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Sample records for rainbow trout gills

  1. Zooplankton size selection relative to gill raker spacing in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budy, P.; Haddix, T.; Schneidervin, R.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss are one of the most widely stocked salmonids worldwide, often based on the assumption that they will effectively utilize abundant invertebrate food resources. We evaluated the potential for feeding morphology to affect prey selection by rainbow trout using a combination of laboratory feeding experiments and field observations in Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Utah-Wyoming. For rainbow trout collected from the reservoir, inter-gill raker spacing averaged 1.09 mm and there was low variation among fish overall (SD = 0.28). Ninety-seven percent of all zooplankton observed in the diets of rainbow trout collected in the reservoir were larger than the interraker spacing, while only 29% of the zooplankton found in the environment were larger than the interraker spacing. Over the size range of rainbow trout evaluated here (200-475 mm), interraker spacing increased moderately with increasing fish length; however, the size of zooplankton found in the diet did not increase with increasing fish length. In laboratory experiments, rainbow trout consumed the largest zooplankton available; the mean size of zooplankton observed in the diets was significantly larger than the mean size of zooplankton available. Electivity indices for both laboratory and field observations indicated strong selection for larger-sized zooplankton. The size threshold at which electivity switched from selection against smaller-sized zooplankton to selection for larger-sized zooplankton closely corresponded to the mean interraker spacing for both groups (???1-1.2 mm). The combination of results observed here indicates that rainbow trout morphology limits the retention of different-sized zooplankton prey and reinforces the importance of understanding how effectively rainbow trout can utilize the type and sizes of different prey available in a given system. These considerations may improve our ability to predict the potential for growth and survival of rainbow trout within and

  2. Procedures for the reconstruction, primary culture and experimental use of rainbow trout gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Sabine; Stott, Lucy C; Hogstrand, Christer; Wood, Chris M; Kelly, Scott P; Pärt, Peter; Owen, Stewart F; Bury, Nic R

    2016-03-01

    This protocol describes how to reconstruct and culture the freshwater rainbow trout gill epithelium on flat permeable membrane supports within cell culture inserts. The protocol describes gill cell isolation, cultured gill epithelium formation, maintenance, monitoring and preparation for use in experimental procedures. To produce a heterogeneous gill epithelium, as seen in vivo, seeding of isolated gill cells twice over a 2-d period is required. As a consequence, this is termed the double-seeded insert technique. Approximately 5-12 d after cell isolation and seeding, preparations develop electrically tight gill epithelia that can withstand freshwater on the apical cell surface. The system can be used to study freshwater gill physiology, and it is a humane alternative for toxicity testing, bioaccumulation studies and environmental water quality monitoring. PMID:26866792

  3. Histological evaluation of sodium percarbonate exposure on the gills of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Forwood, James M; Harris, James O; Landos, Matt; Deveney, Marty R

    2015-06-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a recurring problem in Australian rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss farms and requires strategically timed, repeat treatments for effective management. Sodium percarbonate (SPC) is permitted for use in Australia, with host safety margins based on the toxicity of acute exposures to hydrogen peroxide (HP), the active product released when SPC is added to water. The effects of exposure to HP released by SPC, of repeated doses and of doses exceeding 100 mg l-1 on rainbow trout are unknown. We exposed juvenile rainbow trout (mean weight: 30.5 ± 9 g) to repeated doses of 50, 150 and 250 mg l-1 SPC for 1 h on Days 1, 2, 7 and 8 of a treatment regime. The effect of SPC was assessed by histological evaluation of structural changes in gill tissue. Survival was 100% in all groups, but some fish exposed to 250 mg l-1 SPC displayed impaired swimming performance, and on Day 9 after the final treatment, oedema was present in 9.8% of lamella, which was significantly higher than the mean occurrence of 1.7, 4.2 and 1.3% in fish treated with 0, 50 and 150 mg l-1 SPC, respectively. These changes resolved within 24 h of the cessation of treatment. We conclude that SPC is safe to use on rainbow trout in doses of ≤150 mg l-1 at 17°C, however caution is advised at doses approaching 250 mg l-1. Water temperature, fish age, fish size and maturity, intensity of parasite infection and stocking density could alter the sensitivity of rainbow trout to SPC treatments. PMID:26036833

  4. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  5. Ibuprofen metabolism in the liver and gill of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Gomez, C F; Constantine, L; Moen, M; Vaz, A; Wang, W; Huggett, Duane B

    2011-03-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment has become an important topic of discussion with respect to pharmaceutical absorption, metabolism and elimination in fish. This study investigates the metabolism of ibuprofen by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In vitro metabolic loss of parent compound was measured in gill and liver S9 and microsomal fractions. Metabolite analysis found 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen as the major metabolite in uninduced S9 fractions. Supplementing S9 fractions with UDPGA did not significantly enhance metabolism. Additionally, assays involving the induction and inhibition of specific CYP isozymes support CYP1A2 as a possible metabolic pathway in fish. PMID:21301807

  6. Recurrent amoebic gill infestation in rainbow trout cultured in a semiclosed water recirculation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, A.C.; Herman, R.L.; Noga, E.J.; Bullock, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Five lots of commercially purchased juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (17-44 g) stocked in a continuous-production water recirculation system became infested with gilt amoebae. The amoebae were introduced into the recirculation system, as evidenced by their presence on gills of fish held in quarantine tanks. Based on their morphology, as seen in histological sections and by electron microscopy, the amoebae appeared to be more closely related to the family Cochliopodiidae than to other taxa of free living amoebae. Attempts to culture the amoebae in different media, at different temperatures of incubation, and in fish cell culture were not successful. Initial treatment of the recirculation system with formalin at 167 parts per million (ppm) for 1 h eliminated amoebae from the gills. Subsequent treatments of the entire system with formalin at 50-167 ppm reduced the intensity of further infestations.

  7. Effects of hypoxia on isolated vessels and perfused gills of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P; Russell, M J; Wincko, J T; Olson, K R

    2001-08-01

    Local hypoxia dilates systemic and constricts pulmonary blood vessels in mammals without neural or humoral involvement. The direct effects of hypoxia on isolated vessels from bony fish have not been examined. In the present study, isolated vessels (efferent branchial artery, EBA; coeliacomesenteric artery, CMA; ventral aorta, VA; and anterior cardinal vein, ACV) from rainbow or steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were subjected to either passive load (resting tension) or contracted with a ligand or 50 mM KCl and then subjected to 60 min of hypoxia by N(2) administration and an additional 30 min of normoxia. All vessels were usually refractory to hypoxia under conditions of resting tension. EBAs, CMAs and VAs pre-contracted with a receptor-mediated ligand were all significantly relaxed by hypoxia and only VAs recovered significantly upon subsequent restoration of normoxia. In contrast, tension in all arteries pre-contracted with 50 mM KCl was elevated further in response to hypoxia. Conversely, ligand-contracted ACVs responded to hypoxia with a further increase in tension, whereas KCl-contracted ACVs relaxed. During apparently random 2-3-week periods EBA and CMA from steelhead and EBA from rainbow trout were hyper-reactive to hypoxia. Steelhead vessels responded to hypoxia with a rapid contraction that increased in magnitude over 3 days. These contractions were independent of pre-stimulation and they were dose-dependent upon PO(2). In isolated gills, hypoxic perfusate produced an immediate but transient elevation of resistance (R(GILL)) in all four gill arches. R(GILL) increased by as much as 30% of initial values and this response was unaltered upon a second hypoxic exposure. These studies demonstrate that isolated vascular segments of rainbow trout are indeed responsive to hypoxia and that these differential responses are vessel and tone dependent and the overall response may be altered by as yet unknown seasonal or environmental factors. Hypoxia

  8. Xenobiotic and steroid biotransformation activities in rainbow trout gill epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Leguen; Carlsson; Perdu-Durand; Prunet; Pärt; Cravedi

    2000-03-01

    The biotransformation of xenobiotics and steroids was investigated in cultured respiratory epithelial cells from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gills. As a first approach, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), chosen as a marker of CYP1A activity, was measured in monolayers of adherent cells. The induction of this enzyme was studied in cells exposed to beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-12) M. After 24 h, TCDD showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-9) M while BNF showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Concurrently, a variety of substrates involved in cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism as well as phase II reactions, namely ethoxycoumarin, aniline and testosterone were incubated with cultured gill cells for 2 or 8 h and with freshly isolated hepatocytes for comparison. Our results revealed a significant cytochrome P450-dependent activity in gill cells with ethoxycoumarin and aniline, but no hydroxylation was observed with testosterone as substrate. No trace of sulfate conjugate was detected. With 2.5 µM aniline as substrate, 2-hydroxyaniline accounted for 32.1% of the radioactivity after 2 h incubation whereas acetanilide amounted to 6.4%. Significant differences were found between gill cells and isolated hepatocytes in the capacity of these systems to conduct oxidative and conjugating metabolic pathways. Qualitatively, the main difference was observed for testosterone which is hydroxylated in position 6beta and 16beta and conjugated to glucuronic acid in liver cells, whereas reductive biotransformation giving rise to dihydrotestosterone and androstanediol and traces of androstenedione were observed in gill cells. Quantitatively, the biotransformation activity in gill epithelial cells, expressed as pmol/h per mg protein, was between 1.5 and 14% of the activity level observed in isolated hepatocytes, depending on the substrate. PMID:10686323

  9. Apoptotic effects and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase responses in liver and gill tissues of rainbow trout treated with chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ahmet; Atamanalp, Muhammed; Oruç, Ertan; Kırıcı, Muammer; Kocaman, Esat Mahmut

    2014-12-01

    We investigated apoptotic effects and changes in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity in liver and gill tissues of fish exposed to chlorpyrifos. Three different chlorpyrifos doses (2.25, 4.5 and 6.75 μg/L) were administrated to rainbow trout at different time intervals (24, 48, 72 and 96 h). Acute exposure to chlorpyrifos showed time dependent decrease in G6PD enzyme activity at all concentrations (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical results showed that chlorpyrifos caused mucous cell loss in gill tissue and apoptosis via caspase-3 activation in fish. The present study suggested that chlorpyrifos inhibits G6PD enzyme and causes mucous cell loss in gill and apoptosis in gill and liver tissues. PMID:25438950

  10. Testate amoeba Rhogostoma minus Belar, 1921, associated with nodular gill disease of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Dyková, I; Tyml, T

    2016-05-01

    The case study targeted to determine the aetiology of nodular gill disease (NGD) of farmed rainbow trout. The methods included microscopical examination of gill material in fresh, culturing of isolated organisms, histology, transmission electron microscopy and molecular biology identification. The results revealed an intravital colonization of fish gills by the testate amoeba Rhogostoma minus Belar, 1921. Rhogostoma infection was found in all fish examined microscopically (15/15); in contrast, naked amoebae related to fully developed NGD lesions were found in minority of these fish (5/15). They belonged to four genera, Acanthamoeba, Vermamoeba, Naegleria and Vannella. Results presented in this study contribute to the mosaic of findings that contrary to amoebic gill disease of marine fish turn attention to the possibility of the heterogeneous, multi-amoeba-species and multifactorial aetiology of NGD. PMID:25952929

  11. Flavobacterium branchiophilum and F. succinicans associated with bacterial gill disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raised rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS), and manipulated environmental conditions to promote bacterial gill disease (BGD). For each episode of BGD, gill tissue was sampling from affected fish, unaffected fish within the same WRAS, and...

  12. Sodium efflux and potential differences across the irrigated gill of sea water-adapted rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Greenwald, L; Kirschner, L B; Sanders, M

    1974-08-01

    Sodium extrusion (J(out) (Na)) was measured across the gills of rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, adapted to sea water (SW) using a gill-irrigation system of small volume. The potential difference (TEP) was also measured under similar conditions. J(out) (Na) was usually between 100-250 microeq (100 g)(-1) h(-1), about an order of magnitude faster than in fresh water (FW)-adapted trout, but slower than has been reported for any other marine teleost. The TEP was between 10-11 mV, body fluids positive to SW. When the external medium was changed from SW to FW J(out) (Na) was reduced to about 25 % of the initial value, and the TEP was reduced by 40-50 mV (i.e. body fluids negative by 30-40 mV). Addition of either Na(+) or K(+) in SW concentrations reversed the changes; J(out) (Na) increased and the gill repolarized. The electrical behavior and sodium efflux in irrigated trout gill is qualitatively the same as has been reported for unanaesthetized, free-swimming fish of other species. Thus, the irrigated gill provides an adequate model for studying the mechanism of sodium extrusion in marine teleosts. PMID:4846763

  13. Temporary protection of rainbow trout gill epithelial cells from infection with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus IVb.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussinee, L; Pham, P H; Russell, S; Tubbs, L; Tafalla, C; Bols, N C; Dixon, B; Lumsden, J S

    2016-09-01

    The branchial epithelium is not only a primary route of entry for viral pathogens, but is also a site of viral replication and subsequent shedding may also occur from the gill epithelium. This study investigated the potential of agents known to stimulate innate immunity to protect rainbow trout epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) from infection with VHSV IVb. RTgill-W1 cells were pretreated with poly I:C, FuGENE(®) HD + poly I:C, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS + poly I:C or heat-killed VHSV IVb and then infected with VHSV IVb 4 days later. Cytopathic effect (CPE) was determined at 2, 3, 4, 7 and 11 days post-infection. Virus in cells and supernatant was detected using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). All of the treatments delayed the onset of CPE (per cent of monolayer destruction), compared with untreated controls; however, killed VHSV or poly I:C combined with LPS was the most effective. Similarly, the detection of viral RNA in the supernatant was delayed, and the quantity was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by all treatments with the exception of LPS alone (4 days). Unlike many of the other treatments, pretreatment of RTgill-W1 with heat-killed VHSV did not upregulate interferon 1, 2 or MX 1 gene expression. PMID:26850791

  14. The effects of soft-water acclimation on gill structure in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Greco, A M; Fenwick, J C; Perry, S F

    1996-07-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to ion-poor (soft) water to test the hypothesis that naturally induced proliferation of branchial chloride cells causes a thickening of the blood-to-water diffusion barrier. This was achieved by using a combination of scanning and transmission electron-microscopic techniques. Fish were exposed to soft-water conditions ([Na+]= 0.055 mmol l-1, [Cl-] approximately 0.029 mmol 1(-1), [Ca2+] approximately 0.059 mmol 1(-1), and [K+] approximately 0.007 mmol 1(-1)) for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Marked chloride cell proliferation was evident at all sampling times with an approximate doubling of the gill epithelial surface area covered by chloride cells exposed to the water ("chloride cell fractional area"). The increases in chloride cell fractional area resulted from both increased numbers of cells and expanded apical surfaces of exposed individual cells. As a result of chloride cell proliferation, soft-water exposure was associated with a doubling of the lamellar blood-to-water diffusion distance from 3.26+/-0.08 microM to 6.58+/-0.43 microM as determined from transmission electron micrographs. These data demonstrated a positive correlation between chloride cell fractional area and blood-to-water diffusion distance. We conclude that, in trout, chloride cell proliferation during soft-water exposure, while presumably benefiting ionic regulation, may impair gas transfer owing to the associated thickening of the blood-to-water diffusion barrier. PMID:8766860

  15. Natural Mineral Particles Are Cytotoxic to Rainbow Trout Gill Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Capitani, Christian; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Pietsch, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide increases in fluvial fine sediment are a threat to aquatic animal health. Fluvial fine sediment is always a mixture of particles whose mineralogical composition differs depending on the sediment source and catchment area geology. Nonetheless, whether particle impact in aquatic organisms differs between mineral species remains to be investigated. This study applied an in vitro approach to evaluate cytotoxicity and uptake of four common fluvial mineral particles (quartz, feldspar, mica, and kaolin; concentrations: 10, 50, 250 mg L−1) in the rainbow trout epithelial gill cell line RTgill-W1. Cells were exposed for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Cytotoxicity assays for cell membrane integrity (propidium iodide assay), oxidative stress (H2DCF-DA assay), and metabolic activity (MTT assay) were applied. These assays were complemented with cell counts and transmission electron microscopy. Regardless of mineral species, particles ≤2 µm in diameter were taken up by the cells, suggesting that particles of all mineral species came into contact and interacted with the cells. Not all particles, however, caused strong cytotoxicity: Among all assays the tectosilicates quartz and feldspar caused sporadic maximum changes of 0.8–1.2-fold compared to controls. In contrast, cytotoxicity of the clay particles was distinctly stronger and even differed between the two particle types: mica induced concentration-dependent increases in free radicals, with consistent 1.6–1.8-fold-changes at the 250 mg L−1 concentration, and a dilated endoplasmic reticulum. Kaolin caused concentration-dependent increases in cell membrane damage, with consistent 1.3–1.6-fold increases at the 250 mg L−1 concentration. All effects occurred in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Cell numbers per se were marginally affected. Results indicate that (i.) natural mineral particles can be cytotoxic to gill epithelial cells, (ii.) their cytotoxic potential differs between mineral species

  16. Effects of didecyldimethylammonium chloride on the biochemistry, swimming performance, gill histology and disease resistance of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.D.; Wood, A.W.; Farrell, A.P.; Kennedy, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The acute lethal and sublethal toxicity of the antisapstain didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was investigated. The 96-h LC{sub 50} value in a flow-through exposure system was 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were significantly elevated after an acute 24-h exposure to 0.4 mg-1{sup {minus}1}. Values for hepato-somatic index (HSI), haematocit, leucocrit, plasma haemoglobin, and liver glycogen remained unchanged. Swimming performance decreased significantly after exposure to 0.2 mg-1{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h and 24-h and to 0.4 mg{sup {minus}1} for exposure durations of 12-h, 24-h, and 48-h. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed no gross lesions in gill epithelia as a result of toxicant exposure. In disease challenge experiments, exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDAC for 24-h did not effect the susceptibility of rainbow trout to the pathogen Vibrio anguilarum. Of a suite of toxicity tests, specific biochemical markers were unsatisfactory in revealing sublethal toxic effects. These were best revealed by an integrative measure of performance, namely swimming performance, but not disease resistance.

  17. Apolipoprotein AI could be a significant determinant of epithelial integrity in rainbow trout gill cell cultures: a study in functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Wood, Chris M; Cash, Phil; Diao, Linda; Pärt, Peter

    2005-05-20

    The freshwater fish gill forms a barrier against an external hypotonic environment. By culturing rainbow trout gill cells on permeable supports, as intact epithelia, this study investigates barrier property mechanisms. Under symmetrical conditions the apical and basolateral epithelial surfaces contact cell culture media. Replacing apical media with water, to generate asymmetrical conditions (i.e. the situation encountered by the freshwater gill), rapidly increases transepithelial resistance (TER). Proteomic analysis revealed that this is associated with enhanced expression of pre-apolipoprotein AI (pre-apoAI). To test the physiological relevance, gill cells were treated with a dose of 50 microg ml(-1) human apolipoprotein (apoAI). This was found to elevate TER in those epithelia which displayed a lower TER prior to apoAI treatment. These results demonstrate the action of apoAI and provide evidence that the rainbow trout gill may be a site of apoAI synthesis. TER does not differentiate between the trans-cellular (via the cell membrane) and para-cellular (via intercellular tight junctions) pathways. However, despite the apoAI-induced changes in TER, para-cellular permeability (measured by polyethylene glycol efflux) remained unaltered suggesting apoAI specifically reduces trans-cellular permeability. This investigation combines proteomics with functional measurements to show how a proteome change may be associated with freshwater gill function. PMID:15848139

  18. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENYLGLUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT GILL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG), a primary phase II metabolite of phenol, can be excreted by fish through urine and feces, similar to mammals. In addition, it may also be possible to eliminate it through a fish's gills. In order to assess the significance of gill water elimination, analyt...

  19. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Campos-Perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram-positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund's incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  20. The gills are an important site of iNOS expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after challenge with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    PubMed Central

    Campos‐perez, J J; Ward, M; Grabowski, P S; Ellis, A E; Secombes, C J

    2000-01-01

    Following injection challenge of rainbow trout with the Gram‐positive pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum, serum nitrate levels increased indicative of NO production. The timing and amount of nitrate produced varied with the virulence of the bacterial strain used, with the highest levels seen in fish challenged with the most virulent (autoaggregating) strain. Immunization with a killed R. salmoninarum preparation in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant significantly increased nitrate levels after challenge. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) transcript expression was detectable in rainbow trout tissues after injection challenge with R. salmoninarum, and its induction in the gills was both quick (between 3 and 6 hr) and relatively prolonged (lasting several days). iNOS expression in the kidney was also seen at a later stage (24 hr) but appeared to switch off relatively rapidly. Bath challenge with R. salmoninarum also induced iNOS expression in gill, and a variable expression in the gut and kidney also occurred. These results highlight the importance of the gills, not only as a point of entry of pathogens but also as a tissue capable of mounting an immune response. PMID:10651954

  1. Cortisol affects tight junction morphology between pavement cells of rainbow trout gills in single-seeded insert culture.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Farkas, Julia; Salvenmoser, Willi; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    A primary culture system of rainbow trout gill pavement cells grown on permeable support (single-seeded insert, SSI) was used to examine histological and physiological changes induced by the addition of the corticosteroid hormone cortisol. Pavement cell epithelia were cultured under symmetrical conditions (L15 apical/L15 basolateral) and developed a high transepithelial resistance (TER, 6.84 ± 1.99 kΩ cm(2), mean ± SEM) with a low phenol red diffusion rate (PRD, 0.15 ± 0.03 μmol l(-1)/day). Addition of cortisol to the basolateral compartment increased TER twofold and reduced PRD threefold over a 5-day period. A similar increase in TER could be seen after 24 h apical freshwater (FW) in control cultures. In cortisol-treated cultures FW exposure did not change TER, but PRD increased significantly. Histochemical staining of the cytoskeleton of cells in SSI culture revealed a morphological partitioning into a single mucosal layer of polarized, polygonal cells featuring cortical F-actin rings which were comparable to F-actin rings of epithelial cells on the lamellar and filamental surface, and several unorganized serosal layers of cells with F-actin stress fibers. Addition of cortisol increased cell density by 18% and in the mucosal layer it led to smaller, less polygonal cells with increased height and increased cell contact area. In transmission electron microscopic images two pairs of cytoplasmatic electron-dense structures confining the zonula occludens apically and basally toward the zonula adhaerens were found. Addition of cortisol increased the distance between those paired structures, hence led to deeper tight junctions. The cortisol-induced increase in barrier properties, therefore, involves a structural fortification of the tight junctions which was not generally modified by a short 24-h apical freshwater stress. These results identify cortisol as a regulator of tight junction morphology between pavement cells of euryhaline fish such as the

  2. What is the primary function of the early teleost gill? Evidence for Na+/NH+4 exchange in developing rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Alex M.; Wright, Patricia A.; Wood, Chris M.

    2014-01-01

    Post-hatch fishes lack a functional gill and use cutaneous surfaces for exchange with the surrounding environment. The ionoregulatory hypothesis posits that ionoregulation is the first physiological process to be limited by cutaneous exchange, necessitating its shift to the gills. We hypothesized that the ontogeny of branchial ammonia excretion (Jamm) is coupled to Na+ uptake () in accordance with the current model for exchange in freshwater. Using divided chambers, branchial and cutaneous Jamm, and oxygen consumption (MO2) by larval rainbow trout were assessed. Following hatch, the skin accounted for 97% and 86% of total Jamm and , respectively. Jamm and shifted to the gills simultaneously at 15 days post-hatch (dph) and were highly correlated (R2 = 0.951) at the gills, but not the skin, over development. Contrastingly, MO2 shifted significantly later at 27 dph, in agreement with the ionoregulatory hypothesis. Moreover, the mRNA expression and/or enzymatic activity of Rhesus proteins, Na+/H+-exchanger, H+-ATPase, Na+/K+-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase, all key components of the -exchange system, increased in the gills over larval development. We propose that the ontogeny of branchial occurs as exchange and provide evidence for a novel element to the ionoregulatory hypothesis, the excretion of potentially lethal metabolic ammonia. PMID:25274361

  3. In vivo changes in carbonic anhydrase activity and histopathology of gill and liver tissues after acute exposure to chlorpyrifos in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Topal, Ahmet; Atamanalp, Muhammed; Oruç, Ertan; Demir, Yeliz; Beydemir, Şükrü; Işık, Alparslan

    2014-12-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate pesticide widely used in agriculture and aquaculture. This study investigated its effects on carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme activity and histopathology of rainbow trout gill and liver. The fish were exposed to 2.25 (25% of 96 h LC50), 4.5 (50% of 96 h LC50), and 6.75 μg L⁻¹ (75% of 96 h LC50) of chlorpyrifos for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. CA activity was measured in liver and gills and histopathological changes were examined by light microscopy. The most common liver changes at most of the chlorpyrifos concentrations were hyperaemia and degenerative changes. Gill tissues were characterised by lamellar hyperaemia, lamellar oedemas, clumping, cellular degeneration, hyperplasia, and lamellar atrophy. CA enzyme activity in the gills decreased at all concentrations at 48, 72, and 96 h after exposure to chlorpyrifos (p<0.05). Similarly, there was a time-dependent decrease in CA activity at all of the concentrations in liver tissues (p<0.05). The present study indicated that chlorpyrifos inhibits CA enzyme activity and causes histopathological damage in gill and liver tissues. PMID:25720025

  4. An epizootic among rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1953-01-01

    An epizootic among rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) in a private trout farm, resulting from a species of Ichthyosporidium that caused very high mortality rates in all ages of trout, reported from the State of Washington.

  5. Measurement of total Zn and Zn isotope ratios by quadrupole ICP-MS for evaluation of Zn uptake in gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.E.; Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential use of stable zinc isotopes in toxicity studies measuring zinc uptake by the gills of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The use of stable isotopes in such studies has several advantages over the use of radioisotopes, including cost, ease of handling, elimination of permit requirements, and waste disposal. A pilot study using brown trout was performed to evaluate sample preparation methods and the ability of a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) system to successfully measure changes in the 67Zn/66Zn ratios for planned exposure levels and duration. After completion of the pilot study, a full-scale zinc exposure study using rainbow trout was performed. The results of these studies indicate that there are several factors that affect the precision of the measured 67Zn/66Zn ratios in the sample digests, including variations in sample size, endogenous zinc levels, and zinc uptake rates by individual fish. However, since these factors were incorporated in the calculation of the total zinc accumulated by the gills during the exposures, the data obtained were adequate for their intended use in calculating zinc binding and evaluating the influences of differences in water quality parameters.

  6. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  7. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Wolf, R.E.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (???140 mg/L as CaCO 3) and soft water (???30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1,000 ??g/L) and soft water (0-250 ??g/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 ??g/L) and soft water (110 ??g/L). Following short-term (???3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 ??g/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LC50s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 ??g/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s). ?? 2009 SETAC.

  8. Tissue carboxylesterase activity of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Charron, K.A.; Stott, W.T.; Duvall, S.E.

    1999-11-01

    The activity of carboxylesterase (CaE), a class of nonspecific serine hydrolases, was evaluated in vitro in tissues and microsomes of rainbow trout and compared to esterase activity in rats, other fish species, and embryo to adult life stages of trout. Trout gill and liver microsomes exhibited substantial CaE activity and limited variation over the range of 2 to 40 C, with a temperature optimum of approximately 22 C. Trout sera and rat liver microsomes exhibited a temperature optimum of approximately 35 to 40 C. The CaE of trout liver (maximum reaction rate [V{sub max}] = 672 nmol/min/mg microsomal protein) was four times less than in rats. Apparent Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) values ranged from 28 (trout liver) to 214 (trout sera) {micro}M. Values of V{sub max}/K{sub m} suggested that in vivo CaE activity of trout liver would be about three times higher than serum, 135 times higher than gill, and three times lower than rat liver. The CaE activity in whole rainbow trout homogenates significantly increased 300% per gram of tissue to 1,200% per milligram of protein between the yolk-sac and juvenile stages. The CaE activity of whole fish homogenates was not significantly different in juvenile rainbow trout, channel catfish, fathead minnows, and bluegill. The results demonstrate that rainbow trout had high esterase activity over a broad range of temperatures, the CaE activity significantly increased between the yolk-sac and juvenile life stages, and that variation between the CaE activity in trout and three other families of freshwater fish was limited. The CaE activity in fish is expected to substantially influence the accumulation and toxicity of pesticides and other esters entering the aquatic environment.

  9. Development of the microsporidian parasite, Loma salmonae, in a rainbow trout gill epithelial cell line (RTG-1): evidence of xenoma development in vitro.

    PubMed

    McConnachie, S H; Sheppard, J; Wright, G M; Speare, D J

    2015-02-01

    Growth and propagation of fish-infecting microsporidians within cell culture has been more difficult to achieve than for insect- and human-infecting microsporidians. Fish microsporidia tend to elicit xenoma development rather than diffuse growth in vivo, and this process likely increases host specificity. We present evidence that the fish microsporidian, Loma salmonae, has the capacity to develop xenomas within a rainbow trout gill epithelial cell line (RTG-1). Spore numbers increased over a 4 weeks period within cell culture flasks. Xenoma-like structures were observed using phase contrast microscopy, and then confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Optimization of the L. salmonae-RTG-1 cell model has important implications in elucidating the process of xenoma development induced by microsporidian parasites. PMID:25434457

  10. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. PMID:24240104

  11. Interactive effects of waterborne metals in binary mixtures on short-term gill-metal binding and ion uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Som; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Metal binding to fish gills forms the basis of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach, which has emerged as a useful tool for conducting site-specific water quality assessments for metals. The current BLMs are designed to assess the toxicity of individual metals, and cannot account for the interactive effects of metal mixtures to aquatic organisms including fish. The present study was designed mainly to examine the interactive effects of waterborne metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Ni) in specific binary combinations on short-term (3h) gill-metal binding and essential ion (Ca(2+) and Na(+)) uptake (a physiological index of toxicity) in fish, using juvenile freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as the model species. We hypothesized that binary mixtures of metals that share a common mode of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Zn - Ca(2+) antagonists, Cu and Ag - Na(+) antagonists) would reduce the gill binding of each other via competitive interactions and induce less than additive effects on ion transport. In addition, the mixture of metals that have different modes of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Cu, or Cd and Ni) would not exhibit any interactive effects either on gill-metal binding or ion transport. We found that both Zn and Cu reduced gill-Cd binding and vice versa, however, Ni did not influence gill-Cd binding in fish. Surprisingly, Ag was found to stimulate gill-Cu binding especially at high exposure concentrations, whereas, Cu had no effect on gill-Ag binding. The inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn in mixture on branchial Ca(2+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cd or Zn alone. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Cu and Ag in mixture on branchial Na(+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cu or Ag alone. The inhibitory effects of Cd and Zn mixture on Ca(2+) uptake as well as Cu and Ag mixture on Na(+) uptake were found to follow the principles of simple additivity. In contrast, no significant additive effect on either Ca(2+) or Na

  12. On the mechanism of sodium extrusion across the irrigated gill of sea water-adapted rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L B; Greenwald, L; Sanders, M

    1974-08-01

    Sodium efflux (J(out) (Na)) across the irrigated trout gill was rapid in sea water (SW), but only about 25 % as large in fresh water (FW). The difference correlated with a change in the potential difference across the gill (TEP). The latter was about +10 mV (blood positive) in SW, but -40 mV in FW. Both flux and electrical data indicated that gills in this fish are permeable to a variety of cations including Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), choline, and Tris. They are less permeable to anions; P(Na):P(K):P(Cl) was estimated to be 1:10:0.3, and P(Cl) > P(gluconate). The TEP was shown to be a diffusion potential determined by these permeabilities and the extant ionic gradients in SW, FW as well as in other media. J(out) (Na) appeared to be diffusive in all of the experiments undertaken. Exchange diffusion need not be posited, and the question of whether there is an active component remains open. PMID:4846764

  13. Claudin 28b and F-actin are involved in rainbow trout gill pavement cell tight junction remodeling under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Egg, Margit; Schwerte, Thorsten; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-05-01

    Permeability of rainbow trout gill pavement cells cultured on permeable supports (single seeded inserts) changes upon exposure to freshwater or treatment with cortisol. The molecular components of this change are largely unknown, but tight junctions that regulate the paracellular pathway are prime candidates in this adaptational process. Using differential display polymerase chain reaction we found a set of 17 differentially regulated genes in trout pavement cells that had been exposed to freshwater apically for 24 h. Five genes were related to the cell-cell contact. One of these genes was isolated and identified as encoding claudin 28b, an integral component of the tight junction. Immunohistochemical reactivity to claudin 28b protein was concentrated in a circumferential ring colocalized to the cortical F-actin ring. To study the contribution of this isoform to changes in transepithelial resistance and Phenol Red diffusion under apical hypo-or hyperosmotic exposure we quantified the fluorescence signal of this claudin isoform in immunohistochemical stainings together with the fluorescence of phalloidin-probed F-actin. Upon hypo-osmotic stress claudin 28b fluorescence and epithelial tightness remained stable. Under hyperosmotic stress, the presence of claudin 28b at the junction significantly decreased, and epithelial tightness was severely reduced. Cortical F-actin fluorescence increased upon hypo-osmotic stress, whereas hyperosmotic stress led to a separation of cortical F-actin rings and the number of apical crypt-like pores increased. Addition of cortisol to the basolateral medium attenuated cortical F-actin separation and pore formation during hyperosmotic stress and reduced claudin 28b in junctions except after recovery of cells from exposure to freshwater. Our results showed that short-term salinity stress response in cultured trout gill cells was dependent on a dynamic remodeling of tight junctions, which involves claudin 28b and the supporting F-actin ring

  14. Effects of natural organic matter source on reducing metal toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and on metal binding to their gills.

    PubMed

    Richards, J G; Curtis, P J; Burnison, B K; Playle, R C

    2001-06-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 3 g) were exposed for 74 h in ion-poor (soft) water to a mixed-metal solution in the presence of 4, 6, and 10 mg C/L natural organic matter (NOM). The metals were 0.2 microM Pb, 0.1 microM Hg, 0.1 microM Cd, 1.3 microM Cu, 0.05 microM Ag, and 3.5 microM Co, and the natural organic matter was isolated by reverse osmosis from three sources in southern Ontario, Canada. The six-metal solution alone was extremely toxic to the fish. Increasing concentrations of each NOM increased trout survival, but the NOM having the most allochthonous properties (from Luther Marsh) increased fish survival most, while the NOM having the most autochthonous properties (from Sanctuary Pond, Point Pelee) increased fish survival least. This pattern was reflected in the degree of reduction of Pb and Cu accumulation by the gills. Relatively simple chemical characterization of NOM, such as protein-to-carbohydrate ratios, or optical characterization, such as absorbance-to-fluorescence ratios (e.g., representing aromaticity), may adequately reflect these biologically relevant differences in organic matter quality. PMID:11392125

  15. Phthalate biotransformation by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Hayton, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    The biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was studied in rainbow trout because DEHP bioconcentration is limited by metabolism. Biological fluids were collected following intravascular administration. Methylesterified metabolites were identified using rodent-derived standards and nonlinear gradient elution HPLC; metabolites were confirmed by gas chromatography. Similarities between the biotransformation of DEHP by rainbow trout and mammalian species included: (1) mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) appeared to be the obligatory first step in DEHP metabolism; (2) the phthalate ring was not oxidized; (3) phthalic acid was a minor metabolite; and (4) several metabolites contained multiple oxidations of the 2-ethylhexyl moiety of MEHP. No metabolites unique to rainbow trout were identified. However, fewer oxidized metabolites were identified in rainbow trout than in mammalian species, possibly due to limited mitochondrial metabolism of MEHP in rainbow trout. The amount of biliary MEHP glucuronide after intravascular administration of DEHP was substantially less than reported in rainbow trout exposed to DEHP via the water. The results confirmed that DEHP metabolism in rainbow trout proceeds by initial rapid formation of MEHP, followed by excretion or extensive oxidation by microsomal P450.

  16. Strain variability in fatty acid composition of Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) and its relation to differing ichthyotoxicity toward rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Nichols, Peter D; David Waite, Trevor; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M

    2013-04-01

    Lipid profiles of three strains (Mexico, Australia, Japan) of Chattonella marina (Subrahmanyan) Hara et Chihara were studied under defined growth (phosphate, light, and growth phase) and harvest (intact and ruptured cells) conditions. Triacylglycerol levels were always <2%, sterols <7%, free fatty acids varied between 2 and 33%, and polar lipids were the most abundant lipid class (>51% of total lipids). The major fatty acids in C. marina were palmitic (16:0), eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5ω3), octadecatetraenoic (18:4ω3), myristic (14:0), and palmitoleic (16:1ω7c) acids. Higher levels of EPA were found in ruptured cells (21.4-29.4%) compared to intact cells (8.5-25.3%). In general, Japanese N-118 C. marina was the highest producer of EPA (14.3-29.4%), and Mexican CMCV-1 the lowest producer (7.9-27.1%). Algal cultures, free fatty acids from C. marina, and the two aldehydes 2E,4E-decadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal (suspected fatty acid-derived products) were tested against the rainbow trout fish gill cell line RTgill-W1. The configuration of fatty acids plays an important role in ichthyotoxicity. Free fatty acid fractions, obtained by base saponification of total lipids from C. marina showed a potent toxicity toward gill cells (median lethal concentration, LC50 (at 1 h) of 0.44 μg · mL(-1) in light conditions, with a complete loss of viability at >3.2 μg · mL(-1) ). Live cultures of Mexican C. marina were less toxic than Japanese and Australian strains. This difference could be related to differing EPA content, superoxide anion production, and cell fragility. The aldehydes 2E,4E-decadienal and 2E,4E-heptadienal also showed high impact on gill cell viability, with LC50 (at 1 h) of 0.34 and 0.36 μg · mL(-1) , respectively. Superoxide anion production was highest in Australian strain CMPL01, followed by Japanese N-118 and Mexican CMCV-1 strains. Ruptured cells showed higher production of superoxide anion compared to intact cells (e.g., 19 vs. 9.5

  17. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  18. Characterization of p53 expression in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Liu, Michelle; Tee, Catherine; Zeng, Fanxing; Sherry, James P; Dixon, Brian; Bols, Niels C; Duncker, Bernard P

    2011-11-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a critical component of cell cycle checkpoint responses. It upregulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in response to DNA damage and other cellular perturbations, and promotes apoptosis when DNA repair pathways are overwhelmed. Given the high incidence of p53 mutations in human cancers, it has been extensively studied, though only a small fraction of these investigations have been in non-mammalian systems. For the present study, an anti-rainbow trout p53 polyclonal antibody was generated. A variety of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissues and cell lines were examined through western blot analysis of cellular protein extracts, which revealed relatively high p53 levels in brain and gills. To evaluate the checkpoint response of rainbow trout p53, RTbrain-W1 and RTgill-W1 cell lines were exposed to varying concentrations of the DNA damaging agent bleomycin and ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea. In contrast to mammals, these checkpoint-inducing agents provoked no apparent increase in rainbow trout p53 levels. These results infer the presence of alternate DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in rainbow trout cells. PMID:21767662

  19. Rainbow Trout Innate Immunity against Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum infection is associated with significant loss of rainbow trout production in the U.S. and other parts of the world. In 2005, a selective breeding program was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture to improve rainbow trout innate resistance ...

  20. Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rachel L; Hansen, Adam G; Chan, Maia M; Sanders, George E

    2014-01-01

    A colony of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a decentralized aquatic animal facility was noted to have an increase in morbidity and mortality (from 4 or 5 fish each month to 3 or 4 fish daily) approximately 2 wk after experimental procedures began. The primary clinical signs were erratic swimming behavior and ‘flashing’ of fish against surfaces within housing enclosures. Moribund and normal rainbow trout were presented alive for diagnostic evaluation; samples of water from housing enclosures were provided for water quality assessment. The trout were determined to be infected with gyrodactylids, a common monogenean ectoparasite of the skin and gills in both marine and freshwater fish. This case report describes the diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of gyrodactylids and husbandry modifications associated with the resolution of this clinical aquatic-animal case. PMID:24411786

  1. ABSORPTION DYNAMICS OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT ACROSS TROUT GILLS AS RELATED TO OCTANOL-WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vivo fish preparation was used that allowed a direct measure of the transport rates of 14 different organic chemicals across the gills of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). The chemicals, all 14C labeled, were selected from five classes, encompassing a range of octanol-water ...

  2. CHRONIC TOXICITY OF AMMONIA OF RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of ammonia to rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri were studied in a laboratory test conducted over a 5-year period. Fish were tested at five concentrations over the range 0.01-0.07 mg/liter un-ionized ammonia; the mean pH of the test water was 7.7, and the mean temp...

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance capabilities for genetic analyses in rainbow trout, a large suite of polymorphic markers that are amenable to high-throughput genotyping protocols must be developed. However, the evolutionarily recent whole genome duplication event complicates the use of standard approaches in the discove...

  4. ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity of ammonia to hatchery-reared rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri was measured in 86 flow-through tests, 96 hours to 35 days long. Fish ranged in age from 1-day-old fry (<0.1 g) to 4-year-old adults (2.6 kg). The 96-hour median lethal concentrations (96-hour LC50) ra...

  5. Evaluation of three gears for sampling spawning populations of rainbow trout in a large Alaskan river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwanke, C.J.; Hubert, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Alternatives to electrofishing are needed for sampling sexually mature rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss during the spawning season in large Alaskan rivers. We compared hook and line, beach seining, and actively fished gill nets as sampling tools. Beach seining and active gill netting yielded similar catch rates, length frequencies, and sex ratios of sexually mature fish. Hook-and-line sampling was less effective, with a lower catch rate and selectivity for immature fish and sexually mature females. We conclude that both beach seining and active gill netting can serve as alternatives to electrofishing for sampling sexually mature rainbow trout stocks during the spawning season in large rivers with stable spring flows and spawning areas with few snags.

  6. Acid-sensing ion channels are involved in epithelial Na+ uptake in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Dymowska, Agnieszka K.; Schultz, Aaron G.; Blair, Salvatore D.; Chamot, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    A role for acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) to serve as epithelial channels for Na+ uptake by the gill of freshwater rainbow trout was investigated. We found that the ASIC inhibitors 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and diminazene decreased Na+ uptake in adult rainbow trout in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 0.12 and 0.96 μM, respectively. Furthermore, we cloned the trout ASIC1 and ASIC4 homologs and demonstrated that they are expressed differentially in the tissues of the rainbow trout, including gills and isolated mitochondrion-rich cells. Immunohistochemical analysis using custom-made anti-zASIC4.2 antibody and the Na+-K+-ATPase (α5-subunit) antibody demonstrated that the trout ASIC localizes to Na+/K+-ATPase-rich cells in the gill. Moreover, three-dimensional rendering of confocal micrographs demonstrated that ASIC is found in the apical region of mitochondrion-rich cells. We present a revised model whereby ASIC4 is proposed as one mechanism for Na+ uptake from dilute freshwater in the gill of rainbow trout. PMID:24898589

  7. Acid-sensing ion channels are involved in epithelial Na+ uptake in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Dymowska, Agnieszka K; Schultz, Aaron G; Blair, Salvatore D; Chamot, Danuta; Goss, Greg G

    2014-08-01

    A role for acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) to serve as epithelial channels for Na(+) uptake by the gill of freshwater rainbow trout was investigated. We found that the ASIC inhibitors 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and diminazene decreased Na(+) uptake in adult rainbow trout in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 0.12 and 0.96 μM, respectively. Furthermore, we cloned the trout ASIC1 and ASIC4 homologs and demonstrated that they are expressed differentially in the tissues of the rainbow trout, including gills and isolated mitochondrion-rich cells. Immunohistochemical analysis using custom-made anti-zASIC4.2 antibody and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (α5-subunit) antibody demonstrated that the trout ASIC localizes to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells in the gill. Moreover, three-dimensional rendering of confocal micrographs demonstrated that ASIC is found in the apical region of mitochondrion-rich cells. We present a revised model whereby ASIC4 is proposed as one mechanism for Na(+) uptake from dilute freshwater in the gill of rainbow trout. PMID:24898589

  8. Effects of PCB on the adrenergic response in perfused gills and on levels of muscle glycogen in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri Rich. )

    SciTech Connect

    Kiessling, A; Paert, P.; Ring, O; Lindahl-Keesling, K.

    1983-12-01

    Alterations in behavior have been observed in PCB exposed fish. The response to external disturbance seems to be less evident in the PCB exposed fish than in unexposed ones. Furthermore, the levels of muscle glycogen are reported to be higher in fish exposed to PCB. The question arose if these PCB related effects on fish were the result of an interaction between PCB and the stress system. Response to stress in fish is either mediated by neurons direct to the target organ or by catecholamines released to the blood circulation. The gills are sensitive to circulating adrenaline, increasing the oxygen uptake. Adrenaline also participates in mobilization of muscle glycogen. The purpose of this study was to find out whether PCB influences the adrenaline response in gills and/or glycogen storage in muscle.

  9. Use of behavioral responses of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in identifying sublethal exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Svecevicius, Gintaras

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted in a flow-through apparatus on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to evaluate the sensitivity of a number of their behavioral responses to hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Test fish were exposed to Cr(6+) concentrations corresponding to 0.001-1 parts of the rainbow trout 96-h LC50 (0.029-28.5 mg Cr/L, respectively) in short-term (15 min) tests. Sensitivity parameter responses could be arranged into the following sequence: latent period of detection response = locomotor activity > gill ventilation frequency > coughing rate. All the rainbow trout responses were sensitive behavioral indicators of sublethal exposure. Behavioral responses meet the criteria as rapid tools for bioassay testing and could be easily standardized using Cr(6+) as a reference toxicant. PMID:19190838

  10. Microhabitat selection of Discocotyle sagittata (Monogenea: Polyopisthocotylea) in farmed rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2008-12-01

    Microhabitat preference of the monogenean Discocotyle sagittata (Leuckart, 1842) was determined in late spring and late autumn in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), reared in the Isle of Man, U.K. Discocotyle sagittata exhibits a preference for attachment to anterior gill arches: 29% of all worms occurred on gill arch I, 28% on II, 25% on III and 18% on IV. This distribution pattern on the introduced salmonid species is the same as reported for its native European host, the brown trout Salmo trutta (L.). Previous experimental work suggested that invasion is a passive process followed by post-invasion migration to anterior gill arches; the present work provides evidence of equivalent site selection taking place in fishes maintained under conditions promoting continuous reinfection in aquaculture. Migration may be density-dependent, since a significant inverse association was found between the intensity of mature parasites and their proportion on anteriormost gill arch I. PMID:19175205

  11. Avoidance of aluminum by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Exley, C.

    2000-04-01

    Aluminum is the principal toxicant in fish in acid waters. The ability to avoid Al, particularly at low concentrations, would confer a considerable ecological advantage, but previous research into avoidance of Al has produced mixed results. The author used a cylindrical perspex tank, 150 cm in length, to study avoidance of Al by rainbow trout fry. The fish avoided Al, and their response was dependent on pH. Avoidance that was demonstrated at pHs of 5.00, 5.50, 5.50, and 5.75 was abolished at a pH of 6.00. Fry avoided very low Al concentrations being sensitive to [Al] > 1.00 {micro}mol L{sup {minus}1} at a pH of 5.00. This unequivocal demonstration of avoidance by rainbow trout fry of Al may have important implications for the ecology of indigenous fish populations in surface waters impacted by acidic deposition.

  12. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17‰ salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation. PMID:19111563

  13. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lavado, Ramon Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation.

  14. Status of the rainbow trout genome reference sequence assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most cultivated cold water fish in the U.S. In addition to interests associated with aquaculture and sport fisheries, the rainbow trout serves as a model research organism for studies related to carcinogenesis, toxicology, comparative immunology, disease ...

  15. Progress of the rainbow trout reference genome assembly project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Despite this importance, the complex nature of the rainbow trout genome (pseudotetraploid and high repeat content) has hindered the production of a high-quality refe...

  16. Ontogenetic taurine biosynthesis ability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) plays important roles in multiple physiological processes including osmoregulation, bile salt conjugation and membrane protection. It is known that taurine biosynthesis varies in different fish species. However, its ontogenetic regulation has not been clear. In the present study, we found that the hepatic concentrations of taurine increased marginally with rainbow trout growth. The mRNA expression, protein levels and enzyme activities of key enzymes involved in taurine biosynthesis, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), were analyzed. Our results showed that the mRNA levels and protein abundances of CSD increased dramatically with the development of rainbow trout stages while the enzyme activities showed a slight improvement. However, the expression and activities of CDO decreased with rainbow trout growth. These results provide valuable information on defining the exact supplementation of taurine in diets for different stages of rainbow trout and give new insights into elucidating the regulation of taurine metabolism in rainbow trout. PMID:25773436

  17. Improved husbandry to control an outbreak of rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cohort of 35,200, 13-week-old, female rainbow trout at a fish farm was evaluated because of a two-week history of anorexia, lethargy, and a mortality rate of about 100 fish per day. Affected fish were lethargic and thin and had disequilibrium, bilateral exophthalmia, pale red gills and kidneys...

  18. Growth, morphology, and developmental instability of rainbow trout, Yellowstone cutthroat trout, and four hybrid generations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Duda, J.J.; Graham, J.H.; Zhang, S.; Haywood, K. P., III; Miller, B.; Lerud, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii with nonindigenous rainbow trout O. mykiss contributes to the decline of cutthroat trout subspecies throughout their native range. Introgression by rainbow trout can swamp the gene pools of cutthroat trout populations, especially if there is little selection against hybrids. We used rainbow trout, Yellowstone cutthroat trout O. clarkii bouvieri, and rainbow trout × Yellowstone cutthroat trout F1 hybrids as parents to construct seven different line crosses: F1 hybrids (both reciprocal crosses), F2 hybrids, first-generation backcrosses (both rainbow trout and Yellowstone cutthroat trout), and both parental taxa. We compared growth, morphology, and developmental instability among these seven crosses reared at two different temperatures. Growth was related to the proportion of rainbow trout genome present within the crosses. Meristic traits were influenced by maternal, additive, dominant, overdominant, and (probably) epistatic genetic effects. Developmental stability, however, was not disturbed in F1 hybrids, F2 hybrids, or backcrosses. Backcrosses were morphologically similar to their recurrent parent. The lack of developmental instability in hybrids suggests that there are few genetic incompatibilities preventing introgression. Our findings suggest that hybrids are not equal: that is, growth, development, character traits, and morphology differ depending on the genomic contribution from each parental species as well as the hybrid generation.

  19. Isolation and distribution of bacterial flora in farmed rainbow trout from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Palomares, Elizabeth; Jurado, Mirsam; Marín, Aída; Vega, Fernando; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2010-12-01

    Trout farming is a growing aquaculture industry in Mexico, with stock mainly supplied by the importation of eyed eggs. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of bacterial isolations in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from Mexico. Sixty-five farms distributed among seven states of Mexico were included in the study. Individual samples from gills, liver, spleen, intestine, and kidney were obtained from 563 apparently healthy fish. In total, 371 bacterial isolates were recovered from sampled fish; isolates of the genera Aeromonas, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Plesiomonas, Pseudomonas, and Yersinia were identified. Aeromonads were the most frequently isolated bacteria. Renibacterium salmoninarum was not isolated from any of the sampled fish. Our results showed the presence of bacteria that are potential pathogens of both rainbow trout and humans. PMID:21413508

  20. Biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Hayton, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    The biotransformation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was studied in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following intravascular administration. Methyl-esterified metabolites were identified using rodent-derived standards and non-linear gradient elution HPLC; metabolites were confirmed by gas chromatography. Similarities between the biotransformation of DEHP by rainbow trout and mammalian species included (a) mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP) appeared to be the obligatory first step in DEHP metabolism; (b) the phthalate ring was not oxidized; (c) phthalic acid was a minor metabolite; and (d) several metabolites contained multiple oxidations of the 2-ethylhexyl moiety of MEHP. No metabolites unique to rainbow trout were identified. However, fewer oxidized metabolites were identified in rainbow trout than in mammalian species, possibly due to limited mitochondrial metabolism of MEHP in rainbow trout. The amount of biliary MEHP glucuronide after intravascular administration of DEHP was substantially less than reported in rainbow trout exposed to DEHP via the water. Results confirmed that DEHP metabolism in rainbow trout proceeds by initial rapid formation of MEHP, followed by excretion or extensive oxidation by microsomal P450.

  1. An obscure disease of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Yasutake, W.T.; Wedemeyer, G.

    1970-01-01

    An annul mortality among Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri) has plagued the Shelton Hatchery of the Washington State Department of Game for the last several years. No infectious agent could be isolated from the moribund fish, but histopathologica1 changes in the liver of 1-month-old fish suggested the presence of a toxic substance. Scoliosis in 3-month-old fish suggested a possible deficiency in vitamin C. With this background in mind, we designed studies to determine the nature and source of possible toxicants and the role of vitamin C deficiency in the etiology of this disease.

  2. Exhausting exercise and tissue-specific expression of monocarboxylate transporters in rainbow trout

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Teye

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane lactate movements are mediated by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), but these proteins have never been characterized in rainbow trout. Our goals were to clone potential trout MCTs, determine tissue distribution, and quantify the effects of exhausting exercise on MCT expression. Such information could prove important to understand the mechanisms underlying the classic “lactate retention” seen in trout white muscle after intense exercise. Four isoforms were identified and partially characterized in rainbow trout: MCT1a, MCT1b, MCT2, and MCT4. MCT1b was the most abundant in heart and red muscle but poorly expressed in the gill and brain where MCT1a and MCT2 were prevalent. MCT expression was strongly stimulated by exhausting exercise in brain (MCT2: +260%) and heart (MCT1a: +90% and MCT1b: +50%), possibly to increase capacity for lactate uptake in these highly oxidative tissues. By contrast, the MCTs of gill, liver, and muscle remained unaffected by exercise. This study provides a possible functional explanation for postexercise “lactate retention” in trout white muscle. Rainbow trout may be unable to release large lactate loads rapidly during recovery because: 1) they only poorly express MCT4, the main lactate exporter found in mammalian glycolytic muscles; 2) the combined expression of all trout MCTs is much lower in white muscle than in any other tissue; and 3) exhausting exercise fails to upregulate white muscle MCT expression. In this tissue, carbohydrates act as an “energy spring” that alternates between explosive power release during intense swimming (glycogen to lactate) and recoil during protracted recovery (slow glycogen resynthesis from local lactate). PMID:23535457

  3. In vitro effect of various xenobiotics on trout gill cell volume regulation after hypotonic shock.

    PubMed

    Leguen, I; Prunet, P

    2001-08-01

    Their functions and localisation can expose gill cells to volume changes. To maintain their vital functions, these gill cells must regulate their own volume after cellular swelling or shrinkage. Recently, we showed that rainbow trout pavement gill cells in primary culture have the capacity to regulate their own volume after cellular swelling induced by hypotonic shock. This so-called regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is associated with intracellular calcium increase, which occurs as a transient peak followed by a plateau when maintained a hypotonic condition. Return to an isotonic medium restores baseline [Ca2+]i level. In this study, the effect of different xenobiotics on cellular swelling induced RVD and its calcium signal was investigated in trout pavement gill cells in primary culture. These cells were exposed to different pollutants after confluent epithelium was obtained. After 36 h in xenobiotics exposure in vitro, cellular volume and intracellular calcium concentration were measured. Nonylphenol poly- and di-ethoxylate were lethal at concentrations of 10 and 100 microM, respectively. With 10 microM of the diethoxylate form, cells did not die but, unlike non-treated cells, burst during hypotonic shock (2/3rd strength Ringer solution). With 1 microM nonylphenol polyethoxylate (NPnEO), RVD and [Ca2+]i were reduced. Copper (10 and 100 microM) had no significant effect on gill cell volume regulation. However, the heavy metal modified calcium response to hypotonic shock by inhibiting return to baseline level under isotonic conditions. 10 microM prochloraz and 2,4-dichloroaniline had no effect on cell morphology, volume and [Ca2+]i concentration. With 100 microM, however, prochloraz was lethal and dichloroaniline increased baseline [Ca2+]i. These results indicate that the effects observed on gill cells are consistent with the known toxic properties of the molecules tested, thus confirming the validity of primary culture to investigate the toxic effects of

  4. Nutritionally induced hepatomagenesis of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1967-01-01

    Hepatoma in commercially reared rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) was first seen at this laboratory in April of 1960. The subsequent discovery of it in near epizootic proportions in other hatchery-reared rainbow trout and cutthroat trout (S. clarki) populations throughout the United States precipitated extensive research by numerous agencies. Although the liver neoplasm in trout had been previously noted here (Haddow and Blake, 1933; Nigrelli, 1954; Nigrelli and Jakowska, 1955) and abroad (Cudkowicz and Scolari, 1955) occurrences of it in such proportions had not been reported previously in this country.

  5. IN VIVO RATE OF PHENOL GLUCURONIDATION BY RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) in male fish has become an accepted biomarker for xenoestrogenicity. This study utilized the male rainbow trout liver slice model to determine the estrogenicity of parent compound, methoxychlor (MXC) and metabolites, di-hydroxy methoxychlor (HPTE) ...

  6. Virulence of Flavobacterium columnare genomovars in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Jason P; LaFrentz, Benjamin R

    2016-08-01

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease and is responsible for significant economic losses in aquaculture. F. columnare is a Gram-negative bacterium, and 5 genetic types or genomovars have been described based on restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S rRNA gene. Previous research has suggested that genomovar II isolates are more virulent than genomovar I isolates to multiple species of fish, including rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, improved genotyping methods have shown that some isolates previously classified as genomovar I, and used in challenge experiments, were in fact genomovar III. Our objective was to confirm previous results with respect to genomovar II virulence, and to determine the susceptibility of rainbow trout to other genomovars. The virulence of 8 genomovar I, 4 genomovar II, 3 genomovar II-B, and 5 genomovar III isolates originating from various sources was determined through 3 independent challenges in rainbow trout using an immersion challenge model. Mean cumulative percent mortality (CPM) of ~49% for genomovar I isolates, ~1% for genomovar II, ~5% for the II-B isolates, and ~7% for the III isolates was observed. The inability of genomovar II isolates to produce mortalities in rainbow trout was unanticipated based on previous studies, but may be due to a number of factors including rainbow trout source and water chemistry. The source of fish and/or the presence of sub-optimal environment may influence the susceptibility of rainbow trout to different F. columnare genomovars. PMID:27503917

  7. Patterns of hybridization among cutthroat trout and rainbow trout in northern Rocky Mountain streams.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Wilcox, Taylor M; Bingham, Daniel M; Pilgrim, Kristine L; Schwartz, Michael K

    2016-02-01

    Introgressive hybridization between native and introduced species is a growing conservation concern. For native cutthroat trout and introduced rainbow trout in western North America, this process is thought to lead to the formation of hybrid swarms and the loss of monophyletic evolutionary lineages. Previous studies of this phenomenon, however, indicated that hybrid swarms were rare except when native and introduced forms of cutthroat trout co-occurred. We used a panel of 86 diagnostic, single nucleotide polymorphisms to evaluate the genetic composition of 3865 fish captured in 188 locations on 129 streams distributed across western Montana and northern Idaho. Although introgression was common and only 37% of the sites were occupied solely by parental westslope cutthroat trout, levels of hybridization were generally low. Of the 188 sites sampled, 73% contained ≤5% rainbow trout alleles and 58% had ≤1% rainbow trout alleles. Overall, 72% of specimens were nonadmixed westslope cutthroat trout, and an additional 3.5% were nonadmixed rainbow trout. Samples from seven sites met our criteria for hybrid swarms, that is, an absence of nonadmixed individuals and a random distribution of alleles within the sample; most (6/7) were associated with introgression by Yellowstone cutthroat trout. In streams with multiple sites, upstream locations exhibited less introgression than downstream locations. We conclude that although the widespread introduction of nonnative trout within the historical range of westslope cutthroat trout has increased the incidence of introgression, sites containing nonadmixed populations of this taxon are common and broadly distributed. PMID:26865958

  8. Weissellosis – An important emerging disease in farmed rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2007, disease outbreaks associated with Weissella sp. bacteria in cultured rainbow trout have been reported on farms in China and Brazil. In the summer and fall of 2011, we visited two trout farms in North Carolina to investigate reports of severe, prolonged mortalities in larger fish approach...

  9. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Rainbow Trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raleigh, Robert F.; Hickman, Terry; Solomon, R. Charles; Nelson, Patrick C.

    1984-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop riverine and lacustrine habitat models for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), a freshwater species. The models are scaled to produce an index of habitat suitability between 0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1 (optimally suitable habitat) for freshwater areas of the continental United States. Other habitat suitability models found in the literature are also included. Habitat suitability indexes (HSI's) are designed for use with the habitat evaluation procedures developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Also included are discussions of Suitability Index (SI) curves as used in the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) and SI curves available for an IFIM analysis of Fallfish habitat.

  10. Determination of benzocaine in rainbow trout plasma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernardy, Jeffery A.; Coleman, K.S.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, William H.

    1996-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for analysis of benzocaine (BZ), a proposed fish anesthetic, in rainbow trout plasma, Mean recoveries of BZ from plasma samples fortified at 44-10 100 ng/mL were 96-100%. The method detection limit is 10 ng/mL, and the limit of quantitation is 37 ng/mL. Acetylation of BZ occurs in whole blood after storage at room temperature (i.e., 21 degrees C) for 10 min. However, no acetylation of BZ was detected in plasma samples held at room temperature for 4 h, Mean method precision for plasma samples with incurred BZ residue is similar to that for fortified samples in the same concentration range (relative standard deviations of 0.9 and 1.2%, respectively).

  11. Behavioral avoidance of a metals mixture by rainbow trout and brown trout

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Bergman, H.L.; Woodward, D.F.; Little, E.E.; Deloney, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Behavioral avoidance responses by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were determined in the laboratory to predict the effect of mixtures of copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc on the spatial distribution of fishes in the Clark fork River (CFR), Montana. The typical ambient concentration of these metals (in {micro}g/l) in the CFR was 12 Cu, 1.1 Cd, 3.2 Pb, and 50 Zn. Laboratory tests were conducted in an opposing-flow avoidance chamber using metals concentrations ranging from 10% to 1,000% of this CFR ambient concentration. Rainbow trout avoided all metals concentrations tested from 10% to 1,000% of ambient. Brown trout failed to avoid the 10% metals concentration but did avoid all concentrations higher than 50%. In a further experiment, both species were acclimated to pH 8.0 water and avoided all changes in acidity. However, the avoidance of metals was not altered by acidity additions in brown trout and only slightly altered in rainbow trout. In all experiments, brown trout were less sensitive than rainbow trout, which was consistent with observed species distributions within the river. Behavior avoidance of this metals mixture by rainbow and brown trout in the laboratory indicates metals may have contributed to reduced abundance and altered distribution of salmonids in the CFR.

  12. Improved husbandry to control an outbreak of rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bebak, J.A.; Welch, T.J.; Starliper, C.E.; Baya, A.M.; Garner, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Case Description - A cohort of 35,200, 13-week-old, female rainbow trout at a fish farm was evaluated because of a 2-week history of anorexia and lethargy and a mortality rate of approximately 100 fish/d. Clinical Findings - Affected fish were lethargic and thin and had disequilibrium, bilateral exophthalmia, pale red gills and kidneys, red-tinged coelomic fluid, and pale brown livers. Some fish were differentially pigmented bilaterally. The presumptive diagnosis was bacterial or viral septicemia. The definitive diagnosis was rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Treatment and Outcome - A strategy for controlling the outbreak based on reducing pathogen numbers in affected tanks and reducing pathogen spread among tanks was developed. The option of treating with antimicrobial-medicated feed was discussed with the farmer, but was declined. After changes were made, mortality rate declined quickly, with no more deaths within 10 days after the initial farm visit. Clinical Relevance - Bacterial coldwater disease is the most common manifestation of infection with F psychrophilum in fingerling and adult rainbow trout. However, the organism can also cause rainbow trout fry syndrome. This condition should be included on a list of differential diagnoses for septicemia in hatchery-reared rainbow trout fry.

  13. Introgression and susceptibility to disease in a wild population of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, K.P.; Hemmingsen, A.R.; French, R.A.; Buchanan, D.V.; Schreck, C.B.; Li, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We examined susceptibility of wild rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Metolius River, a tributary of the Deschutes River, Oregon, to genetic introgression and ceratomyxosis as a result of stocking nonnative hatchery rainbow trout. Ceratomyxa shasta, an enzootic myxosporean parasite that can be lethal to nonnative hatchery rainbow trout, might have been limiting the interbreeding of hatchery and wild rainbow trout in the river. However, rainbow trout from the Metolius River had allozyme frequencies intermediate between those of wild and hatchery fish at LDH-B2* and sSOD-1*, two diagnostic genetic loci that allow the inland subspecies of rainbow trout to be distinguished from hatchery strains of coastal origin. They also had notable frequencies of ADA-1*85, an allele documented in hatchery rainbow trout but rarely seen in wild populations. We also found that rainbow trout in the Metolius River averaged 138.9 scales in the lateral series, intermediate between the counts for 9 coastal or nonnative hatchery populations, which always had fewer than 140 scales, and 10 inland populations, which always had more than 140 scales. Disease challenges revealed that rainbow trout from the Metolius River had much greater susceptibility to C. shasta than rainbow trout from the Deschutes River, which have genetic resistance to the lethal disease. Based on these data, we concluded that introgression with nonnative hatchery rainbow trout has reduced the abilities of wild rainbow trout in the Metolius River to survive when conditions for ceratomyxosis infection occur.

  14. Microsomal biotransformation of chlorpyrifos, parathion and fenthion in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch): mechanistic insights into interspecific differences in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Schlenk, Daniel

    2011-01-17

    Rainbow trout often serve as a surrogate species evaluating xenobiotic toxicity in cold-water species including other salmonids of the same genus, which are listed as threatened or endangered. Biotransformation tends to show species-specific patterns that influence susceptibility to xenobiotic toxicity, particularly organophosphate insecticides (OPs). To evaluate the contribution of biotransformation in the mechanism of toxicity of three organophosphate (phosphorothionate) insecticides, (chlorpyrifos, parathion and fenthion), microsomal bioactivation and detoxification pathways were measured in gills, liver and olfactory tissues in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and compared to juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Consistent with species differences in acute toxicity, significantly higher chlorpyrifos bioactivation was found in liver microsomes of rainbow trout (up to 2-fold) when compared with coho salmon. Although bioactivation to the oxon was observed, the catalytic efficiency towards chlorpyrifos dearylation (detoxification) was significantly higher in liver for both species (1.82 and 0.79 for trout and salmon, respectively) when compared to desulfuration (bioactivation). Bioactivation of parathion to paraoxon was significantly higher (up to 2.2-fold) than detoxification to p-nitrophenol in all tissues of both species with rates of conversion in rainbow trout, again significantly higher than coho salmon. Production of fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxides from fenthion was detected only in liver and gills of both species with activities in rainbow trout significantly higher than coho salmon. NADPH-dependent cleavage of fenthion was observed in all tissues, and was the only activity detected in olfactory tissues. These results indicate rainbow trout are more sensitive than coho salmon to the acute toxicity of OP pesticides because trout have higher catalytic rates of oxon formation. Thus, rainbow trout may serve as a conservative surrogate

  15. Patterns of hybridization of nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout with native redband trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, Helen M.; Dunham, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the greatest threats to native fishes. Threats from hybridization are particularly important for native trout species as stocking of nonnative trout has been widespread within the ranges of native species, thus increasing the potential for hybridization. While many studies have documented hybridization between native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii and nonnative rainbow trout O. mykiss, fewer have focused on this issue in native rainbow trout despite widespread threats from introductions of both nonnative cutthroat trout and hatchery rainbow trout. Here, we describe the current genetic (i.e., hybridization) status of native redband trout O. mykiss gairdneri populations in the upper Boise River, Idaho. Interspecific hybridization was widespread (detected at 14 of the 41 sampled locations), but high levels of hybridization between nonnative cutthroat trout and redband trout were detected in only a few streams. Intraspecific hybridization was considerably more widespread (almost 40% of sampled locations), and several local populations of native redband trout have been almost completely replaced with hatchery coastal rainbow trout O. mykiss irideus; other populations exist as hybrid swarms, some are in the process of being actively invaded, and some are maintaining genetic characteristics of native populations. The persistence of some redband trout populations with high genetic integrity provides some opportunity to conserve native genomes, but our findings also highlight the complex decisions facing managers today. Effective management strategies in this system may include analysis of the specific attributes of each site and population to evaluate the relative risks posed by isolation versus maintaining connectivity, identifying potential sites for control or eradication of nonnative trout, and long-term monitoring of the genetic integrity of remaining redband trout populations to track changes in their status.

  16. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations : Rainbow Trout Recruitment : Period Covered: 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, Chris

    1999-02-02

    The objective of this study was to determine if juvenile production is limiting the population of rainbow trout Oncorbynchus mykiss in the Idaho reach of the Kootenai River. We used snorkeling and electrofishing techniques to estimate juvenile rainbow trout abundance in, and outmigration from, the Deep, Boulder, and Myrtle creek drainages in Idaho. The total population estimates for the three drainages estimated in 1997 were 30,023; 763; and 235; respectively. A rotary-screw trap was utilized to capture juvenile outmigrants for quantification of age at outmigration and total outmigration from the Deep Creek drainage to the Kootenai River. The total outmigrant estimate for 1997 from the Deep Creek drainage was 38,206 juvenile rainbow trout. Age determination based largely on scales suggests that most juvenile rainbow trout outmigration from the Deep Creek drainage occurs at age-l, during the spring runoff period. Forty-three adult rainbow trout captured in the Deep Creek drainage were tagged with $10.00 reward T-bar anchor tags in 1997. A total of three of these fish were harvested, all in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia. This suggests the possibility of an adfluvial component in the spawning population of the Deep Creek drainage.

  17. Tissue distribution and elimination of rotenone in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The fate of a single i.v. dose (120 μg/kg) of the piscicide [14C]rotenone was evaluated in rainbow trout for periods up to 72 h after dosing. Rotenone was rapidly cleared from the plasma; less than 2% of the dose remained in the plasma compartment after 20 min. The highest concentrations of rotenone residues (% dose/g tissue) were in the hepatobiliary system, bile, intestine, and in heart, lateral line swimming muscle, and posterior kidney; tissues that are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism. Although rotenone activity was present in all cell fractions examined, greater than 40% was associated with the mitochondrial fraction of liver, kidney, and muscle. More than 85% of the activity extracted from these tissues, except the liver, was parent rotenone. Elimination from whole body and major tissue depots conformed to simple first-order kinetics; the estimated half-life from whole body was 68.5 h. Branchial elimination accounted for 5% of the injected dose over a 4-h period, and urinary elimination was less than 2% over a 48-h period. Rotenone was eliminated essentially unchanged across the gills; however, parent rotenone was not found in either urine or bile. More than 80% of the activity in both urine and bile eluted from HPLC chromatographs as a highly polar fraction that was not hydrolyzed by incubation with either β-glucuronidase or sulfatase. The results imply that hepatobiliary excretion is the major route of elimination for rotenone residues in the trout and that metabolism to a more polar form is a prerequisite for elimination in both the bile and the urine

  18. Brown Trout removal effects on short-term survival and movement of Myxobolus cerebralis-resistant rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fetherman, Eric R.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Schisler, George J.; Davies, K.

    2015-01-01

    Following establishment of Myxobolus cerebralis (the parasite responsible for salmonid whirling disease) in Colorado, populations of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykissexperienced significant declines, whereas Brown Trout Salmo trutta densities increased in many locations across the state, potentially influencing the success of M. cerebralis-resistant Rainbow Trout reintroductions. We examined the effects of Brown Trout removal on the short-term (3-month) survival and movement of two crosses of reintroduced, M. cerebralis-resistant Rainbow Trout in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado. Radio frequency identification passive integrated transponder tags and antennas were used to track movements of wild Brown Trout and stocked Rainbow Trout in reaches where Brown Trout had or had not been removed. Multistate mark–recapture models were used to estimate tagged fish apparent survival and movement in these sections 3 months following Brown Trout removal. A cross between the German Rainbow Trout and Colorado River Rainbow Trout strains exhibited similar survival and movement probabilities in the reaches, suggesting that the presence of Brown Trout did not affect its survival or movement. However, a cross between the German Rainbow Trout and Harrison Lake Rainbow Trout exhibited less movement from the reach in which Brown Trout had been removed. Despite this, the overall short-term benefits of the removal were equivocal, suggesting that Brown Trout removal may not be beneficial for the reintroduction of Rainbow Trout. Additionally, the logistical constraints of conducting removals in large river systems are substantial and may not be a viable management option in many rivers.

  19. Tissue-specific responses of oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant defenses in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss during a vaccination against furunculosis.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Halyna; Kurhaluk, Natalia; Grudniewska, Joanna; Andriichuk, Anastasiia

    2014-08-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vaccination against furunculosis on responses of oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss muscle, gills, liver, and brain tissues. The oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde and carbonyl derivatives of protein oxidative destruction levels), antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase), and total antioxidant capacity in different tissues of rainbow trout were measured. Our data showed that exposure of trout to vaccine against furunculosis produced changes (either increase or decrease) in oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes responses, and these responses showed marked organ differences, associated with tissue patterns. Our study demonstrated that vaccinated trout showed alteration in antioxidant defenses and oxidative stress responses, with higher severity in the liver, compared with other tissues. Our data also suggest that vaccination against furunculosis induced lipid peroxidation in gill and liver tissues. However, muscle and brain tissue are capable of restoring its pro- and antioxidant balance after vaccination. PMID:24599827

  20. Chemical composition of rainbow trout urine following acute hypoxic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, Joseph B.

    1969-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) were anesthetized with MS-222, catheterized, and introduced into urine collecting chambers. Twenty-four hours after introduction, a 4-hour accumulation of urine was collected to serve as the control. Water flow to the chambers was then discontinued for 30 minutes during which the oxygen content of the water exiting in the chamber dropped from 4.9 to 2.8 mg/l. Following this hypoxic stress fresh water was restored and accumulated urine samples were taken for analysis at 1, 4, and 20 hours post-hypoxic stress. Rainbow trout excrete abnormally high concentrations of Na, K, Mg, Cl, and inorganic PO4 following hypoxia.

  1. Toxicity of hydrogen peroxide treatments to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, M.P.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.; Ramsay, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 0, 500, 1,000, and 3,000 I?L/L, concentrations that were multiples of the Low Regulatory Priority limit of 500 I?L/L, were administered for 15 min every weekday (Mondaya??Friday) to eggs of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and steelhead (anadromous rainbow trout) to determine the margin of safety existing for standard egg treatments. All untreated and treated eggs remained free of fungal infection throughout incubation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs by 1.4a??5.9% among those treated at 500 I?L/L, 6.8a??15.4% among those treated at 1,000 I?L/L, and 13.2a??25.3% among those treated at 3,000 I?L/L. Mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated at 1,000 I?L H2O2/L was 7% lower than that for eggs treated at 500 I?L H2O2/L. Mean percent hatch of Skamania strain steelhead was significantly reduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, whereas the mean percent hatch of Ganaraska strain steelhead was similar to the mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs. Daily percent mortality of rainbow trout eggs increased significantly from day 6 to day 10 (78a??135 daily temperature units, DTUsA?C) of incubation. Discontinuing hydrogen peroxide treatments to Skamania strain steelhead eggs from day 7 to day 11 (78a??105 DTUsA?C) of incubation significantly increased the probability of eggs reaching the eyed egg stage. The mean percent hatch of rainbow trout eggs treated with hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 1,000 I?L/L may be increased if no treatments are administered between 70 and 140 DTUsA?C. Mortality of sac fry was not observed at hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 1,000 I?L/L or lower. Fish culturists should be aware that other species or strains may be more sensitive than rainbow trout. Other species and strains should be initially treated with hydrogen peroxide at 500 I?L/L until monitoring of egg mortality identifies the presence or absence of a sensitive period.

  2. Relative sensitivity of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to acute copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Lipton, Josh; Welsh, Paul G

    2002-03-01

    Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were recently listed as threatened in the United States under the federal Endangered Species Act. Past and present habitat for this species includes waterways contaminated with heavy metals released from mining activities. Because the sensitivity of this species to copper was previously unknown, we conducted acute copper toxicity tests with bull and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in side-by-side comparison tests. Bioassays were conducted using water at two temperatures (8 degrees C and 16 degrees C) and two hardness levels (100 and 220 mg/L as CaCO3). At a water hardness of 100 mg/L, both species were less sensitive to copper when tested at 16 degrees C compared to 8 degrees C. The two species had similar sensitivity to copper in 100-mg/ L hardness water, but bull trout were 2.5 to 4 times less sensitive than rainbow trout in 220-mg/L hardness water. However, when our results were viewed in the context of the broader literature on rainbow trout sensitivity to copper, the sensitivities of the two species appeared similar. This suggests that adoption of toxicity thresholds that are protective of rainbow trout would be protective of bull trout; however, an additional safety factor may be warranted because of the additional level of protection necessary for this federally threatened species. PMID:11878477

  3. Innocent until proven guilty? Stable coexistence of alien rainbow trout and native marble trout in a Slovenian stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Crivelli, Alain J.; Jesensek, Dusan; Rossi, Gianluigi; de Leo, Giulio A.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the consequences of the invasion of the nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on the native marble trout Salmo marmoratus, we compared two distinct headwater sectors where marble trout occur in allopatry (MTa) or sympatry (MTs) with rainbow trout (RTs) in the Idrijca River (Slovenia). Using data from field surveys from 2002 to 2009, with biannual (June and September) sampling and tagging from June 2004 onwards, we analyzed body growth and survival probabilities of marble trout in each stream sector. Density of age-0 in September over the study period was greater for MTs than MTa and very similar between MTs and RTs, while density of trout ≥age-1 was similar for MTa and MTs and greater than density of RTs. Monthly apparent survival probabilities were slightly higher in MTa than in MTs, while RTs showed a lower survival than MTs. Mean weight of marble and rainbow trout aged 0+ in September was negatively related to cohort density for both marble and rainbow trout, but the relationship was not significantly different between MTs and MTa. No clear depression of body growth of sympatric marble trout between sampling intervals was observed. Despite a later emergence, mean weight of RTs cohorts at age 0+ in September was significantly higher than weight of both MTs and MTa. The establishment of a self-sustaining population of rainbow trout does not have a significant impact on body growth and survival probabilities of sympatric marble trout. The numerical dominance of rainbow trout in streams at lower altitudes seem to suggest that while the low summer flow pattern of Slovenian streams is favorable for rainbow trout invasion, the adaptation of marble trout to headwater environments may limit the invasion success of rainbow trout in headwaters.

  4. PROGRESS TOWARD AN IMMUNOGENETIC MAP FOR RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QTL (quantitative trait loci) mapping utilizes a series of methods for finding pieces of DNA that are closely linked to genes that confer a desired phenotype. One of our research goals is to map QTL in rainbow trout that associate with innate resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. A high densi...

  5. REVIEW: STATUS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GENOMIC RESEARCH WITH RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are one of the most widely studied of model fish species. Extensive basic biological information has been collected for this species which, because of their large size relative to other model fish species, are particularly suitable for studies requiring ample qua...

  6. A first generation integrated map of the rainbow trout genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficien...

  7. Genomic analysis of the stress response of rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic analyses have the potential to impact selective breeding programs by identifying markers as proxies for traits which are expensive or difficult to measure. One such set of traits is the physiological responses of rainbow trout to the stresses of the aquaculture environment. Typical stresso...

  8. Semen cryopreservation research seeks higher fertility rates in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to cryopreserve rainbow trout milt enables breeders and germplasm repositories to maintain secure reserves of genetic material from large numbers of males with minimal costs, and the material can be maintained indefinitely. However, inseminations using cryopreserved milt generally result...

  9. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma, and either urine or expired water. The data were then an...

  10. METHOXYCHLOR METABOLISM AND VITELLOGENESIS IN MALE RAINBOW TROUT LIVER SLICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) in male fish has become an accepted biomarker to xenoestrogenicity. This study utilized the male rainbow trout liver slice model to determine the estrogenicity of parent compound, methoxychlor (MXC) and metabolites, di-hydroxy methoxychlor (HPTE) a...

  11. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY STUDIES WITH MONOCHLOROBENZENE IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of monochlorobenzene (CB) was investigated in rainbow trout following acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration and chronic exposure via the water in a continuously flowing system for 15 or 30 days. In the acute study overt toxicity and hepatotoxicity was monitored...

  12. RAINBOW TROUT EMBRYOS: ADVANTAGES AND LIMITATIONS FOR CARCINOGENESIS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout embryos are sensitive to the initiation of neoplasms in various tissues by brief exposures to solutions of water-soluble carcinogens. This characteristic was first demonstrated with the sparingly soluble liver carcinogen, aflatoxin B1(AFB1). A 30-minute exposure of ...

  13. PROGRESS TOWARD AN IMMUNOGENETIC MAP FOR RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of our research goals is to map QTL in rainbow trout that associate with innate resistance to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. A high density genetic map of over 1200 microsatellite markers has been recently constructed in our lab to enable whole genome association studies. We are now adding candid...

  14. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ALKYLPHENOLS TO RAINBOW TROUT ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. T R Henry1, J S Denny2 and P K Schmieder2. USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, 1Experimental Toxicology Division and 2Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN, USA.
    The USEPA has been mandated to screen industria...

  15. Gene expression dynamics during embryonic development in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The supply of maternal RNAs in fertilized egg and activation of embryonic genome during maternal-zygotic transition (MZT) are important for normal embryonic development. In order to identify genes and gene products that are essential in the regulation of embryonic development in rainbow trout, RNA-S...

  16. A second generation genetic map for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Genetic maps characterizing the inheritance patterns of traits and markers have been developed for a wide range of species and used to study questions in biomedicine, agriculture, ecology and evolutionary biology. The status of rainbow trout genetic maps has progressed significantly over...

  17. Weissellosis: An Emerging Disease Of Farmed Rainbow Trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weissella ceti is a gram positive bacterium associated with Weissellosis, an emerging disease of farmed rainbow trout. This disease can result in high mortality in large fish (0.5-1.0 kg) and hence can cause significant economic loss. In the summer of 2011, severe Weissellosis outbreaks were identif...

  18. HISTOLOGICAL PROGRESSION OF HEPATIC NEOPLASIA IN RAINBOW TROUT ('SALMO GAIRDNERI')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The histological progression of hepatic neoplasia has not been as systematically studied in rainbow trout as it has been in rodents. Two putative preneoplastic lesions have been identified, the eosinophilic focus and the basophilic focus, but whether these correspond to similar l...

  19. Selective breeding of food size rainbow trout against Flavobacteriosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding of rainbow trout is an important component of an integrated fish health management program. The current goals of our selective breeding program are to improve disease resistance, growth and survival in a reuse water environment. To improve these traits, data are recorded on thousa...

  20. Selective breeding of food sized rainbow trout against Flavobacteriosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding of rainbow trout is an important component of an integrated fish health management program. The current goals of our selective breeding program are to improve disease resistance, growth and survival in a reuse water environment. To improve these traits, data are recorded on thousa...

  1. Assessment of acute toxicity and histopathology of the fungicide captan in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Boran, Halis; Capkin, Erol; Altinok, Ilhan; Terzi, Ertugrul

    2012-03-01

    Acute toxicity of the fungicide, captan, to juvenile rainbow trout was evaluated under static-renewal test condition. Actual concentrations of captan ranged from 0.05 to 1.00 mg/L. The concentrations of captan that killed 50% of the rainbow trout (3.11±0.8 g) within 24 (24 h; LC(50)), 48, 72 and 96 h were 0.57±0.09, 0.49±0.10, 0.44±0.11 and 0.38±0.13 mg/L (95% confidence limits), respectively. None of the unexposed control fish died and the first fish died 6 h after exposure to captan (≥0.65 mg/L). Hypertrophy, separation of epithelium from lamellae, lamellar fusion, and epithelial cell necrosis were observed on captan exposed fish. Gills also had scattered areas of focal lamellar hyperplasia. Fish exposed to fungicide had inflammation and necrosis in liver, trunk kidney and spleen. In order, the most affected organs were gill, trunk kidney and liver. PMID:20817491

  2. Characterization of the rainbow trout egg microRNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hao; Hostuttler, Mark; Wei, Hairong; Rexroad, Caird E; Yao, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate post-transcriptional expression of target genes and play important roles in animal development. The objectives of this study were to characterize the egg miRNA transcriptome and identify novel egg-predominant miRNAs in rainbow trout. Small RNAs isolated from mature unfertilized rainbow trout eggs were subjected to deep sequencing using an Illumina Genome Analyzer. The massive sequencing produced 24,621,741 quality reads, among which, 266 known miRNAs were identified and 230 putatively novel miRNAs were predicted. The most abundantly known miRNAs are let-7 and miR-21, accounting for 24.06% and 18.71% of the known miRNAs, respectively. Other known miRNAs which are abundantly present in eggs include miR-24, miR-202, miR-148, miR-30, miR-10, miR-146, miR-25, and miR-143. Real time PCR analysis using cDNAs derived from 10 tissues validated 87 out of 90 selected putative miRNAs and identified three novel miRNAs predominantly expressed in rainbow trout eggs. Each of these novel egg-predominant miRNAs is predicted to target a significant number of genes, most of which are significantly down-regulated in naturally ovulated rainbow trout eggs based on analysis of publicly available microarray data sets. Quantitative real time PCR analysis also demonstrated low expression of a selected number of target genes in eggs relative to liver and muscle tissues. This study represents the first complete survey of miRNAs in fish eggs and provides a starting point for future studies aimed at understanding the roles of miRNAs in controlling egg quality and early embryogenesis in rainbow trout. PMID:22761856

  3. Diel resource partitioning among juvenile Atlantic Salmon, Brown Trout, and Rainbow Trout during summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna Jr, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific partitioning of food and habitat resources has been widely studied in stream salmonids. Most studies have examined resource partitioning between two native species or between a native species and one that has been introduced. In this study we examine the diel feeding ecology and habitat use of three species of juvenile salmonids (i.e., Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a tributary of Skaneateles Lake, New York. Subyearling Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout fed more heavily from the drift than the benthos, whereas subyearling Atlantic Salmon fed more from the benthos than either species of trout. Feeding activity of Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout was similar, with both species increasing feeding at dusk, whereas Brown Trout had no discernable feeding peak or trough. Habitat availability was important in determining site-specific habitat use by juvenile salmonids. Habitat selection was greater during the day than at night. The intrastream, diel, intraspecific, and interspecific variation we observed in salmonid habitat use in Grout Brook illustrates the difficulty of acquiring habitat use information for widespread management applications.

  4. Diel resource partitioning among juvenile Atlantic Salmon, Brown Trout, and Rainbow Trout during summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna Jr, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific partitioning of food and habitat resources has been widely studied in stream salmonids. Most studies have examined resource partitioning between two native species or between a native species and one that has been introduced. In this study we examine the diel feeding ecology and habitat use of three species of juvenile salmonids (i.e., Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar, Brown Trout Salmo trutta, and Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a tributary of Skaneateles Lake, New York. Subyearling Brown Trout and Rainbow Trout fed more heavily from the drift than the benthos, whereas subyearling Atlantic Salmon fed more from the benthos than either species of trout. Feeding activity of Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout was similar, with both species increasing feeding at dusk, whereas Brown Trout had no discernable feeding peak or trough. Habitat availability was important in determining site-specific habitat use by juvenile salmonids. Habitat selection was greater during the day than at night. The intrastream, diel, intraspecific, and interspecific variation we observed in salmonid habitat use in Grout Brook illustrates the difficulty of acquiring habitat use information for widespread management applications.

  5. Fate of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) after infection of brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; Saleh, Mona; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa) is the causative agent of proliferative kidney disease in salmonids. We assessed differences in intensity of T. bryosalmonae infection between brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the clinical phase of infection onwards. Specific pathogen-free fish were exposed to T. bryosalmonae spores under controlled laboratory conditions and sampled at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 17 wk post exposure (wpe), and the transmission of T. bryosalmonae from infected fish to the bryozoan Fredericella sultana was observed. Parasite load was determined in fish kidneys by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and parasite stages were detected in kidney, liver, and spleen tissues at different time points by immunohistochemistry. T. bryosalmonae was successfully transmitted from infected brown trout to F. sultana colonies but not from infected rainbow trout. Body length and weight of infected brown trout did not differ significantly from control brown trout during all time points, while length and weight of infected rainbow trout differed significantly compared to controls from 10 to 17 wpe. qRT-PCR revealed that parasite load was significantly higher in kidneys of brown trout compared with rainbow trout. Immunohistochemistry showed high numbers of intra-luminal stages (sporogonic stages) in kidneys of brown trout with low numbers of pre-sporogonic stages. Sporogonic stages were not seen in kidneys of rainbow trout; only high numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were detected. Numbers of pre-sporogonic stages were low in the spleen and liver of brown trout but high in rainbow trout. These data confirmed that there are differences in the development and infection progress of T. bryosalmonae between brown trout and rainbow trout. PMID:24270019

  6. Diet overlap of introduced rainbow trout and three native fishes in an Ozark stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenner, D.B.; Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Private angling groups in Oklahoma have requested permission to stock rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss into streams of northeastern Oklahoma although little is known regarding interactions between introduced rainbow trout and native fishes in these systems. Our study objectives were to assess diet overlap between introduced rainbow trout and native smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, shadow bass Ambloplites ariommus, and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus in Brush Creek, Oklahoma, a small spring-fed Ozark stream. Rainbow trout diet composition differed from that of all three native fishes in the 2 months of comparison (March and May 2001), and rainbow trout diets contained relatively low numbers of prey. It is unlikely that exploitative competition for food resources occurred between rainbow trout and these three native fishes. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  7. Yakima River Radio-Telemetry Study, Rainbow Trout, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hockersmith, Eric E.

    1995-04-01

    Rainbow trout populations in the upper Yakima River Basin have increased due to reduced competition from declining populations of steelhead, chinook salmon, and coho salmon. Changing population abundances have increased the potential for interactions between rainbow trout and steelhead. In 1993, NMFS, in cooperation with WDW, proposed a 1-year radio-telemetry study to determine the spawning distribution, timing, and behavior of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. Specific objectives were to: (1) Determine the spatial and temporal spawning distributions of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. (2) Describe post-spawning behavior of rainbow trout in the upper Yakima River Basin. (3) Determine the magnitude and causes of mortalities to rainbow trout that were radio- tagged.

  8. Physiological changes and tissue metal accumulation in rainbow trout exposed to foodborne and waterborne metals

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, A.A.; Boese, C.J.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology); Woodward, D.F. )

    1994-12-01

    Sublethal physiological effects and metal residue accumulation in tissues were measured in adult and juvenile rainbow trout fed a metal-contaminated diet and/or exposed to waterborne metals for 21 d. The consumption of metal-contaminated invertebrates from the Clark Fork River, Montana, significantly affected scale loss and metal accumulation in gut tissue of adult trout. Survival, scale loss, and metal accumulation in gill and kidney tissue were affected by exposure to a waterborne mixture of Cd, Cu, and Pb at twice the acceptable levels and Zn at the maximum acceptable level established by the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of aquatic wildlife. A combination of dietary and waterborne metals also caused lipid peroxidation in the kidney of adult fish and decreased whole-body potassium of juvenile trout. In general, metal accumulation in tissues was higher in gill and kidney with waterborne exposures and was higher in stomach and pyloric caeca with dietary exposure. And metal concentrations in juvenile whole-body tissues accumulated significantly with a combination of waterborne and dietary metals. Although some physiological changes were noted (scale loss, lipid peroxidation of kidney), an exposure time longer than 21 d is probably needed to observe more extensive physiological changes. Regardless, results from this study suggest that a full assessment of metal exposure to fish populations in natural systems must include evaluation of dietary as well as waterborne metal contamination.

  9. Organochlorine insecticide, herbicide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) inhibition of NaK-ATPase in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Paul W.; Friedhoff, Jacqueline M.; Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1972-01-01

    The current widespread presence of chlorinated insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and herbicides in world waterways has elicited much interest in the mechanisms of their toxicity in fishes. Inhibition of Na+,K+-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (NaK-ATPase) and Mg++-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) by DDT, endosulfan and dicofol has been demonstrated in gill, brain and kidney microsomes of rainbow trout (1,2). Intestinal and gill ATPases in marine teleosts were recently reported to be sensitive to organochlorines (3). CutkonTp et al (4) noted inhibition of NaK-ATPase and Mg-ATPase in bluegill brain, liver, muscle and kidney by DDT and related chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inhibition of ATPases by PCB's has been recently shown in bluegill kidney, brain and liver (5). In the present study, we have further examined the NaK-ATPase enzyme system in trout gill as a site for the possible toxicity of selected organopolychlors, i.e., chlorinated insecticides, herbicides and PCB's.

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of Trout Gill Ionocytes in Fresh Water and Sea Water Using Laser Capture Microdissection Combined with Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leguen, Isabelle; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Peron, Sandrine; Fautrel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Fish gills represent a complex organ composed of several cell types that perform multiple physiological functions. Among these cells, ionocytes are implicated in the maintenance of ion homeostasis. However, because the ionocyte represents only a small percent of whole gill tissue, its specific transcriptome can be overlooked among the numerous cell types included in the gill. The objective of this study is to better understand ionocyte functions by comparing the RNA expression of this cell type in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout. To realize this objective, ionocytes were captured from gill cryosections using laser capture microdissection after immunohistochemistry. Then, transcriptome analyses were performed on an Agilent trout oligonucleotide microarray. Gene expression analysis identified 108 unique annotated genes differentially expressed between freshwater and seawater ionocytes, with a fold change higher than 3. Most of these genes were up-regulated in freshwater cells. Interestingly, several genes implicated in ion transport, extracellular matrix and structural cellular proteins appeared up-regulated in freshwater ionocytes. Among them, several ion transporters, such as CIC2, SLC26A6, and NBC, were validated by qPCR and/or in situ hybridization. The latter technique allowed us to localize the transcripts of these ion transporters in only ionocytes and more particularly in the freshwater cells. Genes involved in metabolism and also several genes implicated in transcriptional regulation, cell signaling and the cell cycle were also enhanced in freshwater ionocytes. In conclusion, laser capture microdissection combined with microarray analysis allowed for the determination of the transcriptional signature of scarce cells in fish gills, such as ionocytes, and aided characterization of the transcriptome of these cells in freshwater and seawater acclimated trout. PMID:26439495

  11. Stocking and hooking mortality of planted rainbow trout in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, D. Hugh

    1985-01-01

    Attempts to establish a 'put-grow-and-take' fishery for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina failed despite plantings of 200,000 fish in 1972-1979 because few of the stocked fish survived to legal size. At the same time, a fishery for brown trout (Salmo trutta) was established successfully by planting far fewer fish. Experiments were conducted to determine if stress at stocking and injuries and stress associated with catch and release of fish by shoreline anglers were responsible for the poor survival of rainbow trout. Only 1 of the 606 rainbow trout stocked in floating wire cages anchored in the reservoir died during the first 3 days, and fewer rainbow trout than brown trout died as a result of catch-and-release fishing during the first 11 days after stocking. Thus, these factors were not responsible for the lack of success in establishing a rainbow trout fishery in this reservoir.

  12. Swimming endurance of bull trout, lake trout, arctic char, and rainbow trout following challenge with Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.T.; Moffitt, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the swimming endurance of juvenile bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, lake trout S. namaycush, Arctic char S. alpinus, and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 9??C and 15??C to determine whether sublethal infection from a moderate challenge of Renibacterium salmoninarum administered months before testing affected the length of time fish could maintain a swimming speed of 5-6 body lengths per second in an experimental flume. Rainbow trout and Arctic char swam longer in trials than did bull trout or lake trout, regardless of challenge treatment. When we tested fish 14-23 weeks postchallenge, we found no measurable effect of R. salmoninarum on the swimming endurance of the study species except for bull trout, which showed a mixed response. We conducted additional trials with bull trout 5-8 weeks postchallenge to determine whether increasing the challenge dose would affect swimming endurance and hematocrit. In those tests, bull trout with clinical signs of disease and those exposed to the highest challenge doses had significantly reduced swimming endurance compared with unchallenged control fish. Fish hematocrit levels measured at the end of all swimming endurance tests varied among species and between test temperatures, and patterns were not always consistent between challenged and control fish.

  13. Experimental evaluation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss predation on longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and in-stream enclosure experiments were used to determine whether rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss influence survival of longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae. In the laboratory, adult rainbow trout preyed on longnose dace in 42% of trials and juvenile rainbow trout did not prey on longnose dace during the first 6 h after rainbow trout introduction. Survival of longnose dace did not differ in the presence of adult rainbow trout previously exposed to active prey and those not previously exposed to active prey ( = 0.28, P = 0.60). In field enclosures, the number of longnose dace decreased at a faster rate in the presence of rainbow trout relative to controls within the first 72 h, but did not differ between moderate and high densities of rainbow trout (F2,258.9 = 3.73, P = 0.03). Additionally, longnose dace were found in 7% of rainbow trout stomachs after 72 h in enclosures. Rainbow trout acclimated to the stream for longer periods had a greater initial influence on the number of longnose dace remaining in enclosures relative to those acclimated for shorter periods regardless of rainbow trout density treatment (F4,148.5 = 2.50, P = 0.04). More research is needed to determine how predation rates will change in natural environments, under differing amounts of habitat and food resources and in the context of whole assemblages. However, if rainbow trout are introduced into the habitat of longnose dace, some predation on longnose dace is expected, even when rainbow trout have no previous experience with active prey.

  14. Constitutive heat shock protein 70 (HSC70) expression in rainbow trout hepatocytes: effect of heat shock and heavy metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Boone, Adrienne N; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2002-06-01

    The 70-kDa family of heat shock proteins plays an important role as molecular chaperones in unstressed and stressed cells. The constitutive member of the 70 family (hsc70) is crucial for the chaperoning function of unstressed cells, whereas the inducible form (hsp70) is important for allowing cells to cope with acute stressor insult, especially those affecting the protein machinery. In fish, the role of hsc70 in the cellular stress response process is less clear primarily because of the lack of a fish-specific antibody for hsc70 detection. In this study, we purified hsc70 to homogeneity from trout liver using a three-step purification protocol with differential centrifugation, ATP-agarose affinity chromatography and electroelution. Polyclonal antibodies to trout hsc70 generated in rabbits cross-reacted strongly with both purified trout hsc70 protein and also purified recombinant bovine hsc70. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by Western blotting confirmed that the isoelectric point of rainbow trout hsc70 was more acidic than hsp70. Using this antibody, we detected hsc70 content in the liver, heart, gill and skeletal muscle of unstressed rainbow trout. Primary cultures of trout hepatocytes subjected to a heat shock (+15 degrees C for 1 h) or exposed to either CuSO(4) (200 microM for 24 h), CdCl(2) (10 microM for 24 h) or NaAsO(2) (50 microM for 1 h) resulted in higher hsp70 accumulation over a 24-h period. However, hsc70 content showed no change with either heat shock or heavy metal exposure suggesting that hsc70 is not modulated by sublethal acute stressors in trout hepatocytes. Taken together, we have for the first time generated polyclonal antibodies specific to rainbow trout hsc70 and this antibody will allow for the characterization of the role of hsc70 in the cellular stress response process in fish. PMID:12106899

  15. Movement and survival of brown trout and rainbow trout in an ozark tailwater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, J.W.; Kwak, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the movement of adult brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to a catch-andrelease area in the White River downstream from Beaver Dam, Arkansas. Nine fish of each species were implanted with radio transmitters and monitored from July 1996 to July 1997. The 1.5- km river length of a catch-and-release area (closed to angler harvest) was greater than the total linear range of 72% of the trout (13 of 18 fish), but it did not include two brown trout spawning riffles, suggesting that it effectively protects resident fish within the catch-and-release area except during spawning. The total detected linear range of movement varied from 172 to 3,559 m for brown trout and from 205 to 3,023mfor rainbow trout. The movements of both species appeared to be generally similar to that in unregulated river systems. The annual apparent survival of both trout species was less than 0.40, and exploitation was 44%.Management to protect fish on spawning riffles may be considered if management for wild brown trout becomes a priority. ?? American Fisheries Society 2011.

  16. Global 3D Imaging of Yersinia ruckeri Bacterin Uptake in Rainbow Trout Fry

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming of salmonids for more than 35 years. The gills and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are believed to be the portals of antigen uptake during waterborne vaccination against ERM; however, the actual sites of bacterin uptake are only partly understood. In order to obtain insight into bacterin uptake during waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours. Large amounts of bacterin were present in the blood, and an accumulation of bacterin was found in filtering lymphoid organs such as spleen and trunk kidney where the bacterin accumulates 24 hours post vaccination as demonstrated by OPT and IHC. These results suggest that bacterin is taken up via the gill epithelium in the earliest phases of the bath exposure and from the GI tract in the later phase. The bacterin then enters the blood circulatory system, after which it is filtered by spleen and trunk kidney, before finally accumulating in lymphoid organs where adaptive immunity against ERM is likely to develop. PMID:25658600

  17. 3D Visualization of the Initial Yersinia ruckeri Infection Route in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by Optical Projection Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in farmed rainbow trout is one of the most devastating disease problems, little is known about the initial route of infection and pathogenicity of the aetiological agent, Yersinia ruckeri. In order to determine the initially infected organs, optical projection tomography (OPT), a novel three-dimensional (3D) bio-imaging technique, was applied. OPT not only enables the visualization of Y. ruckeri on mucosal surfaces but also the 3D spatial distribution in whole organs, without sectioning. Rainbow trout were infected by bath challenge exposure to 1×108 CFU/ml of Y. ruckeri O1 for 1 hour. Three fish were sampled for OPT and immunohistochemistry (IHC) 1, 10 and 30 minutes, 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, as well as 2, 3, 7 and 21 days after the start of the infection period. Y. ruckeri was re-isolated from the blood of infected fish as early as 1 minute post infection. Both OPT and IHC analysis confirmed that the secondary gill lamellae were the only tissues infected at this early time point, indicating that Y. ruckeri initially infects gill epithelial cells. The experimentally induced infection caused septicemia, and Y. ruckeri was found in all examined organs 7 days post infection including the brain, which correlated with the peak in mortality. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of Y. ruckeri infection in the brain, which is likely to cause encephalitis. This in part could explain the lethality of ERM in rainbow trout. Using OPT scanning it was possible to visualize the initial route of entry, as well as secondary infection routes along with the proliferation and spread of Y. ruckeri, ultimately causing significant mortality in the exposed rainbow trout. These results demonstrate that OPT is a state-of-the-art technique capable of visualizing pathogenesis at high resolution. PMID:24586953

  18. Residue dynamics of quinaldine and TFM in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Allen, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Study of the residue dynamics of 2-methylquinoline (quinaldine) and 3- trifluoromethy1-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in rainbow trout yielded the following findings: (1) Uptake and distribution of TFM by trout was influenced by the biotransformation of the lipid-soluble free phenol. No such effect was observed with quinaldine. (2) Disappearance of quinaldine and TFM from gallbladder bile was slower than from plasma or muscle during 24 hr of withdrawal in fresh water. (3) The conc of TFM conjugate may exceed that of free TFM in bile by a factor of 10 Super(3).

  19. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: increase rainbow trout recruitment, identify rainbow and bull trout spawning tributaries and migration timing, establish baseline data on bull trout redd numbers in tributaries, and improve the rainbow trout population size structure. Six adult rainbow trout were moved to spawning habitat upstream of a potential migration barrier on Caboose Creek, but numbers of redds and age-0 out-migrants did not appear to increase relative to a reference stream. Measurements taken on the Moyie River indicated the gradient is inadequate to deliver suitable flows to a proposed rainbow trout spawning channel. Summer water temperatures measured in the Deep Creek drainage sometimes exceeded 24 C, higher than those reported as suitable for rainbow trout. Radio-tagged rainbow trout were located in Boulder Creek during the spring spawning season, and bull trout were located in the Moyie River and O'Brien Creek, Montana in the fall. Bull trout spawning migration timing was related to increases in Kootenai River flows. Bull trout redd surveys documented 19 redds on Boulder Creek and North and South Callahan creeks. Fall 2002 electrofishing showed that the Kootenai River rainbow trout proportional stock density was 54, higher than prior years when more liberal fishing regulations were in effect. Boulder Creek produces the highest number of age-0 rainbow trout out-migrants upstream of Bonners Ferry, but the survival rate of these out-migrants upon reaching the Kootenai River is unknown. Determining juvenile survival rates and sources of mortality could aid management efforts

  20. Cryopreservation of rainbow trout spermatozoa (Onchorhynchus mykiss) using different cryodiluents.

    PubMed

    Makwana Nayan, P; Gupta, Sanjay K; Srivastva, Sathis K; Krishna, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential of extenders on sperm motility and to delineate the effect of cyodiluent compostion on post thaw motility, fertilization and hatching percentage in rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) sperm. The mature males of rainbow trout with an average weight of (340 15) g and average size (28.8 0.6) cm were used. In the trials for testing the suitability of cryoprotectants, DMSO yielded higher motility percentage with extenders Zhang and Liu and 0.6 M Sucrose. Significantly (P <0.05) higher value of % post thaw motility and fertilization was recorded in cryodiluent composition of 8 % DMSO and Zhang and Liu. Additionally, composition of 8 % DMSO with Zhang and Liu led to significant (P <0.05) increase in percentage hatching. Overall, results indicated that the combination of (8 % DMSO + Zhang and Liu) produced best results in terms of percentage post thaw motility, fertilization and hatching. PMID:26017293

  1. Healing Rate of Swim Bladders in Rainbow Trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Welch, Abigail E.; Deters, Katherine A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    The swimbladders of juvenile rainbow trout Onchorhynchus mykiss were ruptured and subsequently observed for 28 days to identify healing patterns of swimbladder wounds and the effects of swimbladder rupture on direct mortality. Healing began within seven days, wounds were completely closed after 14 days, and no mortalities occurred. The healing process followed a pattern in which tissue first thickened around the opening (7 to 14 days), followed by scarring of the ruptured area, and disappearance of any evidence of the wound (21 to 28 days). The healing observed in juvenile rainbow trout swimbladders suggests that swimbladder rupture does not result in direct mortality as was hypothesized; however, the indirect effects of swimbladder injury (e.g., a decreased ability to swim efficiently) may lead to mortality by predation or other natural phenomena that were not observable in this study.

  2. Transcriptional Heterogeneity of IgM+ Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; Pignatelli, Jaime; Luque, Alfonso; González, Lucia; Tafalla, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Two major classes of B lymphocytes have been described to date in rainbow trout: IgM+ and IgT+ cells. IgM+ cells are mainly localized in the spleen, peripheral blood and kidney but are also found in other tissues. However, differences among IgM+ cell populations attending to its location are poorly defined in fish. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize the expression of different immune molecules such as chemokine receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and transcription factors on sorted IgM+ lymphocytes from different rainbow trout tissues. IgM+ populations from blood, spleen, kidney, gills, intestine and liver were isolated by cell sorting and the constitutive levels of transcription of these genes evaluated by real-time PCR. To further characterize B cells, we identified an MS4A sequence. In humans, the MS4A family includes several genes with immune functions, such as the B cell marker CD20 or FcRβ. Subsequently, we have also evaluated the mRNA levels of this MS4A gene in the different IgM+ populations. The relevant differences in transcriptional patterns observed for each of these IgM+ populations analyzed, point to the presence of functionally different tissue-specific B cell populations in rainbow trout. The data shown provides a pattern of genes transcribed in IgM+ B cells not previously revealed in teleost fish. Furthermore, the constitutive expression of all the TLR genes analyzed in IgM+ cells suggests an important role for these cells in innate immunity. PMID:24324826

  3. Growth performance, fillet quality, and reproductive maturity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) cultured to 5 kilograms within freshwater recirculating systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout are commonly cultured within aquaculture systems to one pound or less and marketed as pan-sized fillets. Production of larger rainbow trout provides a distinguishable product. Research that describes the growth performance and fillet quality of large rainbow trout is limited, particula...

  4. Case Report: Strawberry Disease in Farmed Chilean Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Carlos; Infante, Jorge; Abad, Jessica; Ferguson, Hugh W; Paredes, Enrique; Valdebenito, Samuel; Yáñez, Alejandro J; Ilardi, Pedro; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-03-01

    Strawberry disease is a chronic, nonlethal skin condition that affects Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the United States and several European countries, where it is also known as red-mark syndrome. We provide the first identification and characterization of three strawberry disease outbreaks occurring at two aquaculture farms in southern Chile. Clinically affected fish weighing an average of 400 g presented multiple bright-red, usually raised, skin lesions on the flank, ventral surface, and dorsal surface. A PCR using Rickettsia-like-organism (RLO)-specific primers was performed on nine affected fish, and all skin samples were positive for the RLO 16S ribosomal RNA sequence. All PCR results for Flavobacterium psychrophilum and other bacterial and viral pathogens were negative. Histopathological examination of the skin lesions revealed extensive dermatitis, with severe lymphocytic infiltration in advanced cases. This report is the first to describe strawberry disease in farmed Chilean Rainbow Trout. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the risk for Rainbow Trout culture; fish challenge experiments should be performed to fulfill Koch's postulates and to demonstrate that RLO is the cause of this disease. Received December 27, 2014; accepted October 23, 2015. PMID:26913369

  5. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival. PMID:17180429

  6. Environmental levels of the antidepressant venlafaxine impact the metabolic capacity of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Best, Carol; Melnyk-Lamont, Nataliya; Gesto, Manuel; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-10-01

    The antidepressant venlafaxine is detected at parts per billion levels in tertiary-treated municipal wastewater effluent. However, the impact of this serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) on non-target aquatic animals is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that environmentally relevant levels of venlafaxine disrupt the highly conserved cortisol and glucose response to stress in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile trout were exposed to venlafaxine (0, 0.2 and 1.0 μg/L) in a static system with daily renewal for seven days. The fish were then subjected to an acute handling disturbance and sampled either prior to (0 h) or 1, 4 and 24h after stressor exposure. Venlafaxine exposure did not affect the handling disturbance-mediated transient elevation in plasma cortisol levels or target tissue glucocorticoid receptor expression. The drug exposure disrupted the interrenal steroidogenic capacity, including altered handling stressor-mediated changes in mRNA abundances of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage. The handling stressor-induced transient elevations in plasma glucose levels were significantly reduced in the venlafaxine-exposed fish. This was not accompanied by changes in liver glycogen content, glucose transporter 2 mRNA abundance or the glycolytic capacity, whereas the capacity for gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism were enhanced. Venlafaxine also brought about changes in the gill of trout, including enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity and Na(+)-K(+) ATPase protein expression, while the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase enzyme activity was reduced. Collectively, our results demonstrate that venlafaxine at levels detected in the aquatic environment impacts tissue metabolic capacities and may compromise the adaptive responses to an acute stressor in rainbow trout. PMID:25036621

  7. The distribution kinetics of waterborne silver-110m in juvenile rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Fernando; Mayer, Greg D; Wood, Chris M; Hogstrand, Christer

    2002-03-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were subjected to a 2-day radioactive pulse of 110mAg at 11.9 microg/l (as AgNO3), followed by a 19-day post-tracer exposure to non-radioactive Ag(I) (3.8 microg/l). The distribution of 110mAg in the gills, liver, intestine, kidney, brain and remaining carcass was investigated over a 19-day post-tracer period. Initially, the intestine contained the highest proportion of the 110mAg burden (34%), however, by day 8, less than 5% of the total radioactivity remained in this tissue. The majority of the 110mAg eliminated from the intestine appeared to distribute to the liver. Eventually, the 110mAg content in the liver accounted for as much as 65% of the total radioactivity in the fish. Apart from the liver and intestine, only the gills and carcass contained any appreciable amount (>5%) of the total body 110mAg content. Liver and gill samples were fractionated using differential centrifugation techniques to discern the subcellular distribution of 110mAg in these tissues. In the liver, the 110mAg levels in the cytosolic fraction increased from 35% to 72% of the total cellular burden between days 8 and 19, respectively. The radioactive pulse in the gills was predominantly found in a membrane compartment termed the nuclear fraction ( approximately 60% of the total). Little change was observed over time (day 8 to day 19) to the subcellular distribution of Ag in the gills. Using size-exclusion chromatography, most ( approximately 70%) of the 110mAg content in the liver cytosol eluted at a molecular weight characteristic of metallothionein. The cytosolic distribution of 110mAg in gills was quite diffuse, occurring primarily in the heavy molecular weight fractions. PMID:11912061

  8. A trial of two trouts: Comparing the impacts of rainbow and brown trout on a native galaxiid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, K.A.; Dunham, J.B.; Stephenson, J.F.; Terreau, A.; Thailly, A.F.; Gajardo, G.; de Leaniz, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta are the world's two most widespread exotic fishes, dominate the fish communities of most cold-temperate waters in the southern hemisphere and are implicated in the decline and extirpation of native fish species. Here, we provide the first direct comparison of the impacts of rainbow and brown trout on populations of a native fish by quantifying three components of exotic species impact: range, abundance and effect. We surveyed 54 small streams on the island of Chilo?? in Chilean Patagonia and found that the rainbow trout has colonized significantly more streams and has a wider geographic range than brown trout. The two species had similar post-yearling abundances in allopatry and sympatry, and their abundances depended similarly on reach-level variation in the physical habitat. The species appeared to have dramatically different effects on native drift-feeding Aplochiton spp., which were virtually absent from streams invaded by brown trout but shared a broad sympatric range with rainbow trout. Within this range, the species' post-yearling abundances varied independently before and after controlling for variation in the physical habitat. In the north of the island, Aplochiton spp. inhabited streams uninvaded by exotic trouts. Our results provide a context for investigating the mechanisms responsible for apparent differences in rainbow and brown trout invasion biology and can help inform conservation strategies for native fishes in Chilo?? and elsewhere. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2010 The Zoological Society of London.

  9. Impacts of Northern Pike on stocked Rainbow Trout in Pactola Reservoir, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheibel, Natalie C.; Dembkowski, Daniel J.; Davis, Jacob L.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of nonnative Northern Pike Esox lucius in Pactola Reservoir, South Dakota, has prompted concern among biologists about the influence of this species on the lake’s intensively managed salmonid fisheries. Ancedotal information suggests that catch rates of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have declined while mean size and abundance of Northern Pike has increased, although quantitative information on diet and growth of the Northern Pike population is lacking. To address potential interactions between Northern Pike and Rainbow Trout, we assessed size-dependent predation by Northern Pike on Rainbow Trout and determined the relative energetic contribution of stocked Rainbow Trout to Northern Pike growth using bioenergetics modeling. Stable isotopes combined with traditional diet analyses revealed that smaller Northern Pike (<600 mm TL) consumed primarily centrarchids and Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax, and Rainbow Trout contributed less than 10% to their annual energy consumption. In contrast, larger Northern Pike (≥600 mm TL) consumed primarily Rainbow Trout, which accounted for 56% of their annual energy consumption. Combining estimates of Northern Pike predation with production costs of catchable-size Rainbow Trout revealed that annual economic losses ranged from US$15,259 to $24,801 per year. Over its lifespan, an age-10 Northern Pike was estimated to consume ~117 Rainbow Trout worth approximately $340. Thus, Northern Pike predation substantially influences salmonid management initiatives and is likely a primary factor contributing to reduced Rainbow Trout abundance and return to anglers in Pactola Reservoir. Strategies for reducing Northern Pike predation on Rainbow Trout include increasing the size of stocked fish or altering the timing and spatial distribution of stocking events.

  10. Case report of an unusual heart abnormality in Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unusual heart abnormality in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was recently observed. During the course of a standard hydrogen peroxide treatment (100 ppm) of production rainbow trout (mean weight, 2-3 g) affected with an external bacterial infection, a small percentage of fish exhibited morbidi...

  11. SNP identification, genetic mapping and tissue expression of the rainbow trout TLR9 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes have been reported to be associated with disease resistance in human and livestock. A number of TLR genes have been identified in rainbow trout including TLR2, TLR3, TLR5, TLR20, TLR22 and TLR23. The rainbow trout (Oncorhynch...

  12. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether estradiol (E2) or the primary soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile rainbow trout (5 mon, 65.8 ± 1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, gen...

  13. Rapid and accurate sequencing of the rainbow trout physical map using Illumina technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and serve as an important model species for many areas of research. Despite their importance, a reference genome sequence has not yet been generated for rainbow trout due in large part to the complex...

  14. The development and characterization of a 57K SNP Chip for rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the development and characterization of the first high density SNP chip for rainbow trout. The chip included 57,500 putative SNPs, of which 49,500 (86%) were validated as high quality and polymorphic in our validation panel of 960 rainbow trout samples. This array is compa...

  15. Rapid and accurate sequencing of the rainbow trout physical map using Illumina technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are the most widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many areas of research. Despite their importance, a reference genome sequence has not been generated for rainbow trout due in large part to the complex nature of th...

  16. Virulence and molecular variation of Flavobacterium columnare affecting rainbow trout in ID, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease is an emerging problem in the rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss) aquaculture industry of Idaho. The epidemiology of this pathogen in the area, and for rainbow trout, is all isolates taken from disease outbreaks are genomovar I and similar based on basic typing protocols. Virulence...

  17. The physiological effects of selection in rainbow trout selected for growth on plant-based feeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been proven that rainbow trout can selectively be improved to more efficiently process and utilize nutrients from different sources. A stock of rainbow trout has been developed to grow faster on a diet formulated without fishmeal and the protein sources coming completely from plant material. ...

  18. Kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Hoffman, Alex D; Lien, Gregory J; Hammermeister, Dean E; Nichols, John W

    2009-09-14

    Halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) produced by chlorine disinfection of municipal drinking water represent a potentially important class of environmental contaminants. Little is known, however, about their potential to adversely impact fish and other aquatic life. In this study we examined the kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) in rainbow trout. Branchial uptake was measured in fish confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers. Branchial uptake efficiency was <5%, suggesting passive diffusion through aqueous channels in the gill epithelium. DCA concentrations in tissues following prolonged (72, 168, or 336 h) waterborne exposures were expressed as tissue:plasma concentration ratios. Concentration ratios for the kidney and muscle at 168 and 336 h were consistent with the suggestion that DCA distributes primarily to tissue water. Reduced concentration ratios for the liver, particularly at 72 h, indicated that DCA was highly metabolized by this tissue. Routes and rates of elimination were characterized by injecting chambered animals with a high (5.0mg/kg) or low (50 microg/kg) bolus dose. DCA was rapidly cleared by naïve animals resulting in elimination half-lives (t(1/2)) of less than 4h. Waterborne pre-treatment of fish with DCA increased the persistence of a subsequently injected dose. In high dose animals, pre-treatment caused a 4-fold decrease in whole-body clearance (CL(B)) and corresponding increases in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (extrapolated to infinity; AUC(0-->infinity)) and t(1/2). Qualitatively similar results were obtained in low dose fish, although the magnitude of the pre-treatment effect ( approximately 2.5-fold) was reduced. Renal and branchial clearance contributed little (combined, <3% of CL(B)) to the elimination of DCA. Biliary elimination of DCA was also negligible. The steady-state volume of distribution (V(SS)) did not vary among treatment groups and was consistent with results of the tissue distribution

  19. Effect of copper sulphate on the antioxidant parameters in the rainbow trout fry, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Yonar, M E; Ispir, U; Mişe Yonar, S; Kirici, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antioxidant responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to different concentrations of copper sulphate (CuSO4). Fish were exposed to 0 (Group I-control), 5 (Group II), 15 (Group III) and 30 µg/L (Group IV) concentrations of CuSO4 for 14 days. Liver and gills samples were collected at the end of the experiment, and analysed for their oxidant-antioxidant status, including the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities as well as the reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration. Results obtained showed that the levels of MDA increased in tissues of fish. Compared to control, GSH level and GSH-Px and CAT activities were significantly reduced in the fish that were exposed to different concentrations of CuSO4. The result demonstrated that CuSO4 has an oxidative-stress-inducing potential in fish. PMID:27262803

  20. Histopathological changes induced by maneb and carbaryl on some tissues of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Boran, Halis; Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol

    2010-06-01

    Acute toxicity of the pesticides, maneb and carbaryl, to juvenile rainbow trout were evaluated under static-renewal test conditions. Actual concentrations of maneb ranged from 0.10mg/L to 2.00mg/L and carbaryl ranged from 0.20mg/L to 3.90mg/L. The concentrations of maneb that killed 50% of the rainbow trout (3.27+/-0.9g) within 24-h (24-h; LC(50)), 48-h, 72-h and 96-h were 1.19+/-0.12, 1.04+/-0.11, 0.92+/-0.12 and 0.81+/-0.14mg/L (95% confidence limits), respectively. LC(50) values of carbaryl for 24-h, 48-h, 72-h and 96-h were 2.52+/-0.71, 2.16+/-0.63, 1.71+/-0.46 and 1.39+/-0.15mg/L, respectively. None of the unexposed control fish died and the first fish died 6h after exposure to maneb (>or=1.30mg/L), and carbaryl (>or=2.60mg/L). Lamellar edema, separation of epithelium from lamellae, lamellar fusion, swelling of the epithelial cells and epithelial cell necrosis were observed on maneb and carbaryl exposed fish. Gills also had scattered areas of focal lamellar hyperplasia. Fish exposed to pesticides had inflammation and focal necrosis in liver, trunk kidney and spleen. Maneb and carbaryl had similar histopathological lesions. In order, the most affected organs were gill, trunk kidney and liver. PMID:20430411

  1. TISSUE-SPECIFIC CADMIUM ACCUMULATION, METALLOTHIONEIN INDUCTION, AND TISSUE ZINC AND COPPER LEVELS DURING CHRONIC SUBLETHAL CADMIUM EXPOSURE IN JUVENILE RAINBOW TROUT. (R826104)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Juvenile rainbow trout, on 3% of body weight daily ration, were exposed to 0 (control) or 3 mug/L Cd (as Cd(NO3)(2) . 4H(2)O) in moderately hard (140 mg/L as CaCO3), alkaline (95 mg/L as CaCO3, pH 8.0) water for 30 days. Particular attention focused on Cd burden in tissues (gills...

  2. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.; Downs, Christopher C.

    2001-08-01

    Our 1999 objectives were to determine sources of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus spawning and recruitment in the Idaho reach of the Kootenai River. We used a rotary-screw trap to capture juvenile trout to determine age at out-migration and to estimate total out-migration from the Boundary Creek drainage to the Kootenai River. The out-migrant estimate for March through August 1999 was 1,574 (95% C. I. = 825-3,283) juvenile rainbow trout. Most juveniles out-migrated at age-2 and age-3. No out-migrating bull trout were caught. Five of 17 rainbow trout radio-tagged in Idaho migrated upstream into Montana waters during the spawning season. Five bull trout originally radio-tagged in O'Brien Creek, Montana in early October moved downstream into Idaho and British Columbia by mid-October. Annual angler exploitation for the rainbow trout population upstream of Bonners Ferry, Idaho was estimated to be 58%. Multi-pass depletion estimates for index reaches of Caboose, Curley, and Debt creeks showed 0.20, 0.01, and 0.13 rainbow trout juveniles/m{sup 2}, respectively. We estimated rainbow trout (180-415 mm TL) standing stock of 1.6 kg/ha for the Hemlock Bar reach (29.4 ha) of the Kootenai River, similar to the 1998 estimate. Recruitment of juvenile rainbow and bull trout from Idaho tributaries is not sufficient to be the sole source of subsequent older fish in the mainstem Kootenai River. These populations are at least partly dependent on recruitment from Montana waters. The low recruitment and high exploitation rate may be indicators of a rainbow trout population in danger of further decline.

  3. Acute and chronic toxicity studies with monochlorobenzene in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlich, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity of monochlorobenzene (CB) was investigated in rainbow trout following acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration and chronic exposure via the water in a continuously flowing system for 15 or 30 days. In the acute study overt toxicity and hepatotoxicity were monitored over a 96-h time period. Variables measured to assess toxicity included weight changes, liver weight to body weight ratios, behavioral changes, alanine aminotransferase activity (GPT), sulfobromophthalein (BSP) retention, total plasma protein concentration and liver histopathology. In the chronic study the same measures of toxicity were followed as well as food consumption and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. Upon acute i.p. exposure the toxicant (9.8 mmol/kg) caused behavioral changes in the fish which were consistent with the known anesthetic properties of CB in mammals. Elevations in BSP retention and GPT activity, and histopathology indicated that CB was hepatotoxic in fish. The LC50 of CB in trout exposed via the water for 96 h was 4.7 mg/l. Chronic exposure of trout to 2 or 3 mg/l CB resulted in similar behavioral changes as seen in the acute study. Liver toxicity was evident from elevations in GPT activity. BSP retention and AP activity appeared to be affected by the nutritional status of the trout as much as by the CB treatment. After 30 days of exposure to 3 mg/l CB, trout appeared to have developed some tolerance to the toxic effects.

  4. Effects of aqueous exposure to silver nanoparticles of different sizes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Scown, Tessa M; Santos, Eduarda M; Johnston, Blair D; Gaiser, Birgit; Baalousha, Mohammed; Mitov, Svetlin; Lead, Jamie R; Stone, Vicki; Fernandes, Teresa F; Jepson, Mark; van Aerle, Ronny; Tyler, Charles R

    2010-06-01

    Despite increasing application of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in industry and consumer products, there is still little known about their potential toxicity, particularly to organisms in aquatic environments. To investigate the fate and effects of silver NPs in fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed via the water to commercial silver particles of three nominal sizes: 10 nm (N(10)), 35 nm (N(35)), and 600-1600 nm (N(Bulk)), and to silver nitrate for 10 days. Uptake into the gills, liver, and kidneys was quantified by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, and levels of lipid peroxidation in gills, liver, and blood were determined by measurements of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Expression of a suite of genes, namely cyp1a2, cyp3a45, hsp70a, gpx, and g6pd, known to be involved in a range of toxicological response to xenobiotics was analyzed in the gills and liver using real-time PCR. Uptake of silver particles from the water into the tissues of exposed fish was low but nevertheless occurred for current estimated environmental exposures. Of the silver particles tested, N(10) were found to be the most highly concentrated within gill tissues and N(10) and N(Bulk) were the most highly concentrated in liver. There were no effects on lipid peroxidation in any of the tissues analyzed for any of the silver particles tested, and this is likely due to the low uptake rates. However, exposure to N(10) particles was found to induce expression of cyp1a2 in the gills, suggesting a possible increase in oxidative metabolism in this tissue. PMID:20219766

  5. Promotion of Hepatocarcinogenesis by Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Benninghoff, Abby D.; Orner, Gayle A.; Buchner, Clarissa H.; Hendricks, Jerry D.; Duffy, Aaron M.; Williams, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) promotes liver cancer in a manner similar to that of 17β-estradiol (E2) in rainbow trout. Also, other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are weakly estrogenic in trout and bind the trout liver estrogen receptor. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether multiple PFAAs enhance hepatic tumorigenesis in trout, an animal model that represents human insensitivity to peroxisome proliferation. A two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model was employed in trout to evaluate PFOA, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2FtOH) as complete carcinogens or promoters of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)- and/or N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced liver cancer. A custom trout DNA microarray was used to assess hepatic transcriptional response to these dietary treatments in comparison with E2 and the classic peroxisome proliferator, clofibrate (CLOF). Incidence, multiplicity, and size of liver tumors in trout fed diets containing E2, PFOA, PFNA, and PFDA were significantly higher compared with AFB1-initiated animals fed control diet, whereas PFOS caused a minor increase in liver tumor incidence. E2 and PFOA also enhanced MNNG-initiated hepatocarcinogenesis. Pearson correlation analyses, unsupervised hierarchical clustering, and principal components analyses showed that the hepatic gene expression profiles for E2 and PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, and PFOS were overall highly similar, though distinct patterns of gene expression were evident for each treatment, particularly for PFNA. Overall, these data suggest that multiple PFAAs can promote liver cancer and that the mechanism of promotion may be similar to that of E2. PMID:21984479

  6. A hematopoietic virus disease of rainbow trout and sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Yasutake, William T.; Mead, Robert W.

    1969-01-01

    A previously undescribed virus disease epizootic of hatchery rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in British Columbia, Canada is presented. In the same locality, a similar virus disease was experienced among hatchery sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). Typical symptoms included flashing, fecal casts, hemorrhagic areas at the base of fins, and petechial hemorrhages on the visceral fat and membranes in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologic changes were typified by extensive degeneration and necrosis in the hematopoietic tissues of the kidney and spleen. A virus was isolated from both species of fish on tissue culture and the viruses showed cross-infectivity. Based upon the pathological changes in the hematopoietic tissue and the demonstration of a vital infection, a tentative descriptive name was designated Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis. The isolated viruses were distinctly different from the infectious pancreatic necrosis or viral hemorrhagic septicemia viruses of trout, but did show similarities to the Oregon sockeye and Sacramento River chinook viruses. Positive identification awaits further tests. The significance of these observations is the reporting of a new viral disease of rainbow trout and the extension of the geographic range of sockeye salmon viruses.

  7. IN VIVO MEASUREMENT OF PHENYLGLUCUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT BY ON-LINE INJECTION MICRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG) was measured in vivo in arterial blood of rainbow trout using on-line injection microdialysis. A microdialysis probe was surgically implanted in the dorsal aorta of spinally-transected trout. The trout were dosed continuously with PG for 24 h using a ventra...

  8. Tissue deposition and residue depletion in rainbow trout following continuous voluntary feeding with various levels of melamine or a blend of melamine and cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Xue, Min; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Jing; Wu, Xiufeng; Zheng, Yinhua; Li, Junguo; Qin, Yuchang

    2014-11-01

    This study determined the deposition and depletion in rainbow trout after continuous administration of melamine (MEL) alone or a blend of MEL and cyanuric acid (CYA). The plasma, muscles, kidneys, liver and gills were sampled at 0, 3, 7, 13, 21, 28 and 42d. After the final sampling at 42d, fish from the MEL0.05, MEL20 and MCA groups were fed the control diet (MEL0) for the depletion test. Co-administration with cyanuric acid accelerated the deposition time to the Css for melamine; during the withdrawal phrase, the melamine and CYA concentrations in the tissues decreased exponentially. Compared to the t(½) for single oral administration, the t(½) for melamine and cyanuric acid after 42d continuous feeding was prolonged. The presence of trace CYA in the plasma and kidneys of trout was detected in the MEL20 group, indicating that MEL can convert into CYA in rainbow trout. PMID:25038476

  9. Enhanced Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin uptake and side effects caused by low frequency sonophoresis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cobo, Cristóbal; Makosch, Katarzyna; Jung, Rainer; Kohlmann, Klaus; Knopf, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Low frequency sonophoresis (LFS) has been recognized as one of the most advanced technologies in transdermal delivery of substances, due to the modification of the stratum corneum lipid bilayer, in focal skin applications in mammals. Based on these findings, LFS has been suggested as a potential technology to be used for enhancement in immersion fish vaccination. In contrast to mammals where LFS is applied to discrete regions of the skin, in fish the whole individual needs to be exposed for practical purposes. The current study evaluated the impact of LFS at 37 kHz on the uptake of an Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin and side effects of the treatment in rainbow trout. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the bacterin uptake into skin and gill tissue. Side effects were assessed by behavioural examination, histology and blood serum analysis. The sonication intensity of 171 mW/cm² was enough for increasing skin permeability, but caused heavy erratic swimming and gill haemorrhages. Sonication intensities as low as 105 mW/cm² did not modify skin permeability and enhanced the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue by factor 15 compared to conventional immersion. Following sonication, the gill permeability for the bacterin decreased after 20 min and 120 min by factor 3 and 2, respectively. However, during sonication, erratic swimming of the fish raised some concerns. Further reduction of the sonication intensity to 57 mW/cm² did not induce erratic swimming, and the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue was still increased by factor 3. In addition, a decreasing albumin-globulin ratio in the serum of the rainbow trout within 40 min revealed that LFS leads to an inflammatory response. Consequently, based on both increased bacterin uptake and the inflammatory response, low intensity LFS has the potential to enhance vaccine immunity without significant side effects. PMID:24378683

  10. Fish models for environmental carcinogenesis: the rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, G S; Williams, D E; Hendricks, J D

    1996-01-01

    Progress over the past 30 years has revealed many strengths of the rainbow trout as an alternative model for environmental carcinogenesis research. These include low rearing costs, an early life-stage ultrasensitive bioassay, sensitivity to many classes of carcinogen, a well-described tumor pathology, responsiveness to tumor promoters and inhibitors, and a mechanistically informative nonmammalian comparative status. Low-cost husbandry, for example, has permitted statistically challenging tumor study designs with up to 10,000 trout to investigate the quantitative interrelationships among carcinogen dose, anticarcinogen dose, DNA adduct formation, and final tumor outcome. The basic elements of the trout carcinogen bioassay include multiple exposure routes, carcinogen response, husbandry requirements, and pathology. The principal known neoplasms occur in liver (mixed hepatocellular/cholangiocellular adenoma and carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma), kidney (nephroblastoma), swim bladder (adenopapilloma), and stomach (adenopapilloma). Trout possess a complex but incompletely characterized array of cytochromes P450, transferases, and other enzymic systems for phase I and phase II procarcinogen metabolism. In general, trout exhibit only limited capacity for DNA repair, especially for removal of bulky DNA adducts. This factor, together with a high capacity for P450 bioactivation and negligible glutathione transferase-mediated detoxication of the epoxide, accounts for the exceptional sensitivity of trout to aflatoxin B1 carcinogenesis. At the gene level, all trout tumors except nephroblastoma exhibit variable and often high incidences of oncogenic Ki-ras gene mutations. Mutations in the trout p53 tumor suppressor gene have yet to be described. There are many aspects of the trout model, especially the lack of complete organ homology, that limit its application as a surrogate for human cancer research. Within these limitations, however, it is apparent that trout and other

  11. Characterization of three novel beta-defensin antimicrobial peptides in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Casadei, Elisa; Wang, Tiehui; Zou, Jun; González Vecino, Jose L; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J

    2009-10-01

    An initial bioinformatics investigation followed by cloning and sequencing analysis, has led to the identification of three novel members (omDB-2, omDB-3, omBD-4) of the beta-defensin family in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The contiguous sequences could be translated to give predicted peptides of 62 (omDB-2), 63 (omDB-3) and 68 (omDB-4) amino acids (aa) in length, with mature peptides of 43 (omDB-2), 39 (omDB-3) and 42 (omDB-4) aa, with no obvious proregion present. Analysis of the gene organization found that all three new genes contained three exons divided by two introns, as seen in defensin genes of other fish species. Constitutive expression of all the trout defensins was detected by RT-PCR in a wide range of mucosal and systemic tissues from healthy fish, with omDB-3 and omDB-4 showing the highest expression levels. Following bacterial challenge in vivo, the defensin genes were induced at the three mucosal sites examined (skin, gill, gut), with levels of omDB-2 and omDB-3 increased some 16-fold in gut and gill respectively. Using polyinosinic polycytosinic RNA (polyI:C) as a viral mimic, all of the four trout beta-defensin genes were induced in head kidney primary leucocyte cultures at 4h post-stimulation, with omDB-1 and omDB-3 particularly highly expressed. These data suggest that beta-defensins are likely an important component of the innate defences of fish, and reveal an added level of antimicrobial peptide complexity in fish to that known previously. PMID:19709750

  12. Genetic characterization of hybridization and introgression between anadromous rainbow trout (oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (o. clarki clarki)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, W.P.; Ostberg, C.O.; Keim, P.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization represents a dynamic evolutionary phenomenon and major conservation problem in salmonid fishes. In this study we used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to describe the extent and characterize the pattern of hybridization and introgression between coastal rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss irideus) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). Hybrid individuals were initially identified using principle coordinate analysis of 133 polymorphic AFLP markers. Subsequent analysis using 23 diagnostic AFLP markers revealed the presence of F1, rainbow trout backcross, cutthroat trout backcross and later-generation hybrids. mtDNA analysis demonstrated equal numbers of F1 hybrids with rainbow and cutthroat trout mtDNA indicating reciprocal mating of the parental types. In contrast, rainbow and cutthroat trout backcross hybrids always exhibited the mtDNA from the recurrent parent, indicating a male hybrid mating with a pure female. This study illustrates the usefulness of the AFLP technique for generating large numbers of species diagnostic markers. The pattern of hybridization raises many questions concerning the existence and action of reproductive isolating mechanisms between these two species. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that introgression between anadromous populations of coastal rainbow and coastal cutthroat trout is limited by an environment-dependent reduction in hybrid fitness.

  13. Energy stores, lipid mobilization and leptin endocrinology of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Marcus; Morgenroth, Daniel; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg Eir; Gong, Ningping; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2016-08-01

    The physiological role of leptin in fish is not fully elucidated. In the present study, the involvement of the leptin system in lipid deposition and mobilization in rainbow trout during feeding and 1, 2 and 4 weeks of fasting was investigated in two lines of rainbow trout with different muscle and visceral adiposity: a fat line (FL) with high total energy reserves, high muscle adiposity, but low visceral adiposity and a lean line (LL) with lower total energy reserves and lower muscle adiposity, but higher visceral adiposity. During 4 weeks of fasting, muscle lipids decreased by 63 % in the FL fish, while no such energy mobilization from muscle occurred in the LL fish. On the other hand, lipid stores in liver and visceral adipose tissue was utilized to a similar extent by the two fish lines during fasting. Under normal feeding conditions, plasma leptin levels were higher in the LL than the FL fish, suggesting a possible contribution of visceral adipocytes to plasma leptin levels. Plasma leptin-binding protein levels did not differ between the lines and were not affected by fasting. After 4 weeks of fasting, the long leptin receptor and the leptin-binding protein isoforms 1 and 3 muscle expression increased in the LL fish, as well as hepatic expression of leptin A1 and the two binding protein isoforms. These responses were not seen in the FL fish. The data suggest that the Lep system in rainbow trout is involved in regulation of energy stores and their mobilization. PMID:27083432

  14. Effect of electric barrier on passage and physical condition of juvenile and adult rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layhee, Megan J.; Sepulveda, Adam; Shaw, Amy; Smuckall, Matthew; Kapperman, Kevin; Reyes, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Electric barriers can inhibit passage and injure fish. Few data exist on electric barrier parameters that minimize these impacts and on how body size affects susceptibility, especially to nontarget fish species. The goal of this study was to determine electric barrier voltage and pulse-width settings that inhibit passage of larger bodied rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (215–410 mm fork length) while allowing passage of smaller bodied juvenile rainbow trout (52–126 mm) in a static laboratory setting. We exposed rainbow trout to 30-Hz pulsed-direct current voltage gradients (0.00–0.45 V cm−1) and pulse widths (0.0–0.7 ms) and recorded their movement, injury incidence, and mortality. No settings tested allowed all juveniles to pass while impeding all adult passage. Juvenile and adult rainbow trout avoided the barrier at higher pulse widths, and fewer rainbow trout passed the barrier at 0.7-ms pulse width compared to 0.1 ms and when the barrier was turned off. We found no effect of voltage gradient on fish passage. No mortality occurred, and we observed external bruising in 5 (7%) juvenile rainbow trout and 15 (21%) adult rainbow trout. This study may aid managers in selecting barrier settings that allow for increased juvenile passage.

  15. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  16. Gill net saturation by lake trout in Michigan waters of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Schorfhaar, Richard G.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted experimental fishing for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Michigan waters of Lake Superior to determine the importance of soak time on catch per effort (CPE) in numbers per kilometer of standard gill net. We modeled CPE as a nonlinear function of the number of nights between setting and lifting (soak time), in which the nets fill at a certain rate toward some maximum after which the nets cannot hold more fish. We found that lake trout CPE increased with soak time at a rate that varied with lake trout density toward a saturation level that was independent of lake trout density. The CPE values of nets soaked 2–5 nights divided by the CPE of nets soaked 1 night were significantly lower than would be expected had CPE increased as a linear function of the number of nights soaked. We derived a means for correcting gill-net CPE values for differing soak times to a common base of 1 night soaked. We concluded that it is inappropriate to assume lake trout catches in gill nets will increase in direct proportion to the number of nights soaked and recommend that CPE of lake trout in gill nets be corrected for soak time.

  17. Metals-contaminated benthic invertebrates in the Clark Fork River, Montana: Effects on age-0 brown trout and rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Daniel F.; Farag, Aïda M.; Bergman, Harold L.; Delonay, Aaron J.; Little, Edward E.; Smiths, Charlie E.; Barrows, Frederic T.

    1995-01-01

    Benthic organisms in the upper Clark Fork River have recently been implicated as a dietary source of metals that may be a chronic problem for young-of-the-year rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In this present study, early life stage brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout were exposed for 88 d to simulated Clark Fork River water and a diet of benthic invertebrates collected from the river. These exposures resulted in reduced growth and elevated levels of metals in the whole body of both species. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb increased in whole brown trout; in rainbow trout, As and Cd increased in whole fish, and As also increased in liver. Brown trout on the metals-contaminated diets exhibited constipation, gut impaction, increased cell membrane damage (lipid peroxidation), decreased digestive enzyme production (zymogen), and a sloughing of intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. Rainbow trout fed the contaminated diets exhibited constipation and reduced feeding activity. We believe that the reduced standing crop of trout in the Clark Fork River results partly from chronic effects of metals contamination in benthic invertebrates that are important as food for young-of-the-year fish.

  18. EFFECT OF FLUCTUATING EXPOSURES ON THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO RAINBOW TROUT (SALMO GAIRDNERI) AND CUTTHROAT TROUT (S. CLARKI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute toxicity bioassays in which fish were exposed to short-term cyclic fluctuations of ammonia were conducted on rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and on cutthroat trout (S. clarki). Companion tests were also conducted in which test fish were subjected to ammonia at constant conc...

  19. Effects of water temperature and fish size on predation vulnerability of juvenile humpback chub to rainbow trout and brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Morton-Starner, Rylan

    2015-01-01

    Predation on juvenile native fish by introduced Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout is considered a significant threat to the persistence of endangered Humpback Chub Gila cypha in the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Diet studies of Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout in Glen and Grand canyons indicate that these species do eat native fish, but impacts are difficult to assess because predation vulnerability is highly variable, depending on prey size, predator size, and the water temperatures under which the predation interactions take place. We conducted laboratory experiments to evaluate how short-term predation vulnerability of juvenile native fish changes in response to fish size and water temperature using captivity-reared Humpback Chub, Bonytail, and Roundtail Chub. Juvenile chub 45–90 mm total length (TL) were exposed to adult Rainbow and Brown trouts at 10, 15, and 20°C to measure predation vulnerability as a function of water temperature and fish size. A 1°C increase in water temperature decreased short-term predation vulnerability of Humpback Chub to Rainbow Trout by about 5%, although the relationship is not linear. Brown Trout were highly piscivorous in the laboratory at any size > 220 mm TL and at all water temperatures we tested. Understanding the effects of predation by trout on endangered Humpback Chub is critical in evaluating management options aimed at preserving native fishes in Grand Canyon National Park.

  20. Toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes to rainbow trout, (Oncorhynchus mykiss): respiratory toxicity, organ pathologies, and other physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine J; Shaw, Benjamin J; Handy, Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Mammalian studies have raised concerns about the toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), but there is very limited data on ecotoxicity to aquatic life. We describe the first detailed report on the toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) to rainbow trout, using a body systems approach. Stock solutions of dispersed SWCNT were prepared using a combination of solvent (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) and sonication. A semi-static test system was used to expose rainbow trout to either a freshwater control, solvent control, 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 mgl(-1) SWCNT for up to 10 days. SWCNT exposure caused a dose-dependent rise in ventilation rate, gill pathologies (oedema, altered mucocytes, hyperplasia), and mucus secretion with SWCNT precipitation on the gill mucus. No major haematological or blood disturbances were observed in terms of red and white blood cell counts, haematocrits, whole blood haemoglobin, and plasma Na(+) or K(+). Tissue metal levels (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cu, Zn and Co) were generally unaffected. However some dose-dependent changes in brain and gill Zn or Cu were observed (but not tissue Ca(2+)), that were also partly attributed to the solvent. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity in the gills and intestine, but not in the brain. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) showed dose-dependent and statistically significant decreases especially in the gill, brain and liver during SWCNT exposure compared to controls. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in the total glutathione levels in the gills (28%) and livers (18%), compared to the solvent control. Total glutathione in the brain and intestine remained stable in all treatments. Pathologies in the brain included possible aneurisms or swellings on the ventral surface of the cerebellum. Liver cells exposed to SWCNT showed condensed nuclear bodies (apoptotic bodies) and cells in abnormal nuclear division. Overt fatty change or wide

  1. Determining Vaccination Frequency in Farmed Rainbow Trout Using Vibrio anguillarum O1 Specific Serum Antibody Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nylén, Jørgen; Lorenzen, Niels; Buchmann, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite vaccination with a commercial vaccine with a documented protective effect against Vibrio anguillarum O1 disease outbreaks caused by this bacterium have been registered among rainbow trout at Danish fish farms. The present study examined specific serum antibody levels as a valid marker for assessing vaccination status in a fish population. For this purpose a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed and used to evaluate sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated against V. anguillarum O1. Study Design Immune sera from rainbow trout immunised with an experimental vaccine based on inactivated V. anguillarum O1 bacterin in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant were used for ELISA optimisation. Subsequently, sera from farmed rainbow trout vaccinated with a commercial vaccine against V. anguillarum were analysed with the ELISA. The measured serum antibody levels were compared with the vaccine status of the fish (vaccinated/unvaccinated) as evaluated through visual examination. Results Repeated immunisation with the experimental vaccine lead to increasing levels of specific serum antibodies in the vaccinated rainbow trout. The farmed rainbow trout responded with high antibody levels to a single injection with the commercial vaccine. However, the diversity in responses was more pronounced in the farmed fish. Primary visual examinations for vaccine status in rainbow trout from the commercial farm revealed a large pool of unvaccinated specimens (vaccination failure rate = 20%) among the otherwise vaccinated fish. Through serum analyses using the ELISA in a blinded set-up it was possible to separate samples collected from the farmed rainbow trout into vaccinated and unvaccinated fish. Conclusions Much attention has been devoted to development of new and more effective vaccines. Here we present a case from a Danish rainbow trout farm indicating that attention should also be directed to the vaccination procedure in order to secure

  2. Diurnal stream habitat use of juvenile Atlantic salmon, brown trout and rainbow trout in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; Douglass, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    The diurnal winter habitat of three species of juvenile salmonids was examined in a tributary of Skaneateles Lake, NY to compare habitat differences among species and to determine if species/age classes were selecting specific habitats. A total of 792 observations were made on the depth, velocity, substrate and cover (amount and type) used by sympatric subyearling Atlantic salmon, subyearling brown trout and subyearling and yearling rainbow trout. Subyearling Atlantic salmon occurred in shallower areas with faster velocities and less cover than the other salmonid groups. Subyearling salmon was also the only group associated with substrate of a size larger than the average size substrate in the study reach during both winters. Subyearling brown trout exhibited a preference for vegetative cover. Compared with available habitat, yearling rainbow trout were the most selective in their habitat use. All salmonid groups were associated with more substrate cover in 2002 under high flow conditions. Differences in the winter habitat use of these salmonid groups have important management implications in terms of both habitat protection and habitat enhancement.

  3. Novel molecular markers differentiate Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout and steelhead) and the O. clarki (cutthroat trout) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of 26 PCR-based markers was developed that differentiates rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coastal cutthroat trout (O. clarki clarki). The markers also differentiated rainbow from other cutthroat trout subspecies (O. clarki), and several of the markers differentiated between cutthroat trout subspecies. This system has numerous positive attributes, including: nonlethal sampling, high species-specificity and products that are easily identified and scored using agarose gel electrophoresis. The methodology described for developing the markers can be applied to virtually any system in which numerous markers are desired for identifying or differentiating species or subspecies.

  4. Estimates of plasma, packed cell and total blood volume in tissues of the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Total blood volume and relative blood volumes in selected tissues were determined in non-anesthetized, confined rainbow trout by using super(51)Cr-labelled trout erythrocytes as a vascular space marker. Mean total blood volume was estimated to be 4.09 plus or minus 0.55 ml/100 g, or about 75% of that estimated with the commonly used plasma space marker Evans blue dye. Relative tissue blood volumes were greatest in highly perfused tissues such as kidney, gills, brain and liver and least in mosaic muscle. Estimates of tissue vascular spaces, made using radiolabelled erythrocytes, were only 25-50% of those based on plasma space markers. The consistently smaller vascular volumes obtained with labelled erythrocytes could be explained by assuming that commonly used plasma space markers diffuse from the vascular compartment.

  5. Effects of copper on the acute cortisol response and associated physiology in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Tellis, Margaret S; Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of chronic waterborne copper (Cu) exposure on the acute stress-induced cortisol response and associated physiological consequences in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout were exposed to 30 μg Cu/L in moderately hard water (120 mg/L as CaCO(3)) for 40 days, following which time the acute cortisol response was examined with a series of stressors. At 40 days, a 65% increase in Cu was observed in the gill, but no accumulation was observed in the liver, brain or head kidney. Stressors such as air exposure or confinement did not elicit an increase in circulating cortisol levels for Cu-exposed fish, in contrast to controls. However, this inhibitory effect on the acute cortisol response appeared to have few implications on the ability of Cu-exposed fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. For example, plasma Na(+), Ca(2+) and glucose levels as well as hepatic glycogen levels were the same post-stress in control and Cu-exposed fish. Trout were also challenged with exposure to 50% seawater for 48 h, where Cu-exposed trout maintained plasma Na(+), glucose and hepatic glycogen levels. However, Cu-exposed fish experienced decreased plasma K(+) levels throughout the Cu exposure and stress tests. In conclusion, chronic Cu exposure resulted in the abolition of an acute cortisol response post-stress. There was no Cu accumulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) suggesting this was not a direct toxic effect of Cu on the cortisol regulatory pathway. However, the lack of an acute cortisol response in Cu-exposed fish did not impair the ability of the fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. This effect on cortisol may be a strategy to reduce costs during the chronic stress of Cu exposure, and not endocrine disruption as a result of toxic injury. PMID:21964321

  6. Fate of silver nanoparticles in wastewater and immunotoxic effects on rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, A; Turcotte, P; Pilote, M; Gagné, F; Gagnon, C

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently used in technology, medicine and consumer products, even though the fate and the ecotoxicological risks on aquatic organisms of these new materials are not well known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the fate, bioavailability of AgNPs and their effects on fish in presence of municipal effluents. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed for 96h to 40μg/L of AgNPs or 4μg/L of dissolved silver (AgNO3) in diluted (10%) municipal wastewater. Silver (Ag) concentrations were measured both on water samples and fish tissues (liver and gills). Toxicity was investigated by following immunological parameters in the pronephros (viability, phagocytosis) and biomarkers in liver and gills (cyclooxygenase activity, lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, metallothioneins, DNA strand breaks and labile zinc). Results indicated that AgNPs appeared as small non-charged aggregates in wastewaters (11.7±1.4nm). In gills, the exposure to AgNPs induced morphological modifications without visible nanoparticle bioaccumulation. Dissolved Ag(+) was bioavailable in diluted effluent and induced oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation), labile zinc and a marginal decrease in superoxide dismutase in fish gills. Ag(+) also increased significantly metallothionein levels and inhibited the DNA repair activity in the liver. Finally, the two silver forms were found in liver and induced immunosuppression and inflammation (increase in cyclooxygenase activity). This study demonstrated that both forms of Ag produced harmful effects and AgNPs in wastewater were bioavailable to fish despite of their formation of aggregates. PMID:26921728

  7. Molecular analysis of population genetic structure and recolonization of rainbow trout following the Cantara spill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, J.L.; Heine, E.L.; Gan, C.A.; Fountain, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and allelic frequency data for 12 microsatellite loci were used to analyze population genetic structure and recolonization by rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, following the 1991 Cantara spill on the upper Sacramento River, California. Genetic analyses were performed on 1,016 wild rainbow trout collected between 1993 and 1996 from the mainstem and in 8 tributaries. Wild trout genotypes were compared to genotypes for 79 Mount Shasta Hatchery rainbow trout. No genetic heterogeneity was found 2 years after the spill (1993) between tributary populations and geographically proximate mainstem fish, suggesting recolonization of the upper mainstem directly from adjacent tributaries. Trout collections made in 1996 showed significant year-class genetic variation for mtDNA and microsatellites when compared to fish from the same locations in 1993. Five years after the spill, mainstem populations appeared genetically mixed with no significant allelic frequency differences between mainstem populations and geographically proximate tributary trout. In our 1996 samples, we found no significant genetic differences due to season of capture (summer or fall) or sampling technique used to capture rainbow trout, with the exception of trout collected by electrofishing and hook and line near Prospect Avenue. Haplotype and allelic frequencies in wild rainbow trout populations captured in the upper Sacramento River and its tributaries were found to differ genetically from Mount Shasta Hatchery trout for both years, with the notable exception of trout collected in the lower mainstem river near Shasta Lake, where mtDNA and microsatellite data both suggested upstream colonization by hatchery fish from the reservoir. These data suggest that the chemical spill in the upper Sacramento River produced significant effects over time on the genetic population structure of rainbow trout throughout the entire upper river basin.

  8. The Effects of Acute Waterborne Exposure to Sublethal Concentrations of Molybdenum on the Stress Response in Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Chelsea D.; Bates, William R.; Reid, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if molybdenum (Mo) is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo) and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit) and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills) stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73), hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l-1 did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout. PMID:25629693

  9. Experimental infection of rainbow trout with Saprolegnia parasitica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, George E.; Stehly, Guy R.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed to experimentally induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The development of a reliable method to produce infected fish is essential to efforts to determine the efficacy of various antifungal treatments. Three methods for inducing saprolegniasis were evaluated in waters containing known concentrations of Saprolegnia parasitica zoospores. These methods included application of the following stressors to fish: (1) abrasion and dewatering, (2) water temperature increase, and (3) a combination of abrasion, dewatering, and temperature increase. Neither physical abrasion nor temperature increase stress alone was effective for inducing saprolegniasis. Only 25.9% of fish stressed by abrasion and dewatering alone became infected. Application of both abrasion and temperature stress, however, induced saprolegniasis in 77.8% of fish tested. Most of these fish became infected after 5 d of stress treatments. No fish became infected or died in the positive control group (not stressed but exposed to S. parasitica zoospores) or the negative control group (not stressed or challenged). This method should enable researchers to induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout to study its pathogenesis or to test the efficacy of antifungal treatments. In conducting efficacy studies, it is important that therapeutic treatments begin promptly after the first signs of saprolegniasis are observed because the disease can progress very quickly and often results in mortality.

  10. Status and opportunities for genomics research with rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorgaard, G.H.; Bailey, G.S.; Williams, D.; Buhler, D.R.; Kaattari, S.L.; Ristow, S.S.; Hansen, J.D.; Winton, J.R.; Bartholomew, J.L.; Nagler, J.J.; Walsh, P.J.; Vijayan, M.M.; Devlin, R.H.; Hardy, R.W.; Overturf, K.E.; Young, W.P.; Robison, B.D.; Rexroad, C.; Palti, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is one of the most widely studied of model fish species. Extensive basic biological information has been collected for this species, which because of their large size relative to other model fish species are particularly suitable for studies requiring ample quantities of specific cells and tissue types. Rainbow trout have been widely utilized for research in carcinogenesis, toxicology, comparative immunology, disease ecology, physiology and nutrition. They are distinctive in having evolved from a relatively recent tetraploid event, resulting in a high incidence of duplicated genes. Natural populations are available and have been well characterized for chromosomal, protein, molecular and quantitative genetic variation. Their ease of culture, and experimental and aquacultural significance has led to the development of clonal lines and the widespread application of transgenic technology to this species. Numerous microsatellites have been isolated and two relatively detailed genetic maps have been developed. Extensive sequencing of expressed sequence tags has begun and four BAC libraries have been developed. The development and analysis of additional genomic sequence data will provide distinctive opportunities to address problems in areas such as evolution of the immune system and duplicate genes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetics of Growth Reaction Norms in Farmed Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Sae-Lim, Panya; Mulder, Han; Gjerde, Bjarne; Koskinen, Heikki; Lillehammer, Marie; Kause, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Rainbow trout is farmed globally under diverse uncontrollable environments. Fish with low macroenvironmental sensitivity (ES) of growth is important to thrive and grow under these uncontrollable environments. The ES may evolve as a correlated response to selection for growth in one environment when the genetic correlation between ES and growth is nonzero. The aims of this study were to quantify additive genetic variance for ES of body weight (BW), defined as the slope of reaction norm across breeding environment (BE) and production environment (PE), and to estimate the genetic correlation (rg(int, sl)) between BW and ES. To estimate heritable variance of ES, the coheritability of ES was derived using selection index theory. The BW records from 43,040 rainbow trout performing either in freshwater or seawater were analysed using a reaction norm model. High additive genetic variance for ES (9584) was observed, inferring that genetic changes in ES can be expected. The coheritability for ES was either -0.06 (intercept at PE) or -0.08 (intercept at BE), suggesting that BW observation in either PE or BE results in low accuracy of selection for ES. Yet, the rg(int, sl) was negative (-0.41 to -0.33) indicating that selection for BW in one environment is expected to result in more sensitive fish. To avoid an increase of ES while selecting for BW, it is possible to have equal genetic gain in BW in both environments so that ES is maintained stable. PMID:26267268

  12. Localization, depuration, bioaccumulation and impairment of ion regulation associated with cationic polymer exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Muir, M M; Kosteretz, K G; Lech, J J

    1997-10-01

    1. Static exposure of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, to three commercial 14C-labelled cationic polymers (EDP, epichlorhydrin-dimethylamine; CYT, polyacrylamide ester; and STK, polyacrylamide amide) resulted in 14C being concentrated only in gill tissue. 2. Depuration studies examining the effect of humic acid (HA) on cationic polymer bound in gill tissue indicate that the binding is reversible with exposure to polymer-free water and polymer-free water with HA for each of the three polymers. 3. Analysis of blood pH, Na+, K+, total NH3 and Cl- after static water exposures to EDP (m.w. 50,000) at 7.5 mg EDP/l revealed a treatment related decrease in blood pH, from 7.1 to 6.6, accompanied by an increase in blood NH3 and evidence of severe impairment of ion regulation. 4. Repeated exposure to the cationic polymers did not result in increases in the 14C concentration in gill tissue suggesting that bioaccumulation of the polymers does not occur. 5. These data suggest that the gill is the site of toxicity for these cationic polymers and that their toxic effects involve gill function and ion regulation rather than systemic actions on internal organs. PMID:9364738

  13. Initiation, promotion, and inhibition of carcinogenesis in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, G.; Selivonchick, D.; Hendricks, J.

    1987-04-01

    The identification of etiological agents in feral fish neoplasia epizootics has been hampered in part by the lack of suitable fish models, and complicated by the likely existence of environmental agents which can act to stimulate or reduce population responses to genotoxin insult. The response of fish to tumor inhibitors and promoters, and the underlying mechanisms of modulation, have been studied in the rainbow trout model. Dietary treatment of trout with the compounds indole-3-carbinol (I3C), ..beta..-napthroflavone (BNF), or the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) complex Aroclor 1254, before and during exposure to aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1), was shown to reduce the final incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after 12 months, compared to fish receiving AFB1 only. By contrast, treatment of trout with BNF or I3C following AFB1 initiation led to a significant enhancement of ultimate tumor response, Similarly, simultaneous treatment of trout with PCB and the carcinogen N-nitrosodiethylamine led to syncarcinogenic enhancement, rather than inhibition, of tumor response. Mechanisms of inhibition of AFB1 carcinogenesis by PCB, BNF, and I3C were investigated. PCB and BNF, but not I3C, are known to be strong inducers of trout cytochrome P448 and associated activities. Dietary induction by BNF or PCB was shown to be accompanied in solvated hepatocytes by considerably altered AFB1 metabolism, and by significantly reduced rates of DNA adduct formation for all three agents. All agents differentially altered in vivo AFB1 pharmacokinetics, enhanced bile elimination of AFB1 as the aflatoxicol-M1 glucuronide, and significantly reduced peak levels of liver DNA adduct formation.

  14. Effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep release on postrelease mortality of Lake Trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Unaccounted postrelease mortality violates assumptions of many fisheries studies, thereby biasing parameter estimates and reducing efficiency. We evaluated effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep-release treatment on postrelease mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake trout were captured at depths up to 65 m with gill nets in Priest Lake, Idaho, and held in a large enclosure for 10–12 d. Postrelease mortality was the same for surface-release–and deep-release–treated fish (41%). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of intrinsic and environmental factors on the probability of mortality. Presence of gill-net trauma and degree of barotrauma were associated with increased probability of postrelease mortality. Smaller fish were also more likely to suffer postrelease mortality. On average, deep-release treatment did not reduce postrelease mortality, but effectiveness of treatment increased with fish length. Of the environmental factors evaluated, only elapsed time between lifting the first and last anchors of a gill-net gang (i.e., lift time) was significantly related to postrelease mortality. Longer lift times, which may allow ascending lake trout to acclimate to depressurization, were associated with lower postrelease mortality rates. Our study suggests that postrelease mortality may be higher than previously assumed for lake trout because mortality continues after 48 h. In future studies, postrelease mortality could be reduced by increasing gill-net lift times and increasing mesh size used to increase length of fish captured.

  15. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations; Rainbow and Bull Trout Recruitment, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jody P.

    2005-08-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss provide the most important sport fishery in the Kootenai River, Idaho, but densities and catch rates are low. Low recruitment is one possible factor limiting the rainbow trout population. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus also exist in the Kootenai River, but little is known about this population. Research reported here addresses the following objectives for the Kootenai River, Idaho: identify sources of rainbow and bull trout recruitment, monitor the rainbow trout population size structure to evaluate regulation changes initiated in 2002, and identify factors potentially limiting rainbow trout recruitment. A screw trap was used to estimate juvenile redband and bull trout out-migration from the Callahan Creek drainage, and electrofishing was conducted to estimate summer densities of bull trout rearing in the Idaho portion of the drainage. An estimated 1,132 juvenile redband trout and 68 juvenile bull trout out-migrated from Callahan Creek to the Kootenai River from April 7 through July 15, 2003. Densities of bull trout {ge} age-1 in North and South Callahan creeks ranged from 1.6 to 7.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in August. Bull trout redd surveys were conducted in North and South Callahan creeks, Boulder Creek, and Myrtle Creek. Thirty-two bull trout redds were located in North Callahan Creek, while 10 redds were found in South Callahan Creek. No redds were found in the other two streams. Modeling of culverts in the Deep Creek drainage identified two as upstream migration barriers, preventing rainbow trout from reaching spawning and rearing habitat. Water temperature monitoring in Deep Creek identified two sites where maximum temperatures exceeded those suitable for rainbow trout. Boulder Creek produces the most rainbow trout recruits to the Kootenai River in Idaho upstream of Deep Creek, but may be below carrying capacity for rearing rainbow trout due to nutrient limitations. Monthly water samples indicate Boulder Creek is nutrient limited

  16. Mechanisms of Cl(-) uptake in rainbow trout: cloning and expression of slc26a6, a prospective Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David; Clifford, Alexander M; Orr, Elizabeth; Chamot, Danuta; Goss, Greg G

    2015-02-01

    In fresh waters, fishes continuously acquire ions to offset diffusive losses to a more dilute ambient environment and to maintain acid-base status. The objectives of the present study were to clone slc26a6, a prospective Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger from rainbow trout, investigate its expression patterns in various tissues, at different developmental stages and after differential salinity exposure, and probe the mechanisms of Cl(-) uptake in rainbow trout embryos during development using a pharmacological inhibitor approach combined with (36)Cl(-) unidirectional fluxes. Results showed that the cloned gene encoded a 783 amino acid protein with conserved domains characteristic of the SLC26a family of anion exchange proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence against all subfamilies of the SLC26a family demonstrated that this translated protein shared a common ancestor with other actinopterygii and mammalian SLC26a6 isoforms and thus confirmed the identity of the cloned gene. Expression of slc26a6 was detected in all tissues and developmental stages assayed but was highest in the gill of juvenile trout. In trout embryos, Cl(-) uptake increased significantly post-hatch and was demonstrated to be mediated via an anion exchanger specific (DIDS sensitive) pathway that was also sensitive to hypercapnia. This parallels well with the predicted function of slc26a6, and the detection of the transcript in embryos and tissues of trout. In conclusion, this study is the first report of slc26a6 in rainbow trout and functional and expression analyses indicate its likely involvement in Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange in two life stages of rainbow trout. PMID:25446148

  17. Multiple biomarkers responses in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, after acute exposure to a fungicide propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zlabek, Vladimir; Velisek, Josef; Grabic, Roman; Machova, Jana; Kolarova, Jitka; Li, Ping; Randak, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the toxic effects of propiconazole (PCZ), a triazole fungicide present in aquatic environment, were studied in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, by acute toxicity test with the concentration of 5.04 mg/L (96 h LC50). Morphological indices, hematological parameters, liver xenobiotic-metabolizing response, and tissue antioxidant status were evaluated. Compared with the control group, fish exposed to PCZ showed significantly higher Leuko, PCV, MCHC, and hepatic EROD, and significantly lower MCV. CF and HSI were not significantly different among groups. SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR activities increased significantly in liver of experimental groups, but decreased significantly in gill. In general, antioxidant enzyme activity in intestine was less evident than in liver. Oxidative stress indices (levels of LPO and CP) were significantly higher in gill. Additionally, through chemometrics of all parameters measured in this study, two groups with 67.29% of total accumulated variance were distinguished. In short, the physiological and biochemical responses in different tissues of fish indicated that PCZ-induced the stressful environmental conditions. But according to PCZ residual status in the natural environment, more long-term experiments at lower concentrations will be necessary in the future. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2013. PMID:21384499

  18. Physiological and biochemical aspects of ozone toxicity to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.; Nelson, Nancy C.; Yasutake, William T.

    1979-01-01

    An acute toxicity curve for dissolved ozone (O3) in soft water at 10 °C, using 10–13-cm rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) as the test species was calculated. The 96-h LC50 (95%, confidence interval) was 9.3 (8.1–10.6) μg/L. The lethal threshold level was about 8 μg/L mandating that a conservative margin of safety be used if ozone is employed as a fish disease control agent. Death apparently results from massive destruction of the gill lamellar epithelium together with a severe hydromineral imbalance. In partial chronic (3-mo) testing, 2 μg/L caused no significant biological damage while 5 μg/L caused some gill pathological changes and reduced feeding behavior. Accordingly, 2 μg/L is suggested as a provisional maximum safe exposure level, pending completion of life cycle studies. Thus, if ozone-treated water is discharged into the environment, dissolved O3 should be reduced to at least the 2 μg/L level to minimize adverse impacts on salmonids in receiving waters.

  19. Structural and regulatory variation of phosphoglucomutase in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Allendorf, F W; Leary, R F; Knudsen, K L

    1983-01-01

    The results of inheritance experiments with allozymic variants indicate that two pairs of duplicate loci encode PGM in rainbow trout. Two of the loci (Pgm-3,4) share five electromorphs and are highly polymorphic. The large number of phenotypes and instability of these isozymes make them difficult to score in population studies. The other pair of duplicate loci (Pgm1 and Pgm2) have diverged both structurally and in their patterns of tissue-specific expression. We have detected four electromorphs at Pgm2; this locus is expressed approximately equally in all tissues examined. Two electromorphs and a null allele have been detected at Pgm1. PGM1 activity is greatest in skeletal muscle, heart, and brain; only weak activity, if any, is detectable in liver, eye, stomach, and kidney. Ten percent of the trout from the Arlee strain have a greater than 100-fold increase in the expression of Pgm1 in the liver but have normal expression of this locus in other tissues. Results of genetic crosses are consistent with a single regulatory gene (Pgm1-t) with additive inheritance being responsible for the differences in liver PGM1 activity. The allele responsible for the expression PGM1 in the liver is rare in rainbow trout and is apparently a recent mutation. The presence of PGM1 liver activity has a variety of phenotypic effects that are likely to be of adaptive significance. Embryos with liver PGM1 activity develop more quickly than their full-sibs lacking activity. This difference apparently results from increased flux through glycolysis in embryos with liver PGM1 activity while they are dependent on the yolk for energy. The more rapidly developing individuals begin exogenous feeding earlier and obtain a size advantage that is maintained until sexual maturity. This size advantage also produces a tendency for earlier age of first sexual maturity. Fish with liver PGM1 activity are also more developmentally buffered, as indicated by less fluctuating asymmetry of five meristic traits

  20. Dietary uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carline, Robert F.; Barry, Patrick M.; Ketola, H. George

    2004-01-01

    The presence of detectable levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in commercially produced fish feed has raised a concern about the degree of biomagnification of these contaminants in hatchery-reared trout. Our objectives were to (1) define the relationship between concentrations of PCBs in fish feed and in fish tissue and (2) estimate the relative contributions of feed and hatchery supply water to PCB concentrations in fish. We conducted a 6-month feeding trial with fingerling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fed commercial diets with four concentrations of PCBs: a low-PCB diet (69 ng/g); a typical commercial diet (126 ng/g); and the typical diet spiked with PCBs at two levels (220 and 280 ng/g). The concentrations of PCBs in fillets after 1 month were commensurate with those in the feeds and remained relatively stable for the next 5 months; mean PCB concentrations in fillets ranged from 54 to 94 ng/g. Low levels of PCBs were detected in the hatchery supply water. We used the concentrations of PCBs in the feeds, absorption rates of PCBs, and two different rates of PCB depuration to estimate the potential uptake of PCBs from supply water. When we used a low depuration rate (half-life = 219 d), the computed body burdens of PCBs could be entirely attributed to the feeds. When a high depuration rate (half-life = 66 d) was used, some uptake of PCBs from the supply water was likely, but most of the total body burden originated from the feeds. We concluded that rainbow trout fed a diet with 126 ng/g PCBs would have a PCB concentration of about 60 ng/g in their fillets, which is high enough to warrant issuance of a consumption advisory (no more than one meal of fish per week) under a protocol adopted by some Great Lakes states.

  1. Evaluation of angler effort and harvest of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Lake Scanewa, Washington, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kock, Tobias J.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    A creel evaluation was conducted in Lake Scanewa, a reservoir on the Cowlitz River, to monitor catch rates of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and determine if the trout fishery was having negative impacts on juvenile anadromous salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the system. The trout fishery, which is supported by releases of 20,000 fish (2 fish per pound) per year from June to August, was developed to mitigate for the construction of the Cowlitz Falls Dam in 1994. The trout fishery has a target catch rate of at least 0.50 fish per hour. Interviews with 1,214 anglers during the creel evaluation found that most anglers targeted rainbow trout (52 percent) or Chinook and coho salmon (48 percent). The interviewed anglers caught a total of 1,866 fish, most of which were rainbow trout (1,213 fish; 78 percent) or coho salmon (311 fish; 20 percent). We estimated that anglers spent 17,365 hours fishing in Lake Scanewa from June to November 2010. Catch rates for boat anglers (1.39 fish per hour) exceeded the 0.50 fish per hour target, whereas catch rates for shore anglers (0.35 fish per hour) fell short of the goal. The combined catch rates for all trout anglers in the reservoir were 0.96 fish per hour. We estimated that anglers harvested 7,584 (95 percent confidence interval = 2,795-12,372 fish) rainbow trout during the study period and boat anglers caught more fish than shore anglers (5,975 and 1,609 fish, respectively). This estimate suggests that more than 12,000 of the 20,000 rainbow trout released into Lake Scanewa during 2010 were not harvested, and could negatively impact juvenile salmon in the reservoir through predation or competition. We examined 1,236 stomach samples from rainbow trout and found that 2.1 percent (26 fish) of these samples contained juvenile fish. Large trout (greater than 300 millimeters) had a higher incidence of predation than small trout (less than 300 millimeters; 8.50 and 0.06 percent, respectively). A total of 39 fish were found in rainbow

  2. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in Rainbow Trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding stress responses is essential for improving animal welfare and increasing agriculture production efficiency. Previously, we reported microsatellite markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting plasma cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout. Our main objectives...

  3. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting response to crowding stress in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture environmental stressors such as handling, overcrowding, sub-optimal water quality parameters and social interactions negatively impact growth, feed intake, feed efficiency, disease resistance, flesh quality and reproductive performance in rainbow trout. To identify QTL affecting response...

  4. Effects of maturation, diet, and estradiol on indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation in salmonids requires mobilization of proteins from muscle tissue as evidenced by increased expression of proteolytic genes and decreased muscle protein content. However, it is unknown how ration level affects this proteolytic response. Female diploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus ...

  5. Immunization of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) with a crude lipopolysaccharide extract from Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control methods for Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease (CWD) and rainbow trout fry syndrome, are limited and oftentimes ineffective; hence, research efforts have focused on vaccine development. This study tested the hypothesis that a crude lipopolysacch...

  6. Inheritance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss spleen size and correlation with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious disease causes substantial loss in aquaculture and selective breeding for increased innate resistance offers an attractive strategy for controlling disease. In 2005, the NCCCWA implemented a selective breeding program to increase rainbow trout survival following challenge with Flavobacte...

  7. Feeding periodicity, diet composition, and food consumption of subyearling rainbow trout in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Chalupnicki, Marc; Abbett, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Although winter is a critically important period for stream salmonids, aspects of the ecology of several species are poorly understood. Consequently, we examined the diel feeding ecology of subyearling rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during winter in a central New York stream. Rainbow trout diet was significantly different during each 4-h interval and also differed from the drift and benthos. Feeding was significantly greater during darkness (i.e. 20:00 h – 04:00 h) than during daylight hours (i.e. 08:00 h – 16:00 h), peaking at 20:00 h. Daily food consumption (1.9 mg) and daily ration (3.4 %) during winter were substantially lower than previously reported for subyearling rainbow trout in the same stream during summer. These findings provide important new insights into the winter feeding ecology of juvenile rainbow trout in streams.

  8. Characterization of the rainbow trout transcriptome using Sanger and 454-pyrosequencing approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Rainbow trout is an important fish for aquaculture and recreational fisheries and serves as a model species for research investigations associated with carcinogenesis, comparative immunology, toxicology and the evolutionary biology. However, to date there is no genome reference sequence...

  9. Detection of QTL in rainbow trout affecting survival when challenged with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation in survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum (Fp), the causative agent of BCWD in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A family-based selectio...

  10. BRANCHIAL ELIMINATION OF SUPERHYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The branchial elimination of pentachloroethane and four congeneric polychlorinated bephenyls by rainbow trout was measured using a fish respirometer-metabolism chamber and an adsorption resin column. Branchial elimination was characterized by calculating a set of apparent in vivo...

  11. Determination of metabolic stability using cryopreserved hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols for isolating, cryopreserving, and thawing rainbow trout hepatocytes are described, along with procedures for using fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes to assess chemical metabolic stability in fish by means of a substrate depletion approach. Variations on thes...

  12. Characterization of the rainbow trout transcriptome using Sanger and 454-Pyrosequencing approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Rainbow trout is an important fish species for aquaculture and a model species for research investigations associated with carcinogenesis, comparative immunology, toxicology and the evolutionary biology. However, to date there is no genome reference sequence to facilitate the development...

  13. The origin and metabolism of vitamin D in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Pierens, S L; Fraser, D R

    2015-01-01

    An explanation for the origin and the high concentration of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) in some species of fish is still not apparent. Because fish may live in deep water and may, thus, not be exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) light, it is commonly assumed that vitamin D found in their livers and adipose tissue has been derived from a food chain, originating in zooplankton exposed to UV light at the water surface. To investigate the metabolism and possible origin of vitamin D in fish, rainbow trout were reared from eggs, in the absence of light, and were fed a vitamin D-free diet. When small quantities of radioactively-labelled vitamin D were injected or fed to these trout, much of the radioactivity was found as excreted metabolites in bile. Hence, even when they are vitamin D deficient, trout vigorously catabolise and excrete exogenous vitamin D. The main vitamin D metabolite found in plasma of non-deficient trout was 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3]. This was produced in the liver by an enzyme process that was strongly stimulated in vitamin D deficiency. When vitamin D was fed for several weeks to vitamin D-deficient trout, plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 levels rose to 180 pg/ml and the fish became hypercacemic. When vitamin D-deficient fish were inadvertently exposed to 60 W incandescent light for 24h, they became moribund and died. It was subsequently found that vitamin D-deficient trout can produce vitamin D in skin when exposed to blue light at wavelengths between 380 and 480 nm. It is concluded that trout, like terrestrial vertebrates, produce 1,25(OH)2D3 as the functional form of vitamin D and that this has an effect on calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, vitamin D is formed in the skin of these fish by the photochemical action of visible light on 7-dehydrocholesterol. Elucidation of the physicochemical mechanism of this process requires further research. PMID:25305412

  14. Exposure to waterborne Cu inhibits cutaneous Na⁺ uptake in post-hatch larval rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Brauner, Colin J; Wood, Chris M

    2014-05-01

    In freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), two common responses to acute waterborne copper (Cu) exposure are reductions in ammonia excretion and Na(+) uptake at the gills, with the latter representing the likely lethal mechanism of action for Cu in adult fish. Larval fish, however, lack a functional gill following hatch and rely predominantly on cutaneous exchange, yet represent the most Cu-sensitive life stage. It is not known if Cu toxicity in larval fish occurs via the skin or gills. The present study utilized divided chambers to assess cutaneous and branchial Cu toxicity over larval development, using disruptions in ammonia excretion (Jamm) and Na(+) uptake (Jin(Na)) as toxicological endpoints. Early in development (early; 3 days post-hatch; dph), approximately 95% of Jamm and 78% of Jin(Na) occurred cutaneously, while in the late developmental stage (late; 25 dph), the gills were the dominant site of exchange (83 and 87% of Jamm and Jin(Na), respectively). Exposure to 50 μg/l Cu led to a 49% inhibition of Jamm in the late developmental stage only, while in the early and middle developmental (mid; 17 dph) stages, Cu had no effect on Jamm. Jin(Na), however, was significantly inhibited by Cu exposure at the early (53% reduction) and late (47% reduction) stages. Inhibition at the early stage of development was mediated by a reduction in cutaneous uptake, representing the first evidence of cutaneous metal toxicity in an intact aquatic organism. The inhibitions of both Jamm and Jin(Na) in the late developmental stage occurred via a reduction in branchial exchange only. The differential responses of the skin and gills to Cu exposure suggest that the mechanisms of Jamm and Jin(Na) and/or Cu toxicity differ between these tissues. Exposure to 20μg/l Cu revealed that Jamm is the more Cu-sensitive process. The results presented here have important implications in predicting metal toxicity in larval fish. The Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) is currently used to predict

  15. Comparative susceptibility of Atlantic salmon, lake trout and rainbow trout to Myxobolus cerebralis in controlled laboratory exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.S.; Densmore, Christine L.; Schill, W.B.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Page, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar to Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, was compared in controlled laboratory exposures. A total of 450 (225 for each dose) fry for each species were exposed to a low (200 spores per fish) or high (2000 spores per fish) dose of the infective triactinomyxon. At 22 wk post-exposure, 60 fish from each group, as well as controls for each species, were examined for clinical signs (whirling behavior, blacktail, deformed heads and skeletal deformities), microscopic lesions, and presence of spores. Rainbow trout were highly susceptible to infection, with 100% being positive for spores and with microscopic pathological changes in both exposure groups. Rainbow trout were the only species to show whirling behavior and blacktail. Atlantic salmon were less susceptible, with only 44 and 61% being positive for spores, respectively, in the low and high dose groups, while 68 and 75%, respectively, had microscopic pathology associated with cartilage damage. Rainbow trout heads contained mean spore concentrations of 2.2 (low dose) or 4.0 (high dose) ?? 106 spores g tissue-1. The means for positive Atlantic salmon (not including zero values) were 1.7 (low) and 7.4 (high) ?? 104 spores g tissue-1. Lake trout showed no clinical signs of infection, were negative for spores in both groups and showed no histopathological signs of M. cerebralis infection.

  16. Trout gill cells in primary culture on solid and permeable supports.

    PubMed

    Leguen, I; Cauty, C; Odjo, N; Corlu, A; Prunet, P

    2007-12-01

    Trout gill cells in primary culture on solid and permeable supports were compared. Cultures were carried out by directly seeding cells on each support after gill dissociation. Most of the cell types present in culture were similar, regardless of culture support (pavement cells, mucous cells (3-4%), but no mitochondria-rich cells). However, insertion of mucous cells in cultured epithelium on permeable support presented a morphology more similar to gills in situ. Gene expression of ion transporters and hormonal receptors indicated similar mRNA levels in both systems. Cortisol inhibited cell proliferation on both supports and maintained or increased the total cell number on solid and permeable membranes, respectively. This inhibition of mitosis associated with an increase or maintenance of total gill cells suggests that cortisol reduced cell degeneration. In the presence of cortisol, transepithelial resistance of cultured gill cells on permeable membranes was increased and maintained for a longer time in culture. In conclusion, gill cells in primary culture on permeable support present: (i) a morphology more similar to epithelium in situ; and (ii) specific responses to cortisol treatment. New findings and differences with previous studies on primary cultures of trout gill cells on permeable membrane are discussed. PMID:17977040

  17. Effect of swimming activity on relative weight and body composition of juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries managers often assess body condition using relative weight (Wr) because it provides a comparative measure of fish plumpness among individuals and populations. However, it is not known whether the morphological information that Wr summarizes reflects physiological measures, such as relative lipid reserves, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The purpose of this study was to determine whether swimming activity affects either the Wr or proximate body composition of juvenile (total length, 170-260 mm) rainbow trout. When rainbow trout from a hatchery were fed ad libitum for 147 d, inactive (no current) and active (15 cm/s current velocity) fish did not differ in Wr However, inactive rainbow trout maintained relatively constant lipid levels, whereas active fish declined in lipid content. Relative weight may provide a comparable measure of body form, but it is not an accurate index of lipid content between active and inactive rainbow trout fed an excess ration. For assessing the physiological condition of rainbow trout, measurement of proximate body composition appears to be more accurate than indices based on length and weight.

  18. Field evaluation of rainbow trout selectively bred for resistance to bacterial cold water disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. Since 2005, the NCCCWA has implemented a selective breeding program and has created three genetic lines of outbred rainbow...

  19. RESPIRATORY-CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND XENOBIOTIC GILL FLUX IN THE LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vivo respirometer-metabolism chamber was used to obtain respiratory-cardiovascular physiology under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and xenobiotic gill absorption (flux) data on adult lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) over a 48-h exposure period at 11? 1?C.

  20. Socially-mediated differences in brain monoamines in rainbow trout: effects of trace metal contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Katherine A; Lepage, Olivier; Rogers, Joseph T; Wood, Chris M; Winberg, Svante

    2005-02-10

    Monoaminergic systems play a crucial role in linking behaviour and physiology. Here the physiological and behavioural effects of metal exposure in relation to monoaminergic systems were considered by exposing rainbow trout dyads, demonstrating stable dominance relationships, to cadmium or lead. Fish exposed to 4 microg l(-1) cadmium accumulated more cadmium at the gill than fish held in control water. Fish exposed to 7 microg l(-1) cadmium had higher gill, liver and kidney cadmium concentrations. No significant lead accumulation was seen after exposure to 46 microg l(-1) for 48 h but exposure to 325 microg l(-1) lead caused an increase in gill, liver and kidney lead concentrations. Brain accumulation of both cadmium and lead was only seen after exposure to the highest concentrations. Exposure to 4 or 7 microg l(-1) cadmium, or 46 or 325 microg l(-1) lead for 48 h did not disrupt established dominance hierarchies. As expected with this stable behavioural situation, in control pairs, animals of different social status displayed different physiological profiles. Subordinate fish had higher concentrations of circulating plasma cortisol and telencephalic 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HIAA/5-HT) ratios. However, these physiological profiles were affected by metal exposure, with a trend towards higher serotonergic activity in dominant fish. Dominants exposed to 325 microg l(-1) lead had significantly higher hypothalamic 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios when compared with subordinates. The results demonstrate that if stable social hierarchies are established in control water they may not be affected by exposure to cadmium and lead although physiological changes may be evident. PMID:15670630

  1. Sensory analysis of rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, fed enriched black soldier fly prepupae, hermetia illucens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growth trial and fillet sensory analysis were conducted to examine the effects of replacing dietary fish meal with black soldier fly (BSF) prepupae, Hermetia illucens, in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. A practical-type trout diet was formulated to contain 45% protein; four test diets were dev...

  2. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF RAINBOW TROUT ('SALMO GAIRDNERI') TO ACUTE FENVALERATE INTOXICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physiological responses of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) to fenvalerate intoxication during aqueous exposure were examined to provide information about the pyrethroid mode of action in fish. Trout (n = 4) were exposed to 412 + or - 50 micro/liter fenvalerate and died in 10....

  3. SUPPLEMENTATION OF TAURINE AND METHIONINE TO ALL-PLANT PROTEIN DIETS FOR RAINBOW TROUT (OMCORHYNCHUS MYKISS).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current trends in trout production include decreasing levels of fishmeal content in feeds for faster growing strains of fish; therefore, taurine may be a limiting nutrient in support of elevated growth for strains of genetically-improved rainbow trout. A 12-week feeding trial was conducted using a f...

  4. SUPPLEMENTATION OF TAURINE AND METHIONINE TO ALL-PLANT PROTEIN DIETS FOR RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current trends in trout production include decreasing levels of fishmeal content in feeds for faster growing strains of fish; therefore, taurine may be a limiting nutrient in support of elevated growth for strains of genetically-improved rainbow trout. A 12-week feeding trial was conducted using a f...

  5. Assessment of metabolic stability using the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols are given for assessing metabolic stability in rainbow trout using the liver S9 fraction. These protocols describe the isolation of S9 fractions from trout livers, evaluation of metabolic stability using a substrate depletion approach, and expression of the res...

  6. DIETARY UPTAKE KINETICS OF 2,2', 5, 5'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition of 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in dietary exposures with live prey. Trout were fed TCB-dosed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 4% of body wt) containing whole-body residues of 244 (low dose) or 1663 (h...

  7. Ebb and flow of encroachment by nonnative rainbow trout in a small stream in the southern Appalachian Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Moore, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis is the native salmonid species of streams in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The present distribution of this species, once widespread from headwaters to lower reaches of large streams, is restricted to mostly headwater areas. Changes in the distribution of native brook trout in the presence of' nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have been documented in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. When rainbow trout were first found in a tributary (Rock Creek) in the park in 1979, a study was begun to assess changes through time in distribution and abundance of rainbow trout in Rock Creek and to compare the brook trout and rainbow trout associations in Rock Creek with associations found in other park streams. Abundance of brook trout was low in the downstream sections of Rock Creek in 1979a??1993. Brook trout abundance was highest in the steep-gradient, pool-dominated headwater section which was only 2 km from the confluence of Rock Creek and Cosby Creek. Rainbow trout were present in low densities in Rock Creek during the same period. Although rainbow trout were most abundant in the lower stream sections and never found in the headwater section, adult and age-0 rainbow trout were found in the middle section in 1988. Rainbow trout were absent in the middle section in 1991, but one large adult rainbow trout was present in the section in 1992 and 1993. Floods, freshets, and periods of low stream discharge appeared to play an important role in the distribution and population structure of rainbow trout in Rock Creek. The lower portion of Rock Creek was poor trout habitat because the sections were dominated by cobblea??rubble substrate and shallow riffle areas. Stream habitat appeared to be better suited for brook trout than for rainbow trout in the steep-gradient upstream sections which were dominated by boulder-cobble substrate and deep pools. The results of this study suggest that encroachment by rainbow trout can exhibit

  8. Some blood chemistry values for the Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary; Chatterton, K.

    1970-01-01

    Normal distribution curves were graphically fitted to approximately 1400 clinical test values obtained from the plasma or kidney tissue of more than 200 yearling rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). Estimated normal ranges were ascorbate, 102–214 μg/g; blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 0.9–4.5 mg/100 ml; chloride, 84–132 mEq/liter; cholesterol, 161–365 mg/100 ml; cortisol, 1.5–18.5 μg/100 ml; glucose, 41–151 mg/100 ml; and total protein, 2–6 g/100 ml.

  9. Factors influencing thiocyanate toxicity in rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri

    SciTech Connect

    Heming, T.A.; Blumhagen, K.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The toxicity of thiocyanate (SCN{sup {minus}}) to fish is influenced by the level of fish activity. This is evidenced most dramatically when fish are forced to perform short bouts of strenuous swimming, such as occurs during capture avoidance. Strenuous exercise of SCN{sup {minus}}-exposed fish results in sudden death syndrome, characterized by the immediate onset of convulsions, loss of equilibrium and buoyancy, flaring of the operculum, darkening of the skin epithelium and, within minutes, cessation of ventilation and extreme rigor. The present study was undertaken to examine the accumulation and toxicity of SCN{sup {minus}} in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), in relation to exercise stress and ambient water quality. The effect of a single bout of exercise on blood SCN{sup {minus}} concentration was measured. In addition, effects of water hardness and Cl{sup {minus}} concentration on the accumulation of SCN{sup {minus}} in blood were determined.

  10. Production of homozygous transgenic rainbow trout with enhanced disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Chen, Maria J; Lin, Chun-Mean; Khoo, Jenny; Larson, Jon; Holt, Rich; Leong, Jo-Ann; Thorgarrd, Gary; Chen, Thomas T

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed that transgenic medaka expressing cecropin B transgenes exhibited resistant characteristic to fish bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Vibrio anguillarum. To confirm whether antimicrobial peptide gene will also exhibit anti-bacterial and anti-viral characteristics in aquaculture important fish species, we produced transgenic rainbow trout expressing cecropin P1 or a synthetic cecropin B analog, CF-17, transgene by sperm-mediated gene transfer method. About 30 % of fish recovered from electroporation were shown to carry the transgene as determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification assay. Positive P₁ transgenic fish were crossed to non-transgenic fish to establish F₁ transgenic founder families, and subsequently generating F₂, and F₃ progeny. Expression of cecropin P1 and CF-17 transgenes was detected in transgenic fish by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis. The distribution of body sizes among F₁ transgenic fish were not significantly different from those of non-transgenic fish. Results of challenge studies revealed that many families of F₂ and F₃ transgenic fish exhibited resistance to infection by Aeromonas salmonicida and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). All-male homozygous cecropin P1 transgenic families were produced by androgenesis from sperm of F₃ heterozygous transgenic fish in one generation. The resistant characteristic to A. salmonicida was confirmed in progeny derived from the outcross of all-male fish to non-transgenic females. Results of our current studies confirmed the possibility of producing disease-resistant homozygous rainbow trout strains by transgenesis of cecropin P1 or CF-17 gene and followed by androgenesis. PMID:24085608

  11. Cloning of two chemokine receptor homologs (CXC-R4 and CC-R7) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G D; Zou, J; Charlemagne, J; Partula, S; Cunningham, C; Secombes, C J

    1999-05-01

    Two rainbow trout chemokine receptors have been sequenced, with homology to CXC-R4 and CC-R7 molecules. The CXC-R4 sequence consisted of 1681 nucleotides, which translated into a mature protein of 357 amino acids, with 80.7% similarity to human CXC-R4. The CC-R7 sequence consisted of 2287 nucleotides, which translated into a 368-amino acid mature protein with 64.5% similarity to human CC-R7. Both sequences contained seven hydrophobic regions, representing the seven transmembrane domains (TM) typical of G-protein-coupled receptors. Extracellular cysteines, transmembrane prolines, and the DRY motif immediately following TM3 were conserved. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a tight clustering of trout CXC-R4 with CXC-R3-5 genes. Trout CC-R7 clustered with CC-R6-7 and CXC-R1-2. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a wide tissue distribution of CXC-R4 and CC-R7 message in trout, being present in head-kidney leukocytes, blood, gill, brain, spleen, and liver. PMID:10331499

  12. Thiamine status of Cayuga Lake rainbow trout and its influence on spawning migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketola, H. George; Chiotti, Thomas L.; Rathman, Robert S.; Fitzsimons, John D.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Van Dusen, Peter J.; Lewis, Graham E.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in Cayuga Lake, New York, appear to be suffering from a thiamine deficiency because their progeny develop general weakness, loss of equilibrium, and increased mortality, which are prevented by treatment with thiamine. Thiamine status and its effect on adults are unknown. In 2000 and 2002, we captured, tagged, and released 64 and 189 prespawning rainbow trout, respectively, in Cayuga Inlet at a collection weir to evaluate their thiamine status and the effect of thiamine injection (150 nmol/g) on instream migration. Half of the rainbow trout in each year (32 in 2000 and 95 in 2002) were injected with thiamine and half were uninjected; all rainbow trout were released above the weir to continue their upstream migration. By means of electrofishing in 2000, we recaptured significantly more thiamine-injected (N = 7) than uninjected (N = 0) rainbow trout approximately 7.0–9.3 river kilometers upstream from the weir. In 2002, the concentration of thiamine in the muscle of rainbow trout collected above a 1.8-m cascade was significantly higher (mean ± SD = 5.47 ± 5.04 nmol/g; range = 1.0– 13.8 nmol/g; N = 8) than that of rainbow trout collected either above a 1.0-m cascade (1.36 ± 0.71 nmol/g; range = 0.6–3.3 nmol/g; N = 16) or below the cascades (1.20 ± 0.46 nmol/g; range = 0.7–1.9 nmol/g; N = 5). The lowest concentration of thiamine observed in the muscle of rainbow trout collected upstream of the 1.8-m cascade was 1.0 nmol/g, suggesting that the threshold concentration required for rainbow trout to ascend the cascade was no more than that. Analyses of thiamine in the muscle of 26 untagged rainbow trout captured in Cayuga Inlet in 2002 showed that 16 fish (62%) had at least 1.0 nmol/g, which was apparently sufficient to support vigorous migration.

  13. Population control of exotic rainbow trout in streams of a natural area park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stephen E.; Larson, Gary L.; Ridley, Bromfield

    1986-03-01

    Expansion of the distribution of exotic rainbow trout is thought to be a leading cause for the decline of native brook trout since the 1930s in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. An experimental rehabilitation project was conducted from 1976 to 1981 using backpack electrofish shockers on four remnant brook trout populations sympatric with rainbow trout. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique to remove the exotic rainbow trout, to determine the population responses by native brook trout, and to evaluate the usefulness of the technique for trout management in the park. Rainbow trout populations were greatly reduced in density after up to six years of electrofishing, but were not eradicated. Rainbow trout recruitment, however, was essentially eliminated. Brook trout populations responded by increasing in density (including young-of-the-year), but rates of recovery differed among streams. The maximum observed densities ir each stream occurred at the end of the project. The findings suggest that electrofishing had a major negative impact on the exotic species, which was followed by positive responses from the native species in the second and third order study streams. The technique would probably be less effective in larger (fourth-order) park streams, but as an eradication tool the technique may have its highest potential in small first order streams. Nonetheless, the technique appears useful for population control without causing undue impacts on native aquatic species, although it is labor intensive, and capture efficiency is greatly influenced by fish size and stream morphology. To completely remove the exotic fish from selected streams, different technologies will have to be explored and developed.

  14. Sex-specific vitellogenin production in immature rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.B.; Williams, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    Many xenobiotics interact with hormone systems of animals, potentially leading to a phenomenon commonly called endocrine disruption. Much attention has focused on steroid hormone systems and corresponding receptor proteins, particularly estrogens. Vitellogenin (Vg) was measured in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in the diet. Mixed-sex populations of trout aged 3, 6, 12, or 18 months were maintained separately and fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 or 2.5 mg/kg for 7d. Females fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 mg/kg consistently produced three- to fourfold greater amounts of Vg than similarly aged males. Age- and sex-matched fish fed E{sub 2} at 2.5 mg/kg produced equivalent amounts of Vg. Sex differences in Vg production were apparent only at a dose of E{sub 2} (0.05 mg/kg) that results in submaximal Vg induction. Their results document the importance of considering the sex of juvenile fish when using Vg production as a marker of xenoestrogen exposure.

  15. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Consoer, Daniel M; Hoffman, Alex D; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Kosian, Patricia A; Nichols, John W

    2016-03-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers were dosed with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by intra-arterial injection and sampled to obtain concentration time-course data for plasma and either urine or expired water. The data were then analyzed using a 2-compartment clearance-volume model. Renal and branchial clearance rates (mL/d/kg) determined for all experiments averaged 19% and 81% of total clearance, respectively. Expressed as mean values for all experiments, the steady-state volume of distribution was 277 mL/kg and the terminal half-life was 86.8 d. Additional animals were exposed to PFOS in water, resulting in an average calculated branchial uptake efficiency of 0.36%. The renal clearance rate determined in the present study is approximately 75 times lower than that determined in earlier studies with perfluorooctanoate (PFOA). Previously, it was suggested that PFOA is a substrate for membrane transporters in the trout kidney. The present study suggests that glomerular filtration may be sufficient to explain the observed renal clearance rate for PFOS, although a role for membrane transporters cannot be ruled out. These findings demonstrate that models developed to predict the bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids by fish must account for differences in renal clearance of individual compounds. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:717-727. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26332333

  16. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Musharrafieh; Luca, Tacchi; Joshua, Trujeque; Scott, LaPatra; Irene, Salinas

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β 1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β , IL-6 and TNF-α) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout. PMID:24438987

  17. Staphylococcus warneri, a resident skin commensal of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) with pathobiont characteristics.

    PubMed

    Musharrafieh, Rami; Tacchi, Luca; Trujeque, Joshua; LaPatra, Scott; Salinas, Irene

    2014-02-21

    Commensal microorganisms live in association with the mucosal surfaces of all vertebrates. The skin of teleost fish is known to harbor commensals. In this study we report for the first time the presence of an intracellular Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus warneri that resides in the skin epidermis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). S. warneri was isolated from healthy hatchery trout skin epithelial cells. In situ hybridization confirmed the intracellular nature of the bacterium. Skin explants exposed in vitro to S. warneri or the extracellular pathogen Vibrio anguillarum show that S. warneri is able to induce an anti-inflammatory cytokine status via TGF-β1b compared to the pro-inflammatory responses (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-∝) elicited by V. anguillarum. In vivo experiments showed that S. warneri is not pathogenic to rainbow trout when injected intraperitoneally at high concentrations. However, S. warneri is able to stimulate V. anguillarum growth and biofilm formation on rainbow trout scales. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout skin commensals such as S. warneri have the potential to become indirect pathobionts by enhancing growth and biofilm formation of pathogens such as V. anguillarum. These results show that fish farming practices (i.e. handling and other manipulations) can alter the skin microbiota and compromise the skin health of rainbow trout. PMID:24438987

  18. The effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) on fuel stores and ion balance in a non-target fish, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Birceanu, Oana; Sorensen, Lisa A; Henry, Matthew; McClelland, Grant B; Wang, Yuxiang S; Wilkie, Michael P

    2014-03-01

    The pesticide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is used to control sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in the Great Lakes through its application to nursery streams containing larval sea lampreys. TFM uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, impairing mitochondrial ATP production in sea lampreys and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, little else is known about its sub-lethal effects on non-target aquatic species. The present study tested the hypotheses that TFM exposure in hard water leads to (i) marked depletion of energy stores in metabolically active tissues (brain, muscle, kidney, liver) and (ii) disruption of active ion transport across the gill, adversely affecting electrolyte homeostasis in trout. Exposure of trout to 11.0mgl(-1) TFM (12-h LC50) led to increases in muscle TFM and TFM-glucuronide concentrations, peaking at 9h and 12h, respectively. Muscle and brain glycogen was reduced by 50%, while kidney and muscle lactate increased with TFM exposure. Kidney ATP and phosphocreatine decreased by 50% and 70%, respectively. TFM exposure caused no changes in whole body ion (Na(+), Cl(-), Ca(2+), K(+)) concentrations, gill Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity, or unidirectional Na(+) movements across the gills. We conclude that TFM causes a mismatch between ATP supply and demand in trout, leading to increased reliance on glycolysis, but it does not have physiologically relevant effects on ion balance in hard water. PMID:24177273

  19. Refuging rainbow trout selectively exploit flows behind tandem cylinders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Tian, Fang-Bao; Akanyeti, Otar; Walker, Christina J; Liao, James C

    2016-07-15

    Fishes may exploit environmental vortices to save in the cost of locomotion. Previous work has investigated fish refuging behind a single cylinder in current, a behavior termed the Kármán gait. However, current-swept habitats often contain aggregations of physical objects, and it is unclear how the complex hydrodynamics shed from multiple structures affect refuging in fish. To begin to address this, we investigated how the flow fields produced by two D-shaped cylinders arranged in tandem affect the ability of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to Kármán gait. We altered the spacing of the two cylinders from l/D of 0.7 to 2.7 (where l=downstream spacing of cylinders and D=cylinder diameter) and recorded the kinematics of trout swimming behind the cylinders with high-speed video at Re=10,000-55,000. Digital particle image velocimetry showed that increasing l/D decreased the strength of the vortex street by an average of 53% and decreased the frequency that vortices were shed by ∼20% for all speeds. Trout were able to Kármán gait behind all cylinder treatments despite these differences in the downstream wake; however, they Kármán gaited over twice as often behind closely spaced cylinders (l/D=0.7, 1.1, and 1.5). Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that when cylinders are widely spaced, the upstream cylinder generates a vortex street that interacts destructively with the downstream cylinder, producing weaker, more widely spaced and less-organized vortices that discourage Kármán gaiting. These findings are poised to help predict when fish may seek refuge in natural habitats based on the position and arrangement of stationary objects. PMID:27445401

  20. Effects of hybridization between nonnative Rainbow Trout and native Westslope Cutthroat Trout on fitness-related traits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drinan, Daniel P.; Webb, Molly A. H.; Naish, Kerry A.; Kalinowski, Steven T.; Boyer, Matthew C.; Steed, Amber C.; Shepard, Bradley B.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between introduced and native fauna is a risk to native species and may threaten the long-term persistence of numerous taxa. Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss has been one of the most widely introduced species around the globe and often hybridizes with native Cutthroat Trout O. clarkii in the Rocky Mountains. Previous work has shown that hybridization negatively affects reproductive success, but identification of the traits contributing to that reduction has been elusive. In this study, we used a combination of field and laboratory techniques to assess how hybridization with Rainbow Trout affects seven traits during several stages of Westslope Cutthroat Trout development: embryonic survival, ova size, ova energy concentration, sperm motility, juvenile weight, juvenile survival, and burst swimming endurance. Rainbow Trout admixture was correlated with an increase in embryonic survival and ova energy concentration but with a decrease in juvenile weight and burst swimming endurance. These correlations differed from previously observed patterns of reproductive success and likely do not explain the declines in reproductive success associated with admixture. Future investigation of additional, unstudied traits and the use of different environments may shed light on the traits responsible for reproductive success in admixed Cutthroat Trout.

  1. Exposure to environmental levels of waterborne cadmium impacts corticosteroidogenic and metabolic capacities, and compromises secondary stressor performance in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Navdeep; McGeer, James C; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-01-01

    The physiological responses to waterborne cadmium exposure have been well documented; however, few studies have examined animal performances at low exposure concentrations of this metal. We tested the hypothesis that longer-term exposure to low levels of cadmium will compromise the steroidogenic and metabolic capacities, and reduce the cortisol response to a secondary stressor in fish. To test this, juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to 0 (control), 0.75 or 2.0 μg/L waterborne cadmium in a flow-through system and were sampled at 1, 7 and 28 d of exposure. There were only very slight disturbances in basal plasma cortisol, lactate or glucose levels in response to cadmium exposure over the 28 d period. Chronic cadmium exposure significantly affected key genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme. At 28 d, the high cadmium exposure group showed a significant drop in the glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor protein expressions in the liver and brain, respectively. There were also perturbations in the metabolic capacities in the liver and gill of cadmium-exposed trout. Subjecting these fish to a secondary handling disturbance led to a significant attenuation of the stressor-induced plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels in the cadmium groups. Collectively, although trout appears to adjust to subchronic exposure to low levels of cadmium, it may be at the cost of impaired interrenal steroidogenic and tissue-specific metabolic capacities, leading to a compromised secondary stress performance in rainbow trout. PMID:24269906

  2. Effect of the liquorice root derivatives on salt and water balance in a teleost fish, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun Chih; Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    The effect of liquorice root derivatives (LRDs) glycyrrhizic acid (GL) and glycyrrhetinic acid (18βGA) on salt and water balance and end points of gill ion transport in a freshwater teleost, (rainbow trout) was examined after feeding fish diets containing GL or 18βGA (0, 5, 50 or 500 µg/g diet) for a two week period. Serum cortisol levels and gill 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 mRNA abundance decreased in fish fed GL but increased (at select doses) in fish fed 18βGA. At higher doses of GL, gill Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and H(+)-ATPase activity increased, while cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator type II mRNA abundance significantly decreased at the lowest dose of GL. End points of gill transcellular ion transport were not significantly altered in fish fed 18βGA, except for a reduction in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity at a 50 µg/g dose. In contrast, high doses of GL and 18βGA increased gill transcript abundance of the tight junction protein claudin-31 (cldn-31). Other end points of gill paracellular transport differed in fishes fed LRDs. Tricellulin mRNA abundance was increased by high dose GL and decreased by high dose 18βGA, and cldn-23a and cldn-27b mRNA abundance significantly decreased in response to GL irrespective of dose. Despite the above observations, systemic end points of salt and water balance (i.e. serum [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] as well as muscle moisture) were unaffected by LRDs. Therefore data suggest that LRDs can alter end points of ion transport in fishes but that overall salt and water balance need not be perturbed. PMID:25460830

  3. Comparison of biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reared in two different trout farms'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Tayfun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare biochemical parameters of cultured rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum, 1972) reared in two different trout farms' (Agri and Erzurum). The average weights of fish were 150±10gr for first station (Agri), 230±10gr for second station (Erzurum). Fishes used in research were randomly caught from pools, and fifteen pieces were used for each group. Fishes were fed with commercial trout feed with 45-50% crude protein twice a day. The levels of AST, ALT, LDL, total cholesterol and triglyceride in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be higher (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Whereas, the levels of HDL in the second station (Erzurum) were found to be lower (p<0.05) than that of first station (Agri). Differences in the levels of total cholesterol and AST, ALT, HDL, LDL, triglyceride may be associated with size, sex, sexual maturity and environmental conditions (temperature, pH, hardness and dissolved oxygen).

  4. Intestinal zinc uptake in freshwater rainbow trout: evidence for apical pathways associated with potassium efflux and modified by calcium.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Bury, Nicolas R; Hogstrand, Christer

    2004-05-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of intestinal zinc uptake in fish is of considerable interest from both nutritional and toxicological perspectives. In this study, properties of zinc transport across the apical membrane of freshwater rainbow trout intestinal epithelia were examined using right-side-out brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV's). Extravesicular calcium was found to have complex actions on zinc uptake. At a low zinc concentration of 1 microM, calcium (0.1-2 mM) significantly stimulated zinc uptake. In contrast, calcium inhibited zinc uptake at higher zinc levels (100 microM). Lanthanum and cadmium in the external medium did not block zinc uptake, suggesting that interactions between zinc and calcium were not exerted at a calcium channel. Copper also failed to exercise any inhibitory action. Zinc association with the BBMV's was enhanced by an outward potassium gradient. This stimulatory effect was only present at a zinc concentration of 100 microM. The potassium channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride inhibited zinc uptake at this relatively high zinc concentration, suggesting the presence of a low affinity zinc uptake pathway linked to potassium efflux. The present study provides evidence that the mechanism of intestinal zinc uptake in rainbow trout is pharmacologically very different from that of the piscine gill and the mammalian intestine. PMID:15157623

  5. Bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers identify hybridization between rainbow trout and cutthroat trout subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Eight polymerase chain reaction primer sets amplifying bi-parentally inherited species-specific markers were developed that differentiate between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and various cutthroat trout (O. clarki) subspecies. The primers were tested within known F1 and first generation hybrid backcrosses and were shown to amplify codominantly within hybrids. Heterozygous individuals also amplified a slower migrating band that was a heteroduplex, caused by the annealing of polymerase chain reaction products from both species. These primer sets have numerous advantages for native cutthroat trout conservation including statistical genetic analyses of known crosses and simple hybrid identification.

  6. Factors affecting competitive dominance of rainbow trout over brook trout in southern Appalachian streams: Implications of an individual-based model

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.E.; Rose, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    We used an individual-based model to examine possible explanations for the dominance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss over brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in southern Appalachian streams. Model simulations were used to quantify the effects on interspecific competition of (1) competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout, (2) latitudinal differences in stream temperatures, flows, and daylight, (3) year-class failures, (4) lower fecundity of brook trout, and (5) reductions in spawning habitat. The model tracks the daily spawning, growth, and survival of individuals of both species throughout their lifetime in a series of connected stream habitat units (pools, runs, or riffles). Average densities of each species based on 100-year simulations were compared for several levels of each of the five factors and for sympatric and allopatric conditions. Based on model results and empirical information, we conclude that more frequent year-class failures and the lower fecundity of brook trout are both possible and likely explanations for rainbow trout dominance, that warmer temperatures due to latitude and limited spawning habitat are possible but unlikely explanations, and that competitive advantage for feeding sites by rainbow trout is an unlikely explanation. Additional field work should focus on comparative studies of the reproductive success and the early life stage mortalities of brook and rainbow trout among Appalachian streams with varying rainbow trout dominance. 53 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Effects of frying in various cooking oils on fatty acid content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to describe the effects of frying with various oils on the fatty acid content of rainbow trout. Four different oils were evaluated (peanut oil, high oleic sunflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil). Farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets were sliced into three portions and eac...

  8. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flabobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of innate CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected four generations for improved bacterial co...

  9. Evidence of major genes affecting stress response in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a first step towards the genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting stress response variation in rainbow trout, we performed complex segregation analyses (CSA) fitting mixed inheritance models of plasma cortisol using Bayesian methods in large full-sib families of rainbow trout. ...

  10. Effects of triploidy on growth and protein degradation during the recovery from feed deprivation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying physiological differences between diploid and triploid rainbow trout will help define how ploidy affects mechanisms that impact growth and nutrient utilization. In this study juvenile diploid and triploid female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were either continually fed or fasted f...

  11. Differences in growth, fillet quality, and fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression between juvenile male and female rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids; however, little is known regarding gender effects on nutrient regulatory mechanisms in rainbow trout prior to maturity. Thirty-two, 14 month old, male and female rainbow trout were sampled for growth, carcass ...

  12. Rainbow trout resistance to bacterial cold-water disease is moderately heritable and is not adversely correlated with growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to estimate the heritabilities for and genetic correlations among resistance to bacterial cold-water disease and growth traits in a population of rainbow trout. Bacterial cold-water disease, a chronic disease of rainbow trout, is caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilu...

  13. Quality assessment of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets during super chilling and chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Shen, Song; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Xiaochang; Luo, Yongkang; Gao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of super chilling (-3 °C) and chilled (3 °C) storage on the quality of rainbow trout fillets, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), drip loss, pH, electric conductivity (EC), total aerobic count (TAC), K and related values, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and related compounds, color and sensory score were determined and correlation between these indicators were analyzed. According to the comprehensive evaluation of TAC, K value and sensory score, the limit for acceptability of rainbow trout fillets was 5 days at 3 °C and 11 days at -3 °C. Additionally, the correlation coefficients between TVB-N and other freshness indicators (TAC, K value, sensory score) were relatively low. TVB-N may be inadequate for evaluating freshness changes of rainbow trout fillets compared with other indicators. Among the K and related values, H value was a better freshness indicator in rainbow trout fillets during chilled and super chilling storage for its better correlation coefficients with other freshness indicators. Super chilling storage could extend the shelf life of rainbow trout fillets by 6 days compared to chilled storage. PMID:26243943

  14. Inhibition of fish pathogens by the microbiota from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Nahuelquín, Yanina; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the isolation and taxonomic identification of the cultivable total microbiota (TM) and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) and rearing environment from selected stages of the life-cycle, and the evaluation of the LAB antimicrobial activity against the main fish pathogens. TM and LAB isolates were randomly selected and identified by 16S rRNA and/or superoxide dismutase gene sequencing. Although a great diversity in the TM was observed, Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae were clearly prevalent, while the genus Lactococcus was the predominant LAB. From a total of 1620 randomly selected LAB, 1159 isolates (71.5%) showed antimicrobial activity. From these, 248 isolates (21.4%) selected for their activity against, at least, four fish pathogens, were taxonomically identified, being Lactococcus lactis the most common species (164 isolates, 66.1%). Interestingly, 88 isolates (35.5%), including 55 L. lactis isolates, exerted activity against four strains of the rainbow trout pathogen Lactococcus garvieae. Our results demonstrate that rainbow trout and rearing environment are potential sources for the isolation of LAB, mainly lactococci, active against L. garvieae and other fish pathogens. Moreover, this is the first study describing the cultivable TM and LAB from rainbow trout intestine and rearing environment along the fish life-cycle. The host-derived LAB active against fish pathogens comprise potential candidates as probiotics in rainbow trout farming as an alternative or complementary strategy to antibiotics and vaccines for disease prevention. PMID:25464142

  15. Postprandial regulation of hepatic microRNAs predicted to target the insulin pathway in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A; Panserat, Stéphane; Larquier, Mélanie; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Medale, Françoise; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow trout are carnivorous fish and poor metabolizers of carbohydrates, which established this species as a model organism to study the comparative physiology of insulin. Following the recent characterisation of key roles of several miRNAs in the insulin action on hepatic intermediary metabolism in mammalian models, we investigated the hypothesis that hepatic miRNA expression is postprandially regulated in the rainbow trout and temporally coordinated in the context of insulin-mediated regulation of metabolic gene expression in the liver. To address this hypothesis, we used a time-course experiment in which rainbow trout were fed a commercial diet after short-term fasting. We investigated hepatic miRNA expression, activation of the insulin pathway, and insulin regulated metabolic target genes at several time points. Several miRNAs which negatively regulate hepatic insulin signaling in mammalian model organisms were transiently increased 4 h after the meal, consistent with a potential role in acute postprandial negative feed-back regulation of the insulin pathway and attenuation of gluconeogenic gene expression. We equally observed a transient increase in omy- miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b 4 h after feeding, whose homologues have potent lipogenic roles in the liver of mammalian model systems. A concurrent increase in the activity of the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the expression of lipogenic genes (srebp1c, fas, acly) was equally observed, while lipolytic gene expression (cpt1a and cpt1b) decreased significantly 4 h after the meal. This suggests lipogenic roles of omy-miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b may be conserved between rainbow trout and mammals and that these miRNAs may furthermore contribute to acute postprandial regulation of de novo hepatic lipid synthesis in rainbow trout. These findings provide a framework for future research of miRNA regulation of hepatic metabolism in trout and will help to further elucidate the metabolic phenotype of rainbow trout

  16. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Hansen, Per Juel; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-13

    Ichthyotoxic algal blooms are normally considered a threat to maricultured fish only when blooms reach lethal cell concentrations. The degree to which sublethal algal concentrations challenge the health of the fish during blooms is practically unknown. In this study, we analysed whether sublethal concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae for 12 h prior to the addition of virus, a marginal decrease in the susceptibility to VHSV was observed compared to fish exposed to VHSV without algae. If virus and algae were added simultaneously, inclusion of the algae increased mortality by 50% compared to fish exposed to virus only, depending on the experimental setup. We concluded that depending on the local exposure conditions, sublethal concentrations of P. parvum could affect susceptibility of fish to infectious agents such as VHSV. PMID:26758652

  17. Metabolism and elimination of benzocaine by rainbow-trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, J.R.; Gingerich, W.H.; Allen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    1. Branchial and urinary elimination of benzocaine residues was evaluated in adult rainbow trout, oncorhynchus mykiss, given a single dorsal aortic dose of c-14-benzocaine hydrochloride.^2. Branchial elimination of benzocaine residues was rapid and accounted for 59.2% Of the dose during the first 3 h after dosing. Renal elimination of radioactivity was considerably slower; the kidney excreted 2.7% Dose within 3 h and 9.0% Within 24 h. Gallbladder bile contained 2.0% Dose 24 h after injection.^3. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from water taken 3 min after injection, 87.3% Was benzocaine and 12.7% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. After 60 min, 32.7% Was benzocaine and 67.3% Was n-acetylated benzocaine.^4. Of the radioactivity in radiochromatograms from urine taken 1 h after dosing, 7.6% Was para-aminobenzoic acid, 59.7% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid, 19.5% Was benzocaine, and 8.0% Was n-acetylated benzocaine. The proportion of the radioactivity in urine changed with time so that by 20 h, 1.0% Was para-aminobenzoic acid and 96.6% Was n-acetylated para-aminobenzoic acid.^5. Benzocaine and a more hydrophobic metabolite, n-acetylated benzocaine, were eliminated primarily through the gills; renal and biliary pathways were less significant elimination routes for benzocaine residues.

  18. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in the hepatocytes of juvenile rainbow trout and mature brown trout exposed to copper or zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.

    1983-01-01

    Morphological changes in hepatocytes of mature brown trout (Salmo trutta Linnaeus) and juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri Richardson), accompanying chronic exposures to copper and zinc, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. At a concentration of copper not inhibitory to the final stages of gonadal development or spawning of brown trout, structural alterations included contraction of mitochondria and a tendency for nuclei to be slightly enlarged. Concentrations of copper or zinc lethal to a small fraction (10% and 4%, respectively) of a population of juvenile rainbow trout exposed for 42 d during larval and early juvenile development caused hepatocyte changes in survivors indicative of a reduction in ability to maintain intracellular water and cation balance and possible intranuclear metal sequestering. Specific structural alterations included increased vesiculation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, an increase in the abundance of electron-dense particles in the nucleus, increases in the numbers of multilaminar and globular inclusions, pooling of glycogen, increased autophagocytic activity and an increase in the number of necrotic cells. At advanced stages of toxicosis (concentrations of copper or zinc lethal to approximately 50% of the juveniles exposed for 42 d during development), loss in integrity of mitochondrial membranes, rupturing of plasma and nuclear membranes, separation of granular and fibrillar nuclear components, fragmentation of endoplasmic reticulum, and extensive autophagic vacuolization were significant features of hepatocytes of surviving juvenile rainbow trout. ?? 1983.

  20. The effect of peptidoglycan enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Casadei, Elisa; Bird, Steve; Vecino, Jose L González; Wadsworth, Simon; Secombes, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) peptidoglycan (PG) enriched diets on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene expression. Fish were divided into 5 groups and fed diets containing 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg, and sampled 1, 7 and 14 days later. The expression of eight AMP genes (four defensins, two cathelicidins and two liver expressed AMPs) was determined in skin, gill, gut and liver, tissues important for first lines of defence or production of acute phase proteins. Up-regulation of many AMPs was found after feeding the PG enriched diets, with sequential expression seen over the time course studied, where defensins were typically expressed early and cathelicidins and LEAPs later on. A number of clear differences in AMP responsiveness between the tissues examined were also apparent. Of the four PG concentrations used, 5 mg PG/Kg did not always elicit AMP gene induction or to the same degree as seen with the other diets. The three higher dose groups generally showed similar trends although differences in fold change were more pronounced in the 50 and 100 mg PG/Kg groups. Curiously several AMPs were down-regulated after 14 days of feeding in gills, gut and liver. Nevertheless, overall the PG enriched diets had a positive effect on AMP expression. Further investigations now need to be undertaken to confirm whether this higher AMP gene expression correlates with protection against common bacterial diseases and if PG enriched diets have value as a means to temporarily boost the piscine immune system. PMID:23220715

  1. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  2. Temporal changes in stress and tissue-specific metabolic responses to municipal wastewater effluent exposure in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ings, Jennifer S; Oakes, Ken D; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Servos, Mark R

    2012-08-01

    Sub-chronic exposure to municipal wastewater effluent (MWWE) in situ was recently shown to impact the acute response to a secondary stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, little is known about whether MWWE exposure in itself is stressful to the animal. To address this, we carried out a laboratory study to examine the organismal and cellular stress responses and tissue-specific metabolic capacity in trout exposed to MWWE. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to 0, 20 and 90% MWWE (from a tertiary wastewater treatment plant), that was replenished every 2d, for 14 d. Fish were sampled 2, 8 or 14 d post-exposure. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were measured as indicators of organismal stress response, while inducible heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), constitutive heat shock protein 70 (hsc70) and hsp90 expression in the liver were used as markers of cellular stress response. Impact of MWWE on cortisol signaling was ascertained by determining glucocorticoid receptor protein (GR) expression in the liver, brain and, heart, and metabolic capacity was evaluated by measuring liver glycogen content and tissue-specific activities of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. Plasma glucose and lactate levels were unaffected by exposure to MWWEs, whereas cortisol showed a transient increase in the 20% group at 8d. Liver hsc70 and hsp90, but not hsp70 expression, were higher in the 90% MWWE group after 8d. There was a temporal change in GR expression in the liver and heart, but not brain of trout exposed to MWWE. Liver glycogen content and activities liver gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) were significantly affected by MWWE exposure. The glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase (PK) and hexokinase (HK) activities were significantly higher temporally by MWWE exposure in the gill and heart, but not in the liver and brain. Overall, a 14 d exposure to MWWE evokes a cellular stress response and

  3. The fibrate drug gemfibrozil disrupts lipoprotein metabolism in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Prindiville, John S. Mennigen, Jan A.; Zamora, Jake M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-15

    Gemfibrozil (GEM) is a fibrate drug consistently found in effluents from sewage treatment plants. This study characterizes the pharmacological effects of GEM on the plasma lipoproteins of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Our goals were to quantify the impact of the drug on: 1) lipid constituents of lipoproteins (phospholipids (PL), triacylglycerol (TAG), and cholesterol), 2) lipoprotein classes (high, low and very low density lipoproteins), and 3) fatty acid composition of lipoproteins. Potential mechanisms of GEM action were investigated by measuring lipoprotein lipase activity (LPL) and the hepatic gene expression of LPL and of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} isoforms. GEM treatment resulted in decreased plasma lipoprotein levels (- 29%) and a reduced size of all lipoprotein classes (lower PL:TAG ratios). However, the increase in HDL-cholesterol elicited by GEM in humans failed to be observed in trout. Therefore, HDL-cholesterol cannot be used to assess the impact of the drug on fish. GEM also modified lipoprotein composition by reducing the abundance of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, thereby potentially reducing the nutritional quality of exposed fish. The relative gene expression of LPL was increased, but the activity of the enzyme was not, and we found no evidence for the activation of PPAR pathways. The depressing effects of GEM on fish lipoproteins demonstrated here may be a concern in view of the widespread presence of fibrates in aquatic environments. Work is needed to test whether exposure to environmental concentrations of these drugs jeopardizes the capacity of fish for reproduction, temperature acclimation or migratory behaviors.

  4. Physiological and molecular ontogeny of branchial and extra-branchial urea excretion in posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Wood, Chris M

    2016-02-01

    All teleost fish produce ammonia as a metabolic waste product. In embryos, ammonia excretion is limited by the chorion, and fish must detoxify ammonia by synthesizing urea via the ornithine urea cycle (OUC). Although urea is produced by embryos and larvae, urea excretion (J(urea)) is typically low until yolk sac absorption, increasing thereafter. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and molecular characteristics of J(urea) by posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Following hatch, whole body urea concentration decreased over time, while J(urea) increased following yolk sac absorption. From 12 to 40 days posthatch (dph), extra-branchial routes of excretion accounted for the majority of J(urea), while the gills became the dominant site for J(urea) only after 55 dph. This represents the most delayed branchial ontogeny of any process studied to date. Urea transporter (UT) gene expression in the gills and skin increased over development, consistent with increases in branchial and extra-branchial J(urea). Following exposure to 25 mmol/l urea, the accumulation and subsequent elimination of exogenous urea was much greater at 55 dph than 12 dph, consistent with increased UT expression. Notably, UT gene expression in the gills of 55 dph larvae increased in response to high urea. In summary, there is a clear increase in urea transport capacity over posthatch development, despite a decrease in OUC activity. PMID:26608657

  5. Dietary effects of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Sakineh; Teimouri, Mahdi; Amirkolaie, Abdolsamad Keramat

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of diets containing 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% of Spirulina platensis on hematological and serum biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish (n=180; 101±8 g) were randomly divided into fifteen 300 L fiberglass tanks in triplicates for a period of ten weeks. The RBC, WBC, hemoglobin, total protein and albumin levels increased significantly in the groups supplemented with S. platensis. Dietary inclusion of S. platensis had no significant effects on hematocrit, cholesterol, triglyceride and lactate of the blood. HDL-cholesterol was larger in rainbow trout fed 10% S. platensis in comparison with the other diets, whereas LDL-cholesterol significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. Cortisol and glucose significantly decreased with increasing of S. platensis inclusion. The present results demonstrate that inclusion of 10% S. platensis can be introduced as an immunostimulant in rainbow trout diets. PMID:26267095

  6. Occurrence and morphogenetic characteristics of Gyrodactylus (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) from a rainbow trout farm (Lake Ladoga, Russia).

    PubMed

    Ieshko, Evgeny; Barskaya, Yulia; Parshukov, Aleksey; Lumme, Jaakko; Khlunov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Gyrodactylus parasite infected juveniles on rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792) from a fish farm in Lake Ladoga were investigated. The observed cases of infection in fish featured a high prevalence, when almost all of the fish were infected. However, if an outbreak of the monogenean infection is observed in spring, the intensity of the infection may be low, and when the infection occurs in the ice-covered period (late autumn - winter), the number of parasites on the fins of a single fish may exceed 3000 specimens. Molecular identification of the parasite demonstrated that the infecting clone was identical with rainbow trout specific strain of Gyrodactylus salaris RBT widely spread in Northern Europe, but a small proportion of the parasites were the hybrid clone Gyrodactylus pomeraniae x G. lavareti. Morphological variations of hooks and other opisthaptor parts in the monogenean Gyrodactylus depending on the intensity of infection in rainbow trout were demonstrated. PMID:26751886

  7. Sequence homologies in the protamine gene family of rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, J M; McKenzie, D; Zhao, H Z; States, J C; Dixon, G H

    1983-01-01

    We have sequenced five different rainbow trout protamine genes plus their flanking regions. The genes are not clustered and do not contain intervening sequences. There is an extremely high degree of sequence conservation in the coding and 3' untranslated regions of the gene. Downstream sequences exhibit little homology though conserved regions are found 250 base pairs 3' to the gene. There are four regions upstream of the gene that are highly conserved in the six clones, including the canonical Goldberg - Hogness box which is 45 base pairs 5' to the coding region. A second homologous region is found 90 bases upstream. Although in the same approximate location as the CAAT box found upstream of other genes, it does not contain the canonical CAAT sequence. Further upstream of the protamine genes at -115 there is an A-T rich sequence while a 25 base pair conserved sequence is located 150 bases upstream. In addition we report the presence of a potential Z-DNA region of predominantly A-C repeats approximately one kilobase downstream of one of the genes. Images PMID:6308564

  8. Assignment of Rainbow Trout Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ruth B.; Nichols, Krista M.; DeKoning, Jenefer J.; Morasch, Matthew R.; Keatley, Kimberly A.; Rexroad, Caird; Gahr, Scott A.; Danzmann, Roy G.; Drew, Robert E.; Thorgaard, Gary H.

    2006-01-01

    The rainbow trout genetic linkage groups have been assigned to specific chromosomes in the OSU (2N = 60) strain using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with BAC probes containing genes mapped to each linkage group. There was a rough correlation between chromosome size and size of the genetic linkage map in centimorgans for the genetic maps based on recombination from the female parent. Chromosome size and structure have a major impact on the female:male recombination ratio, which is much higher (up to 10:1 near the centromeres) on the larger metacentric chromosomes compared to smaller acrocentric chromosomes. Eighty percent of the BAC clones containing duplicate genes mapped to a single chromosomal location, suggesting that diploidization resulted in substantial divergence of intergenic regions. The BAC clones that hybridized to both duplicate loci were usually located in the distal portion of the chromosome. Duplicate genes were almost always found at a similar location on the chromosome arm of two different chromosome pairs, suggesting that most of the chromosome rearrangements following tetraploidization were centric fusions and did not involve homeologous chromosomes. The set of BACs compiled for this research will be especially useful in construction of genome maps and identification of QTL for important traits in other salmonid fishes. PMID:16951085

  9. Comparative efficacy of 16 anesthetic chemicals on rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.; Marking, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Presently there are no legally registered fish anesthetics that allow for the release of fish or use of the fish for food soon after they have been anesthetized. MS-222 (tricaine), the only anesthetic registered for use on fish in the United States, cannot be used within 21 d of harvesting the fish for food. As the start in a search for an anesthetic that can be used with little or no withdrawal period, we tested the efficacy of 16 chemicals as anesthetics on rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri. Efficacy was defined by the fish (1) becoming handleable (quiet enough to be manipulated and handled readily) in 3 min or less, (2) recovering in 10 min or less, and (3) showing no mortality after 15 min in the anesthetic solution. Four chemicals--MS-222, quinaldine sulfate, benzocaine, and 2-phenoxyethanol--met these criteria for efficacy. Chemicals that yielded excessive induction or recovery times or caused excessive mortality were methylpentynol, chlorobutanol, etomidate, metomidate, Piscaine, propanidid, carbon dioxide, nicotine, salt, Halothane, Metofane, and Biotal. Because carbon dioxide leaves no residues and requires no withdrawal period, it may be an acceptable alternative for fishery workers who can tolerate somewhat shallower anesthesia and longer induction and recovery times.

  10. Comparative toxicity of two Iodophors to rainbow trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.

    1974-01-01

    Toxicity of Wescodyne(R) and Betadine(R) to eyed eggs was not adversely affected by water hardness (as calcium and magnesium) or by exposure periods up to 60 min. Both iodophors were much more toxic below pH 6.0 than at pH 8.0. In general Wescodyne was slightly more toxic than Betadine. Significant egg loss occurred if freshly fertilized eggs were water-hardened in either iodophor at 100 ppm of iodine, but egg loss at 25 ppm of iodine or at 100 ppm if the eggs were disinfected 30 min after water hardening was comparable to the control. Also, there was no effect on the egg mortality or fry development following single or multiple exposures after eggs were water hardened. At pH 6.0 and above, Wescodyne and Betadine at 100 ppm iodine in a 15-min dip would be safe to use on rainbow trout eggs at any stage of development after water hardening. Recommendations and precautions for hatchery use are given.