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Sample records for random peptide libraries

  1. Structural aspects of antibody-antigen interaction revealed through small random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Slootstra, J W; Puijk, W C; Ligtvoet, G J; Langeveld, J P; Meloen, R H

    1996-02-01

    Two small random peptide libraries, one composed of 4550 dodecapeptides and one of 8000 tripeptides, were synthesized in newly developed credit-card format miniPEPSCAN cards (miniPEPSCAN libraries). Each peptide was synthesized in a discrete well (455 peptides/card). The two miniPEPSCAN libraries were screened with three different monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). Two other random peptide libraries, expressed on the wall of bacteria (recombinant libraries) and composed of 10(7) hexa- and octapeptides, were screened with the same three Mabs. The aim of this study was to compare the amino acid sequence of peptides selected from small and large pools of random peptides and, in this way, investigate the potential of small random peptide libraries. The screening of the two miniPEPSCAN libraries resulted in the identification of a surprisingly large number of antibody-binding peptides, while the screening of the large recombinant libraries, using the same Mabs, resulted in the identification of only a small number of peptides. The large number of peptides derived from the small random peptide libraries allowed the determination of consensus sequences. These consensus sequences could be related to small linear and nonlinear parts of the respective epitopes. The small number of peptides derived from the large random peptide libraries could only be related to linear epitopes that were previously mapped using small libraries of overlapping peptides covering the antigenic protein. Thus, with respect to the cost and speed of identifying peptides that resemble linear and nonlinear parts of epitopes, small diversity libraries based on synthetic peptides appear to be superior to large diversity libraries based on expression systems. PMID:9237197

  2. Human IgA-binding Peptides Selected from Random Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1–A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (Kd = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (Kd = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination. PMID:23076147

  3. Biotin binders selected from a random peptide library expressed on phage.

    PubMed Central

    Saggio, I; Laufer, R

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant biotin-binding phages were affinity-selected from a random peptide library expressed on the surface of filamentous phage. Phage binding to biotinylated proteins was half-maximally inhibited by micromolar concentrations of a monobiotinylated molecule. Sequencing of the peptide inserts of selected phages led to the identification of a previously unknown biotin-binding motif, CXWXPPF(K or R)XXC. A synthetic peptide containing this sequence motif inhibited streptavidin binding to biotinylated BSA with an IC50 of 50 microM. This compound represents the shortest non-avidin biotin-binding peptide identified to date. Our results illustrate that phage display technology can be used to identify novel ligands for a small non-proteinaceous molecule. PMID:8352728

  4. Biotin binders selected from a random peptide library expressed on phage.

    PubMed

    Saggio, I; Laufer, R

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant biotin-binding phages were affinity-selected from a random peptide library expressed on the surface of filamentous phage. Phage binding to biotinylated proteins was half-maximally inhibited by micromolar concentrations of a monobiotinylated molecule. Sequencing of the peptide inserts of selected phages led to the identification of a previously unknown biotin-binding motif, CXWXPPF(K or R)XXC. A synthetic peptide containing this sequence motif inhibited streptavidin binding to biotinylated BSA with an IC50 of 50 microM. This compound represents the shortest non-avidin biotin-binding peptide identified to date. Our results illustrate that phage display technology can be used to identify novel ligands for a small non-proteinaceous molecule. PMID:8352728

  5. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  6. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    PubMed

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  7. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  8. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  9. Identification of measles virus epitopes using an ultra-fast method of panning phage-displayed random peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Barmina, Olga; Burgoon, Mark; Gilden, Don

    2010-01-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries, in which high affinity phage peptides are enriched by repetitive selection (panning) on target antibody, provide a unique tool for identifying antigen specificity. This paper describes a new panning method that enables selection of peptides in 1 day as compared to about 6 days required in traditional panning to identify virus-specific epitopes. The method, termed ultra-fast selection of peptide (UFSP), utilizes phage produced by bacterial infection (phage amplification) directly for subsequent panning. Phage amplified in less than 1 h of infection in Escherichia coli are used for binding to target antibody pre-coated in the same wells of an ELISA plate, obviating the need for traditional large-scale amplification and purification. Importantly, phage elution at 37 °C was superior to that at room temperature, and phage amplification in a 150-μl volume of E. coli cells was superior to that in 250-μl volume. Application of UFSP to two monoclonal antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain identified high-affinity measles virus-specific-peptide epitopes. The UFSP panning methodology will expedite identification of peptides reacting with antibodies generated in other diseases of unknown antigenic specificity such as multiple sclerosis (MS), sarcoidosis and Behcet’s disease. PMID:19095007

  10. Identification of measles virus epitopes using an ultra-fast method of panning phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Barmina, Olga; Burgoon, Mark; Gilden, Don

    2009-03-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries, in which high affinity phage peptides are enriched by repetitive selection (panning) on target antibody, provide a unique tool for identifying antigen specificity. This paper describes a new panning method that enables selection of peptides in 1 day as compared to about 6 days required in traditional panning to identify virus-specific epitopes. The method, termed ultra-fast selection of peptide (UFSP), utilizes phage produced by bacterial infection (phage amplification) directly for subsequent panning. Phage amplified in less than 1h of infection in Escherichia coli are used for binding to target antibody pre-coated in the same wells of an ELISA plate, obviating the need for traditional large-scale amplification and purification. Importantly, phage elution at 37 degrees C was superior to that at room temperature, and phage amplification in a 150-microl volume of E. coli cells was superior to that in 250-microl volume. Application of UFSP to two monoclonal antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain identified high-affinity measles virus-specific-peptide epitopes. The UFSP panning methodology will expedite identification of peptides reacting with antibodies generated in other diseases of unknown antigenic specificity such as multiple sclerosis (MS), sarcoidosis and Behcet's disease. PMID:19095007

  11. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  12. Phage-displayed peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B; Shen, Juqun; Scott, Jamie K

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year, significant advances have been achieved through the use of phage-displayed peptide libraries. A wide variety of bioactive molecules, including antibodies, receptors and enzymes, have selected high-affinity and/or highly-specific peptide ligands from a number of different types of peptide library. The demonstrated therapeutic potential of some of these peptides, as well as new insights into protein structure and function that peptide ligands have provided, highlight the progress made within this rapidly-expanding field. PMID:9720267

  13. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  14. Pulmonary Targeting of Adeno-associated Viral Vectors by Next-generation Sequencing-guided Screening of Random Capsid Displayed Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Körbelin, Jakob; Sieber, Timo; Michelfelder, Stefan; Lunding, Lars; Spies, Elmar; Hunger, Agnes; Alawi, Malik; Rapti, Kleopatra; Indenbirken, Daniela; Müller, Oliver J; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Trepel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Vectors mediating strong, durable, and tissue-specific transgene expression are mandatory for safe and effective gene therapy. In settings requiring systemic vector administration, the availability of suited vectors is extremely limited. Here, we present a strategy to select vectors with true specificity for a target tissue from random peptide libraries displayed on adeno-associated virus (AAV) by screening the library under circulation conditions in a murine model. Guiding the in vivo screening by next-generation sequencing, we were able to monitor the selection kinetics and to determine the right time point to discontinue the screening process. The establishment of different rating scores enabled us to identify the most specifically enriched AAV capsid candidates. As proof of concept, a capsid variant was selected that specifically and very efficiently delivers genes to the endothelium of the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous administration. This technical approach of selecting target-specific vectors in vivo is applicable to any given tissue of interest and therefore has broad implications in translational research and medicine. PMID:27018516

  15. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  16. Biomathematical description of synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Timo; Hare, Eric; Hofmann, Heike; Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  17. Selection dynamic of Escherichia coli host in M13 combinatorial peptide phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Zanconato, Stefano; Minervini, Giovanni; Poli, Irene; De Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Phage display relies on an iterative cycle of selection and amplification of random combinatorial libraries to enrich the initial population of those peptides that satisfy a priori chosen criteria. The effectiveness of any phage display protocol depends directly on library amino acid sequence diversity and the strength of the selection procedure. In this study we monitored the dynamics of the selective pressure exerted by the host organism on a random peptide library in the absence of any additional selection pressure. The results indicate that sequence censorship exerted by Escherichia coli dramatically reduces library diversity and can significantly impair phage display effectiveness. PMID:21512219

  18. Identification of non-random sequence properties in groups of signature peptides obtained in random sequence peptide microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B

    2016-05-01

    Immunosignaturing is an emerging experimental technique that uses random sequence peptide microarrays to detect antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a particular disease. Two important questions regarding immunosignaturing are "Do microarray peptides that exhibit a strong affinity to a given type of antibodies share common sequence properties?" and "If so, what are those properties?" In this work, three statistical tests designed to detect non-random patterns in the amino acid makeup of a group of microarray peptides are presented. One test detects patterns of significantly biased amino acid usage, whereas the other two detect patterns of significant bias in the biochemical properties. These tests do not require a large number of peptides per group. The tests were applied to analyze 19 groups of peptides identified in immunosignaturing experiments as being specific for antibodies produced in response to various types of cancer and other diseases. The positional distribution of the biochemical properties of the amino acids in these 19 peptide groups was also studied. Remarkably, despite the random nature of the sequence libraries used to design the microarrays, a unique group-specific non-random pattern was identified in the majority of the peptide groups studied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 318-329, 2016. PMID:27037995

  19. Screening peptide array library for the identification of cancer cell-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kamaljit; Ahmed, Sahar; Soudy, Rania; Azmi, Sarfuddin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer cell-specific ligands is a key requirement for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Usually phage display system is employed to discover cancer-specific peptides through a biopanning process. Synthetic peptide array libraries can be used as a complementary method to phage display for screening and identifying cancer cell-specific ligands. Here, we describe a peptide array-whole cell binding assay to identify cancer cell-specific peptides. A peptide array library based on a lead dodecapeptide, p160, is synthesized on a functionalized cellulose membrane using solid phase chemistry and a robotic synthesizer. The relative binding affinity of the peptide library is evaluated by incubating the library with fluorescently labeled cancerous or non-cancerous cells. Thereby the assay allows picking peptides that show selective and high binding to cancerous cells. These peptides represent potential candidates for use in cancer-targeted drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis. PMID:25616337

  20. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  1. Automated mass spectrometric sequence determination of cyclic peptide library members.

    PubMed

    Redman, James E; Wilcoxen, Keith M; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2003-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have come under scrutiny as potential antimicrobial therapeutic agents. Combinatorial split-and-pool synthesis of cyclic peptides can afford single compound per well libraries for antimicrobial screening, new lead identification, and construction of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Here, we report a new sequencing protocol for rapid identification of the members of a cyclic peptide library based on automated computer analysis of mass spectra, obviating the need for library encoding/decoding strategies. Furthermore, the software readily integrates with common spreadsheet and database packages to facilitate data visualization and archiving. The utility of the new MS-sequencing approach is demonstrated using sonic spray ionization ion trap MS and MS/MS spectrometry on a single compound per bead cyclic peptide library and validated with individually synthesized pure cyclic D,L-alpha-peptides. PMID:12523832

  2. Identifying reactive peptides from phage-displayed libraries

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Glenn M.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phage display enables the synthesis, selection and screening of large, polypeptide libraries (>1 × 1010). Selections from such libraries can identify binding partners to essentially any desired target (1, 2). Peptide with affinity or reactivity to small molecule probes are attractive for numerous uses including the targeted, site-specific labeling of proteins. Here, we describe selection and screening protocols for the identification of short peptides that can selectively bind to and/or react with small molecules. PMID:25616334

  3. Amyloid-forming peptides selected proteolytically from phage display library.

    PubMed

    Koscielska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrated that amyloid-forming peptides could be selected from phage-displayed library via proteolysis-based selection protocol. The library of 28-residue peptides based on a sequence of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268, and computationally designed betabetaalpha peptide, FSD-1, was presented monovalently on the surface of M13 phage. The library coupled the infectivity of phage particles to proteolytic stability of a peptide introduced into the coat protein III linker. It was designed to include variants with a strong potential to fold into betabetaalpha motif of zinc finger domains, as expected from secondary structure propensities, but with no structure stabilization via zinc ion coordination. As our primary goal was to find novel monomeric betabetaalpha peptides, the library was selected for stable domains with the assumption that folded proteins are resistant to proteolysis. After less than four rounds of proteolytic selection with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or proteinase K, we obtained a number of proteolysis-resistant phage clones containing several potential sites for proteolytic attack with the proteinases. Eight peptides showing the highest proteolysis resistance were expressed and purified in a phage-free form. When characterized, the peptides possessed proteolytic resistance largely exceeding that of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268 and FSD-1. Six of the characterized peptides formed fibrils when solubilized at high concentrations. Three of them assembled into amyloids as determined through CD measurements, Congo red and thioflavin T binding, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:12876317

  4. Spectral Library Searching To Identify Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, Devin K; Chavez, Juan D; Navare, Arti T; Wu, Xia; Ruiz, Bianca; Eng, Jimmy K; Lam, Henry; Bruce, James E

    2016-05-01

    Methods harnessing protein cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) offer high-throughput means to identify protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and structural interfaces of protein complexes. Yet, specialized data dependent methods and search algorithms are often required to confidently assign peptide identifications to spectra. To improve the efficiency of matching high confidence spectra, we developed a spectral library based approach to search cross-linked peptide data derived from Protein Interaction Reporter (PIR) methods using the spectral library search algorithm, SpectraST. Spectral library matching of cross-linked peptide data from query spectra increased the absolute number of confident peptide relationships matched to spectra and thereby the number of PPIs identified. By matching library spectra from bona fide, previously established PIR-cross-linked peptide relationships, spectral library searching reduces the need for continued, complex mass spectrometric methods to identify peptide relationships, increases coverage of relationship identifications, and improves the accessibility of XL-MS technologies. PMID:27089058

  5. An overhang-based DNA block shuffling method for creating a customized random library

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Venter, Chris; Wang, Kendrick; Ferreira, Raphael; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    We present an overhang-based DNA block shuffling method to create a customized random DNA library with flexible sequence design and length. Our method enables the efficient and seamless assembly of short DNA blocks with dinucleotide overhangs through a simple ligation process. Next generation sequencing analysis of the assembled DNA library revealed that ligation was accurate, directional and unbiased. This straightforward DNA assembly method should fulfill the versatile needs of both in vivo and in vitro functional screening of random peptides and RNA created with a desired amino acid and nucleotide composition, as well as making highly repetitive gene constructs that are difficult to synthesize de novo. PMID:26010273

  6. Design, Synthesis, and Application of OB2C Combinatorial Peptide and Peptidomimetic Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiwu; Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Deng, Xiaojun; Anwar, Lara; Ahadi, Sara; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Lam, Kit S.

    2015-01-01

    The “one-bead two-compound” (OB2C) combinatorial library is constructed on topologically segregated trifunctional bilayer beads such that each bead has a fixed cell-capturing ligand and a random library compound co-displayed on its surface and a chemical coding tag (bar code) inside the bead. An OB2C library containing thousands to millions of compounds can be synthesized and screened concurrently within a short period of time. When live cells are incubated with such OB2C libraries, every bead will be coated with a monolayer of cells. The cell membranes of the captured cells facing the bead surface are exposed to the library compounds tethered to each bead. A specific biochemical or cellular response can be detected with an appropriate reporter system. The OB2C method enables investigators to rapidly discover synthetic molecules that not only interact with cell-surface receptors but can also stimulate or inhibit downstream cell signaling. To demonstrate this powerful method, one OB2C peptide library and two OB2C peptidomimetic libraries were synthesized and screened against Molt-4 lymphoma cells to discover “death ligands.” Apoptosis of the bead-bound cells was detected with immunocytochemistry using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibody and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine as a substrate. Two novel synthetic “death ligands” against Molt-4 cells were discovered using this OB2C library approach. PMID:25616322

  7. Design, synthesis, and application of OB2C combinatorial peptide and peptidomimetic libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiwu; Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Deng, Xiaojun; Anwar, Lara; Ahadi, Sara; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Lam, Kit S

    2015-01-01

    The "one-bead two-compound" (OB2C) combinatorial library is constructed on topologically segregated trifunctional bilayer beads such that each bead has a fixed cell-capturing ligand and a random library compound co-displayed on its surface and a chemical coding tag (bar code) inside the bead. An OB2C library containing thousands to millions of compounds can be synthesized and screened concurrently within a short period of time. When live cells are incubated with such OB2C libraries, every bead will be coated with a monolayer of cells. The cell membranes of the captured cells facing the bead surface are exposed to the library compounds tethered to each bead. A specific biochemical or cellular response can be detected with an appropriate reporter system. The OB2C method enables investigators to rapidly discover synthetic molecules that not only interact with cell-surface receptors but can also stimulate or inhibit downstream cell signaling. To demonstrate this powerful method, one OB2C peptide library and two OB2C peptidomimetic libraries were synthesized and screened against Molt-4 lymphoma cells to discover "death ligands." Apoptosis of the bead-bound cells was detected with immunocytochemistry using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibody and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as a substrate. Two novel synthetic "death ligands" against Molt-4 cells were discovered using this OB2C library approach. PMID:25616322

  8. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  9. Functional proteins from a random-sequence library

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Anthony D; Szostak, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    Functional primordial proteins presumably originated from random sequences, but it is not known how frequently functional, or even folded, proteins occur in collections of random sequences. Here we have used in vitro selection of messenger RNA displayed proteins, in which each protein is covalently linked through its carboxy terminus to the 3′ end of its encoding mRNA1, to sample a large number of distinct random sequences. Starting from a library of 6 × 1012 proteins each containing 80 contiguous random amino acids, we selected functional proteins by enriching for those that bind to ATP. This selection yielded four new ATP-binding proteins that appear to be unrelated to each other or to anything found in the current databases of biological proteins. The frequency of occurrence of functional proteins in random-sequence libraries appears to be similar to that observed for equivalent RNA libraries2,3. PMID:11287961

  10. Uniqueness: skews bit occurrence frequencies in randomly generated fingerprint libraries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nelson G

    2016-08-01

    Requiring that randomly generated chemical fingerprint libraries have unique fingerprints such that no two fingerprints are identical causes a systematic skew in bit occurrence frequencies, the proportion at which specified bits are set. Observed frequencies (O) at which each bit is set within the resulting libraries systematically differ from frequencies at which bits are set at fingerprint generation (E). Observed frequencies systematically skew toward 0.5, with the effect being more pronounced as library size approaches the compound space, which is the total number of unique possible fingerprints given the number of bit positions each fingerprint contains. The effect is quantified for varying library sizes as a fraction of the overall compound space, and for changes in the specified frequency E. The cause and implications for this systematic skew are subsequently discussed. When generating random libraries of chemical fingerprints, the imposition of a uniqueness requirement should either be avoided or taken into account. PMID:27230477

  11. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  12. RNGAVXLIB: Program library for random number generation, AVX realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskova, M. S.; Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2016-03-01

    We present the random number generator (RNG) library RNGAVXLIB, which contains fast AVX realizations of a number of modern random number generators, and also the abilities to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize up to 1019 independent random number streams with block splitting method. Fast AVX implementations produce exactly the same output sequences as the original algorithms. Usage of AVX vectorization allows to substantially improve performance of the generators. The new realizations are up to 2 times faster than the SSE realizations implemented in the previous version of the library (Barash and Shchur, 2013), and up to 40 times faster compared to the original algorithms written in ANSI C.

  13. SWATH Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Extended Peptide MS/MS Assay Libraries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jemma X; Song, Xiaomin; Pascovici, Dana; Zaw, Thiri; Care, Natasha; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    The use of data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH for mass spectrometry based proteomics is usually performed with peptide MS/MS assay libraries which enable identification and quantitation of peptide peak areas. Reference assay libraries can be generated locally through information dependent acquisition, or obtained from community data repositories for commonly studied organisms. However, there have been no studies performed to systematically evaluate how locally generated or repository-based assay libraries affect SWATH performance for proteomic studies. To undertake this analysis, we developed a software workflow, SwathXtend, which generates extended peptide assay libraries by integration with a local seed library and delivers statistical analysis of SWATH-quantitative comparisons. We designed test samples using peptides from a yeast extract spiked into peptides from human K562 cell lysates at three different ratios to simulate protein abundance change comparisons. SWATH-MS performance was assessed using local and external assay libraries of varying complexities and proteome compositions. These experiments demonstrated that local seed libraries integrated with external assay libraries achieve better performance than local assay libraries alone, in terms of the number of identified peptides and proteins and the specificity to detect differentially abundant proteins. Our findings show that the performance of extended assay libraries is influenced by the MS/MS feature similarity of the seed and external libraries, while statistical analysis using multiple testing corrections increases the statistical rigor needed when searching against large extended assay libraries. PMID:27161445

  14. Synthesis of a large library of macrocyclic peptides containing multiple and diverse N-alkylated residues.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Large combinatorial libraries of macrocyclic peptides are a useful source of bioactive compounds. However, peptides are not generally cell permeable, so there is great interest in the development of methods to create large libraries of modified peptides. In particular, N-alkylation of peptides is known to improve their bioavailability significantly. Incorporation of some level of N-methylated amino acids into peptide libraries has been accomplished with ribosome display or related methods, but the modest efficiency and the inability to employ more diverse N-alkylated amino acids in this type of system argue for the development of synthetic libraries. Here we present optimized procedures for synthesizing macrocyclic peptides containing multiple N-alkylated units and show that this chemistry is efficient enough for the creation of high quality combinatorial libraries by split and pool solid-phase synthesis. PMID:26067000

  15. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258690

  16. Error analysis of deep sequencing of phage libraries: peptides censored in sequencing.

    PubMed

    Matochko, Wadim L; Derda, Ratmir

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N × 1 frequency vector n = ||ni||, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N × N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa). The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq). Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq = Sa IN, where IN is a N × N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN), which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process. PMID:24416071

  17. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    PubMed

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  18. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  19. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  20. RScore: a peptide randomicity score for evaluating tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuxin; Sun, Wei; Gao, Youhe; Wang, Jue

    2004-01-01

    RScore, a new criterion of randomicity for evaluating tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra, is described. RScore is defined as the relative quality in cross-correlation and matched intensity percentage of a potentially positive peptide to those of other possible candidates for the same spectrum. By utilizing RScore combined with less stringent SEQUEST score filters, the number of true positive peptides can be increased and the number of false positives in datasets from a known protein mixture can be reduced compared with current SEQUEST parameters used alone. This algorithm is simple and adds little overheads to SEQUEST computation. PMID:15282793

  1. Rapid Optimization of Mcl-1 Inhibitors using Stapled Peptide Libraries Including Non-Natural Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Araghi, Raheleh; Ryan, Jeremy A; Letai, Anthony; Keating, Amy E

    2016-05-20

    Alpha helices form a critical part of the binding interface for many protein-protein interactions, and chemically stabilized synthetic helical peptides can be effective inhibitors of such helix-mediated complexes. In particular, hydrocarbon stapling of peptides to generate constrained helices can improve binding affinity and other peptide properties, but determining the best stapled peptide variant often requires laborious trial and error. Here, we describe the rapid discovery and optimization of a stapled-helix peptide that binds to Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic protein that is overexpressed in many chemoresistant cancers. To accelerate discovery, we developed a peptide library synthesis and screening scheme capable of identifying subtle affinity differences among Mcl-1-binding stapled peptides. We used our method to sample combinations of non-natural amino-acid substitutions that we introduced into Mcl-1 inhibitors in the context of a fixed helix-stabilizing hydrocarbon staple that increased peptide helical content and reduced proteolysis. Peptides discovered in our screen contained surprising substitutions at sites that are conserved in natural binding partners. Library-identified peptide M3d is the most potent molecule yet tested for selectively triggering mitochondrial permeabilization in Mcl-1 dependent cell lines. Our library approach for optimizing helical peptide inhibitors can be readily applied to the study of other biomedically important targets. PMID:26854535

  2. GASPRNG: GPU accelerated scalable parallel random number generator library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuang; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2013-04-01

    Graphics processors represent a promising technology for accelerating computational science applications. Many computational science applications require fast and scalable random number generation with good statistical properties, so they use the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators library (SPRNG). We present the GPU Accelerated SPRNG library (GASPRNG) to accelerate SPRNG in GPU-based high performance computing systems. GASPRNG includes code for a host CPU and CUDA code for execution on NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) along with a programming interface to support various usage models for pseudorandom numbers and computational science applications executing on the CPU, GPU, or both. This paper describes the implementation approach used to produce high performance and also describes how to use the programming interface. The programming interface allows a user to be able to use GASPRNG the same way as SPRNG on traditional serial or parallel computers as well as to develop tightly coupled programs executing primarily on the GPU. We also describe how to install GASPRNG and use it. To help illustrate linking with GASPRNG, various demonstration codes are included for the different usage models. GASPRNG on a single GPU shows up to 280x speedup over SPRNG on a single CPU core and is able to scale for larger systems in the same manner as SPRNG. Because GASPRNG generates identical streams of pseudorandom numbers as SPRNG, users can be confident about the quality of GASPRNG for scalable computational science applications. Catalogue identifier: AEOI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: UTK license. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167900 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1422058 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and CUDA. Computer: Any PC or

  3. Mimotopes of polyreactive anti-DNA antibodies identified using phage-display peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Sibille, P; Ternynck, T; Nato, F; Buttin, G; Strosberg, D; Avrameas, A

    1997-05-01

    Three monoclonal IgG2a anti-DNA polyreactive autoantibodies, derived from lupus-prone mice (NZB x NZW)F1, were studied by surface plasmon resonance (BIAcore) analysis using three different synthetic double-stranded (ds) oligonucleotides of 25, 30, and 25 base pairs (bp). These monoclonal antibodies (mAb) exhibited dissociation rate constants (k(off)), ranging from 0.0001 (mAb F14.6 and F4.1) to 0.01/s (mAb J20.8) and k(on) ranging from 2 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(6) /M/s. The screening of a constrained random peptide library displayed on M13 bacteriophages on these mAb allowed the determination of the specific consensus motifs (mimotopes) for mAb F14.6 and J20.8, but not for mAb F4.1. No cross-reaction was observed between F14.6- and J20.8-specific peptides (and vice versa). Binding of all phages selected on F14.6 was inhibited with 700 ng/ml soluble DNA. The binding of one group of peptides selected on J20.8 was inhibited by 400 ng/ml soluble DNA, of a second group by 2500 ng/ml, while binding of a third group could not be inhibited. The determined consensus sequences do not match with known sequences. Peptides specific for F14.6 share negative charges and aromatic rings that may mimic a DNA backbone, while peptides selected with J20.8 do not bear any negative charge, implying a different kind of molecular recognition, for example hydrogen or salt bonds. The peptides selected on J20.8 also bind serum antibodies from human patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, BALB/c mice immunized with some of the selected phages exhibit high serum titers of IgG3 anti-dsDNA antibodies, further supporting the hypothesis that peptide epitopes may mimic an oligonucleotide structure. PMID:9174614

  4. An extensive library of surrogate peptides for all human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein is a major component of experimental design in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Our software PeptidePicker with its v-score remains distinctive in its approach of integrating information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM that is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our "best knowledge" for selecting candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it has previously been observed. Here we present an updated approach where we have already compiled a list of all possible surrogate peptides of the human proteome. Using our stringent selection criteria, the list includes 165k suitable MRM peptides covering 17k proteins of the human reviewed proteins in UniProtKB. Compared to average of 2-4min per protein for retrieving and integrating the information, the precompiled list includes all peptides available instantly. This allows a more cohesive and faster design of a multiplexed MRM experiment and provides insights into evidence for a protein's existence. We will keep this list up-to-date as proteomics data repositories continue to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:26232110

  5. Identification of calreticulin as a ligand of GABARAP by phage display screening of a peptide library.

    PubMed

    Mohrlüder, Jeannine; Stangler, Thomas; Hoffmann, Yvonne; Wiesehan, Katja; Mataruga, Anja; Willbold, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    4-Aminobutyrate type A (GABA(A)) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) is a ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABA(A) receptors, and belongs to a family of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular transport processes, such as autophagy and intra-Golgi transport. In this article, it is demonstrated that calreticulin is a high affinity ligand of GABARAP. Calreticulin, although best known for its functions as a Ca(2+) -dependent chaperone and a Ca(2+) -buffering protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, is also localized to the cytosol and exerts a variety of extra-endoplasmic reticulum functions. By phage display screening of a randomized peptide library, peptides that specifically bind GABARAP were identified. Their amino acid sequences allowed us to identify calreticulin as a potential GABARAP binding protein. GABARAP binding to calreticulin was confirmed by pull-down experiments with brain lysate and colocalization studies in N2a cells. Calreticulin and GABARAP interact with a dissociation constant K(d) = 64 nm and a mean lifetime of the complex of 20 min. Thus, the interaction between GABARAP and calreticulin is the strongest so far reported for each protein. PMID:17916189

  6. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  7. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  8. Development of a Backbone Cyclic Peptide Library as Potential Antiparasitic Therapeutics Using Microwave Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Kornfeld, Opher S

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are intimately involved in almost all biological processes and are linked to many human diseases. Therefore, there is a major effort to target PPIs in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. Protein-protein interfaces are usually large, flat, and often lack pockets, complicating the discovery of small molecules that target such sites. Alternative targeting approaches using antibodies have limitations due to poor oral bioavailability, low cell-permeability, and production inefficiency. Using peptides to target PPI interfaces has several advantages. Peptides have higher conformational flexibility, increased selectivity, and are generally inexpensive. However, peptides have their own limitations including poor stability and inefficiency crossing cell membranes. To overcome such limitations, peptide cyclization can be performed. Cyclization has been demonstrated to improve peptide selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability. However, predicting the bioactive conformation of a cyclic peptide is not trivial. To overcome this challenge, one attractive approach it to screen a focused library to screen in which all backbone cyclic peptides have the same primary sequence, but differ in parameters that influence their conformation, such as ring size and position. We describe a detailed protocol for synthesizing a library of backbone cyclic peptides targeting specific parasite PPIs. Using a rational design approach, we developed peptides derived from the scaffold protein Leishmania receptor for activated C-kinase (LACK). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK that are conserved in parasites, but not in the mammalian host homolog, may represent interaction sites for proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using microwave irradiation to reduce reaction times and increase efficiency. Developing a library of backbone cyclic peptides with different ring sizes facilitates a

  9. Label-Free, In-Solution Screening of Peptide Libraries for Binding to Protein Targets Using Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maaty, Walid S; Weis, David D

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable interest in the discovery of peptide ligands that bind to protein targets. Discovery of such ligands is usually approached by screening large peptide libraries. However, the individual peptides must be tethered to a tag that preserves their individual identities (e.g., phage display or one-bead one-compound). To overcome this limitation, we have developed a method for screening libraries of label-free peptides for binding to a protein target in solution as a single batch. The screening is based on decreased amide hydrogen exchange by peptides that bind to the target. Hydrogen exchange is measured by mass spectrometry. We demonstrate the approach using a peptide library derived from the Escherichia coli proteome that contained 6664 identifiable features. The library was spiked separately with a peptide spanning the calmodulin binding domain of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, 494-513) and a peptide spanning the N-terminal 20 residues of bovine ribonuclease A (S peptide). Human calmodulin and bovine ribonuclease S (RNase S) were screened against the library. Using a novel data analysis workflow, we identified the eNOS peptide as the only calmodulin binding peptide and S peptide as the only ribonuclease S binding peptide in the library. PMID:26741284

  10. Peptide library approach to uncover phosphomimetic inhibitors of the BRCA1 C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    White, E Railey; Sun, Luxin; Ma, Zhong; Beckta, Jason M; Danzig, Brittany A; Hacker, David E; Huie, Melissa; Williams, David C; Edwards, Ross A; Valerie, Kristoffer; Glover, J N Mark; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-05-15

    Many intracellular protein-protein interactions are mediated by the phosphorylation of serine, and phosphoserine-containing peptides can inhibit these interactions. However, hydrolysis of the phosphate by phosphatases, and the poor cell permeability associated with phosphorylated peptides has limited their utility in cellular and in vivo contexts. Compounding the problem, strategies to replace phosphoserine in peptide inhibitors with easily accessible mimetics (such as Glu or Asp) routinely fail. Here, we present an in vitro selection strategy for replacement of phosphoserine. Using mRNA display, we created a 10 trillion member structurally diverse unnatural peptide library. From this library, we found a peptide that specifically binds to the C-terminal domain (BRCT)2 of breast cancer associated protein 1 (BRCA1) with an affinity comparable to phosphorylated peptides. A crystal structure of the peptide bound reveals that the pSer-x-x-Phe motif normally found in BRCA1 (BRCT)2 binding partners is replaced by a Glu-x-x-4-fluoroPhe and that the peptide picks up additional contacts on the protein surface not observed in cognate phosphopeptide binding. Expression of the peptide in human cells led to defects in DNA repair by homologous recombination, a process BRCA1 is known to coordinate. Overall, this work validates a new in vitro selection approach for the development of inhibitors of protein-protein interactions mediated by serine phosphorylation. PMID:25654734

  11. Peptide Library Approach to Uncover Phosphomimetic Inhibitors of the BRCA1 C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    White, E. Railey; Sun, Luxin; Ma, Zhong; Beckta, Jason M.; Danzig, Brittany A.; Hacker, David E.; Huie, Melissa; Williams, David C.; Edwards, Ross A.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Mark Glover, J. N.; Hartman, Matthew C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular protein–protein interactions are mediated by the phosphorylation of serine, and phosphoserine-containing peptides can inhibit these interactions. However, hydrolysis of the phosphate by phosphatases, and the poor cell permeability associated with phosphorylated peptides has limited their utility in cellular and in vivo contexts. Compounding the problem, strategies to replace phosphoserine in peptide inhibitors with easily accessible mimetics (such as Glu or Asp) routinely fail. Here, we present an in vitro selection strategy for replacement of phosphoserine. Using mRNA display, we created a 10 trillion member structurally diverse unnatural peptide library. From this library, we found a peptide that specifically binds to the C-terminal domain (BRCT)2 of breast cancer associated protein 1 (BRCA1) with an affinity comparable to phosphorylated peptides. A crystal structure of the peptide bound reveals that the pSer-x-x-Phe motif normally found in BRCA1 (BRCT)2 binding partners is replaced by a Glu-x-x-4-fluoroPhe and that the peptide picks up additional contacts on the protein surface not observed in cognate phosphopeptide binding. Expression of the peptide in human cells led to defects in DNA repair by homologous recombination, a process BRCA1 is known to coordinate. Overall, this work validates a new in vitro selection approach for the development of inhibitors of protein–protein interactions mediated by serine phosphorylation. PMID:25654734

  12. Sequence-specific Ni(II)-dependent peptide bond hydrolysis for protein engineering. Combinatorial library determination of optimal sequences.

    PubMed

    Krezel, Artur; Kopera, Edyta; Protas, Anna Maria; Poznański, Jarosław; Wysłouch-Cieszyńska, Aleksandra; Bal, Wojciech

    2010-03-17

    Previously we demonstrated for several examples that peptides having a general internal sequence R(N)-Yaa-Ser/Thr-Xaa-His-Zaa-R(C) (Yaa = Glu or Ala, Xaa = Ala or His, Zaa = Lys, R(N) and R(C) = any N- and C-terminal amino acid sequence) were hydrolyzed specifically at the Yaa-Ser/Thr peptide bond in the presence of Ni(II) ions at alkaline pH (Krezel, A., Mylonas, M., Kopera, E. and Bal, E. Acta Biochim. Polon. 2006, 53, 721-727 and references therein). Hereby we report the synthesis of a combinatorial library of CH(3)CO-Gly-Ala-(Ser/Thr)-Xaa-His-Zaa-Lys-Phe-Leu-NH(2) peptides, where Xaa residues included 17 common alpha-amino acids (except Asp, Glu, and Cys) and Zaa residues included 19 common alpha-amino acids (except Cys). The Ni(II)-dependent hydrolysis at 37 and 45 degrees C of batches of combinatorial peptide mixtures randomized at Zaa was monitored by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The correctness of library-based predictions was confirmed by accurate measurements of hydrolysis rates of seven selected peptides using HPLC. The hydrolysis was strictly limited to the Ala-Ser/Thr bond in all library and individual peptide experiments. The effects of individual residues on hydrolysis rates were quantified and correlated with physical properties of their side chains according to a model of independent contributions of Xaa and Zaa residues. The principal component analysis calculations demonstrated partial molar side chain volume and the free energy of amino acid vaporization for both Xaa and Zaa residues and the amine pK(a) for Zaa residues to be the most significant empirical parameters influencing the hydrolysis rate. Therefore, efficient hydrolysis required bulky and hydrophobic residues at both variable positions Xaa and Zaa, which contributed independently to the hydrolysis rate. This relationship between the peptide sequence and the hydrolysis rate provides a basis for further research, aimed at the elucidation of the reaction mechanism and biotechnological

  13. Histidine-containing peptide catalysts developed by a facile library screening method.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kengo; Sakai, Nobutaka; Kudo, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    Although peptide catalysts have a high potential for the use as organocatalysts, the optimization of peptide sequences is laborious and time-consuming. To address this issue, a facile screening method for finding efficient aminocatalysts from a peptide library has been developed. In the screening for the Michael addition of a malonate to an enal, a dye-labeled product is immobilized on resin-bound peptides through reductive amination to visualize active catalysts. This procedure allows for the monitoring of the reactivity of entire peptides without modifying the resin beads beforehand. Peptides containing histidine at an appropriate position were identified by this method. A novel function of the histidyl residue, which enhances the binding of a substrate to the catalyst by capturing an iminium intermediate, was indicated. PMID:25521645

  14. Interconversion of Peptide Mass Spectral Libraries Derivatized with iTRAQ or TMT Labels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Xiaoyu; Mirokhin, Yuri A; Tchekhovskoi, Dmitrii V; Ji, Weihua; Markey, Sanford P; Roth, Jeri; Neta, Pedatsur; Hizal, Deniz Baycin; Bowen, Michael A; Stein, Stephen E

    2016-09-01

    Derivitization of peptides with isobaric tags such as iTRAQ and TMT is widely employed in proteomics due to their compatibility with multiplex quantitative measurements. We recently made publicly available a large peptide library derived from iTRAQ 4-plex labeled spectra. This resource has not been used for identifying peptides labeled with related tags with different masses, because values for virtually all masses of precursor and most product ions would differ for ions containing the different tags as well as containing different tag-specific peaks. We describe a method for interconverting spectra from iTRAQ 4-plex to TMT (6- and 10-plex) and to iTRAQ 8-plex. We interconvert spectra by appropriately mass shifting sequence ions and discarding derivative-specific peaks. After this "cleaning" of search spectra, we demonstrate that the converted libraries perform well in terms of peptide spectral matches. This is demonstrated by comparing results using sequence database searches as well as by comparing search effectiveness using original and converted libraries. At 1% FDR TMT labeled query spectra match 97% as many spectra against a converted iTRAQ library as compared to an original TMT library. Overall this interconversion strategy provides a practical way to extend results from one derivatization method to others that share related chemistry and do not significantly alter fragmentation profiles. PMID:27386737

  15. Phage Peptide Libraries As a Source of Targeted Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nemudraya, A. A.; Richter, V. A.; Kuligina, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the dominant trends in modern pharmacology is the creation of drugs that act directly on the lesion focus and have minimal toxicity on healthy tissues and organs. This problem is particularly acute in relation to oncologic diseases. Short tissue- and organ-specific peptides capable of delivering drugs to the affected organ or tissue are considered promising targeted agents that can be used in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases, including cancer. The review discusses in detail the technology of phage display as a method for obtaining specific targeted peptide agents and offers examples of their use in diagnostic and clinical practice. PMID:27099784

  16. Chemically synthesized peptide libraries as a new source of BBB shuttles. Use of mass spectrometry for peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Guixer, B; Arroyo, X; Belda, I; Sabidó, E; Teixidó, M; Giralt, E

    2016-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a biological barrier that protects the brain from neurotoxic agents and regulates the influx and efflux of molecules required for its correct function. This stringent regulation hampers the passage of brain parenchyma-targeting drugs across the BBB. BBB shuttles have been proposed as a way to overcome this hurdle because these peptides can not only cross the BBB but also carry molecules which would otherwise be unable to cross the barrier unaided. Here we developed a new high-throughput screening methodology to identify new peptide BBB shuttles in a broadly unexplored chemical space. By introducing d-amino acids, this approach screens only protease-resistant peptides. This methodology combines combinatorial chemistry for peptide library synthesis, in vitro models mimicking the BBB for library evaluation and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry techniques to identify those peptides able to cross the in vitro assays. BBB shuttle synthesis was performed by the mix-and-split technique to generate a library based on the following: Ac-d-Arg-XXXXX-NH2 , where X were: d-Ala (a), d-Arg (r), d-Ile (i), d-Glu (e), d-Ser (s), d-Trp (w) or d-Pro (p). The assays used comprised the in vitro cell-based BBB assay (mimicking both active and passive transport) and the PAMPA (mimicking only passive diffusion). The identification of candidates was determined using a two-step mass spectrometry approach combining LTQ-Orbitrap and Q-trap mass spectrometers. Identified sequences were postulated to cross the BBB models. We hypothesized that some sequences cross the BBB through passive diffusion mechanisms and others through other mechanisms, including paracellular flux and active transport. These results provide a new set of BBB shuttle peptide families. Furthermore, the methodology described is proposed as a consistent approach to search for protease-resistant therapeutic peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID

  17. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo. PMID:27197631

  18. A model of random sequences for de novo peptide sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Cannon, William R.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2003-04-15

    We present a model for the probability of random sequences appearing in product ion spectra obtained from tandem mass spectrometry experiments using collision-induced dissociation. We demonstrate the use of these probabilities for ranking candidate peptide sequences obtained using a de novo algorithm. Sequence candidates are obtained from a spectrum graph that is greatly reduced in size from those in previous graph-theoretical de novo approaches. Evidence of multiple instances of subsequences of each candidate, due to different fragment ion type series as well as isotopic peaks, is incorporated in a hierarchical scoring scheme. This approach is shown to be useful for confirming results from database search and as a first step towards a statistically rigorous de novo algorithm.

  19. Random mutagenesis strategies for construction of large and diverse clone libraries of mutated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2004-01-01

    The first important step toward a successful preparation of large and diverse DNA libraries with desired complexity is to select a suitable mutagenesis strategy. This chapter describes three different methods for random mutagenesis, the use of XL1-red cells, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and degenerate oligonucleotides-Pfu (DOP). These mutagenesis strategies possess different benefits and pitfalls; thus, they are differentially useful for production of DNA libraries with different density and complexity. The use of XL1-red, an engineered Escherichia coli with DNA repair deficiency, is one of the simplest mutagenesis and requires no subcloning step. After plasmid encoding DNA of inter-est is transformed into the cells, the mutations are simply generated during each round of DNA replication. The mutation frequency of this method is reported to be 1 base change per 2000 nucleotides; however, it can be slightly increased by extending the culture period to allow the accumulation of more mutations. This strategy is suitable for generation of random mutations with low frequency in a large target DNA. Error-prone PCR is one of the most widely used random mutagenesis. During DNA amplification, misincorporation of nucleotides can be promoted by altering the nucleotide ratio and the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction. We discovered that, by adjusting template concentration, frequency of mutation could be controlled easily and a library with desired mutation rate could be obtained. Additionally, efficiency of subsequent cloning steps to insert the PCR product into plasmid DNA is also a key factor determining size and complexity of the libraries. DOP mutagenesis is a rapid and effective method for random mutagenesis of small DNA and peptides. This strategy uses two chemically synthesized degenerate oligonucleotides as primers. By controlling the positions and ratios of degenerate nucleotides used during oligonucleotide synthesis, it is possible to

  20. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, J B

    2004-11-11

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.

  1. Fluorescent Mu Selective Opioid Ligands from a Mixture Based Cyclic Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yangmei; Dooley, Colette T.; Misler, Jaime A.; Debevec, Ginamarie; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Cazares, Margaret E.; Maida, Laura; Houghten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    A positional scanning cyclic peptide library was generated using a penta-peptide thioester scaffold. Glycine was fixed at position R1. Diaminopropionic acid was fixed at position R3, with its γ-amino attaching to an anthraniloyl group. Positions R2 and R4 contained 36 L- and D- amino acids and position R5 contained 19 L- amino acids. Cyclization was performed in a mixture of acetonitrile and 1.5 M aqueous imidazole solution (7:1 v/v) at room temperature for 5 days. No significant cross-oligomerization was detected under the cyclization conditions. The library was screened in a binding assay for mu opioid receptor, identifying the active amino acid mixture at each position. A total of 40 individual cyclic peptides were identified and synthesized by the combinations of the most active amino acid mixtures found at three positions 5 × 4 × 2. Two cyclic peptides exhibited high binding affinities to opioid receptor. The most active cyclic peptide in the library was yielded to have Tyr at R2, D-Lys at R4 and Tyr at R5. Further investigation on this compound revealed the side chain-to-tail isomer to have greater binding affinity (14 nM) than the head-to-tail isomer (39 nM). Both isomers were selective for the mu-opioid receptor. PMID:23110623

  2. Generation and screening of an oligonucleotide-encoded synthetic peptide library.

    PubMed Central

    Needels, M C; Jones, D G; Tate, E H; Heinkel, G L; Kochersperger, L M; Dower, W J; Barrett, R W; Gallop, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have prepared a library of approximately 10(6) different peptide sequences on small, spherical (10-microns diameter) beads by the combinatorial chemical coupling of both L- and D-amino acid building blocks. To each bead is covalently attached many copies of a single peptide sequence and, additionally, copies of a unique single-stranded oligonucleotide that codes for that peptide sequence. The oligonucleotide tags are synthesized through a parallel combinatorial procedure that effectively records the process by which the encoded peptide sequence is assembled. The collection of beads was screened for binding to a fluorescently labeled anti-peptide antibody using a fluorescence-activated cell sorting instrument. Those beads to which the antibody bound tightly were isolated by fluorescence-activated sorting, and the oligonucleotide identifiers attached to individual sorted beads were amplified by the PCR. Sequences of the amplified DNAs were determined to reveal the identity of peptide sequences that bound to the antibody with high affinity. By combining the capacity for information storage in an oligonucleotide code with the tremendous level of amplification possible through the PCR, we have devised a means for specifying the identity of each member of a vast library of molecules synthesized from both natural and unnatural chemical building blocks. In addition, we have shown that the use of flow cytometry instrumentation permits facile isolation of individual beads that bear high-affinity ligands for biological receptors. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7504279

  3. Identification and characterization of mutant clones with enhanced propagation rates from phage-displayed peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kieu T H; Adamkiewicz, Marta A; Hebert, Lauren E; Zygiel, Emily M; Boyle, Holly R; Martone, Christina M; Meléndez-Ríos, Carola B; Noren, Karen A; Noren, Christopher J; Hall, Marilena Fitzsimons

    2014-10-01

    A target-unrelated peptide (TUP) can arise in phage display selection experiments as a result of a propagation advantage exhibited by the phage clone displaying the peptide. We previously characterized HAIYPRH, from the M13-based Ph.D.-7 phage display library, as a propagation-related TUP resulting from a G→A mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of gene II. This mutant was shown to propagate in Escherichia coli at a dramatically faster rate than phage bearing the wild-type Shine-Dalgarno sequence. We now report 27 additional fast-propagating clones displaying 24 different peptides and carrying 14 unique mutations. Most of these mutations are found either in or upstream of the gene II Shine-Dalgarno sequence, but still within the mRNA transcript of gene II. All 27 clones propagate at significantly higher rates than normal library phage, most within experimental error of wild-type M13 propagation, suggesting that mutations arise to compensate for the reduced virulence caused by the insertion of a lacZα cassette proximal to the replication origin of the phage used to construct the library. We also describe an efficient and convenient assay to diagnose propagation-related TUPS among peptide sequences selected by phage display. PMID:24952360

  4. Split-and-pool Synthesis and Characterization of Peptide Tertiary Amide Library

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are great sources of protein ligands. The oligomeric nature of these compounds enables us to access large synthetic libraries on solid phase by using combinatorial chemistry. One of the most well studied classes of peptidomimetics is peptoids. Peptoids are easy to synthesize and have been shown to be proteolysis-resistant and cell-permeable. Over the past decade, many useful protein ligands have been identified through screening of peptoid libraries. However, most of the ligands identified from peptoid libraries do not display high affinity, with rare exceptions. This may be due, in part, to the lack of chiral centers and conformational constraints in peptoid molecules. Recently, we described a new synthetic route to access peptide tertiary amides (PTAs). PTAs are a superfamily of peptidomimetics that include but are not limited to peptides, peptoids and N-methylated peptides. With side chains on both α-carbon and main chain nitrogen atoms, the conformation of these molecules are greatly constrained by sterical hindrance and allylic 1,3 strain. (Figure 1) Our study suggests that these PTA molecules are highly structured in solution and can be used to identify protein ligands. We believe that these molecules can be a future source of high-affinity protein ligands. Here we describe the synthetic method combining the power of both split-and-pool and sub-monomer strategies to synthesize a sample one-bead one-compound (OBOC) library of PTAs. PMID:24998250

  5. Screening of Peptide Libraries against Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis in a Disposable Microfluidic Cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Zhang, Yanting; Moore, Stephen J.; Pagano, Paul; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Chang-Yen, David; Turewicz, Marek; Pellegrino, Paul M.; de Fusco, Andre; Soh, H. Tom; Stagliano, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial surface peptide display has gained popularity as a method of affinity reagent generation for a wide variety of applications ranging from drug discovery to pathogen detection. In order to isolate the bacterial clones that express peptides with high affinities to the target molecule, multiple rounds of manual magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) followed by multiple rounds of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) are conventionally used. Although such manual methods are effective, alternative means of library screening which improve the reproducibility, reduce the cost, reduce cross contamination, and minimize exposure to hazardous target materials are highly desired for practical application. Toward this end, we report the first semi-automated system demonstrating the potential for screening bacterially displayed peptides using disposable microfluidic cartridges. The Micro-Magnetic Separation platform (MMS) is capable of screening a bacterial library containing 3×1010 members in 15 minutes and requires minimal operator training. Using this system, we report the isolation of twenty-four distinct peptide ligands that bind to the protective antigen (PA) of Bacilus anthracis in three rounds of selection. A consensus motif WXCFTC was found using the MMS and was also found in one of the PA binders isolated by the conventional MACS/FACS approach. We compared MMS and MACS rare cell recovery over cell populations ranging from 0.1% to 0.0000001% and found that both magnetic sorting methods could recover cells down to 0.0000001% initial cell population, with the MMS having overall lower standard deviation of cell recovery. We believe the MMS system offers a compelling approach towards highly efficient, semi-automated screening of molecular libraries that is at least equal to manual magnetic sorting methods and produced, for the first time, 15-mer peptide binders to PA protein that exhibit better affinity and specificity than peptides isolated using

  6. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  7. Effect of peptide assay library size and composition in targeted data-independent acquisition-MS analyses.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    The quantification of peptides using targeted analysis of data-independent acquisition MS (DIA-MS) is dependent on the size and characteristics of the assay library. We addressed several important questions on how library composition influences: (1) the number of peptides extracted from DIA-MS datasets, (2) the quality of these peptides and proteins, and (3) the biological conclusions inferred. To answer these questions we constructed five libraries from mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lysate, each unique in depth, input sample complexity, data acquisition mode (DDA-MS or DIA-MS), and precursor fragmentation mode (TOF-CID or Orbitrap HCD) and extracted them against the same eight DIA-MS files of VSMCs treated with vehicle or transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1). We found that along with differences in peptide and protein composition, the fragments representing a given peptide differed between the libraries. Collectively these differences impacted both peak group score profile and protein abundance estimates. Surprisingly, there was little overlap in the TGF-β1 response proteome between libraries. We conclude that additional work is needed to optimize peptide assay library building for DIA-MS applications, particularly in terms of selecting optimal peptides and their respective fragments for protein quantification. PMID:27432805

  8. Identification of Protease Specificity by Combining Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Niemer, Melanie; Maksimchuk, Ken; Mayer, Bettina; Fuchs, Julian; Huesgen, Pitter F; McCafferty, Dewey G; Turk, Boris; Fritz, Guenther; Mayer, Jens; Haecker, Georg; Mach, Lukas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present protease specificity profiling based on quantitative proteomics in combination with proteome-derived peptide libraries. Peptide libraries are generated by endoproteolytic digestion of proteomes without chemical modification of primary amines before exposure to a protease under investigation. After incubation with a test protease, treated and control libraries are differentially isotope-labeled using cost-effective reductive dimethylation. Upon analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, cleavage products of the test protease appear as semi-specific peptides that are enriched for the corresponding isotope label. We validate our workflow with two proteases with well-characterized specificity profiles: trypsin and caspase-3. We provide the first specificity profile of a protease encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus and for chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF). For CPAF, we also highlight the structural basis of negative subsite cooperativity between subsites S1 and S2'. For A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4, -5, and -15, we show a canonical preference profile, including glutamate in P1 and glycine in P3'. In total, we report nearly 4000 cleavage sites for seven proteases. Our protocol is fast, avoids enrichment or synthesis steps, and enables probing for lysine selectivity as well as subsite cooperativity. Due to its simplicity, we anticipate usability by most proteomic laboratories. PMID:27122596

  9. One-Pot Photochemical Ring-Opening/Cleavage Approach for the Synthesis and Decoding of Cyclic Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinxia; Vézina-Dawod, Simon; Bédard, François; Porte, Karine; Biron, Eric

    2016-03-01

    A novel dual ring-opening/cleavage strategy to determine the sequence of cyclic peptides from one bead, one compound libraries is described. The approach uses a photolabile residue within the macrocycle and as a linker to allow a simultaneous ring opening and cleavage from the beads upon UV irradiation and provide linearized molecules. Cyclic peptides of five to nine residues were synthesized and the generated linear peptides successfully sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:26914725

  10. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  11. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  12. Rapid Synthesis, RNA Binding, and Antibacterial Screening of a Peptidic-Aminosugar (PA) Library

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liuwei; Watkins, Derrick; Jin, Yi; Gong, Changjun; King, Ada; Washington, Arren Z.; Green, Keith D.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.; Arya, Dev P.

    2016-01-01

    A 215-member mono- and diamino acid peptidic-aminosugar (PA) library, with neomycin as the model aminosugar, was systematically and rapidly synthesized via solid phase synthesis. Antibacterial activities of the PA library, on 13 bacterial strains (seven Gram-positive and six Gram-negative bacterial strains), and binding affinities of the PA library for a 27-base model of the bacterial 16S ribosomal A-site RNA were evaluated using high-throughput screening. The results of the two assays were correlated using Ribosomal Binding-Bacterial Inhibition Plot (RB-BIP) analysis to provide structure–activity relationship (SAR) information. From this work, we have identified PAs that can discriminate the E. coli A-site from the human A-site by up to a 28-fold difference in binding affinity. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme activity studies indicate that APH(2″)-Ia showed nearly complete removal of activity with a number of PAs. The synthesis of the compound library and screening can both be performed rapidly, allowing for an iterative process of aminoglycoside synthesis and screening of PA libraries for optimal binding and antibacterial activity for lead identification. PMID:25706406

  13. Identification of a peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEDAN; HU, YUE; LI, WENJU; WANG, FAN; LU, XIAOSHENG; HAN, XUEYING; LV, JIEQIANG; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in terms of gynecological malignancies, and is difficult to diagnose due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To identify ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, the present study used a Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library to screen for ligands that selectively target HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells. Following 5 rounds of biopanning, the phage clone P2 was selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and DNA sequencing, and its characteristics were additionally validated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed the positive phage were enriched 92-fold following 5 rounds of biopanning, and the DNA sequence AAC CCG ATG ATT CGC CGC CAG (amino acid sequence, NPMIRRQ) was repeated most frequently (phage clones, P2, P3, P15, P30 and P54). Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays revealed that the phage clone P2 was able to bind to ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and not those of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the peptide NPMIRRQ may be a potential agent for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  14. Profiling the substrate specificity of protein kinases by on-bead screening of peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thi B; Xiao, Qing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-20

    A robust, high-throughput method has been developed to screen one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries to systematically profile the sequence specificity of protein kinases. Its ability to provide individual sequences of the preferred substrates permits the identification of sequence contextual effects and nonpermissive residues. Application of the library method to kinases Pim1, MKK6, and Csk revealed that Pim1 and Csk are highly active toward peptide substrates and recognize specific sequence motifs, whereas MKK6 has little activity or sequence selectivity against peptide substrates. Pim1 recognizes peptide substrates of the consensus RXR(H/R)X(S/T); it accepts essentially any amino acid at the S/T-2 and S/T+1 positions, but strongly disfavors acidic residues (Asp or Glu) at the S/T-2 position and a proline residue at the S/T+1 position. The selected Csk substrates show strong sequence covariance and fall into two classes with the consensus sequences of (D/E)EPIYϕXϕ and (D/E)(E/D)S(E/D/I)YϕXϕ (where X is any amino acid and ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid). Database searches and in vitro kinase assays identified phosphatase PTP-PEST as a Pim1 substrate and phosphatase SHP-1 as a potential Csk substrate. Our results demonstrate that the sequence specificity of protein kinases is defined not only by favorable interactions between permissive residue(s) on the substrate and their cognate binding site(s) on the kinase but also by repulsive interactions between the kinase and nonpermissive residue(s). PMID:23848432

  15. Proteome-derived Peptide Libraries to Study the Substrate Specificity Profiles of Carboxypeptidases*

    PubMed Central

    Tanco, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Julia; Garcia-Pardo, Javier; Degroeve, Sven; Martens, Lennart; Aviles, Francesc Xavier; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Through processing peptide and protein C termini, carboxypeptidases participate in the regulation of various biological processes. Few tools are however available to study the substrate specificity profiles of these enzymes. We developed a proteome-derived peptide library approach to study the substrate preferences of carboxypeptidases. Our COFRADIC-based approach takes advantage of the distinct chromatographic behavior of intact peptides and the proteolytic products generated by the action of carboxypeptidases, to enrich the latter and facilitate its MS-based identification. Two different peptide libraries, generated either by chymotrypsin or by metalloendopeptidase Lys-N, were used to determine the substrate preferences of human metallocarboxypeptidases A1 (hCPA1), A2 (hCPA2), and A4 (hCPA4). In addition, our approach allowed us to delineate the substrate specificity profile of mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase (MC-CPA or mCPA3), a carboxypeptidase suggested to function in innate immune responses regulation and mast cell granule homeostasis, but which thus far lacked a detailed analysis of its substrate preferences. mCPA3 was here shown to preferentially remove bulky aromatic amino acids, similar to hCPA2. This was also shown by a hierarchical cluster analysis, grouping hCPA1 close to hCPA4 in terms of its P1 primed substrate specificity, whereas hCPA2 and mCPA3 cluster separately. The specificity profile of mCPA3 may further aid to elucidate the function of this mast cell carboxypeptidase and its biological substrate repertoire. Finally, we used this approach to evaluate the substrate preferences of prolylcarboxypeptidase, a serine carboxypeptidase shown to cleave C-terminal amino acids linked to proline and alanine. PMID:23620545

  16. Screening Bicyclic Peptide Libraries for Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors: Discovery of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Curran A.; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23865589

  17. Discovery of a Direct Ras Inhibitor by Screening a Combinatorial Library of Cell-Permeable Bicyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have great potential as therapeutic agents and research tools. However, their applications against intracellular targets have been limited, because cyclic peptides are generally impermeable to the cell membrane. It was previously shown that fusion of cyclic peptides with a cyclic cell-penetrating peptide resulted in cell-permeable bicyclic peptides that are proteolytically stable and biologically active in cellular assays. In this work, we tested the generality of the bicyclic approach by synthesizing a combinatorial library of 5.7 × 106 bicyclic peptides featuring a degenerate sequence in the first ring and an invariant cell-penetrating peptide in the second ring. Screening of the library against oncoprotein K-Ras G12V followed by hit optimization produced a moderately potent and cell-permeable K-Ras inhibitor, which physically blocks the Ras-effector interactions in vitro, inhibits the signaling events downstream of Ras in cancer cells, and induces apoptosis of the cancer cells. Our approach should be generally applicable to developing cell-permeable bicyclic peptide inhibitors against other intracellular proteins. PMID:26645887

  18. Epitope Identification from Fixed-complexity Random-sequence Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Josh; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies play an important role in modern science and medicine. They are essential in many biological assays and have emerged as an important class of therapeutics. Unfortunately, current methods for mapping antibody epitopes require costly synthesis or enrichment steps, and no low-cost universal platform exists. In order to address this, we tested a random-sequence peptide microarray consisting of over 330,000 unique peptide sequences sampling 83% of all possible tetramers and 27% of pentamers. It is a single, unbiased platform that can be used in many different types of tests, it does not rely on informatic selection of peptides for a particular proteome, and it does not require iterative rounds of selection. In order to optimize the platform, we developed an algorithm that considers the significance of k-length peptide subsequences (k-mers) within selected peptides that come from the microarray. We tested eight monoclonal antibodies and seven infectious disease cohorts. The method correctly identified five of the eight monoclonal epitopes and identified both reported and unreported epitope candidates in the infectious disease cohorts. This algorithm could greatly enhance the utility of random-sequence peptide microarrays by enabling rapid epitope mapping and antigen identification. PMID:25368412

  19. Characterization of new outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a combinatorial peptide ligand library.

    PubMed

    Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Khemiri, Arbia; Seyer, Damien; Hardouin, Julie; Chan Tchi Song, Philippe; Dé, Emmanuelle; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Most often, the use of ProteoMiner beads has been restricted to human serum proteins for the normalization of major proteins, such as albumin. However, there are other situations of interest in which the presence of major proteins would quench the signals of low abundance polypeptides. We propose the use of these beads for investigating the envelope of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially, we performed comparative 2D electrophoresis to qualitatively evaluate the incidence of the normalization stage. This demonstrated a significant reduction of the major membrane proteins. Thereafter, using shotgun analysis, the same protein extract was targeted by using combinatorial peptide ligand library capture. This treatment yielded 154 additional outer membrane proteins (OMPs) uncovered by the study of the crude sample. PMID:25471289

  20. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  1. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  2. In-depth proteomic analysis of banana (Musa spp.) fruit with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Musa ssp. is among the world's leading fruit crops. Although a strong interest on banana biochemistry exists in the scientific community, focused on metabolite composition, proteins have been scarcely investigated even if they play an important role in food allergy and stability, are a source of biologically active peptides, and can provide information about nutritional aspects of this fruit. In this work we have employed the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries after different types of protein extractions, for searching the very low-abundance proteins in banana. The use of advanced MS techniques and Musa ssp. mRNAs database in combination with the Uniprot_viridiplantae database allowed us to identify 1131 proteins. Among this huge amount of proteins we found several already known allergens such as Mus a 1, pectinesterase, superoxide dismutase, and potentially new allergens. Additionally several enzymes involved in degradation of starch granules and strictly correlated to ripening stage were identified. This is the first in-depth exploration of the banana fruit proteome and one of the largest descriptions of the proteome of any vegetable system. PMID:23161558

  3. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, M.F.M.; Alves, F.M.; Assis, D.M.; Hirata, I.Y.; Juliano, L.; Oliveira, V.; Juliano, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1′ substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1′. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2′ and P3′ positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1′ substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  4. Substrate specificity of mitochondrial intermediate peptidase analysed by a support-bound peptide library.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, M F M; Alves, F M; Assis, D M; Hirata, I Y; Juliano, L; Oliveira, V; Juliano, M A

    2015-01-01

    The substrate specificity of recombinant human mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (hMIP) using a synthetic support-bound FRET peptide library is presented. The collected fluorescent beads, which contained the hydrolysed peptides generated by hMIP, were sequenced by Edman degradation. The results showed that this peptidase presents a remarkable preference for polar uncharged residues at P1 and P1' substrate positions: Ser = Gln > Thr at P1 and Ser > Thr at P1'. Non-polar residues were frequent at the substrate P3, P2, P2' and P3' positions. Analysis of the predicted MIP processing sites in imported mitochondrial matrix proteins shows these cleavages indeed occur between polar uncharged residues. Previous analysis of these processing sites indicated the importance of positions far from the MIP cleavage site, namely the presence of a hydrophobic residue (Phe or Leu) at P8 and a polar uncharged residue (Ser or Thr) at P5. To evaluate this, additional kinetic analyses were carried out, using fluorogenic substrates synthesized based on the processing sites attributed to MIP. The results described here underscore the importance of the P1 and P1' substrate positions for the hydrolytic activity of hMIP. The information presented in this work will help in the design of new substrate-based inhibitors for this peptidase. PMID:26082885

  5. Leader Peptide-Free In Vitro Reconstitution of Microviridin Biosynthesis Enables Design of Synthetic Protease-Targeted Libraries.

    PubMed

    Reyna-González, Emmanuel; Schmid, Bianca; Petras, Daniel; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Dittmann, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Microviridins are a family of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides with a highly unusual architecture featuring non-canonical lactone as well as lactam rings. Individual variants specifically inhibit different types of serine proteases. Here we have established an efficient in vitro reconstitution approach based on two ATP-grasp ligases that were constitutively activated using covalently attached leader peptides and a GNAT-type N-acetyltransferase. The method facilitates the efficient in vitro one-pot transformation of microviridin core peptides to mature microviridins. The engineering potential of the chemo-enzymatic technology was demonstrated for two synthetic peptide libraries that were used to screen and optimize microviridin variants targeting the serine proteases trypsin and subtilisin. Successive analysis of intermediates revealed distinct structure-activity relationships for respective target proteases. PMID:27336908

  6. RNGSSELIB: Program library for random number generation. More generators, parallel streams of random numbers and Fortran compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2013-10-01

    In this update, we present the new version of the random number generator (RNG) library RNGSSELIB, which, in particular, contains fast SSE realizations of a number of modern and most reliable generators [1]. The new features are: (i) Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran; (ii) new modern and reliable generators; (iii) the abilities to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize up to 1019 independent random number streams with block splitting method. Summary of revisions: We added Fortran compatibility and examples of using the library in Fortran for each of the generators. New modern and reliable generators GM29, GM55.4, GQ58.1, GQ58.3, and GQ58.4, which were introduced in [5] were added to the library. The ability to jump ahead inside a RNG sequence and to initialize independent random number streams with block splitting method are added for each of the RNGs. Restrictions: For SSE realizations of the generators, the Intel or AMD CPU supporting SSE2 command set is required. In order to use the SSE realization for the lfsr113 generator, the CPU must support the SSE4.1 command set. Additional comments: The function call interface has been slightly modified compared to the previous version in order to support Fortran compatibility. For each of the generators, RNGSSELIB supports the following functions, where rng should be replaced by the particular name of the RNG: void rng_skipahead_(rng_state* state, unsigned long long offset); void rng_init_(rng_state* state); void rng_init_sequence_(rng_state* state,unsigned long long SequenceNumber); unsigned int rng_generate_(rng_state* state); float rng_generate_uniform_float_(rng_state* state); unsigned int rng_sse_generate_(rng_sse_state* state); void rng_get_sse_state_(rng_state* state,rng_sse_state* sse_state); void rng_print_state_(rng_state* state); void rng_print_sse_state_(rng_sse_state* state); There are a few peculiarities for some of the RNGs. For example, the function void mt

  7. Construction, exploitation and evolution of a new peptide library displayed at high density by fusion to the major coat protein of filamentous phage.

    PubMed

    Iannolo, G; Minenkova, O; Gonfloni, S; Castagnoli, L; Cesareni, G

    1997-06-01

    The amino-terminus of the major coat protein (PVIII) of filamentous phage can be extended, up to 6-7 residues, without interfering with the phage life cycle. We have constructed a library of approximately ten millions different phage each displaying a different octapeptide joined to the amino-terminus of the 2700 copies of PVIII. Most of the resulting clones are able to produce infective particles. This molecular repertoire constituted by the periodic regular decoration of the phage filament surface, can be utilized to search elements that bind proteins or relatively small organic molecules like the textile dye Cibacron blue. By sequential growth cycles we have performed a library evolution experiment to select phage clones that have a growth advantage in the absence of any requirement for binding a specific target. The consensus of the best growers reveals a Pro rich sequence with large hydrophobic residues at position 7 and Asn at position 1 of the random peptide insert. We propose that the assembly secretion process is favoured in phages displaying this family of peptides since they fit the groove between two adjacent PVIII subunits by making advantageous molecular contacts on the phage surface. PMID:9224932

  8. Discovery of small peptide antagonists of PED/PEA15-D4α interaction from simplified combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Doti, Nunzianna; Grieco, Paolo; Pedone, Carlo; Ruvo, Menotti; Marasco, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    Most biological processes involve permanent and temporary interactions between different proteins: protein complexes often play key roles in human diseases and, as a consequence, molecules that prevent protein-protein interactions can be potential new therapeutic agents to treat diseases. Here, we describe a simplified approach by which small synthetic peptide libraries were screened to identify the inhibitors of the complex between phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes15 (PED/PEA15) and D4α, a functional domain of the phospholipase D1, that is involved in the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance occurring in type 2 diabetes. By using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based screening, performed on a fully automated platform, we analyzed two simplified peptide libraries in a positional scanning format. This screening led to the identification of small peptides able to inhibit PED/PEA15-D4α interaction. The selection of inhibitors was carried out employing combined competitive and direct experiments, through ELISA and surface plasmon resonance techniques, providing peptides with IC(50) values in the micromolar range. Our results showed that the protein complex PED/PEA15-D4α is susceptible to peptides having H-donor groups and aromatic rings on specific positions. These small sequences can be considered as promising scaffolds that could be converted into higher-affinity inhibitor compounds. PMID:21294846

  9. De novo designed library of linear helical peptides: an exploratory tool in the discovery of protein-protein interaction modulators.

    PubMed

    Bonache, M Ángeles; Balsera, Beatriz; López-Méndez, Blanca; Millet, Oscar; Brancaccio, Diego; Gómez-Monterrey, Isabel; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Pavone, Luigi M; Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Vidal, Michel; de la Torre-Martinez, Roberto; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; García-López, M Teresa; Martín-Martínez, Mercedes; de Vega, M Jesús Pérez; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-05-12

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have emerged as important targets for pharmaceutical intervention because of their essential role in numerous physiological and pathological processes, but screening efforts using small-molecules have led to very low hit rates. Linear peptides could represent a quick and effective approach to discover initial PPI hits, particularly if they have inherent ability to adopt specific peptide secondary structures. Here, we address this hypothesis through a linear helical peptide library, composed of four sublibraries, which was designed by theoretical predictions of helicity (Agadir software). The 13-mer peptides of this collection fixes either a combination of three aromatic or two aromatic and one aliphatic residues on one face of the helix (Ac-SSEEX(5)ARNX(9)AAX(12)N-NH2), since these are structural features quite common at PPIs interfaces. The 81 designed peptides were conveniently synthesized by parallel solid-phase methodologies, and the tendency of some representative library components to adopt the intended secondary structure was corroborated through CD and NMR experiments. As proof of concept in the search for PPI modulators, the usefulness of this library was verified on the widely studied p53-MDM2 interaction and on the communication between VEGF and its receptor Flt-1, two PPIs for which a hydrophobic α-helix is essential for the interaction. We have demonstrated here that, in both cases, selected peptides from the library, containing the right hydrophobic sequence of the hot-spot in one of the protein partners, are able to interact with the complementary protein. Moreover, we have discover some new, quite potent inhibitors of the VEGF-Flt-1 interaction, just by replacing one of the aromatic residues of the initial F(5)Y(9)Y(12) peptide by W, in agreement with previous results on related antiangiogenic peptides. Finally, the HTS evaluation of the full collection on thermoTRPs has led to a few antagonists of TRPV1 and TRPA

  10. Handling a tricycle: orthogonal versus random oxidation of the tricyclic inhibitor cystine knotted peptide gurmarin.

    PubMed

    Eliasen, Rasmus; Andresen, Thomas L; Conde-Frieboes, Kilian W

    2012-09-01

    Gurmarin is a 35 amino acid peptide with three disulfide bridges in an inhibitor cystine knot. It is found in the plant Gymnema sylvestre, and has been identified as a sweet taste inhibitor in rodents. In this article we provide an efficient route for the synthesis of gurmarin by a controlled random oxidation strategy. We compared two oxidation procedures to form the three disulfide bridges. In the first, based on random oxidation, reduced gurmarin was synthesized using trityl for cysteine protection, and oxidized for 48 h in a Tris-HCl buffer containing cystamine and reduced glutathione to facilitate disulfide scrambling. The second was based on step-wise deprotection followed by oxidation in which the cysteine pairs are orthogonally protected with tert-Butylthio, trityl and acetamidomethyl. To verify that the native gurmarin oxidation product was obtained, thermolysin cleavage was used. Cleavage of random oxidized gurmarin showed two possible disulfide combinations; the native and a non-native gurmarin disulfide isomer. The non-native isomer was therefore synthesized using the orthogonal deprotection-oxidation strategy and the native and the non-native gurmarin isomers were analyzed using UPLC. It was found that the random oxidation procedure leads to native gurmarin in high yield. Thus, the synthetic route was simple and significantly more efficient than previously reported syntheses of gurmarin and other cysteine rich peptides. Importantly, native gurmarin was obtained by random oxidation, which was confirmed by a synthetic approach for the first time. PMID:22771618

  11. Identification of avocado (Persea americana) pulp proteins by nano-LC-MS/MS via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) proteins have been scarcely studied despite their importance, especially in food related allergies. The proteome of avocado pulp was explored in depth by extracting proteins with capture by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries at pH 7.4 and under conditions mimicking reverse-phase capture at pH 2.2. The total number of unique gene products identified amounts to 1012 proteins, of which 174 are in common with the control, untreated sample, 190 are present only in the control and 648 represent the new species detected via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries of all combined eluates and likely represent low-abundance proteins. Among the 1012 proteins, it was possible to identify the already known avocado allergen Pers a 1 and different proteins susceptible to be allergens such as a profilin, a polygalacturonase, a thaumatin-like protein, a glucanase, and an isoflavone reductase like protein. PMID:23019098

  12. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs.

    PubMed

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes - PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  13. Using oriented peptide array libraries to evaluate methylarginine-specific antibodies and arginine methyltransferase substrate motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Cowles, Martis W.; Vemulapalli, Vidyasiri; Cheng, Donghang; Sun, Zu-Wen; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Signal transduction in response to stimuli relies on the generation of cascades of posttranslational modifications that promote protein-protein interactions and facilitate the assembly of distinct signaling complexes. Arginine methylation is one such modification, which is catalyzed by a family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases, or PRMTs. Elucidating the substrate specificity of each PRMT will promote a better understanding of which signaling networks these enzymes contribute to. Although many PRMT substrates have been identified, and their methylation sites mapped, the optimal target motif for each of the nine PRMTs has not been systematically addressed. Here we describe the use of Oriented Peptide Array Libraries (OPALs) to methodically dissect the preferred methylation motifs for three of these enzymes – PRMT1, CARM1 and PRMT9. In parallel, we show that an OPAL platform with a fixed methylarginine residue can be used to validate the methyl-specific and sequence-specific properties of antibodies that have been generated against different PRMT substrates, and can also be used to confirm the pan nature of some methylarginine-specific antibodies. PMID:27338245

  14. Chromatographic biopanning for the selection of peptides with high specificity to Pb2+ from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Kim, Duck Sang; Nguyen, Thuong; Tan, Lihan; Kim, Chan-Wha; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2010-09-17

    Toxic heavy metal pollution is a global problem occurring in air, soil as well as water. There is a need for a more cost effective, renewable remediation technique, but most importantly, for a recovery method that is selective for one specific metal of concern. Phage display technology has been used as a powerful tool in the discovery of peptides capable of exhibiting specific affinity to various metals or metal ions. However, traditional phage display is mainly conducted in batch mode, resulting in only one equilibrium state hence low-efficiency selection. It is also unable to monitor the selection process in real time mode. In this study, phage display technique was incorporated with chromatography procedure with the use of a monolithic column, facilitating multiple phage-binding equilibrium states and online monitoring of the selection process in search of affinity peptides to Pb2+. In total, 17 candidate peptides were found and their specificity toward Pb2+ was further investigated with bead-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA). A highly specific Pb2+ binding peptide ThrAsnThrLeuSerAsnAsn (TNTLSNN) was obtained. Based on our knowledge, this is the first report on a new chromatographic biopanning method coupled with monolithic column for the selection of metal ion specific binding peptides. It is expected that this monolith-based chromatographic biopanning will provide a promising approach for a high throughput screening of affinity peptides cognitive of a wide range of target species. PMID:20709321

  15. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  16. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  17. Predicting most probable conformations of a given peptide sequence in the random coil state.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Cigdem Sevim; Erman, Burak

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a computational scheme for finding high probability conformations of peptides. The scheme calculates the probability of a given conformation of the given peptide sequence using the probability distribution of torsion states. Dependence of the states of a residue on the states of its first neighbors along the chain is considered. Prior probabilities of torsion states are obtained from a coil library. Posterior probabilities are calculated by the matrix multiplication Rotational Isomeric States Model of polymer theory. The conformation of a peptide with highest probability is determined by using a hidden Markov model Viterbi algorithm. First, the probability distribution of the torsion states of the residues is obtained. Using the highest probability torsion state, one can generate, step by step, states with lower probabilities. To validate the method, the highest probability state of residues in a given sequence is calculated and compared with probabilities obtained from the Coil Databank. Predictions based on the method are 32% better than predictions based on the most probable states of residues. The ensemble of "n" high probability conformations of a given protein is also determined using the Viterbi algorithm with multistep backtracking. PMID:22955874

  18. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis. PMID:26355961

  19. Library+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses possible future directions for academic libraries in the post Web/Library 2.0 world. These possible directions include areas such as data literacy, linked data sets, and opportunities for libraries in support of digital humanities. The author provides a brief sketch of the background information regarding the topics and…

  20. A computer program for the estimation of protein and nucleic acid sequence diversity in random point mutagenesis libraries

    PubMed Central

    Volles, Michael J.; Lansbury, Peter T.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program for the generation and analysis of in silico random point mutagenesis libraries is described. The program operates by mutagenizing an input nucleic acid sequence according to mutation parameters specified by the user for each sequence position and type of point mutation. The program can mimic almost any type of random mutagenesis library, including those produced via error-prone PCR (ep-PCR), mutator Escherichia coli strains, chemical mutagenesis, and doped or random oligonucleotide synthesis. The program analyzes the generated nucleic acid sequences and/or the associated protein library to produce several estimates of library diversity (number of unique sequences, point mutations, and single point mutants) and the rate of saturation of these diversities during experimental screening or selection of clones. This information allows one to select the optimal screen size for a given mutagenesis library, necessary to efficiently obtain a certain coverage of the sequence-space. The program also reports the abundance of each specific protein mutation at each sequence position, which is useful as a measure of the level and type of mutation bias in the library. Alternatively, one can use the program to evaluate the relative merits of preexisting libraries, or to examine various hypothetical mutation schemes to determine the optimal method for creating a library that serves the screen/selection of interest. Simulated libraries of at least 109 sequences are accessible by the numerical algorithm with currently available personal computers; an analytical algorithm is also available which can rapidly calculate a subset of the numerical statistics in libraries of arbitrarily large size. A multi-type double-strand stochastic model of ep-PCR is developed in an appendix to demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm to amplifying mutagenesis procedures. Estimators of DNA polymerase mutation-type-specific error rates are derived using the model. Analyses of an

  1. Determination of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase substrate specificity by the use of peptide libraries on cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Tegge, W; Frank, R; Hofmann, F; Dostmann, W R

    1995-08-22

    An iterative approach to the a priori determination of the substrate specificity of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA and PKG) by the use of peptide libraries on cellulose paper is described. The starting point of the investigation was an octamer library with the general structure Ac-XXX12XXX, where X represents mixtures of all 20 natural amino acids and 1 and 2 represent individual amino acid residues. The library thus contained all possible 2.56 x 10(10) octamers, divided into 400 sublibraries with defined amino acids 1 and 2 each consisting of 6.4 x 10(7) sequences. After phosphorylation with the kinases in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, the sublibrarys Ac-XXXRRXXX and Ac-XXXRKXXX were identified as the best substrates for PKA and PKG, respectively. The second-generation libraries had the structures Ac-XXXRR12X and Ac-XXXRK12X for PKA and PKG and resulted in the most active sequence pools Ac-XXXRRASX and Ac-XXXRKKSX. After delineation of every position in the octameric sequence and extension of the investigation to decameric peptides, the best sequences, Ac-KRAERKASIY and Ac-TQKARKKSNA, were obtained for PKA and PKG, respectively. Promising octameric and decameric peptides were assembled 5 or 10 times each and assayed in order to determine the experimental scatter inherent in the approach. The kinetic data of several octameric and decameric sequences were determined in solution and compared to data for known substrates. The recognition motif of PKA was confirmed by this approach, and a novel substrate sequence for PKG was identified.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7654713

  2. Random peptide mixtures inhibit and eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stern, Tal; Zelinger, Einat; Hayouka, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a biofilm-forming pathogen that can cause serious health complications in humans, ranging from minor to life-threatening infections. The challenge of successfully combating biofilms requires the discovery of compounds with a novel mode of action. We have recently developed sequence-random hydrophobic-cationic peptides that display a broad antibacterial activity. In the current study we show that our novel compounds are capable of controlling and managing MRSA biofilms and might be used as lead biofilm inhibitor candidates for further studies. PMID:27161246

  3. A specific library of randomly integrated reporter genes for the isolation of inducible functions by cell sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapeyre, J.N.; Marini, F.; Gratzner, H.G. AMC ImmunoDiagnostics, Houston, TX )

    1993-01-01

    A library of cells containing randomly integrated reporter genes has been constructed. The purpose of this library is to enable the isolation of genes of interest which are inducible by radiation, biological response modifiers, cytokines, or other agents. These genes are located near reporter genes which can be induced by the upstream promoter of the gene of interest. The reporter gene, Lac Z, was randomly inserted into the genome by retroviral transduction and subsequent selection of the neo[sup r] gene with gentamycin. Studies of radiation inducible genes were undertaken, whereby cells with the radiation sensitive function were isolated by sorting the cells fluorescent after staining with the beta gal substrate, fluorescein digalactoside (FDG). This gene-tagging approach is an improvement over the cDNA library subtraction protocol in that a single library of cells with random marker gene integration can be repeatedly and sequentially probed by sorting under different, selective conditions, dependent upon the genes to be characterized.

  4. Selection of a potential diagnostic biomarker for HIV infection from a random library of non-biological synthetic peptoid oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Tricia L; Montelaro, Ronald C; Schurdak, Mark E; Pilcher, Chris D; Rinaldo, Charles R; Kodadek, Thomas; Park, Yongseok; Islam, Kazi; Yurko, Raymond; Marques, Ernesto T A; Burke, Donald S

    2016-08-01

    Non-biological synthetic oligomers can serve as ligands for antibodies. We hypothesized that a random combinatorial library of synthetic poly-N-substituted glycine oligomers, or peptoids, could represent a random "shape library" in antigen space, and that some of these peptoids would be recognized by the antigen-binding pocket of disease-specific antibodies. We synthesized and screened a one bead one compound combinatorial library of peptoids, in which each bead displayed an 8-mer peptoid with ten possible different amines at each position (10(8) theoretical variants). By screening one million peptoid/beads we found 112 (approximately 1 in 10,000) that preferentially bound immunoglobulins from human sera known to be positive for anti-HIV antibodies. Reactive peptoids were then re-synthesized and rigorously evaluated in plate-based ELISAs. Four peptoids showed very good, and one showed excellent, properties for establishing a sero-diagnosis of HIV. These results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing sero-diagnostic assays for infectious diseases from libraries of random molecular shapes. In this study we sought a proof-of-principle that we could identify a potential diagnostic antibody ligand biomarker for an infectious disease in a random combinatorial library of 100 million peptoids. We believe that this is the first evidence that it is possible to develop sero-diagnostic assays - for any infectious disease - based on screening random libraries of non-biological molecular shapes. PMID:27182050

  5. Sensitive electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries labeled by quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Bąchor, Remigiusz; Cydzik, Marzena; Rudowska, Magdalena; Kluczyk, Alicja; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-08-01

    A rapid and straightforward method for high-throughput analysis of single resin beads from one-bead-one-compound combinatorial libraries with high resolution electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS/MS) is presented. The application of an efficient method of peptide derivatization by quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) formation increases ionization efficiency and reduces the detection limit, allowing analysis of trace amounts of compounds by ESI-MS. Peptides, synthesized on solid support, contain a new cleavable linker composed of a Peg spacer (9-aza-3,6,12,15-tetraoxa-10-on-heptadecanoic acid), lysine with ɛ-amino group marked by the N,N,N-triethylglycine salt, and methionine, which makes possible the selective cleavage by cyanogen bromide. Even a small portion of peptides derivatized by QAS cleaved from a single resin bead is sufficient for sequencing by HR ESI-MS/MS experiments. The developed strategy was applied to a small training library of α chymotrypsin substrates. The obtained results confirm the applicability of the proposed method in combinatorial chemistry. PMID:22740104

  6. Utilizing Lifetimes to Suppress Random Coil Features in 2D IR Spectra of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Buchanan, Lauren E.; Dunkelberger, Emily B.

    2011-01-01

    We report that the waiting time delay in 2D IR pulse sequences can be used to suppress signals from structurally disordered regions of amyloid fibrils. At a waiting time delay of 1.0 ps, the random coil vibrational modes of amylin fibrils are no longer detectable, leaving only the sharp excitonic vibrational features of the fibril β-sheets. Isotope labeling with 13C18O reveals that structurally disordered residues decay faster than residues protected from solvent. Since structural disorder is usually accompanied by hydration, we conclude that the shorter lifetimes of random-coil residues is due to solvent exposure. These results indicate that 2D IR pulse sequences can utilize the waiting time to better resolve solvent-protected regions of peptides and that local mode lifetimes should be included in simulations of 2D IR spectra. PMID:21966585

  7. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  8. MapReduce Implementation of a Hybrid Spectral Library-Database Search Method for Large-Scale Peptide Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.; Latt, Benjamin K.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR- MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs.

  9. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Machado, Christina Monerat; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; NGuyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Carneiro, Claudia Martins; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Carneiro, Rubens Antonio; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:25710003

  10. Click-Based Libraries of SFTI-1 Peptides: New Methods Using Reversed-Phase Silica.

    PubMed

    Cistrone, Philip A; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-03-14

    Performing sequential reactions for the orthogonal derivatization of peptides in solution often requires intermediate handling and purification steps. To solve these problems, we have exploited the distinct adsorption kinetics of peptides toward particulate reversed-phase (RP) C18 silica material, enabling consecutive reactions to be performed without intermediate elution. To illustrate this approach, sequential CuAAC/click reactions were used to modify an analog of the bicyclic peptide sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1), a potent scaffold for trypsin and chymotrypsin-like enzyme inhibitors. The SFTI-1 scaffold was synthesized containing both β-azido alanine and propargyl glycine residues. Despite the mutual reactivity of these groups, site isolation on RP silica enabled consecutive click reactions and associated washing steps to be performed while the peptide remained immobilized. Importantly, this approach eliminated side products that could form between two peptides or within a single peptide. These studies suggest a broad utility for RP silica in solving both peptide handling problems and in improving synthetic workflows. PMID:26914614

  11. POLCA, a library running in a modern environment, implements a protocol for averaging randomly oriented images.

    PubMed

    Bellon, P L; Lanzavecchia, S

    1990-07-01

    The library POLCA implements the averaging of biological structures whose images are recorded in digital form from electron micrographs. The averaging protocol is based upon a method developed about ten years ago, which allows one to operate on a sequence of objects oriented and displaced at random within their frame; the relative rotations and the displacements of the structures are detected with the use of correlation algorithms and modified to make all objects appear the same, apart from their noisy components. The average image is then obtained by a simple addition and the signal-to-noise ratio is improved by a factor equal to the square root of the number of objects used to calculate the average. With respect to the original implementation of the method, two novel features characterize the library: the first one deals with the functions that are cross-correlated to determine the relative rotations of the structures; the functions used here are the inverse transforms of the amplitude spectra (IAS functions), which give rise to sharp maxima when they are cross-correlated. The second peculiarity is the systematic adoption, in the transformations of coordinates and in other circumstances, of an interpolation technique based upon the Fourier series kernel. POLCA is written in C and runs on a VME machine under the UNIX V/68 operating system. A programming style has been adopted to exploit fully the machine resources. PMID:2207751

  12. MS/MS library facilitated MRM quantification of native peptides prepared by denaturing ultrafiltration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring native peptides provide important information about physiological states of an organism and its changes in disease conditions but protocols and methods for assessing their abundance are not well-developed. In this paper, we describe a simple procedure for the quantification of non-tryptic peptides in body fluids. The workflow includes an enrichment step followed by two-dimensional fractionation of native peptides and MS/MS data management facilitating the design and validation of LC- MRM MS assays. The added value of the workflow is demonstrated in the development of a triplex LC-MRM MS assay used for quantification of peptides potentially associated with the progression of liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:22304756

  13. Identification and characterization of epitopes on Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) using synthetic peptide library and phage display library.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Fei Wen; Fong, Mun Yik; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-02-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi can cause potentially life threatening human malaria. The Plasmodium merozoite surface protein-142 (MSP-142) is a potential target for malaria blood stage vaccine, and for diagnosis of malaria. Two epitope mapping techniques were used to identify the potential epitopes within P. knowlesi MSP-142. Nine and 14 potential epitopes were identified using overlapping synthetic peptide library and phage display library, respectively. Two regions on P. knowlesi MSP-142 (amino acid residues 37-95 and residues 240-289) were identified to be the potential dominant epitope regions. Two of the prominent epitopes, P10 (TAKDGMEYYNKMGELYKQ) and P31 (RCLLGFKEVGGKCVPASI), were evaluated using mouse model. P10- and P31-immunized mouse sera reacted with recombinant P. knowlesi MSP-142, with the IgG isotype distribution of IgG2b>IgG1>IgG2a>IgG3. Significant higher level of cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 was detected in P31-immunized mice. Both P10 and P31 could be the suitable epitope candidates to be used in malaria vaccine designs and immunodiagnostic assays, provided further evaluation is needed to validate the potential uses of these epitopes. PMID:26624919

  14. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  15. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  16. Types of pediatric diabetes mellitus defined by anti-islet autoimmunity and random C-peptide at diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that anti-islet autoantibody expression and random serum C-peptide obtained at diagnosis define phenotypes of pediatric diabetes with distinct clinical features. We analyzed 607 children aged <19 yr consecutively diagnosed with diabetes after ex...

  17. The use of phage display peptide libraries for basic and translational research.

    PubMed

    Brissette, Renee; Goldstein, Neil I

    2007-01-01

    Phage display is a molecular technique, whereby genes are displayed in a functional form on the outer surfaces of bacteriophages by fusion to viral coat proteins. The gene product is encoded by a plasmid contained within the virus, which can be recovered and sequenced, linking the genetic information to the function of the protein. Phage display offers a powerful tool for the identification of short peptides or single chain antibodies that can bind and regulate the function of target proteins. One major advantage of phage display lies in its ability to rapidly identify target-specific peptides with pharmacological activity as agonists or antagonists. PMID:18217687

  18. High-throughput production of a stable isotope-labeled peptide library for targeted proteomics using a wheat germ cell-free synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Tanaka, Yuki; Ishizaki, Jun; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2016-07-19

    Quantitative proteomic approaches using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) are currently limited by the difficulty in the preparation of reference standards. In this study, we demonstrat the high-throughput production of a reference peptide library using a wheat germ cell-free synthesis system to develop a large-scale SRM assay for targeted proteomics. PMID:27203355

  19. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies. PMID:26341796

  20. Targeting deeper the human serum fucome by a liquid-phase multicolumn platform in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Subhashini; El Rassi, Ziad

    2014-03-01

    Combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) was evaluated as an off line step to narrow the differences of protein concentration in human serum prior to the capturing of human fucome from disease-free and breast cancer sera by a multicolumn platform via lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) followed by the fractionation of the captured glycoproteins by reversed phase chromatography (RPC). Two monolithic lectin columns specific to fucose, namely Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (LTA) columns were utilized to capture the fucome, which was subsequently fractionated by RPC yielding desalted fractions in volatile acetonitrile-rich mobile phase, which after vacuum evaporation were subjected to tryptic digestion prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. AAL has a strong affinity towards core fucosylated N-glycans and has a weak binding towards fucose in the outer arm while LTA can bind to glycans having fucose present in the outer arm. The combined strategy consisting of the CPLL, multicolumn platform and LC-MS/MS analysis permitted the identification of the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in breast cancer serum yielding 58 DEPs in both the LTA and AAL fractions with 6 DEPs common to both lectins. 17 DEPs were of the low abundance type, 16 DEPs of the borderline abundance type, 4 DEPs of the medium abundance type and 15 DEPs of the high abundance type. The remaining 6 DEPs are of unknown concentration. Only proteins exhibiting 99.9% protein identification probability, 95% peptide identification probability, and a minimum of 5 unique peptides were considered in finding the DEPs via scatterplots. PMID:24556279

  1. Targeting Deeper the Human Serum Fucome by a Liquid-phase Multicolumn Platform in Combination with Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraju, Subhashini; Rassi, Ziad El

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) was evaluated as an off line step to narrow the differences of protein concentration in human serum prior to the capturing of human fucome from disease-free and breast cancer sera by a multicolumn platform via lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) followed by the fractionation of the captured glycoproteins by reversed phase chromatography (RPC). Two monolithic lectin columns specific to fucose, namely Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (LTA) columns were utilized to capture the fucome, which was subsequently fractionated by RPC yielding desalted fractions in volatile acetonitrile-rich mobile phase, which after vacuum evaporation were subjected to tryptic digestion prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. AAL has a strong affinity towards core fucosylated N-glycans and has a weak binding towards fucose in the outer arm while LTA can bind to glycans having fucose present in the outer arm. The combined strategy consisting of the CPLL, multicolumn platform and LC-MS/MS analysis permitted the identification of the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in breast cancer serum yielding 58 DEPs in both the LTA and AAL fractions with 6 DEPs common to both lectins. 17 DEPs were of the low abundance type, 16 DEPs of the borderline abundance type, 4 DEPs of the medium abundance type and 15 DEPs of the high abundance type. The remaining 6 DEPs are of unknown concentration. Only proteins exhibiting 99.9% protein identification probability, 95% peptide identification probability, and a minimum of 5 unique peptides were considered in finding the DEPs via scatterplots. PMID:24556279

  2. The isolation of strand-specific nicking endonucleases from a randomized SapI expression library

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, James C.; Zhu, Zhenyu; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2004-01-01

    The Type IIS restriction endonuclease SapI recognizes the DNA sequence 5′-GCTCTTC-3′ (top strand by convention) and cleaves downstream (N1/N4) indicating top- and bottom-strand spacing, respectively. The asymmetric nature of DNA recognition presented the possibility that one, if not two, nicking variants might be created from SapI. To explore this possibility, two parallel selection procedures were designed to isolate either top-strand nicking or bottom-strand nicking variants from a randomly mutated SapI expression library. These procedures take advantage of a SapI substrate site designed into the expression plasmid, which allows for in vitro selection of plasmid clones possessing a site-specific and strand-specific nick. A procedure designed to isolate bottom-strand nicking enzymes yielded Nb.SapI-1 containing a critical R420I substitution near the end of the protein. The top-strand procedure yielded several SapI variants with a distinct preference for top-strand cleavage. Mutations present within the selected clones were segregated to confirm a top-strand nicking phenotype for single variants Q240R, E250K, G271R or K273R. The nature of the amino acid substitutions found in the selected variants provides evidence that SapI may possess two active sites per monomer. This work presents a framework for establishing the mechanism of SapI DNA cleavage. PMID:15247348

  3. Development of Diagnostic Fragment Ion Library for Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin: Targeted Quantification in Prediabetic, Diabetic, and Microalbuminuria Plasma by Parallel Reaction Monitoring, SWATH, and MSE.

    PubMed

    Korwar, Arvind M; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Bhat, Shweta; Regin, Bhaskaran S; Ramaswamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2015-08-01

    Human serum albumin is one of the most abundant plasma proteins that readily undergoes glycation, thus glycated albumin has been suggested as an additional marker for monitoring glycemic status. Hitherto, only Amadori-modified peptides of albumin were quantified. In this study, we report the construction of fragment ion library for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of the corresponding synthetically modified albumin using high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HR/AM). The glycated peptides were manually inspected and validated for their modification. Further, the fragment ion library was used for quantification of glycated peptides of albumin in the context of diabetes. Targeted Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH) analysis in pooled plasma samples of control, prediabetes, diabetes, and microalbuminuria, has led to identification and quantification of 13 glycated peptides comprised of four AML, seven CML, and two CEL modifications, representing nine lysine sites of albumin. Five lysine sites namely K549, K438, K490, K88, and K375, were observed to be highly sensitive for glycation modification as their respective m/z showed maximum fold change and had both AML and CML modifications. Thus, peptides involving these lysine sites could be potential novel markers to assess the degree of glycation in diabetes. PMID:26023067

  4. Screening One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries for Optimal Kinase Substrates.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thi B; Pei, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases phosphorylate specific serine, threonine, and/or tyrosine residues in their target proteins, resulting in functional changes of the target proteins such as enzymatic activity, cellular location, or association with other proteins. For many kinases, their in vivo substrate specificity is at least partially defined by the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylatable residue (or sequence specificity). We report here a robust, high-throughput method for profiling the sequence specificity of protein kinases. Up to 10(7) different peptides are rapidly synthesized on PEGA beads in the one-bead-one-compound format and subjected to kinase reaction in the presence of [γ-S]ATP. Positive beads displaying the optimal kinase substrates are identified by covalently labeling the thiophosphorylated peptides with a fluorescent dye via a disulfide exchange reaction. Finally, the most active hit(s) is identified by the partial Edman degradation-mass spectrometry (PED-MS) method. The ability of this method to provide individual sequences of the preferred substrates permits the identification of sequence contextual effects and non-permissive residues. This method is applicable to protein serine, threonine, and tyrosine kinases. PMID:26501910

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  6. Construction of random sheared fosmid library from Chinese cabbage and its use for Brassica rapa genome sequencing project.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jin-A; Hong, Joon Ki; Jin, Mina; Seol, Young-Joo; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the Multinational Genome Sequencing Project of Brassica rapa, linkage group R9 and R3 were sequenced using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) by BAC strategy. The current physical contigs are expected to cover approximately 90% euchromatins of both chromosomes. As the project progresses, BAC selection for sequence extension becomes more limited because BAC libraries are restriction enzyme-specific. To support the project, a random sheared fosmid library was constructed. The library consists of 97536 clones with average insert size of approximately 40 kb corresponding to seven genome equivalents, assuming a Chinese cabbage genome size of 550 Mb. The library was screened with primers designed at the end of sequences of nine points of scaffold gaps where BAC clones cannot be selected to extend the physical contigs. The selected positive clones were end-sequenced to check the overlap between the fosmid clones and the adjacent BAC clones. Nine fosmid clones were selected and fully sequenced. The sequences revealed two completed gap filling and seven sequence extensions, which can be used for further selection of BAC clones confirming that the fosmid library will facilitate the sequence completion of B. rapa. PMID:21338952

  7. Analysis and Prediction of the Critical Regions of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Conditional Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuan Y.; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew’s correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion. PMID:25803302

  8. In-depth proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic beverages with peptide ligand libraries. I: Almond milk and orgeat syrup.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Elisa; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Kravchuk, Alexander V; Citterio, Attilio; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2011-06-10

    Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, both commercial and home-made, have been adopted to investigate the proteome of non-alcoholic beverages, in order to assess their genuineness and detect also trace proteins, in search of potential allergens. Two such beverages have been studied: almond milk and orgeat syrup. In the first product we have been able to identify 132 unique protein species, the deepest investigation so far of the almond proteome. In the second beverage, a handful of proteins (just 14) have been detected, belonging to a bitter almond extract. In both cases, the genuineness of such products has been verified, as well as the fact that almond milk, judging on the total protein and fat content, must have been produced with 100g ground almonds per litre of beverage, as required by authorities. On the contrary, cheap orgeat syrups produced by local supermarkets and sold as their own brands, where found not to contain any residual proteins, suggesting that they contained only synthetic aromas and no natural plant extracts. This could be the starting point for investigating the myriad of beverages that in the last decades have invaded the shelves of supermarkets the world over, whose genuineness and natural origin have never been properly assessed. PMID:21440098

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Lonicera japonica Thunb. Immature Flower Buds Using Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries and Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Xiaobao; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb. flower is a well-known medicinal plant that has been widely used for the treatment of human disease. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used in combination with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation for the enrichment of low-abundance proteins and removal of high-abundance proteins, respectively. A total of 177, 614, and 529 proteins were identified in crude protein extraction, CPLL fractions, and PEG fractions, respectively. Among the identified proteins, 283 and 239 proteins were specifically identified by the CPLL and PEG methods, respectively. In particular, proteins related to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, signaling, hormone metabolism, and transport were highly enriched by CPLL and PEG fractionation compared to crude protein extraction. A total of 28 secondary metabolism-related proteins and 25 metabolites were identified in L. japonica immature flower buds. To determine the specificity of the identified proteins and metabolites for L. japonica immature flower buds, Cerasus flower buds were used, which resulted in the abundance of hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase in L. japonica immature flower buds being 10-fold higher than that in Cerasus flower buds. These results suggest that proteins related to secondary metabolism might be responsible for the biological activities of L. japonica immature flower buds. PMID:26573373

  10. Improving short antimicrobial peptides despite elusive rules for activity.

    PubMed

    Mikut, Ralf; Ruden, Serge; Reischl, Markus; Breitling, Frank; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hilpert, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can effectively kill a broad range of life threatening multidrug-resistant bacteria, a serious threat to public health worldwide. However, despite great hopes novel drugs based on AMPs are still rare. To accelerate drug development we studied different approaches to improve the antibacterial activity of short antimicrobial peptides. Short antimicrobial peptides seem to be ideal drug candidates since they can be synthesized quickly and easily, modified and optimized. In addition, manufacturing a short peptide drug will be more cost efficient than long and structured ones. In contrast to longer and structured peptides short AMPs seem hard to design and predict. Here, we designed, synthesized and screened five different peptide libraries, each consisting of 600 9-mer peptides, against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Each library is presenting a different approach to investigate effectiveness of an optimization strategy. The data for the 3000 peptides were analyzed using models based on fuzzy logic bioinformatics and plausible descriptors. The rate of active or superior active peptides was improved from 31.0% in a semi-random library from a previous study to 97.8% in the best new designed library. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26687790

  11. An unusual cell penetrating peptide identified using a plasmid display-based functional selection platform

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Simon, Melissa J.; Hue, Christopher D.; Morrison, Barclay; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have tremendous potential for use in gene and drug delivery applications. The selection of new CPPs with desired capabilities from randomized peptide libraries is challenging, since the CPP phenotype is a complex selection target. Here we report the discovery of an unusual new CPP from a randomized peptide library using a functional selection system based on plasmid display (PD). After four rounds of screening of a 14-mer peptide library over PC12 cells, several peptides were identified and tested for their ability to deliver the green fluorescent protein (GFP). One peptide (SG3) exhibited a cell penetrating phenotype, however unlike other well-known CPPs such as TAT or Penetratin, the newly identified peptide was not highly cationic. The PD protocol necessitated the addition of a cationic lipid (Lipofectamine2000), and in the presence of this compound, the SG3 peptide significantly outperformed the well-known TAT CPP in the delivery of GFP to PC12 cells and primary astrocytes. When the SG3 peptide was fused to the pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide from the Bak protein, significant cell death was induced in cultured primary astrocytes, indicating relevant, intracellular delivery of a functional cargo. The PD platform is a useful method for identifying functional new CPPs from randomized libraries with unique delivery capabilities. PMID:21291271

  12. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yaoling; Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Lou, Guofeng; Lian, Mengyang; Su, Zhijian; Zheng, Qing

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  13. Diversity and censoring of landscape phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Sorokulova, I.B.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous phages are a valuable source for biospecific ligands. However, their successful use can be hindered by a disproportionate representation of different phage clones and fluctuation of their composition that arises during phage reproduction, which have potential to affect efficiency of selection of clones with an optimal binding. Therefore, there is a need to develop phage display libraries with extended and varied repertoires of displayed peptides. In this work, we compared the complexity, evolution and representation of two phage display libraries displaying foreign octamers and nonamers in 4000 copies as the N-terminal part of the major coat protein pVIII of phage fd–tet (landscape libraries). They were obtained by replacement of amino acids 2–4 and 2–5 of pVIII with random octa- and nonamers, respectively. Statistical analysis of the libraries revealed their dramatic censoring and evolution during amplification. Further, a survey of both libraries for clones that bind common selectors revealed the presence of different non-overlapping families of target-specific clones in each library justifying the concept that different landscape libraries cover different areas of a sequence space. PMID:18988692

  14. Diversity and censoring of landscape phage libraries.

    PubMed

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Jayanna, P K; Sorokulova, I B; Petrenko, V A

    2009-01-01

    Libraries of random peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous phages are a valuable source for biospecific ligands. However, their successful use can be hindered by a disproportionate representation of different phage clones and fluctuation of their composition that arises during phage reproduction, which have potential to affect efficiency of selection of clones with an optimal binding. Therefore, there is a need to develop phage display libraries with extended and varied repertoires of displayed peptides. In this work, we compared the complexity, evolution and representation of two phage display libraries displaying foreign octamers and nonamers in 4000 copies as the N-terminal part of the major coat protein pVIII of phage fd-tet (landscape libraries). They were obtained by replacement of amino acids 2-4 and 2-5 of pVIII with random octa- and nonamers, respectively. Statistical analysis of the libraries revealed their dramatic censoring and evolution during amplification. Further, a survey of both libraries for clones that bind common selectors revealed the presence of different non-overlapping families of target-specific clones in each library justifying the concept that different landscape libraries cover different areas of a sequence space. PMID:18988692

  15. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  16. Discovery of active proteins directly from combinatorial randomized protein libraries without display, purification or sequencing: identification of novel zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Marcus D.; Zhang, Zhan-Ren; Sutherland, Andrew J.; Santos, Albert F.; Hine, Anna V.

    2005-01-01

    We have successfully linked protein library screening directly with the identification of active proteins, without the need for individual purification, display technologies or physical linkage between the protein and its encoding sequence. By using ‘MAX’ randomization we have rapidly constructed 60 overlapping gene libraries that encode zinc finger proteins, randomized variously at the three principal DNA-contacting residues. Expression and screening of the libraries against five possible target DNA sequences generated data points covering a potential 40 000 individual interactions. Comparative analysis of the resulting data enabled direct identification of active proteins. Accuracy of this library analysis methodology was confirmed by both in vitro and in vivo analyses of identified proteins to yield novel zinc finger proteins that bind to their target sequences with high affinity, as indicated by low nanomolar apparent dissociation constants. PMID:15722478

  17. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J.; Owen, Jeremy G.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2012-01-01

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts. PMID:23072412

  18. Screening derivatized peptide libraries for tight binding inhibitors to carbonic anhydrase II by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Cheng, X; Chen, R; Sigal, G B; Bruce, J E; Schwartz, B L; Hofstadler, S A; Anderson, G A; Smith, R D; Whitesides, G M

    1996-05-10

    This paper describes the use of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to screen two libraries of soluble compounds to search for tight binding inhibitors for carbonic anhydrase II (EC 4.2.1.1). The two libraries, H2NO2SC6H4C(O)NH-AA1-AA2-C(O)NHCH2CH2CO2H where AA1 and AA2 are L-amino acids (library size: 289 compounds) or D-amino acids (256 compounds), were constructed by attaching tripeptides to the carboxyl group of 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide. Screening of both libraries yielded, as the tightest binding inhibitor, compound 1 (AA1 = AA2 = L-Leu; binding constant Kb = 1.4 x 10(8) M-1). The ability of ESI-MS to estimate simultaneously the relative binding affinities of a protein to soluble ligands in a library, if general, should be useful in drug development. PMID:8642553

  19. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  20. Topical Administration of a Connexin43-based peptide Augments Healing of Chronic Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Prasad, G.M.; Viswanathan, Vijay; Armstrong, David G.; Gourdie, Robert G.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing neuropathic foot ulcers remain a significant problem in individuals with diabetes. The gap-junctional protein connexin43 (Cx43) has roles in dermal wound healing and targeting Cx43 signaling accelerates wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a peptide mimetic of the C-terminus of Cx43, ACT1, in accelerating the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) when incorporated into standard of care protocols. Adults with DFUs of at least four weeks duration were randomized to receive standard of care with or without topical application of ACT1. Primary outcome was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization and safety variables included incidence of treatment related adverse events and detection of ACT1 immunogenicity. ACT1 treatment was associated with a significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks (72.1% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.03). Analysis of incidence and median time-to-complete-ulcer closure revealed that ACT1 treatment was associated with a greater percentage of participants that reached 100% ulcer reepitheliazation and a reduced median time-to-complete-ulcer closure. No adverse events reported were treatment related, and ACT1 was not immunogenic. Treatment protocols that incorporate ACT1 may present a therapeutic strategy that safely augments the reepithelialization of chronic DFUs. PMID:25703647

  1. Randomized Multicenter Trial of the Effects of Melanoma-Associated Helper Peptides and Cyclophosphamide on the Immunogenicity of a Multipeptide Melanoma Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Petroni, Gina R.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Ross, Merrick I.; Haas, Naomi B.; von Mehren, Margaret; Grosh, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to test whether melanoma-associated helper peptides augment CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine and whether cyclophosphamide (CY) pretreatment augments CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses to that vaccine. Patients and Methods In all, 167 eligible patients with resected stage IIB to IV melanoma were randomly assigned to four vaccination study arms. Patients were vaccinated with 12 class I major histocompatibility complex–restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CD8+ T cells and were randomly assigned to receive a tetanus helper peptide or a mixture of six melanoma-associated helper peptides (6MHP) to stimulate CD4+ T cells. Before vaccination, patients were also randomly assigned to receive CY pretreatment or not. T-cell responses were assessed by an ex vivo interferon gamma ELISpot assay. Clinical outcomes and toxicities were recorded. Results Vaccination with 12MP plus tetanus induced CD8+ T-cell responses in 78% of patients and CD4+ T-cell responses to tetanus peptide in 93% of patients. Vaccination with 12MP plus 6MHP induced CD8+ responses in 19% of patients and CD4+ responses to 6MHP in 48% of patients. CY had no significant effect on T-cell responses. Overall 3-year survival was 79% (95% CI, 71% to 86%), with no significant differences (at this point) by study arm. Conclusion Melanoma-associated helper peptides paradoxically decreased CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine (P < .001), and CY pretreatment had no immunologic or clinical effect. Prior work showed immunologic and clinical activity of 6MHP alone. Possible explanations for negative effects on CD8 responses include modulation of homing receptor expression or induction of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. PMID:21690475

  2. Tools (Viewer, Library and Validator) that facilitate use of the peptide and protein identification standard format, termed mzIdentML.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Fawaz; Krishna, Ritesh; Lukasse, Pieter; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Reisinger, Florian; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Jones, Andrew R

    2013-11-01

    The Proteomics Standards Initiative has recently released the mzIdentML data standard for representing peptide and protein identification results, for example, created by a search engine. When a new standard format is produced, it is important that software tools are available that make it straightforward for laboratory scientists to use it routinely and for bioinformaticians to embed support in their own tools. Here we report the release of several open-source Java-based software packages based on mzIdentML: ProteoIDViewer, mzidLibrary, and mzidValidator. The ProteoIDViewer is a desktop application allowing users to visualize mzIdentML-formatted results originating from any appropriate identification software; it supports visualization of all the features of the mzIdentML format. The mzidLibrary is a software library containing routines for importing data from external search engines, post-processing identification data (such as false discovery rate calculations), combining results from multiple search engines, performing protein inference, setting identification thresholds, and exporting results from mzIdentML to plain text files. The mzidValidator is able to process files and report warnings or errors if files are not correctly formatted or contain some semantic error. We anticipate that these developments will simplify adoption of the new standard in proteomics laboratories and the integration of mzIdentML into other software tools. All three tools are freely available in the public domain. PMID:23813117

  3. Identification of rabies virus mimotopes screened from a phage display peptide library with purified dog anti-rabies virus serum IgG.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limin; Cen, Junyu; Xue, Qinghua; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-06-01

    The rabies virus glycoprotein (G) is a key protein for both virus infectivity and eliciting protective immunity as an antigen. What is more, the nucleoprotein (N) is also a significant rabies virus antigen. In this study, purified anti-rabies virus IgG from dogs immunized with the standard CVS-11 strain was used to screen the Ph.D.-12™ Phage Display Peptide Library for peptides that correspond to or mimic native G and N epitopes. In contrast to previous reports that use monoclonal antibodies or human anti-rabies virus serum, this study describes the first use of dog serum to screen for epitopes. After three rounds of biopanning, selected phage clones were identified by plaque screening, western blotting (WB), and ELISA. Positive phage clones were sequenced, and their amino acid sequences were deduced. Alignment of the peptide sequences to G and N indicated that the epitope peptides matched well with G amino acids at positions 34-42, 198-200, 226-264, 296-371, and 330-343, as well as to N amino acids at positions 22-168 (N-terminal) and 262-450 (C-terminal), confirming that the sequences were indeed mimicking epitopes. Thirty percent of the selected clones matched reported antigenic regions located at sites II and III of the glycoprotein. Two sequences, LEPKGRYDDPWT and ATRYDDIWASTA, that have no homology to the known antigenic sites of either the G or N exhibited a common RYDD-W-T motif that is highly homologous to the amino acid residues at positions 126-141 of the G. This finding indicates that this motif may be a new potential RABV G B cell epitope. Amino acids 126-141 containing the RYDD-W-T motif may become a novel key epitope region and allow the development of a rabies vaccine or diagnostic reagents for the treatment of rabies. PMID:23499997

  4. MEGAWHOP cloning: a method of creating random mutagenesis libraries via megaprimer PCR of whole plasmids.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    MEGAWHOP allows for the cloning of DNA fragments into a vector and is used for conventional restriction digestion/ligation-based procedures. In MEGAWHOP, the DNA fragment to be cloned is used as a set of complementary primers that replace a homologous region in a template vector through whole-plasmid PCR. After synthesis of a nicked circular plasmid, the mixture is treated with DpnI, a dam-methylated DNA-specific restriction enzyme, to digest the template plasmid. The DpnI-treated mixture is then introduced into competent Escherichia coli cells to yield plasmids carrying replaced insert fragments. Plasmids produced by the MEGAWHOP method are virtually free of contamination by species without any inserts or with multiple inserts, and also the parent. Because the fragment is usually long enough to not interfere with hybridization to the template, various types of fragments can be used with mutations at any site (either known or unknown, random, or specific). By using fragments having homologous sequences at the ends (e.g., adaptor sequence), MEGAWHOP can also be used to recombine nonhomologous sequences mediated by the adaptors, allowing rapid creation of novel constructs and chimeric genes. PMID:21601687

  5. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E.

    2016-06-01

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption.

  6. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2016-06-22

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption. PMID:27115518

  7. Small peptides as potent mimetics of the protein hormone erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, N C; Farrell, F X; Chang, R; Kashyap, A K; Barbone, F P; Mulcahy, L S; Johnson, D L; Barrett, R W; Jolliffe, L K; Dower, W J

    1996-07-26

    Random phage display peptide libraries and affinity selective methods were used to isolate small peptides that bind to and activate the receptor for the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). In a panel of in vitro biological assays, the peptides act as full agonists and they can also stimulate erythropoiesis in mice. These agonists are represented by a 14- amino acid disulfide-bonded, cyclic peptide with the minimum consensus sequence YXCXXGPXTWXCXP, where X represents positions allowing occupation by several amino acids. The amino acid sequences of these peptides are not found in the primary sequence of EPO. The signaling pathways activated by these peptides appear to be identical to those induced by the natural ligand. This discovery may form the basis for the design of small molecule mimetics of EPO. PMID:8662529

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana root cell wall proteomics: Increasing the proteome coverage using a combinatorial peptide ligand library and description of unexpected Hyp in peroxidase amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Kim, Huan; San Clemente, Hélène; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-02-01

    Plant cell walls (CWs) contain a large proportion of polysaccharides (90-95% of CW mass) and proteins (5-10%) that play major roles in CW plasticity during development and in response to environmental cues. Here, we present CW proteomics data of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Plants were cultivated in hydroponic conditions. CW protein (CWP) extracts were prepared and analyzed in two different ways in order to enlarge the coverage of the root CW proteome: proteins were analyzed either directly or following an affinity chromatography on a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) to reduce the concentration dynamic range. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics. Altogether, 424 proteins having predicted signal peptides have been identified (CWPs). CPLL permitted to identify low-abundant CWPs never described before, thus enlarging the coverage of the root CW proteome. The number of oxidoreductases is particularly high and includes a large collection of class III peroxidases (CIII Prxs; 38 out of the 73 A. thaliana CIII Prxs). For the first time, hydroxyproline residues were localized at conserved positions in CIII Prx amino acid sequences. PMID:26572690

  9. The specificity of the protein kinase C alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms as assessed by an unnatural alcohol-appended peptide library.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, X; Curley, K; Lawrence, D S

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies using conventional peptide-based libraries have demonstrated that homologous protein-processing enzymes [e.g. the alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms of protein kinase (PKC)] typically display identical amino acid consensus sequences. These observations have hampered the acquisition of selective synthetic substrates for the individual members of these enzyme families. We describe here a parallel synthesis strategy, readily adaptable to the preparation of large libraries, that has led to the emergence of the first examples of selective substrates for the conventional PKC isoforms. In addition, we have found that a wide variety of structurally diverse N-appended alcohol-containing residues, including tyrosine, serve as substrates for the PKC alpha, betaII and gamma isoforms. This broad active-site substrate specificity with respect to both natural and unnatural residues may prove to be especially applicable to the construction of transition-state analogues and suicide substrates, species that often require the presence of structurally elaborate functionality. PMID:10903131

  10. A pH Sensitive High-Throughput Assay for miRNA Binding of a Peptide-Aminoglycoside (PA) Library.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Derrick; Jiang, Liuwei; Nahar, Smita; Maiti, Souvik; Arya, Dev P

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small RNAs that have a regulatory role in gene expression. Because of this regulatory role, miRNAs have become a new target for therapeutic compounds. Here, we outline an approach to target specific miRNAs using a high throughput capable assay and a 215 compound peptidic-aminosugar (PA) library. Aminosugars have been shown in a number of recent reports as important lead compounds that bind miRNA. In order to screen for compounds that bind miRNA, we have developed a high throughput displacement assay using a fluorescein-neomycin conjugated molecule (F-neo) as a probe for competitive miRNA binding compounds. We have applied the F-neo assay to four different miRNA constructs and the assay is applicable to most miRNAs, at various stages of processing. The results of the screen were validated by the determination of the IC50 for a select group of compounds from the library. For example, we identified eight compounds that bind to hsa-miR 504 with higher affinity than the parent neomycin. From the F-neo displacement assay we found that the number of binding sites differs for each miRNA, and the binding sites appear to differ both physically and chemically, with different affinity of the compounds resulting from the size of the molecule as well as the chemical structure. Additionally, the affinity of the compounds was dependent on the identity and position of the amino acid position of conjugation and the affinity of the compounds relative to other compounds in the library was miRNA dependent with the introduction of a second amino acid. PMID:26656788

  11. A pH Sensitive High-Throughput Assay for miRNA Binding of a Peptide-Aminoglycoside (PA) Library

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Derrick; Jiang, Liuwei; Nahar, Smita; Maiti, Souvik; Arya, Dev P.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small RNAs that have a regulatory role in gene expression. Because of this regulatory role, miRNAs have become a new target for therapeutic compounds. Here, we outline an approach to target specific miRNAs using a high throughput capable assay and a 215 compound peptidic-aminosugar (PA) library. Aminosugars have been shown in a number of recent reports as important lead compounds that bind miRNA. In order to screen for compounds that bind miRNA, we have developed a high throughput displacement assay using a fluorescein-neomycin conjugated molecule (F-neo) as a probe for competitive miRNA binding compounds. We have applied the F-neo assay to four different miRNA constructs and the assay is applicable to most miRNAs, at various stages of processing. The results of the screen were validated by the determination of the IC50 for a select group of compounds from the library. For example, we identified eight compounds that bind to hsa-miR 504 with higher affinity than the parent neomycin. From the F-neo displacement assay we found that the number of binding sites differs for each miRNA, and the binding sites appear to differ both physically and chemically, with different affinity of the compounds resulting from the size of the molecule as well as the chemical structure. Additionally, the affinity of the compounds was dependent on the identity and position of the amino acid position of conjugation and the affinity of the compounds relative to other compounds in the library was miRNA dependent with the introduction of a second amino acid. PMID:26656788

  12. Monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 Peptides in Solution Adopt Very Similar Ramachandran Map Distributions That Closely Resemble Random Coil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the aggregation and fibrillation of amyloid peptides Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 into amyloid plaques. Despite strong potential therapeutic interest, the structural pathways associated with the conversion of monomeric Aβ peptides into oligomeric species remain largely unknown. In particular, the higher aggregation propensity and associated toxicity of Aβ1–42 compared to that of Aβ1–40 are poorly understood. To explore in detail the structural propensity of the monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides in solution, we recorded a large set of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters, including chemical shifts, nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), and J couplings. Systematic comparisons show that at neutral pH the Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides populate almost indistinguishable coil-like conformations. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectra collected at very high resolution remove assignment ambiguities and show no long-range NOE contacts. Six sets of backbone J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JNCα, and 1JNCα) recorded for Aβ1–40 were used as input for the recently developed MERA Ramachandran map analysis, yielding residue-specific backbone ϕ/ψ torsion angle distributions that closely resemble random coil distributions, the absence of a significantly elevated propensity for β-conformations in the C-terminal region of the peptide, and a small but distinct propensity for αL at K28. Our results suggest that the self-association of Aβ peptides into toxic oligomers is not driven by elevated propensities of the monomeric species to adopt β-strand-like conformations. Instead, the accelerated disappearance of Aβ NMR signals in D2O over H2O, particularly pronounced for Aβ1–42, suggests that intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic regions of the peptide dominate the aggregation process. PMID:26780756

  13. Selection of Novel Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Variants from a Peptide Insertion Library for Enhanced Purification of Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Julie H.; Schaffer, David V.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new features or functions that are not present in an original protein is a significant challenge in protein engineering. For example, modifications to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G), which is commonly used to pseudotype retroviral and lentiviral vectors for gene delivery, have been hindered by a lack of structural knowledge of the protein. We have developed a transposon-based approach that randomly incorporates designed polypeptides throughout a protein to generate saturated insertion libraries and a subsequent high-throughput selection process in mammalian cells that enables the identification of optimal insertion sites for a novel designed functionality. This method was applied to VSV-G in order to construct a comprehensive library of mutants whose combined members have a His6 tag inserted at likely every site in the original protein sequence. Selecting the library via iterative retroviral infections of mammalian cells led to the identification of several VSV-G-His6 variants that were able to package high-titer viral vectors and could be purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Column purification of vectors reduced protein and DNA impurities more than 5,000-fold and 14,000-fold, respectively, from the viral supernatant. This substantially improved purity elicited a weaker immune response in the brain, without altering the infectivity or tropism from wild-type VSV-G-pseudotyped vectors. This work applies a powerful new tool for protein engineering to construct novel viral envelope variants that can greatly improve the safety and use of retroviral and lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy. Furthermore, this approach of library generation and selection can readily be extended to other challenges in protein engineering. PMID:16537595

  14. Probability-Based Pattern Recognition and Statistical Framework for Randomization: Modeling Tandem Mass Spectrum/Peptide Sequence False Match Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating and controlling the frequency of false matches between a peptide tandem mass spectrum and candidate peptide sequences is an issue pervading proteomics research. To solve this problem, we designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths fr...

  15. Construction of a cDNA library for sea cucumber Acaudina leucoprocta and differential expression of ferritin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Hou, Fujing; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu; Jin, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    Acaudina leucoprocta is an edible sea cucumber of economic interest that is widely distributed in China. Little information is available concerning the molecular genetics of this species although such knowledge would contribute to a better understanding of the optimal conditions for its aquaculture and its mechanisms of defense against disease. Therefore, we constructed a cDNA library and, based on bioinformatics analysis of the sequences, the functions of 75% of the cDNAs were identified, including those involved in cell structure, energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, and signal transduction pathways. Approximately 25% of genes in the library were unmatched. The gene for A. leucoprocta ferritin was also cloned. The predicted amino-acid sequence of ferritin displayed significant homology with other sea-cucumber counterparts but indicated that it was a new member of the ferritin family. Semiquantitative real-time RT-PCR indicated the highest levels of ferritin mRNA expression in the intestine. A polyclonal antibody of ferritin was also produced. These data provide a set of molecular tools essential for further studies of the functions of ferritin protein in A. leucoprocta.

  16. Construction of a cDNA library for sea cucumber Acaudina leucoprocta and differential expression of ferritin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Hou, Fujing; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu; Jin, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Acaudina leucoprocta is an edible sea cucumber of economic interest that is widely distributed in China. Little information is available concerning the molecular genetics of this species although such knowledge would contribute to a better understanding of the optimal conditions for its aquaculture and its mechanisms of defense against disease. Therefore, we constructed a cDNA library and, based on bioinformatics analysis of the sequences, the functions of 75% of the cDNAs were identified, including those involved in cell structure, energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, and signal transduction pathways. Approximately 25% of genes in the library were unmatched. The gene for A. leucoprocta ferritin was also cloned. The predicted amino-acid sequence of ferritin displayed significant homology with other sea-cucumber counterparts but indicated that it was a new member of the ferritin family. Semiquantitative real-time RT-PCR indicated the highest levels of ferritin mRNA expression in the intestine. A polyclonal antibody of ferritin was also produced. These data provide a set of molecular tools essential for further studies of the functions of ferritin protein in A. leucoprocta.

  17. Mendelian Randomization Study of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence of Causal Association from Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Roman; Sharp, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Welsh, Paul; Barroso, Inês; Salomaa, Veikko; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded. Methods and Findings We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%–36%) decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD) higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91–0.97) was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93–0.98) based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74–0.90) and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15–0.29) per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP

  18. Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries for the analysis of low-expression proteins: Validation for normal urine and definition of a first protein MAP.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Bruschi, Maurizio; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Petretto, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Urbani, Andrea; Righetti, Pier G; Ghiggeri, Gian M

    2012-02-01

    In this review, we report the evolution on experimental conditions for the analysis of normal urine based on combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) treatment and successive 2-DE and 2-DE/MS analysis. The main topics are (i) definition of the urine sample requirements, (ii) optimization of the urine/ligand ratio, (iii) essay conditions, (iv) en bloc elution. Overall, normal urine protein composition as studied by 2-DE includes over 2600 spots. Relevant data on inter and intraessay reproducibility obtained by the analysis of different normal urines repeated several times are also here presented. We found a 73% reproducibility upon analysis of the same sample and 68% correspondence of protein composition among different normal urine samples. Based on the above results, we are completing the characterization with LC-MS of 249 spots. The composition of normal urine proteins after CPLLs is finally shown with the indication of those spots which are currently under identification. This map will be completed in a near future; in the meantime this would represent the basic reference sample for newly developed studies on human diseases. PMID:22246922

  19. Mutations in fd phage major coat protein modulate affinity of the displayed peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Eroshkin, A.M.; Grishina, M.A.; Pereyaslavskaya, E.S.; Potemkin, V.A.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multibillion-clone libraries of phages displaying guest peptides fused to the major coat protein pVIII (landscape libraries) are a rich source of probes for proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous targets. As opposed to the pIII-type fusion phages, which display peptides as independent structural domains, the guest peptides in the pVIII-fusion phages can be structurally and functionally influenced by contiguous subunits. To decipher the impact of the locale of a guest peptide on its affinity characteristics, we constructed a library of phages carrying β-galactosidase-binding peptide ADTFAKSMQ at the N-terminus of the pVIII protein surrounded by random amino acids. It was found that mutagenesis of amino acids 12–19 (domain C) has polar effects on target binding affinity of the displayed peptide. The phages with highest affinity are characterized by: (i) a net electrostatic charge around −1 of domain C of the mutated phages at pH 7.0; (ii) a lower radius of cylinder coaxial to α-helix formed by domain C; (iii) a lower higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of domain C leading to a decreased formation of hydrogen bonds and (iv) positively charged surface and torsion energy of domain C, which may require a conformational transition of N-terminal peptide ADTFAKSMQ for its binding with β-galactosidase. Influence of the guest peptide on the diversity of mutations in the neighboring landscape area was also observed. PMID:19633313

  20. Towards an animal model of ovarian cancer: cataloging chicken blood proteins using combinatorial peptide ligand libraries coupled with shotgun proteomic analysis for translational research.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingying; Sun, Zeyu; de Matos, Ricardo; Zhang, Jing; Odunsi, Kunle; Lin, Biaoyang

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer around the world, with high morbidity in industrialized countries. Early diagnosis is key in reducing its morbidity rate. Yet, robust biomarkers, diagnostics, and animal models are still limited for ovarian cancer. This calls for broader omics and systems science oriented diagnostics strategies. In this vein, the domestic chicken has been used as an ovarian cancer animal model, owing to its high rate of developing spontaneous epithelial ovarian tumors. Chicken blood has thus been considered a surrogate reservoir from which cancer biomarkers can be identified. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins in chicken blood has compromised the applicability of proteomics tools to study chicken blood owing to a lack of immunodepletion methods. Here, we demonstrate that a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) can efficiently remove highly abundant proteins from chicken blood samples, consequently doubling the number of identified proteins. Using an integrated CPLL-1DGE-LC-MSMS workflow, we identified a catalog of 264 unique proteins. Functional analyses further suggested that most proteins were coagulation and complement factors, blood transport and binding proteins, immune- and defense-related proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, cellular enzymes, or cell structure and adhesion proteins. Semiquantitative spectral counting analysis identified 10 potential biomarkers from the present chicken ovarian cancer model. Additionally, many human homologs of chicken blood proteins we have identified have been independently suggested as diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, further triangulating our novel observations reported here. In conclusion, the CPLL-assisted proteomic workflow using the chicken ovarian cancer model provides a feasible platform for translational research to identify ovarian cancer biomarkers and understand ovarian cancer biology. To the best of our knowledge, we report here

  1. Application of mimotope peptides of fumonisin b1 in Peptide ELISA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Xu, Yang; He, Qing-hua; He, Zhen-yun; Xiong, Zheng-ping

    2013-05-22

    Anti-fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) McAb 1D11 was used as the target for biopanning from a phage random loop-constrained heptapeptide library. After three cycles of panning, seven phages with three mimotope peptides were selected to mimic the binding of FB(1) to 1D11. After the identification of phage ELISA, the phage clone that showed the best linear range of detection was chosen for further research. One peptide with the inserted peptide sequence of the phage was synthetized, named CT-452. An indirect competitive ELISA (peptide ELISA) for detecting FB(1) was established using the CT-452-bovine serum albumin conjugate as coating antigen. The linear range of the inhibition curve was 1.77-20.73 ng/mL. The half inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 6.06 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 1.18 ng/mL. This method was compared with conventional indirect ELISA (commercial ELISA kit) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the results showed the reliability of the peptide ELISA for the determination of FB(1) in cereal samples. The relationship between the CT-452 and FB(1) standard concentrations in peptide ELISA was evaluated. The results indicated that synthetic peptide CT-452 can replace the FB(1) standard to establish an immunoassay free of FB(1). PMID:23692446

  2. PRAND: GPU accelerated parallel random number generation library: Using most reliable algorithms and applying parallelism of modern GPUs and CPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, L. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.

    2014-04-01

    The library PRAND for pseudorandom number generation for modern CPUs and GPUs is presented. It contains both single-threaded and multi-threaded realizations of a number of modern and most reliable generators recently proposed and studied in Barash (2011), Matsumoto and Tishimura (1998), L'Ecuyer (1999,1999), Barash and Shchur (2006) and the efficient SIMD realizations proposed in Barash and Shchur (2011). One of the useful features for using PRAND in parallel simulations is the ability to initialize up to 1019 independent streams. Using massive parallelism of modern GPUs and SIMD parallelism of modern CPUs substantially improves performance of the generators.

  3. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  4. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids. PMID:27367290

  5. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding. PMID:17054116

  6. McMaster PLUS: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial of an Intervention to Accelerate Clinical Use of Evidence-based Information from Digital Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, R. Brian; Holland, Jennifer; Cotoi, Chris; McKinlay, R. James; Wilczynski, Nancy L.; Walters, Leslie A.; Jedras, Dawn; Parrish, Rick; McKibbon, K. Ann; Garg, Amit; Walter, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Background Physicians have difficulty keeping up with new evidence from medical research. Methods We developed the McMaster Premium LiteratUre Service (PLUS), an internet-based addition to an existing digital library, which delivered quality- and relevance-rated medical literature to physicians, matched to their clinical disciplines. We evaluated PLUS in a cluster-randomized trial of 203 participating physicians in Northern Ontario, comparing a Full-Serve version (that included alerts to new articles and a cumulative database of alerts) with a Self-Serve version (that included a passive guide to evidence-based literature). Utilization of the service was the primary trial end-point. Results Mean logins to the library rose by 0.77 logins/month/user (95% CI 0.43, 1.11) in the Full-Serve group compared with the Self-Serve group. The proportion of Full-Serve participants who utilized the service during each month of the study period showed a sustained increase during the intervention period, with a relative increase of 57% (95% CI 12, 123) compared with the Self-Serve group. There were no differences in these proportions during the baseline period, and following the crossover of the Self-Serve group to Full-Serve, the Self-Serve group’s usage became indistinguishable from that of the Full-Serve group (relative difference 4.4 (95% CI −23.7, 43.0). Also during the intervention and crossover periods, measures of self-reported usefulness did not show a difference between the 2 groups. Conclusion A quality- and relevance-rated online literature service increased the utilization of evidence-based information from a digital library by practicing physicians. PMID:16929034

  7. Solution-phase parallel synthesis of a pharmacophore library of HUN-7293 analogues: a general chemical mutagenesis approach to defining structure-function properties of naturally occurring cyclic (depsi)peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Bilban, Melitta; Foster, Carolyn A; Boger, Dale L

    2002-05-15

    HUN-7293 (1), a naturally occurring cyclic heptadepsipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of cell adhesion molecule expression (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin), the overexpression of which is characteristic of chronic inflammatory diseases. Representative of a general approach to defining structure-function relationships of such cyclic (depsi)peptides, the parallel synthesis and evaluation of a complete library of key HUN-7293 analogues are detailed enlisting solution-phase techniques and simple acid-base liquid-liquid extractions for isolation and purification of intermediates and final products. Significant to the design of the studies and unique to solution-phase techniques, the library was assembled superimposing a divergent synthetic strategy onto a convergent total synthesis. An alanine scan and N-methyl deletion of each residue of the cyclic heptadepsipeptide identified key sites responsible for or contributing to the biological properties. The simultaneous preparation of a complete set of individual residue analogues further simplifying the structure allowed an assessment of each structural feature of 1, providing a detailed account of the structure-function relationships in a single study. Within this pharmacophore library prepared by systematic chemical mutagenesis of the natural product structure, simplified analogues possessing comparable potency and, in some instances, improved selectivity were identified. One potent member of this library proved to be an additional natural product in its own right, which we have come to refer to as HUN-7293B (8), being isolated from the microbial strain F/94-499709. PMID:11996584

  8. Acute ingestion of a novel whey-derived peptide improves vascular endothelial responses in healthy individuals: a randomized, placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D; Bruno, Richard S; Seip, Richard L; Quann, Erin E; Volk, Brittanie M; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Kawiecki, Diana M; Kupchak, Brian R; Chung, Min-Yu; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2009-01-01

    Background Whey protein is a potential source of bioactive peptides. Based on findings from in vitro experiments indicating a novel whey derived peptide (NOP-47) increased endothelial nitric oxide synthesis, we tested its effects on vascular function in humans. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study design was used. Healthy men (n = 10) and women (n = 10) (25 ± 5 y, BMI = 24.3 ± 2.3 kg/m2) participated in two vascular testing days each preceded by 2 wk of supplementation with a single dose of 5 g/day of a novel whey-derived peptide (NOP-47) or placebo. There was a 2 wk washout period between trials. After 2 wk of supplementation, vascular function in the forearm and circulating oxidative stress and inflammatory related biomarkers were measured serially for 2 h after ingestion of 5 g of NOP-47 or placebo. Macrovascular and microvascular function were assessed using brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) and venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography. Results Baseline peak FMD was not different for Placebo (7.7%) and NOP-47 (7.8%). Placebo had no effect on FMD at 30, 60, and 90 min post-ingestion (7.5%, 7.2%, and 7.6%, respectively) whereas NOP-47 significantly improved FMD responses at these respective postprandial time points compared to baseline (8.9%, 9.9%, and 9.0%; P < 0.0001 for time × trial interaction). Baseline reactive hyperemia forearm blood flow was not different for placebo (27.2 ± 7.2%/min) and NOP-47 (27.3 ± 7.6%/min). Hyperemia blood flow measured 120 min post-ingestion (27.2 ± 7.8%/min) was unaffected by placebo whereas NOP-47 significantly increased hyperemia compared to baseline (29.9 ± 7.8%/min; P = 0.008 for time × trial interaction). Plasma myeloperoxidase was increased transiently by both NOP-47 and placebo, but there were no changes in markers inflammation. Plasma total nitrites/nitrates significantly decreased over the 2 hr post-ingestion period and were lower at 120 min after placebo (-25%) compared to

  9. Uncovering the design rules for peptide synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yen Nee; Lee, Jim Yang; Wang, Daniel I C

    2010-04-28

    Peptides are multifunctional reagents (reducing and capping agents) that can be used for the synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles under relatively mild conditions. However, the progress in peptide synthesis of metal nanoparticles has been slow due to the lack of peptide design rules. It is difficult to establish sequence-reactivity relationships from peptides isolated from biological sources (e.g., biomineralizing organisms) or selected by combinatorial display libraries because of their widely varying compositions and structures. The abundance of random and inactive amino acid sequences in the peptides also increases the difficulty in knowledge extraction. In this study, a "bottom-up" approach was used to formulate a set of rudimentary rules for the size- and shape-controlled peptide synthesis of gold nanoparticles from the properties of the 20 natural alpha-amino acids for AuCl(4)(-) reduction and binding to Au(0). It was discovered that the reduction capability of a peptide depends on the presence of certain reducing amino acid residues, whose activity may be regulated by neighboring residues with different Au(0) binding strengths. Another finding is the effect of peptide net charge on the nucleation and growth of the Au nanoparticles. On the basis of these understandings, several multifunctional peptides were designed to synthesize gold nanoparticles in different morphologies (nanospheres and nanoplates) and with sizes tunable by the strategic placement of selected amino acid residues in the peptide sequence. The methodology presented here and the findings are useful for establishing the scientific basis for the rational design of peptides for the synthesis of metal nanostructures. PMID:20355728

  10. Constructing and random sequencing analysis of normalized cDNA library of testis tissue from oriental river prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hui; Fu, Hongtuo; Jin, Shubo; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Sufei; Gong, Yongsheng; Xiong, Yiwei

    2012-09-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. Sexual precocity is a serious problem because of genetic retrogression, which has negative effects on product quality and dramatically affects price. Culture of all-male populations of this species would be economically advantageous, as the males grow faster and reach a much larger size than females. Developing such a culture scheme will require discovery of sex- or reproduction-related genes that affect sexual maturity and sex determination. In this study, a high-quality normalized testis cDNA library was constructed to identify novel transcripts. Of the 5280 successful sequencing reaction yields, 5202 expressed tagged sequences (ESTs) with an average length of 954 bp. Ultimately, 3677 unique sequences, including 891 contigs and 2786 singletons, were identified based on cluster and assembly analyses. Sixteen hundred (43.5%) genes were novel based on the NCBI protein database, thus these unidentified genes may improve basic molecular knowledge about M. nipponense. Of the novel unigenes, 34.4% (715/2077) were homologous to insects, such as Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila spp. and Apis mellifera. Fifty-two genes were identified as sex- or reproduction-related based on Gene Ontology classification and sequence comparison with data from other publications. These genes can be classified into groups based on different functions, including 10 sex-determination related genes, 8 male-reproductive genes, 5 cathepsin-related genes, 20 ubiquitin-related genes, 5 ferritin-related genes, and 4 LRR genes. The results of this study provide new sequence information about M. nipponense, which will be the basis for further genetic studies of this species and other decapods crustaceans. PMID:22632994

  11. Screening and Antiviral Analysis of Phages That Display Peptides with an Affinity to Subunit C of Porcine Aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Feng, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purified C subunit of the recombinant porcine aminopeptidase N (rpAPN-C) protein was used as an immobilized target to screen potential ligands against rpAPN-C from a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of biopanning, five phage clones showed specific binding affinities to rpAPN-C. In 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, the phage clone PM1, which contained the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence, had a protective effect against TGEV infection in swine testis cells. Therefore, the HDAISWTHYHPW peptide sequence has a potential use as a small molecular therapeutic agent against TGEV infection. PMID:24111863

  12. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  13. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name, "LJ" launched…

  14. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C; Adamski, Carolyn J; Gibbs, Richard A; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn(2+)-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  15. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  16. Library Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Patricia; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes nine articles that discuss cooperative library networking in Illinois. Highlights include library systems as cooperative agencies; PALI (Private Academic Libraries of Illinois); rural school and public library development; systemwide users; regional medical libraries; virtual libraries and the Coalition for Networked Information; a…

  17. [Reducing the side effects of aggressive chemotherapy (cisplatin and epirubicin) with xenogenic peptides (factor AF2) in patients with hormone refractory metastatic prostate cancer. A prospective, randomized study].

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, I; Wand, H

    1989-06-01

    The indication of a chemotherapy is advisable with patients who are suffering from a progressively metastasised, secondarily hormone refractory carcinoma of the prostate. In search of efficient chemotherapy protocols we combined cisplatin with epirubicin (PE scheme) in our clinic. Massive side effects of that aggressive chemotherapy scheme like gastro-intestinal trouble and myelotoxicity are the limiting factors of the scheme. With measures like reducing the dosage, delaying the next cycle, or breaking off the therapy the effective dosage can often not be achieved. The anti-emetics which are usually used today exclusively give anti-emetic protection. The additional administration of xenogenic peptides (Factor AF2) had additionally myeloprotective effect in former studies. In this study we examined whether, by additionally giving Factor AF2, the patients' subjective condition, and above all their hemogram, could be stabilised in order to achieve the effective dosage or dosage intensity. For that, the patients were prospectively randomised in two groups by means of a random selection board. The analysis of the data gained in the protocol showed that the additional administration of Factor AF2 improves the patients' subjective conditions significantly. Apart from that, we noticed a considerable reduction of the vomiting frequency. Concerning the objective measured parameters of the leukocytes, thrombocytes, erythrocytes, and the hemoglobin level, the significantly myeloprotective effect of Factor AF2 could be proved. Due to the fact that in the verum group there were considerably fewer cases of breaking off or delays of the treatment than in the control group, the effective dosage intensity could be achieved with a higher number of patients in that group. PMID:2691943

  18. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  19. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  20. Effects of Green Tea Extract on Insulin Resistance and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Lipid Abnormalities: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Yu; Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Lin-Huang; Chen, I-Ju; Chiu, Jung-Peng; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of green tea extract on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid abnormalities on glycemic and lipid profiles, and hormone peptides by a double-blinded, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial. This trial enrolled 92 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid abnormalities randomized into 2 arms, each arm comprising 46 participants. Of the participants, 39 in therapeutic arm took 500 mg green tea extract, three times a day, while 38 in control arm took cellulose with the same dose and frequency to complete the 16-week study. Anthropometrics measurements, glycemic and lipid profiles, safety parameters, and obesity-related hormone peptides were analyzed at screening and after 16-week course. Within-group comparisons showed that green tea extract caused a significant decrease in triglyceride and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index after 16 weeks. Green tea extract also increased significantly high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The HOMA-IR index decreased from 5.4±3.9 to 3.5±2.0 in therapeutic arm only. Adiponectin, apolipoprotein A1, and apolipoprotein B100 increased significantly in both arms, but only glucagon-like peptide 1 increased in the therapeutic arm. However, only decreasing trend in triglyceride was found in between-group comparison. Our study suggested that green tea extract significantly improved insulin resistance and increased glucagon-like peptide 1 only in within-group comparison. The potential effects of green tea extract on insulin resistance and glucagon-like peptide 1 warrant further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01360567 PMID:24614112

  1. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells. PMID:23792224

  2. Unique diversity of the venom peptides from the scorpion Androctonus bicolor revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Wanxia; Zeng, Xian-Chun; Ge, Feng; Yang, Mingkun; Nie, Yao; Bao, Aorigele; Wu, Shifen; E, Guoji

    2015-10-14

    Androctonus bicolor is one of the most poisonous scorpion species in the world. However, little has been known about the venom composition of the scorpion. To better understand the molecular diversity and medical significance of the venom from the scorpion, we systematically analyzed the venom components by combining transcriptomic and proteomic surveys. Random sequencing of 1000 clones from a cDNA library prepared from the venom glands of the scorpion revealed that 70% of the total transcripts code for venom peptide precursors. Our efforts led to a discovery of 103 novel putative venom peptides. These peptides include NaTx-like, KTx-like and CaTx-like peptides, putative antimicrobial peptides, defensin-like peptides, BPP-like peptides, BmKa2-like peptides, Kunitz-type toxins and some new-type venom peptides without disulfide bridges, as well as many new-type venom peptides that are cross-linked with one, two, three, five or six disulfide bridges, respectively. We also identified three peptides that are identical to known toxins from scorpions. The venom was also analyzed using a proteomic technique. The presence of a total of 16 different venom peptides was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The discovery of a wide range of new and new-type venom peptides highlights the unique diversity of the venom peptides from A. bicolor. These data also provide a series of novel templates for the development of therapeutic drugs for treating ion channel-associated diseases and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens, and offer molecular probes for the exploration of structures and functions of various ion channels. PMID:26254009

  3. Identification of peptides that inhibit regulator of G protein signaling 4 function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Young, Kathleen H

    2008-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) that interact with heterotrimeric G proteins in the negative regulation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. RGS4, the first identified mammalian member of the RGS family, has been implicated in many GPCR signaling pathways involved in disease states. We report herein the identification of a 16-amino-acid peptide (P17) as an inhibitor of RGS4. The peptide was found by screening a random peptide library using RGS4 as 'bait' in a yeast two-hybrid system. This peptide inhibited RGS4 GAP activity on Galpha(i1)in a GTPase assay, and blocked the interaction between RGS4 and Galpha(i1)in a pull-down assay. The peptide displayed dose-dependent inhibition of RGS4 and Galpha-interacting protein (GAIP) GAP activities, yet showed no substantial effect on RGS7. Electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that P17 attenuates RGS4 modulation of M(2) muscarinic receptor stimulation of GIRK (G-protein-mediated inwardly rectifying potassium) channels. Deletion of an arginine at the N terminus of P17 abolished its ability to inhibit RGS4 GAP activity, as did deletions of C-terminal residues. The P17 peptide showed no similarity to any known peptide sequence. Further investigation and optimization of the peptide may provide unique information for the development of RGS4 inhibitors for future therapeutic application. PMID:18547979

  4. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  5. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  6. Novel peptide recognized by RhoA GTPase.

    PubMed

    Drulis-Fajdasz, Dominika; Jelen, Filip; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    A phage-displayed random 7-mer disulfide bridge-constrained peptide library was used to map the surface of the RhoA GTPase and to find peptides able to recognize RhoA switch regions. Several peptide sequences were selected after four rounds of enrichment, giving a high signal in ELISA against RhoA-GDP. A detailed analysis of one such selected peptide, called R2 (CWSFPGYAC), is reported. The RhoA-R2 interaction was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, chemical denaturation, and determination of the kinetics of nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis in the presence of RhoA regulatory proteins. All measurements indicate that the affinity of the R2 peptide for RhoA is in the micromolar range and that R2 behaves as an inhibitor of: i) GDP binding to the apo form of RhoA (Mg2+-and nucleotide-free form of the GTPase), ii) nucleotide exchange stimulated by GEF (DH/PH tandem from PDZRhoGEF), and iii) GTP hydrolysis stimulated by the BH domain of GrafGAP protein. PMID:17019437

  7. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Krauson, Aram J; Hall, O Morgan; Fuselier, Taylor; Starr, Charles G; Kauffman, W Berkeley; Wimley, William C

    2015-12-30

    To better understand the sequence-structure-function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding-folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the "negative" peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  8. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the sequence–structure–function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding–folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the “negative” peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  9. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  10. Library 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    In fall 1984, the Georgia Institute of Technology administration and library staff began planning for Library 2000, a project aimed at creating a showcase library to demonstrate the application of the latest information technology in an academic and research environment. The purposes of Library 2000 include: increasing awareness of students,…

  11. Identification of a hexapeptide that mimics a conformation-dependent binding site of acetylcholine receptor by use of a phage-epitope library.

    PubMed Central

    Balass, M; Heldman, Y; Cabilly, S; Givol, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fuchs, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5.5 is directed against the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The epitope for this antibody is conformation-dependent, and the antibody does not react with synthetic peptides derived from the receptor sequence. We have identified a ligand peptide that mimics this conformation-dependent epitope from a phage-epitope library composed of filamentous phage displaying random hexapeptides. Among 38 positive phage clones, individually selected from the library, 34 positive clones carried the sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DLVWLL), 1 positive clone had the sequence Asp-Ile-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DIVWLL), and 3 positive clones expressed the sequence Leu-Ile-Glu-Trp-Leu-Leu (LIEWLL), none of which are significantly homologous with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit sequence. All of these phages bind specifically to mAb 5.5. The synthetic peptide DLVWLL inhibits binding of mAb 5.5 to the related peptide-presenting phage and to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 value is of the order of 10(-4) M. Bioactivity of the peptide "mimotope" DLVWLL was demonstrated in vivo in hatched chickens by inhibition of the mAb 5.5 effect by the peptide. The neuromuscular block and myasthenia gravis-like symptoms that are induced in chicken by passive transfer of mAb 5.5 were specifically abolished by DLVWLL. This study shows the potential of a random peptide phage-epitope library for selecting a mimotope for an antibody that recognizes a folded form of the protein, where peptides from the linear amino acid sequence of the protein are not applicable. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7504273

  12. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-03-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  13. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  14. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  15. Adoption of Library 2.0 Functionalities by Academic Libraries and Users: A Knowledge Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Mi; Abbas, June

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of Library 2.0 functionalities by academic libraries and users through a knowledge management perspective. Based on randomly selected 230 academic library Web sites and 184 users, the authors found RSS and blogs are widely adopted by academic libraries while users widely utilized the bookmark function.…

  16. Phage display selection of peptides that home to atherosclerotic plaques: IL-4 receptor as a candidate target in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hai-yan; Lee, Hwa Young; Kwak, Wonjung; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Na, Moon-Hee; So, In Seop; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Park, Heon-Sik; Huh, Seung; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kwon, Ick-Chan; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2008-01-01

    Imaging or drug delivery tools for atherosclerosis based on the plaque biology are still insufficient. Here, we attempted to identify peptides that selectively home to atherosclerotic plaques using phage display. A phage library containing random peptides was ex viv screened for binding to human atheroma tissues. After three to four rounds of selection, the DNA inserts of phage clones wer sequenced. A peptide sequence, CRKRLDRNC, was the most frequently occurring one. Intravenously injected phage displaying the CRKRLDRNC peptide was observed to home to atherosclerotic aortic tissues of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/–) mice at higher levels than to normal aortic tissues of wild-type mice. Moreover, a fluorescein- or radioisotope-conjugated synthetic CRKRLDRNC peptide, but not a control peptide, homed in vivo to atherosclerotic plaques in Ldlr−/– mice, while homing of the peptide to other organs such as brain was minimal. The homing peptide co-localized with endothelial cells, macrophages and smooth muscle cells a mouse and human atherosclerotic plaques. Homology search revealed that the CRKRLDRNC peptide shares a motif of interleukin-receptor (IL-4) that is critical for binding to its receptor. The peptide indeed co-localized with IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) at atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, the peptide bound to cultured cells expressing IL-4R on the cell surface and the binding was inhibited by the knock-down of IL-4R. These results show that the CRKRLDRNC peptide homes to atherosclerotic plaques through binding to IL-4R as its target and may be a useful tool for selective drug delivery and molecular imaging of atherosclerosis. PMID:19012727

  17. Short-term add-on therapy with angiotensin receptor blocker for end-stage inotrope-dependent heart failure patients: B-type natriuretic peptide reduction in a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Marcelo E; Brancalhão, Euler C O; Puig, Raphael S. N.; Vieira, Kelly R N; Cardoso, Juliano N; de Oliveira-Jr, Múcio Tavares; Barretto, Antonio C P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate angiotensin receptor blocker add-on therapy in patients with low cardiac output during decompensated heart failure. METHODS: We selected patients with decompensated heart failure, low cardiac output, dobutamine dependence, and an ejection fraction <0.45 who were receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. The patients were randomized to losartan or placebo and underwent invasive hemodynamic and B-type natriuretic peptide measurements at baseline and on the seventh day after intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01857999. RESULTS: We studied 10 patients in the losartan group and 11 patients in the placebo group. The patient characteristics were as follows: age 52.7 years, ejection fraction 21.3%, dobutamine infusion 8.5 mcg/kg.min, indexed systemic vascular resistance 1918.0 dynes.sec/cm5.m2, cardiac index 2.8 L/min.m2, and B-type natriuretic peptide 1,403 pg/mL. After 7 days of intervention, there was a 37.4% reduction in the B-type natriuretic peptide levels in the losartan group compared with an 11.9% increase in the placebo group (mean difference, -49.1%; 95% confidence interval: -88.1 to -9.8%, p = 0.018). No significant difference was observed in the hemodynamic measurements. CONCLUSION: Short-term add-on therapy with losartan reduced B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients hospitalized for decompensated severe heart failure and low cardiac output with inotrope dependence. PMID:24838894

  18. A mix-and-read drop-based in vitro two-hybrid method for screening high-affinity peptide binders.

    PubMed

    Cui, Naiwen; Zhang, Huidan; Schneider, Nils; Tao, Ye; Asahara, Haruichi; Sun, Zhiyi; Cai, Yamei; Koehler, Stephan A; de Greef, Tom F A; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Drop-based microfluidics have recently become a novel tool by providing a stable linkage between phenotype and genotype for high throughput screening. However, use of drop-based microfluidics for screening high-affinity peptide binders has not been demonstrated due to the lack of a sensitive functional assay that can detect single DNA molecules in drops. To address this sensitivity issue, we introduced in vitro two-hybrid system (IVT2H) into microfluidic drops and developed a streamlined mix-and-read drop-IVT2H method to screen a random DNA library. Drop-IVT2H was based on the correlation between the binding affinity of two interacting protein domains and transcriptional activation of a fluorescent reporter. A DNA library encoding potential peptide binders was encapsulated with IVT2H such that single DNA molecules were distributed in individual drops. We validated drop-IVT2H by screening a three-random-residue library derived from a high-affinity MDM2 inhibitor PMI. The current drop-IVT2H platform is ideally suited for affinity screening of small-to-medium-sized libraries (10(3)-10(6)). It can obtain hits within a single day while consuming minimal amounts of reagents. Drop-IVT2H simplifies and accelerates the drop-based microfluidics workflow for screening random DNA libraries, and represents a novel alternative method for protein engineering and in vitro directed protein evolution. PMID:26940078

  19. A mix-and-read drop-based in vitro two-hybrid method for screening high-affinity peptide binders

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Naiwen; Zhang, Huidan; Schneider, Nils; Tao, Ye; Asahara, Haruichi; Sun, Zhiyi; Cai, Yamei; Koehler, Stephan A.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David A.; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Drop-based microfluidics have recently become a novel tool by providing a stable linkage between phenotype and genotype for high throughput screening. However, use of drop-based microfluidics for screening high-affinity peptide binders has not been demonstrated due to the lack of a sensitive functional assay that can detect single DNA molecules in drops. To address this sensitivity issue, we introduced in vitro two-hybrid system (IVT2H) into microfluidic drops and developed a streamlined mix-and-read drop-IVT2H method to screen a random DNA library. Drop-IVT2H was based on the correlation between the binding affinity of two interacting protein domains and transcriptional activation of a fluorescent reporter. A DNA library encoding potential peptide binders was encapsulated with IVT2H such that single DNA molecules were distributed in individual drops. We validated drop-IVT2H by screening a three-random-residue library derived from a high-affinity MDM2 inhibitor PMI. The current drop-IVT2H platform is ideally suited for affinity screening of small-to-medium-sized libraries (103–106). It can obtain hits within a single day while consuming minimal amounts of reagents. Drop-IVT2H simplifies and accelerates the drop-based microfluidics workflow for screening random DNA libraries, and represents a novel alternative method for protein engineering and in vitro directed protein evolution. PMID:26940078

  20. Libraries for genomic SELEX.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, B S; Shtatland, T; Brown, D; Gold, L

    1997-01-01

    An increasing number of proteins are being identified that regulate gene expression by binding specific nucleic acidsin vivo. A method termed genomic SELEX facilitates the rapid identification of networks of protein-nucleic acid interactions by identifying within the genomic sequences of an organism the highest affinity sites for any protein of the organism. As with its progenitor, SELEX of random-sequence nucleic acids, genomic SELEX involves iterative binding, partitioning, and amplification of nucleic acids. The two methods differ in that the variable region of the nucleic acid library for genomic SELEX is derived from the genome of an organism. We have used a quick and simple method to construct Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and human genomic DNA PCR libraries that can be transcribed with T7 RNA polymerase. We present evidence that the libraries contain overlapping inserts starting at most of the positions within the genome, making these libraries suitable for genomic SELEX. PMID:9016629

  1. Special Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavendel, Giuliana

    1977-01-01

    Discusses problems involved in maintaining special scientific or engineering libraries, including budget problems, remote storage locations, rental computer retrieval systems, protecting trade secrets, and establishing a magnetic tape library. (MLH)

  2. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karin; Kuhlthau, Carol C.; Branch, Jennifer L.; Solowan, Diane Galloway; Case, Roland; Abilock, Debbie; Eisenberg, Michael B.; Koechlin, Carol; Zwaan, Sandi; Hughes, Sandra; Low, Ann; Litch, Margaret; Lowry, Cindy; Irvine, Linda; Stimson, Margaret; Schlarb, Irene; Wilson, Janet; Warriner, Emily; Parsons, Les; Luongo-Orlando, Katherine; Hamilton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Includes 19 articles that address issues related to library skills and Canadian school libraries. Topics include information literacy; inquiry learning; critical thinking and electronic research; collaborative inquiry; information skills and the Big 6 approach to problem solving; student use of online databases; library skills; Internet accuracy;…

  3. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  4. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  5. Peptide modulators of alpha-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Roskar, Irena; Molek, Peter; Vodnik, Miha; Stempelj, Mateja; Strukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Acute glucose fluctuations during the postprandial period pose great risk for cardiovascular complications and thus represent an important therapeutic approach in type 2 diabetes. In the present study, screening of peptide libraries was used to select peptides with an affinity towards mammalian intestinal alpha-glucosidase as potential leads in antidiabetic agent development. Materials and Methods Three phage-displayed peptide libraries were used in independent selections with different elution strategies to isolate target-binding peptides. Selected peptides displayed on phage were tested to compete for an enzyme-binding site with known competitive inhibitors, acarbose and voglibose. The four best performing peptides were synthesized. Their binding to the mammalian alpha-glucosidase and their effect on enzyme activity were evaluated. Results Two linear and two cyclic heptapeptides with high affinity towards intestinal alpha-glucosidase were selected. Phage-displayed as well as synthetic peptides bind into or to the vicinity of the active site on the enzyme. Both cyclic peptides inhibited enzyme activity, whereas both linear peptides increased enzyme activity. Conclusions Although natural substrates of glycosidase are polysaccharides, in the present study we successfully isolated novel peptide modulators of alpha-glucosidase. Modulatory activity of selected peptides could be further optimized through peptidomimetic design. They represent promising leads for development of efficient alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:26543535

  6. High Capsid–Genome Correlation Facilitates Creation of AAV Libraries for Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; van Bakel, Harm; Hajjar, Roger J; Weber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Directed evolution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) through successive rounds of phenotypic selection is a powerful method to isolate variants with improved properties from large libraries of capsid mutants. Importantly, AAV libraries used for directed evolution are based on the “natural” AAV genome organization where the capsid proteins are encoded in cis from replicating genomes. This is necessary to allow the recovery of the capsid DNA after each step of phenotypic selection. For directed evolution to be used successfully, it is essential to minimize the random mixing of capsomers and the encapsidation of nonmatching viral genomes during the production of the viral libraries. Here, we demonstrate that multiple AAV capsid variants expressed from Rep/Cap containing viral genomes result in near-homogeneous capsids that display an unexpectedly high capsid–DNA correlation. Next-generation sequencing of AAV progeny generated by bulk transfection of a semi-random peptide library showed a strong counter-selection of capsid variants encoding premature stop codons, which further supports a strong capsid–genome identity correlation. Overall, our observations demonstrate that production of “natural” AAVs results in low capsid mosaicism and high capsid–genome correlation. These unique properties allow the production of highly diverse AAV libraries in a one-step procedure with a minimal loss in phenotype–genotype correlation. PMID:25586687

  7. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  8. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  9. A randomized, controlled comparative study of the wrinkle reduction benefits of a cosmetic niacinamide/peptide/retinyl propionate product regimen vs. a prescription 0·02% tretinoin product regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fu, JJJ; Hillebrand, GG; Raleigh, P; Li, J; Marmor, MJ; Bertucci, V; Grimes, PE; Mandy, SH; Perez, MI; Weinkle, SH; Kaczvinsky, JR

    2010-01-01

    Background Tretinoin is considered the benchmark prescription topical therapy for improving fine facial wrinkles, but skin tolerance issues can affect patient compliance. In contrast, cosmetic antiwrinkle products are well tolerated but are generally presumed to be less efficacious than tretinoin. Objectives To compare the efficacy of a cosmetic moisturizer regimen vs. a prescription regimen with 0·02% tretinoin for improving the appearance of facial wrinkles. Methods An 8-week, randomized, parallel-group study was conducted in 196 women with moderate to moderately severe periorbital wrinkles. Following 2 weeks washout, subjects on the cosmetic regimen (n=99) used a sun protection factor (SPF) 30 moisturizing lotion containing 5% niacinamide, peptides and antioxidants, a moisturizing cream containing niacinamide and peptides, and a targeted wrinkle product containing niacinamide, peptides and 0·3% retinyl propionate. Subjects on the prescription regimen (n=97) used 0·02% tretinoin plus moisturizing SPF 30 sunscreen. Subject cohorts (n=25) continued treatment for an additional 16 weeks. Changes in facial wrinkling were assessed by both expert grading and image analysis of digital images of subjects’ faces and by self-assessment questionnaire. Product tolerance was assessed via clinical erythema and dryness grading, subject self-assessment, and determinations of skin barrier integrity (transepidermal water loss) and stratum corneum protein changes. Results The cosmetic regimen significantly improved wrinkle appearance after 8 weeks relative to tretinoin, with comparable benefits after 24 weeks. The cosmetic regimen was significantly better tolerated than tretinoin through 8 weeks by all measures. Conclusions An appropriately designed cosmetic regimen can improve facial wrinkle appearance comparably with the benchmark prescription treatment, with improved tolerability. PMID:20374604

  10. Estimating the diversity of peptide populations from limited sequence data.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Soares, A.; Biosciences Division; BNL

    2003-03-01

    Combinatorial libraries of peptides such as those displayed on the surface of a bacteriophage particle have become widely used tools for characterizing protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. The quality of a library frequently depends on its completeness, or diversity -- the proportion of possible sequences actually present in the library. The diversity of these libraries is frequently quoted on the basis of phage titers that provide little information about their completeness. Here, an analytical expression for diversity is introduced and a method for estimating the diversity of a peptide library from the sequences of a limited number of the members of the library is demonstrated. The diversities of a number of computationally constructed and actual peptide libraries are estimated using this method.

  11. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Koichi; Sugawara, Shunichi; Saijo, Yasuo; Maemondo, Makoto; Sato, Atsushi; Takamori, Shinzo; Harada, Taishi; Sasada, Tetsuro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kishimoto, Junji; Yamada, Akira; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on Day 1) plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p = 0.42). Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS) in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed. PMID:27274999

  12. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  13. Libraries program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Congress authorized a library for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1879. The library was formally established in 1882 with the naming of the first librarian and began with a staff of three and a collection of 1,400 books. Today, the USGS Libraries Program is one of the world's largest Earth and natural science repositories and a resource of national significance used by researchers and the public worldwide.

  14. The Structure of a Thermophilic Kinase Shapes Fitness upon Random Circular Permutation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alicia M; Mehta, Manan M; Thomas, Emily E; Atkinson, Joshua T; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H; Liu, Shirley; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2016-05-20

    Proteins can be engineered for synthetic biology through circular permutation, a sequence rearrangement in which native protein termini become linked and new termini are created elsewhere through backbone fission. However, it remains challenging to anticipate a protein's functional tolerance to circular permutation. Here, we describe new transposons for creating libraries of randomly circularly permuted proteins that minimize peptide additions at their termini, and we use transposase mutagenesis to study the tolerance of a thermophilic adenylate kinase (AK) to circular permutation. We find that libraries expressing permuted AKs with either short or long peptides amended to their N-terminus yield distinct sets of active variants and present evidence that this trend arises because permuted protein expression varies across libraries. Mapping all sites that tolerate backbone cleavage onto AK structure reveals that the largest contiguous regions of sequence that lack cleavage sites are proximal to the phosphotransfer site. A comparison of our results with a range of structure-derived parameters further showed that retention of function correlates to the strongest extent with the distance to the phosphotransfer site, amino acid variability in an AK family sequence alignment, and residue-level deviations in superimposed AK structures. Our work illustrates how permuted protein libraries can be created with minimal peptide additions using transposase mutagenesis, and it reveals a challenge of maintaining consistent expression across permuted variants in a library that minimizes peptide additions. Furthermore, these findings provide a basis for interpreting responses of thermophilic phosphotransferases to circular permutation by calibrating how different structure-derived parameters relate to retention of function in a cellular selection. PMID:26976658

  15. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  16. Characterization of the sporulation control protein SsgA by use of an efficient method to create and screen random mutant libraries in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Traag, Bjørn A; Seghezzi, Nicolas; Vijgenboom, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2007-04-01

    Filamentous actinomycetes are commercially widely used as producers of natural products. However, the mycelial lifestyle of actinomycetes has been a major bottleneck in their commercialization, and screening is difficult due to their poor growth on microtiter plates. We previously demonstrated that the enhanced expression of the cell division activator protein SsgA results in the fragmented growth of streptomycetes, with enhanced growth rates and improved product formation. We here describe a novel and efficient method to create, maintain, and screen mutant libraries in streptomycetes and the application of this method for the functional analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgA. The variants were amplified directly from deep-frozen biomass suspensions. Around 800 ssgA variants, including single-amino-acid-substitution mutants corresponding to more than half of all SsgA residues, were analyzed for their abilities to restore sporulation to an ssgA mutant. The essential residues were clustered in three main sections, and hardly any were in the carboxy-terminal third of the protein. The majority of the crucial residues were conserved among all SsgA-like proteins (SALPs). However, the essential residues L29, D58, and S89 were conserved only in SsgA orthologues and not in other SALPs, suggesting an SsgA-specific function. PMID:17293502

  17. Privatizing Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  18. Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kate

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the issue of advocacy. Standing at the vanguard of literacy, library media specialists have a unique role. However, it is time for media specialists to advocate their services in a proactive way. If library media specialists cannot, both individually and collectively, put advocacy at the forefront, then students will suffer the…

  19. Library Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Keyes D.

    Chapter I provides a background and explains pertinent library lighting problems such as quality, function, aesthetics, intensity, and costs. Emphasis is on the quality and function of lighting for library users. Chapter II deals with the comments and answers to questions by persons who have a special interest and competence in the field of…

  20. Macintoshed Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.; John, Nancy R., Ed.

    Contributed by librarians from public, academic, school, and special libraries, the 17 essays in this collection describe ways in which the Apple Macintosh is used in their libraries: (1) "Workstations and the Apple Macintosh" (Edward J. Valauskas); (2) "The Macintosh Experience at Chesapeake College" (Liz Cooper); (3) "ANSEL Character Set for the…

  1. Library Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  2. Solution Structures of Two Homologous Venom Peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Loening, Nikolaus M.; Wilson, Zachary N.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Binford, Greta J.

    2013-01-01

    We present solution-state NMR structures for two putative venom peptides from Sicarius dolichocephalus. These peptides were identified from cDNA libraries created from venom gland mRNA and then recombinantly expressed. They are the first structures from any species of Sicarius spiders, and the first peptide structures for any haplogyne spiders. These peptides are homologous to one another, and while they have at most only 20% sequence identity with known venom peptides their structures follow the inhibitor cystine knot motif that has been found in a broad range of venom peptides. PMID:23342149

  3. Identification of amino acid residues involved in 4-chloroindole 3-hydroxylation by cytochrome P450 2A6 using screening of random libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Yan; Guengerich, F. Peter; Matse, Johannes H.; Chen, Jun; Wu, Zhong-Liu

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 2A6 is able to catalyze indole hydroxylation to form the blue dye indigo. The wild type P450 2A6 enzyme was randomly mutated throughout the whole open reading frame and screened using 4-chloroindole hydroxylation, a substituted indole selected from 30 indole compounds for enhanced color development. Mutants with up to 5-fold increases of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) and 2-fold increases in kcat were selected after two rounds of screening. Important residues located both in (e.g., Thr305) and outside the active site (e.g., Ser224) were identified. The study utilized a better substrate for "indigo assay" to obtain new information on the structure-functional relationship of P450 2A6 that was not revealed by previous mutagenesis studies with this enzyme. PMID:18984015

  4. Effects of the properties of short peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides on their internalization into cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Okochi, Mina; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kanie, Kei; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Peptides, especially intracellular functional peptides that can play a particular role inside a cell, have attracted attention as promising materials to control cell fate. However, hydrophilic materials like peptides are difficult for cells to internalize. Therefore, the screening and design of intracellular functional peptides are more difficult than that of extracellular ones. An effective high-throughput screening system for intracellular functional peptides has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate a novel peptide array system for screening intracellular functional peptides, in which both cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) domain and photo-cleavable linkers are used. By using this screening system, we determined how the cellular uptake properties of CPP-conjugated peptides varied depending on the properties of the conjugated peptides. We found that the internalization ability of CPP-conjugated peptides varied greatly depending on the property of the conjugated peptides, and anionic peptides drastically decreased the uptake ability. We summarized our data in a scatter diagram that plots hydrophobicity versus isoelectric point (pI) of conjugated peptides. These results define a peptide library suitable for screening of intracellular functional peptides. Thus, our system, including the diagram, is a promising tool for searching biological active molecules such as peptide-based drugs. PMID:26256261

  5. Effects of the properties of short peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides on their internalization into cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Okochi, Mina; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kanie, Kei; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Peptides, especially intracellular functional peptides that can play a particular role inside a cell, have attracted attention as promising materials to control cell fate. However, hydrophilic materials like peptides are difficult for cells to internalize. Therefore, the screening and design of intracellular functional peptides are more difficult than that of extracellular ones. An effective high-throughput screening system for intracellular functional peptides has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate a novel peptide array system for screening intracellular functional peptides, in which both cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) domain and photo-cleavable linkers are used. By using this screening system, we determined how the cellular uptake properties of CPP-conjugated peptides varied depending on the properties of the conjugated peptides. We found that the internalization ability of CPP-conjugated peptides varied greatly depending on the property of the conjugated peptides, and anionic peptides drastically decreased the uptake ability. We summarized our data in a scatter diagram that plots hydrophobicity versus isoelectric point (pI) of conjugated peptides. These results define a peptide library suitable for screening of intracellular functional peptides. Thus, our system, including the diagram, is a promising tool for searching biological active molecules such as peptide-based drugs. PMID:26256261

  6. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  7. Callpath Library

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, T.

    2013-11-09

    The "Callpath Library" is a software abstraction layer over a number of stack tracing utilities. It allows tool develoopers to conveniently represent and mNipulate call paths gathered fro U. Wisconsin's Stackwalker API and GNU Backtrace.

  8. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  9. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  10. Standards for British Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Reviews developments in British library standards since 1971, highlighting types of standards, public libraries, academic libraries (university, polytechnic, college), school libraries, and special libraries (hospital and health sciences, prison, subject specializations). Thirty-nine references are cited. (EJS)

  11. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  12. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  13. A chromosome 11 YAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Zhang, J.; Isaacs, C.M.; Nagafuchi, S.; Jani Sait, S.N.; Abel, K.J.; Higgins, M.J.; Nowak, N.J.; Shows, T.B. )

    1993-06-01

    A targeted yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for chromosome 11 has been constructed from the J1 cell line that carries a single human chromosome 11 within a hamster DNA background. Interspecies chimeric clones generated during construction of the library were detected during the screening process and eliminated from the library. Contig assembly becomes much less difficult using such a library as the complexity is decreased and the ends of the clone inserts can be rescued for walking to neighboring clones. The library contains > 1824 clones with an average insert length of 337 kb. This represents a fourfold coverage of chromosome 11 or a >95% chance of recovering a unique single-copy sequence from the library. Two hundred YAC clones were localized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and found to be randomly distributed along the chromosome. The library has been screened with probes for the chromosome 11 markers HBB, GLUR4, H19, and D11S193. Corresponding YAC clones have been isolated for each locus. This analysis has indicated that the library is unbiased, that cognate YAC clones can be recovered with chromosome 11 markers, and that extensive contig assembly should be feasible. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  14. The translation of recombinant proteins in E. coli can be improved by in silico generating and screening random libraries of a −70/+96 mRNA region with respect to the translation initiation codon

    PubMed Central

    Care, S.; Bignon, C.; Pelissier, M. C.; Blanc, E.; Canard, B.; Coutard, B.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant protein translation in Escherichia coli may be limited by stable (i.e. low free energy) secondary structures in the mRNA translation initiation region. To circumvent this issue, we have set-up a computer tool called ‘ExEnSo’ (Expression Enhancer Software) that generates a random library of 8192 sequences, calculates the free energy of secondary structures of each sequence in the −70/+96 region (base 1 is the translation initiation codon), and then selects the sequence having the highest free energy. The software uses this ‘optimized’ sequence to create a 5′ primer that can be used in PCR experiments to amplify the coding sequence of interest prior to sub-cloning into a prokaryotic expression vector. In this article, we report how ExEnSo was set-up and the results obtained with nine coding sequences with low expression levels in E. coli. The free energy of the −70/+96 region of all these coding sequences was increased compared to the non-optimized sequences. Moreover, the protein expression of eight out of nine of these coding sequences was increased in E. coli, indicating a good correlation between in silico and in vivo results. ExEnSo is available as a free online tool. PMID:18084029

  15. The Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Exenatide Inhibits Small Intestinal Motility, Flow, Transit, and Absorption of Glucose in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Thazhath, Sony S; Marathe, Chinmay S; Wu, Tongzhi; Chang, Jessica; Khoo, Joan; Kuo, Paul; Checklin, Helen L; Bound, Michelle J; Rigda, Rachael S; Crouch, Benjamin; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    The short-acting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide reduces postprandial glycemia, partly by slowing gastric emptying, although its impact on small intestinal function is unknown. In this study, 10 healthy subjects and 10 patients with type 2 diabetes received intravenous exenatide (7.5 μg) or saline (-30 to 240 min) in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Glucose (45 g), together with 5 g 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG) and 20 MBq (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid (total volume 200 mL), was given intraduodenally (t = 0-60 min; 3 kcal/min). Duodenal motility and flow were measured using a combined manometry-impedance catheter and small intestinal transit using scintigraphy. In both groups, duodenal pressure waves and antegrade flow events were fewer, and transit was slower with exenatide, as were the areas under the curves for serum 3-OMG and blood glucose concentrations. Insulin concentrations were initially lower with exenatide than with saline and subsequently higher. Nausea was greater in both groups with exenatide, but suppression of small intestinal motility and flow was observed even in subjects with little or no nausea. The inhibition of small intestinal motor function represents a novel mechanism by which exenatide can attenuate postprandial glycemia. PMID:26470783

  16. Recombinant Brain Natriuretic Peptide for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Nonemergent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention or Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinming; Xie, Yanan; He, Fang; Gao, Zihan; Hao, Yuming; Zu, Xiuguang; Chang, Liang; Li, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    The role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is unknown. This study aimed to investigate BNP's effect on CIN in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary angiography (CAG). The patients were randomized to BNP (0.005 μg/kg/min before contrast media (CM) exposure and saline hydration, n = 106) or saline hydration alone (n = 103). Cystatin C, serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were assessed at several time points. The primary endpoint was CIN incidence; secondary endpoint included changes in cystatin C, SCr, and eGFR. CIN incidence was significantly lower in the BNP group compared to controls (6.6% versus 16.5%, P = 0.025). In addition, a more significant deterioration of eGFR, cystatin C, and SCr from 48 h to 1 week (P < 0.05) was observed in controls compared to the BNP group. Although eGFR gradually deteriorated in both groups, a faster recovery was achieved in the BNP group. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that using >100 mL of CM (odds ratio: 4.36, P = 0.004) and BNP administration (odds ratio: 0.21, P = 0.006) were independently associated with CIN. Combined with hydration, exogenous BNP administration before CM effectively decreases CIN incidence in CKD patients. PMID:26949703

  17. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  18. Construction of Lasso Peptide Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuhan; Maksimov, Mikhail O; Link, A James

    2016-01-15

    Lasso peptides are a family of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) typified by an isopeptide-bonded macrocycle between the peptide N-terminus and an aspartate or glutamate side chain. The C-terminal portion of the peptide threads through the N-terminal macrocycle to give the characteristic lasso fold. Because of the inherent stability, both proteolytic and often thermal, of lasso peptides, we became interested in whether proteins could be fused to the free C-terminus of lasso peptides. Here, we demonstrate fusion of two model proteins, the artificial leucine zipper A1 and the superfolder variant of GFP, to the C-terminus of the lasso peptide astexin-1. Successful lasso cyclization of the N-terminus of these fusion proteins requires a flexible linker in between the C-terminus of the lasso peptide and the N-terminus of the protein of interest. The ability to fuse lasso peptides to a protein of interest is an important step toward phage and bacterial display systems for the high-throughput screening of lasso peptide libraries for new functions. PMID:26492187

  19. Phage-displayed peptide that mimics aflatoxins and its application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-03-13

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 μg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4-24 μg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60-120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  20. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  1. PEP-on-DEP: A competitive peptide-based disposable electrochemical aptasensor for renin diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Kawai, Keiko; Kitamura, Koichiro; Chikae, Miyuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ushijima, Hiromi; Tamiya, Eiichi; Yoneda, Takashi; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2016-10-15

    Antibody-based immunosensors are relatively less accessible to a wide variety of unreachable targets, such as low-molecular-weight biomarkers that represent a rich untapped source of disease-specific diagnostic information. Here, we present a peptide aptamer-based electrochemical sensor technology called 'PEP-on-DEP' to detect less accessible target molecules, such as renin, and to improve the quality of life. Peptide-based aptamers represent a relatively smart class of affinity binders and show great promise in biosensor development. Renin is involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure and is an emerging biomarker protein for predicting cardiovascular risk and prognosis. To our knowledge, no studies have described aptamer molecules that can be used as new potent probes for renin. Here, we describe a portable electrochemical biosensor platform based on the newly identified peptide aptamer molecules for renin. We constructed a randomized octapeptide library pool with diversified sequences and selected renin specific peptide aptamers using cDNA display technology. We identified a few peptide aptamer sequences with a KD in the µM binding affinity range for renin. Next, we grafted the selected peptide aptamers onto gold nanoparticles and detected renin in a one-step competitive assay using our originally developed DEP (Disposable Electrochemical Printed) chip and a USB powered portable potentiostat system. We successfully detected renin in as little as 300ngmL(-1) using the PEP-on-DEP method. Thus, the generation and characterization of novel probes for unreachable target molecules by merging a newly identified peptide aptamer with electrochemical transduction allowed for the development of a more practical biosensor that, in principle, can be adapted to develop a portable, low-cost and mass-producible biosensor for point-of-care applications. PMID:26746799

  2. Efficacy and Safety of 1-Hour Infusion of Recombinant Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guogan; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Yishi; Liu, Wenxian; Bai, Shugong; Zhen, Yang; Li, Dongye; Yang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Hong, Lang; Sun, Jianhui; Chen, Junzhu; Wang, Xian; Zhu, Jihong; Hu, Dayi; Li, Huimin; Wu, Tongguo; Huang, Jie; Tan, Huiqiong; Zhang, Jian; Liao, Zhongkai; Yu, Litian; Mao, Yi; Ye, Shaodong; Feng, Lei; Hua, Yihong; Ni, Xinhai; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Wei; Luan, Xiaojun; Sun, Xiaolu; Wang, Sijia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1-h infusion of recombinant human atrial natriuretic peptide (rhANP) in combination with standard therapy in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF).This was a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Eligible patients with ADHF were randomized to receive a 1-h infusion of either rhANP or placebo at a ratio of 3:1 in combination with standard therapy. The primary endpoint was dyspnea improvement (a decrease of at least 2 grades of dyspnea severity at 12 h from baseline). Reduction in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) 1 h after infusion was the co-primary endpoint for catheterized patients. Overall, 477 patients were randomized: 358 (93 catheterized) patients received rhANP and 118 (28 catheterized) received placebo. The percentage of patients with dyspnea improvement at 12 h was higher, although not statistically significant, in the rhANP group than in the placebo group (32.0% vs 25.4%, odds ratio=1.382, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.863-2.212, P = 0.17). Reduction in PCWP at 1 h was significantly greater in patients treated with rhANP than in patients treated with placebo (-7.74 ± 5.95 vs -1.82 ± 4.47 mm Hg, P < 0.001). The frequencies of adverse events and renal impairment within 3 days of treatment were similar between the 2 groups. Mortality at 1 month was 3.1% in the rhANP group vs 2.5% in the placebo group (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.34-4.26; P > 0.99).1-h rhANP infusion appears to result in prompt, transient hemodynamic improvement with a small, nonsignificant, effect on dyspnea in ADHF patients receiving standard therapy. The safety of 1-h infusion of rhANP seems to be acceptable. (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform [ICTRP] number, ChiCTR-IPR-14005719.). PMID:26945407

  3. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  4. Phages harboring specific peptides that recognize the N protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus distinguish the virus from other viruses.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaofeng; Wang, Mingcui; Yin, Jiechao; Li, Guangxing

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to develop a novel diagnostic test for detecting porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) using phage display technology. The N gene of PRRSV isolate HH08 was cloned following reverse transcription-PCR. Sequence comparison indicated that the N gene shared 96.4% homology to that of North American PRRSV (isolate VR2332) and 35.5% with that of European PRRSV (isolate LV), indicating that the PRRSV isolate was related to the North American PRRSV genotype. The bacterially expressed N protein was used as a target in a biopanning process using a phage display random peptide library. Seven phages expressing different peptides had a specific binding activity with the N protein. The putative binding motifs were identified by DNA sequencing. More importantly, the selected phages harboring specific peptides that recognize the N protein of PRRSV were able to efficiently distinguish PRRSV from other viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:20237096

  5. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  6. CMSU Library Usage: Telephone Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Barbara; And Others

    The Assessment Committee of Library Services at Central Missouri State University conducted a telephone survey of 500 (41.2% completion rate) university students. The goals were to use a random sampling in order to gain more information regarding usage patterns of library services; to identify factors which inhibit patron use; and to reveal…

  7. Peptide-Like Molecules (PLMs): A Journey from Peptide Bond Isosteres to Gramicidin S Mimetics and Mitochondrial Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Peter; Xiao, Jingbo; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are natural ligands and substrates for receptors and enzymes and exhibit broad physiological effects. However, their use as therapeutic agents often suffers from poor bioavailability and insufficient membrane permeability. The success of peptide mimicry hinges on the ability of bioisosteres, in particular peptide bond replacements, to adopt suitable secondary structures relevant to peptide strands and position functional groups in equivalent space. This perspective highlights past and ongoing studies in our group that involve new methods development as well as specific synthetic library preparations and applications in chemical biology, with the goal to enhance the use of alkene and cyclopropane peptide bond isosteres. PMID:20725595

  8. Library Venturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, H. Donald

    1986-01-01

    There is opportunity for service and profit to imaginative libraries organizing to provide new forms of knowledge. Librarians as entrepreneurs must learn venture management and finance. Available assistance includes growing entrepreneural understanding in large institutions; family and friends; private wealth-seeking investment; new business…

  9. Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Building data is given for the following public libraries: New York, New York; Blue Island, Illinois; Corte Madera, California; Muskogee, Oklahoma: Charlotte, North Carolina; Washington, D.C.; Houston, Texas; Albermarle, North Carolina; Spokane, Washington; and Hemet, California. (Author/NH)

  10. Library Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Computers in Libraries, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special section includes two articles that review products and services for the automated library environment. Highlights include ergonomic products; products for visually, hearing-, and speech-impaired users; analog film recorders; computer filters; document imaging systems; electric filing systems; and printers. A list of vendors is…