. Our primary aim was to mine these natural, surfactant-rich habitats for surfactant-resistant bacteria. Relative to sediment porewaters, the gut contents of two polychaete deposit feeders, Nereis succinea and Amphitrite ornata, exhibited a significantly higher ratio of bacteria resistant to both cationic and anionic surfactants. In contrast, bacteria in the gut fluids of a holothuroid, Leptosynapta tenuis, showed surfactant susceptibility similar to that of bacteria from sediments. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the majority of surfactant-resistant isolates were previously undescribed species of the genus Vibrio or were of a group most closely related to Spongiobacter spp. We also tested a subset of resistant bacteria for the production of biosurfactants. The majority did produce biosurfactants, as demonstrated via the oil-spreading method, but in all cases, production was relatively weak under the culture conditions employed. Novel surfactant-resistant, biosurfactant-producing bacteria, and the habitats from which they were isolated, provide a new source pool for potential microorganisms to be exploited in the in situ bioremediation of marine sediments. PMID:18586977

  3. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor Deepening Project and the intensive study of the Turning Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Kohn, N.P.; White, P.J.; Word, J.Q.; Michaels, L.L.

    1995-06-01

    Richmond Harbor is on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay and its access channels and several of the shipping berths are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modem deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (PL99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels in Richmond Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE: disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean disposal sites, or at uplands disposal sites. Purpose of this study was to conduct comprehensive evaluations, including chemical, biological, and bioaccumulation testing of sediments in selected areas of Richmond Harbor. This information was required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USACE. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory collected 20 core samples, both 4-in. and 12-in., to a project depth of -40 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) (-38 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdepth) using a vibratory-hammer core. These 20 field samples were combined to form five test composites plus an older bay mud (OBM) composite that were analyzed for physical/chemical parameters, biological toxicity, and tissue chemistry. Solid-phase tests were conducted with the amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius; the clam, Macoma nasuta; and the polychaete worm, Nephtys caecoides. Suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) tests were conducted with the sanddab, Citharichthys stigmaeus; the mysid, Holmesimysis costata; and the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Bioaccumulation of contaminants was measured in tissues of Macoma nasuta and Nereis virens. Sediments from one ocean reference sediment, and two in-bay reference sediments, were tested concurrently. Results from analysis of the five test treatments were statistically compared with the reference sediment R-OS in the first five sections of this report.

  4. The cost of reproduction: differential resource specialization in female and male California sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott Smith, Emma A.; Newsome, Seth D.; Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in behavior and diet can have important consequences for population and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we examine how differences in reproductive investment and spatial ecology influence individual diet specialization in male and female southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis). We hypothesize that greater reproductive constraints and smaller home ranges of females lead to more pronounced intraspecific competition and increased specialization. We integrate stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of sea otter vibrissae with long-term observational studies of five subpopulations in California. We define individual diet specialization as low ratios of within-individual variation (WIC) to total population niche width (TNW). We compare isotopic and observational based metrics of WIC/TNW for males and females to data on population densities, and movement patterns using both general linear and linear mixed-effects models. Consistent with our hypothesis, increasing population density is associated with increased individual diet specialization by females but not by males. Additionally, we find the amount of coastline in a sea otter’s home range positively related with individual dietary variability, with increased range span resulting in weaker specialization for both males and females. We attribute our results to sex-based differences in movement, with females needing to specialize in their small ranges to maximize energy gain, and posit that the paradigm of individual prey specialization in sea otters with increased intraspecific competition may be a pattern driven largely by females. Our work highlights a potentially broader role of sex in the mechanistic pressures promoting and maintaining diet specialization.

  5. Bartonella spp. Exposure in Northern and Southern Sea Otters in Alaska and California

    PubMed Central

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Gill, Verena A.; Doroff, Angela M.; Miller, Melissa A.; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62–269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  6. Prey choice and habitat use drive sea otter pathogen exposure in a resource-limited coastal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christine K.; Tinker, M.T.; Estes, J.A.; Conrad, P.A.; Staedler, M.; Miller, M.A.; Jessup, David A.; Mazet, J.A.K.

    2009-01-01

    The processes promoting disease in wild animal populations are highly complex, yet identifying these processes is critically important for conservation when disease is limiting a population. By combining field studies with epidemiologic tools, we evaluated the relationship between key factors impeding southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population growth: disease and resource limitation. This threatened population has struggled to recover despite protection, so we followed radio-tagged sea otters and evaluated infection with 2 disease-causing protozoal pathogens, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, to reveal risks that increased the likelihood of pathogen exposure. We identified patterns of pathogen infection that are linked to individual animal behavior, prey choice, and habitat use. We detected a high-risk spatial cluster of S. neurona infections in otters with home ranges in southern Monterey Bay and a coastal segment near San Simeon and Cambria where otters had high levels of infection with T. gondii. We found that otters feeding on abalone, which is the preferred prey in a resource-abundant marine ecosystem, had a very low risk of infection with either pathogen, whereas otters consuming small marine snails were more likely to be infected with T. gondii. Individual dietary specialization in sea otters is an adaptive mechanism for coping with limited food resources along central coastal California. High levels of infection with protozoal pathogens may be an adverse consequence of dietary specialization in this threatened species, with both depleted resources and disease working synergistically to limit recovery. ?? 2009 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  7. Clinical pathology and assessment of pathogen exposure in southern and Alaskan sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanni, K.D.; Mazet, J.A.K.; Gulland, F.M.D.; Estes, James; Staedler, M.; Murray, M.J.; Miller, M.; Jessup, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population in California (USA) and the Alaskan sea otter (E. lutris kenyoni) population in the Aleutian Islands (USA) chain have recently declined. In order to evaluate disease as a contributing factor to the declines, health assessments of these two sea otter populations were conducted by evaluating hematologic and/or serum biochemical values and exposure to six marine and terrestrial pathogens using blood collected during ongoing studies from 1995 through 2000. Samples from 72 free-ranging Alaskan, 78 free-ranging southern, and (for pathogen exposure only) 41 debilitated southern sea otters in rehabilitation facilities were evaluated and compared to investigate regional differences. Serum chemistry and hematology values did not indicate a specific disease process as a cause for the declines. Statistically significant differences were found between free-ranging adult southern and Alaskan population mean serum levels of creatinine kinase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, calcium, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, phosphorous, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, and sodium. These were likely due to varying parasite loads, contaminant exposures, and physiologic or nutrition statuses. No free-ranging sea otters had signs of disease at capture, and prevalences of exposure to calicivirus, Brucella spp., and Leptospira spp. were low. The high prevalence (35%) of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging southern sea otters, lack of antibodies to this parasite in Alaskan sea otters, and the pathogen's propensity to cause mortality in southern sea otters suggests that this parasite may be important to sea otter population dynamics in California but not in Alaska. The evidence for exposure to pathogens of public health importance (e.g., Leptospira spp., T. gondii) in the southern sea otter population, and the nai??vete?? of both populations to other pathogens (e

  8. Energetic demands of immature sea otters from birth to weaning: implications for maternal costs, reproductive behavior and population-level trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thometz, N.M.; Tinker, M.T.; Staedler, M.M.; Mayer, K.A.; Williams, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have the highest mass-specific metabolic rate of any marine mammal, which is superimposed on the inherently high costs of reproduction and lactation in adult females. These combined energetic demands have been implicated in the poor body condition and increased mortality of female sea otters nearing the end of lactation along the central California coast. However, the cost of lactation is unknown and currently cannot be directly measured for this marine species in the wild. Here, we quantified the energetic demands of immature sea otters across five developmental stages as a means of assessing the underlying energetic challenges associated with pup rearing that may contribute to poor maternal condition. Activity-specific metabolic rates, daily activity budgets and field metabolic rates (FMR) were determined for each developmental stage. Mean FMR of pre-molt pups was 2.29±0.81 MJ day−1 and increased to 6.16±2.46 and 7.41±3.17 MJ day−1 in post-molt pups and dependent immature animals, respectively. Consequently, daily energy demands of adult females increase 17% by 3 weeks postpartum and continue increasing to 96% above pre-pregnancy levels by the average age of weaning. Our results suggest that the energetics of pup rearing superimposed on small body size, marine living and limited on-board energetic reserves conspire to make female sea otters exceptionally vulnerable to energetic shortfalls. By controlling individual fitness, maternal behavior and pup provisioning strategies, this underlying metabolic challenge appears to be a major factor influencing current population trends in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

  9. The biomagnification of PCBs, PCDDs, and PCDFs in a simplified laboratory food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Taplin, B.; Pruell, R.; McGovern, D.; McKinney, R.

    1995-12-31

    Polychaetes Nereis virens were exposed to contaminated sediment and fed to juvenile lobsters, Homarus americanus exposed to the same sediment for 112 days. Time series uptake and deputation measurements were made for lobster muscle and hepatopancreas. A nonlinear model (BIOFAC) was used to calculate uptake and deputation rate constants, bioaccumulation factors, and steady state concentrations for PCBS, PCDDS, and PCDFS. Biomagnification factors (BMFs), on a lipid weight basis, were calculated for both tissues. Lobsters accumulated PCDDS, PCDFS, and PCBs from contaminated sediment and food (polychaetes). Of the two tissues, lobster hepatopancreas showed the highest concentrations for all compounds analyzed. Of the PCDDs and PCDFs studied, only 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, and 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran were detected in lobster muscle and hepatopancreas tissues. Of the PCB congeners studied, 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime} hexachlorobiphenyl (UPAC No. 153) reached the highest concentration in lobster muscle and hepatopancreas. Lobsters also accumulated non-ortho substituted PCBs in both tissues. Biomagnification factors (BMFS) were calculated for lobster muscle and hepatopancreas on a lipid weight basis using steady-state concentrations. BMFs for lobster hepatopancreas were generally higher than those for muscle. Of the PCDDs and PCDFs studied, only 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDF were biomagnified in lobster hepatopancreas and muscle compared with levels in the polychaetes. Selected PCB congeners were also biomagnified in both tissues. PCB congeners with log{sub 10} K{sub ow} values > 6.5 had higher BMFs for hepatopancreas tissue than compounds with lower K{sub ow`s}. No trend was evident regarding log{sub 10} K{sub ow} of PCBs and BMFs for lobster muscle.

  10. Epidemiology and pathology of Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Carlson-Bremer, Daphne; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Gulland, Frances M D; Conrad, Patricia A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Johnson, Christine K

    2015-04-01

    The coccidian parasite Toxoplasma gondii infects humans and warm-blooded animals worldwide. The ecology of this parasite in marine systems is poorly understood, although many marine mammals are infected and susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. We summarized the lesions associated with T. gondii infection in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) population and investigated the prevalence of and risk factors associated with T. gondii exposure, as indicated by antibody. Five confirmed and four suspected cases of T. gondii infection were identified by analysis of 1,152 medical records of necropsied sea lions from 1975-2009. One suspected and two confirmed cases were identified in aborted fetuses from a sea lion rookery. Toxoplasmosis was the primary cause of death in five cases, including the two fetuses. Gross and histopathologic findings in T. gondii-infected sea lions were similar to those reported in other marine mammals. The most common lesions were encephalitis, meningitis, and myocarditis. The antibody prevalence in stranded, free-ranging sea lions for 1998-2009 was 2.5% (±0.03%; IgG titer 640). There was an increase in odds of exposure in sea lions with increasing age, suggesting cumulative risk of exposure and persistent antibody over time. The occurrence of disseminated T. gondii infection in aborted fetuses confirms vertical transmission in sea lions, and the increasing odds of exposure with age is consistent with additional opportunities for horizontal transmission in free-ranging sea lions over time. These data suggest that T. gondii may have two modes of transmission in the sea lion population. Overall, clinical disease was uncommon in our study which, along with low prevalence of T. gondii antibody, suggests substantially less-frequent exposure and lower susceptibility to clinical disease in California sea lions as compared to sympatric southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis). PMID:25588007

  11. Burrowing in marine muds by crack propagation: kinematics and forces.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Kelly M; Arwade, Sanjay R; Jumars, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    The polychaete Nereis virens burrows through muddy sediments by exerting dorsoventral forces against the walls of its tongue-depressor-shaped burrow to extend an oblate hemispheroidal crack. Stress is concentrated at the crack tip, which extends when the stress intensity factor (KI) exceeds the critical stress intensity factor (KIc). Relevant forces were measured in gelatin, an analog for elastic muds, by photoelastic stress analysis, and were 0.015+/-0.001 N (mean +/- s.d.; N=5). Measured elastic moduli (E) for gelatin and sediment were used in finite element models to convert the forces in gelatin to those required in muds to maintain the same body shapes observed in gelatin. The force increases directly with increasing sediment stiffness, and is 0.16 N for measured sediment stiffness of E=2.7 x 10(4) Pa. This measurement of forces exerted by burrowers is the first that explicitly considers the mechanical behavior of the sediment. Calculated stress intensity factors fall within the range of critical values for gelatin and exceed those for sediment, showing that crack propagation is a mechanically feasible mechanism of burrowing. The pharynx extends anteriorly as it everts, extending the crack tip only as far as the anterior of the worm, consistent with wedge-driven fracture and drawing obvious parallels between soft-bodied burrowers and more rigid, wedge-shaped burrowers (i.e. clams). Our results raise questions about the reputed high energetic cost of burrowing and emphasize the need for better understanding of sediment mechanics to quantify external energy expenditure during burrowing. PMID:18025018

  12. Energetic demands of immature sea otters from birth to weaning: implications for maternal costs, reproductive behavior and population-level trends.

    PubMed

    Thometz, N M; Tinker, M T; Staedler, M M; Mayer, K A; Williams, T M

    2014-06-15

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have the highest mass-specific metabolic rate of any marine mammal, which is superimposed on the inherently high costs of reproduction and lactation in adult females. These combined energetic demands have been implicated in the poor body condition and increased mortality of female sea otters nearing the end of lactation along the central California coast. However, the cost of lactation is unknown and currently cannot be directly measured for this marine species in the wild. Here, we quantified the energetic demands of immature sea otters across five developmental stages as a means of assessing the underlying energetic challenges associated with pup rearing that may contribute to poor maternal condition. Activity-specific metabolic rates, daily activity budgets and field metabolic rates (FMR) were determined for each developmental stage. Mean FMR of pre-molt pups was 2.29 ± 0.81 MJ day(-1) and increased to 6.16 ± 2.46 and 7.41 ± 3.17 MJ day(-1) in post-molt pups and dependent immature animals, respectively. Consequently, daily energy demands of adult females increase 17% by 3 weeks postpartum and continue increasing to 96% above pre-pregnancy levels by the average age of weaning. Our results suggest that the energetics of pup rearing superimposed on small body size, marine living and limited on-board energetic reserves conspire to make female sea otters exceptionally vulnerable to energetic shortfalls. By controlling individual fitness, maternal behavior and pup provisioning strategies, this underlying metabolic challenge appears to be a major factor influencing current population trends in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis). PMID:24920834

  13. Bartonella spp. exposure in northern and southern sea otters in Alaska and California.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Chomel, Bruno B; Gill, Verena A; Doroff, Angela M; Miller, Melissa A; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Kasten, Rickie W; Byrne, Barbara A; Goldstein, Tracey; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2014-12-01

    Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p<0.001; 95% confidence interval 2.62-269.4). Because Bartonella spp. antibodies were detected in necropsied northern sea otters from southcentral (44%) and southwestern (86%) stocks of Alaska, as well as in necropsied southern sea otters (16%) in southcentral California, we concluded that Bartonella spp. exposure is widely distributed among sea otter populations in the Eastern Pacific, providing context for investigating future disease outbreaks and monitoring of Bartonella infections for sea otter management and conservation. PMID:25514118

  14. The cost of reproduction: differential resource specialization in female and male California sea otters.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emma A Elliott; Newsome, Seth D; Estes, James A; Tinker, M Tim

    2015-05-01

    Intraspecific variation in behavior and diet can have important consequences for population and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we examine how differences in reproductive investment and spatial ecology influence individual diet specialization in male and female southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis). We hypothesize that greater reproductive constraints and smaller home ranges of females lead to more pronounced intraspecific competition and increased specialization. We integrate stable carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) isotope analysis of sea otter vibrissae with long-term observational studies of five subpopulations in California. We define individual diet specialization as low ratios of within-individual variation (WIC) to total population niche width (TNW). We compare isotopic and observational based metrics of WIC/TNW for males and females to data on population densities, and movement patterns using both general linear and linear mixed-effects models. Consistent with our hypothesis, increasing population density is associated with increased individual diet specialization by females but not by males. Additionally, we find the amount of coastline in a sea otter's home range positively related with individual dietary variability, with increased range span resulting in weaker specialization for both males and females. We attribute our results to sex-based differences in movement, with females needing to specialize in their small ranges to maximize energy gain, and posit that the paradigm of individual prey specialization in sea otters with increased intraspecific competition may be a pattern driven largely by females. Our work highlights a potentially broader role of sex in the mechanistic pressures promoting and maintaining diet specialization. PMID:25669450

  15. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  16. The distribution of nuclear genetic variation and historical demography of sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aguilar, A.; Jessup, David A.; Estes, James; Garza, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The amount and distribution of population genetic variation is crucial information for the design of effective conservation strategies for endangered species and can also be used to provide inference about demographic processes and patterns of migration. Here, we describe variation at a large number of nuclear genes in sea otters Enhydra lutris ssp. We surveyed 14 variable microsatellite loci and two genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in up to 350 California sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis, which represents ???10% of the subspecies' population, and 46 otters from two Alaskan sites. We utilized methods for detecting past reductions in effective population size to examine the effects of near extinction from the fur trade. Summary statistic tests largely failed to find a signal of a recent population size reduction (within the past 200years), but a Bayesian method found a signal of a strong reduction over a longer time scale (up to 500years ago). These results indicate that the reduction in size began long enough ago that much genetic variation was lost before the 19th century fur trade. A comparison of geographic distance and pairwise relatedness for individual otters found no evidence of kin-based spatial clustering for either gender. This indicates that there is no population structure, due to extended family groups, within the California population. A survey of population genetic variation found that two of the MHC genes, DQB and DRB, had two alleles present and one of the genes, DRA, was monomorphic in otters. This contrasts with other mammals, where they are often the most variable coding genes known. Genetic variation in the sea otter is among the lowest observed for a mammal and raises concerns about the long-term viability of the species, particularly in the face of future environmental changes. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 The Zoological Society of London No claim to original US government works.

  17. Sporulation and survival of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.S.; Collins, M.V.; Mitchell, S.M.; Cole, R.A.; Flick, G.J.; Wetch, C.N.; Lindquist, A.; Dubey, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    We have been collaborating since 1992 in studies on southern sea otters (Enhdyra lutris nereis) as part of a program to define factors, which may be responsible for limiting the growth of the southern sea otter population. We previously demonstrated Toxoplasma gondii in sea otters. We postulated that cat feces containing oocysts could be entering the marine environment through storm run-off or through municipal sewage since cat feces are often disposed down toilets by cat owners. The present study examined the sporulation of T. gondii oocysts in seawater and the survival of sporulated oocysts in seawater. Unsporulated oocysts were placed in 15 ppt artificial seawater, 32 ppt artificial seawater or 2% sulfuric acid (positive control) at 24 C in an incubator. Samples were examined daily for 3 days and development monitored by counting 100 oocysts from each sample. From 75 to 80% of the oocysts were sporulated by 3 days post-inoculation under all treatment conditions. Groups of 2 mice were fed 10,000 oocysts each from each of the 3 treatment groups. All inoculated mice developed toxoplasmosis indicating that oocysts were capable of sporulating in seawater. Survival of sporulated oocysts was examined by placing sporulated T. gondii oocysts in 15 ppt seawater at room temperature 22a??24 C (RT) or in a refrigerator kept at 4 C. Mice fed oocysts that had been stored at 4C or RT for 6 months became infected. These results indicate that T. gondii oocysts can sporulate and remain viable in seawater for several months.

  18. Using demography and movement behavior to predict range expansion of the southern sea otter.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, M.T.; Doak, D.F.; Estes, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to forecasting population growth, basic demographic data combined with movement data provide a means for predicting rates of range expansion. Quantitative models of range expansion have rarely been applied to large vertebrates, although such tools could be useful for restoration and management of many threatened but recovering populations. Using the southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) as a case study, we utilized integro-difference equations in combination with a stage-structured projection matrix that incorporated spatial variation in dispersal and demography to make forecasts of population recovery and range recolonization. In addition to these basic predictions, we emphasize how to make these modeling predictions useful in a management context through the inclusion of parameter uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. Our models resulted in hind-cast (1989-2003) predictions of net population growth and range expansion that closely matched observed patterns. We next made projections of future range expansion and population growth, incorporating uncertainty in all model parameters, and explored the sensitivity of model predictions to variation in spatially explicit survival and dispersal rates. The predicted rate of southward range expansion (median = 5.2 km/yr) was sensitive to both dispersal and survival rates; elasticity analysis indicated that changes in adult survival would have the greatest potential effect on the rate of range expansion, while perturbation analysis showed that variation in subadult dispersal contributed most to variance in model predictions. Variation in survival and dispersal of females at the south end of the range contributed most of the variance in predicted southward range expansion. Our approach provides guidance for the acquisition of further data and a means of forecasting the consequence of specific management actions. Similar methods could aid in the management of other recovering populations.

  19. Tools for quantifying isotopic niche space and dietary variation at the individual and population level.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsome, Seth D.; Yeakel, Justin D.; Wheatley, Patrick V.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly using stable isotope analysis to inform questions about variation in resource and habitat use from the individual to community level. In this study we investigate data sets from 2 California sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) populations to illustrate the advantages and potential pitfalls of applying various statistical and quantitative approaches to isotopic data. We have subdivided these tools, or metrics, into 3 categories: IsoSpace metrics, stable isotope mixing models, and DietSpace metrics. IsoSpace metrics are used to quantify the spatial attributes of isotopic data that are typically presented in bivariate (e.g., δ13C versus δ15N) 2-dimensional space. We review IsoSpace metrics currently in use and present a technique by which uncertainty can be included to calculate the convex hull area of consumers or prey, or both. We then apply a Bayesian-based mixing model to quantify the proportion of potential dietary sources to the diet of each sea otter population and compare this to observational foraging data. Finally, we assess individual dietary specialization by comparing a previously published technique, variance components analysis, to 2 novel DietSpace metrics that are based on mixing model output. As the use of stable isotope analysis in ecology continues to grow, the field will need a set of quantitative tools for assessing isotopic variance at the individual to community level. Along with recent advances in Bayesian-based mixing models, we hope that the IsoSpace and DietSpace metrics described here will provide another set of interpretive tools for ecologists.

  20. Tissue distribution and histopathological effects of dietary methylmercury in benthic grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, E.; Audet, C.

    1995-05-01

    There is a need to test deterministic models predicting the behavior and effects of chemicals on aquatic systems by conducting experiments with more than one trophic step at a time. This approach requires the set-up of an experimental food chain in pounds or mesocosm facilities which can be used for dietary uptake studies and assessment of sublethal stress induced by contaminated food. In the course of our current research program at the INRS marine mesocosms facilities, a model benthic food chain including inter- and sub-tidal species such as the mussel (Mytilus edulis), clam (Mya arenaria), starfish (Leptasterias polaris), polychaete (Nereis virens), amphipod (Gammarus sp.), gastropod (Buccinum undatum), and fishes (Pleuronectec americanus, Myoxocephalus aenaeus), is used for testing food uptake models and for the development of sublethal toxicity tests which could be used in the environmental assessment of coastal and estuarine waters. Among these test organisms, the grubby (M. aenaeus) is a small coastal fish (12-15 cm) characterized by a broad head. The grubby is tolerant of water temperature and salinity variations and lives on a wide variety of bottom strata at low depths. The grubby is carnivorous and consumes a wide variety of molluscs and the young of many species of fish. Because of its size, its estuarine and coastal distribution and its large spectrum of prey, this species was seen as an ideal fish to fit into our experimental food chain model. This paper reports a preliminary experiment designed to measure distribution of mercury in tissues and to test the response of various histopathological and biochemical stress indicators in grubby exposed to dietary contamination by methylmercury (MeHg) for a 20-day exposure period. MeHg was chosen because it is rapidly bioaccumulated by most living organisms and its toxicity has been studied for decades in numerous aquatic ecosystems. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Bioavailability of inorganic and methylmercury to a marine deposit-feeding polychaete

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.X.; Stupakoff, I.; Gagnon, C.; Fisher, N.S.

    1998-09-01

    The authors measured the assimilation efficiencies (AEs) from various types of sediments and the uptake rate constants from the dissolved phase of inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) and methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg(II)) in the marine deposit-feeding polychaete Nereis succinea. AEs of Hg(II) ranged between 7 and 30% and were unaffected by sediment composition, whereas AEs of CH{sub 3}Hg(II) ranged between 43 and 83% and were strongly affected by sediment composition. Sediment grain size had no apparent effect on Hg(II) and Ch{sub 3}Hg(II) assimilation. AEs for Hg(II) associated with anoxic sediment were slightly lower than with oxic sediment, whereas CH{sub 3}Hg(II) displayed comparable AEs for both oxic and anoxic sediment. Dissolved uptake rate constants of CH{sub 3}Hg(II) were 2.2 times those of Hg(II). A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was used to separate the pathways (solute vs sediment) and sources [Hg(II) vs CH{sub 3}Hg(II)] of Hg accumulation in N. succinea. The model predicted that, under conditions typical of coastal sediment environments, CH{sub 3}Hg(II) accumulation contributes about 5--17% of total Hg accumulation in polychaetes. Most of the Hg(II) (>70%) accumulation is predicted to derive from sediment ingestion, whereas for CH{sub 3}Hg(II) the relative importance of dissolved vs sediment ingestion depends greatly on its partition coefficient for sediments. Uptake from the dissolved phase and sediment ingestion can be equally important for CH{sub 3}Hg(II) accumulation in N. succinea.

  2. A new pathogen transmission mechanism in the ocean: the case of sea otter exposure to the land-parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Mazzillo, Fernanda F M; Shapiro, Karen; Silver, Mary W

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a land-derived parasite that infects humans and marine mammals. Infections are a significant cause of mortality for endangered southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), but the transmission mechanism is poorly understood. Otter exposure to T. gondii has been linked to the consumption of marine turban snails in kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forests. It is unknown how turban snails acquire oocysts, as snails scrape food particles attached to surfaces, whereas T. gondii oocysts enter kelp beds as suspended particles via runoff. We hypothesized that waterborne T. gondii oocysts attach to kelp surfaces when encountering exopolymer substances (EPS) forming the sticky matrix of biofilms on kelp, and thus become available to snails. Results of a dietary composition analysis of field-collected snails and of kelp biofilm indicate that snails graze the dense kelp-biofilm assemblage composed of pennate diatoms and bacteria inserted within the EPS gel-like matrix. To test whether oocysts attach to kelp blades via EPS, we designed a laboratory experiment simulating the kelp forest canopy in tanks spiked with T. gondii surrogate microspheres and controlled for EPS and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP - the particulate form of EPS). On average, 19% and 31% of surrogates were detected attached to kelp surfaces covered with EPS in unfiltered and filtered seawater treatments, respectively. The presence of TEP in the seawater did not increase surrogate attachment. These findings support a novel transport mechanism of T. gondii oocysts: as oocysts enter the kelp forest canopy, a portion adheres to the sticky kelp biofilms. Snails grazing this biofilm encounter oocysts as 'bycatch' and thereby deliver the parasite to sea otters that prey upon snails. This novel mechanism can have health implications beyond T. gondii and otters, as a similar route of pathogen transmission may be implicated with other waterborne pathogens to marine wildlife and humans consuming

  3. Heavy metal contamination from historic mining in upland soil and estuarine sediments of Egypt Bay, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osher, L. J.; Leclerc, L.; Wiersma, G. B.; Hess, C. T.; Guiseppe, V. E.

    2006-10-01

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in sediments of Egypt Bay in Hancock County, Maine, are elevated above background levels. The source of the contamination is Cu mining that occurred in the uplands adjacent to Egypt Stream between 1877 and 1885. Egypt Stream is a tributary to Egypt Bay. Egypt Bay is part of the Taunton Bay estuary system. The Hagan Mine was one of the mines extracting metals from the sulfide deposits in Downeast Maine north of Penobscot Bay. Metal concentrations were determined using ICP-AES after sample digestion with nitric acid. Soil collected from the coarse textured mine tailings pile contained elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, but the majority of the surface soils at the Hagan Mine site were not contaminated. Estuary sediments from the surface to 100 cm depth were collected in four locations within Egypt Bay. Below 40 cm, metal concentrations in sediments were similar to those in uncontaminated upland soils. Metal concentrations in the estuary sediments between the surface and 26 cm were above background levels. According to 210Pb dating, the sediment at 26-34 cm depth was likely to have been deposited at the time the historic mines were in operation. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sediment from the 32-34 cm depth interval are similar to concentrations in the upland soil sample from the mine tailings pile. Elevated Pb concentrations in sediments from the surface to 24 cm are from atmospheric Pb deposition from anthropogenic sources. Sediment in the top 10 cm of the estuary has been mixed both by the polychaete worm Nereis virens and by those harvesting the worms for sale as fish bait.

  4. Toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of silver nanoparticles in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhua; Ho, Kay T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Wu, Fengchang; Cantwell, Mark G; Katz, David R; Horowitz, Doranne Borsay; Boothman, Warren S; Burgess, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP did not exhibit toxicity to the amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia) at ≤75 mg/kg dry wt. A 28-d bioaccumulation study showed that Ag was significantly accumulated in the marine polychaete Nereis virens (N. virens) in the AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP and a conventional salt (AgNO3) treatments. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results showed the distribution of Ag species in marine sediments amended with AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP, and AgNO3 was AgCl (50–65%) > Ag2S (32–42%) > Ag metal (Ag0) (3–11%). In N virens, AgCl (25–59%) and Ag2S (10–31%) generally decreased and, Ag metal (32–44%) increased, relative to the sediments. The patterns of speciation in the worm were different depending upon the coating of the AgNP and both types of AgNPs were different than the AgNO3 salt. These results show that the AgNP surface capping agents influenced Ag uptake, biotransformation, and/or excretion. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the bioaccumulation and speciation of AgNPs in a marine organism (N. virens). PMID:25369427

  5. Epidemiology and potential land-sea transfer of enteric bacteria from terrestrial to marine species in the Monterey Bay Region of California.

    PubMed

    Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Byrne, Barbara A; Chouicha, Nadira; Hardin, Dane; Jessup, David; Dominik, Clare; Roug, Annette; Schriewer, Alexander; Jang, Spencer S; Miller, Woutrina A

    2012-07-01

    Marine mammals are at risk for infection by fecal-associated zoonotic pathogens when they swim and feed in polluted nearshore marine waters. Because of their tendency to consume 25-30% of their body weight per day in coastal filter-feeding invertebrates, southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) can act as sentinels of marine ecosystem health in California. Feces from domestic and wildlife species were tested to determine prevalence, potential virulence, and diversity of selected opportunistic enteric bacterial pathogens in the Monterey Bay region. We hypothesized that if sea otters are sentinels of coastal health, and fecal pollution flows from land to sea, then sea otters and terrestrial animals might share the same enteric bacterial species and strains. Twenty-eight percent of fecal samples tested during 2007-2010 were positive for one or more potential pathogens. Campylobacter spp. were isolated most frequently, with an overall prevalence of 11%, followed by Vibrio cholerae (9%), Salmonella spp. (6%), V. parahaemolyticus (5%), and V. alginolyticus (3%). Sea otters were found positive for all target bacteria, exhibiting similar prevalences for Campylobacter and Salmonella spp. but greater prevalences for Vibrio spp. when compared to terrestrial animals. Fifteen Salmonella serotypes were detected, 11 of which were isolated from opossums. This is the first report of sea otter infection by S. enterica Heidelberg, a serotype also associated with human clinical disease. Similar strains of S. enterica Typhimurium were identified in otters, opossums, and gulls, suggesting the possibility of land-sea transfer of enteric bacterial pathogens from terrestrial sources to sea otters. PMID:22740531

  6. Distributions of key exposure factors controlling the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in an estuarine food web

    SciTech Connect

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Harrington, N.W.; Shear, N.M.; Curry, C.L.; Carlson-Lynch, H.; Henning, M.H.; Su, S.H.; Rabbe, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    A critical evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of common estuarine organisms was conducted in an attempt to develop probabilistic distributions for those variables that influence the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water, and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values were identified for dominant organisms from various trophic levels, including the polychaete Nereis virens, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The exposure factors of interest included ingestion rate for various food sources, growth rate, respiration rate, excretion rate, body weight, wet/dry weight ratio, lipid content, chemical assimilation efficiency, and food assimilation efficiency. These exposure factors are critical to the execution of mechanistic food web models, which, when properly calibrated, can be used to estimate tissue concentrations of nonionic chemicals in aquatic organisms based on knowledge of the bioenergetics and feeding interactions within a food web and the sediment and water concentrations of chemicals. In this article the authors describe the use of distributions for various exposure factors in the context of a mechanistic bioaccumulation model that is amenable to probabilistic analyses for multiple organisms within a food web. A case study is provided which compares the estimated versus measured concentrations of five polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in a representative food web from the tidal portion of the Passaic River, New Jersey, USA. The results suggest that the model is accurate within an order of magnitude or less in estimating the bioaccumulation of PCBs in this food web without calibration. The results of a model sensitivity analysis suggest that the input parameters which most influence the output of the model are both chemical and organism specific.

  7. Species boundaries in gregarine apicomplexan parasites: a case study-comparison of morphometric and molecular variability in Lecudina cf. tuzetae (Eugregarinorida, Lecudinidae).

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Villette, Petra M A H; Leander, Brian S

    2011-01-01

    Trophozoites of gregarine apicomplexans are large feeding cells with diverse morphologies that have played a prominent role in gregarine systematics. The range of variability in trophozoite shapes and sizes can be very high even within a single species depending on developmental stages and host environmental conditions; this makes the delimitation of different species of gregarines based on morphological criteria alone very difficult. Accordingly, comparisons of morphological variability and molecular variability in gregarines are necessary to provide a pragmatic framework for establishing species boundaries within this diverse and poorly understood group of parasites. We investigated the morphological and molecular variability present in the gregarine Lecudina cf. tuzetae from the intestines of Nereis vexillosa (Polychaeta) collected in two different locations in Canada. Three distinct morphotypes of trophozoites were identified and the small subunit (SSU) rDNA was sequenced either from multicell isolates of the same morphotype or from single cells. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the different morphotypes and localities reflected phylogenetic relatedness as inferred from the SSU rDNA sequence data. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rDNA demonstrated that the new sequences did not cluster according to morphotype or locality and instead were intermingled within a strongly supported clade. A comparison of 1,657 bp from 45 new sequences demonstrated divergences between 0% and 3.9%. These data suggest that it is necessary to acquire both morphological and molecular data in order to effectively delimit the "clouds" of variation associated with each gregarine species and to unambiguously reidentify these species in the future. PMID:21569160

  8. Modeling metal bioaccumulation in a deposit-feeding polychaete from labile sediment fractions and from pore water.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Zofia; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2011-06-01

    Estuarine sediments are often highly enriched in particle-reactive metal contaminants and because aquatic animals have often been shown to acquire metals predominantly from their diet, benthic animals feeding on deposited or resuspended sediments may also accumulate metals through this uptake pathway. Laboratory experiments were performed in which the surface deposit-feeding polychaete, Nereis succinea, was exposed to As(+5), Cd, and Cr(+3) in pore water or in estuarine sediments with and without enrichment with algal debris. These experiments generated metal uptake parameters (assimilation efficiency of ingested metal [AE], uptake rate constant of dissolved metal, efflux rate constants following dietary or aqueous metal exposures) used in a kinetic model of metal bioaccumulation. The model showed that > 97% of the body burden of these metals is accumulated through ingested sediment. The kinetic model was further modified to consider the geochemical fractionation of the metals in the sediments because metals bound to some fractions were shown to be unavailable to these polychaetes. The modified model substituted the AE term for each metal by the percentage of metal extracted in neutral and weak acid exchangeable fractions (termed "carbonex" fraction) multiplied by the slope of the regression between the metal AE and its fractionation in carbonex. The modified model generated predictions of As, Cd, and Cr body burdens in polychaetes at three different estuarine sites that matched independent field observations at these sites (r²=0.84 for sediments without organic enrichment, r²=0.87 with organic enrichment). Model predictions that relied on total metal concentrations showed weaker relationships (r²=0.11-0.50). This study adds to the evidence for the dominance of dietary uptake of metals in aquatic animals and identifies a key sedimentary fraction of metals that can account for bioavailability of sediment-bound metals. PMID:21481438

  9. Five Sarsiellidae ostracods (Crustacea: Myodocopida) from the South Coast of Korea (East China Sea).

    PubMed

    Karanovic, Ivana; Soh, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The East China Sea is part of the Warm Temperate Northwest Pacific zoogeographic province and, as such, has a high biodiversity and many tropical and subtropical biotic elements. Nevertheless, many invertebrate groups from this area remain poorly studied. Ostracods are one of them, especially those belonging to the subclass Myodocopa. In this paper we provide the first data on a diverse myodocopid family, Sarsiellidae, not only for the East China Sea, but also for Korea. Five species are reported in this paper from three Korean islands (Jeju, Chuja, and Maemul), and they are only a part of the ostracods collected during this study, indicating a high diversity of the group in this region. Three new species, Eurypylus koreanus sp. nov., Eusarsiella hanguk sp. nov., and Sarsiella nereis sp. nov., clearly stand apart from their respective congeners, mostly by prominent shell characters but also by details of the soft part morphology. Their affinity though clearly indicates a close connection of the region with the more southern zoogeographical realms, especially Central Indo Pacific and partly Temperate Australasia. Two species previously known from Japan (north part of the Sea of Japan and southeastern part of the Pacific Coast of Japan), Sarsiella japonica Hiruta, 1977 and S. misakiensis Kajiyama, 1912, are redescribed. Based on 11 newly obtained COI sequences we construct a preliminary phylogenetic tree, which supports previous hypotheses based on the morphological data, that Eusarsiella Cohen & Kornicker, 1975 is a polyphyletic taxon. With the maps of species distribution provided for each of the three genera, we give an overview of their current zoogeography, and clearly indicate areas that have no data, mostly due to the lack of investigation. PMID:25947749

  10. Harmonization of standard toxicity test methods used in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past two years, Environment Canada (EC) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have developed standard methods for conducting toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with freshwater, estuarine, and marine sediments. Existing ASTM methods were used as a basis to harmonize these methods for conducting testing with either field-collected or laboratory-spiked sediments. For freshwater toxicity tests, methods are described by EC and EPA for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midges Chironomus tentans and C. riparius. Endpoints include 10- to 14-d survival of growth. Methods are also described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. For estuarine and marine toxicity tests, methods are described for several amphipods (i.e., Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, Eohaustorius estuarius, Leptocheirus plumulosus). Endpoints include 10-d survival and reburial. EC is also developing methods for conducting toxicity tests with Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Canadian species of polychaetes. Methods are described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with a variety of mollusks (i.e., Macoma spp.) and polychaetes (i.e., Nereis spp.). Slight inconsistencies in methods between freshwater and estuarine/marine testing or between EC and EPA testing include: (1) static vs. flow-through conditions, (2) sieving of sediment, (3) types and quantity of food, (4) age of test organisms, or (4) duration of the test and required endpoints. Additional research is in progress to: (1) develop chronic toxicity tests with amphipods and midges measuring survival, growth, or reproduction, (2) develop whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures, (3) refine sediment spiking procedures, and (4) field-validate laboratory tests.

  11. Influence of environmental factors on abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary, Samut Sakhon province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ritnim, Nittaya; Meksumpun, Charumas

    2011-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors on the abundance and temporal variation of benthic fauna resources was studied in the eutrophic Tha Chin estuary located in Samut Sakhon province. The objectives were to analyze the status of abundance and temporal variation of the benthic fauna and to clarify the impacts from environmental factors (water and sediment quality). Field surveys were conducted monthly from August 2007 to March 2008 at 11 sampling stations in the estuary. Based on freshwater runoff volumes, the high-, medium-, and low-loading periods were categorized to be from August to October 2007, November to December 2007, and January to March 2008, respectively. The benthic fauna resources were composed of 57 species in eight phyla. Annelids were the dominant species (with the maximum density being 19,885 individuals/m2), followed by the mollusks. Both densities decreased during the low-loading period in 2008. Water quality deteriorated during the high-loading period. Land-based wastewater discharges decreased the levels of salinity and dissolved oxygen but dramatically increased various nutrients. Consequently, the sediment quality deteriorated during the medium-loading period. Bottom deposits during this time depicted high accumulation of acid volatile sulfides (more than 0.76 mg/g dry weight). Analyzing the environmental relationships, deposit feeders (for example, Nereis sp. and Prionospio sp.) and a clam (Arcuatula sp.) showed potential as bio-indicators for environmental monitoring. The overall results revealed the importance of changes in the water and sediment qualities that had an influence on related benthic resources. The increase in the level of NH4(+)-N had a negative impact on the economic clam species, while the sedimentary TOM showed positive correlation (P < 0.05) with this increase. The succession of groups based on feeding behavior seemed to correspond with stress in eutrophication along the salinity gradient and in different estuarine

  12. Sexual Satellites, Moonlight and the Nuptial Dances of Worms: the Influence of the Moon on the Reproduction of Marine Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. G.; Olive, P. J. W.; Last, K.

    The evidence that the moon has a profound effect on the timing of reproductive activities of marine animals is compelling. Some moon phase related spawning events are revealed by the constant phase relationship between the timing of ``once per year'' spawning events and the lunar phase as in the highly synchronised breeding of the palolo worm Palola viridis and the Japanese crinoid Comanthus japonicus In other cases there is a repeated lunar cycle of reproductive activity and again the marine worms provide many good examples. The breeding of the palolo worm involves the highly synchronised release of what are in effect detached sexual satellites and the timing of this has annual (solar year), lunar, daily and tidal rhythm components. In a similar way, the onset of sexual maturation and participation in the nuptial dance of Platynereis dumerilli has strong lunar components. Sexual reproduction is the culmination of a process of sexual maturation that takes many months for completion and the mechanisms by which moon phase relationships are imposed on this process must have been selected for by mechanisms relating to reproductive success. The polychaetes provide excellent models for investigation of both the selective advantage and the physiological processes involved in reproductive synchrony. We have recently shown that the spawning of the lugworm Arenicola marina has lunar components and we conclude that an interaction between solar and lunar signals is widespread in the timing of reproduction in marine animals. Carl Hauenschild was the first to demonstrate the existence of a free-running circa-lunar rhythm in marine animals using captive populations of Platynereis dumerilli His experiments also provided clear evidence for the influence of moonlight (light at night) as the zeitgeber for this rhythm. This implies a high level of sensitivity to light, and the operation of appropriate endogenous biological rhythms. Using Nereis virens we have demonstrated a high level

  13. Assessment of mercury bioavailability to benthic macroinvertebrates using diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT).

    PubMed

    Amirbahman, Aria; Massey, Delia I; Lotufo, Guilherme; Steenhaut, Nicholas; Brown, Lauren E; Biedenbach, James M; Magar, Victor S

    2013-10-01

    Mercury-specific diffusive gradient in thin films (DGTs) were used in laboratory microcosms as a biomonitoring tool to assess the lability of mercury (Hg) total and monomethylmercury Hg (MeHg), and to develop a relationship between chemical lability and bioavailability in estuarine sediments. Time-series deployment of DGTs in sediments showed that sediment-bound MeHg is more labile than sediment-bound inorganic Hg. In subsequent experiments, DGTs were deployed simultaneously with three benthic macroinvertebrates (the estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus; the estuarine polychaete, Nereis virens; and the marine clam, Macoma nasuta) in sediments for up to 55 days. All organisms and their co-deployed DGTs exhibited an initial period of rapid Hg uptake followed by slower uptake reaching apparent steady state. Strong correlative relationships were generally observed between paddle-type DGTs and macroinvertebrate tissue data (r(2) between 0.57 and 0.97). Further, %MeHg:Total Hg ratios for M. nasuta and N. virens (38.5 ± 12.2 and 19.2 ± 5.2) were similar to their corresponding ratios for the DGTs (33.1 ± 13.3 and 24.4 ± 11.0), and they were significantly higher than the same ratios for sediment (2.9 ± 0.3) and pore water (8.5 ± 4.9). The %MeHg:Total Hg ratios for L. plumulosus (68.5 ± 6.2) were significantly higher than those for the DGTs. This may be because the tissue and DGT data for this organism were not truly co-located as L. plumulosus burrows close to the sediment surface, and the DGTs sampled the sediment surface. Overall, our results suggest that for benthic macroinvertebrates in estuarine sediments studied here, (a) sediment MeHg is more bioavailable than inorganic Hg, (b) sediment and pore-water concentration measurements are not good predictors for the extent of bioaccumulation of Hg species, and (c) DGTs are an effective biomonitoring tool for the assessment of bioavailability of Hg species. PMID:24084872

  14. X-Ray Microanalytic Concentration Measurements in Unsectioned Specimens: a Technique and its Application to Zinc, Manganese, and Iron Enriched Mechanical Structures of Organisms from Three Phyla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Robert M. S.

    A method for measuring concentrations of minor elements in microscopic volumes of heterogeneous, unsectioned biological specimens using an ion microprobe is developed. The element quantity is obtained from PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and the total quantity of material is derived from STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) energy loss measurements. Sources of error, including changes in x-ray production cross section with proton energy and absorption of induced x-rays, are discussed and a method of calculating the total measurement uncertainty, typically about 25% here, is developed. The measurement accuracy is shown to be improved for symmetric specimens, and a method of using the bremsstrahlung background to correct for x-ray attenuation within irregular specimens is developed. Methods for measuring local concentrations in internal features are also discussed. With this technique, scorpions were found to contain cuticular accumulations of one or more heavy metals (manganese up to 5% of dry weight, iron up to 8%, zinc up to 24%) in the chelicera, pedipalp denticles, tarsal claws, and stingers; different region soften contained different metals. The stingers are argued to be of particular interest because they are not homologous to legs. Similar accumulations were found in spiders, some other chelicerates and crustaceans. Previous reports of manganese and zinc accumulations in insect and worm mouth parts were augmented with local concentration measurements and with the detection of other enrichment features (such as 6% iron in the paragnaths of the worm Nereis vexillosa). Zinc accumulations (up to only 0.1%) were also found in the tips of the teeth of a hagfish, Myxine + glutinosa. X-ray images of several of these features are presented. It is argued that the extreme magnitude of some concentration values suggests that some metals are incorporated in unusual biominerals rather than organically bound. Results of x-ray diffractometry and Vickers

  15. Confocal analysis of nervous system architecture in direct-developing juveniles of Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida, Nereididae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    polychaete Capitella, brain separation from a distinct epidermis occurs later in N. arenaceodentata, indicating different mechanisms of prostomial development. Our observations of parapodial innervation and the absence of lateral nerves in N. arenaceodentata are similar to a 19th century study of Alitta virens (formerly Nereis/Neanthes virens) but contrast with a more recent study that describes a single parapodial nerve pattern and lateral nerve presence in A. virens and two other genera. The latter study apparently does not account for among-nereidid variation in these major neural features. PMID:20553614

  16. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part II: Fatty acids and aldoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    The activities of sediment-dwelling fauna are known to influence the rates of and pathways through which organic matter is cycled in marine sediments, and thus to influence eventual organic carbon burial or decay. However, due to methodological constraints, the role of faunal gut passage in determining the subsequent composition and thus degradability of organic matter is relatively little studied. Previous studies of organic matter digestion by benthic fauna have been unable to detect uptake and retention of specific biochemicals in faunal tissues, and have been of durations too short to fit digestion into the context of longer-term sedimentary degradation processes. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the aldose and fatty acid compositional alterations occurring to organic matter during gut passage by the abundant and ubiquitous polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Arenicola marina, and to link these to longer-term changes typically observed during organic matter decay. This aim was approached through microcosm experiments in which selected polychaetes were fed with 13C-labelled algal detritus, and organisms, sediments, and faecal pellets were sampled at three timepoints over ∼6 weeks. Samples were analysed for their 13C-labelled aldose and fatty acid contents using GC-MS and GC-IRMS. Compound-selective net accumulation of biochemicals in polychaete tissues was observed for both aldoses and fatty acids, and the patterns of this were taxon-specific. The dominant patterns included an overall loss of glucose and polyunsaturated fatty acids; and preferential preservation or production of arabinose, microbial compounds (rhamnose, fucose and microbial fatty acids), and animal-synthesised fatty acids. These patterns may have been driven by fatty acid essentiality, preferential metabolism of glucose, and A. marina grazing on bacteria. Fatty acid suites in sediments from faunated microcosms showed greater proportions of saturated fatty acids and bacterial markers

  17. Is There Really A North American Plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krill, A.

    2011-12-01

    Lithospheric plates are typically identified from earthquake epicenters and evidence such as GPS movements. But no evidence indicates a plate boundary between the North American and South American Plates. Some plate maps show them separated by a transform boundary, but it is only a fracture zone. Other maps show an "undefined plate boundary" or put no boundary between these two plates (check Google images). Early plate maps showed a single large American Plate, quite narrow east of the Caribbean Plate (Le Pichon 1968, Morgan 1968). The North and South American Plates became established by the leading textbook Earth (Press & Siever 1974). On their map, from a Scientific American article by John Dewey (1972), these new plates were separated by an "uncertain plate boundary." The reasons for postulating a North American Plate were probably more psychological than geological. Each of the other continents of the world had its own plate, and North American geologists naturally wanted theirs. Similarly, European geographers used to view Europe as its own continent. A single large plate should again be hypothesized. But the term American Plate would now be ambiguous ("Which plate, North or South?") Perhaps future textbook authors could call it the "Two-American Plate." Textbook authors ultimately decide such global-tectonic matters. I became aware of textbook authors' opinions and influence from my research into the history of Alfred Wegener's continental drift (see Fixists vs. Mobilists by Krill 2011). Leading textbook author Charles Schuchert realized that continental drift would abolish his cherished paleogeographic models of large east-west continents (Eria, Gondwana) and small oceans (Poseiden, Nereis). He and his junior coauthors conspired to keep drift evidence out of their textbooks, from the 1934-editions until the 1969-editions (Physical Geology by Longwell et al. 1969, Historical Geology by Dunbar & Waage 1969). Their textbooks ruled in America. Textbooks

  18. Three novel cytochrome P450 genes identified in the marine polychaete Perinereis nuntia and their transcriptional response to xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senlin; Chen, Bin; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Lin, Kangli; Yu, Xingguang

    2013-06-15

    Polychaetes have previously been used as bioindicators of environmental pollution. Their ability to eliminate organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) has been extensively analyzed. However, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) genes in polychaetes, which catalyze the first step of oxidative degradation of PAHs, have received little attention. Based on the partial sequences of three CYP genes that were enriched by subtractive cDNA libraries of the polychaete Perinereis nuntia, we amplified and sequenced the full-length cDNA of these novel CYP genes. These genes were named CYP4BB2, CYP423A1 and CYP424A1 by the Cytochrome P450 Nomenclature Committee. The deduced amino acid sequence of CYP4BB2 in P. nuntia showed 68% sequence identity to CYP4BB1 in Nereis virens, and was listed as a new member of the CYP4BB subfamily. The sequence of CYP423A1 and CYP424A1 both share less than 40% sequence identity to all known CYP enzymes and were classed into new CYP families. CYP family members are composite parts of a larger group called a clan. CYP4BB2 and CYP424A1 are listed as CYP4 clan members, while CYP423A1 is of the CYP2 clan. The 3D structures of these P. nuntia CYPs were successfully predicted by homology-modeling using the SWISS-MODEL workspace. The models of CYP424A1 and CYP4BB2 were created using 1jpzB (CYP102A) as a template, while CYP423A1 utilized 3czhB (CYP2R1) as its template. The presence of characteristic CYP superfamily motifs, such as the F-G⋯C-G amino acid sequence, and the conservation of the three-dimensional CYP structure shown by the modeling, suggested that these novel P. nuntia CYP genes may contain conserved functional domains of CYP monooxygenases. To examine the effect of xenobiotics on living organisms, we analyzed the transcriptional levels of these three new CYP genes in sandworms (P. nuntia) exposed to seawater artificially contaminated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). We also exposed individuals to industrial wastewater