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Sample records for rankl-induced osteoclast differentiation

  1. Dual Effect of Cyanidin on RANKL-Induced Differentiation and Fusion of Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ce; Li, Jianmei; Kang, Fei; Cao, Zhen; Yang, Xiaochao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Xiang, Junyu; Xu, Jianzhong; Dong, Shiwu

    2016-03-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or monocyte/macrophage progenitor cells and formed by osteoclasts precursors (OCPs) fusion. Cyanidin is an anthocyanin widely distributed in food diet with novel antioxidant activity. However, the effect of cyanidin on osteoclasts is still unknown. We investigated the effect of cyanidin on RANKL-induced osteoclasts differentiation and cell fusion. The results showed that cyanidin had a dual effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Lower dosage of cyanidin (< 1 µg/ml) has a promoting effect on osteoclastogenesis while higher dosage of cyanidin (> 10 µg/ml) has an inhibitory effect. Fusogenic genes like CD9, ATP6v0d2, DC-STAMP, OC-STAMP, and osteoclasts related genes like NFATc1, mitf, and c-fos were all regulated by cyanidin consistent to its dual effect. Further exploration showed that low concentration of cyanidin could increase osteoclasts fusion whereas higher dosage of cyanidin lead to the increase of LXR-β expression and activation which is suppressive to osteoclasts differentiaton. All these results showed that cyanidin exhibits therapeutic potential in prevention of osteoclasts related bone disorders. PMID:25545964

  2. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  3. Relationship between fluoride exposure and osteoclast markers during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Junrui, Pei; Bingyun, Li; Yanhui, Gao; Xu, Jiaxun; Darko, Gottfried M; Dianjun, Sun

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal fluorosis is a metabolic bone disease caused by excessive accumulation of fluoride. Although the cause of this disease is known, the mechanism by which fluoride accumulates on the bone has not been clearly defined, thus there are no markers that can be used for screening skeletal fluorosis in epidemiology. In this study, osteoclasts were formed from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice-treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), calcitonin receptor (CTR), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and cathepsin K (CK) were detected using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed that fluoride between 0.5 and 8mg/l had no effect on osteoclast formation. However fluoride at 0.5mg/l level significantly decreased the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Fluoride concentration was negatively correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. On day 5 of osteoclast differentiation maturity, MMP9 and CK mRNA expression were not only negatively correlated with fluoride concentration, but directly correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR mRNA expression were positively correlated with the number of osteoclast and they had no correlation with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Thus, it can be seen that MMP9 and CK may reflect the change of activity of bone resorption as well the degree of fluoride exposure. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR can represent the change of number of osteoclast formed. PMID:27500448

  4. The effects of Lycii Radicis Cortex on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JAE-HYUN; KIM, EUN-YOUNG; LEE, BINA; MIN, JU-HEE; SONG, DEA-UK; LIM, JEONG-MIN; EOM, JI WHAN; YEOM, MIJUNG; JUNG, HYUK-SANG; SOHN, YOUNGJOO

    2016-01-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a serious age-related disease. After the menopause, estrogen deficiency is common, and excessive osteoclast activity causes osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells generated from the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage precursor cells such as RAW 264.7 cells. The water extract of Lycii Radicis Cortex (LRC) is made from the dried root bark of Lycium chinense Mill. and is termed 'Jigolpi' in Korea. Its effects on osteoclastogenesis and post-menopausal osteoporosis had not previously been tested. In the present study, the effect of LRC on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was demonstrated using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and pit formation assay. Moreover, in order to analyze molecular mechanisms, we studied osteoclastogenesis-related markers such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), c-Fos, receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), TRAP, cathepsin K (CTK), matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), calcitonin receptor (CTR) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) using RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. Additionally, we also determined the effect of LRC on an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. We noted that LRC inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via suppressing osteoclastogenesis-related markers. It also inhibited osteoporosis in the OVX rat model by decreasing loss of bone density and trabecular area. These results suggest that LRC exerts a positive effect on menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26848104

  5. The effects of Lycii Radicis Cortex on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activation in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Bina; Min, Ju-Hee; Song, Dea-Uk; Lim, Jeong-Min; Eom, Ji Whan; Yeom, Mijung; Jung, Hyuk-Sang; Sohn, Youngjoo

    2016-03-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a serious age-related disease. After the menopause, estrogen deficiency is common, and excessive osteoclast activity causes osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells generated from the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage precursor cells such as RAW 264.7 cells. The water extract of Lycii Radicis Cortex (LRC) is made from the dried root bark of Lycium chinense Mill. and is termed 'Jigolpi' in Korea. Its effects on osteoclastogenesis and post‑menopausal osteoporosis had not previously been tested. In the present study, the effect of LRC on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was demonstrated using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and pit formation assay. Moreover, in order to analyze molecular mechanisms, we studied osteoclastogenesis-related markers such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), c-Fos, receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), TRAP, cathepsin K (CTK), matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), calcitonin receptor (CTR) and carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ (CAII) using RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. Additionally, we also determined the effect of LRC on an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. We noted that LRC inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via suppressing osteoclastogenesis-related markers. It also inhibited osteoporosis in the OVX rat model by decreasing loss of bone density and trabecular area. These results suggest that LRC exerts a positive effect on menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26848104

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura Extract on RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong Ryun; Hwang, Jin-Ki; Erkhembaatar, Munkhsoyol; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kim, Min Seuk; Lee, Young-Rae; Lee, Seoung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura, known as "Gujulcho" in Korea, has been used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. However, these effects have not been tested on osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells that regulate bone metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of C. zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura ethanol extract (CZE) on osteoclast differentiation induced by treatment with the receptor activator of NF- κ B ligand (RANKL). CZE inhibited osteoclast differentiation and formation in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of CZE on osteoclastogenesis was due to the suppression of ERK activation and the ablation of RANKL-stimulated Ca(2+)-oscillation via the inactivation of PLC γ 2, followed by the inhibition of CREB activation. These inhibitory effects of CZE resulted in a significant repression of c-Fos expression and a subsequent reduction of NFATc1, a key transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation, fusion, and activation in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that CZE negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various bone diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. PMID:24174976

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura Extract on RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dong Ryun; Hwang, Jin-Ki; Erkhembaatar, Munkhsoyol; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Lee, Young-Rae; Lee, Seoung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura, known as “Gujulcho” in Korea, has been used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. However, these effects have not been tested on osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells that regulate bone metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of C. zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura ethanol extract (CZE) on osteoclast differentiation induced by treatment with the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). CZE inhibited osteoclast differentiation and formation in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of CZE on osteoclastogenesis was due to the suppression of ERK activation and the ablation of RANKL-stimulated Ca2+-oscillation via the inactivation of PLCγ2, followed by the inhibition of CREB activation. These inhibitory effects of CZE resulted in a significant repression of c-Fos expression and a subsequent reduction of NFATc1, a key transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation, fusion, and activation in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that CZE negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various bone diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. PMID:24174976

  8. A novel PPAR{gamma} agonist, KR62776, suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activity by inhibiting MAP kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ju-Young; Bae, Myung-Ae; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong; Kim, Sung Soo; Hong, Jung-Min; Kim, Tae-Ho; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Lim, Jiwon; Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Shin, Hong-In; Kim, Shin-Yoon Park, Eui Kyun

    2009-01-16

    We investigated the effects of a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, KR62776, on osteoclast differentiation and function, and on the underlying signaling pathways. KR62776 markedly suppressed differentiation into osteoclasts in various osteoclast model systems, including bone marrow mononuclear (BMM) cells and a co-culture of calvarial osteoblasts and BMM cells. KR62776 suppressed the activation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and the expression of genes associated with osteoclast differentiation, such as TRAP, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), and osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR). Furthermore, KR62776 reduced resorption pit formation in osteoclasts, and down-regulated genes essential for osteoclast activity, such as Src and {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin. An analysis of a signaling pathway showed that KR62776 inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). Together, these results demonstrate that KR62776 negatively affects osteoclast differentiation and activity by inhibiting the RANKL-induced activation of MAP kinases and NF-{kappa}B.

  9. Aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB and NFATc1 activation and DC-STAMP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang-zhou; He, Long-gang; Wang, Song; Wang, Keng; Zhang, Yue-yang; Tao, Lei; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aconiti Lateralis Radix Preparata is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat chronic arthritis and is highly effective against rheumatoid arthritis. However, the effects of aconine, a derivative of aconitum alkaloids, on osteoclasts, which can absorb bone, remain unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of aconine on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro. Methods: The viability of mouse leukemic monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was measured using CCK-8 assays. Osteoclast differentiation was induced by incubation of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of RANKL, and assessed with TRAP staining assay. Bone resorption was examined with bone resorption pits assay. The expression of relevant genes and proteins was analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blots. The activation of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was examined using stable NF-κB and NFATc1 luciferase reporter gene systems, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Aconine (0.125, 0.25 μmol/L) did not affect the viability of RAW264.7 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity. Furthermore, aconine dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells, and subsequently reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific genes (c-Src, β3-Integrin, cathepsin K and MMP-9) and the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), which played an important role in cell-cell fusion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 and the expression of the cell-cell fusion molecule DC-STAMP. PMID:26592521

  10. Ethanol Extracts of Fresh Davallia formosana (WL1101) Inhibit Osteoclast Differentiation by Suppressing RANKL-Induced Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Hung; Yang, Rong-Sen; Wang, Kuan-Chin; Lu, Dai-Hua; Liou, Houng-Chi; Ma, Yun; Chang, Shao-Han; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The rhizome of Davallia formosana is commonly used to treat bone disease including bone fracture, arthritis, and osteoporosis in Chinese herbal medicine. Here, we report the effects of WL1101, the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. In addition, excess activated bone-resorbing osteoclasts play crucial roles in inflammation-induced bone loss diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this study, we examined the effects of WL1101 on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Treatment with WL1101 significantly inhibited RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. Two isolated active compounds, ((−)-epicatechin) or WL14 (4-hydroxy-3-aminobenzoic acid) could also inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. WL1101 suppressed the RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and nuclear translocation, which is the key process during osteoclastogenesis, by inhibiting the activation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα. In animal model, oral administration of WL1101 (50 or 200 mg/kg/day) effectively decreased the excess bone resorption and significantly antagonized the trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized rats. Our results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts of fresh rhizomes of Davallia formosana inhibit osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of NF-κB activation and effectively ameliorate ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. WL1101 may thus have therapeutic potential for the treatment of diseases associated with excessive osteoclastic activity. PMID:24191169

  11. Inhibitory Effects of KP-A159, a Thiazolopyridine Derivative, on Osteoclast Differentiation, Function, and Inflammatory Bone Loss via Suppression of RANKL-Induced MAP Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ihn, Hye Jung; Lee, Doohyun; Lee, Taeho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Hong-In; Bae, Yong Chul; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Eui Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally elevated formation and activation of osteoclasts are primary causes for a majority of skeletal diseases. In this study, we found that KP-A159, a newly synthesized thiazolopyridine derivative, inhibited osteoclast differentiation and function in vitro, and inflammatory bone loss in vivo. KP-A159 did not cause a cytotoxic response in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), but significantly inhibited the formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts induced by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). KP-A159 also dramatically inhibited the expression of marker genes related to osteoclast differentiation, including TRAP (Acp5), cathepsin K (Ctsk), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (Nfatc1). Moreover, actin ring and resorption pit formation were inhibited by KP-A159. Analysis of the signaling pathway involved showed that KP-A159 inhibited RANKL-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase1/2 (MEK1/2). In a mouse inflammatory bone loss model, KP-A159 significantly rescued lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone loss by suppressing osteoclast numbers. Therefore, KP-A159 targets osteoclasts, and may be a potential candidate compound for prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory bone loss. PMID:26536233

  12. Curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by attenuating the JNK signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Mingxiang; Chen, Xianying; Lv, Chaoyang; Yi, Xilu; Zhang, Yao; Xue, Mengjuan; He, Shunmei; Zhu, Guoying; Wang, Hongfu

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Curcumol suppresses osteoclasts differentiation in vitro. • Curcumol impairs JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway. • Curcumol may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Osteoclasts, derived from hemopoietic progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, have a unique role in bone resorption, and are considered a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of such pathologic bone diseases as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. In the present study, we demonstrate that curcumol, one of the major components of the essential oil of Rhizoma Curcumae, exhibits an inhibitory effect on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation with both bone marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, RANKL-induced mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K, is prominently reduced in the presence of curcumol. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action was investigated, and curcumol inhibited osteoclastogenesis by specifically impairing RANKL-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling, which was further identified in rescue studies by means of anisomycin, a JNK signaling-specific activator. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation through the JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic treatment for bone resorption-associated diseases.

  13. Eriodictyol Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Formation and Function Via Inhibition of NFATc1 Activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangming; Zhou, Lin; Zhao, Jinmin; Liu, Qian; Yang, Mingli; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Ge; Quinn, Julian M W; Tickner, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanjiao; Xu, Jiake

    2016-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) induces differentiation and function of osteoclasts through triggering multiple signaling cascades, including NF-κB, MAPK, and Ca(2+) -dependent signals, which induce and activate critical transcription factor NFATc1. Targeting these signaling cascades may serve as an effective therapy against osteoclast-related diseases. Here, by screening a panel of natural plant extracts with known anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, or anti-oxidant properties for possible anti-osteoclastogenic activities we identified Eriodictyol. This flavanone potently suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner without detectable cytotoxicity, suppressing RANKL-induced NF-κB, MAPK, and Ca(2+) signaling pathways. Eriodictyol also strongly inhibited RANKL-induction of c-Fos levels (a critical component of AP-1 transcription factor required by osteoclasts) and subsequent activation of NFATc1, concomitant with reduced expression of osteoclast specific genes including cathepsin K (Ctsk), V-ATPase-d2 subunit, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP/Acp5). Taken together, these data provide evidence that Eriodictyol could be useful for the prevention and treatment of osteolytic disorders associated with abnormally increased osteoclast formation and function. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1983-1993, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754483

  14. FOXO1 Mediates RANKL Induced Osteoclast Formation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Dong, Guangyu; Jeon, Hyeran Helen; Elazizi, Mohamad; La, Lan B.; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Xiao, E; Tian, Chen; Alsadun, Sarah; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor FOXO1 is elevated in conditions with high levels of bone resorption. To investigate the role of FOXO1 in the formation of osteoclasts we examined mice with lineage specific deletion of FOXO1 in osteoclast precursors and by knockdown of FOXO1 with siRNA. The receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL), a principal bone resorbing factor, induced FOXO1 expression and nuclear localization two days after stimulation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors. RANKL- induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity was reduced in half in vivo and in vitro with lineage specific FOXO1 deletion (LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L) compared to matched controls (LyzM.Cre−FOXO1L/L). Similar results were obtained by knockdown of FOXO1 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, FOXO1-mediated osteoclast formation was linked to regulation of NFATc1 nuclear localization and expression as well as a number of downstream factors including dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), ATP6vod2, cathepsin K and integrin αν Lastly, FOXO1 deletion reduced M-CSF induced RANK expression and migration of osteoclast precursors. Studies presented here provide the evidence that FOXO1 plays a direct role in osteoclast formation by mediating the effect of RANKL on NFATc1 and several downstream effectors. This is likely to be significant since FOXO1 and RANKL are elevated in osteolytic conditions. PMID:25694609

  15. Decursin from Angelica gigas suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Ting; Kang, Ju-Hee; Li, Hua; Cho, Hyewon; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Yim, Mijung

    2016-03-01

    Osteoclasts are the only cells capable of breaking down bone matrix, and excessive activation of osteoclasts is responsible for bone-destructive diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of decursin from extract of Angelica gigas root on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Decursin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation without cytotoxicity. In particular, decursin maintains the characteristics of macrophages by blocking osteoclast differentiation by RANKL. Furthermore, the RANKL-stimulated bone resorption was diminished by decursin. Mechanistically, decursin blocked the RANKL-triggered ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) phosphorylation, which results in suppression of c-Fos and the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) expression. In accordance with the in vitro study, decursin reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in vivo. Therefore, decursin exerted an inhibitory effect on osteoclast formation and bone loss in vitro and in vivo. Decursin could be useful for the treatment of bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption. PMID:26825541

  16. IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation through the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyomiya, Hiroyasu; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Kaneuji, Takeshi; Mitsugi, Sho; Sakurai, Takuma; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; and others

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. Several studies have reported that IL-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation. However, the mechanism of IL-33 regulation of osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of IL-33 on osteoclast formation in vitro. IL-33 suppressed osteoclast formation in both mouse bone marrow cells and monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and/or macrophage stimulating factor (M-CSF). IL-33 also inhibited the expression of RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), thereby decreasing the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including Cathepsin K, Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Oc-stamp) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap). Blockage of IL-33-ST2 binding suppressed the IL-33-mediated inhibition of NFATc1. RANKL-induced B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) expression was also suppressed by IL-33, which was followed by the stimulation of anti-osteoclastic genes such as interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8). These results suggest that IL-33-ST2 interactions down-regulate both RANKL-induced NFATc1 activation and osteoclast differentiation via the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression. - Highlights: • IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. • IL-33 has inhibitory effect on the RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. • IL-33-induced NFATc1 suppression depends on the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8.

  17. Siglec-15 regulates osteoclast differentiation by modulating RANKL-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and Erk pathways in association with signaling Adaptor DAP12.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiko; Komatsu, Miki; Mikuni, Shintaro; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Angata, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka; Minami, Akio; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2013-12-01

    Siglecs are a family of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins that regulate the functions of cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems through glycan recognition. Here we show that Siglec-15 regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption by modulating receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) signaling in association with DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12), an adaptor protein bearing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Among the known Siglecs expressed in myeloid lineage cells, only Siglec-15 was upregulated by RANKL in mouse primary bone marrow macrophages. Siglec-15-deficient mice exhibit mild osteopetrosis resulting from impaired osteoclast development. Consistently, cells lacking Siglec-15 exhibit defective osteoclast development and resorptive activity in vitro. RANKL-induced activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Erk pathways were impaired in Siglec-15-deficient cells. Retroviral transduction of Siglec-15-null osteoclast precursors with wild-type Siglec-15 or mutant Siglec-15 revealed that the association of Siglec-15 with DAP12 is involved in the downstream signal transduction of RANK. Furthermore, we found that the ability of osteoclast formation is preserved in the region adjacent to the growth plate in Siglec-15-deficient mice, indicating that there is a compensatory mechanism for Siglec-15-mediated osteoclastogenesis in the primary spongiosa. To clarify the mechanism of this compensation, we examined whether osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR)/Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ) signaling, an alternative ITAM-mediated signaling pathway to DAP12, rescues impaired osteoclastogenesis in Siglec-15-deficient cells. The ligands in type II collagen activate OSCAR and rescue impaired osteoclastogenesis in Siglec-15-deficient cells when cultured on bone slices, indicating that Siglec-15-mediated signaling can be compensated for by signaling activated by type II collagen and other bone

  18. Inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation through the downregulation of c-Fos and NFATc1 by Eremochloa ophiuroides (centipedegrass) extract.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo-Yun; Park, Chul-Hong; Na, Yun Hee; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-05-01

    Osteoclasts, derived from hematopoietic stem cells, are specialized macrophages and have a homeostatic role in skeletal modeling and remodeling with bone-forming osteoblasts. However, excessive osteoclast activity induces bone diseases, including osteoporosis, periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Natural substances have received attention as therapeutic drugs in human diseases. In the current study, cells isolated from mouse bone marrow, and a mouse model, were used to determine the effect of centipedegrass extract (CGE) on osteoclasts. Multiple concentrations of CGE were administered to bone marrow cells for 24‑72 hours and, for the in vivo study, mice were treated with CGE for 8 days. The effects of CGE on transcription and translation of osteoclast-associated molecules were then determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting, respectively. In the present study it was shown that CGE extracted from Eremochloa ophiuroides (centipedegrass) inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κ‑B ligand (RANKL)‑mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages, without cytotoxicity, in a dose‑dependent manner. CGE decreased the expression levels of osteoclast‑specific genes, including matrix metalloproteinase‑9, osteoclast‑associated immunoglobulin‑like receptor and cathepsin K, however, CGE had no inhibitory effect on the expression levels of mitogen‑activated protein kinases, nuclear factor‑κB and Akt. Furthermore, the protein and RNA levels of RANKL‑induced c‑Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 were suppressed by CGE. These results indicated that CGE may serve as a useful drug in the prevention of bone loss. PMID:27035226

  19. WSS25, a sulfated polysaccharide, inhibits RANKL-induced mouse osteoclast formation by blocking SMAD/ID1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Qin, Yi; Fang, Jian-ping; Ni, Xin-yan; Yao, Jian; Wang, Hai-ying; Ding, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: WSS25 is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from the rhizome of Gastrodia elata BI, which has been found to bind to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) in hepatocellular cancer cells. Since BMP-2 may regulate both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, here we investigated the effects of WSS25 on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and bone loss in ovariectomized mice. Methods: RAW264.7 cells or mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) were treated with RANKL to induce osteoclastogenesis, which was assessed using TRAP staining, actin ring formation and pit formation assays, as well as bone resorption assay. Cell viability was detected with MTT assay. The mRNA levels of osteoclastogenesis-related genetic markers (TRAP, NFATc1, MMP-9 and cathepsin K) were detected using RT-PCR, while the protein levels of p-Smad1/5/8 and Id1 were measure with Western blotting. WSS25 was administered to ovariectomized mice (100 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 3 months. After the mice were euthanized, total bone mineral density and cortical bone density were measured. Results: In RAW264.7 cells and BMMs, WSS25 (2.5, 5, 10 μg/mL) did not affect the cell viability, but dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, WSS25 potently suppressed RANKL-induced expression of TRAP, NFATc1, MMP-9 and cathepsin K in RAW264.7 cells. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with RANKL increased BMP-2 expression, Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and Id1 expression, which triggered osteoclast differentiation, whereas co-treatment with WSS25 or the endogenous BMP-2 antagonist noggin suppressed the BMP-2/Smad/Id1 signaling pathway. In RAW264.7 cells, knockdown of Id1 attenuated RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, which was partially rescued by Id1 overexpression. In conformity to the in vitro experiments, chronic administration of WSS25 significantly reduced the bone loss in ovariectomized mice. Conclusion: WSS25 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs by blocking the BMP-2/Smad

  20. Dihydroartemisinin, an Anti-Malaria Drug, Suppresses Estrogen Deficiency-Induced Osteoporosis, Osteoclast Formation, and RANKL-Induced Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Liu, Qian; Yang, Mingli; Wang, Tao; Yao, Jun; Cheng, Jianwen; Yuan, Jinbo; Lin, Xixi; Zhao, Jinmin; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake

    2016-05-01

    Osteoporosis is an osteolytic disease that features enhanced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Identification of agents that can inhibit osteoclast formation and function is important for the treatment of osteoporosis. Dihydroartemisinin is a natural compound used to treat malaria but its role in osteoporosis is not known. Here, we found that dihydroartemisinin can suppress RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner. Dihydroartemisinin inhibited the expression of osteoclast marker genes such as cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP). Furthermore, dihydroartemisinin inhibited RANKL-induced NF-κB and NFAT activity. In addition, using an in vivo ovariectomized mouse model, we show that dihydroartemisinin is able to reverse the bone loss caused by ovariectomy. Together, this study shows that dihydroartemisinin attenuates bone loss in ovariectomized mice through inhibiting RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and function. This indicates that dihydroartemisinin, the first physiology or medicine nobel prize discovery of China, is a potential treatment option against osteolytic bone disease. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26684711

  1. Involvement of Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand (RANKL)-induced Incomplete Cytokinesis in the Polyploidization of Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Takegahara, Noriko; Kim, Hyunsoo; Mizuno, Hiroki; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Tomura, Michio; Kanagawa, Osami; Ishii, Masaru; Choi, Yongwon

    2016-02-12

    Osteoclasts are specialized polyploid cells that resorb bone. Upon stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), myeloid precursors commit to becoming polyploid, largely via cell fusion. Polyploidization of osteoclasts is necessary for their bone-resorbing activity, but the mechanisms by which polyploidization is controlled remain to be determined. Here, we demonstrated that in addition to cell fusion, incomplete cytokinesis also plays a role in osteoclast polyploidization. In in vitro cultured osteoclasts derived from mice expressing the fluorescent ubiquitin-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), RANKL induced polyploidy by incomplete cytokinesis as well as cell fusion. Polyploid cells generated by incomplete cytokinesis had the potential to subsequently undergo cell fusion. Nuclear polyploidy was also observed in osteoclasts in vivo, suggesting the involvement of incomplete cytokinesis in physiological polyploidization. Furthermore, RANKL-induced incomplete cytokinesis was reduced by inhibition of Akt, resulting in impaired multinucleated osteoclast formation. Taken together, these results reveal that RANKL-induced incomplete cytokinesis contributes to polyploidization of osteoclasts via Akt activation. PMID:26670608

  2. Orostachys japonicus Suppresses Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting NFATc1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ki-Shuk; Ha, Hyunil; Kim, Taesoo; Lee, Chung-Jo; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    The herb Orostachys japonicus has been traditionally used to treat chronic diseases, such as hepatitis, hemorrhoids, and cancer, in Asia. In this study, we investigated the effect of Orostachys japonicus water extract (OJWE) on the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone loss. We found that OJWE inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bone resorption in bone marrow-derived macrophage cells. Interestingly, OJWE significantly reduced serum levels of C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, markers of bone resorption and osteoclast number, respectively, in an animal model of bone loss. Furthermore, OJWE suppressed the RANKL-induced up-regulation of nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) expression, and activation of the p38 signaling pathway, but prevented the RANKL-mediated down-regulation of interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), which is known to be an anti-osteoclastogenic factor that represses NFATc1 expression. We also identified gallic acid and quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside as the OJWE components that inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. These results suggest that OJWE inhibits osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression, which prevents osteoclast differentiation and bone loss. The present study elucidated a mechanism of action underlying the inhibitory effect of OJWE on osteoclast differentiation. Our findings suggest that O. japonicus has therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of bone diseases. PMID:26205967

  3. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  4. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-κB and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-01-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26442864

  5. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  6. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  7. Sodium-Dependent Phosphate Transporters in Osteoclast Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wagner, Carsten A.; Biber, Jürg; Hernando, Nati; Hofstetter, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated bone degrading cells. Phosphate is an important constituent of mineralized bone and released in significant quantities during bone resorption. Molecular contributors to phosphate transport during the resorptive activity of osteoclasts have been controversially discussed. This study aimed at deciphering the role of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters during osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Our studies reveal RANKL-induced differential expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transport protein IIa (NaPi-IIa) transcript and protein during osteoclast development, but no expression of the closely related NaPi-IIb and NaPi-IIc SLC34 family isoforms. In vitro studies employing NaPi-IIa-deficient osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclasts reveal that NaPi-IIa is dispensable for bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. These results are supported by the analysis of structural bone parameters by high-resolution microcomputed tomography that yielded no differences between adult NaPi-IIa WT and KO mice. By contrast, both type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 were abundantly expressed throughout osteoclast differentiation, indicating that they are the relevant sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. We conclude that phosphate transporters of the SLC34 family have no role in osteoclast differentiation and function and propose that Pit-dependent phosphate transport could be pivotal for bone resorption and should be addressed in further studies. PMID:25910236

  8. Dioscin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption though down-regulating the Akt signaling cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xinhua; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Wu, Chuanlong; Liu, Guangwang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A natural-derived compound, dioscin, suppresses osteoclast formation and bone resorption. •Dioscin inhibits osteolytic bone loss in vivo. •Dioscin impairs the Akt signaling cascades pathways during osteoclastogenesis. •Dioscin have therapeutic value in treating osteoclast-related diseases. -- Abstract: Bone resorption is the unique function of osteoclasts (OCs) and is critical for both bone homeostasis and pathologic bone diseases including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and tumor bone metastasis. Thus, searching for natural compounds that may suppress osteoclast formation and/or function is promising for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we for the first time demonstrated that dioscin suppressed RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressive effect of dioscin is supported by the reduced expression of osteoclast-specific markers. Further molecular analysis revealed that dioscin abrogated AKT phosphorylation, which subsequently impaired RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and inhibited NFATc1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, in vivo studies further verified the bone protection activity of dioscin in osteolytic animal model. Together our data demonstrate that dioscin suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and function through Akt signaling cascades. Therefore, dioscin is a potential natural agent for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases.

  9. The Adaptor Protein p62 Is Involved in RANKL-induced Autophagy and Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui-Fang; Chen, Gang; Ren, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Zhong-Xing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated autophagy in osteoclast differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of p62, a characterized adaptor protein for autophagy, in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were used to evaluate the expression levels of autophagy-related markers during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Meanwhile, the potential relationship between p62/LC3 localization and F-actin ring formation was tested using double-labeling immunofluorescence. Then, the expression of p62 in RAW264.7 cells was knocked down using small-interfering RNA (siRNA), followed by detecting its influence on RANKL-induced autophagy activation, osteoclast differentiation, and F-actin ring formation. The data showed that several key autophagy-related markers including p62 were significantly altered during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. In addition, the expression and localization of p62 showed negative correlation with LC3 accumulation and F-actin ring formation, as demonstrated by western blot and immunofluorescence analyses, respectively. Importantly, the knockdown of p62 obviously attenuated RANKL-induced expression of autophagy- and osteoclastogenesis-related genes, formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells, accumulation of LC3, as well as formation of F-actin ring. Our study indicates that p62 may play essential roles in RANKL-induced autophagy and osteoclastogenesis, which may help to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against osteoclastogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25163928

  10. Selective Regulation of MAPK Signaling Mediates RANKL-dependent Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghee; Chung, Yeoun Ho; Ahn, Heejin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Rho, Jaerang; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Different stimuli often activate the same intracellular signaling molecules but trigger distinct cell responses. We explored whether or not MAPK signaling induced by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), which is responsible for osteoclast proliferation, differs from that induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which is essential for inducing osteoclast differentiation. The activation of MAPKs by M-CSF or RANKL differed in terms of the extent and duration of ERK, p38, and JNK phosphorylation as well as the isoform specificity of JNK phosphorylation. In particular, RANKL induced a second wave of MAPK activation coincident with the onset of osteoclast differentiation, whereas M-CSF triggered only a monophasic response. M-CSF was also able to trigger a full MAPK response on restimulation of cells earlier than was RANKL, representing that MAPK resensitization by M-CSF differs from that by RANKL. Furthermore, the adapter protein TRAF6 recruitment to the cytoplasmic tail of RANK in a submembrane compartment is specifically required for RANKL-induced activation of p38 MAPK, expression of osteoclastogenic transcription factors, and osteoclast differentiation, indicating that the switch from proliferation to differentiation in osteoclast precursors is dependent on p38 activation via the RANKL-RANK-TRAF6 axis. Our results suggest that selective control of MAPK signaling induced by M-CSF and by RANKL mediates the proliferation versus differentiation decision in osteoclast precursors. PMID:26884720

  11. Dioscin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption though down-regulating the Akt signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinhua; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Wu, Chuanlong; Liu, Guangwang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-01-10

    Bone resorption is the unique function of osteoclasts (OCs) and is critical for both bone homeostasis and pathologic bone diseases including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and tumor bone metastasis. Thus, searching for natural compounds that may suppress osteoclast formation and/or function is promising for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we for the first time demonstrated that dioscin suppressed RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressive effect of dioscin is supported by the reduced expression of osteoclast-specific markers. Further molecular analysis revealed that dioscin abrogated AKT phosphorylation, which subsequently impaired RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and inhibited NFATc1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, in vivo studies further verified the bone protection activity of dioscin in osteolytic animal model. Together our data demonstrate that dioscin suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and function through Akt signaling cascades. Therefore, dioscin is a potential natural agent for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. PMID:24333429

  12. Methylsulfonylmethane Inhibits RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis in BMMs by Suppressing NF-κB and STAT3 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Youn Hee; Darvin, Pramod; Kang, Dong Young; SP, Nipin; Byun, Hyo Joo; Lee, Chi-Ho; Lee, Hak Kyo; Yang, Young Mok

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation is dependent on the activities of receptor activator NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Given that RANKL plays a critical role in osteoclast formation and bone resorption, any new compounds found to alter its activity would be predicted to have therapeutic potential for disorders associated with bone loss. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a naturally occurring sulfur compound with well-documented anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties; currently its effects on osteoclast differentiation are unknown. We sought to investigate whether MSM could regulate osteoclastogenesis, and if so, its mechanism of action. In this study, we investigated the effects of MSM on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, together with STAT3’s involvement in the expression of osteoclastic gene markers. These experiments were conducted using bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMs) and cell line material, together with analyses that interrogated both protein and mRNA levels, as well as signaling pathway activity. Although MSM was not toxic to osteoclast precursors, MSM markedly inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP activity, multinucleated osteoclast formation, and bone resorptive activity. Additionally, the expression of several osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including TRAF6, c-Fos, NFATc1, cathepsin K, and OSCAR were suppressed by MSM. MSM mediated suppression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis involved inhibition of ITAM signaling effectors such as PLCγ and Syk, with a blockade of NF-kB rather than MAPK activity. Furthermore, MSM inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 Ser727. Knockdown of STAT3 using shRNAs resulted in reduced RANKL-mediated phosphorylation of Ser727 STAT3, and TRAF6 in cells for which depletion of STAT3 was confirmed. Additionally, the expression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenic marker genes were significantly decreased by MSM and STAT3 knockdown. Taken together, these results indicate

  13. Eriodicyol inhibits osteoclast differentiation and ovariectomy-induced bone loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhyun; Noh, A Long Sae Mi; Zheng, Ting; Kang, Ju-hee; Yim, Mijung

    2015-12-10

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone erosion in diseases such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study, we investigate the effects of eriodictyol, a flavonoid found naturally in citrus fruits, on the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation using mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Eriodictyol inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. In addition, eriodictyol suppressed bone resorption activity of differentiated osteoclasts. The inhibitory effect of eriodictyol was associated with impaired activation of multiple signaling events downstream of RANK, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun terminal kinase phosphorylation, followed by decreased nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)c1 expression. Ectopic overexpression of a constitutively active form of NFATc1 completely rescued the anti-osteoclastogenic effect of eriodictyol, suggesting that the anti-osteoclastogenic effect was mainly attributed to the reduction in NFATc1 expression. Consistent with the in vitro anti-osteoclastogenic effect, eriodictyol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclast formation in the calvarial model and ovariectomy-induced bone loss in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that eriodictyol is a new therapeutic agent with the potential to prevent bone destructive diseases by reducing both osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:26450448

  14. Signaling Pathways in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells of hematopoietic origin that are responsible for the degradation of old bone matrix. Osteoclast differentiation and activity are controlled by two essential cytokines, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). M-CSF and RANKL bind to their respective receptors c-Fms and RANK to stimulate osteoclast differentiation through regulation of delicate signaling systems. Here, we summarize the critical or essential signaling pathways for osteoclast differentiation including M-CSF-c-Fms signaling, RANKL-RANK signaling, and costimulatory signaling for RANK. PMID:26865996

  15. AG490 inhibits NFATc1 expression and STAT3 activation during RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chang-hong; Zhao, Jin-xia; Sun, Lin; Yao, Zhong-qiang; Deng, Xiao-li; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiang-yuan

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •AG490 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. •AG490 affects cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. •AG490 reduces NFATc1 expression during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. •AG490 disrupts the activation of RANKL-mediated JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. •STAT3 depletion partly mimics the effect of AG490 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Commonly, JAK/STAT relays cytokine signals for cell activation and proliferation, and recent studies have shown that the elevated expression of JAK/STAT is associated with the immune rejection of allografts and the inflammatory processes of autoimmune disease. However, the role which JAK2/STAT3 signaling plays in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of AG490, specific JAK2 inhibitor, on osteoclast differentiation in vitro. AG490 significantly inhibited osteoclastogenesis in murine osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 induced by RANKL. AG490 suppressed cell proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle transition. Furthermore, AG490 also suppressed the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 but not c-Fos in RAW264.7. Subsequently, we investigated various intracellular signaling components associated with osteoclastogenesis. AG490 had no effects on RANKL-induced activation of Akt, ERK1/2. Interestingly, AG490 partly inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of Ser{sup 727} in STAT3. Additionally, down-regulation of STAT3 using siRNA resulted in suppression of TRAP, RANK and NFATc1 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AG490 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NFATc1 production and cell proliferation via the STAT3 pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of JAK2 may be useful for the treatment of bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclastogenesis.

  16. The Protein Kinase 2 Inhibitor CX-4945 Regulates Osteoclast and Osteoblast Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Son, You Hwa; Moon, Seong Hee; Kim, Jiyeon

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning can identify new therapeutic applications for existing drugs, thus mitigating high R&D costs. The Protein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitor CX-4945 regulates human cancer cell survival and angiogenesis. Here we found that CX-4945 significantly inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, but enhanced the BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation in a cell culture model. CX-4945 inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of TRAP and NFATc1 expression accompanied with suppression of Akt phosphorylation, but, in contrast, it enhanced the BMP2-mediated ALP induction and MAPK ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CX-4945 is thus a novel drug candidate for bone-related disorders such as osteoporosis. PMID:24293011

  17. Design, synthesis and SARs of novel salicylanilides as potent inhibitors of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Lee, Chia-Chung; Liu, Fei-Lan; Chen, Tsung-Chih; Ahmed Ali, Ahmed Atef; Chang, Deh-Ming; Huang, Hsu-Shan

    2016-07-19

    Inhibiting osteoclastogenesis is a promising therapeutic target for treating osteoclast-related diseases. Herein, we synthesized a series of modified salicylanilides and their corresponding 3-phenyl-2H-benzo[e][1,3]oxazine-2,4(3H)-dione and 10-phenyldibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxazepin-11(10H)-one derivatives, and investigated the effects of such compounds on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Among them, a salicylanilide derivative (A04) and its 3-phenyl-2H-benzo[e][1,3]oxazine-2,4(3H)-dione derivative (B04) markedly suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and showed no significant cytotoxic effects at doses higher than that required to inhibit osteoclast formation. Both compounds reduced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Further, the anti-osteoclastogenic effects of A04 and B04 may operate through reducing the RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc1. Accordingly, we present the potent anti-osteoclastogenic compounds A04 and B04 as promising candidates for further optimization as anti-resorptive agents. PMID:27089213

  18. Cytoplasmic hnRNPK interacts with GSK3β and is essential for the osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Haiting; Wei, Jinmei; Gao, Xuejuan; Feng, Yuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Langxia

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation is a complex and finely regulated physiological process that involves a variety of signaling pathways and factors. Recent studies suggested that the Ser9 phosphorylation of Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is required for the osteoclast differentiation. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains unclear. We have previously identified the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK) as a putative GSK3β interactor. In the present study, we demonstrate that, during the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, the PI3K/Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3β provokes the nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of hnRNPK in an ERK-dependent manner, enhancing the cytoplasmic co-localization and interaction of GSK3β and hnRNPK. We show that hnRNPK is essential for the osteoclast differentiation, and is involved in several reported functions of GSK3β, including the activation of NF-κB, the expression of NFATc1, and the acetylation of tubulin, all known to be critical for osteoclast differentiation and functions. We find that hnRNPK is localized in the actin belt, and is important for the mature osteoclast formation. Taken together, we demonstrate here the critical role of hnRNPK in osteoclast differentiation, and depict a model in which the cytoplasmic hnRNPK interacts with GSK3β and regulates its function. PMID:26638989

  19. Salicortin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by down-regulating JNK and NF-κB/NFATc1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shaobo; Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Chenghua; Xu, Chen; Liu, Ming; Yu, Degang

    2016-01-29

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-activated signaling is essential for osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Salicortin is a phenolic glycoside that has been isolated from many plants such as Populus and Salix species, and has been shown to have anti-amnesic and anti-adipogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of salicortin on RANKL-induced osteoclasts formation, bone resorption, and activation of osteoclast-related signaling pathways. Salicortin suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow macrophage cultures in a dose-dependent manner, and inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption activity without any cytotoxicity. Salicortin inhibited RANKL-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase and NF-κB activation, concomitant with retarded IκBα phosphorylation and inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation, leading to impaired transcription of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) and expression of osteoclastic-specific genes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that salicortin inhibits NF-κB and NFATc1 activation, leading to attenuation of osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Thus, salicortin may be of interest in developments of treatment for osteoclast related diseases. PMID:26740180

  20. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  1. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate inhibition of osteoclastic differentiation via NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Wang, Y.-H.; Ho, M.-L.; Hung, S.-H.; Chen, I.-S. Wang, G.-J.

    2009-02-20

    People who regularly drink tea have been found to have a higher bone mineral density (BMD) and to be at less risk of hip fractures than those who do not drink it. Green tea catechins such as (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been reported to increase osteogenic functioning in mesenchymal stem cells. However, its effect on osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on RANKL-activation osteoclastogenesis and NF-{kappa}B in RAW 264.7, a murine preosteoclast cell line. EGCG (10-100 {mu}M) significantly suppressed the RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and the formation of pits in murine RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). EGCG appeared to target osteoclastic differentiation at an early stage but had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursors. In addition, it significantly inhibited RANKL-induced NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation. We conclude that EGCG inhibits osteoclastogenesis through its activation of NF-{kappa}B.

  2. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. PMID:25016282

  3. LGR4 is a receptor for RANKL and negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Yang, Zhengfeng; Ma, Yu; Yue, Zhiying; Lin, Hongyu; Qu, Guojun; Huang, Jinping; Dai, Wentao; Li, Chenghai; Zheng, Chunbing; Xu, Leqin; Chen, Huaqing; Wang, Jiqiu; Li, Dali; Siwko, Stefan; Penninger, Josef M; Ning, Guang; Xiao, Jianru; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11, also known as RANKL) regulates multiple physiological or pathological functions, including osteoclast differentiation and osteoporosis. TNFRSF11A (also called RANK) is considered to be the sole receptor for RANKL. Herein we report that leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4, also called GPR48) is another receptor for RANKL. LGR4 competes with RANK to bind RANKL and suppresses canonical RANK signaling during osteoclast differentiation. RANKL binding to LGR4 activates the Gαq and GSK3-β signaling pathway, an action that suppresses the expression and activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATC1) during osteoclastogenesis. Both whole-body (Lgr4(-/-)) and monocyte conditional knockout mice of Lgr4 (Lgr4 CKO) exhibit osteoclast hyperactivation (including elevation of osteoclast number, surface area, and size) and increased bone erosion. The soluble LGR4 extracellular domain (ECD) binds RANKL and inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vivo. Moreover, LGR4-ECD therapeutically abrogated RANKL-induced bone loss in three mouse models of osteoporosis. Therefore, LGR4 acts as a second RANKL receptor that negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. PMID:27064449

  4. Andrographolide suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents inflammatory bone loss in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Z J; Li, H W; Liu, G W; Qu, X H; Tian, B; Yan, W; Lin, Z; Tang, T T; Qin, A; Dai, K R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Osteoclasts play a pivotal role in diseases such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and tumour bone metastasis. Thus, searching for natural compounds that may suppress osteoclast formation and/or function is promising for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. Here, we examined changes in osteoclastogenesis and LPS-induced osteolysis in response to andrographolide (AP), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from the traditional Chinese and Indian medicinal plant Andrographis paniculata. Experimental Approach Effects of AP on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption were measured in vitro. Western blots and RT-PCR techniques were used to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms. The bone protective activity of AP in vivo was assessed in a mouse model of osteolysis. Key Results AP concentration-dependently suppressed RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptors and cathepsin K. Further molecular analysis revealed that AP impaired RANKL-induced NF-κB signalling by inhibiting the phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase 1, suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. AP also inhibited the ERK/MAPK signalling pathway without affecting p38 or JNK signalling. Conclusions and Implications AP suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through attenuating NF-κB and ERK/MAPK signalling pathways in vitro, thus preventing bone loss in vivo. These data indicated that AP is a promising natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related bone diseases. PMID:24125472

  5. Enhancement of RANKL-induced MITF-E expression and osteoclastogenesis by TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Asai, Kumiko; Funaba, Masayuki; Murakami, Masaru

    2014-07-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a transcription factor that is expressed in limited types of cells, including osteoclasts, but the expression and role of MITF during osteoclastogenesis have not been fully elucidated. The expression of the MITF-E isoform but not that of the MITF-A isoform was induced in response to differentiation stimulation towards osteoclasts by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in both RAW264.7 cells and primary bone marrow cells. The RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells was inhibited in RAW264.7 cells expressing siRNA for MITF-E. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) enhanced RANKL-induced MITF-E expression and -TRAP positive multinucleated cell formation. In particular, TGF-β potentiated the formation of larger osteoclasts. The expression levels of NFATc1, TRAP and CtsK, genes related to osteoclast development and activity, were concurrently enhanced by TGF-β in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), Itgav, Itga2, Itga5, Itgb1, Itgb3 and Itgb5, genes related to cell adhesion and fusion, were up-regulated by co-treatment with TGF-β. In particular, the regulatory expression of Itgav and Itgb5 in response to RANKL with or without TGF-β resembled that of MITF-E. Because MITF is involved in cell fusion in some cell systems, these results imply a role for MITF-E as an enhancer of osteoclastogenesis and that RANKL-induced levels of both MITF-E mRNA and of MITF-dependent gene expression are enhanced by treatment with TGF-β. PMID:24519885

  6. Tributyltin and triphenyltin inhibit osteoclast differentiation through a retinoic acid receptor-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Ahn, Jae-Yong; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae; E-mail: jwoo@isc.chubu.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), have been widely used in agriculture and industry. Although these compounds are known to have many toxic effects, including endocrine-disrupting effects, their effects on bone resorption are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of organotin compounds, such as monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), TBT, and TPT, on osteoclast differentiation using mouse monocytic RAW264.7 cells. MBT and DBT had no effects, whereas TBT and TPT dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast differentiation at concentrations of 3-30 nM. Treatment with a retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-specific antagonist, Ro41-5253, restored the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by TBT and TPT. TBT and TPT reduced receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) induced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 expression, and the reduction in NFATc1 expression was recovered by Ro41-5253. Our results suggest that TBT and TPT suppress osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression via an RAR-dependent signaling pathway.

  7. PKCβ Positively Regulates RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis by Inactivating GSK-3β

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jihye; Jang, Hyunduk; Lin, Jingjing; Lee, Soo Young

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) family members phosphorylate a wide variety of protein targets and are known to be involved in diverse cellular signaling pathways. However, the role of PKC in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling has remained elusive. We now demonstrate that PKCβ acts as a positive regulator which inactivates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and promotes NFATc1 induction during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Among PKCs, PKCβ expression is increased by RANKL. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ decreased the formation of osteoclasts which was caused by the inhibition of NFATc1 induction. Importantly, the phosphorylation of GSK-3β was decreased by PKCβ inhibition. Likewise, down-regulation of PKCβ by RNA interference suppressed osteoclast differentiation, NFATc1 induction, and GSK-3β phosphorylation. The administration of PKC inhibitor to the RANKL-injected mouse calvaria efficiently protected RANKL-induced bone destruction. Thus, the PKCβ pathway, leading to GSK-3β inactivation and NFATc1 induction, has a key role in the differentiation of osteoclasts. Our results also provide a further rationale for PKCβ’s therapeutic targeting to treat inflammation-related bone diseases. PMID:25256217

  8. Diamagnetic levitation promotes osteoclast differentiation from RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Yin, Chong; Li, Di-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting magnet with a high magnetic force field can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study, a specially designed superconducting magnet with large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF), which provides three apparent gravity levels (μg, 1 g, and 2 g), was used to study its influence on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from preosteoclast cell line RAW264.7. The effects of LGHMF on the viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, morphology in RAW264.7 cells were detected by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the Griess method, and the immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The changes induced by LGHMF in osteoclast formation, mRNA expression, and bone resorption were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, semiquantity PCR, and bone resorption test, respectively. The results showed that: 1) LGHMF had no lethal effect on osteoclast precursors but attenuated NO release in RAW264.7 cells. 2) Diamagnetic levitation (μg) enhanced both the formation and bone resorption capacity of osteoclast. Moreover, diamagnetic levitation up-regulated mRNA expression of RANK, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, and NFATc1, while down-regulated RunX2 in comparison with controls. Furthermore, diamagnetic levitation induced obvious morphological alterations in osteoclast, including active cytoplasmic peripheral pseudopodial expansion, formation of pedosome belt, and aggregation of actin ring. 3) Magnetic field produced by LGHMF attenuated osteoclast resorption activity. Collectively, LGHMF with combined effects has multiple effects on osteoclast, which attenuated osteoclast resorption with magnetic field, whereas promoted osteoclast differentiation with diamagnetic levitation. Therefore, these findings indicate that diamagnetic levitation could be used as a novel ground-based microgravity simulator, which facilitates bone cell research of weightlessness condition

  9. Rhinacanthin C Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption: Roles of TRAF6/TAK1/MAPKs/NF-κB/NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tomomura, Mineko; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Shirataki, Yoshiaki; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Tamura, Nobuaki; Tomomura, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Rhinacanthin C is a naphthoquinone ester with anti-inflammatory activity, found in Rhinacanthus nasutus (L) Kurz (Acanthaceae). We found that rhinacanthin C inhibited osteoclast differentiation stimulated by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mouse bone marrow macrophage cultures, although the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanisms of rhinacanthin C in osteoclastogenesis. Rhinacanthin C suppressed RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) expression. Phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and NF-κB, but not p38, was inhibited by rhinacanthin C, which also inhibited RANKL-stimulated TRAF6-TAK1 complex formation. Thus, the anti-osteoclastogenic effect of rhinacanthin C is mediated by a cascade of inhibition of RANKL-induced TRAF6-TAK1 association followed by activation of MAPKs/NF-κB; this leads to suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1, which regulate transcription of genes associated with osteoclast differentiation. In vivo, rhinacanthin C also reduced RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in mouse calvaria. Rhinacanthin C also suppressed LPS-stimulated osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Rhinacanthin C may provide a novel therapy for abnormal bone lysis that occurs during inflammatory bone resorption. PMID:26083531

  10. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  11. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  12. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor-activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  13. Tmem64 modulates calcium signaling during RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Cho, Il-Taeg; Han, Daehee; Takegahara, Noriko; Negishi-Koga, Takako; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Lee, Jae Hee; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Prasad, Vikram; Lee, Seoung-Hoon; Choi, Yongwon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Osteoclast maturation and function primarily depend on receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated induction of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which is further activated via increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillation. However, the coordination mechanism that mediates Ca2+ oscillation during osteoclastogenesis remains ill defined. Here, we identified transmembrane protein 64 (Tmem64) as a regulator of Ca2+ oscillation during osteoclastogenesis. We found that Tmem64-deficient mice exhibit increased bone mass due in part to impaired osteoclast formation. Using in vitro osteoclast culture systems, we show here that Tmem64 interacts with sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and modulates its activity. Consequently, Tmem64 deficiency significantly diminishes RANKL-induced [Ca2+]i oscillation, which results in reduced Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) IV and mitochondrial ROS, both of which contribute to achieving the CREB activity necessary for osteoclast formation. These data demonstrate that Tmem64 is a positive modulator of osteoclast differentiation via SERCA2-dependent Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23395171

  14. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Increases the Risk of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis by Stimulating Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Haiqing; Guan, Qingbo; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to observe the changes in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women, to research the relationship between FSH and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and to observe the effects of FSH on osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. Methods We analyzed 248 postmenopausal women with normal bone metabolism. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to detect serum FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure forearm BMD. Then, we analyzed the age-related changes in serum FSH, LH and E2. Additionally, FSH serum concentrations were compared between a group of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and a control group. Osteoclasts were induced from RAW264.7 cells in vitro by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), and these cells were treated with 0, 5, 10, and 20 ng/ml FSH. After the osteoclasts matured, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining was used to identify osteoclasts, and the mRNA expression levels of genes involved in osteoclastic phenotypes and function, such as receptor activator of NF-κB (Rank), Trap, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) and Cathepsin K, were detected in different groups using real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Results 1. FSH serum concentrations in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis increased notably compared with the control group. 2. RANKL induced RAW264.7 cell differentiation into mature osteoclasts in vitro. 3. FSH increased mRNA expression of genes involved in osteoclastic phenotypes and function, such as Rank, Trap, Mmp-9 and Cathepsin K, in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The circulating concentration of FSH may play an important role in the acceleration of bone loss in postmenopausal women. FSH increases osteoclastogenesis in vitro. PMID:26241313

  15. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  16. Echinocystic acid inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by regulating NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hui; Li, Bing; Wu, Qiong; Lv, Jian-Guo; Nie, Hui-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) is a key factor in the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts. Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, was reported to prevent reduction of bone mass and strength and improve the cancellous bone structure and biochemical properties in ovariectomy rats. However, the molecular mechanism of EA on the osteoclast formation has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of EA on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our results showed that EA inhibited the formation of osteoclast, as well as the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker proteins in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). At molecular levels, EA inhibited RANKL-induced NF-κB activation and ERK phosphorylation in BMMs. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that EA can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Moreover, we clarified that these inhibitory effects of EA occur through suppression of NF-κB and ERK activation. Therefore, EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27349866

  17. Ly49Q, an ITIM-bearing NK receptor, positively regulates osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mikihito; Nakashima, Tomoki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-12

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated cells that resorb bone, play a key role in bone remodeling. Although immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signaling is critical for osteoclast differentiation, the significance of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) has not been well understood. Here we report the function of Ly49Q, an Ly49 family member possessing an ITIM motif, in osteoclastogenesis. Ly49Q is selectively induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) ligand (RANKL) stimulation in bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage precursor cells (BMMs) among the Ly49 family of NK receptors. The knockdown of Ly49Q resulted in a significant reduction in the RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, accompanied by a decreased expression of osteoclast-specific genes such as Nfatc1, Tm7sf4, Oscar, Ctsk, and Acp5. Osteoclastogenesis was also significantly impaired in Ly49Q-deficient cells in vitro. The inhibitory effect of Ly49Q-deficiency may be explained by the finding that Ly49Q competed for the association of Src-homology domain-2 phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) with paired immunoglobulin-like receptor-B (PIR-B), an ITIM-bearing receptor which negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation. Unexpectedly, Ly49Q deficiency did not lead to impaired osteoclast formation in vivo, suggesting the existence of a compensatory mechanism. This study provides an example in which an ITIM-bearing receptor functions as a positive regulator of osteoclast differentiation.

  18. Niclosamide suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and prevents LPS-induced bone loss.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Ju-Young; Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun; So, Hong-Seob; Oh, Jaemin

    2016-02-01

    Niclosamide (5-chloro-salicyl-(2-chloro-4-nitro) anilide) is an oral anthelmintic drug used for treating intestinal infection of most tapeworms. Recently, niclosamide was shown to have considerable efficacy against some tumor cell lines, including colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia. Specifically, the drug was identified as a potent inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is associated with osteoclast differentiation and function. In this study, we assessed the effect of niclosamide on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was inhibited by niclosamide, due to inhibition of serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt) phosphorylation, inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (IκB), and STAT3 serine(727). Niclosamide decreased the expression of the major transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1, and thereafter abrogated the mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, OSCAR, αv/β3 integrin (integrin αv, integrin β3), and cathepsin K (CtsK). In an in vivo model, niclosamide prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss by diminishing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results show that niclosamide is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and may be considered as a new and safe therapeutic candidate for the clinical treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26792726

  19. Herba epimedii flavonoids suppress osteoclastic differentiation and bone resorption by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Zhang, Jinchao; Fong, Chichun; Yao, Xinsheng; Yang, Mengsu

    2012-12-01

    Accumulating evidences suggest that Herba epimedii has the potential benefits against osteoporosis. However, previous studies were focused on the crude extract, total flavonoids (TF) and icariin (ICA), and the detailed molecular mechanisms of action and structure-activity relationship (SAR) remain unclear. Herein we aimed to systematically investigate the effects of Herba epimedii flavonoids (HEF) on the activity of osteoclasts, and explore the potential SAR. Both ICA and baohuoside-1 (BS) significantly inhibited the proliferation of RAW 264.7 cells (IC(50) 25 μM and 67 μM, respectively). Treatment of ICA resulted in G2/M arrest and apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells as early as 12 h. Besides, HEF remarkably suppressed vitamin D-induced differentiation of osteoclasts in rabbit bone marrow cells and the bone resorption of rabbit mature osteoclasts in vitro. It is notable that the inhibitory effect of 100 μM ICA and BS on osteoclast formation is almost 90%; and the inhibition rate on bone resorption is 50% and 80%, respectively. Besides, RANKL-induced osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells and the expression of TRAP, CA II, CTSK and MMP-9 was significantly reduced by the treatment of 25 μM HEF and 17β-estradiol (ES), and the inhibitory strength increases in the order TF < ES < ICA < BS, which was blocked by ICI182780 suggesting that the regulation of osteoclast activity might be ER dependent. Furthermore, the free hydroxyl group at C-7 of BS played an important role in the SAR for anti-osteoclast action. To conclude, HEF could regulate the formation and activity of osteoclasts by inhibiting the proliferation and differentiation, inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and suppressing bone resorption of osteoclasts. Changes in osteoclast activity are probably mediated predominantly by interaction with nuclear estrogen receptors and via mitochondrial pathway. HEF, especially BS, has great potential for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:22796380

  20. Extracellular Iron is a Modulator of the Differentiation of Osteoclast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Lorenz, Sebastian; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-03-01

    Osteoclasts originate from the hematopoietic stem cell and share a differentiation pathway with the cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineages. Development and activation of osteoclasts, and as a consequence regulation of bone resorption, depend on two growth factors: macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand. Furthermore, cell development and activity are modulated by a microenvironment composed of cytokines and growth factors and of the extracellular matrix. Membrane transporters are a means for cells to interact with their environment. Within this study, the expression of proteins regulating cellular iron homeostasis in osteoclast-like cells grown from bone marrow-derived progenitors was compared to the expression of this set of proteins by monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. In differentiating osteoclasts, levels of transcripts encoding transferrin receptor 1 and divalent metal transporter 1 (Slc11A2) were increased, while levels of transcripts encoding ferroportin (Slc40A1) and natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Slc11A1) were decreased. Supplementation of the culture media with exogenous iron led to an increase in the proliferation of osteoclast progenitor cells and to the expression of a macrophage-like phenotype, while the development of osteoclasts was reduced. Upon transfer of mature OC onto a CaP substrate, iron depletion of the medium with the Fe(3+)-chelator Deferoxamine Mesylate decreased CaP dissolution by ~30 %, which could be restored by addition of exogenous iron. During the 24 h of the assay, no effects were observed on total TRAP activity. The data demonstrate transcriptional regulation of the components of cellular iron transporters during OC development and suggests that iron homeostasis may contribute to fine-tuning of the RANKL-induced OC development. PMID:26615413

  1. HSP90 inhibitors enhance differentiation and MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor) activity in osteoclast progenitors.

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, A Gabrielle J; Chai, Ryan C C; Singh, Preetinder P; Lang, Benjamin J; Xu, Jiake; Gillespie, Matthew T; Price, John T; Quinn, Julian M W

    2013-04-15

    The HSP90 (heat-shock protein 90) inhibitor 17-AAG (17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin) increases osteoclast formation both in vitro and in vivo, an action that can enhance cancer invasion and growth in the bone microenvironment. The cellular mechanisms through which 17-AAG exerts this action are not understood. Thus we sought to clarify the actions of 17-AAG on osteoclasts and determine whether other HSP90 inhibitors had similar properties. We determined that 17-AAG and the structurally unrelated HSP90 inhibitors CCT018159 and NVP-AUY922 dose-dependently increased RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) ligand]-stimulated osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow and pre-osteoclastic RAW264.7 cell cultures. Moreover, 17-AAG also enhanced RANKL- and TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-elicited osteoclastogenesis, but did not affect RANKL-induced osteoclast survival, suggesting that only differentiation mechanisms are targeted. 17-AAG affected the later stages of progenitor maturation (after 3 days of incubation), whereas the osteoclast formation enhancer TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) acted prior to this, suggesting different mechanisms of action. In studies of RANKL-elicited intracellular signalling, 17-AAG treatment did not increase c-Fos or NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) c1 protein levels nor did 17-AAG increase activity in luciferase-based NF-κB- and NFAT-response assays. In contrast, 17-AAG treatment (and RANKL treatment) increased both MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) protein levels and MITF-dependent vATPase-d2 (V-type proton ATPase subunit d2) gene promoter activity. These results indicate that HSP90 inhibitors enhance osteoclast differentiation in an NFATc1-independent manner that involves elevated MITF levels and activity. PMID:23379601

  2. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  3. Malignant Melanoma With Osteoclast-Like Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Jason K; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Ayroud, Yasmine

    2015-09-01

    Osteoclast-like giant cells are frequently encountered in nonskeletal malignancies; however, the evidence to date suggests that they represent a tissue response to the lesion rather than neoplastic differentiation. We describe a case of metastatic melanoma demonstrating osteoclast-like differentiation in the lung. The lung nodule was diagnosed as a metastatic melanoma by histological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Resection specimen showed numerous multinucleated giant cells exhibiting osteoclast-like morphology dispersed throughout the lesion. Both the neoplastic melanocytes and giant cells were reactive for HMB-45, Melan-A, and S100. In addition, the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells were also reactive for the monocyte/macrophage lineage markers CD68 and CD163, and alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme present in normal osteoclasts. The neoplastic melanocytes and the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells were also reactive for microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a protein required for the development of both melanocytes and osteoclasts. Collectively, a co-expression of monocyte/macrophage markers along with melanocytic markers and alkaline phosphatase in the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells in metastatic melanoma suggest that malignant melanocytes are capable of differentiating into osteoclast-like cells and consequently aid invasion into various structures and eliciting the aggressive behavior. PMID:26113663

  4. Tatarinan O, a lignin-like compound from the roots of Acorus tatarinowii Schott inhibits osteoclast differentiation through suppressing the expression of c-Fos and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohan; Liu, Ning; Wang, Yingjian; Pan, Lei-Chang; Wu, Donglin; Peng, Qisheng; Zhang, Maolin; Wang, Hong-Bing; Sun, Wan-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Osteoclasts (OC) are large multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage precursors. Suppressing osteoclastogenesis is considered as an effective therapeutic approach to erosive bone disease. The root of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine was used to treat rheumatosis and other inflammatory disease. However, the effects of tatarinan O (TO), one of the lignin-like compounds isolated from the roots of Acorus tatarinowii Schott during bone development are still unclear. In the present study, we explored the effect of TO on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. TO was found to suppress osteoclast differentiation from RANKL-stimulated mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) without significant cytotoxicity. TO also dose-dependently suppressed bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Additionally, TO apparently inhibited the expression of osteoclastic marker genes, such as MMP-9, Cts K and TRAP. Furthermore, our results showed that TO decreased RANKL-induced expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 without influencing NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Hence, for the first time we revealed that TO dose-dependently inhibited osteoclastogenesis from RANKL-stimulated mouse BMMs via decreasing the expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. PMID:26971224

  5. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity by doxycycline ameliorates RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Gilson C.N.; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Ohta, Kouji; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Groppo, Francisco C.; Bartlett, John D.; Stashenko, Philip; Taubman, Martin A.; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2011-06-10

    Tetracycline antibiotics, including doxycycli/e (DOX), have been used to treat bone resorptive diseases, partially because of their activity to suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, their precise inhibitory mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of Dox on osteoclastogenesis signaling induced by RANKL, both in vitro and in vivo. Although Dox inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and down-modulated the mRNA expression of functional osteoclast markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, Dox neither affected RANKL-induced MAPKs phosphorylation nor NFATc1 gene expression in RAW264.7 murine monocytic cells. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analyses showed that Dox down-regulated the enzyme activity of RANKL-induced MMP-9, but without affecting its protein expression. Furthermore, MMP-9 enzyme inhibitor also attenuated both RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and up-regulation of TRAP and cathepsin K mRNA expression, indicating that MMP-9 enzyme action is engaged in the promotion of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Finally, Dox treatment abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and TRAP activity in mouse calvaria along with the suppression of MMP9 enzyme activity, again without affecting the expression of MMP9 protein. These findings suggested that Dox inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by its inhibitory effect on MMP-9 enzyme activity independent of the MAPK-NFATc1 signaling cascade.

  6. Cyclolinopeptides, cyclic peptides from flaxseed with osteoclast differentiation inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Toshio; Yoshida, Haruka; Nakajima, Yuki; Toishi, Minako; Nugroho, Alfarius Eko; Morita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum seed) is widely used in food and natural health products. In our search for osteoclast differentiation inhibitors, some cyclic peptides isolated from flaxseed, known as the cyclolinopeptides, were discovered to have osteoclast differentiation inhibition activity. The osteoclast differentiation inhibition activity of cyclolinopeptides A-I (1-9) and their related derivatives (10-14) are described herein. Cyclolinopeptides F, H and I (6, 8 and 9), in particular, showed potent osteoclast differentiation inhibition activity. PMID:26923696

  7. Zoledronate inhibits receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via suppression of expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell c1 and carbonic anhydrase 2.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ohta, Kouji; Kubozono, Kazumi; Ishida, Yoko; Naruse, Takako; Takechi, Masaaki; Kamata, Nobuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used in the prevention of skeletal-related events (SRE), including osteoporosis, skeletal metastases of malignant tumours, and multiple myeloma. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is frequently reported as a major adverse effect induced by BP treatment. The receptor activator of the nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor, denosumab, has recently been used to prevent SRE, but the frequency of ONJ induced by denosumab is similar to that by BPs. This finding suggests that the inhibition of RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis may have a close relationship with the occurrence of ONJ. We therefore investigated the expression status of RANKL-inducible genes in zoledronate-treated mouse osteoclast precursor cells. The molecular targets of zoledronate in the RANKL signal pathway and additional factors associated with osteoclastogenesis were analysed by genome-wide screening. Microarray analysis identified that among 31 genes on 44 entities of RANKL-inducible genes, the mRNA expression level of two genes, i.e., nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) and carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), was decreased in zoledronate-treated cells. Subsequent analyses verified that these two genes were significantly silenced by zoledronate treatment and that their expression was restored following inhibition of zoledronate action by geranylgeraniol. Zoledronate inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation by suppression of NFATc1 and CAII gene expression. Our results suggest that these genes might be common targets for zoledronate and denosumab in the mechanism underlying RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. A clear understanding of the common molecular mechanisms of bone-remodelling agents is thus essential for prevention of ONJ. PMID:25601046

  8. Estrogens suppress RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via a stromal cell independent mechanism involving c-Jun repression

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Nirupama K.; Bendixen, Amy C.; Dienger, Krista M.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2000-01-01

    Loss of ovarian function following menopause results in a substantial increase in bone turnover and a critical imbalance between bone formation and resorption. This imbalance leads to a progressive loss of trabecular bone mass and eventually osteoporosis, in part the result of increased osteoclastogenesis. Enhanced formation of functional osteoclasts appears to be the result of increased elaboration by support cells of osteoclastogenic cytokines such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6, all of which are negatively regulated by estrogens. We show here that estrogen can suppress receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism that does not require mediation by stromal cells. This suppression is dose-dependent, isomer-specific, and reversed by ICI 182780. Furthermore, the bone-sparing analogues tamoxifen and raloxifene mimic estrogen's effects. Estrogen blocks RANKL/M-CSF-induced activator protein-1-dependent transcription, likely through direct regulation of c-Jun activity. This effect is the result of a classical nuclear activity by estrogen receptor to regulate both c-Jun expression and its phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our results suggest that estrogen modulates osteoclast formation both by down-regulating the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines from supportive cells and by directly suppressing RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10869427

  9. (+)-Vitisin A Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation by Preventing TRAF6 Ubiquitination and TRAF6-TAK1 Formation to Suppress NFATc1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Wen-Fei; Huang, Yu-Ling; Liu, Yen-Wenn

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that oral administration of a (+)-vitisin A-enriched product prepared from Vitis thunbergii obviously ameliorated bone loss in ovariectomized mice and (+)-vitisin A was able to inhibit receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. Here we further clarified the mechanism(s) by which (+)-vitisin A targets osteoclastic differentiation and activity. Osteoclast-characteristic enzyme activity was determined using gel zymography or spectroflurometric-based assay. Expression of signal molecules was analyzed via Western blot or immunoprecipitation. Results showed that (+)-vitisin A suppressed RANKL-induced multinuclear cells (MNCs) formation and bone resorption which was accompanied with reduction in β3 integrin, osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (OC-STAMP), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and cathepsin K proteins expression. (+)-Vitisin A also down-regulated the proteolytic activities of MMP-9 and cathepsin K via targeting at the late stage function. (+)-Vitisin A prominently abrogated RANKL-triggered nuclear translocations of NF-κB, AP-1 (c-Fos/c-Jun dimer) and associated induction and nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1). The upstream IκB degradation as well as ERK and JNK phosphorylation were also substantially repressed. Transfection with siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) clearly restrained RANKL-induced MNCs formation and NFATc1 induction. Interesting, RANKL triggered poly-ubiquitination of TRAF6 and associated TRAF6-TAK1 (transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1) complex formation was prominently attenuated by (+)-vitisin A. Furthermore, the interaction between c-src tyrosine kinase (c-Src) and β3 was markedly induced by RANKL stimulation. (+)-Vitisin A significantly attenuated this interaction when concomitant treated with RANKL in RAW264.7 cells, but failed to affect c-Src/β3 complex

  10. Tenuigenin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by down-regulating NF-κB activation and suppresses bone loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Li, Xianan; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Hongwei; Zhang, Can; Li, Kanghua

    2015-10-30

    Tenuigenin, a major active component of polygala tenuifolia root, has been used to treat patients with insomnia, dementia, and neurosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of tenuigenin on osteoclastogenesis and clarify the possible mechanism. We showed that tenuigenin inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption without cytotoxicity, which was further demonstrated by reduced osteoclast specific gene expression such as TRAP, c-Src, ATP6v0d2, etc. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of tenuigenin was associated with impaired NF-κB activity owing to delayed degradation/regeneration of IkBa and inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation. Consistent with the in vitro results, micro-ct scanning and analysis data showed that tenuigenin suppressed RANKL-induced bone loss in an animal model. Taken together, our data demonstrate that tenuigenin inhibit osteoclast formation and bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo, and comprise a potential therapeutic alternative for osteoclast-related disorders such as osteoporosis and cancer-induced bone destruction. PMID:26392312

  11. Mutan: A mixed linkage α-[(1,3)- and (1,6)]-d-glucan from Streptococcus mutans, that induces osteoclast differentiation and promotes alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung Min; Han, Kook-Il; Jung, Eui-Gil; Kim, Yong Hyun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Yoon, Mi Sook; Chung, Sung Kyun; Kim, Wan Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2016-02-10

    Mutan is an extracellular polysaccharide of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that consists of α-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in main chains and α-(1,6) bonds in side chains. In the present study, mutan was isolated from S. mutans, and its structural characteristics were determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effects of mutan on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. Furthermore, microCT and morphometric analyses were used to determine the contribution of mutan to alveolar bone loss in the maxilla of a rat periodontitis model. Mutan increased (more than 2-fold) RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Mutan also enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the rat maxilla 2.3-fold. In mutan-treated rats, the bone mineral density, bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness decreased, whereas trabecular separation significantly increased. In addition, mutan and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced similar microarray profiles in RAW 264.7 cells. A total of 43 genes related to osteoclastogenesis were differentially expressed after either mutan or LPS treatment. Five-fold increases in the expression of several genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6, and chemokine ligands, were observed in mutan-treated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inflammation induced by S. mutans during the establishment of periodontal disease. PMID:26686164

  12. Arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing both calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  13. Arctigenin Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation and Function by Suppressing Both Calcineurin-Dependent and Osteoblastic Cell-Dependent NFATc1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  14. Genistein Inhibits Osteoclastic Differentiation of RAW 264.7 Cells via Regulation of ROS Production and Scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been demonstrated to have a bone-sparing and antiresorptive effect. Genistein can inhibit the osteoclast formation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a redox-sensitive factor, to the nucleus. Therefore, the suppressive effect of genistein on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level during osteoclast differentiation and the mechanism associated with the control of ROS levels by genistein were investigated. The cellular antioxidant capacity and inhibitory effect of genistein were confirmed. The translation and activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 1 (Nox1), as well as the disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain system were obviously suppressed by genistein in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was enhanced by genistein. In addition, the translational induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was notably increased by genistein. These results provide that the inhibitory effects of genistein on RANKL-stimulated osteoclast differentiation is likely to be attributed to the control of ROS generation through suppressing the translation and activation of Nox1 and the disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain system, as well as ROS scavenging through the Nrf2-mediated induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD1 and HO-1. PMID:24927148

  15. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation.

  16. Autophagy-linked FYVE containing protein WDFY3 interacts with TRAF6 and modulates RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dennis J; Gu, Ran; Sarin, Ritu; Zavodovskaya, Regina; Chen, Chia-Pei; Christiansen, Blaine A; Adamopoulos, Iannis E

    2016-09-01

    Recently, autophagy-related proteins were shown to regulate osteoclast mediated bone resorption, a critical process in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, the role of autophagy-linked FYVE containing protein, WDFY3, in osteoclast biology remains elusive. WDFY3 is a master regulator in selective autophagy for clearing ubiquitinated protein aggregates and has been linked with rheumatoid arthritis. Herein, we used a series of WDFY3 transgenic mice (Wdfy3(lacZ) and Wdfy3(loxP)) to investigate the function of WDFY3 in osteoclast development and function. Our data demonstrate that WDFY3 is highly expressed at the growth plate of neonatal mice and is expressed in osteoclasts in vitro cultures. Osteoclasts derived from WDFY3 conditional knockout mice (Wdfy3(loxP/loxP)-LysM-Cre(+)) demonstrated increased osteoclast differentiation as evidenced by higher number and enlarged size of TRAP(+) multinucleated cells. Western blot analysis also revealed up-regulation of TRAF6 and an increase in RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling in WDFY3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages compared to wild type cultures. Consistent with these observations WDFY3-deficient cells also demonstrated an increase in osteoclast-related genes Ctsk, Acp5, Mmp9 and an increase of dentine resorption in in vitro assays. Importantly, in vivo RANKL gene transfer exacerbated bone loss in WDFY3 conditional knockout mice, as evidenced by elevated serum TRAP, CTX-I and micro-CT analysis of distal femurs compared to wild type littermates. Taken together, our data highlight a novel role for WDFY3 in osteoclast development and function, which can be exploited for the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases. PMID:27330028

  17. Deficiency of Lipocalin-2 Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoclast Precursors via Regulation of c-Fms Expression and Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ohk, Boram; Kang, Woo Youl; Seong, Sook Jin; Suk, Kyoungho; Lim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a small glycoprotein, has a pivotal role in diverse biological processes such as cellular proliferation and differentiation. We previously reported that LCN2 is implicated in osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). In the present study, we used a knockout mouse model to further investigate the role of LCN2 in osteoclast development. Methods Osteoclastogenesis was assessed using primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. RANKL and M-CSF signaling was determined by immunoblotting, cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and apoptosis by cell death detection ELISA. Bone morphometric parameters were determined using a micro-computed tomography system. Results Our results showed that LCN2 deficiency increases tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated osteoclast formation in vitro, a finding that reflects enhanced proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. LCN2 deficiency promotes M-CSF-induced proliferation of bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), osteoclast precursors, without altering their survival. The accelerated proliferation of LCN2-deficient precursors is associated with enhanced expression and activation of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms. Furthermore, LCN2 deficiency stimulates the induction of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), key transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis, and promotes RANKL-induced inhibitor of kappa B (IκBα) phosphorylation. Interestingly, LCN2 deficiency does not affect basal osteoclast formation in vivo, suggesting that LCN2 might play a role in the enhanced osteoclast development that occurs under some pathological conditions. Conclusions Our study establishes LCN2 as a negative modulator of osteoclast formation, results that are in accordance with our previous findings. PMID:26981515

  18. HDAC2 regulates FoxO1 during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ce; Li, Nan; Ding, Ning; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaochao; Kang, Fei; Cao, Zhen; Quan, Hongyu; Hou, Tianyong; Xu, Jianzhong; Dong, Shiwu

    2016-05-15

    The bone-resorbing osteoclast (OC) is essential for bone homeostasis, yet deregulation of OCs contributes to diseases such as osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Here we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) is a key positive regulator during receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) showed increased HDAC2 expression during osteoclastogenesis. HDAC2 overexpression enhanced, whereas HDAC2 deletion suppressed osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption using lentivirus infection. Mechanistically, upon RANKL activation, HDAC2 activated Akt; Akt directly phosphorylates and abrogates Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1), which is a negative regulator during osteoclastogenesis through reducing reactive oxygen species. HDAC2 deletion in BMMs resulted in decreased Akt activation and increased FoxO1 activity during osteoclastogenesis. In conclusion, HDAC2 activates Akt thus suppresses FoxO1 transcription results in enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Our data imply the potential value of HDAC2 as a new target in regulating osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:26962001

  19. Osteoclast differentiation and function in aquaglyceroporin AQP9 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjian; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Rojek, Aleksandra; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information Osteoclasts are cells specialized for bone resorption and play important roles in bone growth and calcium homeostasis. Differentiation of osteoclasts involves fusion of bone marrow macrophage mononuclear precursors in response to extracellular signals. A dramatic increase in osteoclast cell volume occurs during osteoclast biogenesis and is believed to be mediated by Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a membrane protein that can rapidly transport water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Results Here we report an increase in expression of AQP9 during differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line into osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from wild type and AQP9 null mice differentiate into osteoclasts that have similar morphology, contain comparable numbers of nuclei, and digest synthetic bone to the same extent. Bones from wild type and AQP9 null mice contain similar numbers of osteoclasts and have comparable density and structure as measured by X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography. Conclusions Our data confirm that AQP9 expression rises during osteoclast biogenesis but indicate that AQP9 is not essential for osteoclast function or differentiation under normal physiological conditions. PMID:18666888

  20. Benzo[a]pyrene inhibits osteoclastogenesis by affecting RANKL-induced activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Voronov, I; Li, K; Tenenbaum, H C; Manolson, M F

    2008-05-15

    Exposure to polycyclic aryl hydrocarbons is linked to cancer, immunosuppression and other numerous health problems. We previously demonstrated that exposure to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), an environmental pollutant present in high concentrations in urban smog and cigarette smoke, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. We hypothesized that this inhibition could be due to crosstalk between the receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and AhR signaling cascades competing for NF-kappaB, a common transcription factor for both pathways. RAW264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line capable of differentiating into osteoclasts in the presence of RANKL) were exposed to different concentrations of RANKL and BaP and the effect on NF-kappaB activation, nuclear translocation, as well as the effect of NF-kappaB inhibitors on BaP-mediated CYP1B1 gene expression was measured. The results demonstrated that BaP inhibited both RANKL-induced NF-kappaB activation and nuclear translocation. At the same time, BaP-induced CYP1B1 gene expression was inhibited by two NF-kappaB inhibitors in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating that NF-kappaB is involved in a BaP-mediated signaling pathway. A reporter gene assay showed that both BaP and RANKL-induced luciferase reporter gene transcription under the control of NF-kappaB response elements. Co-immunoprecipitation results demonstrated that AhR interacted with NF-kappaB p65 in RAW cells and BaP appeared to enhance this interaction. However, in the presence of RANKL, we did not observe any interaction between AhR and p65. These results support our hypothesis that BaP-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis is a consequence of crosstalk between AhR and RANKL signaling pathways competing for the common transcription factor NF-kappaB. PMID:18396263

  1. Modulation of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Touaitahuata, Heiani; Blangy, Anne; Vives, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue constantly renewed through a regulated balance between bone formation and resorption. Excessive bone degradation by osteoclasts leads to pathological decreased bone density characteristic of osteolytic diseases such as post-menopausal osteoporosis or bone metastasis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells via a complex differentiation process. Their unique ability to resorb bone is dependent on the formation of the actin-rich sealing zone. Within this adhesion structure, the plasma membrane differentiates into the ruffled border where protons and proteases are secreted to demineralize and degrade bone, respectively. On the bone surface, mature osteoclasts alternate between stationary resorptive and migratory phases. These are associated with profound actin cytoskeleton reorganization, until osteoclasts die of apoptosis. In this review, we highlight the role of Rho GTPases in all the steps of osteoclasts differentiation, function, and death and conclude on their interest as targets for treatment of osteolytic pathologies. PMID:24614674

  2. Retinoid X receptors orchestrate osteoclast differentiation and postnatal bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Rőszer, Tamás; Fuentes, Lucía; Núñez, Vanessa; Escolano, Amelia; Redondo, Juan Miguel; De Clerck, Nora; Metzger, Daniel; Valledor, Annabel F.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are important for maintenance of bone remodeling and mineral homeostasis. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity is important for the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases associated with bone loss. Here, we demonstrate that retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key elements of the transcriptional program of differentiating osteoclasts. Loss of RXR function in hematopoietic cells resulted in formation of giant, nonresorbing osteoclasts and increased bone mass in male mice and protected female mice from bone loss following ovariectomy, which induces osteoporosis in WT females. The increase in bone mass associated with RXR deficiency was due to lack of expression of the RXR-dependent transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family, protein B (MAFB) in osteoclast progenitors. Evaluation of osteoclast progenitor cells revealed that RXR homodimers directly target and bind to the Mafb promoter, and this interaction is required for proper osteoclast proliferation, differentiation, and activity. Pharmacological activation of RXRs inhibited osteoclast differentiation due to the formation of RXR/liver X receptor (LXR) heterodimers, which induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), resulting in indirect MAFB upregulation. Our study reveals that RXR signaling mediates bone homeostasis and suggests that RXRs have potential as targets for the treatment of bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. PMID:25574839

  3. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  4. Stimulation by toll-like receptors inhibits osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takami, Masamichi; Kim, Nacksung; Rho, Jaerang; Choi, Yongwon

    2002-08-01

    Osteoclasts, the cells capable of resorbing bone, are derived from hemopoietic precursor cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The same precursor cells can also give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells, which are essential for proper immune responses to various pathogens. Immune responses to microbial pathogens are often triggered because various microbial components induce the maturation and activation of immunoregulatory cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells by stimulating Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Since osteoclasts arise from the same precursors as macrophages, we tested whether TLRs play any role during osteoclast differentiation. We showed here that osteoclast precursors prepared from mouse bone marrow cells expressed all known murine TLRs (TLR1-TLR9). Moreover, various TLR ligands (e.g., peptidoglycan, poly(I:C) dsRNA, LPS, and CpG motif of unmethylated DNA, which act as ligands for TLR2, 3, 4, and 9, respectively) induced NF-kappa B activation and up-regulated TNF-alpha production in osteoclast precursor cells. Unexpectedly, however, TLR stimulation of osteoclast precursors by these microbial products strongly inhibited their differentiation into multinucleated, mature osteoclasts induced by TNF-related activation-induced cytokine. Rather, TLR stimulation maintained the phagocytic activity of osteoclast precursors in the presence of osteoclastogenic stimuli M-CSF and TNF-related activation-induced cytokine. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR stimulation of osteoclast precursors inhibits their differentiation into noninflammatory mature osteoclasts during microbial infection. This process favors immune responses and may be critical to prevent pathogenic effects of microbial invasion on bone. PMID:12133979

  5. Extract of acai-berry inhibits osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Brito, C; Stavroullakis, A T; Ferreira, A C; Li, K; Oliveira, T; Nogueira-Filho, G; Prakki, A

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is the major cellular event responsible for bone loss and is triggered by inflammation. Acai-berry has proven anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is a lack of evidence for its effects on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether acai-berry extract (ABE) could inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity in vitro. The secretion of cytokines by osteoclasts has been also evaluated. RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with RANKL (50ng/mL) and treated with various concentrations of ABE (25-100μg/mL) to verify: cell viability (MTT), total protein concentration (BCA), osteoclast differentiation and activity, and cytokine secretion. Cell viability and protein assays showed no toxicity to RAW cells for the tested ABE concentrations (p>0.05). ABE also showed a dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and hydroxylapatite resorption assay, respectively (p<0.05). ABE decreased the secretion of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha while increasing the secretion of IL-3, -4, -13 and interferon gamma when compared to the control group (p<0.05). Results of this study showed that acai-berry extract inhibits osteoclast differentiation and activity possibly due to the modulation of a vast number of cytokines produced by osteoclast precursor cells. PMID:27054700

  6. RNA-binding protein Musashi2 induced by RANKL is critical for osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Zhou, J; Ye, S; Zhao, H

    2016-01-01

    The Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins, Musashi1 and Musashi2, regulate self-renewal and differentiation of neuronal and hematopoietic stem cells by modulating protein translation. It has been recently reported that Musashi2, not Musashi1, regulates hematopoietic stem cells. Although osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic cells, the expression and functions of Musashi proteins in osteoclast lineage cells remain unknown. In this study, we have uncovered that Musashi2 is the predominant isoform of Musashi proteins in osteoclast precursors and its expression is upregulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) during osteoclast differentiation. Knocking down the expression of Musashi2 in osteoclast lineage cells by shRNAs attenuates nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) expression and osteoclast formation in vitro. Mechanistically, loss of Musashi2 inhibits Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation and induces apoptosis in pre-osteoclasts. In contrast, depletion of Musashi2 has no effects on cell cycle progression and p21(WAF-1) protein expression in macrophages. Furthermore, depletion of Notch2 and its downstream target Hes1 in osteoclast precursors by shRNAs abrogates osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting NFATc1. Finally, absence of Musashi2 in osteoclast precursors promotes apoptosis and inhibits RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, which is essential for osteoclast survival, Thus, Musashi2 is required for cell survival and optimal osteoclastogenesis by affecting Notch signaling and NF-κB activation. PMID:27441652

  7. RNA-binding protein Musashi2 induced by RANKL is critical for osteoclast survival

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, T; Zhou, J; Ye, S; Zhao, H

    2016-01-01

    The Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins, Musashi1 and Musashi2, regulate self-renewal and differentiation of neuronal and hematopoietic stem cells by modulating protein translation. It has been recently reported that Musashi2, not Musashi1, regulates hematopoietic stem cells. Although osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic cells, the expression and functions of Musashi proteins in osteoclast lineage cells remain unknown. In this study, we have uncovered that Musashi2 is the predominant isoform of Musashi proteins in osteoclast precursors and its expression is upregulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) during osteoclast differentiation. Knocking down the expression of Musashi2 in osteoclast lineage cells by shRNAs attenuates nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) expression and osteoclast formation in vitro. Mechanistically, loss of Musashi2 inhibits Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation and induces apoptosis in pre-osteoclasts. In contrast, depletion of Musashi2 has no effects on cell cycle progression and p21WAF-1 protein expression in macrophages. Furthermore, depletion of Notch2 and its downstream target Hes1 in osteoclast precursors by shRNAs abrogates osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting NFATc1. Finally, absence of Musashi2 in osteoclast precursors promotes apoptosis and inhibits RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, which is essential for osteoclast survival, Thus, Musashi2 is required for cell survival and optimal osteoclastogenesis by affecting Notch signaling and NF-κB activation. PMID:27441652

  8. Aldehydic components of cinnamon bark extract suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through NFATc1 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2008-10-15

    Several major bone diseases are directly attributable to bone loss, including osteoporosis, bone metastasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The nuclear factor of activated T cell 1 (NFATc1), a transcription factor, has recently been shown to play an essential role in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we found that of several herbs, Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zeylanicum) exhibited the strong inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis and that its mechanism of action involves the suppression of NFATc1-mediated signal transduction. C. zeylanicum dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast-like cell formation at concentrations of 12.5-50 microg/ml without affecting cell viability. Resorption pit assays have shown that C. zeylanicum also inhibits the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Treatment with C. zeylanicum inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced NFATc1 and c-fos expression. Additionally, C. zeylanicum moderately inhibited phosphorylation of IkappaB-alpha, suggesting that the c-fos/NFATc1 pathway, rather than the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, is the primary target of C. zeylanicum during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Using an HPLC-DAD system, we identified three major peaks for four characteristic components in the C. zeylanicum extract and identified an unknown peak as 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde via HPLC and a 2D-COSY (1)H NMR study. We identified cinnamaldehyde and 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde as active components reducing osteoclast-like cell formation and inhibiting NFATc1 expression. Notably, in a resorption pit assay, 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde exhibited remarkable inhibition rates of 95% at 2 microM on bone resorption. In summary, this study points to the conclusion that C. zeylanicum inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. This finding raises prospects for the development of a novel approach in the treatment of osteopenic disease. PMID:18823786

  9. The plant limonoid 7-oxo-deacetoxygedunin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Wisutsitthiwong, Chonnaree; Buranaruk, Chayanit; Pudhom, Khanitha; Palaga, Tanapat

    2011-11-18

    Osteoclasts together with osteoblasts play pivotal roles in bone remodeling. Aberrations in osteoclast differentiation and activity contribute to osteopenic disease. Osteoclasts differentiate from monocyte/macrophage progenitors, a process that is initiated by the interaction between receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL. In this study, we identified 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin (7-OG), a gedunin type limonoid from seeds of the mangrove Xylocarpus moluccensis, as a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, 7-OG showed strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity with low cytotoxicity against the monocyte/macrophage progenitor cell line, RAW264.7. The IC50 for anti-osteoclastogenic activity was 4.14μM. Treatment with 7-OG completely abolished the appearance of multinucleated giant cells with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with RANKL. When the expression of genes related to osteoclastogenesis was investigated, a complete downregulation of NFATc1 and cathepsin K and a delayed downregulation of irf8 were observed upon 7-OG treatment in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, treatment with this limonoid suppressed RANKL-induced activation of p38, MAPK and Erk and nuclear localization of NF-κB p65. Taken together, we present evidence indicating a plant limonoid as a novel osteoclastogenic inhibitor that could be used for osteoporosis and related conditions. PMID:22037580

  10. Myristoleic acid inhibits osteoclast formation and bone resorption by suppressing the RANKL activation of Src and Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in osteoclasts such as formation of actin ring is required for bone-resorbing activity. The tyrosine kinase Src is a key player in massive cytoskeletal change of osteoclasts, thereby in bone destruction. In order for Src to be activated, trafficking to the inner plasma membrane via myristoylation is of importance. A previous study reported that myristoleic acid derived from myristic acid, inhibited N-myristoyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for myristoylation process. This prompted us to investigate whether myristoleic acid could affect osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, we observed that myristoleic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in vitro, especially, at later stages of differentiation. Myristoleic acid attenuated the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and Pyk2, which associates with Src, by RANKL. When myristoleic acid was co-administered with soluble RANKL into mice, RANKL-induced bone loss was substantially prevented. Bone dissection clearly revealed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly diminished by myristoleic acid. On the other hand, myristoleic acid treatment had little or no influence on early osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos and NFATc1, and proteins related to cytoskeletal rearrangement, including DC-STAMP, integrin αv and integrin β3 in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that myristoleic acid is capable of blocking the formation of large multinucleated osteoclasts and bone resorption likely through suppressing activation of Src and Pyk2. PMID:26528796

  11. DC-STAMP: A Key Regulator in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Hui; Ritchlin, Christopher T

    2016-11-01

    Osteoimmunology research is a new emerging research field that investigates the links between the bone and immune responses. Results from osteoimmunology studies suggest that bone is not only an essential component of the musculoskeletal system, but is also actively involved in immune regulation. Many important factors involved in immune regulation also participate in bone homeostasis. Bone homeostasis is achieved by a coordinated action between bone-synthesizing osteoblasts and bone-degrading osteoclasts. An imbalanced action between osteoblasts and osteoclasts often results in pathological bone diseases: osteoporosis is caused by an excessive osteoclast activity, whereas osteopetrosis results from an increased osteoblast activity. This review focuses on dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an important protein currently considered as a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. Of clinical relevance, the frequency of circulating DC-STAMP+ cells is elevated during the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases. Intriguingly, recent results suggest that DC-STAMP also plays an imperative role in bone homeostasis by regulating the differentiation of both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. This article summarizes our current knowledge on DC-STAMP by focusing on its interacting proteins, its regulation on osteoclastogenesis-related genes, its possible involvement in immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated signaling cascade, and its potential of developing therapeutics for clinical applications. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2402-2407, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018136

  12. Decreased ferroportin promotes myeloma cell growth and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2015-06-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell-induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  13. The plant limonoid 7-oxo-deacetoxygedunin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Wisutsitthiwong, Chonnaree; Buranaruk, Chayanit; Pudhom, Khanitha; Palaga, Tanapat

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A gedunin type limonoid from seeds of mangroves, 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin, exhibits strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with this limonoid results in significant decrease in expression of NFATc1 and osteoclast-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mode of action of this limonoid is by inhibiting activation of the NF-{kappa}B and MAPK pathways which are activated by RANKL. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts together with osteoblasts play pivotal roles in bone remodeling. Aberrations in osteoclast differentiation and activity contribute to osteopenic disease. Osteoclasts differentiate from monocyte/macrophage progenitors, a process that is initiated by the interaction between receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL. In this study, we identified 7-oxo-7-deacetoxygedunin (7-OG), a gedunin type limonoid from seeds of the mangrove Xylocarpus moluccensis, as a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Additionally, 7-OG showed strong anti-osteoclastogenic activity with low cytotoxicity against the monocyte/macrophage progenitor cell line, RAW264.7. The IC50 for anti-osteoclastogenic activity was 4.14 {mu}M. Treatment with 7-OG completely abolished the appearance of multinucleated giant cells with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with RANKL. When the expression of genes related to osteoclastogenesis was investigated, a complete downregulation of NFATc1 and cathepsin K and a delayed downregulation of irf8 were observed upon 7-OG treatment in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, treatment with this limonoid suppressed RANKL-induced activation of p38, MAPK and Erk and nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65. Taken together, we present evidence indicating a plant limonoid as a novel osteoclastogenic inhibitor that could be used for osteoporosis and related conditions.

  14. Disulfiram attenuates osteoclast differentiation in vitro: a potential antiresorptive agent.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hua; Qin, An; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J; Rea, Sarah; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), a cysteine modifying compound, has long been clinically employed for the treatment of alcohol addiction. Mechanistically, DSF acts as a modulator of MAPK and NF-κB pathways signaling pathways. While these pathways are crucial for osteoclast (OC) differentiation, the potential influence of DSF on OC formation and function has not been directly assessed. Here, we explore the pharmacological effects of DSF on OC differentiation, activity and the modulation of osteoclastogenic signaling cascades. We first analyzed cytotoxicity of DSF on bone marrow monocytes isolated from C57BL/6J mice. Upon the establishment of optimal dosage, we conducted osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption assays in the presence or absence of DSF treatment. Luciferase assays in RAW264.7 cells were used to examine the effects of DSF on major transcription factors activation. Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, intracellular acidification and proton influx assays were employed to further dissect the underlying mechanism. DSF treatment dose-dependently inhibited both mouse and human osteoclastogenesis, especially at early stages of differentiation. This inhibition correlated with a decrease in the expression of key osteoclastic marker genes including CtsK, TRAP, DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2 as well as a reduction in bone resorption in vitro. Suppression of OC differentiation was found to be due, at least in part, to the blockade of several key receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-signaling pathways including ERK, NF-κB and NFATc1. On the other hand, DSF failed to suppress intracellular acidification and proton influx in mouse and human osteoclasts using acridine orange quenching and microsome-based proton transport assays. Our findings indicate that DSF attenuates OC differentiation via the collective suppression of several key RANKL-mediated signaling cascades, thus making it an attractive agent for the treatment of OC

  15. Disulfiram Attenuates Osteoclast Differentiation In Vitro: A Potential Antiresorptive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tak S.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Rea, Sarah; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Ming H.

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), a cysteine modifying compound, has long been clinically employed for the treatment of alcohol addiction. Mechanistically, DSF acts as a modulator of MAPK and NF-κB pathways signaling pathways. While these pathways are crucial for osteoclast (OC) differentiation, the potential influence of DSF on OC formation and function has not been directly assessed. Here, we explore the pharmacological effects of DSF on OC differentiation, activity and the modulation of osteoclastogenic signaling cascades. We first analyzed cytotoxicity of DSF on bone marrow monocytes isolated from C57BL/6J mice. Upon the establishment of optimal dosage, we conducted osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption assays in the presence or absence of DSF treatment. Luciferase assays in RAW264.7 cells were used to examine the effects of DSF on major transcription factors activation. Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, intracellular acidification and proton influx assays were employed to further dissect the underlying mechanism. DSF treatment dose-dependently inhibited both mouse and human osteoclastogenesis, especially at early stages of differentiation. This inhibition correlated with a decrease in the expression of key osteoclastic marker genes including CtsK, TRAP, DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2 as well as a reduction in bone resorption in vitro. Suppression of OC differentiation was found to be due, at least in part, to the blockade of several key receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-signaling pathways including ERK, NF-κB and NFATc1. On the other hand, DSF failed to suppress intracellular acidification and proton influx in mouse and human osteoclasts using acridine orange quenching and microsome-based proton transport assays. Our findings indicate that DSF attenuates OC differentiation via the collective suppression of several key RANKL-mediated signaling cascades, thus making it an attractive agent for the treatment of OC

  16. Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction: inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by abrogation of the RANKL-induced NFATc1 and NF-κB signaling pathways via selective estrogen receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Qiu, Xue-Min; Gui, Yu-Yan; Xu, Ying-Ping; Gober, Hans-Jürgen; Li, Da-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bu-Shen-Ning-Xin decoction (BSNXD) is a traditional Chinese medicinal composition that has been used as a remedy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, but the mechanisms affecting bone metabolism are not fully understood. Purpose We investigated the molecular mechanism and signaling pathway underlying the effect of BSNXD on osteoclastogenesis. Materials and methods A postmenopausal osteoporosis animal model generated by ovariectomy was administered BSNXD and drug-derived serum was prepared. An enzyme immunoassay was conducted to measure the 17-β-estradiol (E2) concentration in the drug-derived serum. Bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage precursor cells were treated with drug-derived serum, and tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase staining was conducted to observe osteoclastogenesis. A bone resorption assay was performed to analyze the effect on osteoclastic resorptive function. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry, Western blotting, transfection, and luciferase assays were conducted to explore the related mechanism. Results E2 was not elevated in BSNXD-derived serum. BSNXD-derived serum suppressed receptor activation of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-activated osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner; this effect could be reversed by estrogen receptor α antagonist methyl-piperidino-pyrazole. The serum suppressed RANKL-induced NF-κB transcription and inhibited the accumulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 in osteoclast precursor cells; the inhibitory effect was abolished by methyl-piperidino-pyrazole but not the estrogen receptor β antagonist or androgen receptor antagonist. Conclusion These results collectively suggest that administration of BSNXD presents inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation by abrogating the RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 and NF-κB signaling pathways downstream of estrogen receptor α, thereby contributing to the inhibitory effect on bone resorption. PMID

  17. Smad 1/5 and Smad 4 Expression Are Important for Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Amy; Stemig, Melissa; Broege, Aaron; Huang, Brandon; Davydova, Julia; Zwijsen, An; Umans, Lieve; Jensen, Eric D.; Gopalakrishnan, Raj; Mansky, Kim C.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the necessity of the canonical BMP pathway during osteoclast differentiation, we created osteoclasts with a conditional gene deletion for Smad1 and Smad5 (SMAD1/5), or Smad4 using adenovirus expressing CRE recombinase (Ad-CRE). Reduction of either Smad4 or Smad1/5 expression resulted in fewer and smaller multinuclear cells compared to control cells. We also detected changes in osteoclast enriched genes, demonstrated by decreased Dc-stamp and cathepsin K expression in both Smad4 and Smad1/5 Ad-CRE osteoclasts, and changes in c-fos and Nfatc1 expression in only Smad4 Ad-CRE cells. Lastly we also detected a significant decrease in resorption pits and area resorbed in both the Smad4 and Smad1/5 Ad-CRE osteoclasts. Because we inhibited osteoclast differentiation with loss of either Smad4 or Smad1/5 expression, we assessed whether BMPs affected osteoclast activity in addition to BMP’s effects on differentiation. Therefore, we treated mature osteoclasts with BMP2 or with dorsomorphin, a chemical inhibitor that selectively suppresses canonical BMP signaling. We demonstrated that BMP2 stimulated resorption in mature osteoclasts whereas treatment with dorsomorphin blocks osteoclast resorption. These results indicate that the BMP canonical signaling pathway is important for osteoclast differentiation and activity. PMID:25711193

  18. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  19. Ethyl-2, 5-dihydroxybenzoate displays dual activity by promoting osteoblast differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Lee, Mi Hee; Koo, Min-Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Han, Jae-Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-03-11

    The interplay between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts is essential for balanced bone remodeling. In this study, we evaluate the ability of ethyl-2, 5-dihyrdoxybenzoate (E-2, 5-DHB) to affect both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation for bone regeneration. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was quantified by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition. To evaluate osteoclast differentiation, we investigated the effect of E-2, 5-DHB on RANKL-activated osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells. E-2, 5-DHB enhanced ALP activity and inhibited RAW 264.7 cell osteoclastogenesis in vitro. To assess the in vivo activity of E-2, 5-DHB, hMSCs were delivered subcutaneosuly alone or in combination with E-2, 5-DHB in an alginate gel into the backs of nude-mice. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluation showed significantly higher calcium deposition in the E-2, 5-DHB group. Osteocalcin (OCN) was highly expressed in cells implanted in the gels containing E-2, 5-DHB. Our results suggest that E-2, 5-DHB can effectively enhance osteoblast differentiation and inhibit osteoclast differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Understanding the dual function of E-2, 5-DHB on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation will aid in future development of E-2, 5-DHB as a material for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26869515

  20. Effects of IL-23 and IL-27 on osteoblasts and osteoclasts: inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Sadahiro; Nakamura, Chika; Fukawa, Takeshi; Ono, Katsuhiro; Ohwaki, Toshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Takayuki; Wada, Seiki

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-27 are IL-6/IL-12 family members that play a role in the regulation of T helper 1 cell differentiation. Cytokines are known to be involved in the bone remodeling process, although the effects of IL-23 and IL-27 have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the possible roles of these cytokines on osteoblast phenotypes and osteoclastogenesis. We found that IL-27 induced signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 activation in osteoblasts. However, neither IL-23 nor IL-27 showed any significant effects on alkaline phosphatase activity, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression, mRNA expression such as alkaline phosphatase type I procollagen, or the proliferation of osteoblasts. Osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow cells induced by soluble RANKL was partially inhibited by IL-23 and IL-27 with reduced multinucleated cell numbers, but these interleukins did not affect the proliferation of osteoclast progenitor cells. These results indicate that IL-23 and IL-27 could partly modify cell fusion or the survival of multinucleated osteoclasts. On the other hand, partially purified T cells, which are activated by 2 microg/ml anti-CD3 antibody, completely inhibited osteoclastogenesis by M-CSF/RANKL. On using T cells activated with 0.2 microg/ml anti-CD3 antibody, in which osteoclastogenesis was partially inhibited, the interleukins had additive effects for inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Although the consequences of phosphorylated signals in osteoblasts have not been identified, IL-23 and IL-27, partly and indirectly through activated T cells, inhibited osteoclastogenesis, indicating that these interleukins may protect against bone destructive autoimmune disorders. PMID:17704992

  1. The Free Fatty Acid Receptor G Protein-coupled Receptor 40 (GPR40) Protects from Bone Loss through Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Wauquier, Fabien; Philippe, Claire; Léotoing, Laurent; Mercier, Sylvie; Davicco, Marie-Jeanne; Lebecque, Patrice; Guicheux, Jérôme; Pilet, Paul; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Poitout, Vincent; Alquier, Thierry; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms linking fat intake to bone loss remain unclear. By demonstrating the expression of the free fatty acid receptor G-coupled protein receptor 40 (GPR40) in bone cells, we hypothesized that this receptor may play a role in mediating the effects of fatty acids on bone remodeling. Using micro-CT analysis, we showed that GPR40−/− mice exhibit osteoporotic features suggesting a positive role of GPR40 on bone density. In primary cultures of bone marrow, we showed that GW9508, a GRP40 agonist, abolished bone-resorbing cell differentiation. This alteration of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation occurred via the inhibition of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway as demonstrated by decrease in gene reporter activity, inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKα/β) activation, inhibitor of κB (IkBα) phosphorylation, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) expression. The GPR40-dependent effect of GW9508 was confirmed using shRNA interference in osteoclast precursors and GPR40−/− primary cell cultures. In addition, in vivo administration of GW9508 counteracted ovariectomy-induced bone loss in wild-type but not GPR40−/− mice, enlightening the obligatory role of the GPR40 receptor. Then, in a context of growing prevalence of metabolic and age-related bone disorders, our results demonstrate for the first time in translational approaches that GPR40 is a relevant target for the design of new nutritional and therapeutic strategies to counter bone complications. PMID:23335512

  2. Sirt6 cooperates with Blimp1 to positively regulate osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Jeong; Huh, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Jihye; Park, Doo Ri; Ko, Ryeojin; Jin, Gyu-Rin; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Shin, Hong-In; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, Hyun Seok; Lee, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Global deletion of the gene encoding a nuclear histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (Sirt6) in mice leads to osteopenia with a low bone turnover due to impaired bone formation. But whether Sirt6 regulates osteoclast differentiation is less clear. Here we show that Sirt6 functions as a transcriptional regulator to directly repress anti-osteoclastogenic gene expression. Targeted ablation of Sirt6 in hematopoietic cells including osteoclast precursors resulted in increased bone volume caused by a decreased number of osteoclasts. Overexpression of Sirt6 led to an increase in osteoclast formation, and Sirt6-deficient osteoclast precursor cells did not undergo osteoclast differentiation efficiently. Moreover, we showed that Sirt6, induced by RANKL-dependent NFATc1 expression, forms a complex with B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1) to negatively regulate expression of anti-osteoclastogenic gene such as Mafb. These findings identify Sirt6 as a novel regulator of osteoclastogenesis by acting as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:27189179

  3. Sirt6 cooperates with Blimp1 to positively regulate osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Jeong; Huh, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Jihye; Park, Doo Ri; Ko, Ryeojin; Jin, Gyu-Rin; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Shin, Hong-In; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, Hyun Seok; Lee, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Global deletion of the gene encoding a nuclear histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (Sirt6) in mice leads to osteopenia with a low bone turnover due to impaired bone formation. But whether Sirt6 regulates osteoclast differentiation is less clear. Here we show that Sirt6 functions as a transcriptional regulator to directly repress anti-osteoclastogenic gene expression. Targeted ablation of Sirt6 in hematopoietic cells including osteoclast precursors resulted in increased bone volume caused by a decreased number of osteoclasts. Overexpression of Sirt6 led to an increase in osteoclast formation, and Sirt6-deficient osteoclast precursor cells did not undergo osteoclast differentiation efficiently. Moreover, we showed that Sirt6, induced by RANKL-dependent NFATc1 expression, forms a complex with B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1) to negatively regulate expression of anti-osteoclastogenic gene such as Mafb. These findings identify Sirt6 as a novel regulator of osteoclastogenesis by acting as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:27189179

  4. Effects of Zinc and Strontium Substitution in Tricalcium Phosphate on Osteoclast Differentiation and Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Fielding, Gary; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    Bone replacement materials must be able to regulate both osteoblastic synthesis of new bone and osteoclastic resorption process in order to maintain the balance of bone remodeling. Osteoclasts generate from differentiation of mononuclear cells. In the present study, we have studied the osteoclast-like-cells responses (differentiation from mononuclear cells and resorption) to beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) doped with zinc (Zn) and strontium (Sr). Osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and resorption was studied in vitro using osteoclast-like-cells precursor RAW 264.7 cell, supplemented with receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL). Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed successful differentiation of osteoclast-like-cells on the doped and undoped β-TCP substrates after 8 days of culture. Cells on the substrate surface expressed specific osteoclast markers such as; actin ring, multiple nucleus, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) synthesis, and vitronectin receptor. However, quantitative TRAP assay indicated the inhibiting effect of Zn on osteoclast differentiation. Although, Zn doped β-TCP restricted osteoclast-like-cells differentiation, the samples were resorbed much faster. An increased resorption pit volume was noticed on Zn doped β-TCP samples after 28 days of culture compared to pure and Sr doped β-TCP. In this work, we demonstrated that β-TCP bone substitute materials can be successfully resorbed by osteoclast-like-cells, where both osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and resorption were modulated by Zn and/or Sr doping- a much needed property for successful bone remodeling. PMID:24244866

  5. Polycan suppresses osteoclast differentiation and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Eun; Park, Kwang-Soo; Park, Eui-Kyun; Im, Sang-Uk; Choi, Youn-Hee; Song, Keun-Bae

    2016-08-01

    Particle-induced osteolysis is a major issue, and it is most likely the result of enhanced osteoclast activation in the pathogenesis of various skeletal diseases. This study investigated whether the inhibitory effect that Polycan has on osteoclast differentiation can be used to treat osteolysis induced by titanium (Ti) particles. To this end, the effects of Polycan were examined in terms of the cytotoxicity, osteoclast differentiation, cytokine expression, and Ti-induced calvarial osteolysis. Polycan had no significant cytotoxic effects on bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) but instead increased BMM proliferation. High levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were expressed in BMM cells in the presence of Polycan, suggesting that Polycan drives the differentiation of BMMs into M1 macrophages. Polycan significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation induced by M-CSF and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The expression levels of the osteoclast marker genes significantly decreased, and Polycan induced and maintained the expression of IL-12, which suppressed osteoclast differentiation. In contrast, the RANKL signaling pathway was not inhibited by Polycan. An in vivo calvarial osteolysis model revealed that Polycan significantly decreased the osteoclast numbers and suppressed osteolysis. Our results suggest that the natural compound Polycan is a good candidate for therapeutic intervention against enhanced osteoclast differentiation and Ti particle-induced osteolysis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1170-1175, 2016. PMID:26097144

  6. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Deficiency Causes Impaired Osteoclastogenesis and Increased Bone Mass in Mice because of Defect in Osteoclastic Cell-Cell Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Okayasu, Mari; Nakayachi, Mai; Hayashida, Chiyomi; Ito, Junta; Kaneda, Toshio; Masuhara, Masaaki; Suda, Naoto; Sato, Takuya; Hakeda, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with both atherosclerosis and vascular calcification attributed to hyperlipidemia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms explaining the parallel progression of these diseases remain unclear. Here, we used low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice to elucidate the role of LDLR in regulating the differentiation of osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone resorption. Culturing wild-type osteoclast precursors in medium containing LDL-depleted serum decreased receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation, and this defect was additively rescued by simultaneous treatment with native and oxidized LDLs. Osteoclast precursors constitutively expressed LDLR in a RANKL-independent manner. Osteoclast formation from LDLR−/− osteoclast precursors was delayed, and the multinucleated cells formed in culture were smaller and contained fewer nuclei than wild-type cells, implying impaired cell-cell fusion. Despite these findings, RANK signaling, including the activation of Erk and Akt, was normal in LDLR−/− preosteoclasts, and RANKL-induced expression of NFATc1 (a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis), cathepsin K, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase was equivalent in LDLR-null and wild-type cells. In contrast, the amounts of the osteoclast fusion-related proteins v-ATPase V0 subunit d2 and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein in LDLR−/− plasma membranes were reduced when compared with the wild type, suggesting a correlation with impaired cell-cell fusion, which occurs on the plasma membrane. LDLR−/− mice consistently exhibited increased bone mass in vivo. This change was accompanied by decreases in bone resorption parameters, with no changes in bone formation parameters. These findings provide a novel mechanism for osteoclast differentiation and improve the understanding of the correlation between osteoclast formation and lipids. PMID:22500026

  7. High bone mass in mice lacking Cx37 because of defective osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Davis, Hannah M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2014-03-21

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37(-/-)) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37(-/-) mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37(-/-) mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37(+/+) littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37(-/-) bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37(+/+) cell cultures. Further, Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37(-/-) mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  8. High Bone Mass in Mice Lacking Cx37 Because of Defective Osteoclast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D.; Davis, Hannah M.; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R.; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37−/−) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37−/− mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37−/− mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37+/+ littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37−/− bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37+/+ cell cultures. Further, Cx37−/− osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37−/− osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37−/− mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  9. Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption by Bisphosphonate-conjugated Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghyun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Kim, Han-Jun; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Bang, Jae Beum; Lee, Jung Bok; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Do, Sun Hee; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been reported to affect the regeneration of bone tissue. The goal of this study was to improve bone tissue regeneration by using targeted GNPs. We fabricated a functionalized GNPs conjugated with alendronate (ALD), of the bisphosphonate group. Subsequently, the ALD, GNPs, and ALD conjugated GNPs (GNPs-ALD) were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible absorbance (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared GNPs-ALD were used to investigate their inhibitory effects on the receptor activator of nuclear factor- κb ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Additionally, the GNPs-ALD were applied to ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporotic mice and the experiments were evaluated. ALD was found to be successfully conjugated to the GNPs surface, and it displayed significant adhesion onto the bone surface. The in-vitro study indicated that the GNPs, ALD and GNPs-ALD suppressed osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, in the OVX mouse model, the mice treated GNPs-ALD had higher bone density as compared to other OVX mice groups. The results from these tests indicated that GNPs-ALD can be useful agents for preventing and treating osteoporosis. PMID:27251863

  10. Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption by Bisphosphonate-conjugated Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghyun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Kim, Han-Jun; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Bang, Jae Beum; Lee, Jung Bok; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Do, Sun Hee; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been reported to affect the regeneration of bone tissue. The goal of this study was to improve bone tissue regeneration by using targeted GNPs. We fabricated a functionalized GNPs conjugated with alendronate (ALD), of the bisphosphonate group. Subsequently, the ALD, GNPs, and ALD conjugated GNPs (GNPs-ALD) were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible absorbance (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared GNPs-ALD were used to investigate their inhibitory effects on the receptor activator of nuclear factor- κb ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Additionally, the GNPs-ALD were applied to ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporotic mice and the experiments were evaluated. ALD was found to be successfully conjugated to the GNPs surface, and it displayed significant adhesion onto the bone surface. The in-vitro study indicated that the GNPs, ALD and GNPs-ALD suppressed osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, in the OVX mouse model, the mice treated GNPs-ALD had higher bone density as compared to other OVX mice groups. The results from these tests indicated that GNPs-ALD can be useful agents for preventing and treating osteoporosis. PMID:27251863

  11. Thymoquinone prevents RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis activation and osteolysis in an in vivo model of inflammation by suppressing NF-KB and MAPK Signalling.

    PubMed

    Thummuri, Dinesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Nemani, Harishankar; Ramavat, Ravindar Naik; Chaudhari, Pradip; Naidu, V G M

    2015-09-01

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear giant cells responsible for bone resorption in inflammatory bone diseases such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis. Because of deleterious side effects with currently available drugs the search continues for novel effective and safe therapies. Thymoquinone (TQ), the major bioactive component of Nigella sativa has been investigated for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, its effects in osteoclastogenesis have not been reported. In the present study we show for the first time that TQ inhibits nuclear factor-KB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 and primary bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMs) cells. RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis is associated with increased expression of multiple transcription factors via activation of NF-KB, MAPKs signalling and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically TQ blocked the RANKL induced NF-KB activation by attenuating the phosphorylation of IkB kinase (IKKα/β). Interestingly, in RAW 264.7 cells TQ inhibited the RANKL induced phosphorylation of MAPKs and mRNA expression of osteoclastic specific genes such as TRAP, DC-STAMP, NFATc1 and c-Fos. In addition, TQ also decreased the RANKL stimulated ROS generation in macropahges (RAW 264.7) and H2O2 induced ROS generation in osteoblasts (MC-3T3-E1). Consistent with in vitro results, TQ inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced bone resorption by suppressing the osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, micro-CT analysis showed that bone mineral density (BMD) and bone architecture parameters were positively modulated by TQ. Taken together our data demonstrate that TQ has antiosteoclastogenic effect by inhibiting inflammation induced activation of MAPKs, NF-KB and ROS generation followed by suppressing the gene expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors. PMID:26022736

  12. Adseverin plays a role in osteoclast differentiation and periodontal disease-mediated bone loss.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Viniegra, Ana; Sima, Corneliu; McCulloch, Christopher A; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclast differentiation and function are highly dependent on the assembly and turnover of actin filaments, but little is known about the roles of actin binding proteins in these processes. Adseverin (Ads), a member of the gelsolin superfamily of actin capping and severing proteins, regulates actin filament turnover and can regulate the turnover of cortical actin filaments of chromaffin cells during exocytosis. Using a conditional Ads knockout mouse model, we confirmed our previous finding in cultured cells that Ads plays a role in osteoclastogenesis (OCG) and actin cytoskeletal organization in osteoclasts. Here we show that Ads is required for osteoclast formation and that when alveolar bone resorption is experimentally induced in mice, genetic deletion of Ads prevents osteoclast-mediated bone loss. Further, when Ads-null osteoclasts are cultured, they exhibit defective OCG, disorganized podosome-based actin filament superstructures, and decreased bone resorption. Reintroduction of Ads into Ads-null osteoclast precursor cells restored these osteoclast defects. Collectively, these data demonstrate a unique and osteoclast-specific role for Ads in OCG and osteoclast function. PMID:25681458

  13. Wnt Signaling Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation by Activating Canonical and Noncanonical cAMP/PKA Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Weivoda, Megan M; Ruan, Ming; Hachfeld, Christine M; Pederson, Larry; Howe, Alan; Davey, Rachel A; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Williams, Bart O; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been extensive characterization of the Wnt signaling pathway in the osteoblast lineage, the effects of Wnt proteins on the osteoclast lineage are less well studied. We found that osteoclast lineage cells express canonical Wnt receptors. Wnt3a reduced osteoclast formation when applied to early bone-marrow macrophage (BMM) osteoclast differentiation cultures, whereas late addition did not suppress osteoclast formation. Early Wnt3a treatment inactivated the crucial transcription factor NFATc1 in osteoclast progenitors. Wnt3a led to the accumulation of nuclear β-catenin, confirming activation of canonical Wnt signaling. Reducing low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (Lrp) 5 and Lrp6 protein expression prevented Wnt3a-induced inactivation of NFATc1; however, deletion of β-catenin did not block Wnt3a inactivation of NFATc1, suggesting that this effect was mediated by a noncanonical pathway. Wnt3a rapidly activated the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and pharmacological stimulation of cAMP/PKA signaling suppressed osteoclast differentiation; Wnt3a-induced NFATc1 phosphorylation was blocked by inhibiting interactions between PKA and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). These data indicate that Wnt3a directly suppresses osteoclast differentiation through both canonical (β-catenin) and noncanonical (cAMP/PKA) pathways in osteoclast precursors. In vivo reduction of Lrp5 and Lrp6 expressions in the early osteoclast lineage via Rank promoter Cre recombination reduced trabecular bone mass, whereas disruption of Lrp5/6 expression in late osteoclast precursors via cathepsin K (Ctsk) promoter Cre recombination did not alter the skeletal phenotype. Surprisingly, reduction of Lrp5/6 in the early osteoclast lineage decreased osteoclast numbers, as well as osteoblast numbers. Published studies have previously noted that β-catenin signaling is required for osteoclast progenitor proliferation. Our in vivo data

  14. Identification of Nedd9 as a TGF-β-Smad2/3 Target Gene Involved in RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis by Comprehensive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Tetsuro; Hirose, Jun; Izawa, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Takumi; Imai, Yuuki; Seo, Sachiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Kadono, Yuho; Morimoto, Chikao; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    TGF-ß is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and function. We previously reported an essential role of the TGF-ß -Smad2/3 pathways in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing, we comprehensively identified Smad2/3 target genes in bone marrow macrophages. These genes were enriched in the gene population upregulated by TGF-ß and downregulated by RANKL. Recent studies have revealed that histone modifications, such as trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and lysine 27 (H3K27me3), critically regulate key developmental steps. We identified Nedd9 as a Smad2/3 target gene whose histone modification pattern was converted from H3K4me3(+)/H3K4me27(+) to H3K4me3(+)/H3K4me27(-) by TGF-ß. Nedd9 expression was increased by TGF-ß and suppressed by RANKL. Overexpression of Nedd9 partially rescued an inhibitory effect of a TGF-ß inhibitor, while gene silencing of Nedd9 suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis were reduced and stimulatory effects of TGF-ß on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis were partially abrogated in cells from Nedd9-deficient mice although knockout mice did not show abnormal skeletal phenotypes. These results suggest that Nedd9 is a Smad2/3 target gene implicated in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27336669

  15. Positive regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by growth differentiation factor 15 upregulated in osteocytic cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Ochi, Hiroki; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakatani, Eri; Iezaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hidano, Shinya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Takeda, Shu; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Osteocytes are thought to play a role as a mechanical sensor through their communication network in bone. Although osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone, little attention has been paid to their physiological and pathological functions in skeletogenesis. Here, we have attempted to delineate the pivotal functional role of osteocytes in regulation of bone remodeling under pathological conditions. We first found markedly increased osteoclastic differentiation by conditioned media (CM) from osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells previously exposed to hypoxia in vitro. Using microarray and real-time PCR analyses, we identified growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) as a key candidate factor secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia. Recombinant GDF15 significantly promoted osteoclastic differentiation in a concentration-dependent manner, with concomitant facilitation of phosphorylation of both p65 and inhibitory-κB in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. To examine the possible functional significance of GDF15 in vivo, mice were subjected to ligation of the right femoral artery as a hypoxic model. A significant increase in GDF15 expression was specifically observed in tibias of the ligated limb but not in tibias of the normally perfused limb. Under these experimental conditions, in cancellous bone of proximal tibias in the ligated limb, a significant reduction was observed in bone volume, whereas a significant increase was seen in the extent of osteoclast surface/bone surface when determined by bone histomorphometric analysis. Finally, the anti-GDF15 antibody prevented bone loss through inhibiting osteoclastic activation in tibias from mice with femoral artery ligation in vivo, in addition to suppressing osteoclastic activity enhanced by CM from osteocytes exposed to hypoxia in vitro. These findings suggest that GDF15 could play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bone loss relevant to hypoxia through promotion of osteoclastogenesis after

  16. Interleukin-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the osteoclastogenic process

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Huixian; Shi, Zhenqi; Qiao, Ping; Li, Hui; McCoy, Erin M.; Mao, Ping; Xu, Hui; Feng, Xu; Wang, Shunqing

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generates a population of hematopoietic cells. •IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts. •Osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are functional. •IL-3 promotes the development of osteoclast progenitors. •IL-3 inhibits the osteoclastogenic process. -- Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-3, a multilineage hematopoietic growth factor, is implicated in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. However, the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis remains controversial; whereas early studies showed that IL-3 stimulates osteoclastogenesis, recent investigations demonstrated that IL-3 inhibits osteoclast formation. The objective of this work is to further address the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis. We found that IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generated a population of cells capable of differentiating into osteoclasts in tissue culture dishes in response to the stimulation of the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). The IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were able to further proliferate and differentiate in response to M-CSF stimulation and the resulting cells were also capable of forming osteoclasts with M-CSF and RANKL treatment. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits M-CSF-/RANKL-induced differentiation of the IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells into osteoclasts. The flow cytometry analysis indicates that while IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells slightly affected the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the surviving populations, it considerably increased the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the populations after subsequent M-CSF treatment. Moreover, osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were fully functional. Thus, we conclude that IL-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the

  17. Glycosylation of immunoglobulin G determines osteoclast differentiation and bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Harre, Ulrike; Lang, Stefanie C.; Pfeifle, René; Rombouts, Yoann; Frühbeißer, Sabine; Amara, Khaled; Bang, Holger; Lux, Anja; Koeleman, Carolien A.; Baum, Wolfgang; Dietel, Katharina; Gröhn, Franziska; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Krönke, Gerhard; Kocijan, Roland; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Toes, René E. M.; Herrmann, Martin; Scherer, Hans Ulrich; Schett, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Immunglobulin G (IgG) sialylation represents a key checkpoint that determines the engagement of pro- or anti-inflammatory Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and the direction of the immune response. Whether IgG sialylation influences osteoclast differentiation and subsequently bone architecture has not been determined yet, but may represent an important link between immune activation and bone loss. Here we demonstrate that desialylated, but not sialylated, immune complexes enhance osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we find that the Fc sialylation state of random IgG and specific IgG autoantibodies determines bone architecture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In accordance with these findings, mice treated with the sialic acid precursor N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc), which results in increased IgG sialylation, are less susceptible to inflammatory bone loss. Taken together, our findings provide a novel mechanism by which immune responses influence the human skeleton and an innovative treatment approach to inhibit immune-mediated bone loss. PMID:25825024

  18. Prostate cancer promotes CD11b positive cells to differentiate into osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Kosuke; Sud, Sudha; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2009-01-01

    Bone is the preferred site of prostate cancer metastasis, contributing to the morbidity and mortality of this disease. A key step in the successful establishment of prostate cancer bone metastases is activation of osteoclasts with subsequent bone resorption causing the release of several growth factors from the bone matrix. CD11b+ cells in bone marrow are enriched for osteoclast precursors. Conditioned media from prostate cancer PC-3 cells induces CD11b+ cells from human peripheral blood to differentiate into functional osteoclasts with subsequent bone resorption. Analysis of PC-3 conditioned media revealed high amounts of IL-6 and IL-8. CD11b+ cells were cultured with M-CSF and RANKL, IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2, alone or in combination. All of these conditions induced osteoclast fusion, but cells cultured with M-CSF, IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 were capable of limited bone resorption. Co-incubation with IL-6 and IL-8 and the RANK inhibitor, RANK-Fc, failed to inhibit osteoclast fusion and bone resorption, suggesting a potential RANKL-independent mechanism of functional osteoclast formation. This study demonstrates that functional osteoclasts can be derived from CD11b+ cells derived from human PBMCs. Prostate cancer cells secrete factors, including IL-6 and IL-8, that play an important role in osteoclast fusion by a RANKL-independent mechanism. PMID:19170075

  19. Supporting data for the effect of gamma-secretase inhibitors in osteoclast differentiation and spreading.

    PubMed

    Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Jung-Wook; Kim, Hong-Hee; Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Zang Hee

    2016-06-01

    The data in this article is related to the research article entitled "Notch2 signaling promotes osteoclast resorption via activation of PYK2" (Jin et al., 2016 [1]). To block Notch signaling activation, we used several gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and evaluate the inhibitory potential of GSIs on osteoclastogenesis. We measured the effect of GSIs on osteoclastogenesis and normal spreading of osteoclasts by using the mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) which may contributes to insight of physiological relevant of in vivo. This data article suggests valuable approach to GSIs treatment doses and potential of those in the osteoclast differentiation and spreading. PMID:27054177

  20. Monosodium Urate in the Presence of RANKL Promotes Osteoclast Formation through Activation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jung-Yoon; Park, Ki-Yeun; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand- (RANKL-) RANK-induced osteoclast formation. RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were incubated with MSU crystals or RANKL and differentiated into osteoclast-like cells as confirmed by staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and actin ring, pit formation assay, and TRAP activity assay. MSU crystals in the presence of RANKL augmented osteoclast differentiation, with enhanced mRNA expression of NFATc1, cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase II, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in comparison to RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated in the presence of RANKL alone. Treatment with both MSU crystals and RANKL induced osteoclast differentiation by activating downstream molecules in the RANKL-RANK pathway including tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF-6), JNK, c-Jun, and NFATc1. IL-1b produced in response to treatment with both MSU and RANKL is involved in osteoclast differentiation in part through the induction of TRAF-6 downstream of the IL-1b pathway. This study revealed that MSU crystals contribute to enhanced osteoclast formation through activation of RANKL-mediated pathways and recruitment of IL-1b. These findings suggest that MSU crystals might be a pathologic causative agent of bone destruction in gout. PMID:26347587

  1. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  2. Differentiation signalobody: Demonstration of antigen-dependent osteoclast differentiation from a progenitor cell line.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Hideto; Aoyama, Saeko; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    A "cytokine-less" in vitro differentiation method would be promising for cost-effective mass production of cells used for regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a differentiation signalobody S-RANK, in which the extracellular domain of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) is replaced with a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) to attain signaling in response to an inexpensive antigen. A murine macrophage cell line RAW264, which is known to differentiate into an osteoclast by RANK ligand (RANKL), was lentivirally transduced with S-RANK. When the resultant cells were cultured with a specific antigen, the cells differentiated into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts. The differentiation efficiency was almost comparable to those induced by RANKL. In addition, the signaling analysis demonstrated that nuclear factor kappa-B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways, which are the major signaling pathways downstream of wild-type RANK, were also activated by S-RANK. These results demonstrate that S-RANK sufficiently mimics signal transduction of wild-type RANK. Differentiation signalobodies may be applied for controlling differentiation of other cell types by using appropriate signaling domains. PMID:26979343

  3. Osteoprotegerin exposure at different stages of osteoclastogenesis differentially affects osteoclast formation and function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Gu, Jianhong; Dai, Nannan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Dong; Song, Ruilong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Liu, Zongping

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), during the various stages of osteoclast differentiation, and additionally investigate its effects on osteoclast adhesion and activity. RAW264.7 murine monocytic cells were incubated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor and RANKL for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days, followed by an additional 24-h incubation in the presence or absence of OPG (80 ng/mL). We examined osteoclast differentiation and adhesion capacity using the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and immunofluorescence microscopy, and additionally examined cell growth in real time using the xCELLigence system. Furthermore, the expression levels of TRAP, RANK, integrin β3, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase II, and vesicular-type H(+)-ATPase A1 were examined using western blotting. OPG exposure on day 1 enhanced the osteoclast growth curve as well as adhesion, and increased RANK and integrin β3 expression. In contrast, exposure to OPG at later time points (days 3-7) inhibited osteoclast differentiation, adhesion structure formation, and protease expression. In conclusion, the biological effects of OPG exposure at the various stages of osteoclast differentiation were varied, and included the enhanced adhesion and survival of preosteoclasts, the block of differentiation from the early to the terminal stages of osteoclastogenesis, and suppression of mature osteoclast activation following OPG exposure during the terminal differentiation stage, suggesting that the effects of OPG exposure differ based on the stage of differentiation. PMID:26044733

  4. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or

  5. Production and Functional Characterization of Murine Osteoclasts Differentiated from ER-Hoxb8-Immortalized Myeloid Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Frank; Mueller, Alexandra; Gessner, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro differentiation into functional osteoclasts is routinely achieved by incubation of embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or primary as well as cryopreserved spleen and bone marrow-derived cells with soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Additionally, osteoclasts can be derived from co-cultures with osteoblasts or by direct administration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage cells. However, despite their benefits for osteoclast-associated research, these different methods have several drawbacks with respect to differentiation yields, time and animal consumption, storage life of progenitor cells or the limited potential for genetic manipulation of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we therefore established a novel protocol for the differentiation of osteoclasts from murine ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid stem cells. We isolated and immortalized bone marrow cells from wild type and genetically manipulated mouse lines, optimized protocols for osteoclast differentiation and compared these cells to osteoclasts derived from conventional sources. In vitro generated ER-Hoxb8 osteoclasts displayed typical osteoclast characteristics such as multi-nucleation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of supernatants and cells, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption activity. Furthermore, the osteoclast differentiation time course was traced on a gene expression level. Increased expression of osteoclast-specific genes and decreased expression of stem cell marker genes during differentiation of osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8-immortalized myeloid progenitor cells were detected by gene array and confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR approaches. In summary, we established a novel method for the quantitative production of murine bona fide osteoclasts from ER-Hoxb8 stem cells generated from wild type or

  6. RANKL-induced down-regulation of CX3CR1 via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway suppresses Fractalkine/CX3CL1-induced cellular responses in RAW264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Yurika; Koizumi, Keiichi Sakurai, Hiroaki; Minami, Takayuki; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-12-21

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) is essential for osteoclast differentiation. In this study, we examined the effects of RANKL on chemokine receptor expression in osteoclast precursor cells, RAW264.7 cells. CX3CL1 (also called Fractalkine) receptor, CX3CR1 mRNA expression, was rapidly reduced by treatment with RANKL in contrast to the increased expression of CCR1 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). This reduction occurred within 12 h and was maintained for 5 days during osteoclastogenesis. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, but not mitogen-activated protein kinases, restored the RANKL-induced reduction of CX3CR1 mRNA. The stability of CX3CR1 mRNA was not changed, suggesting transcriptional repression by RANKL. The down-regulation of CX3CR1 mRNA correlated with the suppression of CX3CL1-induced activation of Akt and ERK as well as chemotaxis. These results suggest a potential role for decreased CX3CL1-CX3CR1 interaction in osteoclastogenesis.

  7. The Alternative Faces of Macrophage Generate Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Lampiasi, N; Russo, R; Zito, F

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how osteoclasts are generated and whether they can be altered by inflammatory stimuli is a topic of particular interest for osteoclastogenesis. It is known that the monocyte/macrophage lineage gives rise to osteoclasts (OCs) by the action of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL), which induce cell differentiation through their receptors, c-fms and RANK, respectively. The multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) generated by the engagement of RANK/RANKL are typical OCs. Nevertheless, very few studies have addressed the question of which subset of macrophages generates OCs. Indeed, two main subsets of macrophages are postulated, the inflammatory or classically activated type (M1) and the anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated type (M2). It has been proposed that macrophages can be polarized in vitro towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype with the addition of granulocyte macrophage- (GM-) CSF or M-CSF, respectively. Various inflammatory stimuli known to induce macrophage polarization, such as LPS or TNF-α, can alter the type of MGC obtained from RANKL-induced differentiation. This review aims to highlight the role of immune-related stimuli and factors in inducing macrophages towards the osteoclastogenesis choice. PMID:26977415

  8. Differentiation kinetics of osteoclasts in the periosteum of embryonic bones in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Kawilarang-De Haas, E.W.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    Osteoclast progenitors are seeded via the blood stream in the mesenchyme surrounding embryonic long bone models long before the appearance of multinucleated osteoclasts. The proliferation and differentiation of these progenitors in embryonic mouse metatarsal bones was studied with acid phosphatase (AcP) histochemistry and /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography. In vivo, tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase-positive, mononuclear cells appear in the periosteum (AcPP-P cells) at the age of 17 days (after conception). On day 18, AcP-positive, multinucleated osteoclasts invade the bone rudiment and start resorbing the calcified cartilage matrix, resulting in the formation of the marrow cavity. The kinetics of osteoclast formation in vitro was studied in metatarsal bones of embryonic mice of different ages cultured in the continuous presence of /sup 3/H-thymidine. In young bones (15 days), mainly proliferating, /sup 3/H-thymidine-incorporating progenitors gave rise to AcPP-P cell and osteoclast formation. In older bones (16 and 17 days) osteoclasts were progressively more derived from postmitotic, unlabeled precursors. Irradiation of the metatarsal bones with a radiation dose of 5.0 Gy prior to culture resulted in a selective elimination of the proliferating progenitors, whereas the contribution of postmitotic precursors in AcPP-P cell and osteoclast formation remained unchanged. The results demonstrate that in the periosteum of embryonic metatarsal bones a shift occurs from a population composed of proliferating osteoclast progenitors (15 days) to a population composed of postmitotic precursors (17 days) before multinucleated osteoclasts are formed (18 days).

  9. New roles of filopodia and podosomes in the differentiation and fusion process of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Song, R L; Liu, X Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhang, J M; Gao, Q; Zhao, H Y; Sheng, A Z; Yuan, Y; Gu, J H; Zou, H; Wang, Q C; Liu, Z P

    2014-01-01

    The cytoskeleton mediates various cellular processes such as differentiation and fusion, including in the filopodia and podosomes. However, apart from cell migration and formation of the sealing zone, little is known regarding the changes and related regulatory mechanisms of the cytoskeleton and additional roles of the filopodia and podosomes during the differentiation and fusion of osteoclasts. The cytomorphology and cytoskeleton of osteoclasts in the differentiation process were evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, the expression levels of Rho GTPases and enzymes related to osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We detected 3 types of filopodia in osteoclast precursors and only 1 type of filopodia in undifferentiated cells. Mature osteoclasts were completely devoid of filopodia. Interestingly, cell fusion was highly specific, and the fusion initially occurred to the filopodia. Confocal images revealed that F-actin and microtubules significantly differed among fused cells. These results suggest that filopodia and podosomes not only play important roles in cell migration and the formation of sealing zones but also in the pre-fusion selectivity of 2 cells and the movement direction of the cell nucleus and cytoplasm during the fusion process. In addition, cdc42v1, RhoU, and RhoF regulate the formation of 3 types of filopodia during various stages of differentiation, while Rac1, Rac2, and filament A may be associated with cell selectivity during the fusion process. PMID:25062413

  10. Prevention of Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis by a Novel V-ATPase Inhibitor Saliphenylhalamide through Inhibition of Osteoclast Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Chim, Shek M.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Xu, Jiake; Zheng, Ming Hao; Dai, Ke Rong

    2012-01-01

    Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening (Aseptic prosthetic loosening) is one of the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty. It is well established that extensive bone destruction (osteolysis) by osteoclasts is responsible for wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption should prevent wear particle induced osteolysis and may serve as a potential therapeutic avenue for prosthetic loosening. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that saliphenylhalamide, a new V-ATPase inhibitor attenuates wear particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In vitro biochemical and morphological assays revealed that the inhibition of osteolysis is partially attributed to a disruption in osteoclast acidification and polarization, both a prerequisite for osteoclast bone resorption. Interestingly, the V-ATPase inhibitor also impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we showed that saliphenylhalamide affected multiple physiological processes including osteoclast differentiation, acidification and polarization, leading to inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption in vitro and wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. The results of the study provide proof that the new generation V-ATPase inhibitors, such as saliphenylhalamide, are potential anti-resorptive agents for treatment of peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:22509274

  11. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) dose-dependently reduces osteoclast differentiation and resorption.

    PubMed

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Perrot, Rodolphe; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Boni, Sébastien; Flatt, Peter R; Irwin, Nigel; Chappard, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A role for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in controlling bone resorption has been suspected. However uncertainty remains to identify whether GIP act directly on osteoclasts. The aim of the present study were (i) to identify in different osteoclast differentiation models (human peripheral blood mononuclear cells-PBMC, murine bone marrow macrophage-BMM and murine Raw 264.7 cells) whether GIP was capable of reducing osteoclast formation and resorption; (ii) ascertain whether the highly potent GIP analogue N-AcGIP was capable of inducing a response at lower concentrations and (iii) to decipher the molecular mechanisms responsible for such effects. [d-Ala(2)]-GIP dose-dependently reduced osteoclast formation at concentration as low as 1nM in human PBMC and 10nM in murine BMM cultures. Furthermore, [d-Ala(2)]-GIP also reduced the extent of osteoclast resorption at concentration as low as 1nM in human PBMC and murine BMM cultures. The mechanism of action of [d-Ala(2)]-GIP appeared to be mediated by reduction in intracellular calcium concentration and oscillation that subsequently inhibited calcineurin activity and NFATc1 nuclear translocation. The potency of the highly potent N-AcGIP was determined and highlighted an effect on osteoclast formation and resorption at concentration ten times lower than observed with [d-Ala(2)]-GIP in vitro. Furthermore, N-AcGIP was also capable of reducing the number of osteoclast in ovariectomized mice as well as the circulating level of type I collagen C-telopeptide. Pharmacological concentrations required for reducing osteoclast formation and resorption provide the impetus to design and exploit enzymatically stable GIP analogues for the treatment of bone resorption disorders in humans. PMID:27451082

  12. Role of heterodimerization of c-Fos and Fra1 proteins in osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Takada, Yasunari; Radolf, Martin; Eferl, Robert; Yaniv, Moshe; Wagner, Erwin F; Matsuo, Koichi

    2007-04-01

    Bone resorbing osteoclasts are specialized macrophages that cannot differentiate in the absence of c-Fos, a member of the dimeric transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein-1). However, osteoclast differentiation in the absence of c-Fos can be rescued in vitro and in vivo by Fra1, a Fos-like protein and transcriptional target of c-Fos. To enable AP-1 proteins binding to DNA, c-Fos or Fra1 must heterodimerize with a partner such as c-Jun, JunB and JunD. In this study, we investigated the dimerization partners of c-Fos and Fra1 required for osteoclast differentiation using synthetic "single-chain" AP-1 dimers in which c-Fos or Fra1 is tethered via a linker to Jun proteins. When c-Fos was analyzed in combination with any Jun protein, including a c-Jun mutant lacking major phosphorylation sites for c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), osteoclasts were efficiently formed from c-Fos-deficient hematopoietic precursors. However, Fra1 in combination with any Jun protein could not rescue osteoclastogenesis. The ability to rescue was compared to transcriptional activity measured in transient transfection assays using promoters driven by consensus AP-1 sites or a composite AP-1/NFAT binding site. These data show that a single Jun/c-Fos dimer is sufficient for osteoclast differentiation, likely due to its transactivation ability for a broader range of promoters, in particular consensus AP-1 sites. We propose that Fra1 together with a dimerization partner different from Jun proteins can rescue osteoclast differentiation in c-Fos-deficient precursors. PMID:17189721

  13. Complex effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on the differentiation and functional activity of human pre-osteoclastic cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Rodrigues, João; Silva, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Almeida, Maria Margarida; Costa, Maria Elisabete; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-12-01

    Nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) is a promising material in clinical applications targeting the bone tissue. NanoHA is able to modulate bone cellular events, which accounts for its potential utility, but also raises safety concerns regarding the maintenance of the bone homeostasis. This work analyses the effects of HA nanoparticles (HAnp) on osteoclastic differentiation and activity, an issue that has been barely addressed. Rod-like HAnp, produced by a hydrothermal precipitation method, were tested on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which contains the CD14+ osteoclastic precursors, in unstimulated or osteoclastogenic-induced conditions. HAnp were added at three time-points during the osteoclastic differentiation pathway, and cell response was evaluated for osteoclastic related parameters. Results showed that HAnp modulated the differentiation and function of osteoclastic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the effects were dependent on the stage of osteoclastic differentiation. In unstimulated PBMC, HAnp significantly increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the formation of mature osteoclasts, as evident by the significant increase of TRAP activity, number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, osteoclastic gene expression and resorbing ability. However, in a population of mature osteoclasts (formed in osteoclastogenic-induced PBMC cultures), HAnp caused a dose-dependent decrease on the osteoclastic-related parameters. These results highlight the complex effects of HAnp in osteoclastic differentiation and activity, and suggest the possibility of HAnp to modulate/disrupt osteoclastic behavior, with eventual imbalances in the bone metabolism. This should be carefully considered in bone-related and other established and prospective biomedical applications of HAnp. PMID:26000372

  14. Intracellular and extracellular ATP coordinately regulate the inverse correlation between osteoclast survival and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Iwasawa, Mitsuyasu; Nakashima, Tomoki; Mori, Shuuichi; Shigemoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Katagiri, Hideki; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2012-11-01

    Osteoclasts, highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin, have two conflicting tendencies: a lower capacity to survive and a higher capacity to execute energy-consuming activities such as bone resorption. Here, we report that when compared with their precursors, mature mitochondria-rich osteoclasts have lower levels of intracellular ATP, which is associated with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced Bcl-x(L) down-regulation. Severe ATP depletion, caused by disrupting mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) gene, leads to increased bone-resorbing activity despite accelerated apoptosis. Although AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation by ATP depletion is not involved in the regulation of osteoclast function, the release of ATP from intracellular stores negatively regulates bone-resorbing activity through an autocrine/paracrine feedback loop by altering cytoskeletal structures. Furthermore, osteoclasts derived from aged mice exhibit reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and intracellular ATP levels with increased bone-resorbing activity, implicating the possible involvement of age-related mitochondrial dysfunction in osteoporosis. Thus, our study provides evidence for a mechanism underlying the control of cellular functions by reciprocal changes in intracellular and extracellular ATP, which regulate the negative correlation between osteoclast survival and bone resorption. PMID:22988253

  15. Effect of Age on Regulation of Human Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ping-Lin; Zhou, Shuanhu; Eslami, Behnam; Shen, Longxiang; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Glowacki, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Human skeletal aging is characterized as a gradual loss of bone mass due to an excess of bone resorption not balanced by new bone formation. Using human marrow cells, we tested the hypothesis that there is an age-dependent increase in osteoclastogenesis due to intrinsic changes in regulatory factors [macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG)] and their receptors [c-fms and RANK]. In bone marrow cells (BMCs), c-fms (r=0.61, p=0.006) and RANK expression (r=0.59, p=0.008) were increased with age (27-82 years, n=19). In vitro generation of osteoclasts was increased with age (r=0.89, p=0.007). In enriched marrow stromal cells (MSCs), constitutive expression of RANKL was increased with age (r=0.41, p=0.049) and expression of OPG was inversely correlated with age (r=-0.43, p=0.039). Accordingly, there was an age-related increase in RANKL/OPG (r=0.56, p=0.005). These data indicate an age-related increase in human osteoclastogenesis that is associated with an intrinsic increase in expression of c-fms and RANK in osteoclast progenitors, and, in the supporting MSCs, an increase in pro-osteoclastogenic RANKL expression and a decrease in anti-osteoclastogenic OPG. These findings support the hypothesis that human marrow cells and their products can contribute to skeletal aging by increasing the generation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. These findings help to explain underlying molecular mechanisms of progressive bone loss with advancing age in humans. PMID:24700654

  16. Follistatin-like 1 promotes osteoclast formation via RANKL-mediated NF-κB activation and M-CSF-induced precursor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kang, Woo Youl; Seong, Sook Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Lim, Mi-Sun; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2016-09-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) functions as a pivotal modulator of inflammation and is implicated in many inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we report that FSTL1 is strongly upregulated and secreted during osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and that FSTL1 positively regulates osteoclast formation induced by RANKL and M-CSF. The overexpression of FSTL1 or treatment with recombinant FSTL1 (rFSTL1) in BMMs enhances the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts and the induction of c-Fos and NFATc1, transcription factors important for osteoclastogenesis. Conversely, knockdown of FSTL1 using a small hairpin RNA suppresses osteoclast formation and the expression of these transcription factors. While FSTL1 does not affect RANKL-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK, phosphorylation of IκBα, JNK, and ERK were increased by overexpression or addition of rFSTL1. Furthermore, rFSTL1 increased RANKL-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition to its role in osteoclastogenesis, FSTL1 promotes proliferation of osteoclast precursors by increasing M-CSF-induced ERK activation, which in turn leads to accelerated osteoclast formation. Together, our findings demonstrate that FSTL1 is a secreted osteoclastogenic factor that plays a critical role in osteoclast formation via the NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:27234130

  17. Mutation in Osteoactivin Promotes Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL)-mediated Osteoclast Differentiation and Survival but Inhibits Osteoclast Function*

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmagid, Samir M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Moussa, Fouad M.; Belcher, Joyce Y.; Yu, Bing; Stinnett, Hilary; Novak, Kimberly; Mbimba, Thomas; Khol, Matthew; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Malcuit, Christopher; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the importance of osteoactivin (OA/Gpnmb) in osteogenesis. In this study, we examined the role of OA in osteoclastogenesis, using mice with a nonsense mutation in the Gpnmb gene (D2J) and wild-type controls (D2J/Gpnmb+). In these D2J mice, micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased cortical thickness, whereas total porosity and eroded surface were significantly reduced in D2J mice compared with wild-type controls, and these results were corroborated by lower serum levels of CTX-1. Contrary to these observations and counterintuitively, temporal gene expression analyses supported up-regulated osteoclastogenesis in D2J mice and increased osteoclast differentiation rates ex vivo, marked by increased number and size. The finding that MAPK was activated in early differentiating and mature D2J osteoclasts and that survival of D2J osteoclasts was enhanced and mediated by activation of the AKT-GSK3β pathway supports this observation. Furthermore, this was abrogated by the addition of recombinant OA to cultures, which restored osteoclastogenesis to wild-type levels. Moreover, mix and match co-cultures demonstrated an induction of osteoclastogenesis in D2J osteoblasts co-cultured with osteoclasts of D2J or wild-type. Last, in functional osteo-assays, we show that bone resorption activity of D2J osteoclasts is dramatically reduced, and these osteoclasts present an abnormal ruffled border over the bone surface. Collectively, these data support a model whereby OA/Gpnmb acts as a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation and survival but not function by inhibiting the ERK/AKT signaling pathways. PMID:25837253

  18. [Research on effect of Sargentodoxae caulis on activity of osteoclasts and proliferation differentiation of osteoblasts].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-zhen; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Jun-fei; Zhang, Xue; Feng, Ting-ting

    2015-11-01

    Through morphological observation, HE staining, TRAP staining and toluidine blue staining of bone resorption pits to identify osteoclasts which obtained by 1α, 25-(OH)2 VitD3 inducing rabbit bone marrow cells. Three indicators-TRAP staining, TRAP enzyme activity detecting and the number and area of bone resorption pits were adapted to detect the effect of Sargentodoxae caulis on the activity of osteoclasts. Culturing MC3T3-E1 Subclong 14 cells and detecting the effect of S. caulis on differentiation and proliferation of them by MTT and detecting the alkaline phosphatase in cells. The results show that all of the low, middle and high doses of water and alcohol extracts of S. caulis have significant inhibition on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption ability in a dose-dependent manner. The low and middle doses of water and alcohol extracts of S. caulis can stimulate differentiation and proliferation of MC3T3-ElSubclone 14 cells, which indicates S. caulis can prevent osteoporosis and the function could be achieved by inhibiting osteoclast activity and promoting the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. PMID:27097425

  19. V-ATPase subunit ATP6AP1 (Ac45) regulates osteoclast differentiation, extracellular acidification, lysosomal trafficking, and protease exocytosis in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De-Qin; Feng, Shengmei; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Haibo; Paulson, Christie; Li, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis in osteoclasts are essential for ruffled border formation and bone resorption. Yet, the mechanism underlying lysosomal trafficking and the related process of exocytosis remains largely unknown. We found ATP6ap1 (Ac45), an accessory subunit of vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases), to be highly induced by receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) in osteoclast differentiation. Ac45 knockdown osteoclasts formed normal actin rings, but had severely impaired extracellular acidification and bone resorption. Ac45 knockdown significantly reduced osteoclast formation. The decrease in the number of osteoclasts does not result from abnormal apoptosis; rather, it results from decreased osteoclast precursor cell proliferation and fusion, which may be partially due to the downregulation of ERK phosphorylation and FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-fos), nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and Tm7sf4 expression. Notably, Ac45 knockdown osteoclasts exhibited impaired lysosomal trafficking and exocytosis, as indicated by the absence of lysosomal trafficking to the ruffled border and a lack of cathepsin K exocytosis into the resorption lacuna. Our data revealed that the impaired exocytosis is specifically due to Ac45 deficiency, and not the general consequence of a defective V-ATPase. Together, our results demonstrate the essential role of Ac45 in osteoclast-mediated extracellular acidification and protease exocytosis, as well as the ability of Ac45 to guide lysosomal intracellular trafficking to the ruffled border, potentially through its interaction with the small GTPase Rab7. Our work indicates that Ac45 may be a novel therapeutic target for osteolytic disease. PMID:22467241

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders. PMID:26318644

  1. NDRG2 Expression Decreases Tumor-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation by Down-regulating ICAM1 in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bomi; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Bone matrix is properly maintained by osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In the tumor microenvironment, osteoclasts are increasingly differentiated by the various ligands and cytokines secreted from the metastasized cancer cells at the bone metastasis niche. The activated osteoclasts generate osteolytic lesions. For this reason, studies focusing on the differentiation of osteoclasts are important to reduce bone destruction by tumor metastasis. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been known to contribute to the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis, but the precise role of NDRG2 in osteoclast differentiation induced by cancer cells has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells has an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation. RAW 264.7 cells, which are monocytic preosteoclast cells, treated with the conditioned media (CM) of murine breast cancer cells (4T1) expressing NDRG2 are less differentiated into the multinucleated osteoclast-like cells than those treated with the CM of 4T1-WT or 4T1-mock cells. Interestingly, 4T1 cells stably expressing NDRG2 showed a decreased mRNA and protein level of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), which is known to enhance osteoclast maturation. Osteoclast differentiation was also reduced by ICAM1 knockdown in 4T1 cells. In addition, blocking the interaction between soluble ICAM1 and ICAM1 receptors significantly decreased osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells in the tumor environment. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of ICAM1 expression by NDRG2 in breast cancer cells decreases osteoclast differentiation, and demonstrate that excessive bone resorption could be inhibited via ICAM1 down-regulation by NDRG2 expression. PMID:26759696

  2. NDRG2 Expression Decreases Tumor-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation by Down-regulating ICAM1 in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Nam, Sorim; Lim, Ji Hyun; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Bone matrix is properly maintained by osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In the tumor microenvironment, osteoclasts are increasingly differentiated by the various ligands and cytokines secreted from the metastasized cancer cells at the bone metastasis niche. The activated osteoclasts generate osteolytic lesions. For this reason, studies focusing on the differentiation of osteoclasts are important to reduce bone destruction by tumor metastasis. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been known to contribute to the suppression of tumor growth and metastasis, but the precise role of NDRG2 in osteoclast differentiation induced by cancer cells has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that NDRG2 expression in breast cancer cells has an inhibitory effect on osteoclast differentiation. RAW 264.7 cells, which are monocytic preosteoclast cells, treated with the conditioned media (CM) of murine breast cancer cells (4T1) expressing NDRG2 are less differentiated into the multinucleated osteoclast-like cells than those treated with the CM of 4T1-WT or 4T1-mock cells. Interestingly, 4T1 cells stably expressing NDRG2 showed a decreased mRNA and protein level of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), which is known to enhance osteoclast maturation. Osteoclast differentiation was also reduced by ICAM1 knockdown in 4T1 cells. In addition, blocking the interaction between soluble ICAM1 and ICAM1 receptors significantly decreased osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells in the tumor environment. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduction of ICAM1 expression by NDRG2 in breast cancer cells decreases osteoclast differentiation, and demonstrate that excessive bone resorption could be inhibited via ICAM1 down-regulation by NDRG2 expression. PMID:26759696

  3. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  4. Lycorine suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevents ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuai; Jin, Gu; Huang, Kang-Mao; Ma, Jian-Jun; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yan; Tang, Xiao-Zhen; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Ji-Ying; Qin, An; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts play an important role in diseases involving bone loss. In this study, we assessed the effect of a plant-derived natural alkaloid (lycorine, or LY) on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis could be inhibited by LY; this effect was due to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling via MAP kinase kinases (MKKs). The MAPK agonist anisomycin could partially rescue the inhibitory effect of LY. Furthermore, LY also played a protective role in both a murine ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model and a titanium particle-induced osteolysis model. These results confirmed that LY was effective in preventing osteoclast-related diseases in vivo. In conclusion, our results show that LY is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and therefore could be used to treat OVX-induced osteoporosis and wear particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:26238331

  5. TAK1 Is Essential for Osteoclast Differentiation and Is an Important Modulator of Cell Death by Apoptosis and Necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, YunJu; Xie, Min; Schneider, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), a mitogen-activated protein 3 (MAP3) kinase, plays an essential role in inflammation by activating the IκB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and stress kinase (p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK]) pathways in response to many stimuli. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) regulates osteoclastogenesis through its receptor, RANK, and the signaling adaptor TRAF6. Because TAK1 activation is mediated through TRAF6 in the interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) and toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, we sought to investigate the consequence of TAK1 deletion in RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. We generated macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-derived monocytes from the bone marrow of mice with TAK1 deletion in the myeloid lineage. Unexpectedly, TAK1-deficient monocytes in culture died rapidly but could be rescued by retroviral expression of TAK1, inhibition of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase activity with necrostatin-1, or simultaneous genetic deletion of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Further investigation using TAK1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts revealed that TNF-α-induced cell death was abrogated by the simultaneous inhibition of caspases and knockdown of RIP3, suggesting that TAK1 is an important modulator of both apoptosis and necroptosis. Moreover, TAK1-deficient monocytes rescued from programmed cell death did not form mature osteoclasts in response to RANKL, indicating that TAK1 is indispensable to RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. To our knowledge, we are the first to report that mice in which TAK1 has been conditionally deleted in osteoclasts develop osteopetrosis. PMID:23166301

  6. Apolipoprotein E inhibits osteoclast differentiation via regulation of c-Fos, NFATc1 and NF-κB

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo-Shin; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2013-02-15

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a major role in the transport and metabolism of lipid. Other functions of ApoE include modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The expression of ApoE in osteoblasts and its relevance with bone formation have also been reported. However, the effect of ApoE on osteoclasts has not yet been examined. Here, we investigated the role of ApoE in osteoclast differentiation using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 cells. We found a down-regulation of ApoE gene expression during osteoclastic differentiation of those cells. Overexpression of ApoE in BMMs and RAW264.7 cells significantly blocked the induction of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1), transcription factors critical for expression of osteoclast marker genes, by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), the osteoclast differentiation factor. ApoE inhibited osteoclast differentiation, as measured by decreased number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNCs). In addition, ApoE reduced the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) and ATPase, H{sup +} transporting, lysosomal 38 kDa, V0 subunit d2 (ATP6v0d2), genes involved in cell–cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis. Knock-down of ApoE using a specific siRNA promoted the RANKL-mediated induction of osteoclast differentiation. While ApoE did not affect the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways by RANKL, the phosphorylation of p65 trans-activation domain on serine 536 and transcription activity of NF-κB were reduced by ApoE overexpression. These findings suggest that ApoE plays an inhibitory role in osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of RANKL-dependent activation of NF-κB and induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. - Highlights: ► Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation and activation of NF-κB. ► ApoE decreased the induction of osteoclast marker

  7. Fibrillin-1 directly regulates osteoclast formation and function by a dual mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Kerstin; Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Rajakumar, Irina; Kaur, Jasvir; Roughley, Peter; Reinhardt, Dieter P.; Komarova, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to a number of heritable disorders, which are all characterized by various malformations of bone as well as manifestations in other tissues. However, the role of fibrillin-1 in the development and homeostasis of bone is not well understood. Here, we examined the role of fibrillin-1 in regulating osteoclast differentiation from primary bone-marrow-derived precursors and monocytic RAW 264.7 cells. The soluble N-terminal half of fibrillin-1 (rFBN1-N) strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis, whereas the C-terminal half (rFBN1-C) did not. By contrast, when rFBN1-N was immobilized on calcium phosphate, it did not affect osteoclastogenesis but modulated osteoclast resorptive activity, which was evident by a larger number of smaller resorption pits. Using a panel of recombinant sub-fragments spanning rFBN1-N, we localized an osteoclast inhibitory activity to the 63 kDa subfragment rF23 comprising the N-terminal region of fibrillin-1. Osteoclastic resorption led to the generation of small fibrillin-1 fragments that were similar to those identified in human vertebral bone extracts. rF23, but not rFBN1-N, was found to inhibit the expression of cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and Dcstamp in differentiating osteoclasts. rFBN1-N, but not rF23, exhibited interaction with RANKL. Excess RANKL rescued the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by rFBN1-N. By contrast, rF23 disrupted RANKL-induced Ca2+ signaling and activation of transcription factor NFATc1. These studies highlight a direct dual inhibitory role of N-terminal fibrillin-1 fragments in osteoclastogenesis, the sequestration of RANKL and the inhibition of NFATc1 signaling, demonstrating that osteoclastic degradation of fibrillin-1 provides a potent negative feedback that limits osteoclast formation and function. PMID:24039232

  8. NLRP12 provides a critical checkpoint for osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Jennifer L.; Zeng, Rong; Hickman-Brecks, Cynthia L.; Wilson, Justin E.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Novack, Deborah V.

    2015-01-01

    The alternative or noncanonical nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway regulates the osteoclast (OC) response to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and thus bone metabolism. Although several lines of evidence support the emerging concept that nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain-containing receptor 12 (NLRP12) impedes alternative NF-κB activation in innate immune cells, a functional role for NLRP12 outside an inflammatory disease model has yet to be reported. Our study demonstrates that NLRP12 has a protective role in bone via suppression of alternative NF-κB–induced osteoclastogenesis and is down-modulated in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. Here, we show that retroviral overexpression of NLRP12 suppressed RelB nuclear translocation and OC formation. Conversely, genetic ablation of NLRP12 promoted NIK stabilization, RelB nuclear translocation, and increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Using radiation chimeras, we demonstrated these in vitro observations dovetail with our in vivo findings that NLRP12 deficiency leads to enhanced OC numbers accompanied by a significant decline in bone mass under physiological conditions. Consistent with the basal bone phenotype, we also observed an enhanced osteolytic response following RANKL injection over the calvaria of NLRP12-deficient chimeric mice compared with wild-type control mice. Thus, modulation of NLRP12 levels controls alternative NF-κB signaling in OC precursors, altering bone homeostasis and osteolytic responses. PMID:26240332

  9. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    OMORI, AKINA; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; DEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; SUZUKI, KUNIAKI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1. PMID:26171153

  10. The collection of NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast includes numerous genes non-essential to physiologic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Coury, Fabienne; Sulyanto, Rosalyn; Sitara, Despina; Wu, Jing; Brady, Nicholas; Tsang, Kelly; Sigrist, Kirsten; Tollefsen, Douglas M.; He, Li; Storm, Daniel; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialized secretory cells of the myeloid lineage important for normal skeletal homeostasis as well as pathologic conditions of bone including osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and cancer metastasis. Differentiation of these multinucleated giant cells from precursors is controlled by the cytokine RANKL, which through its receptor RANK initiates a signaling cascade culminating in the activation of transcriptional regulators which induce the expression of the bone degradation machinery. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) is the master regulator of this process and in its absence osteoclast differentiation is aborted both in vitro and in vivo. Differential mRNA expression analysis by microarray is used to identify genes of potential physiologic relevance across nearly all biologic systems. We compared the gene expression profile of murine wild-type and NFATc1-deficient osteoclast precursors stimulated with RANKL and identified that the majority of the known genes important for osteoclastic bone resorption require NFATc1 for induction. Here, five novel RANKL-induced, NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast are described: Nhedc2, Rhoc, Serpind1, Adcy3 and Rab38. Despite reasonable hypotheses for the importance of these molecules in the bone resorption pathway and their dramatic induction during differentiation, the analysis of mice with mutations in these genes failed to reveal a function in osteoclast biology. Compared to littermate controls, none of these mutants demonstrated a skeletal phenotype in vivo or alterations in osteoclast differentiation or function in vitro. These data highlight the need for rigorous validation studies to complement expression profiling results before functional importance can be assigned to highly regulated genes in any biologic process. PMID:22985540

  11. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor is indispensable for both proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Takahashi, N; Udagawa, N; Tamura, T; Akatsu, T; Stanley, E R; Kurokawa, T; Suda, T

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of action of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in osteoclast development was examined in a co-culture system of mouse osteoblastic cells and spleen cells. In this co-culture, osteoclast-like multinucleated cells (MNCs) were formed within 6 d in response to 10 nM 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 added only for the final 2 d of culture. Simultaneously adding hydroxyurea for the final 2 d completely inhibited proliferation of cultured cells without affecting 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-stimulated MNC formation. Autoradiographic examination using [3H]-thymidine revealed that osteoclast progenitors primarily proliferated during the first 4 d, whereas their differentiation into MNCs occurred predominantly during the final 2 d of culture in response to 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3. When anti-M-CSF antibody or anti-M-CSF receptor antibody was added either for the first 4 d or for the final 2 d, the MNC formation was similarly inhibited. In co-cultures of normal spleen cells and osteoblastic cells obtained from op/op mice, which cannot produce functionally active M-CSF, the lack of M-CSF either for the first 4 d or for the final 2 d failed to form MNCs in response to 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 added for the last 2 d. These results clearly indicate that M-CSF is indispensable for both proliferation of osteoclast progenitors and their differentiation into mature osteoclasts. Images PMID:8423223

  12. Thymosin Beta-4 Suppresses Osteoclastic Differentiation and Inflammatory Responses in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Im; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Bae, Won-Jung; Lee, Soojung; Cha, Hee-Jae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest that thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a key regulator for wound healing and anti-inflammation. However, the role of Tβ4 in osteoclast differentiation remains unclear. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate Tβ4 expression in H2O2-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs), the effects of Tβ4 activation on inflammatory response in PDLCs and osteoclastic differentiation in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), and identify the underlying mechanism. Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Osteoclastic differentiation was assessed in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) using conditioned medium (CM) from H2O2-treated PDLCs. Results Tβ4 was down-regulated in H2O2-exposed PDLCs in dose- and time-dependent manners. Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide attenuated the H2O2-induced production of NO and PGE2 and up-regulated iNOS, COX-2, and osteoclastogenic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17) as well as reversed the effect on RANKL and OPG in PDLCs. Tβ4 peptide inhibited the effects of H2O2 on the activation of ERK and JNK MAPK, and NF-κB in PDLCs. Furthermore, Tβ4 peptide inhibited osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast-specific gene expression, and p38, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation and NF-κB activation in RANKL-stimulated BMMs. In addition, H2O2 up-regulated Wnt5a and its cell surface receptors, Frizzled and Ror2 in PDLCs. Wnt5a inhibition by Wnt5a siRNA enhanced the effects of Tβ4 on H2O2-mediated induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenic cytokines as well as helping osteoclastic differentiation whereas Wnt5a activation by Wnt5a peptide reversed it. Conclusion In conclusion, this study demonstrated, for the first time, that Tβ4 was down-regulated in ROS-stimulated PDLCs as well as Tβ4 activation exhibited anti-inflammatory effects and anti-osteoclastogenesis in vitro

  13. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  14. Class A scavenger receptor promotes osteoclast differentiation via the enhanced expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK)

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, Kenichi; Sakashita, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Lei, XiaoFeng; Ohnishi, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2010-01-22

    Osteoclasts originate from bone marrow monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, and their differentiation depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand. Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is one of the principal functional molecules of macrophages, and its level of expression declines during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of SR-A in osteoclastogenesis, we examined pathological changes in femoral bone and the expression levels of osteoclastogenesis-related molecules in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. The femoral osseous density of SR-A{sup -/-} mice was higher than that of SR-A{sup +/+} mice, and the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly decreased. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that the differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is impaired in SR-A{sup -/-} mice. Elimination of SR-A did not alter the expression level of the M-CSF receptor, c-fms; however, the expression levels of RANK and RANK-related osteoclast-differentiation molecules such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) significantly decreased. Furthermore, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL), an SR-A ligand, significantly increased the expression level of RANK and MITF during osteoclast differentiation. These data indicate that SR-A promotes osteoclastogenesis via augmentation of the expression level of RANK and its related molecules.

  15. Non-Canonical (RANKL-Independent) Pathways of Osteoclast Differentiation and Their Role in Musculoskeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sabokbar, A; Mahoney, D J; Hemingway, F; Athanasou, N A

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from mononuclear phagocyte precursors (monocytes, macrophages); in the canonical pathway of osteoclastogenesis, these cells fuse and differentiate to form specialised bone-resorbing osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). Non-canonical pathways of osteoclastogenesis have been described in which several cytokines and growth factors are able to substitute for RANKL. These humoral factors can generally be divided into those which, like RANKL, are tumour necrosis family (TNF) superfamily members and those which are not; the former include TNFα lymphotoxin exhibiting inducible expression and competing with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpesvirus entry mediator, a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes (LIGHT), a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) and B cell activating factor (BAFF); the latter include transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-11, nerve growth factor (NGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. This review summarises the evidence for these RANKL substitutes in inducing osteoclast differentiation from tissue-derived and circulating mononuclear phagocytes. It also assesses the role these factors are likely to play in promoting the pathological bone resorption seen in many inflammatory and neoplastic lesions of bone and joint including rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic implant loosening and primary and secondary tumours of bone. PMID:26578261

  16. Antiresorptive Activity of Bacillus-Fermented Antler Extracts: Inhibition of Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sik-Won; Moon, Seong-Hee; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Son, Young-Jin; Yu, Ri; Kim, Young Su; Kim, So I.; Chae, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang-Joon; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Antlers have been traditionally used for thousands of years as a natural product with medicinal and pharmaceutical properties. In developing healthy foods, Bacillus-mediated fermentation is widely used to enhance the biological activity of nutrients in foods. Recently, fermentation was shown to enhance the osteogenic activity of antlers. This study aimed to elucidate the antiresorptive activity of Bacillus-fermented antler and its mode of action. We found that Bacillus-fermented antler extract strongly inhibited osteoclast differentiation by downregulating the expression and activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1). This extract also inhibited the activation of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a signaling molecule that could regulate NFATc1 transcriptional activity. This suggested that Bacillus-fermented antler extract could inhibit PLCγ2-NFATc1 signaling required for bone resorption and cell fusion. Consequently, Bacillus-fermented antler extract might benefit osteoclast-related disorders, including osteoporosis; furthermore, it may improve gastrointestinal activity. PMID:23509596

  17. Suppressive effects of the leaf of Terminalia catappa L. on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and bone weight loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Chie; Nishimoto, Sogo; Takami, Masamichi; Woo, Je-Tae; Yazawa, Kazunaga

    2012-01-01

    Oral administration of Terminalia catappa extract (TCE; 1,000 mg/kg) for 5 wk suppressed bone weight loss and trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized mice. An in vitro experiment showed that TCE (1.3-20 µg/mL) did not increase alkaline phosphatase activity, which would indicate osteoclast formation, in osteoblast-like 3T3-L1 cells. On the other hand, TCE (12.5 µg/mL) markedly decreased the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, which would indicate osteoclast formation, in a co-culture system (bone marrow cells/osteoblastic UAMS-32 cells). A detailed analysis of the stages of osteoclast differentiation revealed that TCE mainly suppressed the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells into osteoclast progenitor cells in the presence of M-CSF and TGF-β. An additional experiment using fractionated TCE revealed that the water-soluble fraction suppressed the bone weight loss in OVX-mice and osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Therefore, the suppressive effects of TCE on bone weight loss in mice might be due to the suppressive effects of highly polar components on the early stage of osteoclast differentiation. PMID:22790571

  18. Dual Effect of Chrysanthemum indicum Extract to Stimulate Osteoblast Differentiation and Inhibit Osteoclast Formation and Resorption In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Park, Sun-Hyang; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Oh, Jaemin; Lee, Myeung Su

    2014-01-01

    The risk of bone-related diseases increases due to the imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively. The goal in the development of antiosteoporotic treatments is an agent that will improve bone through simultaneous osteoblast stimulation and osteoclast inhibition without undesirable side effects. To achieve this goal, numerous studies have been performed to identify novel approaches using natural oriental herbs to treat bone metabolic diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Chrysanthemum indicum extract (CIE) on the differentiation of osteoclastic and osteoblastic cells. CIE inhibited the formation of TRAP-positive mature osteoclasts and of filamentous-actin rings and disrupted the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. CIE strongly inhibited Akt, GSK3β, and IκB phosphorylation in RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophages and did not show any effects on MAP kinases, including p38, ERK, and JNK. Interestingly, CIE also enhanced primary osteoblast differentiation via upregulation of the expression of alkaline phosphatase and the level of extracellular calcium concentrations during the early and terminal stages of differentiation, respectively. Our results revealed that CIE could have a potential therapeutic role in bone-related disorders through its dual effects on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation. PMID:25530776

  19. Interleukin-33 is expressed in differentiated osteoblasts and blocks osteoclast formation from bone marrow precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Jochen; Bickert, Thomas; Beil, F Timo; Zaiss, Mario M; Albers, Joachim; Wintges, Kristofer; Streichert, Thomas; Klaetschke, Kristin; Keller, Johannes; Hissnauer, Tim-Nicolas; Spiro, Alexander S; Gessner, Andre; Schett, Georg; Amling, Michael; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Horst, Andrea Kristina; Schinke, Thorsten

    2011-04-01

    Since the hematopoetic system is located within the bone marrow, it is not surprising that recent evidence has demonstrated the existence of molecular interactions between bone and immune cells. While interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-18, two cytokines of the IL-1 family, have been shown to regulate differentiation and activity of bone cells, the role of IL-33, another IL-1 family member, has not been addressed yet. Since we observed that the expression of IL-33 increases during osteoblast differentiation, we analyzed its possible influence on bone formation and observed that IL-33 did not affect matrix mineralization but enhanced the expression of Tnfsf11, the gene encoding RANKL. This finding led us to analyze the skeletal phenotype of Il1rl1-deficient mice, which lack the IL-33 receptor ST2. Unexpectedly, these mice displayed normal bone formation but increased bone resorption, thereby resulting in low trabecular bone mass. Since this finding suggested a negative influence of IL-33 on osteoclastogenesis, we next analyzed osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow precursor cells and observed that IL-33 completely abolished the generation of TRACP(+) multinucleated osteoclasts, even in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although our molecular studies revealed that IL-33 treatment of bone marrow cells caused a shift toward other hematopoetic lineages, we further observed a direct negative influence of IL-33 on the osteoclastogenic differentiation of RAW264.7 macrophages, where IL-33 repressed the expression of Nfatc1, which encodes one of the key transciption factors of osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these findings have uncovered a previously unknown function of IL-33 as an inhibitor of bone resorption. PMID:20939024

  20. Triterpenoid Saponin W3 from Anemone flaccida Suppresses Osteoclast Differentiation through Inhibiting Activation of MAPKs and NF-κB Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Yue; Wu, Wenbin; Wan, Hongye; Li, Xiaomin; Zhong, Michun; Su, Xiaohui; Jia, Shiwei; Lin, Na

    2015-01-01

    Excessive bone resorption by osteoclasts within inflamed joints is the most specific hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis. A. flaccida has long been used for the treatment of arthritis in folk medicine of China; however, the active ingredients responsible for the anti-arthritis effects of A. flaccida are still elusive. In this study, W3, a saponin isolated from the extract of A. flaccida was identified as the major active ingredient by using an osteoclast formation model induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). W3 dose-dependently suppressed the actin ring formation and lacunar resorption. Mechanistic investigation revealed that W3 inhibited the RANKL-induced TRAF6 expression, decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and IκB-α, and suppressed NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity. Furthermore, W3 almost abrogated the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1). Therefore, our results suggest that W3 is a potential agent for treating lytic bone diseases although further evaluation in vivo and in clinical trials is needed. PMID:26327814

  1. TIEG1 Null Mouse-Derived Osteoblasts Are Defective in Mineralization and in Support of Osteoclast Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Malayannan; Gorny, Genevieve; Johnsen, Steven A.; Monroe, David G.; Evans, Glenda L.; Fraser, Daniel G.; Rickard, David J.; Rasmussen, Kay; van Deursen, Jan M. A.; Turner, Russell T.; Oursler, Merry Jo; Spelsberg, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) is a member of the Krüppel-like transcription factor family. To understand the physiological role of TIEG1, we generated TIEG−/− (null) mice and found that the TIEG−/− mice had increased osteoblast numbers with no increased bone formation parameters. However, when calvarial osteoblasts (OBs) were isolated from neonatal TIEG−/− and TIEG+/+ mice and cultured in vitro, the TIEG−/− cells displayed reduced expression of important OB differentiation markers. When the OBs were differentiated in vitro by treatment with bone morphogenic protein 2, the OBs from TIEG+/+ calvaria displayed several mineralized nodules in culture, whereas those from TIEG−/− mice showed no nodules. To characterize the OBs' ability to support osteoclast differentiation, the OBs from TIEG+/+ and TIEG−/− mice were cultured with marrow and spleen cells from TIEG+/+ mice. Significantly fewer osteoclasts developed when TIEG−/− OBs were used to support osteoclast differentiation than when TIEG+/+ OBs were used. Examination of gene expression in the TIEG−/− OBs revealed decreased RANKL and increased OPG expression compared to TIEG+/+ OBs. The addition of RANKL to these cocultures only partially restored the ability of TIEG−/− OBs to support osteoclast differentiation, whereas M-CSF alone or combined with RANKL had no additional effect on osteoclast differentiation. We conclude from these data that TIEG1 expression in OBs is critical for both osteoblast-mediated mineralization and osteoblast support of osteoclast differentiation. PMID:15657444

  2. Differential Expression of Claudin Family Members during Osteoblast and Osteoclast Differentiation: Cldn-1 Is a Novel Positive Regulator of Osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alshbool, Fatima Z.; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-01-01

    Claudins (Cldns), a family of 27 transmembrane proteins, represent major components of tight junctions. Aside from functioning as tight junctions, Cldns have emerging roles as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. While Cldns are known to be expressed and have important functions in various tissues, their expression and function in bone cells is ill-defined. In this study, the expression of Cldns was examined during osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. The expression of Cldn-1, -7, -11, and -15 was downregulated during early stages of osteoclast differentiation, whereas Cldn-6 was upregulated. Moreover, the expression of several Cldns increased 3–7 fold in fully differentiated osteoclasts. As for osteoblasts, the expression of several Cldns was found to increase more than 10-fold during differentiation, with some peaking at early, and others at late stages. By contrast, only expression of Cldn-12, and -15 decreased during osteoblast differentiation. In subsequent studies, we focused on the role of Cldn-1 in osteoblasts as its expression was increased by more than 10 fold during osteoblast differentiation and was found to be regulated by multiple osteoregulatory agents including IGF-1 and Wnt3a. We evaluated the consequence of lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown of Cldn-1 on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation using MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblasts. Cldn-1 knockdown caused a significant reduction in MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and ALP activity. Accordingly, expression levels of cyclinD1 and ALP mRNA levels were reduced in Cldn-1 shRNA knockdown cells. We next determined if Cldn-1 regulates the expression of Runx-2 and osterix, master transcription factors of osteoblast differentiation, and found that their levels were reduced significantly as a consequence of Cldn-1 knockdown. Moreover, knocking down Cldn-1 reduced β-catenin level. In conclusion, the expression of Cldn family members during bone cell differentiation is complex and

  3. Intercellular Communication between Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Induces Local Osteoclast Differentiation: a Mechanism Underlying Cholesteatoma-Induced Bone Destruction.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yoriko; Nishikawa, Keizo; Imai, Ryusuke; Furuya, Masayuki; Uenaka, Maki; Ohta, Yumi; Morihana, Tetsuo; Itoi-Ochi, Saori; Penninger, Josef M; Katayama, Ichiro; Inohara, Hidenori; Ishii, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by a balance in activity between bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Shifting the balance toward bone resorption causes osteolytic bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis. Osteoclast differentiation is regulated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), which, under some pathological conditions, is produced by T and B lymphocytes and synoviocytes. However, the mechanism underlying bone destruction in other diseases is little understood. Bone destruction caused by cholesteatoma, an epidermal cyst in the middle ear resulting from hyperproliferation of keratinizing squamous epithelium, can lead to lethal complications. In this study, we succeeded in generating a model for cholesteatoma, epidermal cyst-like tissue, which has the potential for inducing osteoclastogenesis in mice. Furthermore, an in vitro coculture system composed of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and osteoclast precursors was used to demonstrate that keratinocytes stimulate osteoclast differentiation through the induction of RANKL in fibroblasts. Thus, this study demonstrates that intercellular communication between keratinocytes and fibroblasts is involved in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts, which may provide the molecular basis of a new therapeutic strategy for cholesteatoma-induced bone destruction. PMID:27001307

  4. Noncanonical Wnt signaling promotes osteoclast differentiation and is facilitated by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, Francisco; Oguma, Junya; Brown, Anthony M.C.; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First demonstration of direct role for noncanonical Wnt in osteoclast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of Ryk as a Wnt5a/b receptor in inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modulation of noncanonical Wnt signaling by a clinically important drug, ritonavir. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishes a mechanism for an important clinical problem: HIV-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Wnt proteins that signal via the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway directly regulate osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, most studies of Wnt-related effects on osteoclasts involve indirect changes. While investigating bone mineral density loss in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its treatment with the protease inhibitor ritonavir (RTV), we observed that RTV decreased nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin, critical to canonical Wnt signaling, in primary human and murine osteoclast precursors. This occurred in parallel with upregulation of Wnt5a and Wnt5b transcripts. These Wnts typically stimulate noncanonical Wnt signaling, and this can antagonize the canonical Wnt pathway in many cell types, dependent upon Wnt receptor usage. We now document RTV-mediated upregulation of Wnt5a/b protein in osteoclast precursors. Recombinant Wnt5b and retrovirus-mediated expression of Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast differentiation from human and murine monocytic precursors, processes facilitated by RTV. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling mediated by Wnt3a suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Both RTV and Wnt5b inhibited canonical, {beta}-catenin/T cell factor-based Wnt reporter activation in osteoclast precursors. RTV- and Wnt5-induced osteoclast differentiation were dependent upon the receptor-like tyrosine kinase Ryk, suggesting that Ryk may act as a Wnt5a/b receptor in this context. This is the first demonstration of a direct role for Wnt signaling pathways and Ryk in

  5. ATF3 controls proliferation of osteoclast precursor and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Kazuya; Park, Gyujin; Iezaki, Takashi; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Kanayama, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Onishi, Yuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Vacher, Jean; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the sophisticated coupled actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we identify activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a pivotal transcription factor for the regulation of bone resorption and bone remodeling under a pathological condition through modulating the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. The osteoclast precursor-specific deletion of ATF3 in mice led to the prevention of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced bone resorption and bone loss, although neither bone volume nor osteoclastic parameter were markedly altered in these knockout mice under the physiological condition. RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis was impaired in vitro in ATF3-deleted bone marrow macrophages (BMM). Mechanistically, the deficiency of ATF3 impaired the RANKL-induced transient increase in cell proliferation of osteoclast precursors in bone marrow in vivo as well as of BMM in vitro. Moreover, ATF3 regulated cyclin D1 mRNA expression though modulating activator protein-1-dependent transcription in the osteoclast precursor, and the introduction of cyclin D1 significantly rescued the impairment of osteoclastogenesis in ATF3-deleted BMM. Therefore, these findings suggest that ATF3 could have a pivotal role in osteoclastogenesis and bone homeostasis though modulating cell proliferation under pathological conditions, thereby providing a target for bone diseases. PMID:27480204

  6. NHE10, a novel osteoclast-specific member of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger family, regulates osteoclast differentiation and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Taesoo; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Jeong, Daewon; Choi, Yongwon; Rho, Jaerang

    2008-05-02

    Bone homeostasis is tightly regulated by the balanced actions of osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclasts (OCs). We previously analyzed the gene expression profile of OC differentiation using a cDNA microarray, and identified a novel osteoclastogenic gene candidate, clone OCL-1-E7 [J. Rho, C.R. Altmann, N.D. Socci, L. Merkov, N. Kim, H. So, O. Lee, M. Takami, A.H. Brivanlou, Y. Choi, Gene expression profiling of osteoclast differentiation by combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis, DNA Cell Biol. 21 (2002) 541-549]. In this study, we have isolated full-length cDNAs corresponding to this clone from mice and humans to determine the functional roles of this gene in osteoclastogenesis. The full-length cDNA of OCL-1-E7 encodes 12 membrane-spanning domains that are typical of isoforms of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers (NHEs), indicating that this clone is a novel member of the NHE family (hereafter referred to as NHE10). Here, we show that NHE10 is highly expressed in OCs in response to receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand signaling and is required for OC differentiation and survival.

  7. Anti-apoptotic Molecule Bcl-2 Regulates the Differentiation, Activation, and Survival of Both Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Yuichi; Iwasawa, Mitsuyasu; Akiyama, Toru; Kadono, Yuho; Nakamura, Masaki; Oshima, Yasushi; Yasui, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Takumi; Hirose, Jun; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Bouillet, Philippe; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae

    2009-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by preventing cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Although several studies have indicated the importance of Bcl-2 in maintaining skeletal integrity, the detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Bcl-2−/− mice are growth-retarded and exhibit increased bone volume of the primary spongiosa, mainly due to the decreased number and dysfunction of osteoclasts. Osteoblast function is also impaired in Bcl-2−/− mice. Ex vivo studies on osteoblasts and osteoclasts showed that Bcl-2 promoted the differentiation, activation, and survival of both cell types. Because Bcl-2−/− mice die before 6 weeks of age due to renal failure and cannot be compared with adult wild type mice, we generated Bcl-2−/−Bim+/− mice, in which a single Bim allele was inactivated, and compared them with their Bcl-2+/−Bim+/− littermates. Loss of a single Bim allele restored normal osteoclast function in Bcl-2−/− mice but did not restore the impaired function of osteoblasts, and the mice exhibited osteopenia. These data demonstrate that Bcl-2 promotes the differentiation, activity, and survival of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The balance between Bcl-2 and Bim regulates osteoclast apoptosis and function, whereas other pro-apoptotic members are important for osteoblasts. PMID:19846553

  8. A metabolomics study of the inhibitory effect of 17-beta-estradiol on osteoclast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yanqiu; Cheng, Mengchun; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xiao, Hongbin

    2015-02-01

    Estradiol is a major drug used clinically to alleviate osteoporosis, partly through inhibition of the activity of osteoclasts, which play a crucial role in bone resorption. So far, little is known about the effects of estradiol on osteoclast metabolism. In this study, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS)-based metabolomics strategy was used to investigate the metabolite response to 17β-estradiol in mouse osteoclast RAW264.7, a commonly used cell model for studying osteoporosis. Our results showed that the application of estradiol altered the levels of 27 intracellular metabolites, including lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), other lipids and amino acid derivants. The changes of all the 27 metabolites were observed in the study of estradiol induced osteoclast proliferation inhibition (1 μM estradiol applied), while the changes of only 18 metabolites were observed in the study of differentiation inhibition (0.1 μM estradiol applied). Further pathway impact analysis determined glycerophospholipid metabolism as the main potential target pathway of estradiol, which was further confirmed by LCAT (phosphatidylcholine-sterol acyltransferase) activity changes and lipid peroxidative product (MDA, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde) changes caused by estradiol. Additionally, we found that estradiol significantly decreased intracellular oxidative stress during cell proliferation but not during cell differentiation. Our study suggested that estradiol generated a highly condition-dependent influence on osteoclast metabolism. PMID:25474166

  9. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    PubMed

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P < .05) without alteration of osteoblast histomorphometric indices. We also demonstrated that loss of Runx1 in pluripotential myeloid precursors with LysM-Cre did not alter the number of myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow or their ability to differentiate into phagocytizing or antigen-presenting cells. This study demonstrates that abrogation of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells significantly and specifically enhanced the ability of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  10. Murine osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation on strontium releasing hydroxyapatite forming cements.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish S; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun; Parekh, Shrey; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-06-01

    Ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds and self-setting cements containing Sr(2+) ions incorporated are particularly of interest in bone regeneration. To date, the approach widely used to incorporate Sr(2+) ions into HA cements has been the addition of Sr(2+) containing salts, such as SrCO3, SrCl2∙6H2O, or SrHPO4. However, this approach is dependent upon the relative solubility of Sr(2+) containing salts with respect to calcium phosphate (CaP) precursors. Therefore, in the current study Sr(2+) substituted dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was first synthesized and directly reacted with tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) to form Sr(2+) substituted HA forming cements. Rietveld refinement indicated that after one week of aging in phosphate buffered saline, cements prepared with and without Sr(2+) were composed of 75% HA and 25% unreacted TTCP by weight. Cements prepared with 10% Sr(2+) DCPD exhibited increased compressive strengths in comparison to unsubstituted cements. Increased MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were also observed on the cements prepared with increasing Sr(2+) content. It was concluded that both the scaffold microstructure and Sr(2+) ion release supported osteogenic differentiation. With respect to osteoclastic differentiation, no statistically significant differences in TRAP activity or cell morphology were observed. This suggests that the amount of Sr(2+) released may have been too low to influence osteoclast formation in comparison to unsubstituted cements. The results obtained herein demonstrate that the use of Sr(2+) substituted DCPD precursors rather than individually separate Sr(2+) containing salts may be a useful approach to prepare Sr(2+) containing HA cements. PMID:27040237

  11. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss. PMID:27142480

  12. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss. PMID:27142480

  13. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss.

  14. CGRP may regulate bone metabolism through stimulating osteoblast differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    He, Haitao; Chai, Jianshen; Zhang, Shengfu; Ding, Linlin; Yan, Peng; Du, Wenjun; Yang, Zhenzhou

    2016-05-01

    Calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide, which is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Numerous mechanisms underlying the action of CGRP in osteoblast-associated cells have been suggested for bone growth and metabolism. The present study was designed to closely investigate the osteoblast‑ and osteoclast-associated mechanisms of the effect of CGRP administration on bone metabolism in primary osteoblasts. Primary osteoblasts were obtained from newborn rabbit calvaria and incubated with different concentrations of human CGRP (hCGRP), hCGRP and hCGRP (8‑37), or without treatment as a control. Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) were detected following treatment, as well as the expression levels of osteoblast differentiation markers, including activating transcription factor‑4 (ATF4) and osteocalcin (OC), and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The isolated primary osteoblasts were found to stain positively for ALP. hCGRP treatment had no significant effect on transient intracellular Ca2+ in the osteoblasts. Treatment of the osteoblasts with hCGRP led to elevations in the expression levels of cAMP, ATF4 and OPG, and downregulation in the expression of RANKL, in a dose‑dependent manner. These effects were markedly reversed by the addition of hCGRP (8‑37). The results of the present study demonstrated that CGRP administration not only stimulated osteoblast differentiation, as demonstrated by upregulated expression levels of ATF4 and OC in the hCGRP‑treated osteoblasts, but also inhibited OPG/RANKL‑regulated osteoclastogenesis. CGRP may act as a modulator of bone metabolism through osteoblast and osteoclast-associated mechanisms, which result in osteoblast formation with subsequent activation of bone formation. PMID:27035229

  15. Gene Disruption of the Calcium Channel Orai1 Results in Inhibition of Osteoclast and Osteoblast Differentiation and Impairs Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Mancarella, Salvatore; Songsawad, Duangrat; Tourkova, Irina L.; Barnett, John B.; Gill, Donald L.; Soboloff, Jonathan; Blair, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium signaling plays a central role in the regulation of bone cells, though uncertainty remains with regard to the channels involved. In previous studies, we determined that the calcium channel Orai1 was required for the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts in vitro. To define the skeletal functions of calcium release-activated calcium currents, we compared mice with targeted deletion of the calcium channel Orai1 to wild-type littermate controls, and examined differentiation and function of osteoblast and osteoclast precursors in vitro with and without Orai1 inhibition. Consistent with in vitro findings, Orai1−/− mice lacked multinucleated osteoclasts. Yet they did not develop osteopetrosis. Mononuclear cells expressing osteoclast products were found in Orai1−/− mice, and in vitro studies showed significantly reduced, but not absent, mineral resorption by the mononuclear osteoclast-like cells that form in culture from peripheral blood monocytic cells when Orai1 is inhibited. More prominent in Orai1−/− mice was a decrease in bone with retention of fetal cartilage. Micro-computed tomography showed reduced cortical ossification and thinned trabeculae in Orai1−/− animals compared to controls; bone deposition was markedly decreased in the knock-out. This suggested a previously unrecognized role for Orai1 within osteoblasts. Analysis of osteoblasts and precursors in Orai1−/− and control mice showed a significant decrease in alkaline phosphatase-expressing osteoblasts. In vitro studies confirmed that inhibiting Orai1 activity impaired differentiation and function of human osteoblasts, supporting a critical function for Orai1 in osteoblasts, in addition to its role as a regulator of osteoclast formation. PMID:22546867

  16. CCN3 Impairs Osteoblast and Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation to Favor Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Véronique; Tiedemann, Kerstin; Mourskaia, Anna; Fong, Jenna E.; Tran-Thanh, Danh; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Perbal, Bernard; Komarova, Svetlana V.; Siegel, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a preferred site for breast cancer metastasis, causing pain, fractures, spinal cord compressions, and hypercalcemia, all of which can significantly diminish the patient's quality of life. We identified CCN3 as a novel factor that is highly expressed in bone metastatic breast cancer cells from a xenograft mouse model and in bone metastatic lesions from patients with breast cancer. We demonstrate that CCN3 overexpression enhances the ability of weakly bone metastatic breast cancer cells to colonize and grow in the bone without altering their growth in the mammary fat pad. We further demonstrated that human recombinant CCN3 inhibits osteoblast differentiation from primary bone marrow cultures, leading to a higher receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio. In conjunction with its ability to impair osteoblast differentiation, we uncovered a novel role for CCN3 in promoting osteoclast differentiation from RANKL-primed monocyte precursors. CCN3 exerts its pro-osteoclastogenic effects by promoting calcium oscillations and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) nuclear translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 regulates the differentiation of bone resident cells to create a resorptive environment that promotes the formation of osteolytic breast cancer metastases. PMID:21514448

  17. Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis via modulating RANKL signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Shen, Yi; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Dan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • Schisantherin A suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Schisantherin A impairs RANKL signaling pathway. • Schisantherin A suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Schisantherin A may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays critical role in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been a promising strategy for treating osteoclast related bone diseases such as osteoporosis and aseptic prosthetic loosening. Schisantherin A (SA), a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra sphenanthera, has been used as an antitussive, tonic, and sedative agent, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SA was found to inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, SA inhibited OSCAR, cathepsin K and TRAP in a dose dependent manner. Further signal transduction studies revealed that SA down-regulate RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling activation by suppressing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and subsequently preventing the NF-κB transcriptional activity. Moreover, SA also decreased the RANKL-induced MAPKs signaling pathway, including JNK and ERK1/2 posphorylation while had no obvious effects on p38 activation. Finally, SA suppressed the NF-κB and MAPKs subsequent gene expression of NFATc1 and c-Fos. In vivo studies, SA inhibited osteoclast function and exhibited bone protection effect in wear-particle-induced bone erosion model. Taken together, SA could attenuate osteoclast formation and wear particle-induced osteolysis by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. These data indicated that SA is a promising therapeutic natural compound for the treatment of osteoclast-related prosthesis loosening.

  18. The Inhibition of RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis through the Suppression of p38 Signaling Pathway by Naringenin and Attenuation of Titanium-Particle-Induced Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Liu, Xuqiang; Zhai, Zanjing; Qu, Xinhua; Jiang, Chuan; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Mao, Yuanqing; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of naringenin on osteoclastogenesis and titanium particle-induced osteolysis. Osteolysis from wear-induced particles and aseptic loosening are the most frequent late complications of total joint arthroplasty leading to revision of the prosthesis. Osteolysis during aseptic loosening is most likely due to increased bone resorption by osteoclasts. Through in vitro studies, we demonstrated that naringenin, a naturally occurring flavanone in grapefruit and tomatoes, exerts potent inhibitory effects on the ligand of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and revealed that the mechanism of action of naringenin, which inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppression of the p38 signaling pathway. Through in vivo studies, we proved that naringenin attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In general, we demonstrated that naringenin inhibited osteoclastogenesis via suppression of p38 signaling in vitro and attenuated titanium particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. This study also suggested that naringenin has significant potential for the treatment of osteolysis-related diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and activity. PMID:25464380

  19. Iron Chelation Inhibits Osteoclastic Differentiation In Vitro and in Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Peng; Pan, Jin-Xiu; Xiong, Lei; Xia, Wen-Fang; Cui, Shun; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Patients of Alzheimer's disease (AD) frequently have lower bone mineral density and higher rate of hip fracture. Tg2576, a well characterized AD animal model that ubiquitously express Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe), displays not only AD-relevant neuropathology, but also age-dependent bone deficits. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. As APP is implicated as a regulator of iron export, and the metal chelation is considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for AD, we examined iron chelation's effect on the osteoporotic deficit in Tg2576 mice. Remarkably, in vivo treatment with iron chelator, clinoquinol (CQ), increased both trabecular and cortical bone-mass, selectively in Tg2576, but not wild type (WT) mice. Further in vitro studies showed that low concentrations of CQ as well as deferoxamine (DFO), another iron chelator, selectively inhibited osteoclast (OC) differentiation, without an obvious effect on osteoblast (OB) differentiation. Intriguingly, both CQ and DFO's inhibitory effect on OC was more potent in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) from Tg2576 mice than that of wild type controls. The reduction of intracellular iron levels in BMMs by CQ was also more dramatic in APPswe-expressing BMMs. Taken together, these results demonstrate a potent inhibition on OC formation and activation in APPswe-expressing BMMs by iron chelation, and reveal a potential therapeutic value of CQ in treating AD-associated osteoporotic deficits. PMID:26575486

  20. Manganese superoxide dismutase is required to maintain osteoclast differentiation and function under static force

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Zhang, Liqiang; Konermann, Anna; Zhou, Hong; Jin, Fang; Liu, Wenjia

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance of osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclasts (OCs). Increased activity of OCs not only contributes to pathological bone resorption, such as osteoporosis and periodontitis, but also is responsible for physiological conditions like orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). However, the detailed mechanism by which orthodontic force promotes the formation of OCs is still poorly understood. In this study, we confirmed that static force promoted the differentiation of human cord monocytes (HMNCs) into OCs depending on loading time and magnitude. Protein expression profiles among HMNCs, HMNCs subjected to static force and mature OCs were established via 2-DE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Total respective protein spot numbers of 549 ± 13, 612 ± 19 and 634 ± 16 were detected in each of the gels by image analysis. The five proteins identified were plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2, Spot 1), peroxiredoxin-6 (PRD-6, Spot 3), manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2, Spot 6), Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (Rho-GDI2, Spot 11) and L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain (L-LDH, Spot 15). More importantly, we revealed that SOD2 was required to maintain monocyte differentiation into functional OCs and may become a potential target for regulating the efficiency of OTM in the future. PMID:25619900

  1. Inhibitory effects of French pine bark extract, Pycnogenol®, on alveolar bone resorption and on the osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Toyama, Toshizo; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Sugiyama, Shuta; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2015-02-01

    Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) is a standardized bark extract from French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton). We examined the inhibitory effects of PYC on alveolar bone resorption, which is a characteristic feature of periodontitis, induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and osteoclast differentiation. In rat periodontitis model, rats were divided into four groups: group A served as the non-infected control, group B was infected orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, group C was administered PYC in the diet (0.025%: w/w), and group D was infected with P. gingivalis and administered PYC. Administration of PYC along with P. gingivalis infection significantly reduced alveolar bone resorption. Treatment of P. gingivalis with 1 µg/ml PYC reduced the number of viable bacterial cells. Addition of PYC to epithelial cells inhibited adhesion and invasion by P. gingivalis. The effect of PYC on osteoclast formation was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. PYC treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast formation. Addition of PYC (1-100 µg/ml) to purified osteoclasts culture induced cell apoptosis. These results suggest that PYC may prevent alveolar bone resorption through its antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis and by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, PYC may be useful as a therapeutic and preventative agent for bone diseases such as periodontitis. PMID:25336411

  2. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines. PMID:24500983

  3. Carvacrol Inhibits Osteoclastogenesis and Negatively Regulates the Survival of Mature Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Vishwa; Kasonga, Abe; Kruger, Marlena Cathorina; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes continuous remodeling coupled with the action of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Osteoclast activity is elevated during osteoporosis and periodontitis resulting in excessive loss of trabecular and alveolar bone. Osteoclasts are formed in an inflammatory response to cytokine production receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) and bacterial challenge lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol present in Origanum vulgare and Thymus vulgaris, is a natural compound with known medicinal properties. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on osteoclast formation induced by RANKL and LPS. Carvacrol suppressed RANKL-induced formation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in RAW264.7 macrophages and human CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW264.7 macrophages. Investigation of the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed that carvacrol downregulated RANKL-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the suppression of NF-κB activation correlated with inhibition of inhibitor of kappaB (IκB) kinase (IKK) activation and attenuation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBa) degradation. Carvacrol potentiated apoptosis in mature osteoclasts by caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, carvacrol did not affect the viability of proliferating MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that carvacrol mitigates osteoclastogenesis by impairing the NF-κB pathway and induction of apoptosis in mature osteoclasts. PMID:27170515

  4. Rhus javanica Gall Extract Inhibits the Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Osteoclasts and Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Park, Eui Kyun; Huh, Man-Il; Kim, Hong Kyun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption is a therapeutic strategy for the management of postmenopausal bone loss. This study investigated the effects of Rhus javanica (R. javanica) extracts on bone marrow cultures to develop agents from natural sources that may prevent osteoclastogenesis. Extracts of R. javanica (eGr) cocoons spun by Rhus javanica (Bell.) Baker inhibited the osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. The effects of aqueous extract (aeGr) or 100% ethanolic extract (eeGr) on ovariectomy- (OVX-) induced bone loss were investigated by various biochemical assays. Furthermore, microcomputed tomography (µCT) was performed to study bone remodeling. Oral administration of eGr (30 mg or 100 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks) augmented the inhibition of femoral bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and other factors involved in bone remodeling when compared to OVX controls. Additionally, eGr slightly decreased bone turnover markers that were increased by OVX. Therefore, it may be suggested that the protective effects of eGr could have originated from the suppression of OVX-induced increase in bone turnover. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that eGr has potential to activate bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and bone loss. PMID:27313644

  5. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  6. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  7. Patient specific proteolytic activity of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts predicted with temporal kinase activation states during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keon-Young; Li, Weiwei A.; Platt, Manu O.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-to-patient variability in disease progression continues to complicate clinical decisions of treatment regimens for cardiovascular diseases, metastatic cancers and osteoporosis. Here, we investigated if monocytes, circulating white blood cells that enter tissues and contribute to disease progression by differentiating into macrophages or osteoclasts, could be useful in understanding this variability. Monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts produce cysteine cathepsins, powerful extracellular matrix proteases which have been mechanistically linked to accelerated atherosclerotic, osteoporotic, and tumor progression. We hypothesized that multivariate analysis of temporal kinase activation states during monocyte differentiation could predict cathepsin proteolytic responses of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts in a patient-specific manner. Freshly isolated primary monocytes were differentiated with M-CSF or RANKL into macrophages or osteoclasts, respectively, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, c-jun, and IκB-α were measured at days 1, 3, 6, and 9. In parallel, cell diameters and numbers of nuclei were measured, and multiplex cathepsin zymography was used to quantify cathepsins K, L, S, and V activity from cell extracts and conditioned media. There was extensive patient-to-patient variability in temporal kinase activation states, cell morphologies, and cathepsin K, L, S, and V proteolytic activity. Partial least squares regression models trained with temporal kinase activation states successfully predicted patient-specific morphological characteristics (mean cell diameter and number of nuclei) and patient-specific cathepsin proteolytic activity with predictability as high as 95%, even with the challenge of incorporating the complex, unknown cues from individual patients’ unique genetic and biochemical backgrounds. This personalized medicine approach considers patient variability in kinase signals to predict cathepsin activity

  8. Methanol Extract of Croton Pycnanthus Benth. Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation by Suppressing the MAPK and NF-κB Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyeon

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoclasts are differentiated from monocytes/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). Croton pycnanthus Benth. (CPB) is a herbal plant that belongs to Euphorbiaceae family. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CPB on osteoclastogenesis and RANKL-dependent signaling pathways. Methods Methanol extract of CPB was obtained from International Biological Material Research Center. Osteoclast differentiation was achieved by culturing mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) with M-CSF and RANKL. Osteoclast numbers were evaluated by counting multinuclear cells positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. The activation of signaling molecules were assessed after acute stimulation of cells with high dose of RANKL by Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Results CPB reduced the generation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling pathways. The induction of the expression of c-Fos, nuclear factor-activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) by RANKL was also suppressed. Conclusions CPB exerts negative effects on osteoclast differentiation in response to the RANKL. The inhibitory mechanism involves the suppression of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways and subsequently the down-regulation of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. PMID:25489576

  9. Effect of heparin and alendronate coating on titanium surfaces on inhibition of osteoclast and enhancement of osteoblast function

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ho-Jin; Yun, Young-Pil; Han, Choong-Wan; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Sung Eun; Bae, Min Soo; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Duck-Su; Kwon, Il Keun

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} We examine bone metabolism of engineered alendronate attached to Ti surfaces. {yields} Alendronate-immobilized Ti enhances activation of osteoblast differentiation. {yields} Alendronate-immobilized Ti inhibits osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Alendronate-immobilized Ti may be a bioactive implant with dual functions. -- Abstract: The failure of orthopedic and dental implants has been attributed mainly to loosening of the implant from host bone, which may be due to weak bonding of the implant material to bone tissue. Titanium (Ti) is used in the field of orthopedic and dental implants because of its excellent biocompatibility and outstanding mechanical properties. Therefore, in the field of materials science and tissue engineering, there has been extensive research to immobilize bioactive molecules on the surface of implant materials in order to provide the implants with improved adhesion to the host bone tissue. In this study, chemically active functional groups were introduced on the surface of Ti by a grafting reaction with heparin and then the Ti was functionalized by immobilizing alendronate onto the heparin-grafted surface. In the MC3T3-E1 cell osteogenic differentiation study, the alendronate-immobilized Ti substrates significantly enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium content. Additionally, nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells was inhibited with the alendronate-immobilized Ti as confirmed by TRAP analysis. Real time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expressions of osteocalcin and osteopontin, which are markers for osteogenesis, were upregulated in MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on alendronate-immobilized Ti. The mRNA expressions of TRAP and Cathepsin K, markers for osteoclastogenesis, in RAW264.7 cells cultured on alendronate-immobilized Ti were down-regulated. Our study suggests that alendronate-immobilized Ti may be a bioactive implant with dual functions to enhance

  10. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  11. Parthenolide inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorbing activity by down-regulation of NFATc1 induction and c-Fos stability, during RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Young; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, a natural product derived from Feverfew, prevents septic shock and inflammation. We aimed to identify the effects of parthenolide on the RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand)-induced differentiation and bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts. In this study, parthenolide dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in BMMs, without any evidence of cytotoxicity and the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, and IκB, as well as IκB degradation by RANKL treatment. Parthenolide suppressed the expression of NFATc1, OSCAR, TRAP, DC-STAMP, and cathepsin K in RANKL-treated BMMs. Furthermore, parthenolide down-regulated the stability of c-Fos protein, but could not suppress the expression of c-Fos. Overexpression of NFATc1 and c-Fos in BMMs reversed the inhibitory effect of parthenolide on RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Parthenolide also inhibited the bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. Parthenolide inhibits the differentiation and bone-resolving activity of osteoclast by RANKL, suggesting its potential therapeutic value for bone destructive disorders associated with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(8): 451-456] PMID:24314143

  12. Inhibition of CaMKK2 Stimulates Osteoblast Formation and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Rachel L.; Waddell, Seid; Racioppi, Luigi; Long, Fanxin; Novack, Deborah V.; Voor, Michael J.; Sankar, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling, a physiological process characterized by bone formation by osteoblasts (OB) and resorption of pre-existing bone matrix by osteoclasts (OC), is vital for the maintenance of healthy bone tissue in adult humans. Imbalances in this vital process result in pathological conditions including osteoporosis. Owing to its initial asymptomatic nature, osteoporosis is often detected only after the patient has sustained significant bone loss or a fracture. Hence, anabolic therapeutics that stimulates bone accrual is in high clinical demand. Here we identify Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) as a potential target for such therapeutics, as its inhibition enhances OB differentiation and bone growth and suppresses OC differentiation. Mice null for CaMKK2 possess higher trabecular bone mass in their long bones, along with significantly more OBs and fewer multinuclear OCs. Whereas Camkk2−/− MSCs yield significantly higher numbers of OBs, bone marrow cells from Camkk2−/− mice produce fewer multinuclear OCs, in vitro. Acute inhibition of CaMKK2 by its selective, cell-permeable pharmacological inhibitor STO-609 also results in increased OB and diminished OC formation. Further, we find phospho-protein kinase A (PKA) and Ser133 phosphorylated form of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (pCREB) to be markedly elevated in OB progenitors deficient in CaMKK2. On the other hand, genetic ablation of CaMKK2 or its pharmacological inhibition in OC progenitors results in reduced pCREB as well as significantly reduced levels of its transcriptional target, nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1). Moreover, in vivo administration of STO-609 results in increased OBs and diminished OCs, conferring significant protection from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis in adult mice. Overall, our findings reveal a novel function for CaMKK2 in bone remodeling and highlight the potential for its therapeutic

  13. Supplementation of broccoli or Bifidobacterium longum-fermented broccoli suppresses serum lipid peroxidation and osteoclast differentiation on alveolar bone surface in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Irie, Koichiro; Endo, Yasumasa; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Ishikado, Atsushi; Sato, Takehiko; Harada, Kayo; Suido, Hirohisa; Morita, Manabu

    2012-04-01

    High-cholesterol diet enhances osteoclastic activity on alveolar bone by increasing serum lipid peroxidation. We hypothesized that supplementation with dietary antioxidants, such as found in broccoli and its fermented products, might suppress increases in serum lipid peroxidation, contributing to the inhibition of osteoclastic activity after high-cholesterol diet intake. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of broccoli and fermented broccoli consumption on serum lipid peroxidation and osteoclast differentiation in alveolar bone of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. In this 12-week study, rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6/group): a control group (fed regular diet) and 3 experimental groups (fed a high-cholesterol [1% wt/wt] diet, or a high-cholesterol diet supplemented with either broccoli powder [5% wt/wt] or Bifidobacterium longum-fermented broccoli powder [5% wt/wt]). Serum hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) levels were measured as a parameter of lipid peroxidation. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts in alveolar bone was enumerated to evaluate osteoclast differentiation. When compared with regular diet, the high-cholesterol diet increased serum HEL levels and resulted in a higher number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at 12 weeks. The high-cholesterol diet supplemented with broccoli or B. longum-fermented broccoli showed lower levels of serum HEL and fewer TRAP-positive osteoclasts than the high-cholesterol diet at 12 weeks. In conclusion, consumption of broccoli, or its fermented product, inhibited the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on osteoclast differentiation in rat alveolar bone by suppressing serum lipid peroxidation. PMID:22575044

  14. PSTPIP2 deficiency in mice causes osteopenia and increased differentiation of multipotent myeloid precursors into osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Viorel; Charles, Julia F.; Henne, William M.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Nandi, Sayan; Ketchum, Halley; Harris, Renee; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    Missense mutations that reduce or abrogate myeloid cell expression of the F-BAR domain protein, proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), lead to autoinflammatory disease involving extramedullary hematopoiesis, skin and bone lesions. However, little is known about how PSTPIP2 regulates osteoclast development. Here we examined how PSTPIP2 deficiency causes osteopenia and bone lesions, using the mouse PSTPIP2 mutations, cmo, which fails to express PSTPIP2 and Lupo, in which PSTPIP2 is dysfunctional. In both models, serum levels of the pro-osteoclastogenic factor, MIP-1α, were elevated and CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R)–dependent production of MIP-1α by macrophages was increased. Treatment of cmo mice with a dual specificity CSF-1R and c-Kit inhibitor, PLX3397, decreased circulating MIP-1α and ameliorated the extramedullary hematopoiesis, inflammation, and osteopenia, demonstrating that aberrant myelopoiesis drives disease. Purified osteoclast precursors from PSTPIP2-deficient mice exhibit increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro and were used to probe the structural requirements for PSTPIP2 suppression of osteoclast development. PSTPIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation and a functional F-BAR domain were essential for PSTPIP2 inhibition of TRAP expression and osteoclast precursor fusion, whereas interaction with PEST-type phosphatases was only required for suppression of TRAP expression. Thus, PSTPIP2 acts as a negative feedback regulator of CSF-1R signaling to suppress inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22923495

  15. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneuji, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. {yields} Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. {yields} This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm{sup 2}) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt

  16. Sinomenine suppresses osteoclast formation and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra-induced bone loss by modulating RANKL signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; He, Longgang; Hu, Yiping; Duan, Heng; Li, Xianglian; Tan, Suiyi; Zou, Min; Gu, Chunping; Zeng, Xiangzhou; Yu, Le; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Shuwen

    2013-01-01

    Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is essential for osteoclastogenesis. Targeting RANKL signaling pathways has been an encouraging strategy for treating lytic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sinomenine (SIN), derived from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenioumacutum, is an active compound to treat RA, but its effect on osteoclasts has been hitherto unknown. In the present study, SIN was found to ameliorate M. tuberculosis H37Ra (Mt)-induced bone loss in rats with a decreased serum level of TRACP5b and RANKL, and an increased level of osteoprotegerin (OPG). In vitro study also showed that SIN could inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The osteoclastic specific marker genes induced by RANKL including c-Src, MMP-9, TRACP were inhibited by SIN in a dose dependent manner. Signal transduction studies showed that SIN could obviously reduce the expression of RANK adaptor molecule TRAF6 and down-regulate RANKL-induced NF-κB activation. It decreased the RANKL-induced p38, JNK posphorylation but not ERK1/2 posphorylation. SIN could also reduce RANKL-mediated calcium influx which is associated with TRAF6/c-Src complex. Finally, SIN suppressed RANKL induced AP-1 and NFAT transcription, as well as the gene expression of NFATc1 and AP-1 components (Fra-1, Fra-2, c-Fos). The protein expression of c-Fos and TRAF6 were also inhibited by SIN after RANKL stimulation. Taken together, SIN could attenuate osteoclast formation and Mt-induced bone loss by mediating RANKL signaling pathways. PMID:24066131

  17. Synergistic effects of tributyltin and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on differentiating osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Koskela, Antti; Viluksela, Matti; Keinänen, Meeri; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the persistent and accumulative environmental pollutants tributyltin (TBT) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) individually and in combination on differentiating bone cells. TBT and TCDD are chemically distinct compounds with different mechanisms of toxicity, but they typically have the same sources of exposure and both have been shown to affect bone development at low exposure levels. Bone marrow stem cells were isolated from femurs and tibias of C57BL/6 J mice, differentiated in culture into osteoblasts or osteoclasts and exposed to 0.1–10 nM TBT, 0.01–1 nM TCDD or 10 nM TBT + 1 nM TCDD. In osteoblasts, the combined exposure to TBT and TCDD significantly decreased the mRNA expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin more than TBT or TCDD alone. PCR array showed different gene expression profiles for TBT and TCDD individually, and the combination evoked several additional alterations in gene expression. Expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) was increased by TCDD as expected, but simultaneous exposure to TBT prevented the increase thus potentially strengthening AHR-mediated effects of TCDD. The number of osteoclasts was reduced by TCDD alone and in combination with TBT, but TBT alone had no effect. However, the total area of resorbed bone was remarkably lower after combined exposure than after TBT or TCDD alone. In conclusion, very low concentrations of TBT and TCDD have synergistic deleterious effects on bone formation and additive effects on bone resorption. -- Highlights: ► Combined exposure to TCDD and TBT evoked a unique gene expression profile. ► Osteoblast differentiation was synergistically disturbed after combined exposure. ► Bone resorbing activity was additively decreased after combined exposure.

  18. Triptolide Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption In Vitro via Enhancing the Production of IL-10 and TGF-β1 by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huihui; Zhao, Hongyan; Wang, Gui; Huang, Jing; Guo, Minghui; Guo, Baosheng; Tan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide, a purified component of Tripterygiumwilfordii Hook F, has been shown to have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although triptolide has demonstrated that it could suppress bone destruction in collagen-induced mice, its therapeutic mechanism remains unclear. Many studies have investigated the effect of triptolide on Tregs and Tregs-related cytokine involved in RA. Additionally, previous studies have implied that Tregs inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Thus, in this study we aimed to explore the regulatory mechanism by which triptolide influences the Treg-mediated production of IL-10 and TGF-β1 to affect osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. In cocultures system of Tregs and mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), Tregs inhibited the differentiation of osteoclasts and reduced the resorbed areas significantly and the production of both IL-10 and TGF-β1 was upregulated. When the coculture systems were pretreated with triptolide, they produced higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Our data indicate that triptolide enhances the suppressive effects of Tregs on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by enhancing the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Tregs are most likely involved in the triptolide-mediated regulation of bone metabolism and may provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory bone destruction. PMID:27413257

  19. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  20. Effect of heparin and alendronate coating on titanium surfaces on inhibition of osteoclast and enhancement of osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Jin; Yun, Young-Pil; Han, Choong-Wan; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Sung Eun; Bae, Min Soo; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Duck-Su; Kwon, Il Keun

    2011-09-23

    The failure of orthopedic and dental implants has been attributed mainly to loosening of the implant from host bone, which may be due to weak bonding of the implant material to bone tissue. Titanium (Ti) is used in the field of orthopedic and dental implants because of its excellent biocompatibility and outstanding mechanical properties. Therefore, in the field of materials science and tissue engineering, there has been extensive research to immobilize bioactive molecules on the surface of implant materials in order to provide the implants with improved adhesion to the host bone tissue. In this study, chemically active functional groups were introduced on the surface of Ti by a grafting reaction with heparin and then the Ti was functionalized by immobilizing alendronate onto the heparin-grafted surface. In the MC3T3-E1 cell osteogenic differentiation study, the alendronate-immobilized Ti substrates significantly enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium content. Additionally, nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells was inhibited with the alendronate-immobilized Ti as confirmed by TRAP analysis. Real time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expressions of osteocalcin and osteopontin, which are markers for osteogenesis, were upregulated in MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on alendronate-immobilized Ti. The mRNA expressions of TRAP and Cathepsin K, markers for osteoclastogenesis, in RAW264.7 cells cultured on alendronate-immobilized Ti were down-regulated. Our study suggests that alendronate-immobilized Ti may be a bioactive implant with dual functions to enhance osteoblast differentiation and to inhibit osteoclast differentiation simultaneously. PMID:21888898

  1. Lupeol Isolated from Sorbus commixta Suppresses 1α,25-(OH)2D3-Mediated Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Loss in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Im, Nam Kyung; Lee, Dong-Sung; Lee, Seong-Ryong; Jeong, Gil Saeng

    2016-02-26

    Lupeol is a lupane-type triterpene isolated from Sorbus commixta, an oriental medicine used to treat arthritis and inflammatory diseases. However, the antiosteoporotic effects of S. commixta or any of its constituents have not been studied yet. In the present study, we have examined the effect of lupeol (a major active triterpenoid isolated from S. commixta) on osteoclastogenesis and sought to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. We evaluated whether lupeol antagonized osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Lupeol markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption activity through its effects on MAP kinases and transcription factors (NF-κB, NFATc1, and c-Fos) downstream of the osteoclast differentiation factor receptor RANK. Furthermore, in vivo efficacy of lupeol was confirmed by using an animal model of hypercalcemic mediated bone loss. Taken together, lupeol showed strong inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Supplementation with S. commixta and lupeol could be beneficial for bone health or osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, osteolysis associated with periodontal disease, and multiple myeloma. PMID:26878936

  2. Punicalagin attenuates osteoclast differentiation by impairing NFATc1 expression and blocking Akt- and JNK-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Iwatake, Mayumi; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Takashi; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    Punicalagin is a bioactive polyphenol that is classified as an ellagitannin. Although punicalagin has been shown to have various pharmacological effects, such as anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor effects, no studies have reported the effects of punicalagin on osteoclasts (OCLs). In this study, we investigated the effects of punicalagin on OCL differentiation by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand in the murine monocytic RAW-D cell line and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Treatment with punicalagin significantly inhibited OCL formation from RAW-D cells and BMMs and prevented bone resorption of BMM-derived OCLs. Moreover, punicalagin impaired multinucleation and actin-ring formation in OCLs, and decreased the protein levels of nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), which is a master regulator of OCL differentiation, and concomitantly reduced the expression levels of Src and cathepsin K, which are transcriptionally regulated by NFATc1. The effects of punicalagin on intracellular signaling during the OCL differentiation of BMMs indicated that punicalagin-treated OCLs displayed markedly reduced phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase and Akt, and partially impaired phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B alpha compared with untreated OCLs. Thus, punicalagin may affect bone metabolism by inhibiting OCL differentiation. PMID:26048715

  3. Myostatin is a direct regulator of osteoclast differentiation and its inhibition reduces inflammatory joint destruction in mice.

    PubMed

    Dankbar, Berno; Fennen, Michelle; Brunert, Daniela; Hayer, Silvia; Frank, Svetlana; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Beckmann, Denise; Paruzel, Peter; Bertrand, Jessica; Redlich, Kurt; Koers-Wunrau, Christina; Stratis, Athanasios; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Pap, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Myostatin (also known as growth and differentiation factor 8) is a secreted member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, which is also its primary target tissue. Deletion of the myostatin gene (Mstn) in mice leads to muscle hypertrophy, and animal studies support the concept that myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle growth and regeneration. However, myostatin deficiency also increases bone formation, mainly through loading-associated effects on bone. Here we report a previously unknown direct role for myostatin in osteoclastogenesis and in the progressive loss of articular bone in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We demonstrate that myostatin is highly expressed in the synovial tissues of RA subjects and of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α transgenic (hTNFtg) mice, a model for human RA. Myostatin strongly accelerates receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast formation in vitro through transcription factor SMAD2-dependent regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATC1). Myostatin deficiency or antibody-mediated inhibition leads to an amelioration of arthritis severity in hTNFtg mice, chiefly reflected by less bone destruction. Consistent with these effects in hTNFtg mice, the lack of myostatin leads to increased grip strength and less bone erosion in the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model in mice. The results strongly suggest that myostatin is a potent therapeutic target for interfering with osteoclast formation and joint destruction in RA. PMID:26236992

  4. Effects of JSOG-6 on protection against bone loss in ovariectomized mice through regulation of osteoblast differentiation and osteoclast formation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background JSOG-6 is used as a traditional medicine to relieve the symptoms associated with inflammation, rheumatism, and osteoporosis in Korea. In the present study, we investigated the effects of JSOG-6 on bone loss prevention both in in vitro and in vivo as well as its underlying mechanism of action. Methods Protection against bone loss was assessed in an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. Bone microarchitecture was measured using a micro-computed tomography to detect the parameters of three-dimensional structure of a trabecular bone. Serum biomarkers were also evaluated in an OVX-induced model. Osteoclasts derived from mouse bone marrow cells (BMCs) and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were also employed to investigate the mechanism of action. Results Oral administration of JSOG-6 significantly increased the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur in OVX mice in vivo. Especially, the reduced Tb.No (trabecular bone number) in the OVX group was significantly recovered by JSOG-6 treatment. The serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, biomarkers of bone resorption, were significantly elevated in OVX mice, but JSOG-6 effectively inhibited the increase in OVX mice. JSOG-6 was also found to enhance the osteoblastic differentiation and maturation with the increase of the density and ALP activity, a marker of osteoblastic differentiation, as well as calcium deposition, a marker of osteoblastic maturation in MC3T3-E1 cells. The effects of JSOG-6 on osteoblastic differentiation were also associated in part with the increase of ALP and OPN mRNA expressions and the decrease of RANKL mRNA expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that JSOG-6 induced protection against bone loss in OVX mice, and its anti-osteoporotic property might be, in part, a function of the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation and the inhibition of osteoclast formation. These findings suggest that

  5. Lysyl oxidase propeptide stimulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and enhances PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell effects on bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alsulaiman, Mona; Bais, Manish V; Trackman, Philip C

    2016-03-01

    Lysyl oxidase pro-enzyme is secreted by tumor cells and normal cells as a 50 kDa pro-enzyme into the extracellular environment where it is cleaved into the ~30 kDa mature enzyme (LOX) and 18 kDa pro-peptide (LOX-PP). Extracellular LOX enzyme activity is required for normal collagen and elastin extracellular cross-linking and maturation of the extracellular matrix. Extracellular LOX-PP acts as a tumor suppressor and can re-enter cells from the extracellular environment to induce its effects. The underlying hypothesis is that LOX-PP has the potential to promote bone cell differentiation, while inhibiting cancer cell effects in bone. Here we investigate the effect of LOX-PP on bone marrow cell proliferation and differentiation towards osteoblasts or osteoclasts, and LOX-PP modulation of prostate cancer cell conditioned media-induced alterations of proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow cells in vitro. Effects of overexpression of rLOX-PP in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines on bone structure in vivo after intramedullary injections were determined. Data show that prostate cancer cell conditioned media inhibited osteoblast differentiation in bone marrow-derived cells, which was reversed by rLOX-PP treatment. Prostate cancer conditioned media stimulated osteoclast differentiation which was further enhanced by rLOX-PP treatment. rLOX-PP stimulated osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting OPG expression, up-regulating CCN2 expression, and increasing osteoclast fusion. In vivo studies indicate that rLOX-PP expression by PC3 cells implanted into the tibia of mice further enhanced PC3 cell ability to resorb bone, while rLOX-PP expression in DU145 cells resulted in non-significant increases in net bone formation. rLOX-PP enhances both osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation. rLOX-PP may serve to enhance coupling interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts helping to maintain a normal bone turnover in health, while contributing to bone abnormalities

  6. How the osteoclast degrades bone.

    PubMed

    Blair, H C

    1998-10-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated monocyte-macrophage derivatives that degrade bone. Their specialized role is central to a process that continuously removes and replaces segments of the skeleton in the higher vertebrates. Osteoclasts allow skeletal mineral to be used to manage extracellular calcium activity, which is an important adaptation for life on land, and solid skeletal structure to be replaced by hollow architecture that has a superior strength-to-weight ratio. Degrading bone also allows periodic repair and remodeling for ordered growth and efficient response to mechanical loads. A fairly comprehensive view of osteoclastic ontogeny and function is emerging from recent studies. Osteoclasts dissolve bone mineral by massive acid secretion and secrete specialized proteinases that degrade the organic matrix, mainly type I collagen, in this acidic milieu. The site of bone dissolution is a high-calcium environment; removal of degradation products by transcytosis of membrane vesicles allows the osteoclast to maintain a normal intracellular calcium. Osteoclastic differentiation is normally balanced with bone formation, although bone formation is the function of unrelated stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Interactions between osteoclast precursors and bone-forming cells are believed to control osteoclast differentiation under most circumstances, preserving bone architecture over many cycles of bone replacement. PMID:9819571

  7. The dynamin inhibitor dynasore inhibits bone resorption by rapidly disrupting actin rings of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Thirukonda, Gnanasagar J; Uehara, Shunsuke; Nakayama, Takahiro; Yamashita, Teruhito; Nakamura, Yukio; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagami, Kimitoshi; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The cytoskeletal organization of osteoclasts is required for bone resorption. Binding of dynamin with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was previously suggested to be required for the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the role of the GTPase activity of dynamin in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as well as in the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of dynasore, an inhibitor of the GTPase activity of dynamin, on the bone-resorbing activity of and actin ring formation in mouse osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo. Dynasore inhibited the formation of resorption pits in osteoclast cultures by suppressing actin ring formation and rapidly disrupting actin rings in osteoclasts. A time-lapse image analysis showed that dynasore shrank actin rings in osteoclasts within 30 min. The intraperitoneal administration of dynasore inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced trabecular bone loss in mouse femurs. These in vitro and in vivo results suggest that the GTPase activity of dynamin is critical for the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts and that dynasore is a seed for the development of novel anti-resorbing agents. PMID:26063501

  8. Human osteoclast and giant cell differentiation: the apparent switch from nonspecific esterase to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity coincides with the in situ expression of osteopontin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Connor, J R; Dodds, R A; James, I E; Gowen, M

    1995-12-01

    +/TRAP- to NSE-/TRAP+ cells that express osteopontin mRNA. We propose that the clusters of NSE+/TRAP- mononuclear cells represent the immature osteoclast precursor. In support of this, TRAP+/NSE+ cells were occasionally observed in both tissues, representing an intermediate stage in differentiation. These results further suggest that cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage within bone and inflammatory connective tissue have the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts. PMID:8537635

  9. Calcitonin receptors as markers for osteoclastic differentiation: correlation between generation of bone-resorptive cells and cells that express calcitonin receptors in mouse bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, G; Chambers, T J

    1989-09-01

    The osteoclast is the cell that resorbs bone. It is known to derive from hemopoietic precursors, but analysis of lineage and regulation of differentiation has been hampered by lack of a specific marker that enables identification of cells of osteoclastic phenotype. Previously used markers, such as multinuclearity, that are specific for osteoclasts in bone become less specific in culture. Uniquely among bone and bone marrow cells, osteoclasts possess abundant calcitonin (CT) receptors. We therefore tested the correlation between the generation of bone-resorptive function and the formation of CT receptor-positive cells from hemopoietic tissue in vitro. Without 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3], a hormone that induces osteoclastic differentiation in vitro, bone marrow cultures showed very little bone resorption, and only small numbers of CT receptor-positive cells developed. When 1,25-(OH)2D3 was added to the cultures, CT receptor-positive cells developed within 1 day and reached a peak after 7 days. Bone resorption commenced within 2 days of hormone addition. There was a strong parallelism between the cumulative number of CT receptor-positive cells and the extent of bone resorption. The capacity of cultures to generate bone-resorptive activity and CT receptor-positive cells declined progressively when 1,25-(OH)2D3 was added to hemopoietic tissue after a 7- to 21-day hormone-free incubation period. The number of CT receptor-positive cells in these cultures correlated strongly (r = 0.96) with bone resorption. The behavior of these cultures suggests that 1,25-(OH)2D3 acts to induce terminal differentiation of osteoclast precursors present in the cultures, and that precursor cell numbers decreased with increasing time in vitro. All of the CT receptor-positive cells in control cultures and all of those seen shortly after 1,25-(OH)2D3 addition were mononuclear, despite considerable bone resorption; the majority of CT receptor-positive cells remained mononuclear

  10. The role(s) of Src kinase and Cbl proteins in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Horne, William C; Sanjay, Archana; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2005-12-01

    The osteoclast resorbs mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis, and repair. The deletion of the gene encoding the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src produces an osteopetrotic skeletal phenotype that is the consequence of the inability of the mature osteoclast to efficiently resorb bone. Src-/- osteoclasts exhibit reduced motility and abnormal organization of the apical secretory domain (the ruffled border) and attachment-related cytoskeletal elements that are necessary for bone resorption. A key function of Src in osteoclasts is to promote the rapid assembly and disassembly of the podosomes, the specialized integrin-based attachment structures of osteoclasts and other highly motile cells. Once recruited to the activated integrins, especially alphavbeta3), by the adhesion tyrosine kinase Pyk2, Src binds and phosphorylates Cbl and Cbl-b, homologous multisite adapter proteins with ubiquitin ligase activity. The Cbl proteins in turn recruit and activate additional signaling effectors, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and dynamin, which play key roles in the development of cell polarity and the regulation of cell attachment and motility. In addition, Src and the Cbl proteins contribute to signaling cascades that are activated by several important receptors, including receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB and the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, and also downregulate the signaling from many of these receptors. PMID:16313344

  11. Selective inhibition of TNFR1 reduces osteoclast numbers and is differentiated from anti-TNF in a LPS-driven model of inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, A I; Ersek, A; Freidin, A; Feldmann, M; Stoop, A A; Horwood, N J

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of autoimmune disorders has been revolutionised by the introduction of biologics such as anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Although in rheumatoid arthritis patients a bone sparing effect of anti-TNF has been shown, the mechanism is not fully understood. Anti-TNF molecules block tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and prevent signalling via both TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1; p55) and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75). However, signalling via TNFR2 is reported to have protective effects in a number of cell and organ systems. Hence we set out to investigate if pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1 had differential effects compared to pan-TNF inhibition in both an in vitro cell-based model of human osteoclast activity and an in vivo mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteolysis. For the in vitro experiments the anti-human TNFR1 domain antibody (dAb) DMS5541 was used, whereas for the in vivo mouse experiments the anti-mouse TNFR1 dAb DMS5540 was used. We show that selective blocking of TNFR1 signalling reduced osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF. Subcutaneous LPS injection over the calvaria leads to the development of osteolytic lesions within days due to inflammation driven osteoclast formation. In this model, murine TNFR2 genetically fused with mouse IgG1 Fc domain (mTNFR2.Fc), an anti-TNF, did not protect from bone loss in contrast to anti-TNFR1, which significantly reduced lesion development, inflammatory infiltrate, and osteoclast number and size. These results support further exploring the use of TNFR1-selective inhibition in inflammatory bone loss disorders such as osteomyelitis and peri-prosthetic aseptic loosening. PMID:26208457

  12. Ceylonamides A-F, Nitrogenous Spongian Diterpenes That Inhibit RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis, from the Marine Sponge Spongia ceylonensis.

    PubMed

    El-Desoky, Ahmed H; Kato, Hikaru; Angkouw, Esther D; Mangindaan, Remy E P; de Voogd, Nicole J; Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2016-08-26

    Seven new spongian diterpenes, ceylonamides A-F (1-6) and 15α,16-dimethoxyspongi-13-en-19-oic acid (7), were isolated from the Indonesian marine sponge Spongia ceylonensis along with eight known spongian diterpenes, 8-15. Compounds 1-6 were determined to be nitrogenous spongian diterpenes. The isolated compounds were examined for the inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264 macrophages. Ceylonamide A (1) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 13 μM, followed by ceylonamide B (2) (IC50, 18 μM). An examination of the structure-activity relationships of the isolated compounds revealed that the position of the carbonyl group of the γ-lactam ring and bulkiness of the substituent at its nitrogen atom were important for inhibitory activity. PMID:27526327

  13. Involvement of toll-like receptor 2 and 4 in association between dyslipidemia and osteoclast differentiation in apolipoprotein E deficient rat periodontium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia increases circulating levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and this may induce alveolar bone loss through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dyslipidemia on osteoclast differentiation associated with TLR2 and TLR4 in periodontal tissues using a rat dyslipidemia (apolipoprotein E deficient) model. Methods Levels of plasma OxLDL, and the cholesterol and phospholipid profiles in plasma lipoproteins were compared between apolipoprotein E-deficient rats (16-week-old males) and wild-type (control) rats. In the periodontal tissue, we evaluated the changes in TLR2, TLR4, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression. Results Apolipoprotein E-deficient rats showed higher plasma levels of OxLDL than control rats (p<0.05), with higher plasma levels of total cholesterol (p<0.05) and LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05) and lower plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p<0.05). Their periodontal tissue also exhibited a higher ratio of RANKL-positive cells and a higher number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts than control rats (p<0.05). Furthermore, periodontal gene expression of TLR2, TLR4 and RANKL was higher in apolipoprotein E-deficient rats than in control rats (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings underscore the important role for TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the osteoclast differentiation on alveolar bone response to dyslipidemia. PMID:23295061

  14. The role of microRNAs in osteoclasts and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peifu; Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the exclusive cells of bone resorption. Abnormally activating osteoclasts can lead to low bone mineral density, which will cause osteopenia, osteoporosis, and other bone disorders. To date, the mechanism of how osteoclast precursors differentiate into mature osteoclasts remains elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel regulatory factors that play an important role in numerous cellular processes, including cell differentiation and apoptosis, by post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Recently, a number of studies have revealed that miRNAs participate in bone homeostasis, including osteoclastic bone resorption, which sheds light on the mechanisms underlying osteoclast differentiation. In this review, we highlight the miRNAs involved in regulating osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, and their roles in osteoporosis. PMID:25692234

  15. The role of MicroRNAs in Osteoclasts and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Peifu; Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the exclusive cells of bone resorption. Abnormally activating osteoclasts can lead to low bone mineral density, which will cause osteopenia, osteoporosis, and other bone disorders. To date, the mechanism of how osteoclast precursors differentiate into mature osteoclasts remains elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel regulatory factors that play an important role in numerous cellular processes, including cell differentiation and apoptosis, by post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Recently, a number of studies have revealed that miRNAs participate in bone homeostasis, including osteoclastic bone resorption, which sheds light on the mechanisms underlying osteoclast differentiation. In this review, we highlight the miRNAs involved in regulating osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, and their roles in osteoporosis. PMID:25692234

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 is required for normal osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation during skeletal growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Georgy, S R; Pagel, C N; Ghasem-Zadeh, A; Zebaze, R M D; Pike, R N; Sims, N A; Mackie, E J

    2012-03-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is a G-protein coupled receptor expressed by osteoblasts and monocytes. PAR(2) is activated by a number of proteinases including coagulation factors and proteinases released by inflammatory cells. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of PAR(2) in skeletal growth and repair using wild type (WT) and PAR(2) knockout (KO) mice. Micro computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to examine the structure of tibias isolated from uninjured mice at 50 and 90 days of age, and from 98-day-old mice in a bone repair model in which a hole had been drilled through the tibias. Bone marrow was cultured and investigated for the presence of osteoblast precursors (alkaline phosphatase-positive fibroblastic colonies), and osteoclasts were counted in cultures treated with M-CSF and RANKL. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine which proteinases that activate PAR(2) are expressed in bone marrow. Regulation of PAR(2) expression in primary calvarial osteoblasts from WT mice was investigated by quantitative PCR. Cortical and trabecular bone volumes were significantly greater in the tibias of PAR(2) KO mice than in those of WT mice at 50 days of age. In trabecular bone, osteoclast surface, osteoblast surface and osteoid volume were significantly lower in KO than in WT mice. Bone marrow cultures from KO mice showed significantly fewer alkaline phosphatase-positive colony-forming units and osteoclasts compared to cultures from WT mice. Significantly less new bone and significantly fewer osteoclasts were observed in the drill sites of PAR(2) KO mice compared to WT mice 7 days post-surgery. A number of activators of PAR(2), including matriptase and kallikrein 4, were found to be expressed by normal bone marrow. Parathyroid hormone, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3), or interleukin-6 in combination with its soluble receptor down-regulated PAR(2) mRNA expression, and fibroblast growth factor-2 or thrombin stimulated PAR(2

  17. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and monocytes in a miniaturized three-dimensional culture with mineral granules.

    PubMed

    Gamblin, Anne Laure; Renaud, Audrey; Charrier, Céline; Hulin, Philippe; Louarn, Guy; Heymann, Dominique; Trichet, Valérie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The pathologies of the skeleton have a significant socioeconomic impact on our population. Although therapies have improved the treatment of osteosarcoma and osteoporosis, their efficacy still remains limited. In this context, we developed a miniaturized 3-D culture model of bone cells on calcium phosphate ceramics. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were three-dimensionally cultured on particles of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, 125-200μm) in osteogenic media. The MSCs seeded on the BCP particles adhered and proliferated, producing abundant collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM). Light and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the MSCs created bridges between the BCP particles and formed a 3-D structure. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis in a scanning electron microscope confirmed the mineralization of the collagen matrix. The 96-well sized bone constructs were tested by immunohistology and transcription analysis, proving cell differentiation. Both techniques corroborated the osteoblastic differentiation with high production of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Peripheral blood CD14-positive monocytes (MOs) were pre-differentiated into osteoclasts prior to seeding on the 3-D constructs. Multinucleated and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were also identified at the surface of the 3-D constructs after 90days of culture. In addition, cell viability within these constructs was measured by flow cytometry. In summary, we have developed a miniaturized 3-D culture of bone cell precursors with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. This 3-D culture may make it possible to test the effects of new drugs for bone healing, osteoporosis and osteosarcomas, in more appropriate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions than conventional 2-D cultures. PMID:25196309

  18. The in vitro osteoclastic degradation of nacre.

    PubMed

    Duplat, D; Chabadel, A; Gallet, M; Berland, S; Bédouet, L; Rousseau, M; Kamel, S; Milet, C; Jurdic, P; Brazier, M; Lopez, E

    2007-04-01

    Osteoclast activity was studied on nacre, the mother of pearl (MOP) in order to assess the plasticity of bone resorbing cells and their capacity to adapt to a biomineralized material with a different organic and mineral composition from that of its natural substrate, bone. Pure MOP, a natural biomineralized CaCO(3) material, was obtained from Pinctada oyster shell. When implanted in the living system, nacre has proven to be a sustainable bone grafting material although a limited surface degradation process. Osteoclast stem cells and mature osteoclasts were cultured on MOP substrate and osteoclast precursor cells were shown to differentiate into osteoclasts capable of resorbing nacre substrate. However, analysis of the organization of the cytoskeleton showed that both a sealing zone and a podosome structure were observed on the nacre substrate. Moreover, MOP resorption efficiency was consistently found to be lower than that of bone and appeared to be a limited process. PMID:17258312

  19. Ebselen Is a Potential Anti-Osteoporosis Agent by Suppressing Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation In vitro and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Bone Destruction In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Oh, Jaemin; Lee, Myeung Su

    2016-01-01

    Ebselen is a non-toxic seleno-organic drug with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that is currently being examined in clinical trials to prevent and treat various diseases, including atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. However, no reports are available for verifying the pharmacological effects of ebselen on major metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we observed that ebselen suppressed the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture by regulating the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin secreted by osteoblasts. In addition, ebselen treatment in the early stage of osteoclast differentiation inhibited RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of IκB, PI3K, and Akt in early signaling pathways and by subsequently inducing c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1. Further, ebselen induced apoptosis of osteoclasts in the late stage of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, ebselen treatment suppressed filamentous actin ring formation and bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Reflecting these in vitro effects, administration of ebselen recovered bone loss and its µ-CT parameters in lipopolysaccharide-mediated mouse model. Histological analysis confirmed that ebselen prevented trabecular bone matrix degradation and osteoclast formation in the bone tissues. Finally, it was proved that the anti-osteoclastogenic action of ebselen is achieved through targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. These results indicate that ebselen is a potentially safe drug for treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27019631

  20. IL-37 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Jafari; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Ishida, Masahiko; Sugisawa, Haruki; Ochi, Yumiko; Kishikawa, Akiko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2016-07-01

    IL-37 is a newly defined member of the IL-1 cytokine family. It has been reported that IL-37 inhibited innate immunity and inflammatory responses in autoimmune diseases and tumors. IL-37 also inhibited Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immunological reaction. LPS is a bacterial cell wall component that is capable of inducing osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption. However, there is no study to investigate the effect of IL-37 on LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of IL-37 in LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. LPS was administrated with or without IL-37 by subcutaneous injection on mice calvariae. The number of osteoclasts, the level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA, the ratio of the bone resorption pits and the level of C-terminal telopeptide fragments of type I collagen cross-Links as a marker of bone resorption in mice administrated both LPS and IL-37 were lower than that in mice administrated LPS alone. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to analyze osteoclast related cytokines RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels in vivo. RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were increased in the LPS alone administrated mice as compared with PBS administrated groups. On the other hand, RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were inhibited in the IL-37 and LPS administrated mice as compared with LPS alone administrated group. In vitro analysis, there was no effect of IL-37 in RANKL-induced osteoclast formation, TNF-α-induced osteoclast formation and cell viability from bone marrow macrophages as osteoclast precursor and LPS-induced RANKL expression from stromal cells. These results indicated that IL-37 inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption via inhibition of LPS-induced osteoclast related cytokines, but might not directly inhibit osteoclast formation on osteoclast precursor and RANKL expression on stromal cells. PMID:27154248

  1. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin’s effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  2. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin's effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  3. Lysozyme synthesis in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, T J; Meadows, G; Kahn, A J

    1990-12-01

    Osteoclasts may or may not be directly related to monocytes and macrophages, but it is well established that these cell types share a number of features in common. In the present study we sought to extend this comparison by assessing lysozyme synthesis in osteoclasts, an enzyme known to be produced and secreted in large amounts by monocytes and macrophages. Our data show that freshly isolated chicken osteoclasts and osteoclasts in situ contain an abundant amount of lysozyme and correspondingly high steady-state levels of the enzyme's messenger RNA. Marrow macrophages, at various stages of in vitro maturation, also possess lysozyme mRNA but in amounts approximately two to four times lower than osteoclasts. These observations reaffirm the monocyte-macrophage nature of the osteoclast but raise questions about the function of the lysozyme in this cell. At present, the role of the lysozyme in osteoclast activity remains unexplained. PMID:1706132

  4. Characterization of Regulatory Extracellular Vesicles from Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Huynh, N; VonMoss, L; Smith, D; Rahman, I; Felemban, M F; Zuo, J; Rody, W J; McHugh, K P; Holliday, L S

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), which include exosomes and ectosomes/microvesicles, have emerged as important intercellular regulators. EVs can interact with surface receptors of target cells and can transport luminal components, including messenger RNAs (mRNAs), microRNAs, and enzymes, to the cytosol of the target cell. Here, we show that hematopoietic cells grown in culture shed exosome-like EVs as they differentiate from preosteoclasts into osteoclasts. These EVs were between 25 and 120 nm (mean, 40 nm) in diameter determined by transmission electron microscopy. The exosome-associated markers CD63 and EpCAM were enriched in the isolated EVs while markers of Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum were not detected. Treatment of isolated hematopoietic cells with EVs did not affect their receptor activator of nuclear factor κB-ligand (RANKL)-stimulated differentiation into osteoclasts. However, EVs from osteoclast precursors promoted 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent osteoclast formation in whole mouse marrow cultures, and EVs from osteoclast-enriched cultures inhibited osteoclastogenesis in the same cultures. These data suggested that osteoclast-derived EVs are paracrine regulators of osteoclastogenesis. EVs from mature osteoclasts contained receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK). Immunogold labeling showed RANK was enriched in 1 in every 32 EVs isolated from osteoclast-enriched cultures. Depletion of RANK-rich EVs relieved the ability of osteoclast-derived EVs to inhibit osteoclast formation in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-stimulated marrow cultures. In summary, we show for the first time that EVs released by osteoclasts are novel regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Our data suggest that RANK in EVs may be mechanistically linked to the inhibition of osteoclast formation. RANK present in EVs may function by competitively inhibiting the stimulation of RANK on osteoclast surfaces by RANKL similar to osteoprotegerin. RANK-rich EVs may also take advantage of the RANK

  5. Denosumab-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw affects osteoclast formation and differentiation: Pathological features of two cases

    PubMed Central

    MATSUSHITA, YUKI; HAYASHIDA, SAKI; MORISHITA, KOTA; SAKAMOTO, HIROSHI; NARUSE, TOMOFUMI; SAKAMOTO, YUKI; YAMADA, SHIN-ICHI; YANAMOTO, SOUICHI; FUJITA, SHUICHI; IKEDA, TOHRU; UMEDA, MASAHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is caused by antiresorptive (bisphosphonates and denosumab) and antiangiogenic agents, with the first report of denosumab-related ONJ emerging in 2010. To date, although certain case reports on denosumab-related ONJ have been published, those of ONJ caused by a single application of the drug are scarce. In addition, only one report described the histopathological features of this condition, although not completely; only the sequestrum resected by conservative surgery was evaluated. Although conservative treatment is recommended, the effectiveness of extensive surgery in the early stages of bisphosphonate-related ONJ has been described in recent years. Here we report the clinical and histopathological features of denosumab-related ONJ caused by single application of the drug, which was treated by extensive surgery in two patients. Histopathological analysis revealed a decreased number of osteoclasts in viable bone around the sequestrum, and these appeared morphologically immature, as indicated by the presence of very few nuclei. These findings are different from those for bisphosphonate-related ONJ and may assist in elucidating the mechanism underlying denosumab-related ONJ. Furthermore, extensive surgery may be effective for the management of this condition. PMID:26893859

  6. Mechanically loaded myotubes affect osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bakker, Astrid D

    2014-03-01

    In response to mechanical loading skeletal muscle produces numerous growth factors and cytokines that enter the circulation. We hypothesized that myotubes produce soluble factors that affect osteoclast formation and aimed to identify which osteoclastogenesis-modulating factors are differentially produced by mechanically stimulated myotubes. C2C12 myotubes were subjected to mechanical loading by cyclic strain for 1 h, and postincubated with or without cyclic strain for 24 h. The effect of cyclic strain on gene expression in myotubes was determined by PCR. Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from cultures of unloaded and loaded myotubes and from MLO-Y4 osteocytes. CM was added to mouse bone marrow cells containing osteoclast precursors, and after 6 days osteoclasts were counted. Compared to unconditioned medium, CM from unloaded osteocytes increased osteoclast formation, while CM from unloaded myotubes decreased osteoclast formation. Cyclic strain strongly enhanced IL-6 expression in myotubes. CM from cyclically strained myotubes increased osteoclast formation compared to CM from unloaded myotubes, but this effect did not occur in the presence of an IL-6 antibody. In conclusion, mechanically loaded myotubes secrete soluble factors, among others IL-6, which affect osteoclast formation. These results suggest that muscle could potentially affect bone homeostasis in vivo via production of growth factors and/or cytokines. PMID:24264813

  7. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: Role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E.; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1β, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing due to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:26343372

  8. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1β, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:26343372

  9. miR-29b negatively regulates human osteoclastic cell differentiation and function: implications for the treatment of multiple myeloma-related bone disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Pitari, Maria Rita; Amodio, Nicola; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Conforti, Francesco; Leone, Emanuela; Botta, Cirino; Paolino, Francesco Maria; Del Giudice, Teresa; Iuliano, Eleonora; Caraglia, Michele; Ferrarini, Manlio; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal homeostasis relies upon a fine tuning of osteoclast (OCL)-mediated bone resorption and osteoblast (OBL)-dependent bone formation. This balance is unsettled by multiple myeloma (MM) cells, which impair OBL function and stimulate OCLs to generate lytic lesions. Emerging experimental evidence is disclosing a key regulatory role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of bone homeostasis suggesting the miRNA network as potential novel target for the treatment of MM-related bone disease (BD). Here, we report that miR-29b expression decreases progressively during human OCL differentiation in vitro. We found that lentiviral transduction of miR-29b into OCLs, even in the presence of MM cells, significantly impairs tartrate acid phosphatase (TRAcP) expression, lacunae generation, and collagen degradation, which are relevant hallmarks of OCL activity. Accordingly, expression of cathepsin K and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as well as actin ring rearrangement were impaired in the presence of miR-29b. Moreover, we found that canonical targets C-FOS and metalloproteinase 2 are suppressed by constitutive miR-29b expression which also downregulated the master OCL transcription factor, NAFTc-1. Overall, these data indicate that enforced expression of miR-29b impairs OCL differentiation and overcomes OCL activation triggered by MM cells, providing a rationale for miR-29b-based treatment of MM-related BD. PMID:23254643

  10. Notch signaling promotes osteoclast maturation and resorptive activity.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jason W; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2015-11-01

    The role of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation is controversial with conflicting experimental evidence indicating both stimulatory and inhibitory roles. Differences in experimental protocols and in vivo versus in vitro models may explain the discrepancies between studies. In this study, we investigated cell autonomous roles of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation and function by altering Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation using stimulation with immobilized ligands Jagged1 or Delta-like1 or by suppression with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or transcriptional inhibitor SAHM1. Stimulation of Notch signaling in committed osteoclast precursors resulted in larger osteoclasts with a greater number of nuclei and resorptive activity whereas suppression resulted in smaller osteoclasts with fewer nuclei and suppressed resorptive activity. Conversely, stimulation of Notch signaling in osteoclast precursors prior to induction of osteoclastogenesis resulted in fewer osteoclasts. Our data support a mechanism of context-specific Notch signaling effects wherein Notch stimulation inhibits commitment to osteoclast differentiation, but enhances the maturation and function of committed precursors. PMID:25914241

  11. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits the differentiation and bone resorption by osteoclasts generated from Wistar rat bone marrow-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONG; GU, JIAN-HONG; CHEN, YANG; ZHAO, HONG-YAN; LIU, WEI; SONG, RUI-LONG; BIAN, JIAN-CHUN; LIU, XUE-ZHONG; YUAN, YAN; LIU, ZONG-PING

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1α,25-(OH)2D3] plays an important role in maintaining a balance in calcium and bone metabolism. To study the effects of 1α,25-(OH)2D3 on osteoclast (OC) formation and bone resorption, OC differentiation was induced in bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells from Wistar rats with the addition of macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand in vitro. Cells were then treated with 1α,25-(OH)2D3 at 10−9, 10−8 or 10−7 mol/l. OCs were identified using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and activity was monitored in the absorption lacunae by scanning electron microscopy. Expression levels of functional proteins associated with bone absorption, namely carbonic anhydrase II, cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were evaluated by western blot analysis. The results showed that 1α,25-(OH)2D3 inhibited the formation and activation of OCs in a dose-dependent manner and downregulated the expression levels of bone absorption-associated proteins. PMID:26622436

  12. Acidosis environment promotes osteoclast formation by acting on the last phase of preosteoclast differentiation: a study to elucidate the action points of acidosis and search for putative target molecules.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kohtaro; Morita, Ikuo

    2011-08-01

    Acidosis promoted tartaric acid-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinuclear cell (TRAP+MNC) or osteoclast formation. Large osteoclast or TRAP+LMNC formation was observed far more in an acidosis environment than in a physiologically neutral environment. One of the major action points of acidosis was determined to be located in the last phase of preosteoclast differentiation using a co-culture system and a soluble RANKL-dependent bone marrow cell culture system. On-going osteoclast formation in an acidosis environment markedly deteriorated when the medium was replaced with physiologically neutral medium within the first 6h; however, bone marrow cells previously stimulated in an acidosis environment for 9h differentiated into TRAP+LMNC in pH 7.4 medium. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of DC-STAMP, a key molecule in cell fusion, and NFATc1 did not increase in the acidosis environment compared with those under physiologically neutral conditions. Ruthenium red, a general TRP antagonist, deteriorated acidosis-promoted TRAP+LMNC formation. 4-Alpha-PDD, a TRPV4-specific agonist, added in the last 21 h of preosteoclast differentiation, potentiated TRAP+LMNC formation in a mild acidosis environment, showing synergism between TRPV4 activation and acidosis. RN1734, a TRPV4-specific antagonist, partly inhibited acidosis-promoted TRAP+LMNC formation. We thus narrowed down the major action points of acidosis in osteoclast formation and elucidated the characteristics of this system in detail. Our results show that acidosis effectively uses TRPV4 to drive large-scale cell fusion and also utilizes systems independently of TRPV4. PMID:21575626

  13. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor‑activator of nuclear factor κB (NF‑κB) ligand (RANKL)‑induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF‑κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF‑κB and MAPKs in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  14. Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclastic Resorption of Tricalcium Phosphate: Effect of Strontium and Magnesium Doping

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Bone substitute materials are required to support the remodeling process, which consists of osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic synthesis. Osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, generate from differentiation of hemopoietic mononuclear cells. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of 1.0 wt% strontium (Sr) and 1.0 wt% magnesium (Mg) doping in beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the differentiation of mononuclear cells into osteoclast-like cells and its resorptive activity. In vitro osteoclast-like cell formation, adhesion, and resorption were studied using osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cell, supplemented with receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL). Osteoclast-like cell formation was noticed on pure and Sr doped β-TCP samples at day 8 which was absent on Mg doped β-TCP samples indicating decrease in initial osteoclast differentiation due to Mg doping. After 21 days of culture, osteoclast-like cell formation was evident on all samples with osteoclastic markers such as actin ring, multiple nuclei, and presence of vitronectin receptor αvβ3 integrin. After osteoclast differentiation, all substrates showed osteoclast-like cell mediated degradation, however; significantly restricted for Mg doped β-TCP samples. Our present results indicated substrate chemistry controlled osteoclast differentiation and resorptive activity which can be used in designing TCP based resorbable bone substitutes with controlled degradation properties. PMID:22566212

  15. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  16. RANKL, osteopontin, and osteoclast homeostasis in a hyperocclusion mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Cameron G.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Dangaria, Smit; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2009-10-21

    The biological mechanisms that maintain the position of teeth in their sockets establish a dynamic equilibrium between bone resorption and apposition. In order to reveal some of the dynamics involved in the tissue responses towards occlusal forces on periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone homeostasis, we developed the first mouse model of hyperocclusion. Swiss-Webster mice were kept in hyperocclusion for 0, 3, 6, and 9 d. Morphological and histological changes in the periodontium were assessed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ground sections with fluorescent detection of vital dye labels. Sections were stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Traumatic occlusion resulted in enamel surface abrasion, inhibition of alveolar bone apposition, significant formation of osteoclasts at 3, 6 and 9 d, and upregulation of OPN and RANKL. Data from this study suggest that both OPN and RANKL contribute to the stimulation of bone resorption in the hyperocclusive state. In addition, we propose that the inhibition of alveolar bone apposition by occlusal forces is an important mechanism for the control of occlusal height that might work in synergy with RANKL-induced bone resorption to maintain normal occlusion.

  17. Tumor-Induced Osteoclast miRNA Changes as Regulators and Biomarkers of Osteolytic Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Brian; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Campbell, Neil; Schwarzenbach, Heidi; Pantel, Klaus; Amadori, Dino; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanism by which tumor cells influence osteoclast differentiation is crucial for improving treatment of osteolytic metastasis. Here, we report broad microRNA (miRNA) expression changes in differentiating osteoclasts after exposure to tumor-conditioned media, in part through activation of NFκB signaling by soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM1) secreted from bone-metastatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of multiple miRNAs down-regulated during osteoclastogenesis suppresses osteoclast differentiation by targeting important osteoclast genes. Intravenous delivery of these miRNAs in vivo inhibits osteoclast activity and reduces osteolytic bone metastasis. Importantly, serum levels of sICAM1 and two osteoclast miRNAs, miR-16 and miR-378, which are elevated in osteoclast differentiation, correlate with bone metastasis burden. These findings establish miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers of bone metastasis. PMID:24135284

  18. Suppressed osteoclast differentiation at the chondro-osseous junction mediates endochondral ossification retardation in long bones of Wistar fetal rats with prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhengqi; Zhang, Xianrong; Shangguan, Yangfan; Hu, Hang; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-08-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) inhibits longitudinal growth of fetal bones, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate how PEE induces the retardation of long bone development in fetal rats. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with ethanol or distilled water (control group) by gavage from gestational day (GD) 9 to 20. Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section on GD20. Fetal sera were collected for assessing corticosterone (CORT) level. Fetal long bones were harvested for histochemical, immunohistochemical and gene expression analysis. Primary chondrocytes were treated with ethanol or CORT for analyzing genes expression. PEE fetuses showed a significant reduction in birth weight and body length. The serum CORT concentration in PEE group was significantly increased, while the body weight, body length and femur length all were significantly decreased in the PEE group. The length of the epiphyseal hypertrophy zone was enlarged, whereas the length of the primary ossification center was significantly reduced in PEE fetuses. TUNEL assay showed reduced apoptosis in the PEE group. Further, the gene expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) was markedly up-regulated. In vitro experiments showed that CORT (but not ethanol) treatment significantly activated the expression of OPG, while the application of glucocorticoid receptor inhibitor, mifepristone, attenuated these change induced by CORT. These results indicated that PEE-induced glucocorticoid over-exposure enhanced the expression of OPG in fetal epiphyseal cartilage and further lead to the suppressed osteoclast differentiation in the chondro-osseous junction and consequently inhibited the endochondral ossification in long bones of fetal rats. PMID:27338645

  19. Recombinant Human Endostatin Suppresses Mouse Osteoclast Formation by Inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPKs Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nong; Gao, Ru-Feng; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive joint destruction. As reported previously, recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) is associated with inhibition of joint bone destruction present in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis; however, the effect of rhEndostatin on bone destruction is not known. This study was designed to assess the inhibitory effect and mechanisms of rhEndostatin on formation and function of osteoclasts in vitro, and to gain insight into the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of bone destruction. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from BALB/c mice were stimulated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor to establish osteoclast formation. Osteoclast formation was determined by TRAP staining. Cell viability of BMMs affected by rhEndostatin was determined using a MTT assay. Bone resorption was examined with a bone resorption pits assay. The expression of osteoclast-specific markers was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. The related signaling pathways were examined using a Luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis. Indeed, rhEndostatin showed a significant reduction in the number of osteoclast-like cells and early-stage bone resorption. Moreover, molecular analysis demonstrated that rhEndostatin attenuated RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, rhEndostatin significantly inhibited the activation of RANKL-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Hence, we demonstrated for the first time that preventing the formation and function of osteoclasts is an important anti-bone destruction mechanism of rhEndostatin, which might be useful in the prevention and treatment of bone destruction in RA. PMID:27313530

  20. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b improves the prognosis of RANK positive breast cancer patients by inhibiting RANKL-induced cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyun; Teng, Yuee; Fan, Yibo; Wang, Yan; Li, Wei; Shi, Jing; Ma, Yanju; Li, Ce; Shi, Xiaonan; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-09-01

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL)/RANK pathway plays an important role in breast cancer progression. Despite the known role of Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl)-b as an essential regulator of the RANKL/RANK pathway, its effect on RANK pathway in breast cancer remains unclear. Thus, the present study investigated the effect of Cbl-b on the prognosis of RANK-expressing breast cancer patients, as well as on RANKL/RANK pathway. The results showed that RANK and Cbl-b expression was separately detected in 154 (154/300, 51.3%) and 165 (165/300, 55.0%) breast cancer tissue samples. In RANK-expressing breast cancer patients, Cbl-b expression was correlated with low metastasis rate (p = 0.004), better disease-free survival (DFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) (p = 0.004 and p = 0.036, respectively). In addition, multivariate analysis showed that Cbl-b expression was an independent predictor of DFS (p = 0.038). Animal experiment results demonstrated that silencing Cbl-b expression in breast cancer cells increased the incidence of lung metastasis in nude mice. Further mechanism investigation revealed that Cbl-b down-regulated RANK protein expression and inhibited RANKL-induced breast cancer cell migration by negatively regulating the Src-Akt/ERK pathway. Our results suggest that Cbl-b improves the prognosis of RANK-expressing breast cancer patients by inhibiting RANKL-induced breast cancer cell migration and metastasis. PMID:26087197

  1. Osteoclasts in the interface with electrospun hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Pasuri, Jenni; Holopainen, Jani; Kokkonen, Hanna; Persson, Maria; Kauppinen, Kyösti; Lehenkari, Petri; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2015-11-01

    Electrospinning is a method to produce lightweight, resorbable and bioinspired scaffolds for tissue engineering. Here we investigated the influence of electrospun hydroxyapatite fibers (HA) on macrophages and osteoclasts. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and human bone marrow derived primary osteoclasts (hOC) were cultured with electrospun HA fibers embedded in Matrigel. Cell morphology and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) were analyzed using macrophages. Both fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the cell morphology differed on the various materials (HA fibers on Matrigel, pure Matrigel and a glass control). Control macrophages were activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but electrospun HA did not provoke an inflammatory response. Cytokine secretion detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also supported this observation. LPS, but not HA fibers, stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 secretion by macrophages at the 2 day time point. After 4 days in culture there was an increasing trend in cytokine secretion in the HA fiber samples. Human bone marrow myeloid precursor cells were able to fuse and differentiate on the fibrous mineral scaffold to form functional multinuclear osteoclasts that were able to resorb the HA nanofibers. This indicates that osteoclasts do not necessarily need a continuous bone surface but osteoclast ruffled border membranes can form a resorption interface with a fibrous mineral scaffold. PMID:26342323

  2. Adrenergic stimulation of osteoclastogenesis mediated by expression of osteoclast differentiation factor in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Tsuboi, T; Arai, M; Togari, A

    2001-03-01

    It is well known that adrenergic agonists efficiently activate beta-adrenoceptors on osteoblastic cells and can stimulate bone resorption in intact mouse calvaria. Recently, an osteoclastogenic factor of osteoblastic origin was found to be a novel tumor necrosis factor ligand family member and was termed osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF). Using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach, we investigated the effect of epinephrine on mRNA levels of ODF and its decoy receptor, osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF), in MC3T3-E1 cells. Treatment with epinephrine (1 microM) rapidly increased ODF and OCIF mRNA levels, which peaked after 0.5 hr of treatment. Epinephrine (1 microM) also increased interleukin (IL)-6, IL-11, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-II mRNA levels, as well as increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) accumulation in the culture medium. Treatment of the cells with IL-11 (10 ng/mL) or PGE(2) (1 microM) increased ODF and OCIF mRNA levels as observed with epinephrine. However, increases in ODF and OCIF mRNA levels by epinephrine were more rapid than those by IL-11, and were not influenced by NS-398 (100 microM; an inhibitor of COX-II), suggesting a direct effect of epinephrine on ODF and OCIF mRNA expressions as well as an indirect effect mediated by IL-11 and PGE(2) production. Epinephrine-induced increases in ODF and OCIF mRNA levels were inhibited by pretreatment with timolol (1 microM; beta-antagonist) and phentolamine (1 microM; alpha-antagonist), respectively. Furthermore, the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells from mouse bone marrow cells was stimulated by isoproterenol (0.1 to 10 microM) or epinephrine (0.1 to 10 microM). The action of isoproterenol, a beta-agonist, was clearly stronger than that of epinephrine, suggesting the importance of the physiological balance between ODF and OCIF productions for osteoclastogenesis. These findings suggest that beta-adrenergic stimulation induces not

  3. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  4. Role of osteoclasts in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) cavities are utilized for hematopoiesis and to maintain hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs have the ability to self-renew as well as to differentiate into multiple different hematopoietic lineage cells. HSCs produce their daughter cells throughout the lifespan of individuals and thus, maintaining HSCs is crucial for individual life. BM cavities provide a specialized microenvironment termed “niche” to support HSCs. Niches are composed of various types of cells such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells and reticular cells. Osteoclasts are unique cells which resorb bones and are required for BM cavity formation. Loss of osteoclast function or differentiation results in inhibition of BM cavity formation, an osteopetrotic phenotype. Osteoclasts are also reportedly required for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization to the periphery from BM cavities. Thus, lack of osteoclasts likely results in inhibition of HSC maintenance and HSPC mobilization. However, we found that osteoclasts are dispensable for hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and mobilization by using three independent osteoclast-less animal models. In this review, I will discuss the roles of osteoclasts in hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and mobilization. PMID:24147255

  5. Generation and culture of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Silvia; Logan, John G; Mellis, David; Capulli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells of haematopoietic lineage that are uniquely responsible for bone resorption. In the past, osteoclasts were isolated as mature cells from chicken long bones, or were generated using osteoblasts or stromal cells to induce osteoclast formation in total bone marrow from mice or rabbits. The Copernican revolution in osteoclast biology began with the identification of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator NFκB-ligand (RANKL ) as the key regulators of osteoclast formation, fusion and function. The availability of recombinant human and mouse M-CSF and RANKL has enabled researchers to reliably generate osteoclasts from primary monocyte/macrophage cells as well as from cell lines such as RAW 264.7. This article summarizes the most commonly used procedures for the isolation, generation and characterization of human, rodent and chicken osteoclasts in vitro. Lists of further reading and recommendations are included to facilitate a successful application by the reader. PMID:25228983

  6. Interleukin-6 does not mediate the stimulation by prostaglandin E2, parathyroid hormone, or 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in neonatal mouse parietal bones.

    PubMed

    Holt, I; Davie, M W; Braidman, I P; Marshall, M J

    1994-08-01

    The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was produced by neonatal mouse parietal bones during a 6- or 48-hour culture period in response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and bovine parathyroid hormone (PTH) 1-34 fragment but not 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. At the same time there was an increase in tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts (TRAP+OC) with all three osteotropic effectors over 6 hours, and an increase in 45Ca release over 48 hours. TRAP+OC numbers on PGE2-stimulated bones were positively correlated with IL-6 concentration. Our aim was to determine if IL-6 mediated this response. Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) was added to parietal bones in culture at concentrations within the range that PGE2 or PTH would produce during incubation. However, over 6 or 48 hours, rhIL-6 did not stimulate TRAP+OC to increase in number nor did it cause an increase in calcium release over 48 hours. Adding an antibody against mouse IL-6 to bone cultures stimulated with PTH or PGE2 neutralized the resulting IL-6 bioactivity by up to 92% but did not inhibit TRAP+OC formation. We conclude that although IL-6 is produced in response to two important stimulators of bone resorption, it does not mediate osteoclast differentiation or bone resorption in this model. PMID:7953976

  7. Role of MKP-1 in Osteoclasts and Bone Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jodi; Cui, Weiguo; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Xiaoqing; Mercan, Fatih; Bennett, Anton M.; Vignery, Agnès

    2009-01-01

    Bone mass is maintained through the complementary activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts; yet differentiation of either osteoblasts and osteoclasts engages the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The MAPKs are negatively regulated by a family of dual-specificity phosphatases known as the MAPK phosphatases (MKPs). MKP-1 is a stress-responsive MKP that inactivates the MAPKs and plays a central role in macrophages; however, whether MKP-1 plays a role in the maintenance of bone mass has yet to be investigated. We show here, using a genetic approach, that mkp-1−/− female mice exhibited slightly reduced bone mass. We found that mkp-1+/+ and mkp-1−/− mice had equivalent levels of bone loss after ovariectomy despite mkp-1−/− mice having fewer osteoclasts, suggesting that mkp-1−/− osteoclasts are hyperactive. Indeed, deletion of MKP1 led to a profound activation of osteoclasts in vivo in response to local lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. These results suggest a role for MKP-1 in osteoclasts, which originate from the fusion of macrophages. In support of these observations, receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand induced the expression for MKP-1, and osteoclasts derived from mkp-1−/− mice had increased resorptive activity. Finally, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-induced p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activities were enhanced in osteoclasts derived from mkp-1−/− mice. Taken together, these results show that MKP-1 plays a role in the maintenance of bone mass and does so by negatively regulating MAPK-dependent osteoclast signaling. PMID:19762714

  8. IL-1R/TLR2 through MyD88 Divergently Modulates Osteoclastogenesis through Regulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells c1 (NFATc1) and B Lymphocyte-induced Maturation Protein-1 (Blimp1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihong; Su, Lingkai; Xu, Qingan; Katz, Jenny; Michalek, Suzanne M; Fan, Mingwen; Feng, Xu; Zhang, Ping

    2015-12-11

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) and the receptor for interleukin-1 (IL-1R) signaling play an important role in bacteria-mediated bone loss diseases including periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Recent studies have shown that TLR ligands inhibit the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from un-committed osteoclast precursors, whereas IL-1 potentiates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. However, IL-1R and TLR belong to the same IL-1R/TLR superfamily, and activate similar intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the distinct effects of IL-1 and Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Our results show that LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-induced activation of osteoclast genes encoding Car2, Ctsk, MMP9, and TRAP, as well as expression of NFATc1, a master transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis. Regulation of osteoclast genes and NFATc1 by LPS-PG and IL-1 is dependent on MyD88, an important signaling adaptor for both TLR and IL-1R family members. Furthermore, LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-costimulatory receptor OSCAR (osteoclast-associated receptor) expression and Ca(2+) oscillations induced by RANKL. Moreover, LPS-PG completely abrogates RANKL-induced gene expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1), a global transcriptional repressor of anti-osteoclastogenic genes encoding Bcl6, IRF8, and MafB. However, IL-1 enhances RANKL-induced blimp1 gene expression but suppresses the gene expression of bcl6, irf8, and mafb. Our study reveals the involvement of multiple signaling molecules in the differential regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by TLR2 and IL-1 signaling. Understanding the signaling cross-talk among TLR, IL-1R, and RANK is critical for identifying therapeutic strategies to control bacteria-mediated bone loss. PMID:26483549

  9. RANK is essential for osteoclast and lymph node development

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, William C.; Glaccum, Moira; Charrier, Keith; Rohrbach, Kathy; Brasel, Kenneth; De Smedt, Thibaut; Daro, Elizabeth; Smith, Jeffery; Tometsko, Mark E.; Maliszewski, Charles R.; Armstrong, Allison; Shen, Victor; Bain, Steven; Cosman, David; Anderson, Dirk; Morrissey, Philip J.; Peschon, Jacques J.; Schuh, JoAnn

    1999-01-01

    The physiological role of the TNF receptor (TNFR) family member, RANK, was investigated by generating RANK-deficient mice. RANK−/− mice were characterized by profound osteopetrosis resulting from an apparent block in osteoclast differentiation. RANK expression was not required for the commitment, differentiation, and functional maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells from their myeloid precursors but provided a necessary and specific signal for the differentiation of myeloid-derived osteoclasts. RANK−/− mice also exhibited a marked deficiency of B cells in the spleen. RANK−/− mice retained mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues including Peyer’s patches but completely lacked all other peripheral lymph nodes, highlighting an additional major role for RANK in lymph node formation. These experiments reveal that RANK provides critical signals necessary for lymph node organogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10500098

  10. Secretion of PDGF isoforms during osteoclastogenesis and its modulation by anti-osteoclast drugs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Motiur; Matsuoka, Kazuhiko; Takeshita, Sunao; Ikeda, Kyoji

    2015-06-26

    In an attempt to identify secretory products of osteoclasts that mediate the coupling of bone formation to resorption, we found that along with osteoclast differentiation, PDGF-A gene expression increase occurred first, by 12 h after stimulation of bone marrow macrophages with M-CSF and RANKL, and peaked at 36 h. This was next followed by a progressive increase in PDGF-B gene expression until a peak at 60 h, when mature osteoclasts formed. Isoform-specific ELISA of the conditioned medium collected every 24 h revealed that all three of the isoforms of PDGF-AA, AB and BB were secreted, in this temporal order as differentiation proceeded. Their secretion was enhanced when osteoclasts were activated by placing them on dentin slices. The secretion of all three isoforms was decreased in cathepsin K-deficient osteoclasts compared with wild-type osteoclasts. Pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin K with odanacatib also inhibited the secretion of all three isoforms, as was also the case with alendronate treatment. The secretion of sphingosine-1-phosphate, which increased during osteoclastogenesis, was reduced from cathepsin K-deficient osteoclasts, and was inhibited by treatment with odanacatib more profoundly than with alendronate. Thus, all three isoforms of PDGF, which are secreted at distinct differentiation stages of osteoclasts, appear to have distinct roles in the cell-cell communication that takes place in the microenvironment of bone remodeling, especially from the osteoclast lineage to mesenchymal cells and vascular cells, thereby stimulating osteogenesis and angiogenesis. PMID:25951977

  11. Different Blood-Borne Human Osteoclast Precursors Respond in Distinct Ways to IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Sara; Schoenmaker, Ton; Cao, Yixuan; Everts, Vincent; de Vries, Teun J

    2016-06-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-degrading cells that are formed through fusion of their monocytic precursors. Three distinct subsets of monocytes have been identified in human peripheral blood: classical, intermediate, and non-classical monocytes. They are known to play different roles in physiology and pathology, but their capacity to differentiate into osteoclasts and whether inflammatory cytokines influence this differentiation is unknown. We hypothesized that classical, intermediate, and non-classical monocytes generate functionally different osteoclasts and that they respond in different ways to the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A). To investigate this, the different monocyte subsets were isolated from human peripheral blood and osteoclastogenesis was induced with the cytokines M-CSF and RANKL, with or without IL-17A. We found that all subsets are able to differentiate into osteoclasts in vitro, and that both osteoclastogenesis and subsequent bone resorption was distinctly affected by IL-17A. Osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption by osteoclasts derived from classical monocytes remained unaffected by IL-17A, while osteoclast formation from intermediate monocytes was inhibited by the cytokine. Surprisingly, bone resorption by osteoclasts derived from intermediate monocytes remained at similar levels as control cultures, indicating an increased bone resorbing activity by these osteoclasts. Limited numbers of osteoclasts were formed from non-classical monocytes on bone and no bone resorption was detected, which suggest that these cells belong to a cell lineage different from the osteoclast. By providing more insight into osteoclast formation from human blood monocytes, this study contributes to the possible targeting of specific osteoclast precursors as a therapeutic approach for diseases associated with inflammatory bone loss. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1249-1260, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26491867

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lysine gingipain enhances osteoclast differentiation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β but suppresses that by interleukin-17A: importance of proteolytic degradation of osteoprotegerin by lysine gingipain.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Tomohito; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Yamada, Atsushi; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Marie; Imamura, Takahisa; Akiyama, Chie; Yasuhara, Rika; Mishima, Kenji; Maruyama, Toshifumi; Kohda, Chikara; Tanaka, Kazuo; Potempa, Jan; Yasuda, Hisataka; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2014-05-30

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease accompanied by alveolar bone resorption by osteoclasts. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an etiological agent for periodontitis, produces cysteine proteases called gingipains, which are classified based on their cleavage site specificity (i.e. arginine (Rgps) and lysine (Kgps) gingipains). We previously reported that Kgp degraded osteoprotegerin (OPG), an osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor secreted by osteoblasts, and enhanced osteoclastogenesis induced by various Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (Yasuhara, R., Miyamoto, Y., Takami, M., Imamura, T., Potempa, J., Yoshimura, K., and Kamijo, R. (2009) Lysine-specific gingipain promotes lipopolysaccharide- and active-vitamin D3-induced osteoclast differentiation by degrading osteoprotegerin. Biochem. J. 419, 159-166). Osteoclastogenesis is induced not only by TLR ligands but also by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-17A, in inflammatory conditions, such as periodontitis. Although Kgp augmented osteoclastogenesis induced by TNF-α and IL-1β in co-cultures of mouse osteoblasts and bone marrow cells, it suppressed that induced by IL-17A. In a comparison of proteolytic degradation of these cytokines by Kgp in a cell-free system with that of OPG, TNF-α and IL-1β were less susceptible, whereas IL-17A and OPG were equally susceptible to degradation by Kgp. These results indicate that the enhancing effect of Kgp on cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis is dependent on the difference in degradation efficiency between each cytokine and OPG. In addition, elucidation of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of OPG fragments revealed that Kgp primarily cleaved OPG in its death domain homologous region, which might prevent dimer formation of OPG required for inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that degradation of OPG by Kgp is a crucial event in the development of

  13. Immunophenotypic differences between osteoclasts and macrophage polykaryons: immunohistological distinction and implications for osteoclast ontogeny and function.

    PubMed Central

    Athanasou, N A; Quinn, J

    1990-01-01

    The antigenic phenotype of human fetal osteoclasts was compared with that of human tissue macrophages and macrophage polykaryons in foreign body lesions using a large number of monoclonal antibodies directed against myeloid (granulocyte/mononuclear phagocyte) antigens. Osteoclasts expressed a restricted range of macrophage-associated antigens including CD13, CD15A, CD44, CD45, CD54, (ICAM-1), CD71 (transferrin receptor), and CD68. These antigens were also present on macrophages and macrophage polykaryons both of which also strongly expressed CD11a,b,c, CD18, (LFA family), CD14, CD31, CD36, CD37, CD39 and CD43 antigens. There was also weak and occasional expression of CD16 (FcRIII), CD25 (interleukin 2 receptor), CD32 (FcRII), CD35 (C3b receptor) and HLA-DR by macrophage polykaryons. The presence of some macrophage associated antigens on osteoclasts is consistent with their originating from cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. The numerous differences in antigenic phenotype between osteoclasts and macrophage polykaryons, however, suggest that their pathways of development and differentiation are not identical. The differences discerned in antigenic phenotype should also permit distinction between these polykaryons (and possibly their mononuclear precursors) in normal and diseased tissues. Images PMID:2266187

  14. Comprehensive profiling analysis of actively resorbing osteoclasts identifies critical signaling pathways regulated by bone substrate

    PubMed Central

    Purdue, P. Edward; Crotti, Tania N.; Shen, Zhenxin; Swantek, Jennifer; Li, Jun; Hill, Jonathan; Hanidu, Adedayo; Dimock, Janice; Nabozny, Gerald; Goldring, Steven R.; McHugh, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    As the only cells capable of efficiently resorbing bone, osteoclasts are central mediators of both normal bone remodeling and pathologies associates with excessive bone resorption. However, despite the clear evidence of interplay between osteoclasts and the bone surface in vivo, the role of the bone substrate in regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation at a molecular level has not been fully defined. Here, we present the first comprehensive expression profiles of osteoclasts differentiated on authentic resorbable bone substrates. This analysis has identified numerous critical pathways coordinately regulated by osteoclastogenic cytokines and bone substrate, including the transition from proliferation to differentiation, and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whilst, as expected, much of this program is dependent upon integrin beta 3, the pre-eminent mediator of osteoclast-bone interaction, a surprisingly significant portion of the bone substrate regulated expression signature is independent of this receptor. Together, these findings identify an important hitherto underappreciated role for bone substrate in osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25534583

  15. RANKL, Osteopontin, and Osteoclast Homeostasis in a Hyper-Occlusion Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Cameron G.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Dangaria, Smit; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2010-11-15

    The biological mechanisms that maintain the position of teeth in their sockets establish a dynamic equilibrium between bone resorption and apposition. In order to reveal some of the dynamics involved in the tissue responses towards occlusal forces on periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone homeostasis, we developed the first mouse model of hyperocclusion. Swiss-Webster mice were kept in hyperocclusion for 0, 3, 6, and 9 d. Morphological and histological changes in the periodontium were assessed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ground sections with fluorescent detection of vital dye labels. Sections were stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Traumatic occlusion resulted in enamel surface abrasion, inhibition of alveolar bone apposition, significant formation of osteoclasts at 3, 6 and 9 d, and upregulation of OPN and RANKL. Data from this study suggest that both OPN and RANKL contribute to the stimulation of bone resorption in the hyperocclusive state. In addition, we propose that the inhibition of alveolar bone apposition by occlusal forces is an important mechanism for the control of occlusal height that might work in synergy with RANKL-induced bone resorption to maintain normal occlusion.

  16. Effects of ionizing irradiation on formation and resorbing activity of osteoclasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Burger, E.H.; Kawilarang-de Haas, E.W.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of ionizing irradiation on the differentiation and activity of the osteoclast were investigated. Embryonic mouse metatarsal bones of different ages (14, 15, 16, 17 days) in which no osteoclasts had as yet been formed were irradiated with various x-ray doses and cultured until a marrow cavity became visible in the nonirradiated paired control bones. Bone growth and calcification were followed microscopically during culture. Irradiation caused a dose-dependent stunting of the longitudinal growth. Calcification was inhibited by high radiation doses (10 to 20 Gray (Gy), whereas a dose of 2.5 Gy stimulated the process in the early stages of long bone development. Histologic examination revealed complete inhibition of osteoclast formation in the 14- and 15-day-old bones after irradiation with 2.5 Gy or more. The number of osteoclasts in cultured older bones (16 days) was significantly reduced by irradiation, but osteoclast formation could not be completely prevented even by high dosages. Irradiation of explanted bone rudiments which were in a stage 1 day prior to the appearance of osteoclasts in vivo (17 days) did not significantly influence the formation of osteoclasts. Autoradiographic experiments using young bones showed that differentiation of osteoclast precursors into multinucleated osteoclasts is preceded by one or more divisions of the precursors in the periosteum. Furthermore, it was established from continuous /sup 3/H-thymidine-labeling experiments that in older bones (16 days) a part of the osteoclast nuclei originated from postmitotic osteoclast precursors. Irradiation mainly inhibited the appearance of labeled osteoclast nuclei in these bones.

  17. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells function as novel osteoclast progenitors enhancing bone loss in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Deshane, Jessy; Jules, Joel; Lee, Carnella M.; Harris, Brittney A.; Feng, Xu; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced bone destruction is a hallmark of various carcinomas such as breast cancer, where osteolytic bone metastasis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Immune cells contribute to osteolysis in cancer growth but the factors contributing to aggressive bone destruction are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in this process at bone metastatic sites. Since MDSC originate from the same myeloid lineage as macrophages, which are osteoclast precursors, we hypothesized that MDSC may undergo osteoclast differentiation and contribute to enhanced bone destruction and tumor growth. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis, we confirmed that MDSC isolated from the tumor-bone microenvironment differentiated into functional osteoclasts both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide signaling was critical for differentiation of MDSC into osteoclasts. Remarkably, osteoclast differentiation did not occur in MDSC isolated from control or tumor-bearing mice that lacked bone metastasis, signifying the essential cross-talk between tumor cells and myeloid progenitors in the bone microenvironment as a requirement for osteoclast differentiation of MDSC. Overall, our results identify a wholly new facet to the multifunctionality of MDSC in driving tumor progression, in this case as a novel osteoclast progenitor that specifically drives bone metastasis during cancer progression. PMID:23243021

  19. Resorption of monetite calcium phosphate cement by mouse bone marrow derived osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Montazerolghaem, M; Karlsson Ott, M; Engqvist, H; Melhus, H; Rasmusson, A J

    2015-01-01

    Recently the interest for monetite based biomaterials as bone grafts has increased; since in vivo studies have demonstrated that they are degradable, osteoconductive and improve bone healing. So far osteoclastic resorption of monetite has received little attention. The current study focuses on the osteoclastic resorption of monetite cement using primary mouse bone marrow macrophages, which have the potential to differentiate into resorbing osteoclasts when treated with receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL). The osteoclast viability and differentiation were analysed on monetite cement and compared to cortical bovine bone discs. After seven days live/dead stain results showed no significant difference in viability between the two materials. However, the differentiation was significantly higher on the bone discs, as shown by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and Cathepsin K gene expression. Moreover monetite samples with differentiated osteoclasts had a 1.4 fold elevated calcium ion concentration in their culture media compared to monetite samples with undifferentiated cells. This indicates active resorption of monetite in the presence of osteoclasts. In conclusion, this study suggests that osteoclasts have a crucial role in the resorption of monetite based biomaterials. It also provides a useful model for studying in vitro resorption of acidic calcium phosphate cements by primary murine cells. PMID:25953560

  20. Isolation of a murine osteoclast colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M Y; Eyre, D R; Osborne, W R

    1991-01-01

    Cultures of a cell line derived from a murine mammary carcinoma that induces hypercalcemia were examined for soluble products that could induce osteoclasts to differentiate from murine bone marrow cells. The serum-free culture supernatant of this cell line stimulated growth of colonies from bone marrow cells that exhibited tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase) activity. These TRAPase-positive cells demonstrated essential features of osteoclasts when cultured with mineralized bone or dentin. The culture period required for colony development and the frequency of colony-forming cells indicated that relatively primitive marrow progenitors were stimulated by a tumor-derived factor(s) to form immature osteoclasts. Other colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), including granulocyte CSF, macrophage CSF, granulocyte-macrophage CSF and interleukin 3, were ruled out as the source of the activity produced by the tumor cells. The biological activity was successfully purified by gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. By SDS/PAGE, the activity was traced to a protein of approximately 17 kDa. Functional and biochemical studies of the purified factor suggest that it is distinct from any known CSF of myeloid cells. This protein appears to be a CSF for the osteoclast lineage, osteoclast CSF (O-CSF). Images PMID:1924309

  1. Deletion of Histone Deacetylase 7 in Osteoclasts Decreases Bone Mass in Mice by Interactions with MITF

    PubMed Central

    Stemig, Melissa; Astelford, Kristina; Emery, Ann; Cho, Jangyeun J.; Allen, Ben; Huang, Tsang-hai; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Mansky, Kim C.; Jensen, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular regulators of osteoclast formation and function are an important area of research due to the central role of osteoclasts in bone resorption. Transcription factors such as MITF are essential for osteoclast generation by regulating expression of the genes required for cellular differentiation and resorptive function. We recently reported that histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) binds to and represses the transcriptional activity of MITF in osteoclasts, and that loss of HDAC7 in vitro accelerated osteoclastogenesis. In the current study, we extend this initial observation by showing that conditional deletion of HDAC7 in osteoclasts of mice leads to an in vivo enhancement in osteoclast formation, associated with increased bone resorption and lower bone mass. Expression of multiple MITF target genes is increased in bone marrow derived osteoclast cultures from the HDAC7 knockout mice. Interestingly, multiple regions of the HDAC7 amino-terminus can bind to MITF or exert repressive activity. Moreover, mutation or deletion of the HDAC7 conserved deacetylase catalytic domain had little effect on repressive function. These observations identify HDAC7 in osteoclasts as an important molecular regulator of MITF activity and bone homeostasis, but also highlight a gap in our understanding of exactly how HDAC7 functions as a corepressor. PMID:25875108

  2. Screening of Korean medicinal plants for possible osteoclastogenesis effects in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Yu Na; Lim, Erang; Lee, Nari; Kim, Young Seop; Koo, Min Seon

    2007-01-01

    Bone undergoes continuous remodeling through bone formation and resorption, and maintaining the balance for skeletal rigidity. Bone resorption and loss are generally attributed to osteoclasts. Differentiation of osteoclasts is regulated by receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-kB ligand (RANKL), a member of tumor necrosis factor family. When the balance is disturbed, pathological bone abnormality ensues. Through the screening of traditional Korean medicinal plants, the effective molecules for inhibition and stimulation of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone marrow macrophages were identified. Among 222 methanol extracts, of medicinal plants, 10 samples exhibited ability to induce osteoclast differentiation. These include Dryobalanops aromatica, Euphoria longana, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Prunus mume, Prunus nakaii, and Polygonatum odoratum. In contrast, Ailanthus altissima, Curcuma longa, Solanum nigrum, Taraxacum platycarpa, Trichosanthes kirilowii, and Daphne genkwa showed inhibitory effects in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:18850234

  3. Bafilomycin A1 Attenuates Osteoclast Acidification and Formation, Accompanied by Increased Levels of SQSTM1/p62 Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Sipin; Rea, Sarah L; Cheng, Taksum; Feng, Hao Tian; Walsh, John P; Ratajczak, Thomas; Tickner, Jennifer; Pavlos, Nathan; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xu, Jiake

    2016-06-01

    Vacuolar proton pump H(+)-adenosine triphosphatases (V-ATPases) play an important role in osteoclast function. Further understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of V-ATPase inhibition is vital for the development of anti-resorptive drugs specifically targeting osteoclast V-ATPases. In this study, we observed that bafilomycin A1, a naturally-occurring inhibitor of V-ATPases, increased the protein level of SQSTM1/p62, a known negative regulator of osteoclast formation. Consistently, we found that bafilomycin A1 diminishes the intracellular accumulation of the acidotropic probe lysotracker in osteoclast-like cells; indicative of reduced acidification. Further, bafilomycin A1 inhibits osteoclast formation with attenuation of cell fusion and multi-nucleation of osteoclast-like cells during osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these data indicate that bafilomycin A1 attenuates osteoclast differentiation in part via increased levels of SQSTM1/p62 protein, providing further mechanistic insight into the effect of V-ATPase inhibition in osteoclasts. PMID:27043248

  4. Slight Changes in the Mechanical Stimulation Affects Osteoblast- and Osteoclast-Like Cells in Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Duda, Georg N.; Bormann, Nicole; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells are responsible for coordinated bone maintenance, illustrated by a balanced formation and resorption. Both parameters appear to be influenced by mechanical constrains acting on each of these cell types individually. We hypothesized that the interactions between both cell types are also influenced by mechanical stimulation. Methods Co-cultures of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells were stimulated with 1,100 µstrain, 0.1 or 0.3 Hz for 1–5 min/day over 5 days. Two different setups depending on the differentiation of the osteoclast-like cells were used: i) differentiation assay for the fusion of pre-osteoclasts to osteoclasts, ii) resorption assay to determine the activity level of osteoclast-like cells. Results In the differentiation assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with unfused osteoclast precursor cells) the mechanical stimulation resulted in a significant decrease of collagen-1 and osteocalcin produced by osteoblast-like cells. Significantly more TRAP-iso5b was measured after stimulation for 3 min with 0.1 Hz, indicating enhanced osteoclastogenesis. In the resorption assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with fused osteoclasts) the stimulation for 3 min with 0.3 Hz significantly increased the resorption activity of osteoclasts measured by the pit formation and the collagen resorption. The same mechanical stimulation resulted in an increased collagen-1 production by the osteoblast-like cells. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was not different between the groups. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that already small changes in duration or frequency of mechanical stimulation had significant consequences for the behavior of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells in co-culture, which partially depend on the differentiation status of the osteoclast-like cells. PMID:24474895

  5. Notch2 signaling promotes osteoclast resorption via activation of PYK2.

    PubMed

    Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Jung-Wook; Kim, Hong-Hee; Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Zang Hee

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling plays a central role in various cell fate decisions, including skeletal development. Recently, Notch signaling was implicated in osteoclast differentiation and maturation, including the resorption activity of osteoclasts. However, the specific involvement of notch signaling in resorption activity was not fully investigated. Here, we investigated the roles of Notch signaling in the resorption activity of osteoclasts by use of the gamma-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine (DBZ). Attenuating Notch signaling by DBZ suppressed the expression of NFATc1, a master transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation. However, overexpression of a constitutively active form of NFATc1 did not fully rescue the effects of DBZ. DBZ suppressed the autophosphorylation of PYK2, which is essential for the formation of the podosome belt and sealing zone, with reduced c-Src/PYK2 interaction. We found that RANKL increases PYK2 activation accompanied by increased NICD2 production in osteoclasts. Overexpression of NICD2 in osteoclasts rescued DBZ-mediated suppression of resorption activity with promotion of PYK2 autophosphorylation and microtubule acetylation. Consistent with the in vitro results, DBZ strongly suppressed bone destruction in an interleukin-1-induced bone loss model. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Notch2 in osteoclasts plays a role in the control of resorption activity via the PYK2-c-Src-microtubule signaling pathway. PMID:26829213

  6. Piperine alleviates osteoclast formation through the p38/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Vishwa; Kruger, Marlena C; Joubert, Annie; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Increased bone fracture is one of the health risk factors in patients with bone loss related disorders such as osteoporosis and breast cancer metastasis to bone. Over activity of osteoclasts leads to uncoupling of bone remodeling favoring bone loss over bone formation. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κβ ligand (RANKL) triggers the differentiation pathway leading to multinucleated osteoclast formation. Modulation of RANKL or its downstream signaling pathways involved in osteoclast formation is of significant interest in the development of anti-resorptive agents. In this study, the effects of piperine, an alkaloid present in Piper nigrum L. on osteoclast formation was investigated. Piperine inhibited tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclast formation in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and human CD14+ monocytes induced by RANKL and breast cancer cells. Piperine attenuated the p38-mitogen activated protein kinase pathway activation, while the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, or NF-κβ pathways downstream of RANKL remained unaffected. Concomitantly, expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), the key transcription factors involved in osteoclastogenesis were remarkably inhibited by piperine. Furthermore, piperine disrupted the actin ring structure and bone resorption, a characteristic hallmark of osteoclasts. Collectively, these results suggested that piperine inhibited osteoclast differentiation by suppressing the p38/NFATc1/c-Fos signaling axis.. PMID:26627060

  7. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  8. IL-4 inhibits osteoclast formation through a direct action on osteoclast precursors via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ1

    PubMed Central

    Bendixen, Amy C.; Shevde, Nirupama K.; Dienger, Krista M.; Willson, Timothy M.; Funk, Colin D.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2001-01-01

    IL-4 is a pleiotropic immune cytokine secreted by activated TH2 cells that inhibits bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo. The cellular targets of IL-4 action as well as its intracellular mechanism of action remain to be determined. We show here that IL-4 inhibits receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation through an action on osteoclast precursors that is independent of stromal cells. Interestingly, this inhibitory effect can be mimicked by both natural as well as synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ1 (PPARγ1) ligands and can be blocked by the irreversible PPARγ antagonist GW 9662. These findings suggest that the actions of IL-4 on osteoclast differentiation are mediated by PPARγ1, an interpretation strengthened by the observation that IL-4 can activate a PPARγ1-sensitive luciferase reporter gene in RAW264.7 cells. We also show that inhibitors of enzymes such as 12/15-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenases that produce known PPARγ1 ligands do not abrogate the IL-4 effect. These findings, together with the observation that bone marrow cells from 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient mice retain sensitivity to IL-4, suggest that the cytokine may induce novel PPARγ1 ligands. Our results reveal that PPARγ1 plays an important role in the suppression of osteoclast formation by IL-4 and may explain the beneficial effects of the thiazolidinedione class of PPARγ1 ligands on bone loss in diabetic patients. PMID:11226258

  9. Osteoclasts: more than ‘bone eaters’

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2014-01-01

    As the only cells definitively shown to degrade bone, osteoclasts are key mediators of skeletal diseases including osteoporosis. Bone forming osteoblasts, and hematopoietic and immune system cells, each influence osteoclast formation and function, but the reciprocal impact of osteoclasts on these cells is less well appreciated. Here, we highlight functions osteoclasts perform beyond bone resorption. First, we consider how osteoclast signals may contribute to bone formation by osteoblasts and the pathology of bone lesions, such as fibrous dysplasia and giant cell tumors. Second, we review the interaction of osteoclasts with the hematopoietic system, including the stem cell niche and adaptive immune cells. Connections between osteoclasts and other cells in the bone microenvironment are discussed within a clinically relevant framework. PMID:25008556

  10. Osteoimmunology: the expanding role of immunoreceptors in osteoclasts and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Long, Courtney L; Humphrey, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    The study of bone and immunology (termed osteoimmunology) has led to the discovery of many important similarities between the two systems including shared niches, mechanisms, cytokines and receptors. The bone marrow provides a niche for hematopoietic cells including those of the lymphoid and myeloid lineage. Osteoclasts, specialized polykarons arising from myeloid precursors, bind to bone and resorb the organic and inorganic components through secretion of acid and proteases. Osteoclasts are differentiated and activated by cytokines that can be produced by immune cells and osteoclast activity can be dysregulated in states of autoimmunity or high inflammation. Similar to B and T cells, osteoclasts require coordinated co-stimulation of signaling pathways provided in the form of receptor-associated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, DAP12 and FcRγ, to drive differentiation and activation. In this review, we will cover the differentiation process of osteoclasts from the earliest precursors shown to have differentiation potential and the signals needed to drive these cells into osteoclast commitment and activation. PMID:23789115

  11. c-Src Control of Chloride Channel Support for Osteoclast HCl Transport and Bone Resorption*

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Cohen, Christopher; Xu, Weibing; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    Bone degradation by osteoclasts depends upon active transport of hydrogen ions to solubilize bone mineral. This transport is supported by the parallel actions of a proton ATPase and a chloride channel located in the osteoclast ruffled membrane. We have previously identified a novel chloride channel, p62, which appears to be the avian counterpart to CLIC-5b and is expressed coincident with the appearance of acid secretion as avian osteoclasts differentiate in culture. In this article, we show that suppression of CLIC-5b in differentiating avian osteoclasts results in decreased acidification by vesicles derived from these cells and decreased ability of the cells to resorb bone. Acidification is rescued by the presence of valinomycin, consistent with a selective loss of chloride channel but not proton pump activity. Osteoclast bone resorption is known to be dependent on the expression of the tyrosine kinase, c-Src. We show that CLIC-5b from osteoclasts has affinity for both Src SH2 and SH3 domains. We find that suppression of expression of Src in developing osteoclasts results in decreased vesicular acidification, which is rescued by valinomycin, consistent with the loss of chloride conductance in the proton pump-containing vesicles. Suppression of c-Src causes no change in the steady state level of CLIC-5b expression, but does result in failure of proton pump and CLIC-5b to colocalize in cultured osteoclast precursors. We conclude that suppression of c-Src interferes with osteoclast bone resorption by disrupting functional co-localization of proton pump and CLIC-5b. PMID:16831863

  12. Regulation of osteoclast function and bone mass by RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng; Immel, David; Xi, Cai-Xia; Bierhaus, Angelika; Feng, Xu; Mei, Lin; Nawroth, Peter; Stern, David M.; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that has multiple ligands and is implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including diabetic complications, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory responses. However, the role of RAGE in normal physiology is largely undefined. Here, we present evidence for a role of RAGE in osteoclast maturation and function, which has consequences for bone remodeling. Mice lacking RAGE had increased bone mass and bone mineral density and decreased bone resorptive activity in vivo. In vitro–differentiated RAGE-deficient osteoclasts exhibited disrupted actin ring and sealing zone structures, impaired maturation, and reduced bone resorptive activity. Impaired signaling downstream of αvβ3 integrin was observed in RAGE−/− bone marrow macrophages and precursors of OCs. These results demonstrate a role for RAGE in osteoclast actin cytoskeletal reorganization, adhesion, and function, and suggest that the osteosclerotic-like phenotype observed in RAGE knockout mice is due to a defect in osteoclast function. PMID:16606672

  13. Retinoic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulate osteoclast formation by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Hamilton, N.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) on osteoclast formation were examined in intact fetal long bones of different ages/developmental stages maintained in organ culture using a chemically defined medium with or without the presence of serum. Besides stimulating bone resorption, RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 increased the number of osteoclasts in 19-day-old fetal rat tibiae. Likewise, these bone-resorbing agents induced and stimulated osteoclast formation in 19- and 18-day-old metatarsal bones which were osteoclast-free at the beginning of the culture. The response to 1,25-(OH)2D3 was greatly enhanced by 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) irrespective of the developmental stage of the long bone. The response to RA was not. Light microscopic autoradiography after labeling of the cultures with tritiated thymidine showed that both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 induced osteoclast differentiation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors. However, neither agent was able to stimulate proliferation of osteoclast progenitor cells in the older bones (19 days). Studies on the formation of osteoclast-like (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive) cells in bone marrow cultures indicated that FBS was a potent inducer of osteoclast-like cell formation. In the presence of FBS, 1,25-(OH)2D3 significantly stimulated this response, but RA did not. The results demonstrate that although both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulate osteoclast formation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors in long bones in vitro, they do so by different mechanisms.

  14. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Shu, Bing; Mira, Ranim R; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using type II collagen promoter. The Col2-Opg transgenic mice showed delayed formation of secondary ossification center and localized increase of bone mass in proximal metaphysis of tibiae. TRAP staining showed that osteoclast numbers were reduced in both secondary ossification center and proximal metaphysis. This finding was further confirmed by in vitro chondrocyte/spleen cell co-culture assay. In contrast, the mineral apposition rates were not changed in Col2-Opg transgenic mice. TUNEL staining revealed more apoptotic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate of Col2-Opg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed fewer RANK-expressing cells in the marrow of Col2a1-Opg mice, suggesting the role of OPG in blocking the differentiation of early mesenchymal progenitors into RANK-expressing pre-osteoclasts. Our results demonstrated that OPG expression in chondrocyte increases bone mass in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae through negative regulation of osteoclast formation. PMID:26329493

  15. Chondrocytes-Specific Expression of Osteoprotegerin Modulates Osteoclast Formation in Metaphyseal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Shu, Bing; Mira, Ranim R.; Chen, Di

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells/osteoblasts were originally thought to be the major player in regulating osteoclast differentiation through expressing RANKL/OPG cytokines. Recent studies have established that chondrocytes also express RANKL/OPG and support osteoclast formation. Till now, the in vivo function of chondrocyte-produced OPG in osteoclast formation and postnatal bone growth has not been directly investigated. In this study, chondrocyte-specific Opg transgenic mice were generated by using type II collagen promoter. The Col2-Opg transgenic mice showed delayed formation of secondary ossification center and localized increase of bone mass in proximal metaphysis of tibiae. TRAP staining showed that osteoclast numbers were reduced in both secondary ossification center and proximal metaphysis. This finding was further confirmed by in vitro chondrocyte/spleen cell co-culture assay. In contrast, the mineral apposition rates were not changed in Col2-Opg transgenic mice. TUNEL staining revealed more apoptotic hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate of Col2-Opg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed fewer RANK-expressing cells in the marrow of Col2a1-Opg mice, suggesting the role of OPG in blocking the differentiation of early mesenchymal progenitors into RANK-expressing pre-osteoclasts. Our results demonstrated that OPG expression in chondrocyte increases bone mass in the proximal metaphysis of tibiae through negative regulation of osteoclast formation. PMID:26329493

  16. Mice lacking JunB are osteopenic due to cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, Lukas; Hoebertz, Astrid; Beil, Timo; Keon, Niamh; Karreth, Florian; Eferl, Robert; Scheuch, Harald; Szremska, Agnieszka; Amling, Michael; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter; Wagner, Erwin F.

    2004-01-01

    Because JunB is an essential gene for placentation, it was conditionally deleted in the embryo proper. JunBΔ/Δ mice are born viable, but develop severe low turnover osteopenia caused by apparent cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects before a chronic myeloid leukemia-like disease. Although JunB was reported to be a negative regulator of cell proliferation, junBΔ/Δ osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts show reduced proliferation along with a differentiation defect in vivo and in vitro. Mutant osteoblasts express elevated p16INK4a levels, but exhibit decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression. Runx2 is transiently increased during osteoblast differentiation in vitro, whereas mature osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein are strongly reduced. To support a cell-autonomous function of JunB in osteoclasts, junB was inactivated specifically in the macrophage–osteoclast lineage. Mutant mice develop an osteopetrosis-like phenotype with increased bone mass and reduced numbers of osteoclasts. Thus, these data reveal a novel function of JunB as a positive regulator controlling primarily osteoblast as well as osteoclast activity. PMID:14769860

  17. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  18. Jaw bone marrow-derived osteoclast precursors internalize more bisphosphonate than long-bone marrow precursors.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Jenny A F; Jansen, Ineke D C; Marthi, Matangi; Coxon, Fraser P; McKenna, Charles E; Sun, Shuting; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used in the treatment of several bone diseases, such as osteoporosis and cancers that have metastasized to bone, by virtue of their ability to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption. Previously, it was shown that osteoclasts present at different bone sites have different characteristics. We hypothesized that BPs could have distinct effects on different populations of osteoclasts and their precursors, for example as a result of a different capacity to endocytose the drugs. To investigate this, bone marrow cells were isolated from jaw and long bone from mice and the cells were primed to differentiate into osteoclasts with the cytokines M-CSF and RANKL. Before fusion occurred, cells were incubated with fluorescein-risedronate (FAM-RIS) for 4 or 24h and uptake was determined by flow cytometry. We found that cultures obtained from the jaw internalized 1.7 to 2.5 times more FAM-RIS than long-bone cultures, both after 4 and 24h, and accordingly jaw osteoclasts were more susceptible to inhibition of prenylation of Rap1a after treatment with BPs for 24h. Surprisingly, differences in BP uptake did not differentially affect osteoclastogenesis. This suggests that jaw osteoclast precursors are less sensitive to bisphosphonates after internalization. This was supported by the finding that gene expression of the anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was higher in jaw cells than long bone cells, suggesting that the jaw cells might be more resistant to BP-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that bisphosphonates have distinct effects on both populations of osteoclast precursors and support previous findings that osteoclasts and precursors are bone-site specific. This study may help to provide more insights into bone-site-specific responses to bisphosphonates. PMID:23962725

  19. Biocorrosion and uptake of titanium by human osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Al-Mushaiqri, Mohamed S; Gautschi, Oliver P; Meagher, James; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-12-15

    All metals in contact with a biological system undergo corrosion through an electrochemical redox reaction. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on titanium and aluminum, and directly corrode the metals leading to the release of corresponding metal ions, which are believed to cause inflammatory reactions and activate osteoclastic differentiation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures on the surface of titanium and aluminum foils. Atomic emission spectrometry investigations showed significantly increased levels of aluminum in the supernatant of OC cultured on aluminum; however, all measurements in the supernatants of cell cultures on titanium were below detection limits. Despite this, confocal microscopy analysis with Newport Green DCF diacetate ester staining depicted intense fluorescence throughout the cytoplasm and nucleolus of OC cultured on titanium foils. Comparable fluorescence intensities were not observed in monocytes and control cells cultured on glass. The present study demonstrated that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate toward mature OC on titanium and aluminum. Furthermore, it established that the mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and take up corresponding metal ions, which subsequently may be released and thereby induce the formation of osteolytic lesions in the periprosthetic bone, contributing to the loosening of the implant. PMID:20872748

  20. The Great Beauty of the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Cappariello, Alfredo; Maurizi, Antonio; Veeriah, Vimal; Teti, Anna

    2014-09-15

    Much has been written recently on osteoclast biology, but this cell type still astonishes scientists with its multifaceted functions and unique properties. The last three decades have seen a change in thinking about the osteoclast, from a cell with a single function, which just destroys the tissue it belongs to, to an "orchestrator" implicated in the concerted regulation of bone turnover. Osteoclasts have unique morphological features, organelle distribution and plasma membrane domain organization. They require polarization to cause extracellular bone breakdown and release of the digested bone matrix products into the circulation. Osteoclasts contribute to the control of skeletal growth and renewal. Alongside other organs, including kidney, gut, thyroid and parathyroid glands, they also affect calcemia and phosphatemia. Osteoclasts are very sensitive to pro-inflammatory stimuli, and studies in the '00s ascertained their tight link with the immune system, bringing about the question why bone needs a cell regulated by the immune system to remove the extracellular matrix components. Recently, osteoclasts have been demonstrated to contribute to the hematopoietic stem cell niche, controlling local calcium concentration and regulating the turnover of factors essential for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. Finally, osteoclasts are important regulators of osteoblast activity and angiogenesis, both by releasing factors stored in the bone matrix, and secreting "clastokines" that regulate the activity of neighboring cells. All these facets will be discussed in this review article, with the aim of underscoring The Great Beauty of the osteoclast. PMID:24976175

  1. TDAG8 activation inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Hikiji, Hisako; Endo, Daisuke; Horie, Kyoji; Harayama, Takeshi; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Yanagida, Keisuke; Takeda, Junji; Koji, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    Although the roles of acids in bone metabolism are well characterized, the function of proton-sensing receptors in bone metabolism remains to be explored. In this study, we evaluated the role of proton-sensing receptor T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) in osteoclastic activity during bone loss after ovariectomy. Through observations of bone mineral content, we found that pathological bone resorption was significantly exacerbated in mice homozygous for a gene trap mutation in the Tdag8 gene. Furthermore, osteoclasts from the homozygous mutant mice resorbed calcium in vitro more than the osteoclasts from the heterozygous mice did. Impaired osteoclast formation under acidic conditions was ameliorated in cultures of bone marrow cells by Tdag8 gene mutation. Extracellular acidification changed the cell morphology of osteoclasts via the TDAG8-Rho signaling pathway. These results suggest that the enhancement of TDAG8 function represents a new strategy for preventing bone resorption diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:24221084

  2. The Roles of Acidosis in Osteoclast Biology

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Feng-Lai; Xu, Ming-Hui; Li, Xia; Xinlong, He; Fang, Wei; Dong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The adverse effect of acidosis on the skeletal system has been recognized for almost a century. Although the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated, it appears that acidosis acts as a general stimulator of osteoclasts derived from bone marrow precursors cells and enhances osteoclastic resorption. Prior work suggests that acidosis plays a significant role in osteoclasts formation and activation via up-regulating various genes responsible for its adhesion, migration, survival and bone matrix degradation. Understanding the role of acidosis in osteoclast biology may lead to development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diseases related to low bone mass. In this review, we aim to discuss the recent investigations into the effects of acidosis in osteoclast biology and the acid-sensing molecular mechanism. PMID:27445831

  3. Knee loading inhibits osteoclast lineage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinle; Yang, Jing; Liu, Daquan; Li, Jie; Niu, Kaijun; Feng, Shiqing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disorder that involves cartilage degradation and periarticular bone response. Changes of cartilage and subchondral bone are associated with development and activity of osteoclasts from subchondral bone. Knee loading promotes bone formation, but its effects on OA have not been well investigated. Here, we hypothesized that knee loading regulates subchondral bone remodeling by suppressing osteoclast development, and prevents degradation of cartilage through crosstalk of bone-cartilage in osteoarthritic mice. Surgery-induced mouse model of OA was used. Two weeks application of daily dynamic knee loading significantly reduced OARSI scores and CC/TAC (calcified cartilage to total articular cartilage), but increased SBP (subchondral bone plate) and B.Ar/T.Ar (trabecular bone area to total tissue area). Bone resorption of osteoclasts from subchondral bone and the differentiation of osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived cells were completely suppressed by knee loading. The osteoclast activity was positively correlated with OARSI scores and negatively correlated with SBP and B.Ar/T.Ar. Furthermore, knee loading exerted protective effects by suppressing osteoclastogenesis through Wnt signaling. Overall, osteoclast lineage is the hyper responsiveness of knee loading in osteoarthritic mice. Mechanical stimulation prevents OA-induced cartilage degeneration through crosstalk with subchondral bone. Knee loading might be a new potential therapy for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:27087498

  4. Bisphosphonate-functionalized hyaluronic acid showing selective affinity for osteoclasts as a potential treatment for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kootala, Sujit; Ossipov, Dmitri; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander; Hilborn, Jöns

    2015-08-01

    Current treatments for osteoporosis involve the administration of high doses of bisphosphonates (BPs) over a number of years. However, the efficiency of the absorption of these drugs and specificity towards targeted osteoclastic cells is still suboptimal. In this study, we have exploited the natural affinity of high (H) and low (L) molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) towards a cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) receptors on osteoclasts to use it as a biodegradable targeting vehicle. We covalently bonded BP to functionalised HA (HA-BP) and found that HA-BP conjugates were highly specific to osteoclastic cells and reduced mature osteoclast numbers significantly more than free BP. To study the uptake of HA-BP, we fluorescently derivatised the polymer-drug with fluorescein B isothiocyanate (FITC) and found that L-HA-BP could seamlessly enter osteoclastic cells. Alternatively, we tested polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a synthetic polymer delivery vehicle using similar chemistry to link BP and found that osteoclast numbers did not reduce in the same way. These findings could pave the way for biodegradable polymers to be used as vehicles for targeted delivery of anti-osteoporotic drugs. PMID:26222035

  5. Knee loading inhibits osteoclast lineage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinle; Yang, Jing; Liu, Daquan; Li, Jie; Niu, Kaijun; Feng, Shiqing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disorder that involves cartilage degradation and periarticular bone response. Changes of cartilage and subchondral bone are associated with development and activity of osteoclasts from subchondral bone. Knee loading promotes bone formation, but its effects on OA have not been well investigated. Here, we hypothesized that knee loading regulates subchondral bone remodeling by suppressing osteoclast development, and prevents degradation of cartilage through crosstalk of bone-cartilage in osteoarthritic mice. Surgery-induced mouse model of OA was used. Two weeks application of daily dynamic knee loading significantly reduced OARSI scores and CC/TAC (calcified cartilage to total articular cartilage), but increased SBP (subchondral bone plate) and B.Ar/T.Ar (trabecular bone area to total tissue area). Bone resorption of osteoclasts from subchondral bone and the differentiation of osteoclasts from bone marrow-derived cells were completely suppressed by knee loading. The osteoclast activity was positively correlated with OARSI scores and negatively correlated with SBP and B.Ar/T.Ar. Furthermore, knee loading exerted protective effects by suppressing osteoclastogenesis through Wnt signaling. Overall, osteoclast lineage is the hyper responsiveness of knee loading in osteoarthritic mice. Mechanical stimulation prevents OA-induced cartilage degeneration through crosstalk with subchondral bone. Knee loading might be a new potential therapy for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:27087498

  6. Distinct osteoclast precursors in the bone marrow and extramedullary organs characterized by responsiveness to Toll-like receptor ligands and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Takayuki; Tsuneto, Motokazu; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Masayuki; Shultz, Leonard D; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2003-11-15

    Osteoclasts are derived from hemopoietic stem cells and play critical roles in bone resorption and remodeling. Multinucleated osteoclasts are attached tightly to bone matrix, whereas precursor cells with the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts in culture are widely distributed. In this study, we assessed the characteristics of osteoclast precursors in bone marrow (BM) and in extramedullary organs as indicated by their responsiveness to ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and to TNF-alpha. Development of osteoclasts from precursor cells in the BM was inhibited by CpG oligonucleotides, a ligand for TLR9, but not by LPS, a ligand for TLR4. BM osteoclasts were induced by TNF-alpha as well as receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand in the presence of M-CSF. Splenic osteoclast precursors, even in osteoclast-deficient osteopetrotic mice, differentiated into mature osteoclasts following exposure to TNF-alpha or receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand. However, splenic osteoclastogenesis was inhibited by both LPS and CpG. Osteoclastogenesis from peritoneal precursors was inhibited by not only these TLR ligands but also TNF-alpha. The effects of peptidoglycan, a ligand for TLR2, were similar to those of LPS. BM cells precultured with M-CSF were characterized with intermediate characteristics between those of splenic and peritoneal cavity precursors. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that osteoclast precursors are not identical in the tissues examined. To address the question of why mature osteoclasts occur only in association with bone, we may characterize not only the microenvironment for osteoclastogenesis, but also the osteoclast precursor itself in intramedullary and extramedullary tissues. PMID:14607912

  7. Microcracks and osteoclast resorption activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Monika; Würger, Tanja; Roschger, Paul; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Peterlik, Herwig; Fratzl, Peter; Klaushofer, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    During bone remodeling osteoclasts resorb bone, thus removing material, e.g., damaged by microcracks, which arises as a result of physiological loading and could reduce bone strength. Such a process needs targeted bone resorption exactly at damaged sites. Osteocytic signaling plays a key role in this process, but it is not excluded that osteoclasts per se may possess toposensitivity to recognize and resorb damaged bone since it has been shown that resorption spaces are associated with microcracks. To address this question, we used an in vitro setup of a pure osteoclast culture and mineralized substrates with artificially introduced microcracks and microscratches. Histomorphometric analyses and statistical evaluation clearly showed that these defects had no effect on osteoclast resorption behavior. Osteoclasts did not resorb along microcracks, even when resorption started right beside these damages. Furthermore, quantification of resorption on three different mineralized substrates, cortical bone, bleached bone (bone after partial removal of the organic matrix), and dentin, revealed lowest resorption on bone, significantly higher resorption on bleached bone, and highest resorption on dentin. The difference between native and bleached bone may be interpreted as an inhibitory impact of the organic matrix. However, the collagen-based matrix could not be the responsible part as resorption was highest on dentin, which contains collagen. It seems that osteocytic proteins, stored in bone but not present in dentin, affect osteoclastic action. This demonstrates that osteoclasts per se do not possess a toposensitivity to remove microcracks but may be influenced by components of the organic bone matrix. PMID:22271249

  8. The protocol for the isolation and cryopreservation of osteoclast precursors from mouse bone marrow and spleen.

    PubMed

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for physiological bone remodeling as well as pathological bone destruction in osteoporosis, periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis, and thus represent a pharmacological target for drug development. We aimed to characterize and compare the cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow and spleen precursors. Established protocols used to generate osteoclasts from bone marrow were modified to examine osteoclastogenesis of the spleen cells of healthy mice. Osteoclast formation was successfully induced from spleen precursors using receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (50 ng/ml) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (50 ng/ml). Compared to bone marrow cultures, differentiation from spleen required a longer cultivation time (9 days for spleen, as compared to 5 days for marrow cultures) and a higher plating density of non-adherent cells (75,000/cm(2) for spleen, as compared to 50,000/cm(2) for bone marrow). Osteoclasts generated from spleen precursors expressed osteoclast marker genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 and were capable of resorbing hydroxyapatite. The differentiation capacity of spleen and bone marrow precursors was comparable for BALB/c, C57BL/6 and FVB mice. We also developed and tested a cryopreservation protocol for the osteoclast precursors. While 70-80 % of cells were lost during the first week of freezing, during the subsequent 5 weeks the losses were within 2-5 % per week. Osteoclastogenesis from the recovered bone marrow precursors was successful up to 5 weeks after freezing. Spleen precursors retained their osteoclastogenic capacity for 1 week after freezing, but not thereafter. The described protocol is useful for the studies of genetically modified animals as well as for screening new osteoclast-targeting therapeutics. PMID:25245056

  9. Crosstalk of osteoblast and osteoclast precursors on mineralized collagen--towards an in vitro model for bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A; Thieme, S; Domaschke, H; Springer, A; Rösen-Wolff, A; Gelinsky, M

    2010-12-01

    Bone remodeling and, therefore, integration of implant materials require the coordinated regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity. This is why the in vitro evaluation of biomaterials for bone regeneration should involve not only the analysis of osteoblast differentiation but also the formation and differentiation of osteoclasts. In the present study, we applied a material made of mineralized collagen I that mimics extracellular bone matrix to establish a culture system, which allows the cocultivation of human monocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), which were differentiated into osteoclast-like cells and osteoblasts, respectively. Both cell types were cultivated on membrane-like structures from mineralized collagen. Transwell inserts were used to spatially separate the cell types but allowed exchange of soluble factors. The osteoclastogenesis and osteogenic differentiation were evaluated by analysis of gene expression, determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Furthermore, cell morphology was studied using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. Osteogenically induced hMSC showed an increased specific ALP activity as well as increased gene expression of gene coding for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), when cocultivated with differentiating osteoclasts. Adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs was suppressed by the presence of osteoclasts as indicated by a major decrease in adipocyte cell number and a decrease in gene expression of adipogenic markers. The formation of multinucleated osteoclasts seems to be decreased in the presence of osteogenically induced hMSC as indicated by electron microscopic evaluation and determination of TRAP activity. However, gene expression of osteoclast markers was not decreased in coculture with osteogenically induced hMSC. PMID:20824694

  10. Impairment of osteoclastic bone resorption in rapidly growing female p47phox knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone formation is dependent on the activity and differentiation of osteoblasts; whereas resorption of preexisting mineralized bone matrix by osteoclasts is necessary not only for bone development but also for regeneration and remodeling. Bone remodeling is a process in which osteoblasts and osteocla...

  11. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  12. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Supports Homing of Osteoclast Precursors to Peripheral Osteolytic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Ishii, Takenobu; Albassam, Abdullah; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Howait, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Ruiz-Torruella, Montserrat; Bahammam, Laila; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Van Dyke, Thomas; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-09-01

    By binding to its chemokine receptor CXCR4 on osteoclast precursor cells (OCPs), it is well known that stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) promotes the chemotactic recruitment of circulating OCPs to the homeostatic bone remodeling site. However, the engagement of circulating OCPs in pathogenic bone resorption remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated a possible chemoattractant role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), another ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), in the recruitment of circulating OCPs to the bone lytic lesion. To accomplish this, we used Csf1r-eGFP-knock-in (KI) mice to establish an animal model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced calvarial osteolysis. In the circulating Csf1r-eGFP+ cells of healthy Csf1r-eGFP-KI mice, Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells showed a greater degree of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis compared to a subset of Csf1r+/RANK+ cells in vitro. Therefore, Csf1r-eGFP+/CD11b+ cells were targeted as functionally relevant OCPs in the present study. Although expression of the two cognate receptors for MIF, CXCR2 and CXCR4, was elevated on Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells, transmigration of OCPs toward recombinant MIF in vitro was facilitated by ligation with CXCR4, but not CXCR2. Meanwhile, the level of PMMA-induced bone resorption in calvaria was markedly greater in wild-type (WT) mice compared to that detected in MIF-knockout (KO) mice. Interestingly, in contrast to the elevated MIF, diminished SDF-1 was detected in a particle-induced bone lytic lesion of WT mice in conjunction with an increased number of infiltrating CXCR4+ OCPs. However, such diminished SDF-1 was not found in the PMMA-injected calvaria of MIF-KO mice. Furthermore, stimulation of osteoblasts with MIF in vitro suppressed their production of SDF-1, suggesting that MIF can downmodulate SDF-1 production in bone tissue. Systemically administered anti-MIF neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited the homing of CXCR4+ OCPs, as well as

  13. Biphasic influence of PGE2 on the resorption activity of osteoclast-like cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and mouse RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Anne-Helen; Hempel, Ute; Anderer, Ursula; Dieter, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclasts are large bone-resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. Their main function is to dissolve the inorganic component hydroxyapatite and to degrade the organic bone matrix. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) indirectly affects osteoclasts by stimulating osteoblasts to release factors that influence osteoclast activity. The direct effect of PGE2 on osteoclasts is still controversial. To study the influence of PGE2 on osteoclast activity, human peripheral blood monocytes (hPBMC) and mouse RAW264.7 cells were cultured on osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix. hPBMC and RAW264.7 cells were differentiated by the addition of macrophage colony-stimulation factor and receptor activator of NFκB ligand and treated with PGE2 before and after differentiation induction. The pit area, an indicator of resorption activity, and the activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were dose-dependently inhibited when PGE2 was present ab initio, whereas the resorption activity remained unchanged when the cells were exposed to PGE2 from day 4 of culture. These results lead to the conclusion that PGE2 treatment inhibits only the differentiation of precursor osteoclasts whereas differentiated osteoclasts are not affected. PMID:27499447

  14. Approximating bone ECM: Crosslinking directs individual and coupled osteoblast/osteoclast behavior.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mintai P; Subbiah, Ramesh; Kim, In Gul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Park, Jimin; Kim, Sang Heon; Park, Kwideok

    2016-10-01

    Osteoblast and osteoclast communication (i.e. osteocoupling) is an intricate process, in which the biophysical profile of bone ECM is an aggregate product of their activities. While the effect of microenvironmental cues on osteoblast and osteoclast maturation has been resolved into individual variables (e.g. stiffness or topography), a single cue can be limited with regards to reflecting the full biophysical scope of natural bone ECM. Additionally, the natural modulation of bone ECM, which involves collagenous fibril and elastin crosslinking via lysyl oxidase, has yet to be reflected in current synthetic platforms. Here, we move beyond traditional substrates and use cell-derived ECM to examine individual and coupled osteoblast and osteoclast behavior on a physiological platform. Specifically, preosteoblast-derived ECM is crosslinked with genipin, a biocompatible crosslinker, to emulate physiological lysyl oxidase-mediated ECM crosslinking. We demonstrate that different concentrations of genipin yield changes to ECM density, stiffness, and roughness while retaining biocompatibility. By approximating various bone ECM profiles, we examine how individual and coupled osteoblast and osteoclast behavior are affected. Ultimately, we demonstrate an increase in osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation on compact and loose ECM, respectively, and identify ECM crosslinking density as an underlying force in osteocoupling behavior. PMID:27376556

  15. Characterization of two types of osteoclasts from human peripheral blood monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, Kimitaka . E-mail: yuasa911@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Mori, Kouki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2007-05-04

    The two osteoclastogenesis pathways, receptor activator nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-mediated and fusion regulatory protein-1 (FRP-1)-mediated osteoclastogenesis, have recently been reported. There were significant differences in differentiation and activation mechanisms between the two pathways. When monocytes were cultured with FRP-1 without adding M-CSF, essential for the RANKL system, TRAP-positive polykaryocyte formation occurred. FRP-1-mediated osteoclasts formed larger pits on mineralized calcium phosphate plates than RANKL+M-CSF-mediated osteoclasts did. Lacunae on dentin surfaces induced by FRP-1-mediated osteoclasts were inclined to be single and isolated. However, osteoclasts induced by RANKL+M-CSF made many connected pits on dentin surfaces as if they crawled on there. Interestingly, FRP-1 osteoclastogenesis was enhanced by M-CSF/IL-1{alpha}, while chemotactic behavior to the dentin slices was not effected. There were differences in pH and concentration of HCO3- at culture endpoint and in adherent feature to dentin surfaces. Our findings indicate there are two types of osteoclasts with distinct properties.

  16. Tetraspanin 7 regulates sealing zone formation and the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Tetraspanin family proteins regulate morphology, motility, fusion, and signaling in various cell types. We investigated the role of the tetraspanin 7 (Tspan7) isoform in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Tspan7 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. When Tspan7 expression was reduced in primary precursor cells by siRNA-mediated gene knock-down, the generation of multinuclear osteoclasts was not affected. However, a striking cytoskeletal abnormality was observed: the formation of the podosome belt structure was inhibited and the microtubular network were disrupted by Tspan7 knock-down. Decreases in acetylated microtubules and levels of phosphorylated Src and Pyk2 in Tspan7 knock-down cells supported the involvement of Tspan7 in cytoskeletal rearrangement signaling in osteoclasts. This cytoskeletal defect interfered with sealing zone formation and subsequently the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts on dentin surfaces. Our results suggest that Tspan7 plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization required for the bone-resorbing function of osteoclasts by regulating signaling to Src, Pyk2, and microtubules. PMID:27416754

  17. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  18. Osteoclasts, key players in skeletal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Novack, Deborah Veis; Mbalaviele, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary The differentiation of osteoclasts (OC) from early myeloid progenitors is a tightly regulated process that is modulated by a variety of mediators present in the bone microenvironment. Once generated, the function of mature OC depends on cytoskeletal features controlled by an αvβ3-containing complex at the bone-apposed membrane, and the secretion of protons and acid-protease cathepsin K. OC also have important interactions with other cells in the bone microenvironment including osteoblasts and immune cells. Dysregulation of OC differentiation and/or function can cause bone pathology. In fact, many components of OC differentiation and activation have been targeted therapeutically with great success. However, questions remain about the identity and plasticity of OC precursors, and the interplay between essential networks that control OC fate. In this review, we summarize the key principles of OC biology, and highlight recently uncovered mechanisms regulating OC development and function in homeostatic and disease states. PMID:27337470

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase association with the osteoclast cytoskeleton, and its involvement in osteoclast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Lakkakorpi, P T; Wesolowski, G; Zimolo, Z; Rodan, G A; Rodan, S B

    1997-12-15

    Osteoclast activation involves attachment to the mineralized bone matrix and reorganization of the cytoskeleton, leading to polarization of the cell. Signaling molecules, PI3-kinase, rho A, and pp60c-src, were shown to be essential for osteoclastic bone resorption. In this study we have focused on the involvement of these signaling molecules in the early event of osteoclast activation: attachment, spreading, and organization of the cytoskeleton. Highly purified osteoclasts were fractionated into Triton X-100-soluble or cytosolic and Triton X-100-insoluble or cytoskeletal fractions, and the distribution of above-mentioned signaling molecules between the two fractions was examined. PI3-kinase, rho A, and pp60c-src all showed translocation to the cytoskeletal fraction upon osteoclast attachment to plastic. However, PI3-kinase and rho A, but not pp60c-src, showed further translocation of 2.4- and 3.2-fold, respectively, upon attachment of osteoclasts to bone. PI3-kinase translocation to the cytoskeleton was inhibited by either cytochalasin B or colchicine. Furthermore, treatment of osteoclasts with the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin decreased its translocation, suggesting that PI3-kinase activity was needed for its translocation. Moreover, wortmannin inhibited osteoclast attachment to both bone and plastic and caused drastic changes in osteoclast morphology resulting in rounding of the cells, disappearance of F-actin structures or podosomes, and appearance of punctate or vesicular structures inside the cells. Osteoblastic MB1.8 cells and IC-21 macrophages did not show additional translocation of PI3-kinase or rho A upon attachment to bone or changes in attachment or morphology in response to wortmannin. Finally, PI3-kinase coimmunoprecipitated with alpha v beta 3 integrin from osteoclasts. PMID:9434625

  20. Stage-specific functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) in the transcriptional control of osteoclast development

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji-Takechi, Kaori; Negishi-Koga, Takako; Sumiya, Eriko; Kukita, Akiko; Kato, Shigeaki; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Moriyama, Keiji; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is tightly regulated by transcriptional activators and repressors. Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF; encoded by Zbtb7a), known as a POK (POZ/BTB and Krüppel) family transcriptional repressor, is induced during the development of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, but the physiological significance of LRF in bone metabolism and the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of osteoclastogenesis by LRF have not been elucidated. Here we show that LRF negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation by repressing nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) induction in the early phase of osteoclast development, while positively regulating osteoclast-specific genes by functioning as a coactivator of NFATc1 in the bone resorption phase. The stage-specific distinct functions of LRF were demonstrated in two lines of conditional knockout mice in which LRF was deleted in the early or late phase of osteoclast development. Thus, this study shows that LRF plays stage-specific distinct roles in osteoclast differentiation, exemplifying the delicate transcriptional regulation at work in lineage commitment. PMID:22308398

  1. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization and analysis of established cell lines of osteoclast precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, Shigehisa; Suzuki, Jun; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mizutamari, Megumi; Ishida-Kitagawa, Norihiro; Yogo, Keiichiro; Jat, Parmjit S.; Shishido, Tomoyuki . E-mail: shishid@bs.naist.jp

    2006-11-10

    Osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs) have previously been established from bone marrow cells of SV40 temperature-sensitive T antigen-expressing transgenic mice. Here, we use retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to conditionally immortalize OPCs by expressing temperature-sensitive large T antigen (tsLT) from wild type bone marrow cells. The immortalized OPCs proliferated at the permissive temperature of 33.5 deg. C, but stopped growing at the non-permissive temperature of 39 deg. C. In the presence of receptor activator of NF{kappa}B ligand (RANKL), the OPCs differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and formed multinucleate osteoclasts at 33.5 deg. C. From these OPCs, we cloned two types of cell lines. Both differentiated into TRAP-positive cells, but one formed multinucleate osteoclasts while the other remained unfused in the presence of RANKL. These results indicate that the established cell lines are useful for analyzing mechanisms of differentiation, particularly multinucleate osteoclast formation. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization should be a useful method to immortalize OPCs from primary bone marrow cells.

  2. Mechanisms of osteoclast-dependent bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Should we believe that osteoclasts are only involved in bone resorption? What about their contribution to bone formation? In this article I will review evidence that bone formation can be regulated by osteoclasts. Why is this? Likely because in the physiologic condition of bone remodeling, bone resorption and formation are balanced, and there is no better way to control this equilibrium than through a concerted action between the two cell types. Although the influence of osteoblasts on osteoclastic bone resorption is well documented and consolidated over time, what osteoclasts do to regulate osteoblast activity is still matter of intense investigation. The original hypothesis that all is in the osteoblast-seeking factors stored in the bone matrix, released and activated during bone resorption, is now being challenged by several studies, suggesting that osteoclasts are also capable of producing ‘clastokines' that regulate osteoblast performance. Indeed, several of them have been demonstrated to orchestrate osteoclast–osteoblast activities. However, we are probably still at the dawn of a new era, and future work will tell us whether any of these clastokines can be exploited to stimulate bone formation and rebalance bone remodeling in skeletal diseases. PMID:24422142

  3. Osteoclasts Lose Innate Inflammatory Reactivity to Metal and Polymer Implant Debris Compared to Monocytes/Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Jessica; Samelko, Lauryn; Gilvar, Phil; McAllister, Kyron; Hallab, Nadim James

    2013-01-01

    Long-term aseptic failures of joint replacements are generally attributed to implant debris-induced inflammation and osteolysis. This response is largely mediated by immune and bone cells (monocytes/macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively), that in the presence of implant debris (e.g. metal particles and ions), release pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. The relative degree to which implant debris can illicit inflammatory response(s) from osteoclasts vs monocytes/macrophages is unknown, i.e. are osteoclasts a viable target for anti-inflammatory therapy for implant debris? We investigated relative monocyte versus osteoclast inflammatory responses in a side-by-side comparison using implant debris from the perspective of both danger signaling (IL-1β) and pathogenic recognition (TNF-α) reactivity (Challenge Agents: Cobalt-alloy, Titanium-alloy, and PMMA particles, 0.9-1.8um-dia ECD and Cobalt, and Nickel-ions 0.01-0.1mM, all with and without LPS priming). Human monocytes/macrophages reacted to implant debris with >100 fold greater production of cytokines compared to osteoclast-like cells. Particulate Co-alloy challenge induced >1000 pg/ml of IL-1β and TNF-α, in monocytes and <50pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in osteoclasts. Cobalt ions induced >3000pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in monocytes/macrophages and <50pg/mL IL-1β and TNF-α in osteoclasts. The paracrine effect of supernatants from debris-treated monocytes/macrophages was capable of inducing greater osteoclastogenesis (TRAP+, p<0.06) and inflammation than direct debris challenge on osteoclasts. Our results indicate that as monocytes/macrophages differentiate into osteoclasts, they largely lose their innate immune reactivity to implant debris and thus may not be as relevant a therapeutic target as monocytes/macrophages for mitigating debris-induced inflammation. PMID:24198853

  4. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  5. Effect of glucocorticoids on osteoclast function in a mouse model of bone necrosis.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi; Wang, Guangbin; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Linlin; Ren, Zhaozhou; Qiu, Chuang; Fu, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Osteonecrosis, also termed aseptic necrosis, is the cellular death of bone components due to interruption of the blood supply. Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is a common non-traumatic cause of osteonecrosis. However, the mechanism by which GCs induce osteonecrosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of GCs on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and function in a GC‑induced osteonecrosis mouse model. BALB/c male mice (n=40; 4‑weeks‑old) were treated with dexamethasone and asparaginase for 8 weeks. The control group (n=20) was administered normal saline. The results demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a lower mean weight compared with the control group. Morphologically, 16/37 (43%) mice demonstrated significant osteonecrotic lesions in the GC‑treated group. However, osteonecrotic lesions were not observed in the mice of the control group. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GC‑treated group had a higher level of osteoprotegerin compared with the control group, without any change in the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor‑κB ligand. In addition, tartarate‑resistant acid-phosphatase staining demonstrated significantly decreased osteoclasts in the areas of bone destruction in the GCs-treated group. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that GCs increased expression levels of osterix and osteocalcin, and decreased expression of matrix metallopeptidase‑9 to regulate the differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The results of the present study suggested that GCs influence bone remolding resulting in decreased osteoclasts formation/differentiation. Therefore, regulating the differentiation and activity of the osteoclasts may be beneficial to the control and treatment of osteonecrosis. PMID:27277157

  6. Effect of glucocorticoids on osteoclast function in a mouse model of bone necrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi; Wang, Guangbin; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Linlin; Ren, Zhaozhou; Qiu, Chuang; Fu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also termed aseptic necrosis, is the cellular death of bone components due to interruption of the blood supply. Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is a common non-traumatic cause of osteonecrosis. However, the mechanism by which GCs induce osteonecrosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of GCs on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and function in a GC-induced osteonecrosis mouse model. BALB/c male mice (n=40; 4-weeks-old) were treated with dexamethasone and asparaginase for 8 weeks. The control group (n=20) was administered normal saline. The results demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a lower mean weight compared with the control group. Morphologically, 16/37 (43%) mice demonstrated significant osteonecrotic lesions in the GC-treated group. However, osteonecrotic lesions were not observed in the mice of the control group. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a higher level of osteoprotegerin compared with the control group, without any change in the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. In addition, tartarate-resistant acid-phosphatase staining demonstrated significantly decreased osteoclasts in the areas of bone destruction in the GCs-treated group. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that GCs increased expression levels of osterix and osteocalcin, and decreased expression of matrix metallopeptidase-9 to regulate the differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The results of the present study suggested that GCs influence bone remolding resulting in decreased osteoclasts formation/differentiation. Therefore, regulating the differentiation and activity of the osteoclasts may be beneficial to the control and treatment of osteonecrosis. PMID:27277157

  7. How are osteoclasts induced to resorb bone?

    PubMed

    Chambers, T J; Fuller, K

    2011-12-01

    Although much is known about how osteoclasts are formed, we know little about how they are activated, or how they recognize bone as the substrate appropriate for resorption. Bone mineral is considered to be essential to this recognition process, but a "mineral receptor" has never been identified. Recently, we found that resorptive behavior, as judged by the formation of ruffled borders and actin rings, occurs on ordinary tissue culture substrates if they are first coated with vitronectin. Similarly, vitronectin-coated substrates induce osteoclasts to secrete tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and to form podosome belts, and to make resorption trails in the protein that coat the substrate. The same applies to bone mineral, which only induces resorptive behavior if coated with vitronectin. In contrast, fibronectin has none of these effects, despite inducing adhesion and spreading. It appears that osteoclasts recognize bone as the substrate appropriate for resorption through the high affinity of vitronectin-receptor ligands for bone mineral. PMID:22172032

  8. Human iPSC-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts together promote bone regeneration in 3D biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ok Hee; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Lu, Qiaozhi; Chae, Jeremy J.; Feldman, Ricardo A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Bone substitutes can be designed to replicate physiological structure and function by creating a microenvironment that supports crosstalk between bone and immune cells found in the native tissue, specifically osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) represent a powerful tool for bone regeneration because they are a source of patient-specific cells that can differentiate into all specialized cell types residing in bone. We show that osteoblasts and osteoclasts can be differentiated from hiPSC-mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages when co-cultured on hydroxyapatite-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) (HA–PLGA/PLLA) scaffolds. Both cell types seeded on the PLGA/PLLA especially with 5% w/v HA recapitulated the tissue remodeling process of human bone via coupling signals coordinating osteoblast and osteoclast activity and finely tuned expression of inflammatory molecules, resulting in accelerated in vitro bone formation. Following subcutaneous implantation in rodents, co-cultured hiPSC-MSC/-macrophage on such scaffolds showed mature bone-like tissue formation. These findings suggest the importance of coupling matrix remodeling through osteoblastic matrix deposition and osteoclastic tissue resorption and immunomodulation for tissue development. PMID:27225733

  9. Deletion of FGFR3 in Osteoclast Lineage Cells Results in Increased Bone Mass in Mice by Inhibiting Osteoclastic Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan; Li, Xiaogang; Tang, Yubin; Yang, Jing; Wen, Xuan; Guo, Jingyuan; Tang, Junzhou; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) participates in bone remodeling. Both Fgfr3 global knockout and activated mice showed decreased bone mass with increased osteoclast formation or bone resorption activity. To clarify the direct effect of FGFR3 on osteoclasts, we specifically deleted Fgfr3 in osteoclast lineage cells. Adult mice with Fgfr3 deficiency in osteoclast lineage cells (mutant [MUT]) showed increased bone mass. In a drilled-hole defect model, the bone remodeling of the holed area in cortical bone was also impaired with delayed resorption of residual woven bone in MUT mice. In vitro assay demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts derived from wild-type and Fgfr3-deficient bone marrow monocytes, suggesting that FGFR3 had no remarkable effect on osteoclast formation. The bone resorption activity of Fgfr3-deficient osteoclasts was markedly decreased accompanying with downregulated expressions of Trap, Ctsk, and Mmp 9. The upregulated activity of osteoclastic bone resorption by FGF2 in vitro was also impaired in Fgfr3-deficient osteoclasts, indicating that FGFR3 may participate in the regulation of bone resorption activity of osteoclasts by FGF2. Reduced adhesion but not migration in osteoclasts with Fgfr3 deficiency may be responsible for the impaired bone resorption activity. Our study for the first time genetically shows the direct positive regulation of FGFR3 on osteoclastic bone resorption. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26990430

  10. Caffeic acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenethyl ester suppresses receptor activator of NF-κB ligand–induced osteoclastogenesis and prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss through inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase/activator protein 1 and Ca2+–nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian; Li, Zhenxi; Yang, Zhengfang; Zheng, Chunbing; Jing, Ji; Chen, Yihua; Ye, Xiyun; Lian, Xiaoyuan; Qiu, Wenwei; Yang, Fan; Tang, Jie; Xiao, Jianru; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Jian

    2012-06-01

    Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) stimulation leads to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/AP-1 and Ca2+–nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathways in osteoclastogenesis. Targeting these pathways has been an encouraging strategy for bone-related diseases, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid 3,4-dihydroxy-phenethyl ester (CADPE) on osteoclastogenesis. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs) and RAW264.7 cells, CADPE suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and actin-ring formation in a dose-dependent manner within non–growth inhibitory concentrations at the early stage, while CADPE had no effect on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation and differentiation. At the molecular level, CADPE inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs, including extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), without significantly affecting the NF-κB signaling pathway. CADPE abrogated RANKL-induced activator protein 1 (AP-1)/FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (c-Fos) nuclear translocation and activation. Overexpression of c-Fos prevented the inhibition by CADPE of osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, CADPE suppressed RANKL-induced the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) interaction with c-src tyrosine kinase (c-Src), blocked RANKL-induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT), and inhibited RANKL-induced Ca2+ oscillation. As a result, CADPE decreased osteoclastogenesis-related marker gene expression, including NFATc1, TRAP, cathepsin K, and c-Src. To test the effects of CADPE on osteoclast activity in vivo, we showed that CADPE prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Together, our data demonstrate that CADPE suppresses osteoclastogenesis and bone loss through inhibiting RANKL-induced MAPKs and Ca

  11. Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Attenuates TNF-Induced Pathologic Bone Resorption and Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis by Inducing A20 Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Joon; Lim, Elisha; Mun, Se-Hwan; Bae, Seyeon; Murata, Koichi; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Investigations on the therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) have focused on the suppression of autoantibody and immune complex-mediated inflammatory pathogenesis. Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by excessive bone erosion but the effect of IVIG on osteoclasts, bone-resorbing cells, has not been studied. Here, we investigate whether IVIG directly regulates osteoclast differentiation and has therapeutic potential for suppressing osteoclast-mediated pathologic bone resorption. IVIG or cross-linking of Fcγ receptors with plate-bound IgG suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κ B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and expression of osteoclast-related genes such as integrin β3 and cathepsin K in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, IVIG or plate-bound IgG suppressed osteoclastogenesis by downregulating RANKL-induced expression of NFATC1, the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. IVIG suppressed NFATC1 expression by attenuating RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling, explained in part by induction of the inflammatory signaling inhibitor A20. IVIG administration attenuated in vivo osteoclastogenesis and suppressed bone resorption in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced calvarial osteolysis model. Our findings show that, in addition to suppressing inflammation, IVIG directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis through a mechanism involving suppression of RANK signaling. Direct suppression of osteoclast differentiation may provide beneficial effects on preserving bone mass when IVIG is used to treat rheumatic disorders. PMID:26189496

  12. Deletion of Rac in Mature Osteoclasts Causes Osteopetrosis, an Age-Dependent Change in Osteoclast Number, and a Reduced Number of Osteoblasts In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meiling; Sun, Ben-hua; Saar, Katarzyna; Simpson, Christine; Troiano, Nancy; Dallas, Sarah L; Tiede-Lewis, LeAnn M; Nevius, Erin; Pereira, João P; Weinstein, Robert S; Tommasini, Steven M; Insogna, Karl L

    2016-01-01

    Rac1 and Rac2 are thought to have important roles in osteoclasts. Therefore, mice with deletion of both Rac1 and Rac2 in mature osteoclasts (DKO) were generated by crossing Rac1flox/flox mice with mice expressing Cre in the cathepsin K locus and then mating these animals with Rac2−/− mice. DKO mice had markedly impaired tooth eruption. Bone mineral density (BMD) was increased 21% to 33% in 4- to 6-week-old DKO mice at all sites when measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and serum cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTx) was reduced by 52%. The amount of metaphyseal trabecular bone was markedly increased in DKO mice, but the cortices were very thin. Spinal trabecular bone mass was increased. Histomorphometry revealed significant reductions in both osteoclast and osteoblast number and function in 4- to 6-week-old DKO animals. In 14- to 16-week-old animals, osteoclast number was increased, although bone density was further increased. DKO osteoclasts had severely impaired actin ring formation, an impaired ability to generate acid, and reduced resorptive activity in vitro. In addition, their life span ex vivo was reduced. DKO osteoblasts expressed normal differentiation markers except for the expression of osterix, which was reduced. The DKO osteoblasts mineralized normally in vitro, indicating that the in vivo defect in osteoblast function was not cell autonomous. Confocal imaging demonstrated focal disruption of the osteocytic dendritic network in DKO cortical bone. Despite these changes, DKO animals had a normal response to treatment with once-daily parathyroid hormone (PTH). We conclude that Rac1 and Rac2 have critical roles in skeletal metabolism. PMID:26496249

  13. Osteoclast function and bone-resorbing activity: An overview.

    PubMed

    Soysa, Niroshani Surangika; Alles, Neil

    2016-07-29

    Bone resorption is an important cellular function in skeletal development and remodeling of the adult skeleton. Most of the pathological bone disease conditions like osteoporosis reflect increased osteoclast activity; hence, increased bone resorption. Researchers have unraveled most of the intracellular mechanisms responsible for osteoclast bone-resorbing activity in last few decades. Therefore, understanding the fundamentals of osteoclast-induced bone resorption and the cytokines and other substances that modulate the osteoclast activity unequivocally provide insights into the development of drugs to ameliorate pathological bone diseases with enhanced bone resorption. The aim of this review is to examine the literature on osteoclast function and bone-resorbing activity. PMID:27157135

  14. Nano-topography sensing by osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Geblinger, Dafna; Addadi, Lia; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Bone resorption by osteoclasts depends on the assembly of a specialized, actin-rich adhesive ‘sealing zone’ that delimits the area designed for degradation. In this study, we show that the level of roughness of the underlying adhesive surface has a profound effect on the formation and stability of the sealing zone and the associated F-actin. As our primary model substrate, we use ‘smooth’ and ‘rough’ calcite crystals with average topography values of 12 nm and 530 nm, respectively. We show that the smooth surfaces induce the formation of small and unstable actin rings with a typical lifespan of ~8 minutes, whereas the sealing zones formed on the rough calcite surfaces are considerably larger, and remain stable for more than 6 hours. It was further observed that steps or sub-micrometer cracks on the smooth surface stimulate local ring formation, raising the possibility that similar imperfections on bone surfaces may stimulate local osteoclast resorptive activity. The mechanisms whereby the physical properties of the substrate influence osteoclast behavior and their involvement in osteoclast function are discussed. PMID:20375065

  15. The Multifaceted Osteoclast; Far and Beyond Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Drissi, Hicham; Sanjay, Archana

    2016-08-01

    The accepted function of the bone resorbing cell, osteoclast, has been linked to bone remodeling and pathological osteolysis. Emerging evidence points to novel functions of osteoclasts in controlling bone formation and angiogenesis. Thus, while the concept of a "clastokine" with the potential to regulate osteogenesis during remodeling did not come as a surprise, new evidence provided unique insight into the mechanisms underlying osteoclastic control of bone formation. The question still remains as to whether osteoclast precursors or a unique trap positive mononuclear cell, can govern any aspect of bone formation. The novel paradigm eloquently proposed by leaders in the field brings together the concept of clastokines and osteoclast precursor-mediated bone formation, potentially though enhanced angiogenesis. These fascinating advances in osteoclast biology have motivated this short review, in which we discuss these new roles of osteoclasts. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1753-1756, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019318

  16. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas☆

    PubMed Central

    Temesgen, Wudneh M.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare, with an incidence of less than 1% of all pancreatic tumors. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor (OGCT) of the pancreas is one of the three types of PGCT, which are now classified as undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient is a 57 year old woman who presented with a 3 week history of epigastric pain and a palpable abdominal mass. Imaging studies revealed an 18 cm × 15 cm soft tissue mass with cystic components which involved the pancreas, stomach and spleen. Exploratory laparotomy with distal pancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy and splenectomy was performed. Histology revealed undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells with production of osteoid and glandular elements. DISCUSSION OGCT of the pancreas resembles benign-appearing giant cell tumors of bone, and contain osteoclastic-like multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells. OGCTs display a less aggressive course with slow metastasis and lymph node spread compared to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Due to the rarity of the cancer, there is a lack of prospective studies on treatment options. Surgical en-bloc resection is currently considered first line treatment. The role of adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not been established. CONCLUSION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare pancreatic neoplasms with unique clinical and pathological characteristics. Osteoclastic giant cell tumors are the most favorable sub-type. Surgical en bloc resection is the first line treatment. Long-term follow-up of patients with these tumors is essential to compile a body of literature to help guide treatment. PMID:24631915

  17. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. PMID:26516894

  18. Nicotine Affects Bone Resorption and Suppresses the Expression of Cathepsin K, MMP-9 and Vacuolar-Type H+-ATPase d2 and Actin Organization in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hideki; Tanabe, Natsuko; Kawato, Takayuki; Nakai, Kumiko; Kariya, Taro; Matsumoto, Sakurako; Zhao, Ning; Motohashi, Masafumi; Maeno, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is an important risk factor for the development of several cancers, osteoporosis, and inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis. Nicotine is one of the major components of tobacco. In previous study, we showed that nicotine inhibits mineralized nodule formation by osteoblasts, and the culture medium from osteoblasts containing nicotine and lipopolysaccharide increases osteoclast differentiation. However, the direct effect of nicotine on the differentiation and function of osteoclasts is poorly understood. Thus, we examined the direct effects of nicotine on the expression of nicotine receptors and bone resorption-related enzymes, mineral resorption, actin organization, and bone resorption using RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow cells as osteoclast precursors. Cells were cultured with 10−5, 10−4, or 10−3 M nicotine and/or 50 µM α-bungarotoxin (btx), an 7 nicotine receptor antagonist, in differentiation medium containing the soluble RANKL for up 7 days. 1–5, 7, 9, and 10 nicotine receptors were expressed on RAW264.7 cells. The expression of 7 nicotine receptor was increased by the addition of nicotine. Nicotine suppressed the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinuclear osteoclasts with large nuclei(≥10 nuclei), and decreased the planar area of each cell. Nicotine decreased expression of cathepsin K, MMP-9, and V-ATPase d2. Btx inhibited nicotine effects. Nicotine increased CA II expression although decreased the expression of V-ATPase d2 and the distribution of F-actin. Nicotine suppressed the planar area of resorption pit by osteoclasts, but did not affect mineral resorption. These results suggest that nicotine increased the number of osteoclasts with small nuclei, but suppressed the number of osteoclasts with large nuclei. Moreover, nicotine reduced the planar area of resorption pit by suppressing the number of osteoclasts with large nuclei, V-ATPase d2, cathepsin K and MMP-9 expression and actin organization. PMID

  19. MiR-142-3p is a RANKL-dependent inducer of cell death in osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Fordham, Jezrom B.; Guilfoyle, Katherine; Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Nares, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA are small, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that are estimated to regulate ~60% of the human genome. MiRNA profiling of monocyte-to-osteoclast differentiation identified miR-142-3p as a miRNA that is significantly, differentially expressed throughout osteoclastogenesis. Enforced expression of miR-142-3p via transient transfection with miR-142-3p mimic inhibited cell-to-cell contact and fusion, decreased protein kinase C alpha expression, and ultimately reduced cell viability. miR-142-3p was also identified as significantly differentially expressed during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and overexpression of miR-142-3p prevented their conversion to osteoclasts. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of miR-142-3p on osteoclastogenesis extended to the conversion of a third osteoclast precursor cell type- dendritic cells. These results demonstrate miR-142-3p to be a negative regulator of osteoclastogenesis from the 3 main precursor cell types: monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Importantly, decreased survival was dependent upon both miR-142-3p expression and RANK-signaling, with no harmful effects detected in the absence of this combination. As such, miR-142-3p represents a novel target for the selective removal of osteoclasts by targeting of osteoclastogenic pathways. PMID:27113904

  20. Protocatechuic Acid Attenuates Osteoclastogenesis by Downregulating JNK/c-Fos/NFATc1 Signaling and Prevents Inflammatory Bone Loss in Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Hyang; Kim, Ju-Young; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin

    2016-04-01

    Protocatechuic acid (PCA) plays a critical role in nutritional metabolism; it is a major metabolite of anthocyanins, which are flavonoids with a range of health benefits. PCA has a variety of biological activities including anti-oxidant, antiinflammatory, anti-apoptosis, and anti-microbial activities. However, the pharmacological effect of PCA, especially on osteoclastogenesis, remains unknown. We examined the effect of PCA on receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. PCA dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) and suppressed the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. At the molecular level, PCA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of JNK among MAPKs only, without significantly affecting the early signaling pathway. PCA also suppressed RANKL-stimulated expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) at the mRNA and protein levels, without altering c-Fos mRNA expression. Additionally, PCA down-regulated the expression of downstream osteoclastogenesis-related genes including β3-integrin, DC-STAMP, OC-STAMP, Atp6v0d2, CTR, and CtsK. Mice treated with PCA efficiently recovered from lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss in vivo. Thus, PCA inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing JNK signaling, c-Fos stability, and expression of osteoclastic marker genes. These results suggest that PCA could be useful in treatment of inflammatory bone disorders. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26792397

  1. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A.; Mains, Richard E.; Allen, Matthew R.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36 week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14 week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  2. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A; Mains, Richard E; Allen, Matthew R; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  3. Influence of osteoclasts and osteoprotegerin on the mode of calcific degeneration of aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Czubek, Urszula; Jasek-Gajda, Ewa; Łoboda, Agnieszka; Dulak, Józef; Nessler, Jadwiga; Kapelak, Bogusław; Sadowski, Jerzy; Litwin, Jan A

    2016-03-22

    INTRODUCTION    Calcific aortic valve disease is associated with inflammation and calcification, thus the osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and its ligand (RANKL) system involved in osteoclastogenesis and inflammation may play a significant role in valve degeneration. OBJECTIVES    The aim of this study was to assess whether circulating OPG, sRANKL, and other bone metabolism markers can predict the presence of osteoclasts in stenotic valves and to evaluate their impact on the mode of degeneration. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study involved 60 patients with aortic stenosis who underwent valve replacement surgery and subsequently were divided into 2 groups: osteoclastic (n = 12) and nonosteoclastic (n = 48), according to the presence or absence of intravalvular osteoclasts. Before the surgery, we measured serum levels of OPG, sRANKL, osteocalcin, osteopontin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 1β, and IL-6. Immunohistochemistry and morphometry were used to determine the extent of valve calcification, lipid accumulation, neovascularization, and the number and phenotype of macrophages. RESULTS    Compared with the nonosteoclastic group, patients with intravalvular osteoclasts had lower levels of OPG (P = 0.0006) and TNF-α (P = 0.02) and less frequently had diabetes (P = 0.04). Their valves showed higher incidence of ossification (P = 0.002), higher total (P = 0.008) and M2 macrophage counts (P = 0.0002), increased neovascularization (P = 0.003), and lower accumulation of lipids (P = 0.04). They also showed a negative correlation between valve calcification and age (r = -0.79, P = 0.002), which was not observed in patients without osteoclasts. In a multivariate analysis, low circulating OPG levels and the absence of diabetes were predictors of intravalvular osteoclastic differentiation. CONCLUSIONS    The presence of osteoclasts in stenotic valves associated with low circulating OPG levels and an

  4. A new method for measuring osteoclast formation by electrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Emori, Haruka; Iwai, Shinichi; Ryu, Kakei; Amano, Hitoshi; Sambe, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Oguchi, Tatsunori; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts are important target cells for osteoporosis treatment. Recently, a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system was developed to observe cell morphology and adhesion; however, the use of RTCA to study osteoclastogenesis has not been reported. Here, we investigated whether osteoclast formation could be monitored in real-time using RTCA. The cell index determined via electrical impedance using RTCA, and the number of osteoclasts exhibited a significant positive correlation. RTCA was useful for determining the effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on the inhibition of bone resorption. We established a new method of measuring osteoclast formation in real-time using RTCA. PMID:26032840

  5. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates osteoclastogenesis via regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Je-Yoel; Woo, Kyung Mi; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Kim, Gwan-Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa . E-mail: baekjh@snu.ac.kr

    2006-08-18

    Tetraspanin CD9 has been shown to regulate cell-cell fusion in sperm-egg fusion and myotube formation. However, the role of CD9 in osteoclast, another multinucleated cell type, is not still clear. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD9 in osteoclast differentiation. CD9 was expressed in osteoclast lineage cells and its expression level increased during the progression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. KMC8, a neutralizing antibody specific to CD9, significantly suppressed RANKL-induced multinucleated osteoclast formation and the mRNA expression of osteoclast differentiation marker genes. To define CD9-regulated osteoclastogenic signaling pathway, MAPK pathways were examined. KMC8 induced long-term phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, but not of p38 MAPK. Constitutive activation of p44/42 MAPK by overexpressing constitutive-active mutant of MEK1 almost completely blocked osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that CD9 expressed on osteoclast lineage cells might positively regulate osteoclastogenesis via the regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity.

  6. Acredinone C and the Effect of Acredinones on Osteoclastogenic and Osteoblastogenic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Hiyoung; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lee, Jihye; Won, Dong Hwan; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kang, Heonjoong; Son, Young-Jin

    2016-07-22

    A new inhibitor, acredinone C (1), of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was isolated from the culture broth of the fungus Acremonium sp. (F9A015) along with acredinones A (2) and B (3). The structure of acredinone C (1), which incorporates benzophenone and xanthone moieties, was established by the analyses of combined spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR and MS. All of the acredinones studied efficiently inhibited the RANKL-induced formation of TRAP(+)-MNCs in a dose-dependent manner without any cytotoxicity up to 10 μM. Acredinone A showed dual activity in both osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation in vitro and good efficacy in an animal disease model of bone formation. PMID:27356092

  7. Calebin A downregulates osteoclastogenesis through suppression of RANKL signalling.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit K; Prasad, Sahdeo; Majeed, Muhammed; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that is exacerbated by aging and age-associated chronic diseases such as cancer. Cancer-induced bone loss is usually treated with bisphosphonates or denosumab, an antibody against receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL). Because these drugs are expensive and have numerous side effects and high rates of toxicity, safer, more effective, and more affordable therapies for osteoporosis are still needed. We identified a compound, calebin A (CA), derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa) that affects osteoclastogenesis through modulation of the RANKL signalling pathway. The CA's effect on NF-κB activation was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Using mouse macrophages in vitro model, we found that CA suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of macrophages into osteoclasts, and downregulate RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis-related marker gene expression, including NFATc-1, TRAP, CTR, and cathepsin K. CA also suppressed the osteoclastogenesis induced by multiple myeloma and breast cancer cells. This effect of CA was correlated with suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of κB and, thus, inhibition of NF-κB activation. Furthermore, we found that an NF-κB-specific inhibitory peptide blocked RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, demonstrating that the NF-κB signalling pathway is mandatory for RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Our results conclusively indicate that CA downmodulates the osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL and by tumour cells through suppression of NF-κB pathway. PMID:26874195

  8. Dihydroartemisinin prevents breast cancer-induced osteolysis via inhibiting both breast caner cells and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Hong, Jian-Xin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yong; Yuan, Chi-Ting; Lei, Xin-Huan; Zhu, Min; Qin, An; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Hong, Dun

    2016-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of distant relapse in breast cancer, leading to severe complications which dramatically affect the patients' quality of life. It is believed that the crosstalk between metastatic breast cancer cells and osteoclasts is critical for breast cancer-induced osteolysis. In this study, the effects of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) on osteoclast formation, bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation and mineralization were initially assessed in vitro, followed by further investigation in a titanium-particle-induced osteolysis model in vivo. Based on the proved inhibitory effect of DHA on osteolysis, DHA was further applied to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-induced mouse osteolysis model, with the underlying molecular mechanisms further investigated. Here, we verified for the first time that DHA suppressed osteoclast differentiation, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption through suppressing AKT/SRC pathways, leading to the preventive effect of DHA on titanium-particle-induced osteolysis without affecting osteoblast function. More importantly, we demonstrated that DHA inhibited breast tumor-induced osteolysis through inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells via modulating AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, DHA effectively inhibited osteoclastogenesis and prevented breast cancer-induced osteolysis. PMID:26743690

  9. Targeted Gene Correction in Osteopetrotic-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Generation of Functional Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Tui; Muggeo, Sharon; Paulis, Marianna; Caldana, Maria Elena; Crisafulli, Laura; Strina, Dario; Focarelli, Maria Luisa; Faggioli, Francesca; Recordati, Camilla; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Scanziani, Eugenio; Mantero, Stefano; Buracchi, Chiara; Sobacchi, Cristina; Lombardo, Angelo; Naldini, Luigi; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Ficara, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a human bone disease mainly caused by TCIRG1 gene mutations that prevent osteoclasts resorbing activity, recapitulated by the oc/oc mouse model. Bone marrow transplantation is the only available treatment, limited by the need for a matched donor. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as an unlimited source of autologous cells to generate gene corrected osteoclasts might represent a powerful alternative. We generated iPSCs from oc/oc mice, corrected the mutation using a BAC carrying the entire Tcirg1 gene locus as a template for homologous recombination, and induced hematopoietic differentiation. Similarly to physiologic fetal hematopoiesis, iPSC-derived CD41+ cells gradually gave rise to CD45+ cells, which comprised both mature myeloid cells and high proliferative potential colony-forming cells. Finally, we differentiated the gene corrected iPSC-derived myeloid cells into osteoclasts with rescued bone resorbing activity. These results are promising for a future translation into the human clinical setting. PMID:26344905

  10. Dihydroartemisinin prevents breast cancer-induced osteolysis via inhibiting both breast caner cells and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Hong, Jian-Xin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yong; Yuan, Chi-Ting; Lei, Xin-Huan; Zhu, Min; Qin, An; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Hong, Dun

    2016-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of distant relapse in breast cancer, leading to severe complications which dramatically affect the patients’ quality of life. It is believed that the crosstalk between metastatic breast cancer cells and osteoclasts is critical for breast cancer-induced osteolysis. In this study, the effects of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) on osteoclast formation, bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation and mineralization were initially assessed in vitro, followed by further investigation in a titanium-particle-induced osteolysis model in vivo. Based on the proved inhibitory effect of DHA on osteolysis, DHA was further applied to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-induced mouse osteolysis model, with the underlying molecular mechanisms further investigated. Here, we verified for the first time that DHA suppressed osteoclast differentiation, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption through suppressing AKT/SRC pathways, leading to the preventive effect of DHA on titanium-particle-induced osteolysis without affecting osteoblast function. More importantly, we demonstrated that DHA inhibited breast tumor-induced osteolysis through inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells via modulating AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, DHA effectively inhibited osteoclastogenesis and prevented breast cancer-induced osteolysis. PMID:26743690

  11. New methodology for evaluating osteoclastic activity induced by orthodontic load

    PubMed Central

    ARAÚJO, Adriele Silveira; FERNANDES, Alline Birra Nolasco; MACIEL, José Vinicius Bolognesi; NETTO, Juliana de Noronha Santos; BOLOGNESE, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is a dynamic process of bone modeling involving osteoclast-driven resorption on the compression side. Consequently, to estimate the influence of various situations on tooth movement, experimental studies need to analyze this cell. Objectives The aim of this study was to test and validate a new method for evaluating osteoclastic activity stimulated by mechanical loading based on the fractal analysis of the periodontal ligament (PDL)-bone interface. Material and Methods The mandibular right first molars of 14 rabbits were tipped mesially by a coil spring exerting a constant force of 85 cN. To evaluate the actual influence of osteoclasts on fractal dimension of bone surface, alendronate (3 mg/Kg) was injected weekly in seven of those rabbits. After 21 days, the animals were killed and their jaws were processed for histological evaluation. Osteoclast counts and fractal analysis (by the box counting method) of the PDL-bone interface were performed in histological sections of the right and left sides of the mandible. Results An increase in the number of osteoclasts and in fractal dimension after OTM only happened when alendronate was not administered. Strong correlation was found between the number of osteoclasts and fractal dimension. Conclusions Our results suggest that osteoclastic activity leads to an increase in bone surface irregularity, which can be quantified by its fractal dimension. This makes fractal analysis by the box counting method a potential tool for the assessment of osteoclastic activity on bone surfaces in microscopic examination. PMID:25760264

  12. Reprint of: The Great Beauty of the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Cappariello, Alfredo; Maurizi, Antonio; Veeriah, Vimal; Teti, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Much has been written recently on osteoclast biology, but this cell type still astonishes scientists with its multifaceted functions and unique properties. The last three decades have seen a change in thinking about the osteoclast, from a cell with a single function, which just destroys the tissue it belongs to, to an "orchestrator" implicated in the concerted regulation of bone turnover. Osteoclasts have unique morphological features, organelle distribution and plasma membrane domain organization. They require polarization to cause extracellular bone breakdown and release of the digested bone matrix products into the circulation. Osteoclasts contribute to the control of skeletal growth and renewal. Alongside other organs, including kidney, gut, thyroid and parathyroid glands, they also affect calcemia and phosphatemia. Osteoclasts are very sensitive to pro-inflammatory stimuli, and studies in the '00s ascertained their tight link with the immune system, bringing about the question why bone needs a cell regulated by the immune system to remove the extracellular matrix components. Recently, osteoclasts have been demonstrated to contribute to the hematopoietic stem cell niche, controlling local calcium concentration and regulating the turnover of factors essential for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. Finally, osteoclasts are important regulators of osteoblast activity and angiogenesis, both by releasing factors stored in the bone matrix, and secreting "clastokines" that regulate the activity of neighboring cells. All these facets will be discussed in this review article, with the aim of underscoring The Great Beauty of the osteoclast. PMID:25282390

  13. Regulation of osteoclast structure and function by FAK family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Brianne J.; Thomas, Keena; Huang, Cynthia S.; Gutknecht, Michael F.; Botchwey, Edward A.; Bouton, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells that resorb bone and contribute to bone remodeling. Diseases such as osteoporosis and osteolytic bone metastasis occur when osteoclast-mediated bone resorption takes place in the absence of concurrent bone synthesis. Considerable effort has been placed on identifying molecules that regulate the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts. To this end, we investigated unique and overlapping functions of members of the FAK family (FAK and Pyk2) in osteoclast functions. With the use of a conditional knockout mouse model, in which FAK is selectively targeted for deletion in osteoclast precursors (FAKΔmyeloid), we found that loss of FAK resulted in reduced bone resorption by osteoclasts in vitro, coincident with impaired signaling through the CSF-1R. However, bone architecture appeared normal in FAKΔmyeloid mice, suggesting that Pyk2 might functionally compensate for reduced FAK levels in vivo. This was supported by data showing that podosome adhesion structures, which are essential for bone degradation, were significantly more impaired in osteoclasts when FAK and Pyk2 were reduced than when either molecule was depleted individually. We conclude that FAK contributes to cytokine signaling and bone resorption in osteoclasts and partially compensates for the absence of Pyk2 to maintain proper adhesion structures in these cells. PMID:22941736

  14. Advanced glycation end products biphasically modulate bone resorption in osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziqing; Li, Chaohong; Zhou, Yuhuan; Chen, Weishen; Luo, Guotian; Zhang, Ziji; Wang, Haixing; Zhang, Yangchun; Xu, Dongliang; Sheng, Puyi

    2016-03-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) disturb bone remodeling during aging, and this process is accelerated in diabetes. However, their role in modulation of osteoclast-induced bone resorption is controversial, with some studies indicating that AGEs enhance bone resorption and others showing the opposite effect. We determined whether AGEs present at different stages of osteoclast differentiation affect bone resorption differently. Based on increased levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K (CTSK), we identified day 4 of induction as the dividing time of cell fusion stage and mature stage in RAW264.7 cell-derived osteoclast-like cells (OCLs). AGE-modified BSA (50-400 μg/ml) or control BSA (100 μg/ml) was then added at the beginning of each stage. Results showed that the presence of AGEs at the cell fusion stage reduced pit numbers, resorption area, and CTSK expression. Moreover, expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) as well as the number of TRAP-positive cells, nuclei per OCL, actin rings, and podosomes also decreased. However, the presence of AGEs at the mature stage enlarged the resorption area markedly and increased pit numbers slightly. Intriguingly, only the number of nuclei per OCL and podosomes increased. These data indicate that AGEs biphasically modulate bone resorption activity of OCLs in a differentiation stage-dependent manner. AGEs at the cell fusion stage reduce bone resorption dramatically, mainly via suppression of RANK expression in osteoclast precursors, whereas AGEs at the mature stage enhance bone resorption slightly, most likely by increasing the number of podosomes in mature OCLs. PMID:26670486

  15. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  16. Effects of Silicon on Osteoclast Cell Mediated Degradation, In Vivo Osteogenesis and Vasculogenesis of Brushite Cement

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are being widely used for treating small scale bone defects. Among the various CPCs, brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement is widely used due to its superior solubility and ability to form new bone. In the present study, we have studied the physical, mechanical, osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of silicon (Si) doped brushite cements. Addition of Si did not alter the phase composition of final product and regardless of Si level, all samples included β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and DCPD. 1.1 wt. % Si addition increased the compressive strength of undoped brushite cement from 4.78±0.21 MPa to 5.53±0.53 MPa, significantly. Cellular activity was studied using receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) supplemented osteoclast-like-cells precursor RAW 264.7 cell. Phenotypic expressions of the cells confirmed successful differentiation of RAW264.7 monocytes to osteoclast-like-cells on undoped and doped brushite cements. An increased activity of osteoclast-like cells was noticed due to Si doping in the brushite cement. An excellent new bone formation was found in all cement compositions, with significant increase in Si doped brushite samples as early as 4 weeks post implantation in rat femoral model. After 4 weeks of implantation, no significant difference was found in blood vessel formation between the undoped and doped cements, however, a significant increase in vasculgenesis was found in 0.8 and 1.1 wt. % Si doped brushite cements after 8 weeks. These results show the influence of Si dopant on physical, mechanical, in vitro osteoclastogenesis and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of brushite cements. PMID:26855779

  17. Secretory clusterin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by attenuating M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Soon-Suk; Kang, Sang-Wook; Min, Bon-Hong; Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Youngsup; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We describe the expression and secretion of clusterin in osteoclasts. • Endogenous clusterin deficiency does not affect osteoclast formation. • Exogenous treatment with secretory clusterin decreases osteoclast differentiation. • Secretory clusterin attenuates osteoclast precursor cell proliferation by inhibiting M-CSF-mediated ERK activation. - Abstract: Secretory clusterin (sCLU)/apolipoprotein J is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Reduced sCLU in the joints of patients with bone erosive disease is associated with disease activity; however, its exact role has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report that CLU is expressed and secreted during osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) that are treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). CLU-deficient BMMs obtained from CLU{sup −/−} mice exhibited no significant alterations in OC differentiation in comparison with BMMs obtained from wild-type mice. In contrast, exogenous sCLU treatment significantly inhibited OC formation in both BMMs and OC precursor cultures. The inhibitory effect of sCLU was more prominent in BMMs than OC precursor cultures. Interestingly, treating BMMs with sCLU decreased the proliferative effects elicited by M-CSF and suppressed M-CSF-induced ERK activation of OC precursor cells without causing apoptotic cell death. This study provides the first evidence that sCLU reduces OC formation by inhibiting the actions of M-CSF, thereby suggesting its protective role in bone erosion.

  18. Quetiapine inhibits osteoclastogenesis and prevents human breast cancer-induced bone loss through suppression of the RANKL-mediated MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongkai; Shen, Weiwei; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Zhuo, Yunyun; Li, Tao; Mei, Feng; Li, Xinmin; Xiao, Lan; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-02-01

    Bone loss is one of the major complications of advanced cancers such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, and lung cancer. Extensive research has revealed that the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which is considered to be a key factor in osteoclast differentiation, plays an important role in cancer-associated bone resorption. Therefore, agents that can suppress this bone loss have therapeutic potential. In this study, we detected whether quetiapine (QUE), a commonly used atypical antipsychotic drug, can inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro and prevent human breast cancer-induced bone loss in vivo. RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were used to detect inhibitory effect of QUE on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone was used to test suppressive effect of QUE on breast cancer-induced bone loss in vivo. Our results show that QUE can inhibit RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs without signs of cytotoxicity. Moreover, QUE reduced the occurrence of MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic bone loss by suppressing the differentiation of osteoclasts. Finally, molecular analysis revealed that it is by inhibiting RANKL-mediated MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways that QUE suppressed the osteoclast differentiation. We demonstrate, for the first time, the novel suppressive effects of QUE on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro and human breast cancer-induced bone loss in vivo, suggesting that QUE may be a potential therapeutic drug for osteolysis treatment. PMID:25667102

  19. 5-Azacytidine-induced Protein 2 (AZI2) Regulates Bone Mass by Fine-tuning Osteoclast Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M.; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  20. 5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-04-10

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  1. Loss of Protein Kinase C-δ Protects against LPS-Induced Osteolysis Owing to an Intrinsic Defect in Osteoclastic Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Ee Cheng; Abel, Tamara; Tickner, Jennifer; Chim, Shek Man; Wang, Cathy; Cheng, Taksum; Ng, Benjamin; Ng, Pei Ying; Teguh, Dian Astari; Kenny, Jacob; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Nakayama, Keiko; Pavlos, Nathan; Zheng, Ming H.; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is intrinsically regulated by cell signaling molecules. The Protein Kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases is involved in multiple signaling pathways including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and osteoclast biology. However, the precise involvement of individual PKC isoforms in the regulation of osteoclast formation and bone homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we identify PKC-δ as the major PKC isoform expressed among all PKCs in osteoclasts; including classical PKCs (−α, −β and −γ), novel PKCs (−δ, −ε, −η and −θ) and atypical PKCs (−ι/λ and −ζ). Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of PKC-δ impairs osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. Moreover, disruption of PKC-δ activity protects against LPS-induced osteolysis in mice, with osteoclasts accumulating on the bone surface failing to resorb bone. Treatment with the PKC-δ inhibitor Rottlerin, blocks LPS-induced bone resorption in mice. Consistently, PKC-δ deficient mice exhibit increased trabeculae bone containing residual cartilage matrix, indicative of an osteoclast-rich osteopetrosis phenotype. Cultured ex vivo osteoclasts derived from PKC-δ null mice exhibit decreased CTX-1 levels and MARKS phosphorylation, with enhanced formation rates. This is accompanied by elevated gene expression levels of cathepsin K and PKC −α, −γ and −ε, as well as altered signaling of pERK and pcSrc416/527 upon RANKL-induction, possibly to compensate for the defects in bone resorption. Collectively, our data indicate that PKC-δ is an intrinsic regulator of osteoclast formation and bone resorption and thus is a potential therapeutic target for pathological osteolysis. PMID:23951014

  2. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  3. Induction of apoptosis of human primary osteoclasts treated with extracts from the medicinal plant Emblica officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Penolazzi, Letizia; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Zennaro, Margherita; Piva, Roberta; Gambari, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoclasts (OCs) are involved in rheumatoid arthritis and in several pathologies associated with bone loss. Recent results support the concept that some medicinal plants and derived natural products are of great interest for developing therapeutic strategies against bone disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this study we determined whether extracts of Emblica officinalis fruits display activity of possible interest for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis by activating programmed cell death of human primary osteoclasts. Methods The effects of extracts from Emblica officinalis on differentiation and survival of human primary OCs cultures obtained from peripheral blood were determined by tartrate-acid resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positivity and colorimetric MTT assay. The effects of Emblica officinalis extracts on induction of OCs apoptosis were studied using TUNEL and immunocytochemical analysis of FAS receptor expression. Finally, in vitro effects of Emblica officinalis extracts on NF-kB transcription factor activity were determined by gel shift experiments. Results Extracts of Emblica officinalis were able to induce programmed cell death of mature OCs, without altering, at the concentrations employed in our study, the process of osteoclastogenesis. Emblica officinalis increased the expression levels of Fas, a critical member of the apoptotic pathway. Gel shift experiments demonstrated that Emblica officinalis extracts act by interfering with NF-kB activity, a transcription factor involved in osteoclast biology. The data obtained demonstrate that Emblica officinalis extracts selectively compete with the binding of transcription factor NF-kB to its specific target DNA sequences. This effect might explain the observed effects of Emblica officinalis on the expression levels of interleukin-6, a NF-kB specific target gene. Conclusion Induction of apoptosis of osteoclasts could be an important strategy both in

  4. IL-6 alters osteocyte signaling toward osteoblasts but not osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A D; Kulkarni, R N; Klein-Nulend, J; Lems, W F

    2014-04-01

    Mechanosensitive osteocytes regulate bone mass in adults. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), such as present during orthodontic tooth movement, also strongly affects bone mass, but little is known about the effect of IL-6 on osteocyte function. Therefore we aimed to determine in vitro whether IL-6 affects osteocyte mechanosensitivity, and osteocyte regulation of osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast differentiation. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were incubated with/without IL-6 (1 or 10 pg/mL) for 24 hr. Subsequently, osteocytes were subjected to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) for 1 hr. Mouse osteoclast precursors were cultured for 7 days on top of IL-6-treated osteocytes. Conditioned medium from osteocytes treated with/without IL-6 was added to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts for 14 days. Exogenous IL-6 (10 pg/mL) did not alter the osteocyte response to PFF. PFF significantly enhanced IL-6 production by osteocytes. IL-6 enhanced Rankl expression but reduced caspase 3/7 activity by osteocytes, and therefore did not affect osteocyte-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from IL-6-treated osteocytes reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Runx2 expression in osteoblasts, but increased expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 and osteocalcin. Our results suggest that IL-6 is produced by shear-loaded osteocytes and that IL-6 may affect bone mass by modulating osteocyte communication toward osteoblasts. PMID:24492932

  5. Inhibition of Osteoclast Bone Resorption by Disrupting Vacuolar H+-ATPase a3-B2 Subunit Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Kartner, Norbert; Yao, Yeqi; Li, Keying; Crasto, Gazelle J.; Datti, Alessandro; Manolson, Morris F.

    2010-01-01

    Vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are highly expressed in ruffled borders of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, where they play a crucial role in skeletal remodeling. To discover protein-protein interactions with the a subunit in mammalian V-ATPases, a GAL4 activation domain fusion library was constructed from an in vitro osteoclast model, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-differentiated RAW 264.7 cells. This library was screened with a bait construct consisting of a GAL4 binding domain fused to the N-terminal domain of V-ATPase a3 subunit (NTa3), the a subunit isoform that is highly expressed in osteoclasts (a1 and a2 are also expressed, to a lesser degree, whereas a4 is kidney-specific). One of the prey proteins identified was the V-ATPase B2 subunit, which is also highly expressed in osteoclasts (B1 is not expressed). Further characterization, using pulldown and solid-phase binding assays, revealed an interaction between NTa3 and the C-terminal domains of both B1 and B2 subunits. Dual B binding domains of equal affinity were observed in NTa, suggesting a possible model for interaction between these subunits in the V-ATPase complex. Furthermore, the a3-B2 interaction appeared to be moderately favored over a1, a2, and a4 interactions with B2, suggesting a mechanism for the specific subunit assembly of plasma membrane V-ATPase in osteoclasts. Solid-phase binding assays were subsequently used to screen a chemical library for inhibitors of the a3-B2 interaction. A small molecule benzohydrazide derivative was found to inhibit osteoclast resorption with an IC50 of ∼1.2 μm on both synthetic hydroxyapatite surfaces and dentin slices, without significantly affecting RAW 264.7 cell viability or receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and inhibitors may contribute to the design of novel therapeutics for bone loss disorders, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20837476

  6. Azanitrile Cathepsin K Inhibitors: Effects on Cell Toxicity, Osteoblast-Induced Mineralization and Osteoclast-Mediated Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Domenget, Chantal; Buchet, Rene; Wu, Yuqing; Jurdic, Pierre; Mebarek, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Aim The cysteine protease cathepsin K (CatK), abundantly expressed in osteoclasts, is responsible for the degradation of bone matrix proteins, including collagen type 1. Thus, CatK is an attractive target for new anti-resorptive osteoporosis therapies, but the wider effects of CatK inhibitors on bone cells also need to be evaluated to assess their effects on bone. Therefore, we selected, among a series of synthetized isothiosemicarbazides, two molecules which are highly selective CatK inhibitors (CKIs) to test their effects on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Research Design and Methods Cell viability upon treatment of CKIs were was assayed on human osteoblast-like Saos-2, mouse monocyte cell line RAW 264.7 and mature mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow. Osteoblast-induced mineralization in Saos-2 cells and in mouse primary osteoblasts from calvaria, with or without CKIs,; were was monitored by Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity, while osteoclast-induced bone resorption was performed on bovine slices. Results Treatments with two CKIs, CKI-8 and CKI-13 in human osteoblast-like Saos-2, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with RANKL and mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow stimulated with RANKL and MCSF were found not to be toxic at doses of up to 100 nM. As probed by Alizarin Red staining, CKI-8 did not inhibit osteoblast-induced mineralization in mouse primary osteoblasts as well as in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. However, CKI-13 led to a reduction in mineralization of around 40% at 10–100 nM concentrations in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells while it did not in primary cells. After a 48-hour incubation, both CKI-8 and CKI-13 decreased bone resorption on bovine bone slices. CKI-13 was more efficient than the commercial inhibitor E-64 in inhibiting bone resorption induced by osteoclasts on bovine bone slices. Both CKI-8 and CKI-13 created smaller bone resorption pits on bovine bone slices, suggesting that the mobility of

  7. Podosome rings generate forces that drive saltatory osteoclast migration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shiqiong; Planus, Emmanuelle; Georgess, Dan; Place, Christophe; Wang, Xianghui; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Jurdic, Pierre; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Podosomes are dynamic, actin-containing adhesion structures that collectively self-organize as rings. In this study, we first show by observing osteoclasts plated on bead-seeded soft substrates that podosome assemblies, such as rings, are involved in tension forces. During the expansion of a podosome ring, substrate displacement is oriented outward, suggesting that podosomal structures push the substrate away. To further elucidate the function of forces generated by podosomes, we analyze osteoclast migration. Determining the centers of mass of the whole cell (G) and of actin (P), we demonstrate that osteoclasts migrate by “jumps” and that the trajectories of G and P are strongly correlated. The velocity of the center of mass as a function of time reveals that osteoclasts rapidly catch up with podosomal structures in a periodic pattern. We conclude that actin dynamics inside the cell are not only correlated with cell migration, but drive it. PMID:21737683

  8. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells. PMID:26629304

  9. Biosynthesis and processing of cathepsin K in cultured human osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Rieman, D J; McClung, H A; Dodds, R A; Hwang, S M; Holmes, M W; James, I E; Drake, F H; Gowen, M

    2001-03-01

    Cathepsin K (cat K) is the major cysteine protease expressed in osteoclasts and is thought to play a key role in matrix degradation during bone resorption. However, little is known regarding the synthesis, activation, or turnover of the endogenous enzyme in osteoclasts. In this study, we show that mature cat K protein and enzyme activity are localized within osteoclasts. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that, following the synthesis of pro cat K, intracellular conversion to the mature enzyme occurred in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the level of mature enzyme decreased. Little or no cat K was observed in the culture media at any timepoint. Pretreatment of osteoclasts with either chloroquine or monensin resulted in complete inhibition of the processing of newly synthesized cat K. In addition, pro cat K demonstrated susceptibility to treatment with N-glycosidase F, suggesting the presence of high-mannose-containing oligosaccharides. Treatment of osteoclasts with the PI3-kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin (WT), not only prevented the intracellular processing of cat K but also resulted in the secretion of proenzyme into the culture media. Taken together, these results suggest that the biosynthesis, processing, and turnover of cat K in human osteoclasts is constitutive and occurs in a manner similar to that of other known cysteine proteases. Furthermore, cat K is not secreted as a proenzyme, but is processed intracellularly, presumably in lysosomal compartments prior to the release of active enzyme into the resorption lacunae. PMID:11248658

  10. The "love-hate" relationship between osteoclasts and bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are unique cells that destroy the mineralized matrix of the skeleton. There is a "love-hate" relationship between the osteoclasts and the bone matrix, whereby the osteoclast is stimulated by the contact with the matrix but, at the same time, it disrupts the matrix, which, in turn, counteracts this disruption by some of its components. The balance between these concerted events brings about bone resorption to be controlled and to contribute to bone tissue integrity and skeletal health. The matrix components released by osteoclasts are also involved in the local regulation of other bone cells and in the systemic control of organismal homeostasis. Disruption of this regulatory loop causes bone diseases, which may end up with either reduced or increased bone mass, often associated with poor bone quality. Expanding the knowledge on osteoclast-to-matrix interaction could help to counteract these diseases and improve the human bone health. In this article, we will present evidence of the physical, molecular and regulatory relationships between the osteoclasts and the mineralized matrix, discussing the underlying mechanisms as well as their pathologic alterations and potential targeting. PMID:26921625

  11. Comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity of human osteoclasts on tissue culture polystyrene and on natural extracellular bone matrix in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, C; Schmid, F F; Schmid, F V; Kluger, P J

    2015-07-10

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by osteoblasts (bone formation) and osteoclasts (bone resorption). While there have been numerous studies investigating mesenchymal stem cells and their potential to differentiate into osteoblasts as well as their interaction with different bone substitute materials, there is only limited knowledge concerning in vitro generated osteoclasts. Due to the increasing development of degradable bone-grafting materials and the need of sophisticated in vitro test methods, it is essential to gain deeper insight into the process of osteoclastogenesis and the resorption functionality of human osteoclasts. Therefore, we focused on the comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and bovine extracellular bone matrices (BMs). Cortical bone slices were used as two-dimensional (2D) substrates, whereas a thermally treated cancellous bone matrix was used for three-dimensional (3D) experiments. We isolated primary human monocytes and induced osteoclastogenesis by medium supplementation. Subsequently, the expression of the vitronectin receptor (αVβ3) and cathepsin K as well as the characteristic actin formation on TCPS and the two BMs were examined. The cell area of human osteoclasts was analyzed on TCPS and on BMs, whereas significantly larger osteoclasts could be detected on BMs. Additionally, we compared the diameter of the sealing zones with the measured diameter of the resorption pits on the BMs and revealed similar diameters of the sealing zones and the resorption pits. We conclude that using TCPS as culture substrate does not affect the expression of osteoclast-specific markers. The analysis of resorption activity can successfully be conducted on cortical as well as on cancellous bone matrices. For new in vitro test systems concerning bone resorption, we suggest the establishment of a 2D assay for high throughput screening of new degradable bone substitute materials with osteoclasts. PMID:25562421

  12. TRAP-positive osteoclast precursors mediate ROS/NO-dependent bactericidal activity via TLR4.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuaki; Shindo, Satoru; Movila, Alexandru; Kayal, Rayyan; Abdullah, Albassam; Savitri, Irma Josefina; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Howait, Mohammed; Al-Dharrab, Ayman; Mira, Abdulghani; Han, Xiaozhe; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclastogenesis was induced by RANKL stimulation in mouse monocytes to examine the possible bactericidal function of osteoclast precursors (OCp) and mature osteoclasts (OCm) relative to their production of NO and ROS. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive OCp, but few or no OCm, phagocytized and killed Escherichia coli in association with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Phagocytosis of E. coli and production of ROS and NO were significantly lower in TRAP+ OCp derived from Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 KO mice than that derived from wild-type (WT) or TLR2-KO mice. Interestingly, after phagocytosis, TRAP+ OCp derived from wild-type and TLR2-KO mice did not differentiate into OCm, even with continuous exposure to RANKL. In contrast, E. coli-phagocytized TRAP+ OCp from TLR4-KO mice could differentiate into OCm. Importantly, neither NO nor ROS produced by TRAP+ OCp appeared to be engaged in phagocytosis-induced suppression of osteoclastogenesis. These results suggested that TLR4 signaling not only induces ROS and NO production to kill phagocytized bacteria, but also interrupts OCm differentiation. Thus, it can be concluded that TRAP+ OCp, but not OCm, can mediate bactericidal activity via phagocytosis accompanied by the production of ROS and NO via TLR4-associated reprograming toward phagocytic cell type. PMID:27343691

  13. Regulation of human umbilical cord blood-derived multi-potent stem cells by autogenic osteoclast-based niche-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bo; Jeong, Yun-Hyeok; Jung, Ji-Won; Seo, Kwangwon; Lee, Yong-Soon ||; Kang, Kyung-Sun ||. E-mail: kangpub@snu.ac.kr

    2007-05-25

    Stem cell niches provide the micro-environment for the development of stem cells. Under our culturing regimen, a kind of osteoclast-centralized structure supports the proliferation of MSCs, derived from human cord blood, once they reside on osteoclasts. MSCs in this structure expressed Oct4 which is a marker of embryonic stem cells. Floating daughter cells of MSCs colony showed abilities to differentiate into osteocyte, adipocyte, and neuronal progenitor cells. Compared with the easy senescence of MSCs without this niche-like structure in vitro, these results suggested that osteoclasts might play an important role the development and maintenance of Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs and might provide a means to expand UCB-MSCs in vitro, more easily, through a stem cell niche-like structure.

  14. Calcitonin Induces Expression of the Inducible cAMP Early Repressor in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Maobin; Kream, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    The cAMP response element modulator gene (Crem) encodes a variety of transcriptional regulators including the inducible cAMP early repressor, ICER. We previously showed that Crem knockout mice, which are deficient in CREM and ICER factors, display slightly increased long bone mass and decreased osteoclast number. These data are consistent with the notion that Crem regulates bone mass in part through an effect on osteoclast formation and/or function. Since ICER is strongly induced by cAMP, we asked whether the calcium-regulating hormone calcitonin, which stimulates cAMP production and inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption, could induce ICER in osteoclasts. The monocytic cell line RAW264.7 was treated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) to induce osteoclast formation. Calcitonin caused a time- and dose-dependent induction of ICER mRNA and an increase in ICER protein abundance in RANKL-treated RAW264.7 cells. Calcitonin also induced ICER mRNA and protein in osteoclasts derived from primary mouse bone marrow cell cultures. Calcitonin-treated osteoclasts showed immunoreactivity with an anti-CREM antibody. Calcitonin decreased the activity of wild type and Crem knockout osteoclasts in vitro, and this inhibitory effect was greater in Crem knockout osteoclasts. Furthermore, calcitonin decreased calcitonin receptor mRNA expression in wild type osteoclasts but not in Crem knockout osteoclasts. These data suggest that calcitonin induction of ICER in osteoclasts might regulate osteoclast activity. PMID:19016003

  15. Extremely High Expression of Antisense RNA for Wilms' Tumor 1 in Active Osteoclasts: Suppression of Wilms' Tumor 1 Protein Expression during Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Ji; Kukita, Akiko; Kyumoto-Nakamura, Yukari; Kukita, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), a zinc-finger transcription regulator of the early growth response family, identified as the product of a tumor suppressor gene of Wilms' tumors, bears potential ability to induce macrophage differentiation in blood cell differentiation. Herein, we examined the involvement of WT1 in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. We detected a high level of WT1 protein expression in osteoclast precursors; however, WT1 expression was markedly suppressed during osteoclastogenesis. We examined expression of WT1 transcripts in bone tissue by RNA in situ hybridization. We found a high level of antisense transcripts in osteoclasts actively resorbing bone in mandible of newborn rats. Expression of antisense WT1 RNA in mandible was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis and strand-specific RT-PCR. Overexpression of antisense WT1 RNA in RAW-D cells, an osteoclast precursor cell line, resulted in a marked enhancement of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that antisense WT1 RNA functions to suppress expression of WT1 protein in osteoclastogenesis. High level expression of antisense WT1 RNA may contribute to commitment to osteoclastogenesis, and may allow osteoclasts to maintain or stabilize their differentiation state. PMID:27393793

  16. Osteoactivin inhibition of osteoclastogenesis is mediated through CD44-ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Sondag, Gregory R; Mbimba, Thomas S; Moussa, Fouad M; Novak, Kimberly; Yu, Bing; Jaber, Fatima A; Abdelmagid, Samir M; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-01-01

    Osteoactivin is a heavily glycosylated protein shown to have a role in bone remodeling. Previous studies from our lab have shown that mutation in Osteoactivin enhances osteoclast differentiation but inhibits their function. To date, a classical receptor and a signaling pathway for Osteoactivin-mediated osteoclast inhibition has not yet been characterized. In this study, we examined the role of Osteoactivin treatment on osteoclastogenesis using bone marrow-derived osteoclast progenitor cells and identify a signaling pathway relating to Osteoactivin function. We reveal that recombinant Osteoactivin treatment inhibited osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner shown by qPCR, TRAP staining, activity and count. Using several approaches, we show that Osteoactivin binds CD44 in osteoclasts. Furthermore, recombinant Osteoactivin treatment inhibited ERK phosphorylation in a CD44-dependent manner. Finally, we examined the role of Osteoactivin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κ B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteolysis in vivo. Our data indicate that recombinant Osteoactivin inhibits RANKL-induced osteolysis in vivo and this effect is CD44-dependent. Overall, our data indicate that Osteoactivin is a negative regulator of osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo and that this process is regulated through CD44 and ERK activation. PMID:27585719

  17. Tropomyosin 4 regulates adhesion structures and resorptive capacity in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Brooke K; Lee, Beth S

    2008-02-01

    Tropomyosins (Tms) are alpha-helical dimers that bind and stabilize actin microfilaments while regulating their accessibility to other actin-associated proteins. Four genes encode expression of over forty Tms, most of which are expressed in nonmuscle cells. In recent years, it has become clear that individual Tm isoforms may regulate specific actin pools within cells. In this study, we examined how osteoclast function may be regulated by the tropomyosin isoform Tm-4, which we previously showed to be highly localized to podosomes and sealing zones of osteoclasts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Tm-4, both in RAW264.7- and mouse marrow-derived osteoclasts, resulted in thinning of the actin ring of the sealing zone. Knockdown of Tm-4 also resulted in diminished bone resorptive capacity and altered resorption pit shape. In contrast, osteoclasts overexpressing Tm-4 demonstrated thickened podosomes on glass as well as thickened, aberrant actin structures on bone, and diminished motility and resorptive capacity. These results indicate that Tm-4 plays a role in regulating adhesion structures of osteoclasts, most likely by stabilizing the actin microfilaments present in podosomes and the sealing zone. PMID:18036591

  18. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 and dexamethasone induce the cyclooxygenase 1 gene in osteoclast-supporting stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, A E; Abu-Amer, Y; Chappel, J; Stueckle, S; Ross, F P; Teitelbaum, S L; Suva, L J

    1999-09-15

    Commitment of members of the monocyte/macrophage family to the bone resorptive phenotype, in vitro, requires contact, of these osteoclast precursors, with osteoblasts or related stromal cells. The osteoclast-inductive properties of these stromal cells are typically expressed, however, only in the presence of steroid hormones such as 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D3) and dexamethasone (DEX). To gain insight into the means by which steroid treated accessory cells induce osteoclast differentiation we asked, using differential RNA display (DRD), if gene expression by this stromal cell population differs from that of their untreated, non-osteoclastogenic counterpart. We identified four known genes specifically expressed by 1,25D3/DEX-treated ST2 stromal cells: 1) a family of rat organic anion transporters, 2) Na/K ATPase ss-subunit, 3) tazarotene-induced gene 2 (TIG2), and 4) prostaglandin G/H synthase I, or cyclooxygenase 1 (Cox-1). The regulation of these genes in 1,25D3/DEX-treated ST2 cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis of treated (osteoclast-supporting) and untreated (non-osteoclast-supporting) ST2 cells; the genes have a limited and specific tissue mRNA expression pattern. Northern blot analysis of treated and untreated ST2 cell total RNA using either a DRD-derived Cox-1 cDNA or a Cox-1 specific oligonucleotide confirmed the steroid regulation of Cox-1 mRNA. Surprisingly, there is no detectable expression by untreated or steroid exposed ST2 cells, of Cox-2, the classical regulated cyclooxygenase isoform. In contrast to 1, 25D3/DEX, serum treatment rapidly induces Cox-2 mRNA, substantiating the capacity of ST2 cells to express the gene. These data establish that steroid induction of the osteoclastogenic properties of stromal cells is attended by Cox gene expression, a phenomenon consistent with the capacity of eicosinoids to impact the resorptive process. The response of osteoclast-supporting ST2 cells to 1,25D3/DEX treatment may be one prostaglandin

  19. SCFβ-TRCP regulates osteoclastogenesis via promoting CYLD ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    North, Brian J.; Nagaoka, Yoshiyuki; Nagashima, Katsuyuki; Deng, Feng; Okabe, Koji; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    CYLD negatively regulates the NF-κB signaling pathway and osteoclast differentiation largely through antagonizing TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-mediated K63-linkage polyubiquitination in osteoclast precursor cells. CYLD activity is controlled by IκB kinase (IKK), but the molecular mechanism(s) governing CYLD protein stability remains largely undefined. Here, we report that SCFβ-TRCP regulates the ubiquitination and degradation of CYLD, a process dependent on prior phosphorylation of CYLD at Ser432/Ser436 by IKK. Furthermore, depletion of β-TRCP induced CYLD accumulation and TRAF6 deubiquitination in osteoclast precursor cells, leading to suppression of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Therefore, these data pinpoint the IKK/β-TRCP/CYLD signaling pathway as an important modulator of osteoclastogenesis. PMID:24961988

  20. Effects of (3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene)-1,1-bisphosphonate on mouse osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, M.J.; Wilson, A.S.; Davie, M.W. )

    1990-09-01

    A group of 5-day-old mice were injected intraperitoneally with (3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidine)-1,1-bisphosphonate (APD). Morphologic changes were observed in vitally stained osteoclasts on parietal bones 3 days later, and these were judged to be degenerative. At this time significantly increased numbers of nuclei per osteoclast and total numbers of osteoclast nuclei were observed. However, at 4 days after the injection of APD, the total numbers of osteoclasts were significantly reduced relative to controls. When parietal bones were maintained in culture, APD reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited cell-mediated 45Ca2+ release. Exposure of bones to parathyroid hormone increased the number of osteoclasts counted 1 day later. This effect was not blocked by APD. Calcitonin prevented the reduction in osteoclast numbers due to APD in vitro. We conclude that APD has a direct effect on resorbing mouse osteoclasts.

  1. Mechanical regulation of osteoclastic genes in human osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, Ludwika Liedert, Astrid; Hasni, Sofia; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2008-04-11

    Bone adaptation to mechanical load is accompanied by changes in gene expression of bone-forming cells. Less is known about mechanical effects on factors controlling bone resorption by osteoclasts. Therefore, we studied the influence of mechanical loading on several key genes modulating osteoclastogenesis. Human osteoblasts were subjected to various cell stretching protocols. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate gene expression. Cell stretching resulted in a significant up-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) immediate after intermittent loading (3 x 3 h, 3 x 6 h, magnitude 1%). Continuous loading, however, had no effect on RANKL expression. The expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), and osteoclast inhibitory lectin (OCIL) was not significantly altered. The data suggested that mechanical loading could influence osteoclasts recruitment by modulating RANKL expression in human osteoblasts and that the effects might be strictly dependent on the quality of loading.

  2. Osteoclasts are not activated in middle ear cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ikezaki, Shoji; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Hashida, Koichi; Sakai, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear whether osteoclasts are present and activated in cholesteatomas. We explored the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for osteoclast biomarkers and regulating factors in middle ear cholesteatomas to elucidate the level of osteoclast activity in this disease. Bone powder was collected from 14 patients with cholesteatomatous and noncholesteatomatous chronic otitis media during tympanomastoidectomy, separately from cortical bone of the mastoid (clean bone powder), from bone neighboring cholesteatoma (cholesteatomatous bone powder), and from bone of the air cells and antrum of noncholesteatomatous chronic otitis media patients (noncholesteatomatous bone powder). The samples collected were soaked in TRIzol reagent, and total RNA was extracted and purified by the acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform method, followed by the use of magnetic bead technology. The sample was then subjected to quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CTSK), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), calcitonin receptor (CALCR), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG). There was no significant difference in the expression of TRAP, CTSK, OSCAR, CALCR, MMP9, or OPG among the clean, cholesteatomatous, and noncholesteatomatous bone powder. On the other hand, the expression of RANK and RANKL was significantly lower in the cholesteatomatous bone powder than in the noncholesteatomatous bone powder (P = 0.003 and P = 0.028, respectively). The RANKL mRNA/OPG mRNA ratio did not differ among the three samples. These results indicate that osteoclasts are unlikely to be activated in cholesteatomas. Bone resorption mechanisms not mediated by osteoclasts may need to be reappraised in cholesteatoma research in future studies. PMID:25796629

  3. High molecular weight tropomyosins regulate osteoclast cytoskeletal morphology.

    PubMed

    Kotadiya, Preeyal; McMichael, Brooke K; Lee, Beth S

    2008-11-01

    Tropomyosins are coiled-coil dimers that bind to the major groove of F-actin and regulate its accessibility to actin-modifying proteins. Although approximately 40 tropomyosin isoforms have been identified in mammals, they can broadly be classified into two groups based on protein size, that is, high molecular weight and low molecular weight isoforms. Osteoclasts, which undergo rounds of polarization and depolarization as they progress through the resorptive cycle, possess an unusual and highly dynamic actin cytoskeleton. To further define some of the actin regulatory proteins involved in osteoclast activity, we previously performed a survey of tropomyosin isoforms in resting and resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts were found to express two closely related tropomyosins of the high molecular weight type, which are not expressed in monocytic and macrophage precursors. These isoforms, Tm-2 and Tm-3, are not strongly associated with actin-rich adhesion structures, but are instead distributed diffusely throughout the cell. In this study, we found that Tm-2/3 expression occurs late in osteoclastogenesis and continues to increase as cells mature. Knockdown of these isoforms via RNA interference results in flattening and increased spreading of osteoclasts, accompanied by diminished motility and altered resorptive capacity. In contrast, overexpression of Tm-2, but not Tm-3, caused morphological changes that include decreased spreading of the cells and induction of actin patches or stress fiber-like actin filaments, also with effects on motility and resorption. Suppression of Tm-2/3 or overexpression of Tm-2 resulted in altered distribution of gelsolin and microfilament barbed ends. These data suggest that high molecular weight tropomyosins are expressed in fusing osteoclasts to regulate the cytoskeletal scaffolding of these large cells, due at least in part by moderating accessibility of gelsolin to these microfilaments. PMID:18674650

  4. Megakaryocyte-mediated inhibition of osteoclast development.

    PubMed

    Kacena, Melissa A; Nelson, Tracy; Clough, Mary E; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Lorenzo, Joseph A; Gundberg, Caren M; Horowitz, Mark C

    2006-11-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that megakaryocytes (MK) or their growth factors play a role in skeletal homeostasis. We previously identified a novel regulatory pathway that controls bone formation, which is mediated by MK. In vivo megakaryocytosis resulted in massive bone formation. The co-culture of MK with osteoblasts (OB) resulted in increased OB proliferation in vitro, by a mechanism that required direct cell-to-cell contact. Here, we examined a second MK-mediated pathway that regulates osteoclast (OC) development. We have begun examining the unique inhibitory effect of MK on OC development. Spleen or bone marrow (BM) cells from C57BL/6 mice, as a source of OC precursors, were cultured with M-CSF and RANKL to induce OC development. MK were prepared by culturing fetal liver cells with thrombopoietin and separating cells into MK and non-MK populations. MK were titrated into spleen cell cultures and OC were identified as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive giant cells with >3 nuclei. There was a significant, P < 0.001, up to 10-fold reduction in OC formed when MK were added to the spleen cell cultures. We determined that 30% (vol:vol) MK conditioned media (CM) were able to completely block OC development from precursors, whereas 3% MK CM resulted in up to a 10-fold reduction in OC development, P < 0.001. These data indicate that a soluble factor(s) was responsible, at least in part, for the inhibition. We examined MK CM for known inhibitors of OC formation, using ELISAs. IL-4 was undetectable in MK CM, whereas IL-10 and IFN-gamma levels were similar in MK and non-MK CM. TGFbeta-1 levels were increased 2-fold in MK CM compared to control CM but were not responsible for the inhibition in OC development. Although, we found a significant increase in the levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in MK CM, antibody neutralization studies, MK derived from OPG-deficient mice, and tandem mass spectrophotometry, all confirm that OPG was not responsible for the MK

  5. Amlexanox Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis and Prevents Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Jing; Fang, Zhong; Chen, Wenjian; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The activity of protein kinases IKK-ε and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) has been shown to be associated with inflammatory diseases. As an inhibitor of IKK-ε and TBK1, amlexanox is an anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, immunomodulator and used for treatment of ulcer, allergic rhinitis and asthma in clinic. We hypothesized that amlexanox may be used for treatment of osteoclast-related diseases which frequently associated with a low grade of systemic inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of amlexanox on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ovariectomy-mediated bone loss in vivo. In primary bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMs), amlexanox inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption. At the molecular level, amlexanox suppressed RANKL-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs), c-Fos and NFATc1. Amlexanox decreased the expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, MMP9, Cathepsin K and NFATc1. Moreover, amlexanox enhanced osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs. In ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model, amlexanox prevented OVX-induced bone loss by suppressing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that amlexanox suppresses osteoclastogenesis and prevents OVX-induced bone loss. Therefore, amlexanox may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for osteoclast-related diseases, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26338477

  6. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase regulates RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via AMPK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jeong; Gu, Dong Ryun; Jin, Su Hyun; Park, Keun Ha; Lee, Seoung Hoon

    2016-06-17

    Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (malate dehydrogenase 1, MDH1) plays pivotal roles in the malate/aspartate shuttle that might modulate metabolism between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we investigated the role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation and formation. MDH1 expression was induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) treatment. Knockdown of MDH1 by infection with retrovirus containing MDH1-specific shRNA (shMDH1) reduced mature osteoclast formation and bone resorption activity. Moreover, the expression of marker genes associated with osteoclast differentiation was downregulated by shMDH1 treatment, suggesting a role of MDH1 in osteoclast differentiation. In addition, intracellular ATP production was reduced following the activation of adenosine 5' monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular energy sensor and negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, in shMDH1-infected osteoclasts compared to control cells. In addition, the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a critical transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, was decreased with MDH1 knockdown during RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings provide strong evidence that MDH1 plays a critical role in osteoclast differentiation and function via modulation of the intracellular energy status, which might affect AMPK activity and NFATc1 expression. PMID:27179783

  7. Baculovirus-expressed vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) activates osteoclasts and binding of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) does not influence this activity.

    PubMed

    Swamy, N; Ghosh, S; Schneider, G B; Ray, R

    2001-01-01

    conversion of DBP to DBP-maf requires the selective removal of galactose and sialic acid from the third domain of the protein. Hence, the differential effects of the two recombinant forms of DBP-maf is most likely related to glycosylation; E. coli expressed recombinant DBP is non-glycosylated, whereas the baculovirus expressed form is glycosylated. These data support the essential role of glycosylation for the osteoclast activating property of DBP-maf. PMID:11255236

  8. Bone as a Target Organ in Rheumatic Disease: Impact on Osteoclasts and Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Baum, Rebecca; Gravallese, Ellen M

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulated bone remodeling occurs when there is an imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation. In rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthritis, systemic and local factors disrupt the process of physiologic bone remodeling. Depending upon the local microenvironment, cell types, and local mechanical forces, inflammation results in very different effects on bone, promoting bone loss in the joints and in periarticular and systemic bone in RA and driving bone formation at enthesial and periosteal sites in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS), included within the classification of axial spondyloarthritis. There has been a great deal of interest in the role of osteoclasts in these processes and much has been learned over the past decade about osteoclast differentiation and function. It is now appreciated that osteoblast-mediated bone formation is also inhibited in the RA joint, limiting the repair of erosions. In contrast, osteoblasts function to produce new bone in AS. The Wnt and BMP signaling pathways have emerged as critical in the regulation of osteoblast function and the outcome for bone in rheumatic diseases, and these pathways have been implicated in both bone loss in RA and bone formation in AS. These pathways provide potential novel approaches for therapeutic intervention in diseases in which inflammation impacts bone. PMID:26411424

  9. Nrp2 deficiency leads to trabecular bone loss and is accompanied by enhanced osteoclast and reduced osteoblast numbers.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Lieve; Kriebitzsch, Carsten; Beullens, Ine; Tan, Biauw Keng; Carmeliet, Geert; Verstuyf, Annemieke

    2013-08-01

    Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2 are transmembrane receptors that can bind class 3 semaphorins (Sema3A-G) in addition to VEGF family members to play important roles in axonal guidance, vascularization and angiogenesis, as well as immune responses. Moreover, recent evidence implicates Sema3A/Nrp-mediated signaling in bone regulation. However, to date the expression of Nrp2 in bone has not been investigated and a possible role for Nrp2 in the maintenance of bone homeostasis in vivo remains unexplored. Here we show that Nrp2, together with its possible coreceptors (Plexin A family members and Plexin D1) and class 3 semaphorin ligands, were expressed during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, Nrp2 transcript and protein levels were highly induced in hematopoietic bone marrow cell-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblastic as well as osteoclastic Nrp2 expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the long bones of mice. Interestingly, Nrp2 knockout mice were characterized by a low bone mass phenotype which was accompanied by an increased number of osteoclasts and a decreased osteoblast count. Collectively, these data point to a physiological role for Nrp2 in bone homeostasis. PMID:23598046

  10. Polarized osteoclasts put marks of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase on dentin slices--a simple method for identifying polarized osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahiro; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Uehara, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Teruhito; Kawahara, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Kurihara, Saburo; Sahara, Noriyuki; Ozawa, Hidehiro; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2011-12-01

    Osteoclasts form ruffled borders and sealing zones toward bone surfaces to resorb bone. Sealing zones are defined as ringed structures of F-actin dots (actin rings). Polarized osteoclasts secrete protons to bone surfaces via vacuolar proton ATPase through ruffled borders. Catabolic enzymes such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K are also secreted to bone surfaces. Here we show a simple method of identifying functional vestiges of polarized osteoclasts. Osteoclasts obtained from cocultures of mouse osteoblasts and bone marrow cells were cultured for 48 h on dentin slices. Cultures were then fixed and stained for TRAP to identify osteoclasts on the slices. Cells were removed from the slices with cotton swabs, and the slices subjected to TRAP and Mayer's hematoxylin staining. Small TRAP-positive spots (TRAP-marks) were detected in the resorption pits stained with Mayer's hematoxylin. Pitted areas were not always located in the places of osteoclasts, but osteoclasts existed on all TRAP-marks. A time course experiment showed that the number of TRAP-marks was maintained, while the number of resorption pits increased with the culture period. The position of actin rings formed in osteoclasts corresponded to that of TRAP-marks on dentin slices. Immunostaining of dentin slices showed that both cathepsin K and vacuolar proton ATPase were colocalized with the TRAP-marks. Treatment of osteoclast cultures with alendronate, a bisphosphonate, suppressed the formation of TRAP-marks and resorption pits without affecting the cell viability. Calcitonin induced the disappearance of both actin rings and TRAP-marks in osteoclast cultures. These results suggest that TRAP-marks are vestiges of proteins secreted by polarized osteoclasts. PMID:21983021

  11. E-cadherin is important for cell differentiation during osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Cara; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-05-01

    E-cadherin, a protein responsible for intercellular adhesion between epithelial cells, is also expressed in the monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this study we have explored the involvement of E-cadherin during receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated osteoclast differentiation. Osteoclastogenesis involves a period of precursor expansion followed by multiple fusion events to generate a multinuclear osteoclast that is capable of bone resorption. We asked whether E-cadherin participated in early precursor interactions and recognition or was a component of the osteoclast fusion machinery. Here, we show that endogenous E-cadherin expression is the highest during early stages of osteoclast differentiation, with surface expression visible on small precursor cells (fewer than four nuclei per cell) in both RAW 264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Blocking E-cadherin function with neutralizing antibodies prior to the onset of fusion delayed the expression of TRAP, Cathepsin K, DC-STAMP and NFATc1 and significantly diminished multinucleated osteoclast formation. Conversely, E-cadherin-GFP overexpressing macrophages displayed earlier NFATc1 nuclear translocation along with faster formation of multinucleated osteoclasts compared to control macrophages. Through live imaging we identified that disrupting E-cadherin function prolonged the proliferative phase of the precursor population while concomitantly decreasing the proportion of migrating precursors. The lamellipodium and polarized membrane extensions appeared to be the principal sites of fusion, indicating precursor migration was a critical factor contributing to osteoclast fusion. These findings demonstrate that E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts can modulate osteoclast-specific gene expression and prompt differentiating osteoclast precursors toward migratory and fusion activities. PMID:26959175

  12. Osteoclast-derived exosomal miR-214-3p inhibits osteoblastic bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Defang; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Cheung, Hilda Yeuk-Siu; Xu, Liang; Lu, Changwei; He, Bing; Liu, Biao; Shaikh, Atik Badshah; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Yang, Zhijun; Au, Doris Wai-Ting; Peng, Songlin; Zhang, Zongkang; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Pan, Xiaohua; Qian, Airong; Shang, Peng; Xiao, Lianbo; Jiang, Baohong; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Xu, Jiake; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Guo, De-an; Zhu, Hailong; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that osteoclasts direct osteoblastic bone formation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have a crucial role in regulating osteoclast and osteoblast function. However, whether miRNAs mediate osteoclast-directed osteoblastic bone formation is mostly unknown. Here, we show that increased osteoclastic miR-214-3p associates with both elevated serum exosomal miR-214-3p and reduced bone formation in elderly women with fractures and in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Osteoclast-specific miR-214-3p knock-in mice have elevated serum exosomal miR-214-3p and reduced bone formation that is rescued by osteoclast-targeted antagomir-214-3p treatment. We further demonstrate that osteoclast-derived exosomal miR-214-3p is transferred to osteoblasts to inhibit osteoblast activity in vitro and reduce bone formation in vivo. Moreover, osteoclast-targeted miR-214-3p inhibition promotes bone formation in ageing OVX mice. Collectively, our results suggest that osteoclast-derived exosomal miR-214-3p transfers to osteoblasts to inhibit bone formation. Inhibition of miR-214-3p in osteoclasts may be a strategy for treating skeletal disorders involving a reduction in bone formation. PMID:26947250

  13. Evidence of a correlation of estrogen receptor level and avian osteoclast estrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pederson, L; Kremer, M; Foged, N T; Winding, B; Ritchie, C; Fitzpatrick, L A; Oursler, M J

    1997-05-01

    Isolated osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens respond to estradiol treatment in vitro with decreased resorption activity, increased nuclear proto-oncogene expression, and decreased lysosomal enzyme secretion. This study examines osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and egg-laying hens for evidence of estrogen responsiveness. Although osteoclasts from both of these sources express estrogen receptor mRNA and protein, estradiol treatment had no effect on resorption activity. In contrast to the lack of effect on resorption, estradiol treatment for 30 minutes resulted in steady-state mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun increasing in osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and decreasing in osteoclasts from egg-laying hens. These data suggest that a nuclear proto-oncogene response may not be involved in estradiol-mediated decreased osteoclast resorption activity. To examine the influence of circulating estrogen on osteoclast estrogen responsiveness, 5-week-old chickens were injected with estrogen for 4 days prior to sacrifice. Estradiol treatment of osteoclasts from these chickens did not decrease resorption activity in vitro. Transfection of an estrogen receptor expression vector into osteoclasts from the estradiol-injected chickens and egg-laying hens restored estrogen responsiveness. Osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens and estradiol treated 5-week-old chickens transfected with the estrogen receptor expression vector contained significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor protein and responded to estradiol treatment by decreasing secretion of cathepsins B and L and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, osteoclasts from embryonic chickens, egg-laying hens, and estradiol-treated 5-week-old chickens either untransfected or transfected with an empty expression vector did not respond similarly. These data suggest that modulation of osteoclast estrogen responsiveness may be controlled by changes in the osteoclast estrogen receptor levels. PMID:9144340

  14. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V; Geisler, Carsten; Karlsson, Lars; Söderström, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow as well as to inflammatory sites associated with enhanced bone erosion, including the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, little is known about the impact NK cells may have on mature osteoclasts and bone erosion. We studied the interaction between human NK cells and autologous monocyte-derived osteoclasts from healthy donors in vitro. We show that osteoclasts express numerous ligands for receptors present on activated NK cells. Co-culture experiments revealed that interleukin-15-activated, but not resting, NK cells trigger osteoclast apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in drastically decreased bone erosion. Suppression of bone erosion requires contact between NK cells and osteoclasts, but soluble factors also play a minor role. Antibodies masking leucocyte function-associated antigen-1, DNAX accessory molecule-1 or tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand enhance osteoclast survival when co-cultured with activated NK cells and restore the capacity of osteoclasts to erode bone. These results suggest that interleukin-15-activated NK cells may directly affect bone erosion under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25684021

  15. Defective entry into mitosis 1 (Dim1) negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting the expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1).

    PubMed

    An, Daniel; Kim, Kyunghwan; Lu, Wange

    2014-08-29

    Bone remodeling is a continuous process of osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption to maintain normal bone mass. NFATc1 is the master regulator of osteoclastogensis and transcriptionally activated by c-Fos and NF-κB in response to receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) treatment. Defective entry into mitosis 1 (Dim1) is a nuclear protein that is implicated in pre-mRNA splicing and cell cycle progression, but the possible role of Dim1 in regulating other cellular processes remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Dim1 attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by targeting NFATc1 signaling pathway. Expression levels of Dim1 and NFATc1 are significantly increased during the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Dim1 markedly enhances the expression of NFATc1 and its target genes, leading to the increase of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Conversely, ectopic expression of Dim1 decreases RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation by silencing NFATc1 and its target genes, further linking Dim1 to the dynamic regulation of osteoclastogenesis. Consistent with this notion, ChIP and interaction studies show that Dim1 directly associates with c-Fos and prevents c-Fos from binding to the NFATc1 promoter, resulting in targeted inactivation of the NFATc1 gene. Therefore, our studies reveal an unrecognized role for Dim1 as a master modulator of osteoclast differentiation, as well as the molecular mechanism underlying its repressive action toward osteoclastogensis. PMID:25023277

  16. Biomimetic composites by surface-initiated polymerization of cyclic lactones at anorganic bone: preparation and in vitro evaluation of osteoblast and osteoclast competence.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Troy; Hiebner, Kris; Gauza, Lukasz; Schwartz, Chris; Song, Zheng; Miller, Steve; Zacharias, Nora; Wooley, Paul H; Redepenning, Jody

    2014-06-01

    Biomimetic composites were constructed using anorganic bone to initiate the polymerization of cyclic lactones. The resulting anorganic bone/polylactone composites preserve the inorganic structure and the mechanical properties of the original bone. Thermal conditions used to prepare the anorganic bone were shown to control the surface functionalities, surface area, and crystallinity, all of which influence the rates of subsequent polymerizations. Thermal pretreatment of anorganic bone was examined as a function of time and temperature, ranging from 400°C to 800°C. Polymerization rates of different monomers were also compared. Additionally, in vitro evaluations of anorganic bone/poly-L-lactide and anorganic bone/polyglycolide composites for osteoblast and osteoclast competence suggest that these composites are good candidates for potential in vivo use, since both composites promoted osteoblast differentiation. The anorganic bone/poly-L-lactide composite also promoted osteoclast differentiation. PMID:23776188

  17. RNA therapeutics targeting osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing technique developed with dramatically increasing utility for both scientific and therapeutic purposes. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently exploited to regulate protein expression relevant to many therapeutic applications, and commonly used as a tool for elucidating disease-associated genes. Osteoporosis and their associated osteoporotic fragility fractures in both men and women are rapidly becoming a global healthcare crisis as average life expectancy increases worldwide. New therapeutics are needed for this increasing patient population. This review describes the diversity of molecular targets suitable for RNAi-based gene knock-down in osteoclasts to control osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption. We identify strategies for developing targeted siRNA delivery and efficient gene silencing, and describe opportunities and challenges of introducing siRNA as a therapeutic approach to hard and connective tissue disorders. PMID:21945356

  18. The influence of hydroxyapatite particles on osteoclast cell activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, J S; Lin, F H; Hung, T Y; Tsuang, Y H; Chang, W H; Liu, H C

    1999-06-15

    Aseptic loosening after total joint arthroplasty is a major problem in orthopedic surgery. Small particles from material wear have been reported as the main cause of implant failure. For this reason, investigation into possible wear particles from the materials used in the implant may lead to longevity after arthroplasty. Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been extensively investigated and reported as an excellent biomaterial with excellent biocompatibility. In this study, we used an in vitro osteoblast/osteoclast model to test the biocompatibility of various-sized HA particles. Primary osteoclasts/osteoblasts were co-cultured with different-sized HA particles (0.5-3.0 microm, 37-53 microm, 177-205 microm, and 420-841 microm) for 3 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days. Cellular responses to the HA particles were evaluated by changes in cell counts and the secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin (PGE2), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the supernatant of the culture media. The results showed that osteoblasts/osteoclasts co-cultured with HA particles smaller than 53 microm undergo the most significant changes. Cellular counts significantly decreased, and the changes were more obvious in the osteoblast population. There also was a significant decrease in TGF-beta1 concentration and a significant increase in PGE2 and LDH concentration, but there were no changes in the TNF-alpha or ALP titer. It can be concluded that larger HA particles may be quite compatible with bone cells while smaller-sized HA particles can both activate the osteoclasts and decrease the cell population of the osteoblasts. Justification for the additional expense incurred with the use of hydroxyapatite in primary total hip arthroplasty should be further evaluated. PMID:10321703

  19. Bioactive glass foam scaffolds are remodelled by osteoclasts and support the formation of mineralized matrix and vascular networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Midha, Swati; van den Bergh, Wouter; Kim, Taek B; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Julian R; Mitchell, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    Remodelling of scaffolds and new bone formation is critical for effective bone regeneration. Herein is reported the first demonstration of resorption pits due to osteoclast activity on the surface of sol-gel bioactive glass foam scaffolds. Bioactive glass foam scaffolds are known to have osteogenic potential and suitable pore networks for bone regeneration. Degradation of the scaffolds is known to be initially solution mediated, but for effective bone regeneration, remodelling of the scaffold by osteoclasts and vascularisation of the scaffold is necessary. The culture of C7 macrophages on a bioactive glass scaffold induces the cells to differentiate into (TRAP(+ve) ) osteoclasts. They then form distinctive resorption pits within 3 weeks, while MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts deposit mineralized osteoid on their surfaces in co-culture. The scaffolds are of the 70S30C (70 mol% SiO2 , 30 mol% CaO) composition, with modal pore and interconnect diameters of 373 μm and 172 μm respectively (quantified by X-ray micro-tomography and 3D image analysis). The release of soluble silica and calcium ions from 70S30C scaffolds induces an increase in osteoblast numbers as determined via the MTT assay. Scaffolds also support growth of endothelial cells on their surface and tube formation (characteristic of functional microvasculature) following 4 days in culture. This data supports the hypothesis that 70S30C bioactive glass scaffolds promote the differentiation of the 3 main cell types involved in vascularized bone regeneration. PMID:23184651

  20. siRNA Knock-Down of RANK Signaling to Control Osteoclast-Mediated Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the ability of small interfering (si)RNA targeting the cell receptor, RANK, to control osteoclast function in cultures of both primary and secondary osteoclasts and their precursor cells. Methods siRNA targeting RANK was transfected into both RAW264.7 and primary bone marrow cell cultures. RANK knock-down by siRNA and functional inhibition were assessed in both mature osteoclast and their precursor cell cultures. RANK mRNA message and protein expression after the transfections were analyzed by PCR and Western blot, respectively. Off-target effects were assessed. The inhibition of osteoclast formation was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay, and subsequent bone resorption was determined by resorption pit assay. Results Both osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors can be targeted by siRNA in serum-containing media. Delivery of siRNA targeting RANK to both RAW 264.7 and primary bone marrow cell cultures produces short term repression of RANK expression without off-targeting effects, and significantly inhibits both osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Moreover, data support successful RANK knock-down by siRNA specifically in mature osteoclast cultures. Conclusions RANK is demonstrated to be an attractive target for siRNA control of osteoclast activity, with utility for development of new therapeutics for low bone mass pathologies or osteoporosis. PMID:20333451

  1. Role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in regulation of osteoclastic activity.

    PubMed

    Sheng, M H-C; Lau, K-H W

    2009-06-01

    Osteoclasts, the primary cell type mediating bone resorption, are multinucleated, giant cells derived from hematopoietic cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. Osteoclast activity is, in a large part, regulated by protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. While information about functional roles of several protein-tyrosine kinases (PTK), including c-Src, in osteoclastic resorption has been accumulated, little is known about the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in regulation of osteoclast activity. Recent evidence implicates important regulatory roles for four PTPs (SHP-1, cyt-PTP-epsilon, PTP-PEST, and PTPoc) in osteoclasts. Cyt-PTP-epsilon, PTP-PEST, and PTP-oc are positive regulators of osteoclast activity, while SHP-1 is a negative regulator. Of these PTPs in osteoclasts, only PTP-oc is a positive regulator of c-Src PTK through dephosphorylation of the inhibitory phosphotyrosine-527 residue. Although some information about mechanisms of action of these PTPs to regulate osteoclast activity is reviewed in this article, much additional work is required to provide more comprehensive details about their functions in osteoclasts. PMID:19189046

  2. Time course of "escape" from calcitonin-induced inhibition of motility and resorption of disaggregated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, J

    1989-01-01

    The reversible calcitonin (CT)-induced inhibition of osteoclastic activity has been studied to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the so-called "escape phenomenon." Osteoclasts disaggregated from neonatal rabbits were cultured on glass coverslips or thin bovine bone slices. Resorption activity was evaluated by using time-lapse recording and scanning electron microscopy. Addition of CT to the cultures caused most osteoclasts on glass surfaces to be immotile and contracted. From 1.5 h onward, in cultures with CT, osteoclasts started to escape from CT-induced quiescence independently of other cells. CT also prevented osteoclasts on bone slices from excavating bone while concomitant cell immobility occurred. Inhibited osteoclasts were able to regain apparent bone-resorbing potency only after resumption of cytoplasmic immobility. The resumption of bone resorption could begin as early as 9.7 h after CT addition. The observations indicate that CT-induced inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption is associated with inhibition of cytoplasmic motility and that the "escape" phenomenon reflects resumption of activity of osteoclasts that were previously inhibited by CT action rather than the resportive activity of newly formed osteoclasts. PMID:2765310

  3. ABCC5 supports osteoclast formation and promotes breast cancer metastasis to bone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis, and complications associated with bone metastases can lead to a significantly decreased patient quality of life. Thus, it is essential to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the emergence and growth of breast cancer skeletal metastases. Methods To search for novel molecular mediators that influence breast cancer bone metastasis, we generated gene-expression profiles from laser-capture microdissected trephine biopsies of both breast cancer bone metastases and independent primary breast tumors that metastasized to bone. Bioinformatics analysis identified genes that are differentially expressed in breast cancer bone metastases compared with primary, bone-metastatic breast tumors. Results ABCC5, an ATP-dependent transporter, was found to be overexpressed in breast cancer osseous metastases relative to primary breast tumors. In addition, ABCC5 was significantly upregulated in human and mouse breast cancer cell lines with high bone-metastatic potential. Stable knockdown of ABCC5 substantially reduced bone metastatic burden and osteolytic bone destruction in mice. The decrease in osteolysis was further associated with diminished osteoclast numbers in vivo. Finally, conditioned media from breast cancer cells with reduced ABCC5 expression failed to induce in vitro osteoclastogenesis to the same extent as conditioned media from breast cancer cells expressing ABCC5. Conclusions Our data suggest that ABCC5 functions as a mediator of breast cancer skeletal metastasis. ABCC5 expression in breast cancer cells is important for efficient osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Hence, ABCC5 may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer bone metastasis. PMID:23174366

  4. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C.; van Tol, Maarten J.; Lankester, Arjan C.; Borst, Jannie

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)αhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship. PMID:26004632

  5. Resolvin E1 regulates osteoclast fusion via DC-STAMP and NFATc1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Gyurko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between the immune and skeletal systems in inflammatory bone diseases are well appreciated, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate the resolution phase of inflammation and bone turnover have not been unveiled. Here we investigated the direct actions of the proresolution mediator resolvin E1 (RvE1) on bone-marrow-cell-derived osteoclasts in an in vitro murine model of osteoclast maturation and inflammatory bone resorption. Investigation of the actions of RvE1 treatment on the specific stages of osteoclast maturation revealed that RvE1 targeted late stages of osteoclast maturation to decrease osteoclast formation by 32.8%. Time-lapse vital microscopy and migration assays confirmed that membrane fusion of osteoclast precursors was inhibited. The osteoclast fusion protein DC-STAMP was specifically targeted by RvE1 receptor binding and was down-regulated by 65.4%. RvE1 did not affect the induction of the essential osteoclast transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) or its nuclear translocation; however, NFATc1 binding to the DC-STAMP promoter was significantly inhibited by 60.9% with RvE1 treatment as shown in electrophoresis mobility shift assay. Our findings suggest that proresolution mediators act directly on osteoclasts, in addition to down-regulation of inflammation, providing a novel mechanism for modulating osteoclast signaling in osteolytic inflammatory disease.—Zhu, M., Van Dyke, T. E., Gyurko, R. Resolvin E1 regulates osteoclast fusion via DC-STAMP and NFATc1. PMID:23629863

  6. Versatile Roles of V-ATPases Accessory Subunit Ac45 in Osteoclast Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Jiake; Dai, Ke R.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are macromolecular proton pumps that acidify intracellular cargos and deliver protons across the plasma membrane of a variety of specialized cells, including bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Extracellular acidification is crucial for osteoclastic bone resorption, a process that initiates the dissolution of mineralized bone matrix. While the importance of V-ATPases in osteoclastic resorptive function is well-defined, whether V-ATPases facilitate additional aspects of osteoclast function and/or formation remains largely obscure. Here we report that the V-ATPase accessory subunit Ac45 participates in both osteoclast formation and function. Using a siRNA-based approach, we show that targeted suppression of Ac45 impairs intracellular acidification and endocytosis, both are prerequisite for osteoclastic bone resorptive function in vitro. Interestingly, we find that knockdown of Ac45 also attenuates osteoclastogenesis owing to a reduced fusion capacity of osteoclastic precursor cells. Finally, in an effort to gain more detailed insights into the functional role of Ac45 in osteoclasts, we attempted to generate osteoclast-specific Ac45 conditional knockout mice using a Cathepsin K-Cre-LoxP system. Surprisingly, however, insertion of the neomycin cassette in the Ac45-FloxNeo mice resulted in marked disturbances in CNS development and ensuing embryonic lethality thus precluding functional assessment of Ac45 in osteoclasts and peripheral bone tissues. Based on these unexpected findings we propose that, in addition to its canonical function in V-ATPase-mediated acidification, Ac45 plays versatile roles during osteoclast formation and function. PMID:22087256

  7. Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Resorption in vitro and in vivo by a prenylflavonoid xanthohumol from hops

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zeng, Li; Xie, Juan; Yue, Zhiying; Deng, Huayun; Ma, Xueyun; Zheng, Chunbing; Wu, Xiushan; Luo, Jian; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Excessive RANKL signaling leads to superfluous osteoclast formation and bone resorption, is widespread in the pathologic bone loss and destruction. Therefore, targeting RANKL or its signaling pathway has been a promising and successful strategy for this osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we examined the effects of xanthohumol (XN), an abundant prenylflavonoid from hops plant, on osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast resorption, and RANKL-induced signaling pathway using both in vitro and in vivo assay systems. In mouse and human, XN inhibited osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast formation at the early stage. Furthermore, XN inhibited osteoclast actin-ring formation and bone resorption in a dose-dependent manner. In ovariectomized-induced bone loss mouse model and RANKL-injection-induced bone resorption model, we found that administration of XN markedly inhibited bone loss and resorption by suppressing osteoclast activity. At the molecular level, XN disrupted the association of RANK and TRAF6, resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB and Ca2+/NFATc1 signaling pathway during osteoclastogenesis. As a results, XN suppressed the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including CtsK, Nfatc1, Trap, Ctr. Therefore, our data demonstrated that XN inhibits osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption through RANK/TRAF6 signaling pathways. XN could be a promising drug candidate in the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26620037

  8. Long-term loss of osteoclasts and unopposed cortical mineral apposition following limited field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Franken, Veerle; Kuchera, Timothy; Strauss, Judy; Damron, Timothy A

    2015-03-01

    Late-onset fragility fractures are a common complication following radiotherapy for metastatic disease and soft tissue sarcomas. Using a murine hindlimb focal irradiation model (RTx), we quantified time-dependent changes in osteoclasts and mineral apposition rate (MAR). Mice received either a single, unilateral 5 Gy exposure or four fractionated doses (4 × 5 Gy). Osteoclast numbers and MAR were evaluated histologically at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 26 weeks post-RTx. Radiation induced an early, transient increase in osteoclasts followed by long-term depletion. Increased osteoclast numbers correlated temporally with trabecular resorption; the resorbed trabeculae were not later restored. Radiotherapy did not attenuate MAR at any time point. A transient, early increase in MAR was noted in both RTx groups, however, the 4 × 5 Gy group exhibited an unexpected spike in MAR eight weeks. Persistent depletion of osteoclasts permitted anabolic activity to continue unopposed, resulting in cortical thickening. These biological responses likely contribute to post-radiotherapy bone fragility via microdamage accumulation and matrix embrittlement in the absence of osteoclastic remodeling, and trabecular resorption-induced decrease in bone strength. The temporal distribution of osteoclast numbers suggests that anti-resorptive therapies may be of clinical benefit only if started prior to radiotherapy and continued through the following period of increased osteoclastic remodeling. PMID:25408493

  9. Long-Term Loss of Osteoclasts and Unopposed Cortical Mineral Apposition Following Limited Field Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oest, Megan E.; Franken, Veerle; Kuchera, Timothy; Strauss, Judy; Damron, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset fragility fractures are a common complication following radiotherapy for metastatic disease and soft tissue sarcomas. Using a murine hindlimb focal irradiation model (RTx), we quantified time-dependent changes in osteoclasts and mineral apposition rate (MAR). Mice received either a single, unilateral 5 Gy exposure or four fractionated doses (4x5 Gy). Osteoclast numbers and MAR were evaluated histologically at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 26 weeks post-RTx. Radiation induced an early, transient increase in osteoclasts followed by long-term depletion. Increased osteoclast numbers correlated temporally with trabecular resorption; the resorbed trabeculae were not later restored. Radiotherapy did not attenuate MAR at any time point. A transient, early increase in MAR was noted in both RTx groups, however, the 4x5 Gy group exhibited an unexpected spike in MAR eight weeks. Persistent depletion of osteoclasts permitted anabolic activity to continue unopposed, resulting in cortical thickening. These biological responses likely contribute to post-radiotherapy bone fragility via microdamage accumulation and matrix embrittlement in the absence of osteoclastic remodeling, and trabecular resorption-induced decrease in bone strength. The temporal distribution of osteoclast numbers suggests that anti-resorptive therapies may be of clinical benefit only if started prior to radiotherapy and continued through the following period of increased osteoclastic remodeling. PMID:25408493

  10. [Effect of osthol on apoptosis and bone resorption of osteoclasts cultured in vitro].

    PubMed

    Ming, Lei-Guo; Wang, Ming-Gang; Chen, Ke-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Han, Gui-Qiu; Zhu, Rui-Qing

    2012-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of osthol on osteoclasts' activity, bone resorption as well as apoptosis in vitro, and explore the mechanism of osthol in preventing osteoporosis. Osteoclasts were separated from long-limb bones of new born rabbits, cultured in 24-well plate with glass slices and bone slices, and treated by 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. Osteoclasts were identified by observing live cells with phase contrast microscope, HE staining, TRAP staining and toluidine blue staining of bone resorption pits. The numbers of bone resorption pits were counted as well as the surface area of bone resorption on bone slice. Osteoclasts were stained with acridine orange to detect the cell apoptosis. The ratio of apoptotic osteoclasts was observed under fluorescence microscope. The gene expression of RANKL, OPG, TRAP and p-JNK1/2 protein expression were examined using real time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Comparing with the control group without osthol, the rates of apoptotic osteoclasts increased obviously and the number and area of bone resorption pits decreased evidently with 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. There is significant difference between control group and experiment group treated by 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) osthol. Therefore, the osthol through RANK+RANKL/TRAF6/Mkk/JNK signal pathway inhibits the osteoclasts activity, enhances osteoclasts apoptotic and inhibits the bone resorption. PMID:22512027

  11. Dynamin Forms a Src Kinase–sensitive Complex with Cbl and Regulates Podosomes and Osteoclast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C.; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption. PMID:15872089

  12. Dynamin forms a Src kinase-sensitive complex with Cbl and regulates podosomes and osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-07-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption. PMID:15872089

  13. Differences in osteoclast formation between proximal and distal tibial osteoporosis in rats with adjuvant arthritis: inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Shu, Goukei; Yamamoto, Kaname; Nagashima, Masakazu

    2006-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis commonly suffer both systemic and periarticular osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are inhibitors of bone resorption, and several derivatives have been developed for treatment of enhanced bone resorption. We aimed to characterize osteoclast formation in two different sites, the proximal tibial and distal tibial areas, in rats with adjuvant arthritis, and to investigate the impact of amino or non-amino types of bisphosphonate. Adjuvant arthritis was initiated in rats while administering daily injections of either etidronate, a non-amino BP, or alendronate, an amino BP, for 3 weeks. On the day following the last injection, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in the proximal tibia to assess systemic osteoporosis and in the distal tibia for periarticular osteoporosis using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subsequently, bone marrow cells from either end of the tibia were collected and incubated for 7 days before staining and counting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells. In the rats with adjuvant arthritis, BMD of either end of the tibia was lower than in normal rats. Although etidronate prevented bone mineral loss at both ends, distal loss was significantly less than proximal. In contrast, alendronate significantly inhibited mineral loss primarily in the proximal area. Large osteoclasts, defined as having five or more nuclei, formed preferentially in the proximal tibia, while small osteoclasts with fewer than four nuclei were found mainly distally. The suppressive effect of alendronate was greater on the large osteoclasts, while etidronate had a greater effect on the small osteoclasts. These results show that the size and multinuclearity of osteoclasts and the number of osteoclasts formed are different in the distal and proximal areas of the tibia, and that alendronate and etidronate may suppress different types of osteoclasts as discriminated by the number of nuclei. PMID:17164994

  14. Enhanced osteoblast and osteoclast responses to a thin film sputtered hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Hao, J; Kuroda, S; Ohya, K; Bartakova, S; Aoki, H; Kasugai, S

    2011-06-01

    A sputtering technique followed by a low temperature hydrothermal treatment has been demonstrated to produce a dense-and-bioactive hydroxyapatite thin film coating. The purpose of the present study was to investigate osteoblast and osteoclast responses to the hydroxyapatite coated plates and titanium plates with similar roughness. Rat bone marrow stromal cells were cultured on these plates to induce osteoblasts. The cells showed a significantly enhanced proliferation on the hydroxyapatite surface, accompanied by increase of osteoblastic phenotypes. The co-cultured osteoclasts exhibited the significantly different cell number and morphology between the hydroxyapatite and the titanium surfaces. A series of osteoclast marker genes were more stimulated on the hydroxyapatite and thirty two percent of the hydroxyapatite surface area could be resorbed by osteoclasts. The thin film sputtered hydroxyapatite could provide a favorable surface for both osteoblast and osteoclast formation and their function, indicating its good osteoconductivity and biodegradability. PMID:21567286

  15. Looking for Calcium Phosphate Composite Suitable to Study Osteoclast Endocytosis: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nicolin, V; Baldini, G; De Iaco, D; Bortul, R; Turco, G; Nori, SL

    2016-01-01

    One of the issues regarding in vitro study of bone resorption is the synthesis of a bone-like biomaterial forming a thin layer onto either glass or plastic. The synthesis of a bone-like material suitable for in vitro studies can be valuable both to investigate osteoclast differentiation, that in vivo proceeds within the local microenvironment of bone and to understand how its presence triggers activation of macrophages present in situ when bone is damaged (a scenario that can occur for example in case of bone fracture). Despite the intensive studies committed to recreate synthetic bone analogues, the most used substrates for in vitro studies on bone resorption are slices of bone or dentine. Therefore morphological investigations (i.e. fluorescence analysis and phase contrast) are strongly compromised due to the thickness of the bone analogue. In the present study, with the aim to guarantee a versatile (and easy to be made) substrate, that could be suitable to study cell adhesion and morphology by epifluorescence, phase contrast and TEM, we developed a biomaterial containing a calcium phosphate salt and type I collagen. This material (made specifically for in vitro studies) forms a very thin layer that allowed to merge the morphological information derived from phase-contrast and epifluorescence observation, making possible the observation of the interface between cell and matrix. Moreover the electron microscopy evaluation of the endocytosis performed on cell differentiated could be more suitable because sample does not need the process of demineralization. PMID:27326391

  16. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27034236

  17. [Regulation of osteoclastogenesis by osteocytes through growth differentiation factor-15].

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone. However, little attention has been paid to their role in bone remodeling. In this study, osteoclast differentiation was significantly enhanced by conditioned media derived from cultures of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells that were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Using microarray analysis, we identified growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF15) as a pivotal factor secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia. Indeed, treatment with recombinant GDF15 markedly increased osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Further to investigate the importance of GDF15 in vivo, we used a hypoxic murine model that involved ligation of the right femoral artery. The volume of cancellous bone in the proximal tibia of the ligated limb was significantly reduced, together with a significant increase in osteoclast-related parameters. Addition of anti-GDF15 antibody prevented bone loss and osteoclastic activation in the tibiae of mice that had undergone femoral artery ligation. These results suggest that GDF15, which is secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia during bone remodeling, may be a positive regulator of osteoclastic differentiation. The in vivo usefulness of the anti-GDF15 antibody might provide insights for the development of novel therapeutics for bone disorders related to hypoxia or ischemic insults. PMID:25452236

  18. Osteoclasts Control Osteoblast Chemotaxis via PDGF-BB/PDGF Receptor Beta Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Fernandez, Maria Arantzazu; Gallois, Anne; Riedl, Thilo; Jurdic, Pierre; Hoflack, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Bone remodeling relies on the tightly regulated interplay between bone forming osteoblasts and bone digesting osteoclasts. Several studies have now described the molecular mechanisms by which osteoblasts control osteoclastogenesis and bone degradation. It is currently unclear whether osteoclasts can influence bone rebuilding. Methodology/Principal Findings Using in vitro cell systems, we show here that mature osteoclasts, but not their precursors, secrete chemotactic factors recognized by both mature osteoblasts and their precursors. Several growth factors whose expression is upregulated during osteoclastogenesis were identified by DNA microarrays as candidates mediating osteoblast chemotaxis. Our subsequent functional analyses demonstrate that mature osteoclasts, whose platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-bb) expression is reduced by siRNAs, exhibit a reduced capability of attracting osteoblasts. Conversely, osteoblasts whose platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) expression is reduced by siRNAs exhibit a lower capability of responding to chemotactic factors secreted by osteoclasts. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that, in vitro mature osteoclasts control osteoblast chemotaxis via PDGF-bb/PDGFR-β signaling. This may provide one key mechanism by which osteoclasts control bone formation in vivo. PMID:18953417

  19. Reproducible quantification of osteoclastic activity: characterization of a biomimetic calcium phosphate assay.

    PubMed

    Maria, Salwa M; Prukner, Christiane; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Mueller, Frank; Barralet, Jake E; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, periodontitis, and osteoporosis. Animal tusk slice assays are standard for evaluating the effect of therapeutics on these cells. However, in addition to batch-to-batch variability inherent to animal tusks, their use is clearly not sustainable. Our objective was to develop and characterize a biomimetic calcium phosphate assay based on the use of phase pure hydroxyapatite coated as a thin film on the surface of culture plates, to facilitate the reproducible quantification of osteoclast resorptive activity. Osteoclasts were formed from RAW 264.7 mouse monocyte cell line using a pro-resorptive cytokine RANKL (50 ng/mL). No change in substrate appearance was noted after culture with media without cells, or undifferentiated monocytes. Only in the presence of osteoclasts localized areas of calcium phosphate dissolution were observed. The total area resorbed positively correlated with the osteoclast numbers (R(2) = 0.99). The resorbed area was significantly increased by the addition of RANKL, and decreased after application of known inhibitors of osteoclast resorptive activity, calcitonin (10 μM), or alendronate (100 μM). Thus, calcium phosphate coated substrates allow reliable monitoring of osteoclast resorptive activity and offer an alternative to animal tusk slice assays. PMID:24259122

  20. Potentiation of osteoclast bone-resorption activity by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, T P; Collin-Osdoby, P; Patel, N; Osdoby, P; Krukowski, M; Misko, T P; Settle, S L; Currie, M G; Nickols, G A

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the effects of modulating nitric oxide (NO) levels on osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in vitro and the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on bone mineral density in vivo. Diaphorase-based histochemical staining for NOS activity of bone sections or highly enriched osteoclast cultures suggested that osteoclasts exhibit substantial NOS activity that may account for basal NO production. Chicken osteoclasts were cultured for 36 hr on bovine bone slices in the presence or absence of the NO-generating agent sodium nitroprusside or the NOS inhibitors N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and aminoguanidine. Nitroprusside markedly decreased the number of bone pits and the average pit area in comparison with control cultures. On the other hand, NOS inhibition by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or aminoguanidine dramatically increased the number of bone pits and the average resorption area per pit. In a model of osteoporosis, aminoguanidine potentiated the loss of bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats. Aminoguanidine also caused a loss of bone mineral density in the sham-operated rats. Inhibition of NOS activity in vitro and in vivo resulted in an apparent potentiation of osteoclast activity. These findings suggest that endogenous NO production in osteoclast cultures may regulate resorption activity. The modulation of NOS and NO levels by cells within the bone microenvironment may be a sensitive mechanism for local control of osteoclast bone resorption. Images PMID:7513424

  1. Osteoclast recruitment in mice is stimulated by (3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene)-1,1-bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Marshall, M J; Holt, I; Davie, M W

    1993-01-01

    Though some evidence suggests that bisphosphonates (BPs) act directly on osteoclasts to inhibit bone resorption, other evidence suggests that they inhibit the development of the osteoclast. We found an increase in osteoclast recruitment in 2-day-old mice given (3-amino-1-hydroxypropylidene)-1,1-bisphosphonate (APD). A threefold increase in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled osteoclast nuclei was observed on mouse parietal bones 3 days after APD injection. This suggests that inhibition of osteoclast development is not an action of APD in mice of this age. The mechanism of the increased recruitment was investigated. As osteoclast progenitors were not detected on parietal bones in vitro, we looked for an increase in circulating monocytes to account for the recruitment. No such increase was found, but when 51Cr-labeled bone marrow was injected intraperitoneally into mice given APD there was an increase in accumulation of 51Cr in calvaria and in femur and tibia over controls. This increase did not occur when 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes or free 51Cr was injected. We conclude that APD causes increased recruitment of osteoclast precursors by increasing the avidity of bone for hematopoietically derived cells. PMID:8453501

  2. Co-detection of PTH/PTHrP receptor and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Gay, Carol V; Zheng, Betty; Gilman, Virginia R

    2003-08-01

    Serial sections of rat metaphyses were prepared from paraffin embedded tissue blocks and analyzed in sets of three. The central section was stained for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in order to identify osteoclasts, one adjacent section was immunostained with an affinity purified antibody to a 15 amino acid sequence unique to rat PTH/PTHrP receptor, and the other adjacent section in the set served as an immunostaining control. This allowed each of the 110 osteoclasts examined to be identified by TRAP and to be tested for the presence or absence of PTH/PTHrP receptor. All antibody solutions and rinses contained 1% donkey serum and 0.5% Tween 20 to ensure antibody integrity and good rinsing procedure. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate fluorescence intensity of the immunostained osteoclasts. Pixel intensities of 58 osteoclasts from young (4 month) rats and 52 osteoclasts from old (15 month) rats were obtained. Pixel intensities were similar (P = 0.89) for both young and old animals. However, the number of PTH/PTHrP receptor deficient osteoclasts was greater for the older animals (14.29% vs. 7.24%). This provides direct evidence of PTH/PTHrP receptors in osteoclasts. PMID:12874824

  3. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  4. The Crosstalk between Osteoclasts and Osteoblasts Is Dependent upon the Composition and Structure of Biphasic Calcium Phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Shiwaku, Yukari; Neff, Lynn; Nagano, Kenichi; Takeyama, Ken-Ichi; de Bruijn, Joost; Dard, Michel; Gori, Francesca; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs), consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), exhibit good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, maintaining a balance between resorption of the biomaterial and formation of new bone. We tested whether the chemical composition and/or the microstructure of BCPs affect osteoclasts (OCs) differentiation and/or their ability to crosstalk with osteoblasts (OBs). To this aim, OCs were cultured on BCPs with HA content of 5, 20 or 60% and their differentiation and activity were assessed. We found that OC differentiation is partially impaired by increased HA content, but not by the presence of micropores within BCP scaffolds, as indicated by TRAP staining and gene profile expression. We then investigated whether the biomaterial-induced changes in OC differentiation also affect their ability to crosstalk with OBs and regulate OB function. We found that BCPs with low percentage of HA favored the expression of positive coupling factors, including sphingosine-kinase 1 (SPHK1) and collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (Cthrc1). In turn, the increase of these secreted coupling factors promotes OB differentiation and function. All together our studies suggest that the chemical composition of biomaterials affects not only the differentiation and activity of OCs but also their potential to locally regulate bone formation. PMID:26193362

  5. Implications of osteoblast-osteoclast interactions in the management of osteoporosis by antiresorptive agents denosumab and odanacatib.

    PubMed

    Sims, Natalie A; Ng, Kong Wah

    2014-03-01

    Antiresorptive agents, used in the treatment of osteoporosis, inhibit either osteoclast formation or function. However, with these approaches, osteoblast activity is also reduced because of the loss of osteoclast-derived coupling factors that serve to stimulate bone formation. This review discusses how osteoclast inhibition influences osteoblast function, comparing the actions of an inhibitor of osteoclast formation [anti-RANKL/Denosumab (DMAB)] with that of a specific inhibitor of osteoclastic cathepsin K activity [Odanacatib (ODN)]. Denosumab rapidly and profoundly, but reversibly, reduces bone formation. In contrast, preclinical studies and clinical trials of ODN showed that bone formation at some skeletal sites was preserved although resorption was reduced. This preservation of bone formation appears to be due to effects of coupling factors, secreted by osteoclasts and released from demineralized bone matrix. This indicates that bone resorptive activities of osteoclasts are separable from their coupling activities. PMID:24477416

  6. Cell-cell contact between marrow stromal cells and myeloma cells via VCAM-1 and alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin enhances production of osteoclast-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Michigami, T; Shimizu, N; Williams, P J; Niewolna, M; Dallas, S L; Mundy, G R; Yoneda, T

    2000-09-01

    Myeloma is a unique hematologic malignancy that exclusively homes in the bone marrow and induces massive osteoclastic bone destruction presumably by producing cytokines that promote the differentiation of the hematopoietic progenitors to osteoclasts (osteoclastogenesis). It is recognized that neighboring bone marrow stromal cells influence the expression of the malignant phenotype in myeloma cells. This study examined the role of the interactions between myeloma cells and neighboring stromal cells in the production of osteoclastogenic factors to elucidate the mechanism underlying extensive osteoclastic bone destruction. A murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which causes severe osteolysis, expresses alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin and tightly adheres to the mouse marrow stromal cell line ST2, which expresses the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a ligand for alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with primary bone marrow cells generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with ST2 showed increased production of bone-resorbing activity and neutralizing antibodies against VCAM-1 or alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin inhibited this. The 5TGM1 cells contacting recombinant VCAM-1 produced increased osteoclastogenic and bone-resorbing activity. The activity was not blocked by the neutralizing antibody to known osteoclastogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor, or parathyroid hormone-related peptide. These data suggest that myeloma cells are responsible for producing osteoclastogenic activity and that establishment of direct contact with marrow stromal cells via alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin/VCAM-1 increases the production of this activity by myeloma cells. They also suggest that the presence of stromal cells may provide a microenvironment that allows exclusive colonization of myeloma cells in the bone marrow. (Blood. 2000;96:1953-1960) PMID:10961900

  7. Live imaging of osteoclast inhibition by bisphosphonates in a medaka osteoporosis model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tingsheng; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Huysseune, Ann; Buettner, Anita; To, Thuy Thanh; Winkler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells derived from the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Excess osteoclast activity leads to reduced bone mineral density, a hallmark of diseases such as osteoporosis. Processes that regulate osteoclast activity are therefore targeted in current osteoporosis therapies. To identify and characterize drugs for treatment of bone diseases, suitable in vivo models are needed to complement cell-culture assays. We have previously reported transgenic medaka lines expressing the osteoclast-inducing factor receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (Rankl) under control of a heat shock-inducible promoter. Forced Rankl expression resulted in ectopic osteoclast formation, as visualized by live imaging in fluorescent reporter lines. This led to increased bone resorption and a dramatic reduction of mineralized matrix similar to the situation in humans with osteoporosis. In an attempt to establish the medaka as an in vivo model for osteoporosis drug screening, we treated Rankl-expressing larvae with etidronate and alendronate, two bisphosphonates commonly used in human osteoporosis therapy. Using live imaging, we observed an efficient, dose-dependent inhibition of osteoclast activity, which resulted in the maintenance of bone integrity despite an excess of osteoclast formation. Strikingly, we also found that bone recovery was efficiently promoted after inhibition of osteoclast activity and that osteoblast distribution was altered, suggesting effects on osteoblast-osteoclast coupling. Our data show that transgenic medaka lines are suitable in vivo models for the characterization of antiresorptive or bone-anabolic compounds by live imaging and for screening of novel osteoporosis drugs. PMID:26704995

  8. Effects of Isoform-selective Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Inhibitors on Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shugg, Ryan P. P.; Thomson, Ashley; Tanabe, Natsuko; Kashishian, Adam; Steiner, Bart H.; Puri, Kamal D.; Pereverzev, Alexey; Lannutti, Brian J.; Jirik, Frank R.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Sims, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) participate in numerous signaling pathways, and control distinct biological functions. Studies using pan-PI3K inhibitors suggest roles for PI3K in osteoclasts, but little is known about specific PI3K isoforms in these cells. Our objective was to determine effects of isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors on osteoclasts. The following inhibitors were investigated (targets in parentheses): wortmannin and LY294002 (pan-p110), PIK75 (α), GDC0941 (α, δ), TGX221 (β), AS252424 (γ), and IC87114 (δ). In addition, we characterized a new potent and selective PI3Kδ inhibitor, GS-9820, and explored roles of PI3K isoforms in regulating osteoclast function. Osteoclasts were isolated from long bones of neonatal rats and rabbits. Wortmannin, LY294002, GDC0941, IC87114, and GS-9820 induced a dramatic retraction of osteoclasts within 15–20 min to 65–75% of the initial area. In contrast, there was no significant retraction in response to vehicle, PIK75, TGX221, or AS252424. Moreover, wortmannin and GS-9820, but not PIK75 or TGX221, disrupted actin belts. We examined effects of PI3K inhibitors on osteoclast survival. Whereas PIK75, TGX221, and GS-9820 had no significant effect on basal survival, all blocked RANKL-stimulated survival. When studied on resorbable substrates, osteoclastic resorption was suppressed by wortmannin and inhibitors of PI3Kβ and PI3Kδ, but not other isoforms. These data are consistent with a critical role for PI3Kδ in regulating osteoclast cytoskeleton and resorptive activity. In contrast, multiple PI3K isoforms contribute to the control of osteoclast survival. Thus, the PI3Kδ isoform, which is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, is an attractive target for anti-resorptive therapeutics. PMID:24133210

  9. Changes in the numbers of osteoclasts in newts under conditions of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovska, O. P.; Rodionova, N. V.; Grigoryan, E. N.; Mitashov, V. I.

    Intensity of osteoclastic resorption and calcium content were investigated in intact limb bones of the newts flown on board of a biosatellite Cosmos-2229 after amputation of their forelimbs and tail. Using X-ray microanalysis it was shown an increase in calcium content in the bones on 20^th day after operation. Histological study revealed an activation of osteoclastic resorption on endosteal surface of long bones. The newts exposed after surgery on a biosatellite had the same level of bone mineralisation as operated ground control ones, but the increase in number of polynuclear osteoclasts was lower.

  10. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  11. Transforming growth factor-{beta} enables NFATc1 expression during osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, S.W. Evans, K.E.; Lovibond, A.C.

    2008-02-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is dependent on distinct stimuli that prime and activate osteoclast differentiation. One cytokine needed to prime monocytes for osteoclastogenesis is TGF-{beta}, which enables and augments RANKL and TNF-{alpha}-induced osteoclast differentiation. However, the precise time-period during which this occurs and the molecular mechanism mediating this action are unknown. We report here TGF-{beta} prime monocytes for osteoclast formation within 24 h by regulating expression of NFATc1, a key osteoclastic transcription factor. TGF-{beta} directly induces cytoplasmic NFATc1 expression within 24 h, but is unable to stimulate NFATc1 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression is dependent on the presence of TGF-{beta} during the early stages of osteoclastogenesis. Similarly, TNF-{alpha} activates osteoclastogenesis by stimulating translocation of TGF-{beta}-induced NFATc1. In light of these findings, it is apparent that osteoclast formation is dependent on coordinated interactions between TGF-{beta} and RANKL/TNF-{alpha} that regulate the expression and intracellular distribution of NFATc1 during early stages of osteoclast differentiation.

  12. Signaling Networks that Control the Lineage Commitment and Differentiation of Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Soltanoff, Carrie S.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Shuying; Li, Yi-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are the two major bone cells involved in the bone remodeling process. Osteoblasts are responsible for bone formation while osteoclasts are the bone-resorbing cells. The major event that triggers osteogenesis and bone remodeling is the transition of mesenchymal stem cells into differentiating osteoblast cells and monocyte/macrophage precursors into differentiating osteoclasts. Imbalance in differentiation and function of these two cell types will result in skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteopetrosis, periodontal disease, and bone cancer metastases. Osteoblast and osteoclast commitment and differentiation are controlled by complex activities involving signal transduction and transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Recent advances in molecular and genetic studies using gene targeting in mice enable a better understanding of the multiple factors and signaling networks that control the differentiation process at a molecular level. This review summarizes recent advances in studies of signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast cell lineage commitment and differentiation. Understanding the signaling networks that control the commitment and differentiation of bone cells will not only expand our basic understanding of the molecular mechanisms of skeletal development but will also aid our ability to develop therapeutic means of intervention in skeletal diseases. PMID:19191755

  13. Estrogen-deficient osteoporosis enhances the recruitment and activity of osteoclasts by breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Salamanna, Francesca; Pagani, Stefania; Maglio, Melania; Borsari, Veronica; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Martelli, Alberto M; Buontempo, Francesca; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the burden of bone metastases, the pathophysiology of the metastatic niche should be elucidated and targeted. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of tumor cells on osteoclast (OC) recruitment and activity in the presence of altered bone remodelling. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from healthy and ovariectomized (OVX) rats and co-cultured with MRMT-1 rat breast carcinoma cells or with their conditioned medium for 1 and 2 weeks. Alamar Blue viability test, synthesis of cathepsin K, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), metalloproteinase (MMP)-7, MMP-9, FITC-conjugate phalloidin staining and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were evaluated. The results indicate that breast carcinoma cells induced different responses in PBMC derived from rats affected by estrogen deficiency osteoporosis (OP) in comparison with healthy ones, with a significant increase in proliferation rate, OC differentiation, synthesis of TNF-α, MMP-7 and MMP-9. The data support the "proof of concept" that OP due to estrogen deficiency might offer a receptive site for cancer cells to form bone metastases. PMID:26254457

  14. The Function of Naringin in Inducing Secretion of Osteoprotegerin and Inhibiting Formation of Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tong; Wang, Lu; Tao, You; Ji, Yan; Deng, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the world. It is a metabolic disease characterized by reduction in bone mass due to an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoporosis causes fractures, prolongs bone healing, and impedes osseointegration of dental implants. Its pathological features include osteopenia, degradation of bone tissue microstructure, and increase of bone fragility. In traditional Chinese medicine, the herb Rhizoma Drynariae has been commonly used to treat osteoporosis and bone nonunion. However, the precise underlying mechanism is as yet unclear. Osteoprotegerin is a cytokine receptor shown to play an important role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Hence, activators and ligands of osteoprotegerin are promising drug targets and have been the focus of studies on the development of therapeutics against osteoporosis. In the current study, we found that naringin could synergistically enhance the action of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in promoting the secretion of osteoprotegerin by osteoblasts in vitro. In addition, naringin can also influence the generation of osteoclasts and subsequently bone loss during organ culture. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that natural compounds such as naringin have the potential to be used as alternative medicines for the prevention and treatment of osteolysis. PMID:26884798

  15. The Function of Naringin in Inducing Secretion of Osteoprotegerin and Inhibiting Formation of Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Wang, Lu; Tao, You; Ji, Yan; Deng, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis has become one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the world. It is a metabolic disease characterized by reduction in bone mass due to an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoporosis causes fractures, prolongs bone healing, and impedes osseointegration of dental implants. Its pathological features include osteopenia, degradation of bone tissue microstructure, and increase of bone fragility. In traditional Chinese medicine, the herb Rhizoma Drynariae has been commonly used to treat osteoporosis and bone nonunion. However, the precise underlying mechanism is as yet unclear. Osteoprotegerin is a cytokine receptor shown to play an important role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Hence, activators and ligands of osteoprotegerin are promising drug targets and have been the focus of studies on the development of therapeutics against osteoporosis. In the current study, we found that naringin could synergistically enhance the action of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in promoting the secretion of osteoprotegerin by osteoblasts in vitro. In addition, naringin can also influence the generation of osteoclasts and subsequently bone loss during organ culture. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that natural compounds such as naringin have the potential to be used as alternative medicines for the prevention and treatment of osteolysis. PMID:26884798

  16. RANKL Signaling and Osteoclastogenesis Is Negatively Regulated by Cardamonin

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vivek R.; Gupta, Subash C.; Reuter, Simone; Yamamoto, Norio; Murakami, Akira; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss/resorption or osteoporosis is a disease that is accelerated with aging and age-associated chronic diseases such as cancer. Bone loss has been linked with human multiple myeloma, breast cancer, and prostate cancer and is usually treated with bisphosphonates, and recently approved denosumab, an antibody against receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Because of the numerous side effects of the currently available drugs, the search continues for safe and effective therapies for bone loss. RANKL, a member of the TNF superfamily, has emerged as a major mediator of bone loss via activation of osteoclastogenesis. We have identified cardamonin, a chalcone isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata that can affect osteoclastogenesis through modulation of RANKL. We found that treatment of monocytes with cardamonin suppressed RANKL-induced NF-κB activation and this suppression correlated with inhibition of IκBα kinase and of phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB. Furthermore, cardamonin also downregulated RANKL-induced phosphorylation of MAPK including ERK and p38 MAPK. Cardamonin suppressed the RANKL-induced differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. We also found that an inhibitor of NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) blocked RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, indicating a direct link with NF-κB. Finally, osteoclastogenesis induced by human breast cancer cells or human multiple myeloma cells were completely suppressed by cardamonin. Collectively, our results indicate that cardamonin suppresses osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL and tumor cells by suppressing activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathway. PMID:23691159

  17. Microgravity promotes osteoclast activity in medaka fish reared at the international space station.

    PubMed

    Chatani, Masahiro; Mantoku, Akiko; Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Abduweli, Dawud; Sugamori, Yasutaka; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Suzuki, Hiromi; Uchida, Satoko; Sakimura, Toru; Kono, Yasushi; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shirakawa, Masaki; Takano, Yoshiro; Kudo, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The bone mineral density (BMD) of astronauts decreases specifically in the weight-bearing sites during spaceflight. It seems that osteoclasts would be affected by a change in gravity; however, the molecular mechanism involved remains unclear. Here, we show that the mineral density of the pharyngeal bone and teeth region of TRAP-GFP/Osterix-DsRed double transgenic medaka fish was decreased and that osteoclasts were activated when the fish were reared for 56 days at the international space station. In addition, electron microscopy observation revealed a low degree of roundness of mitochondria in osteoclasts. In the whole transcriptome analysis, fkbp5 and ddit4 genes were strongly up-regulated in the flight group. The fish were filmed for abnormal behavior; and, interestingly, the medaka tended to become motionless in the late stage of exposure. These results reveal impaired physiological function with a change in mechanical force under microgravity, which impairment was accompanied by osteoclast activation. PMID:26387549

  18. Microgravity promotes osteoclast activity in medaka fish reared at the international space station

    PubMed Central

    Chatani, Masahiro; Mantoku, Akiko; Takeyama, Kazuhiro; Abduweli, Dawud; Sugamori, Yasutaka; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Suzuki, Hiromi; Uchida, Satoko; Sakimura, Toru; Kono, Yasushi; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shirakawa, Masaki; Takano, Yoshiro; Kudo, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The bone mineral density (BMD) of astronauts decreases specifically in the weight-bearing sites during spaceflight. It seems that osteoclasts would be affected by a change in gravity; however, the molecular mechanism involved remains unclear. Here, we show that the mineral density of the pharyngeal bone and teeth region of TRAP-GFP/Osterix-DsRed double transgenic medaka fish was decreased and that osteoclasts were activated when the fish were reared for 56 days at the international space station. In addition, electron microscopy observation revealed a low degree of roundness of mitochondria in osteoclasts. In the whole transcriptome analysis, fkbp5 and ddit4 genes were strongly up-regulated in the flight group. The fish were filmed for abnormal behavior; and, interestingly, the medaka tended to become motionless in the late stage of exposure. These results reveal impaired physiological function with a change in mechanical force under microgravity, which impairment was accompanied by osteoclast activation. PMID:26387549

  19. Bone resorption by isolated human osteoclasts in vitro: effects of calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Murrills, R J; Shane, E; Lindsay, R; Dempster, D W

    1989-04-01

    Human osteoclasts were isolated from 12- to 17-week-old fetal tissue and from transiliac crest bone biopsies for an in vitro study of their biology. A hypodermic needle was used to flush either the fetal long bones or the trabeculae of the iliac crest bone biopsy with tissue culture medium and the resulting cell suspension sedimented briefly either onto the surface of plastic tissue culture dishes, for time-lapse microcinematography, or onto slices of devitalized bovine cortical bone for quantitative assay of bone resorption. The osteoclasts were motile, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive and capable of excavating pits in slices of devitalized bovine cortical bone. Human calcitonin, at doses of 1 ng/ml and 1 microgram/ml, caused a 70% inhibition of bone resorption by human fetal osteoclasts over a 24 h period but had no apparent effect on the morphology or motility of either fetal or adult osteoclasts. PMID:2728929

  20. Surface-induced regulation of podosome organization and dynamics in cultured osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Geblinger, Dafna; Geiger, Benjamin; Addadi, Lia

    2010-01-01

    Bone is continuously repaired and remodeled through the well-coordinated activity of osteoblasts, which form new bone, and osteoclasts, which resorb it. How osteoclasts sense the properties of the bone surface remains unclear. Combining light and electron microscopy, we compared osteoclast behavior on three distinct surfaces: glass, calcite single crystals, and bone. Podosomes, the basic units of the adhesion structure, and their organization into super-structures, were found to be common to cells attached to all three substrates, while the structure of the resorption organelle, the so-called “ruffled border,” markedly differed. Moreover, the integrity, stability and dynamic behavior of the adhesion super-structures also fundamentally differed, depending on the substrate. We conclude that osteoclasts sense the local properties of the underlying substrate and respond to these signals, both locally and globally. PMID:19065685

  1. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According t