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Sample records for rapid cellular identification

  1. Rapid Cellular Identification by Dynamic Electromechanical Response

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Reukov, Vladimir V; Vertegel, Alexey; Thompson, Gary L

    2009-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is ubiquitous in living systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Principal component analysis of the dynamic electromechanical response spectra bundled with neural network based recognition provides a robust identification algorithm based on their electromechanical signature, and allows unambiguous differentiation of model Micrococcus Lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas Fluorescens system. This methodology provides a universal pathway for biological identification obviating the need for well-defined analytical models of Scanning Probe Microscopy response.

  2. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, M. P.; Reukov, V. V.; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, A. A.; Guo, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Jesse, S.

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  3. Rapid detection of biothreat agents based on cellular machinery.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; Gantt, Richard W.

    2004-12-01

    This research addresses rapid and sensitive identification of biological agents in a complex background. We attempted to devise a method by which the specificity of the cellular transcriptional machinery could be used to detect and identify bacterial bio-terror agents in a background of other organisms. Bacterial cells contain RNA polymerases and transcription factors that transcribe genes into mRNA for translation into proteins. RNA polymerases in conjunction with transcription factors recognize regulatory elements (promoters) upstream of the gene. These promoters are, in many cases, recognized by the polymerase and transcription factor combinations of one species only. We have engineered a plasmid, for Escherichia coli, containing the virA promoter from the target species Shigella flexneri. This promoter was fused to a reporter gene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In theory the indicator strain (carrying the plasmid) is mixed with the target strain and the two are lysed. The cellular machinery from both cells mixes and the GFP is produced. This report details the results of testing this system.

  4. Rapid methods for identification of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, M; Harper, G; Sun, S H; Delanerolle, V

    1975-01-01

    Opportunistic infections by yeasts have been implicated as one of the major causes of complications in the compromised patient. Rapid recognition and identification of these yeasts is essential for patient management, but conventional liquid medium methods for completing identification tests are cumbersome and time consuming. Rapid tests have been devised based on modifications of methods commonly used in bacteriology. These rapid methods included tests for carbohydrate and nitrate assimilation, fermentation, and urease production. These were compared with several current methods for accuracy of results, for time to final identification, and for economy of time and reagents. In addition, the usual tests for pseudogerm tube formation, for production of hyphae or pseudohyphae, and for growth temperatures were included. The rapid tests achieved 96% or better accuracy compared with expected results, and 46 species of yeasts were identified in 1 to 2 days compared with the 10 to 14 days required by conventional liquid culture methods. Images PMID:1241586

  5. Rapid detection and identification of infectious agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsbury, D.T.; Falkow, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among five sections. Some of the paper titles are: Aspects of Using Nucleic Acid Filter Hybridization to Characterize and Detect Enteroviral RNAs; Rapid Identification of Lesihmania Species using Specific Hybridization of Kinetoplast DNA Sequences; Selection of DNA Probes for use in the Diagnosis of Infectious Disease; and Summary of DNA Probes.

  6. Blind identification of cellular phone cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeliktutan, Oya; Avcibas, Ismail; Sankur, Bülent

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we focus on blind source cell-phone identification problem. It is known various artifacts in the image processing pipeline, such as pixel defects or unevenness of the responses in the CCD sensor, black current noise, proprietary interpolation algorithms involved in color filter array [CFA] leave telltale footprints. These artifacts, although often imperceptible, are statistically stable and can be considered as a signature of the camera type or even of the individual device. For this purpose, we explore a set of forensic features, such as binary similarity measures, image quality measures and higher order wavelet statistics in conjunction SVM classifier to identify the originating cell-phone type. We provide identification results among 9 different brand cell-phone cameras. In addition to our initial results, we applied a set of geometrical operations to original images in order to investigate how much our proposed method is robust under these manipulations.

  7. Fluorescent, bioactive protein nanoparticles (prodots) for rapid, improved cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Deshapriya, Inoka K; Stromer, Bobbi S; Pattammattel, Ajith; Kim, Christina S; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Gonzalez-Fajardo, Laura; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J Silvio; Lu, Xiuling; Kumar, Challa V

    2015-03-18

    A simple and effective method for synthesizing highly fluorescent, protein-based nanoparticles (Prodots) and their facile uptake into the cytoplasm of cells is described here. Prodots made from bovine serum albumin (nBSA), glucose oxidase (nGO), horseradish peroxidase (nHRP), catalase (nCatalase), and lipase (nLipase) were found to be 15-50 nm wide and have been characterized by gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and optical microscopic methods. Data showed that the secondary structure of the protein in Prodots is retained to a significant extent and specific activities of nGO, nHRP, nCatalase, and nLipase were 80%, 70%, 65%, and 50% of their respective unmodified enzyme activities. Calorimetric studies indicated that the denaturation temperatures of nGO and nBSA increased while those of other Prodots remained nearly unchanged, and accelerated storage half-lives of Prodots at 60 °C increased by 4- to 8-fold. Exposure of nGO and nBSA+ nGO to cells indicated rapid uptake within 1-3 h, accompanied by significant blebbing of the plasma membrane, but no uptake has been noted in the absence of nGO. The presence of nGO/glucose in the media facilitated the uptake, and hydrogen peroxide induced membrane permeability could be responsible for this rapid uptake of Prodots. In control studies, FITC alone did not enter the cell, BSA-FITC was not internalized even in the presence of nGO, and there has been no uptake of nBSA-FITC in the absence of nGO. These are the very first examples of very rapid cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles into cells, particularly nanoparticles made from pure proteins. The current approach is a simple and efficient method for the preparation of bioactive, fluorescent protein nanoparticles of controllable size for cellular imaging, and cell uptake is under the control of two separate chemical triggers. PMID:25642999

  8. Rapid identification of microorganisms by intrinsic fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hemant; Goldys, Ewa M.; Learmonth, Robert

    2005-03-01

    Microbial contamination has serious consequences for the industries that use fermentation processes. Common contaminants such as faster growing lactic acid bacteria or wild yeast can rapidly outnumber inoculated culture yeast and produce undesirable end products. Our study focuses on a rapid method of identification of such contaminants based on autofluorescence spectroscopy of bacterial and yeast species. Lactic acid bacteria (Lac-tobacillus casei), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were cultured under controlled conditions and studied for variations in their autofluorescence. We observed spectral differences in the spectral range representative of tryptophan residues of proteins, with excitation at 290 nm and emission scanned in the 300 nm - 440 nm range. Excitation scans between 240 nm and 310 nm were also performed for the emission at 340 nm. Moreover, we observed clearly pronounced differences in the excitation and emission in the visible range, with 410 nm excitation. These results demonstrate that bacterial and yeast species can be differentiated using their intrinsic fluorescence both in UV and in the visible region. The comparative spectroscopic study of selected strains of Saccharomyces yeast showed clear differences between strains. Spectrally-resolved laser scanning microscopy was carried out to link the results obtained using ensembles of cells with spectral properties of individual cells. Strongly fluorescent subpopulation were observed for all yeast strains with excitation at 405 nm. The fluorescence spectra showed variations correlated with cell brightness. The presented results demonstrate that using autofluorescence, it is possible to differentiate between yeast and lactic acid bacteria and between different yeast species.

  9. Rapid Identification of Emerging Pathogens: Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Levene, Harold M.; Hannis, James C.; Harrell, Patina M.; Neuman, Benjamin; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Jiang, Yun; Ranken, Raymond; Drader, Jared J.; Samant, Vivek; Griffey, Richard H.; McNeil, John A.; Crooke, Stanley T.; Ecker, David J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new approach for infectious disease surveillance that facilitates rapid identification of known and emerging pathogens. The process uses broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify nucleic acid targets from large groupings of organisms, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for accurate mass measurements of PCR products, and base composition signature analysis to identify organisms in a sample. We demonstrate this principle by using 14 isolates of 9 diverse Coronavirus spp., including the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We show that this method could identify and distinguish between SARS and other known CoV, including the human CoV 229E and OC43, individually and in a mixture of all 3 human viruses. The sensitivity of detection, measured by using titered SARS-CoV spiked into human serum, was ≈1 PFU/mL. This approach, applicable to the surveillance of bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoal pathogens, is capable of automated analysis of >900 PCR reactions per day. PMID:15757550

  10. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  11. Automated identification of stratifying signatures in cellular subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Bruggner, Robert V.; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Dill, David L.; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation and examination of cellular subpopulations that display condition-specific behavior can play a critical contributory role in understanding disease mechanism, as well as provide a focal point for development of diagnostic criteria linking such a mechanism to clinical prognosis. Despite recent advancements in single-cell measurement technologies, the identification of relevant cell subsets through manual efforts remains standard practice. As new technologies such as mass cytometry increase the parameterization of single-cell measurements, the scalability and subjectivity inherent in manual analyses slows both analysis and progress. We therefore developed Citrus (cluster identification, characterization, and regression), a data-driven approach for the identification of stratifying subpopulations in multidimensional cytometry datasets. The methodology of Citrus is demonstrated through the identification of known and unexpected pathway responses in a dataset of stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells measured by mass cytometry. Additionally, the performance of Citrus is compared with that of existing methods through the analysis of several publicly available datasets. As the complexity of flow cytometry datasets continues to increase, methods such as Citrus will be needed to aid investigators in the performance of unbiased—and potentially more thorough—correlation-based mining and inspection of cell subsets nested within high-dimensional datasets. PMID:24979804

  12. Cellular instability in rapid directional solidification - Bifurcation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, R. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    Merchant and Davis performed a linear stability analysis on a model for the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy valid for all speeds. The analysis revealed that nonequilibrium segregation effects modify the Mullins and Sekerka cellular mode, whereas attachment kinetics has no effect on these cells. In this paper, the nonlinear stability of the steady cellular mode is analyzed. A Landau equation is obtained that determines the amplitude of the cells. The Landau coefficient here depends on both nonequilibrium segregation effects and attachment kinetics. This equation gives the ranges of parameters for subcritical bifurcation (jump transition) or supercritical bifurcation (smooth transition) to cells.

  13. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  14. Identification of Protein Interactions Involved in Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westermarck, Jukka; Ivaska, Johanna; Corthals, Garry L.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive biological processes. They are critical for all intra- and extracellular functions, and the technologies to analyze them are widely applied throughout the various fields of biological sciences. This study takes an in-depth view of some common principles of cellular regulation and provides a detailed account of approaches required to comprehensively map signaling protein-protein interactions in any particular cellular system or condition. We provide a critical review of the benefits and disadvantages of the yeast two-hybrid method and affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometric procedures for identification of signaling protein-protein interactions. In particular, we emphasize the quantitative and qualitative differences between tandem affinity and one-step purification (such as FLAG and Strep tag) methods. Although applicable to all types of interaction studies, a special section is devoted in this review to aspects that should be considered when attempting to identify signaling protein interactions that often are transient and weak by nature. Finally, we discuss shotgun and quantitative information that can be gleaned by MS-coupled methods for analysis of multiprotein complexes. PMID:23481661

  15. Rapid identification of Streptomyces isolates by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Loucif, Lotfi; Bendjama, Esma; Gacemi-Kirane, Djamila; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-12-01

    The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria over the last decade has led to a renewal in the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. Streptomyces members are practically unlimited sources of new antibiotics. However, the identification of Streptomyces species is difficult and time-consuming. Therefore, there is a need for alternative methods for their rapid identification. In this study, an efficient protocol of identification using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed and applied for the rapid identification of Streptomyces isolates from the El Kala lakes in northeastern Algeria. A collection of 48 Streptomyces isolates were used for this study. The optimized procedure allowed us to obtain specific and reproducible protein spectra for each Streptomyces isolate tested. The spectra generated were used to build a preliminary local database based on their initial 16S rRNA identification. The blind test used for the identification of 20 Streptomyces strains already available in our created database and 20 unknown Streptomyces isolates showed that all (100%) of the Streptomyces strains listed in the database were rapidly (<30min) identified with high scores of up to 2.8. Here, for the first time we showed that MALDI-TOF MS could be used as a cost-effective tool for the rapid identification of Streptomyces isolates. PMID:24862894

  16. [Rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae: evaluation of 3 commercial systems].

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Dore, R; Raffaele, L; Cappello, P

    1985-06-01

    We have compared three rapid systems for the identification of Enterobacteriaceae: MS-2, Rapid 20E, Micro-ID. These methods allows to identifications of bacteria within 4-5 hours. We have chosen API 20E as reference system; because it is normally used in the clinical microbiology laboratories. We have noted good agreement of concordance for MS-2, Micro-ID and Rapid 20E towards API 20E, respectively 95, 90, 84%. We have, moreover, analysed significative difference about three systems biochemical tests in comparison with the same of API 20E. PMID:4080964

  17. [Study of Rapid Species Identification of Bacteria in Water].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiu-yue; Zhao, Nan-jing; Duan, Jing-bo; Fang, Li; Meng, De-shuo; Yang, Rui-fang; Xiao, Xue; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-09-01

    Multi-wavelength ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectra of bacteria combined the forward scattering and absorption properties of microbes, contains substantial information on size, shape, and the other chemical, physiological character of bacterial cells, has the bacterial species specificity, which can be applied to rapid species identification of bacterial microbes. Four different kinds of bacteria including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumonia which were commonly existed in water were researched in this paper. Their multi-wavelength UV-Vis transmission spectra were measured and analyzed. The rapid identification method and model of bacteria were built which were based on support vector machine (SVM) and multi-wavelength UV-Vis transmission spectra of the bacteria. Using the internal cross validation based on grid search method of the training set for obtaining the best penalty factor C and the kernel parameter g, which the model needed. Established the bacteria fast identification model according to the optimal parameters and one-against-one classification method included in LibSVM. Using different experimental bacteria strains of transmission spectra as a test set of classification accuracy verification of the model, the analysis results showed that the bacterial rapid identification model built in this paper can identification the four kinds bacterial which chosen in this paper as the accuracy was 100%, and the model also can identified different subspecies of E. coli test set as the accuracy was 100%, proved the model had a good stability in identification bacterial species. In this paper, the research results of this study not only can provide a method for rapid identification and early warning of bacterial microbial in drinking water sources, but also can be used as the microbes identified in biomedical a simple, rapid and accurate means. PMID:26669181

  18. Rapid identification of viridans streptococci by mass spectrometric discrimination.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, C; Rodloff, A C; Chhatwal, G S; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K

    2007-08-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are responsible for several systemic diseases, such as endocarditis, abscesses, and septicemia. Unfortunately, species identification by conventional methods seems to be more difficult than species identification of other groups of bacteria. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the rapid identification of 10 different species of VS. A total of 99 VS clinical isolates, 10 reference strains, and 20 strains from our in-house culture collection were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. To evaluate the mass-spectrometric discrimination results, all strains were identified in parallel by phenotypic and genotypic methods. MALDI-TOF-MS identified 71 isolates as the mitis group, 23 as the anginosus group, and 5 as Streptococcus salivarius. Comparison of the species identification results obtained by the MALDI-TOF-MS analyses and with the phenotypic/genotypic identification systems showed 100% consistency at the species level. Thus, MALDI-TOF-MS seems to be a rapid and reliable method for the identification of species of VS from clinical samples. PMID:17553974

  19. Feed-forward regulation ensures stability and rapid reversibility of a cellular state

    PubMed Central

    Doncic, Andreas; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular transitions are important for all life. Such transitions, including cell fate decisions, often employ positive feedback regulation to establish and stabilize new cellular states. However, positive feedback is unlikely to underlie stable cell cycle arrest in yeast exposed to mating pheromone because the signaling pathway is linear, rather than bistable, over a broad range of extracellular pheromone concentration. We show that the stability of the pheromone arrested state results from coherent feed-forward regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor Far1. This network motif is effectively isolated from the more complex regulatory network in which it is embedded. Fast regulation of Far1 by phosphorylation allows rapid cell cycle arrest and reentry, whereas slow Far1 synthesis reinforces arrest. We thus expect coherent feed-forward regulation to be frequently implemented at reversible cellular transitions because this network motif can achieve the ostensibly conflicting aims of arrest stability and rapid reversibility without loss of signaling information. PMID:23685071

  20. HRR length and velocity decision regions for rapid target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.

    1999-09-01

    Effective theater defense requires rapid target identification with ground sensors. Modern radar performs target recognition and target imaging tasks, in addition to conventional tasks of detection and tracking. New processing techniques, like stepped frequency waveforms and RF hardware are now becoming available and will soon result in lower- cost high resolution rate. Additional feature extraction, namely length and velocity obtained from tracker can be used to design an efficient and a rapid ID after a preliminary recognition is performed. Prior information of these features for critical set of targets can be used to design decision regions for a given SNR value.

  1. Divergent synthesis and identification of the cellular targets of deoxyelephantopins.

    PubMed

    Lagoutte, Roman; Serba, Christelle; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G; Adibekian, Alexander; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Herbal extracts containing sesquiterpene lactones have been extensively used in traditional medicine and are known to be rich in α,β-unsaturated functionalities that can covalently engage target proteins. Here we report synthetic methodologies to access analogues of deoxyelephantopin, a sesquiterpene lactone with anticancer properties. Using alkyne-tagged cellular probes and quantitative proteomics analysis, we identified several cellular targets of deoxyelephantopin. We further demonstrate that deoxyelephantopin antagonizes PPARγ activity in situ via covalent engagement of a cysteine residue in the zinc-finger motif of this nuclear receptor. PMID:27539788

  2. Divergent synthesis and identification of the cellular targets of deoxyelephantopins

    PubMed Central

    Lagoutte, Roman; Serba, Christelle; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G.; Adibekian, Alexander; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Herbal extracts containing sesquiterpene lactones have been extensively used in traditional medicine and are known to be rich in α,β-unsaturated functionalities that can covalently engage target proteins. Here we report synthetic methodologies to access analogues of deoxyelephantopin, a sesquiterpene lactone with anticancer properties. Using alkyne-tagged cellular probes and quantitative proteomics analysis, we identified several cellular targets of deoxyelephantopin. We further demonstrate that deoxyelephantopin antagonizes PPARγ activity in situ via covalent engagement of a cysteine residue in the zinc-finger motif of this nuclear receptor. PMID:27539788

  3. Rapid bacterial identification using evanescent-waveguide oligonucleotide microarray classification.

    PubMed

    Francois, Patrice; Charbonnier, Yvan; Jacquet, Jean; Utinger, Dominic; Bento, Manuela; Lew, Daniel; Kresbach, Gerhard M; Ehrat, Markus; Schlegel, Werner; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial identification relies primarily on culture-based methodologies and requires 48-72 h to deliver results. We developed and used i) a bioinformatics strategy to select oligonucleotide signature probes, ii) a rapid procedure for RNA labelling and hybridization, iii) an evanescent-waveguide oligoarray with exquisite signal/noise performance, and iv) informatics methods for microarray data analysis. Unique 19-mer signature oligonucleotides were selected in the 5'-end of 16s rDNA genes of human pathogenic bacteria. Oligonucleotides spotted onto a Ta(2)O(5)-coated microarray surface were incubated with chemically labelled total bacterial RNA. Rapid hybridization and stringent washings were performed before scanning and analyzing the slide. In the present paper, the eight most abundant bacterial pathogens representing >54% of positive blood cultures were selected. Hierarchical clustering analysis of hybridization data revealed characteristic patterns, even for closely related species. We then evaluated artificial intelligence-based approaches that outperformed conventional threshold-based identification schemes on cognate probes. At this stage, the complete procedure applied to spiked blood cultures was completed in less than 6 h. In conclusion, when coupled to optimal signal detection strategy, microarrays provide bacterial identification within a few hours post-sampling, allowing targeted antimicrobial prescription. PMID:16216356

  4. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  5. Method for Rapid Protein Identification in a Large Database

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Zhao, Xiaofang

    2013-01-01

    Protein identification is an integral part of proteomics research. The available tools to identify proteins in tandem mass spectrometry experiments are not optimized to face current challenges in terms of identification scale and speed owing to the exponential growth of the protein database and the accelerated generation of mass spectrometry data, as well as the demand for nonspecific digestion and post-modifications in complex-sample identification. As a result, a rapid method is required to mitigate such complexity and computation challenges. This paper thus aims to present an open method to prevent enzyme and modification specificity on a large database. This paper designed and developed a distributed program to facilitate application to computer resources. With this optimization, nearly linear speedup and real-time support are achieved on a large database with nonspecific digestion, thus enabling testing with two classical large protein databases in a 20-blade cluster. This work aids in the discovery of more significant biological results, such as modification sites, and enables the identification of more complex samples, such as metaproteomics samples. PMID:24000323

  6. Rapid Molecular Identification of Human Taeniid Cestodes by Pyrosequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  7. Rapid molecular identification of human taeniid cestodes by pyrosequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-01-01

    Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica are causative agents of taeniasis in humans. The difficulty of morphological identification of human taeniids can lead to misdiagnosis or confusion. To overcome this problem, several molecular methods have been developed, but use of these tends to be time-consuming. Here, a rapid and high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was developed for the identification of three human taeniids originating from various countries. Primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of the three Taenia species were designed. Variations in a 26-nucleotide target region were used for identification. The reproducibility and accuracy of the pyrosequencing technology was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. This technique will be a valuable tool to distinguish between sympatric human taeniids that occur in Thailand, Asia and Pacific countries. This method could potentially be used for the molecular identification of the taeniid species that might be associated with suspicious cysts and lesions, or cyst residues in humans or livestock at the slaughterhouse. PMID:24945530

  8. Rapid identification of cytokinins by an immunological method

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.O.; Jameson, P.E.; Morris, J.W. ); Laloue, M. )

    1991-04-01

    A method for rapid identification of bacterial cytokinins has been developed in which cultures are fed ({sup 3}H)adenine, the cytokinins (including, {sup 3}H-labeled cytokinins) are isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography, and analyzed by HPLC with on-line scintillation counting. Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains showed that some produced primarily trans-zeatin, whereas others produced primarily trans-zeatin riboside. Pseudomonas syringae pv savastanoi produced mixtures of transzeatin, dihydrozeatin, 1{double prime}-methyl-trans-zeatin riboside, and other unknown cytokinin-like substances. Corynebacterium fascians, produced cis-zeatin, isopentenyladenine and isopentenyladenosine. The technique is designed for qualitative rather than quantitative studies and allows ready identification of bacterial cytokinins. It may also have utility in the study of plant cytokinins if adequate incorporation of label into cytokinin precursor pools can be achieved.

  9. Emerging technologies for rapid identification of bloodstream pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Atul; Morgan, Margie; Haake, David A

    2014-07-15

    Technologies for rapid microbial identification are poised to revolutionize clinical microbiology and enable informed decision making for patients with life-threatening bloodstream infections. Species identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures can be performed in minutes using commercial fluorescence in situ hybridization tests or mass spectroscopy. Microorganisms in positive blood cultures can also be identified within 1-2.5 hours using automated polymerase chain reaction-based systems that can also detect selected antibiotic resistance markers, such as methicillin resistance. When combined with antibiotic stewardship programs, these approaches improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare expenditures. Tests for direct detection in whole blood samples are highly desirable because of their potential to identify bloodstream pathogens without waiting 1-2 days for blood cultures to become positive. However, results for pathogen detection in whole blood do not overlap with those of conventional blood culture techniques and we are still learning how best to use these approaches. PMID:24771332

  10. Autonomous Metabolomics for Rapid Metabolite Identification in Global Profiling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. As a result of this unique integration, we can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications. Validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level. PMID:25496351

  11. Autonomous metabolomics for rapid metabolite identification in global profiling.

    PubMed

    Benton, H Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Kurczy, Michael E; Johnson, Caroline H; Franco, Lauren; Rinehart, Duane; Valentine, Elizabeth; Gowda, Harsha; Ubhi, Baljit K; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Gieschen, Andrew; Fields, Matthew W; Patti, Gary J; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-01-20

    An autonomous metabolomic workflow combining mass spectrometry analysis with tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition was designed to allow for simultaneous data processing and metabolite characterization. Although previously tandem mass spectrometry data have been generated on the fly, the experiments described herein combine this technology with the bioinformatic resources of XCMS and METLIN. As a result of this unique integration, we can analyze large profiling datasets and simultaneously obtain structural identifications. Validation of the workflow on bacterial samples allowed the profiling on the order of a thousand metabolite features with simultaneous tandem mass spectra data acquisition. The tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition enabled automatic search and matching against the METLIN tandem mass spectrometry database, shortening the current workflow from days to hours. Overall, the autonomous approach to untargeted metabolomics provides an efficient means of metabolomic profiling, and will ultimately allow the more rapid integration of comparative analyses, metabolite identification, and data analysis at a systems biology level. PMID:25496351

  12. Rapid Detection and Identification of Biogenic Aerosol Releases and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Macher, J.; Ghosal, S.; Ahmed, K.; Hemati, K.; Wall, S.; Kumagai, K.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols can be important contributors to aerosol chemistry, cloud droplet and ice nucleation, absorption and scattering of radiation, human health and comfort, and plant, animal, and microbial ecology. Many types of bioaerosols, e.g., fungal spores, are released into the atmosphere in response to specific climatological and meteorological conditions. The rapid identification of bioaerosol releases is thus important for better characterization of the above phenomena, as well as enabling public officials to respond quickly and appropriately to releases of infectious agents or biological toxins. One approach to rapid and accurate bioaerosol detection is to employ sequential, automated samples that can be fed directly into an image acquisition and data analysis device. Raman spectroscopy-based identification of bioaerosols, automated analysis of microscopy images, and automated detection of near-monodisperse peaks in aerosol size-distribution data were investigated as complementary approaches to traditional, manual methods for the identification and counting of fungal and actinomycete spores. Manual light microscopy is a widely used analytical technique that is compatible with a number of air sample formats and requires minimal sample preparation. However, a major drawback is its dependence on a human analyst's ability to distinguish particles and accurately count, size, and identify them. Therefore, automated methods, such as those evaluated in this study, have the potential to provide cost-effective and rapid alternatives if demonstrated to be accurate and reliable. An exploratory examination of individual spores for several macro- and microfungi (those with and without large fruiting bodies) by Raman microspectroscopy found unique spectral features that were used to identify fungi to the genus level. Automated analyses of digital spore images accurately recognized and counted single fungal spores and clusters. An automated procedure to discriminate near

  13. Rapid identification of bacteria with a disposable colorimetric sensing array.

    PubMed

    Carey, James R; Suslick, Kenneth S; Hulkower, Keren I; Imlay, James A; Imlay, Karin R C; Ingison, Crystal K; Ponder, Jennifer B; Sen, Avijit; Wittrig, Aaron E

    2011-05-18

    Rapid identification of both species and even specific strains of human pathogenic bacteria grown on standard agar has been achieved from the volatiles they produce using a disposable colorimetric sensor array in a Petri dish imaged with an inexpensive scanner. All 10 strains of bacteria tested, including Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus and their antibiotic-resistant forms, were identified with 98.8% accuracy within 10 h, a clinically important time frame. Furthermore, the colorimetric sensor arrays also proved useful as a simple research tool for the study of bacterial metabolism and as an easy method for the optimization of bacterial production of fine chemicals or other fermentation processes. PMID:21524080

  14. Rapid Accurate Identification of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John

    2007-03-09

    The goals of this program were to develop two assays for rapid, accurate identification of pathogenic organisms at the strain level. The first assay "Quantitative Genome Profiling or QGP" is a real time PCR assay with a restriction enzyme-based component. Its underlying concept is that certain enzymes should cleave genomic DNA at many sites and that in some cases these cuts will interrupt the connection on the genomic DNA between flanking PCR primer pairs thereby eliminating selected PCR amplifications. When this occurs the appearance of the real-time PCR threshold (Ct) signal during DNA amplification is totally eliminated or, if cutting is incomplete, greatly delayed compared to an uncut control. This temporal difference in appearance of the Ct signal relative to undigested control DNA provides a rapid, high-throughput approach for DNA-based identification of different but closely related pathogens depending upon the nucleotide sequence of the target region. The second assay we developed uses the nucleotide sequence of pairs of shmi identifier tags (-21 bp) to identify DNA molecules. Subtle differences in linked tag pair combinations can also be used to distinguish between closely related isolates..

  15. Identification of cellular senescence-specific genes by comparative transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Taiki; Nakano, Masayuki; Nakashima, Akio; Onishi, Kengo; Yamao, Shunsuke; Enari, Masato; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as permanent cell cycle arrest induced by various stresses. Although the p53 transcriptional activity is essential for senescence induction, the downstream genes that are crucial for senescence remain unsolved. Here, by using a developed experimental system in which cellular senescence or apoptosis is induced preferentially by altering concentration of etoposide, a DNA-damaging drug, we compared gene expression profiles of senescent and apoptotic cells by microarray analysis. Subtraction of the expression profile of apoptotic cells identified 20 genes upregulated specifically in senescent cells. Furthermore, 6 out of 20 genes showed p53-dependent upregulation by comparing gene expression between p53-proficient and -deficient cells. These 6 genes were also upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts, suggesting that upregulation of these genes is a general phenomenon in senescence. Among these genes, 2 genes (PRODH and DAO) were found to be directly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of 4 genes (PRODH, DAO, EPN3, and GPR172B) affected senescence phenotypes induced by etoposide treatment. Collectively, our results identified several proteins as novel downstream effectors of p53-mediated senescence and provided new clues for further research on the complex signalling networks underlying the induction and maintenance of senescence. PMID:27545311

  16. Identification of cellular senescence-specific genes by comparative transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Taiki; Nakano, Masayuki; Nakashima, Akio; Onishi, Kengo; Yamao, Shunsuke; Enari, Masato; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as permanent cell cycle arrest induced by various stresses. Although the p53 transcriptional activity is essential for senescence induction, the downstream genes that are crucial for senescence remain unsolved. Here, by using a developed experimental system in which cellular senescence or apoptosis is induced preferentially by altering concentration of etoposide, a DNA-damaging drug, we compared gene expression profiles of senescent and apoptotic cells by microarray analysis. Subtraction of the expression profile of apoptotic cells identified 20 genes upregulated specifically in senescent cells. Furthermore, 6 out of 20 genes showed p53-dependent upregulation by comparing gene expression between p53-proficient and -deficient cells. These 6 genes were also upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts, suggesting that upregulation of these genes is a general phenomenon in senescence. Among these genes, 2 genes (PRODH and DAO) were found to be directly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of 4 genes (PRODH, DAO, EPN3, and GPR172B) affected senescence phenotypes induced by etoposide treatment. Collectively, our results identified several proteins as novel downstream effectors of p53-mediated senescence and provided new clues for further research on the complex signalling networks underlying the induction and maintenance of senescence. PMID:27545311

  17. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth A.; Mogridge, Jeremy; Mourez, Michael; Collier, R. John; Young, John A. T.

    2001-11-01

    The tripartite toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, helps the bacterium evade the immune system and can kill the host during a systemic infection. Two components of the toxin enzymatically modify substrates within the cytosol of mammalian cells: oedema factor (OF) is an adenylate cyclase that impairs host defences through a variety of mechanisms including inhibiting phagocytosis; lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent protease that cleaves mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and causes lysis of macrophages. Protective antigen (PA), the third component, binds to a cellular receptor and mediates delivery of the enzymatic components to the cytosol. Here we describe the cloning of the human PA receptor using a genetic complementation approach. The receptor, termed ATR (anthrax toxin receptor), is a type I membrane protein with an extracellular von Willebrand factor A domain that binds directly to PA. In addition, a soluble version of this domain can protect cells from the action of the toxin.

  18. Rapid cellular translocation is related to close contacts formed between various cultured cells and their substrata.

    PubMed

    Kolega, J; Shure, M S; Chen, W T; Young, N D

    1982-04-01

    Interference-reflection microscopy combined with time-lapse cinemicrography was used to examine the relationship between cell-to-substratum contact patterns and the speeds of translocation for a variety of cell types. Rapid translocation of amphibian leukocytes (average speed = 9.0 micron/min), amphibian epidermal cells (7 micron/min) and teleost epidermal cells (7 micron/min) was found to correlate with patterns of broad grey close contacts. Similar contact patterns were found under freshly seeded (2 h) chick heart fibroblasts (moving 1-3 micron/min), the rapidly advancing (1-5 micron/min) margin of spreading human WI-38 fibroblasts, and isolated MDCK canine epithelial cells (0.5-1.0 micron/min). Conversely, numerous dark streaks of focal contact were found associated with the slow rate of translocation displayed by older cultures (72 h) of chick fibroblasts (less than 0.1 micron/min), well-spread WI-38 cells (less than or equal to 0.3 micron/min) and confluent MDCK cells (less than 0.01 micron/min). It is concluded that close contacts, but not focal contacts, are associated with rapid cellular translocation, and that the build-up of focal contacts is associated with reduced cellular translocation and maintenance of the spread cell shape. PMID:7076724

  19. Passive IFF: Autonomous Nonintrusive Rapid Identification of Friendly Assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Philip; Steenburg, Robert Van; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would identify targets rapidly, without need to radiate an interrogating signal, apply identifying marks to the targets, or equip the targets with transponders. The instrument was conceived as an identification, friend or foe (IFF) system in a battlefield setting, where it would be part of a targeting system for weapons, by providing rapid identification for aimed weapons to help in deciding whether and when to trigger them. The instrument could also be adapted to law-enforcement and industrial applications in which it is necessary to rapidly identify objects in view. The instrument would comprise mainly an optical correlator and a neural processor (see figure). The inherent parallel-processing speed and capability of the optical correlator would be exploited to obtain rapid identification of a set of probable targets within a scene of interest and to define regions within the scene for the neural processor to analyze. The neural processor would then concentrate on each region selected by the optical correlator in an effort to identify the target. Depending on whether or not a target was recognized by comparison of its image data with data in an internal database on which the neural processor was trained, the processor would generate an identifying signal (typically, friend or foe ). The time taken for this identification process would be less than the time needed by a human or robotic gunner to acquire a view of, and aim at, a target. An optical correlator that has been under development for several years and that has been demonstrated to be capable of tracking a cruise missile might be considered a prototype of the optical correlator in the proposed IFF instrument. This optical correlator features a 512-by-512-pixel input image frame and operates at an input frame rate of 60 Hz. It includes a spatial light modulator (SLM) for video-to-optical image conversion, a pair of precise lenses to effect Fourier transforms, a filter SLM

  20. Rapid Bacterial Identification Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Su, Yin-Fong; Forrester, Joel B.

    2007-02-01

    Recent studies at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using infrared spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have shown the ability to identify and discriminate vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferents from one another. Since the anthrax releases in 2001, rapid identification of unknown powders has become a necessity. Bacterial endospores are formed by some Bacillus species as a result of the vegetative bacteria undergoing environmental stress, e.g. a lack of nutrients. Endospores are formed as a survival mechanism and are extremely resistant to heat, cold, sunlight and some chemicals. They become airborne easily and are thus readily dispersed which was demonstrated in the Hart building. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is one of several rapid analytical methods used for bacterial endospore identification. The most common means of bacterial identification is culturing, but this is a time-consuming process, taking hours to days. It is difficult to rapidly identify potentially harmful bacterial agents in a highly reproducible way. Various analytical methods, including FTIR, Raman, photoacoustic FTIR and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) have been used to identify vegetative bacteria and bacterial endospores. Each has shown certain areas of promise, but each has shortcomings in terms of sensitivity, measurement time or portability. IR spectroscopy has been successfully used to distinguish between the sporulated and vegetative state. [1,2] It has also shown its utility at distinguishing between the spores of different species. [2-4] There are several Bacillus species that occur commonly in nature, so it is important to be able to distinguish between the many different species versus those that present an imminent health threat. The spectra of the different sporulated species are all quite similar, though there are some subtle yet reproducible spectroscopic differences. Thus, a more robust and

  1. Cellular and dendritic growth in rapidly solidified Al-Fe and Al-Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shu Zu; Hunt, J.D. . Dept. of Materials); Gilgien, P.; Kurz, W. )

    1994-05-01

    A recent numerical model of cellular and dendritic growth has been extended into the high velocity region where the distribution coefficient, liquids slope and diffusion coefficients depend on the growth velocity. The primary spacing selection mechanism is modeled so that no a priori assumptions need be made about a spacing selection condition. The results are compared with experimental primary spacing measurements obtained using rapid laser resolidification and good agreement is found. The numerical results for undercooling and tip radii are compared with those predicted for dendrites using marginal stability arguments, showing the potential and limits of the analytical models. The effect of high velocity on microsegregation is examined and microsegregation profiles are predicted.

  2. Rapid identification of Zygosaccharomyces with genus-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Hulin, Michelle; Wheals, Alan

    2014-03-01

    There has been a recent and rapid increase in the number of species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces which now comprises Z. bailii, Z. bisporus, Z. gambellarensis, Z. kombuchaensis, Z. lentus, Z. machadoi, Z. mellis, Z. parabaillii, Z. pseudobailii, Z. pseudorouxii, Z. rouxii, Z. sapae, and Z. siamensis. Z. pseudorouxii is an unofficial name given to isolates closely related to the newly-described species Z. sapae. The Zygosaccharomyces genus contains species that are important as food and beverage spoilage organisms and others are associated with fermentations and sweet foodstuffs, such as honey. Their economic significance means that the ability to identify them rapidly is of significant importance. Although Z. rouxii and Z. bailii have been genome-sequenced the extent of sequence data for the others, especially the newly-discovered species, is sometimes extremely limited which makes identification slow. However, parts of the ITS1/5.8S/ITS2 rDNA region contain sequences of sufficient similarity within the genus and of sufficient difference with outgroups, to be potential regions for the design of genus-wide specific primers. We report here the development of genus-specific primers that can detect all the major Zygosaccharomyces species including all those associated with foods; the rare and localised species Z. machadoi and Z. gambellarensis are not detected. The size of the single amplicon produced varies between species and in some cases is sufficiently different to assign provisional species identification. Sequence data from rDNA regions are available for virtually all described yeast species in all genera, thus, prior to having sufficient sequence data from structural genes, rDNA regions may provide more generally suitable candidates for both genus-specific and species-specific primer design. PMID:24382328

  3. Rapid identification of bacteria with miniaturized pyrolysis/GC analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Catherine H.; Mowry, Curtis; Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick

    2001-02-01

    Identification of bacteria and other biological moieties finds a broad range of applications in the environmental, biomedical, agricultural, industrial, and military arenas. Linking these applications are biological markers such as fatty acids, whose mass spectral profiles can be used to characterize biological samples and to distinguish bacteria at the gram-type, genera, and even species level. Common methods of sample analysis require sample preparation that is both lengthy and labor intensive, especially for whole cell bacteria. The background technique relied on here utilizes chemical derivatization of fatty acids to the more volatile fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), which can be separated on a gas chromatograph column or input directly into a mass spectrometer. More recent publications demonstrate improved sample preparation time with in situ derivatization of whole bacterial samples using pyrolysis at the inlet; although much faster than traditional techniques, these systems still rely on bench-top analytical equipment and individual sample preparation. Development of a miniaturized pyrolysis/GC instrument by this group is intended to realize the benefits of FAME identification of bacteria and other biological samples while further facilitating sample handling and instrument portability. The technologies being fabricated and tested have the potential of achieving pyrolysis and FAME separation on a very small scale, with rapid detection time (1-10 min from introduction to result), and with a modular sample inlet. Performance results and sensor characterization will be presented for the first phase of instrument development, encompassing the microfabricated pyrolysis and gas chromatograph elements.

  4. Rapid isothermal substrate microfabrication of a biocompatible thermoplastic elastomer for cellular contact guidance.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Maxime D; Roy, Emmanuel; Auger, François A; Veres, Teodor

    2011-06-01

    The use of microstructured substrates to study and influence cell orientation, which plays an important role in tissue functionality, has been of great interest lately. Silicon and poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates have typically been used, but long processing times and exogenous protein surface coating, required to enhance cell viability, limit their use as large-scale platforms. There is thus a need for a non-biodegradable biocompatible substrate that allows rapid and low cost microfabrication. In this paper a styrene-(ethylene/butylene)-styrene block co-polymer (SEBS) microstructured by a rapid replication technique using low pressure an isothermal hot embossing approach has been demonstrated. SEBS substrates were treated with oxygen plasma to enhance cell adhesion and sterilized using ethylene oxide gas. While cell adhesion to and proliferation on these substrates was as good as on tissue culture polystyrene, cellular alignment on microstructured SEBS was also very high (97.7±0.5%) when calculated within a 10° angle variation from the longitudinal axis. Furthermore, tissue sheets on microstructured SEBS have been produced and exhibited cellular alignment within the engineered tissue. In addition, these results were obtained without coating the material with exogenous proteins. Such substrates should be helpful in the culture of tissue engineered substitutes with an intrinsic orientation and to elucidate questions in cell biology. PMID:21329768

  5. Identification and Molecular Mechanisms of the Rapid Tonicity-induced Relocalization of the Aquaporin 4 Channel.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E; Taylor, Luke H J; Salman, Mootaz M; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Matthew T; Conner, Alex C

    2015-07-01

    The aquaporin family of integral membrane proteins is composed of channels that mediate cellular water flow. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is highly expressed in the glial cells of the central nervous system and facilitates the osmotically driven pathological brain swelling associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury. Here we show that AQP4 cell surface expression can be rapidly and reversibly regulated in response to changes of tonicity in primary cortical rat astrocytes and in transfected HEK293 cells. The translocation mechanism involves PKA activation, influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of calmodulin. We identify five putative PKA phosphorylation sites and use site-directed mutagenesis to show that only phosphorylation at one of these sites, serine 276, is necessary for the translocation response. We discuss our findings in the context of the identification of new therapeutic approaches to treating brain edema. PMID:26013827

  6. Identification and Molecular Mechanisms of the Rapid Tonicity-induced Relocalization of the Aquaporin 4 Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E.; Taylor, Luke H. J.; Salman, Mootaz M.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Conner, Matthew T.; Conner, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    The aquaporin family of integral membrane proteins is composed of channels that mediate cellular water flow. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is highly expressed in the glial cells of the central nervous system and facilitates the osmotically driven pathological brain swelling associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury. Here we show that AQP4 cell surface expression can be rapidly and reversibly regulated in response to changes of tonicity in primary cortical rat astrocytes and in transfected HEK293 cells. The translocation mechanism involves PKA activation, influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of calmodulin. We identify five putative PKA phosphorylation sites and use site-directed mutagenesis to show that only phosphorylation at one of these sites, serine 276, is necessary for the translocation response. We discuss our findings in the context of the identification of new therapeutic approaches to treating brain edema. PMID:26013827

  7. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans by staphylococcal coagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Maccani, J E

    1981-01-01

    A coagglutination reagent was prepared by sensitizing the Cowan I strain of Staphylococcus aureus with rabbit immune globulin directed against Cryptococcus neofromans A15 and absorbed with C. laurentii. This reagent was evaluated for its usefulness in differentiating C. neoformans from other yeast colonies rapidly. Antigen-containing extracts were prepared form Sabouraud dextrose agar cultures of 48 C. neoformans, 33 other Cryptococcus species, 21 Candida, 4 Torulopsis, 3 Saccharomyces, and 2 Rhodotorula strains. This was done by suspending a 0.001-ml loopful of colony growth in 0.5 ml of phenolized saline, mixing for 30 s, and then centrifuging. Equal volumes (50 microliters) of coagglutination reagent and yeast extract were mixed within marked circles on a glass slide and then mechanically rotated at 180 rpm for 8 min. Forty-five of the 48 strains of C. neoformans produced strong (3+ to 4+) agglutination, and 3 strains of serotype C produced weak (1+ to 2+) agglutination with the reagent. Other Cryptococcus species which reacted positively were 4 C. albidus subsp. diffluens, 7 C. albidus subsp. albidus, and 2 C. terreus strains; however, false-positive errors in identification were circumvented by performing a supplemental rapid test for nitrate utilization which differentiated these yeasts from C. neoformans. None of the other yeasts tested (including 14 C. laurentii, 2 C. luteolus, and 2 C. uniguttulatus strains) produced any degree of agglutination with the reagent. A commercial cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent (Crypto-Test, Microbiological Associates, Walkersville, Md.) proved less reliable for identifying C. neoformans yeast colonies because of cross-reactions which occurred with all other species of Cryptococcus tested. PMID:7016909

  8. Changes in gravity rapidly alter the magnitude and direction of a cellular calcium current.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mari L; ul Haque, Aeraj; Bushart, Thomas J; Stout, Stephen C; Roux, Stanley J; Porterfield, D Marshall

    2011-05-01

    In single-celled spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, gravity directs polarity of development and induces a directional, trans-cellular calcium (Ca(2+)) current. To clarify how gravity polarizes this electrophysiological process, we measured the kinetics of the cellular response to changes in the gravity vector, which we initially estimated using the self-referencing calcium microsensor. In order to generate more precise and detailed data, we developed a silicon microfabricated sensor array which facilitated a lab-on-a-chip approach to simultaneously measure calcium currents from multiple cells in real time. These experiments revealed that the direction of the gravity-dependent polar calcium current is reversed in less than 25 s when the cells are inverted, and that changes in the magnitude of the calcium current parallel rapidly changing g-forces during parabolic flight on the NASA C-9 aircraft. The data also revealed a hysteresis in the response of cells in the transition from 2g to micro-g in comparison to cells in the micro-g to 2-g transition, a result consistent with a role for mechanosensitive ion channels in the gravity response. The calcium current is suppressed by either nifedipine (calcium-channel blocker) or eosin yellow (plasma membrane calcium pump inhibitor). Nifedipine disrupts gravity-directed cell polarity, but not spore germination. These results indicate that gravity perception in single plant cells may be mediated by mechanosensitive calcium channels, an idea consistent with some previously proposed models of plant gravity perception. PMID:21234599

  9. Rapid identification of chemical genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  10. Rat cellular retinol-binding protein: cDNA sequence and rapid retinol-dependent accumulation of mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D R; Lloyd, R S; Chytil, F

    1987-01-01

    Cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) may be an important mediator of vitamin A action. We report here the identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to the rat CRBP gene. The cDNA is 695 nucleotides long, with an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 134 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is identical with that of rat CRBP. The nucleotide sequence shows 90.5% similarity with the human CRBP cDNA sequence. Genomic DNA analysis indicates that CRBP is present in one, or at most two, copies within the rat genome. Analysis of mRNA reveals a single species in every tissue tested and suggests that the isolated cDNA is full-length. Finally, when retinol-deficient rats are fed retinyl acetate for 4 hr, about 4-fold accumulation of CRBP-specific mRNA is observed in the lungs. This rapid effect suggests that the micronutrient retinol may directly influence the expression of its specific intracellular binding protein. Images PMID:3472205

  11. Lithology intelligent identification using support vector machine and adaptive cellular automata in multispectral remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Niu, Ruiqing; Wu, Ke

    2011-07-01

    Remote sensing provides a new idea and an advanced method for lithology identification, but lithology identification by remote sensing is quite difficult because 1. the disciplines of lithology identification in a concrete region are often quite different from the experts' experience; 2. in the regions with flourishing vegetation, lithology information is poor, so it is very difficult to identify the lithologies by remote sensing images. At present, the studies on lithology identification by remote sensing are primarily conducted on the regions with low vegetation coverage and high rock bareness. And there is no mature method of lithology identification in the regions with flourishing vegetation. Traditional methods lacking in the mining and extraction of the various complicated lithology information from a remote sensing image, often need much manual intervention and possess poor intelligence and accuracy. An intelligent method proposed in this paper for lithology identification based on support vector machine (SVM) and adaptive cellular automata (ACA) is expected to solve the above problems. The method adopted Landsat-7 ETM+ images and 1:50000 geological map as the data origins. It first derived the lithology identification factors on three aspects: 1. spectra, 2. texture and 3. vegetation cover. Second, it plied the remote sensing images with the geological map and established the SVM to obtain the transition rules according to the factor values of the samples. Finally, it established an ACA model to intelligently identify the lithologies according to the transition and neighborhood rules. In this paper an ACA model is proposed and compared with the traditional one. Results of 2 real-world examples show that: 1. The SVM-ACA method obtains a good result of lithology identification in the regions with flourishing vegetation; 2. it possesses high accuracies of lithology identification (with the overall accuracies of 92.29% and 85.54%, respectively, in the two

  12. Rapid identification of female Culexmosquito species using Expert System in the South East Asian region

    PubMed Central

    Murty, Upadhyayula Suryanarayana; Kumar, Duvvuri Venkata Rama Satya; Rao, Mutheneni Srinivasa; Reuben, Rachel; Tewari, Satish Chandra; Hiriyan, J; Akiyama, J; Akavaram, Deepa

    2005-01-01

    Rapid identification of mosquito (vector) species is critical for vector control and disease management. Pictorial keys of mosquito species are currently used for the identification of new mosquito species. However, this approach is not very effective. Here, we describe the use of an ID3 algorithm (part of artificial intelligence) for the rapid identification of the South East Asian female Culex mosquito species. Availability http://www.envisiict.org/ PMID:17597850

  13. Rapid cellular internalization of multifunctional star polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong Y; Gao, Haifeng; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hong, Joanna; Bencherif, Sidi A; Siegwart, Daniel J; Paik, Hyun-Jong; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-09-13

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) star polymers containing GRGDS (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide sequences on the star periphery were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), GRGDS modified poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (GRGDS-PEG-Acryl), fluorescein o-methacrylate (FMA), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) via an "arm-first" method. Star polymers were approximately 20 nm in diameter, as measured by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Conjugation of FMA to the stars was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and successful attachment of GRGDS segments to the star periphery was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both fluorescent PEG star polymers with and without peripheral GRGDS peptide segments were cultured with MC3T3-E1.4 cells. These star polymers were biocompatible with ≥ 90% cell viability after 24 h of incubation. Cellular uptake of PEG star polymers in MC3T3-E1.4 cells was observed by confocal microscopy. Rapid uptake of PEG star polymers with GRGDS peptides (∼ 100% of FITC-positive cells in 15 min measured by flow cytometry) was observed, suggesting enhanced delivery potential of these functional star polymers. PMID:20831270

  14. Identification of cellular targets of a series of boron heterocycles using TIPA II-A sensitive target identification platform.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew S; Silva, Isba; Martinez, Walfre; Jefferson, Jameka; Rahman, Shakila; Garcia, Jeanie M; Kanichar, Divya; Roppiyakuda, Lance; Kosmowska, Ewa; Faust, Michelle A; Tran, Kim P; Chow, Felicia; Buglo, Elena; Zhou, Feimeng; Groziak, Michael P; Xu, H Howard

    2016-08-01

    One of the hurdles in the discovery of antibiotics is the difficulty of linking antibacterial compounds to their cellular targets. Our laboratory has employed a genome-wide approach of over-expressing essential genes in order to identify cellular targets of antibacterial inhibitors. Our objective in this project was to develop and validate a more sensitive disk diffusion based platform of target identification (Target Identification Platform for Antibacterials version 2; TIPA II) using a collection of cell clones in an Escherichia coli mutant (AS19) host with increased outer membrane permeability. Five known antibiotics/inhibitors and 28 boron heterocycles were tested by TIPA II assay, in conjunction with the original assay TIPA. The TIPA II was more sensitive than TIPA because eight boron heterocycles previously found to be inactive to AG1 cells in TIPA assays exhibited activity to AS19 cells. For 15 boron heterocycles, resistant colonies were observed within the zones of inhibition only on the inducing plates in TIPA II assays. DNA sequencing confirmed that resistant clones harbor plasmids with fabI gene as insert, indicating that these boron heterocycles all target enoyl ACP reductase. Additionally, cell-based assays and dose response curved obtained indicated that for two boron heterocycle inhibitors, the fabI cell clone in AG1 (wild-type) host cells exhibited at least 11 fold more resistance under induced conditions than under non-induced conditions. Moreover, TIPA II also identified cellular targets of known antibacterial inhibitors triclosan, phosphomycin, trimethoprim, diazaborine and thiolactomycin, further validating the utility of the new system. PMID:27301675

  15. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  16. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  17. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  18. Rapid Confirmation of Listeria spp. with the MIT 1000 Microbial Identification System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that can rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The USDA has recently entered into a collaborative research agreement with Micro Imaging Technology to evaluate their MIT 1000 microbial identification system for its ability to identify Listeria species ...

  19. A rapid lung de-cellularization protocol supports embryonic stem cell differentiation in vitro and following implantation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Todd; Roszell, Blair; Zang, Fan; Girard, Eric; Matson, Adam; Thrall, Roger; Jaworski, Diane M; Hatton, Cayla; Weiss, Daniel J; Finck, Christine

    2012-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases represent a large portion of neonatal and adult morbidity and mortality. Many of these have no cure, and new therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. De-cellularization of whole organs, which removes cellular elements but leaves intact important extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and three-dimensional architecture, has recently been investigated for ex vivo generation of lung tissues. As specific cell culture surfaces, including ECM composition, profoundly affect cell differentiation, this approach offers a potential means of using de-cellularized lungs to direct differentiation of embryonic and other types of stem/progenitor cells into lung phenotypes. Several different methods of whole-lung de-cellularization have been reported, but the optimal method that will best support re-cellularization and generation of lung tissues from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has not been determined. We present a 24-h approach for de-cellularizing mouse lungs utilizing a detergent-based (Triton-X100 and sodium deoxycholate) approach with maintenance of three-dimensional lung architecture and ECM protein composition. Predifferentiated murine ESCs (mESCs), with phenotypic characteristics of type II alveolar epithelial cells, were seeded into the de-cellularized lung scaffolds. Additionally, we evaluated the effect of coating the de-cellularized scaffold with either collagen or Matrigel to determine if this would enhance cell adhesion and affect mechanics of the scaffold. Finally, we subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in vivo after seeding them with mESCs that are predifferentiated to express pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SPC). The in vivo environment supported maintenance of the pro-SPC-expressing phenotype and further resulted in vascularization of the implant. We conclude that a rapid detergent-based de-cellularization approach results in a scaffold that can maintain phenotypic evidence of alveolar epithelial differentiation of ESCs and support

  20. Rapid Identification of Genes Contributing to FH Resistance in Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of wheat and barley with improved Fusarium head blight resistance will be greatly aided by knowledge of the plant genes that make essential contributions to the FHB resistance mechanism. This knowledge will permit identification of the best naturally occurring variants for use in breedin...

  1. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  2. Comparison of Rapid NFT system and conventional methods for identification of nonsaccharolytic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martin, R; Siavoshi, F; McDougal, D L

    1986-12-01

    This study examined the Rapid NFT system (Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.) to determine its ability to accurately identify 229 clinical isolates of mostly nonsaccharolytic gram-negative rods. Identifications were classified by the following scheme: correct (corresponding to excellent, very good, good, or acceptable identification as listed in the code book); low discrimination (correct identification among a range of listed possibilities, with additional tests necessary for accurate identification); incorrect. Correct identification was considered correct to species and subspecies for all organisms except Alcaligenes faecalis and "Alcaligenes odorans"; "A. faecalis/odorans" was considered a correct response. By using these criteria, 71.6% of the strains were correctly identified, 17.9% were identified with low discrimination, and 10.5% were incorrectly identified. When consideration was made for incorrect identification resulting from taxonomic problems (e.g., Alcaligenes and Moraxella spp.), incorrect identifications fell to 5.2%. The Rapid NFT system was truly rapid and was easy to use and interpret. Its use of carbon substrate assimilation enables it to provide more accurate identification of medically important nonsaccharolytic bacteria than do other commercially available systems. PMID:3536999

  3. Rapid microbiochemical method for presumptive identification of gastroenteritis-associated members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Yong, D C; Thompson, J S; Prytula, A

    1985-01-01

    A method for rapid screening of isolates of pathogenic members of the family Enterobacteriaceae is described. Flow charts are used in conjunction with triple sugar iron agar, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside-phenylalanine-motility sulfate screening media, oxidase test, and six rapid biochemical tests, namely, lysine decarboxylase, urease, indole, esculin hydrolysis, malonate, and xylose. This scheme is used to provide an inexpensive but rapid presumptive identification of Salmonella, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, Vibrio, and Yersinia isolates from stool cultures. PMID:4008622

  4. Progress towards rapid identification of phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New mass spectrometry equipment is bringing closer to reality the rapid accurate assessment of chemical composition of extracts from a variety of plant materials. Using a variety of plant sources, we are using HPLC separation, UV-VIS spectrometry, ion trap mass fragmentation and accurate mass deter...

  5. Web-based software for rapid "top-down" proteomic identification of protein biomarkers with implications for bacterial identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed web-based software for the rapid identification of protein biomarkers of bacterial microorganisms. Proteins from bacterial cell lysates were ionized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), mass-isolated and fragmented using a time-of-flight/time-of-flight (TOF-TOF)...

  6. Rapid and in vivo quantification of cellular lipids in Chlorella vulgaris using near-infrared Raman spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Hua; Chang, Jo-Shu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2013-02-19

    A rapid and noninvasive quantification method for cellular lipids in Chlorella vulgaris is demonstrated in this study. This method applied near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to monitor the change of signal intensities at 1440 cm(-1) and 2845-3107 cm(-1) along the nitrogen depletion period, and calibration curves relating signal intensity and cellular lipid abundance were established. The calibration curves show that signal intensity at 2845-3107 cm(-1) and cellular lipid abundance were highly correlated. When the calibration curve was applied on the lipid quantification of two unknown samples, the differences between lipid abundances estimated by the calibration curve and measured by gas chromatography were less than 2 wt %. Carotenoids produced a strong and broad peak near 1440 cm(-1), and it weakened the correlation between signal intensity and lipid abundance. The consistency of detection and effects of cellular contents and water on the Raman spectrogram of Chlorella vulgaris were also addressed. The sample pretreatment only involved centrifugation, and the time required for lipid quantification was shortened to less than 1.5 h. The rapid detection has great potential in high-throughput screening of microalgae and also provides valuable information for monitoring the quality of microalgae culture and determining parameters for the mass production of biodiesel from microalgae. PMID:23331037

  7. Transition from a planar interface to cellular and dendritic structures during rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1986-01-01

    The development of theoretical models which characterize the planar-cellular and cell-dendrite transitions is described. The transitions are analyzed in terms of the Chalmers number, the solute Peclet number, and the tip stability parameter, which correlate microstructural features and processing conditions. The planar-cellular transition is examined using the constitutional supercooling theory of Chalmers et al., (1953) and it is observed that the Chalmers number is between 0 and 1 during dendritic and cellular growth. Analysis of cell-dendrite transition data reveal that the transition occurs when the solute Peclet number goes through a minimum, the primary arm spacings go through a maximum, and the Chalmers number is equal to 1/2. The relation between the tip stability parameter and the solute Peclet number is investigated and it is noted that the tip stability parameter is useful for studying dendritic growth in alloys.

  8. Identification of nucleolin as a cellular receptor for human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Tayyari, Farnoosh; Marchant, David; Moraes, Theo J; Duan, Wenming; Mastrangelo, Peter; Hegele, Richard G

    2011-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a large burden of disease worldwide. There is no effective vaccine or therapy, and the use of passive immunoprophylaxis with RSV-specific antibodies is limited to high-risk patients. The cellular receptor (or receptors) required for viral entry and replication has yet to be described; its identification will improve understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and provide a target for the development of novel antiviral interventions. Here we show that RSV interacts with host-cell nucleolin via the viral fusion envelope glycoprotein and binds specifically to nucleolin at the apical cell surface in vitro. We observed decreased RSV infection in vitro in neutralization experiments using nucleolin-specific antibodies before viral inoculation, in competition experiments in which virus was incubated with soluble nucleolin before inoculation of cells, and upon RNA interference (RNAi) to silence cellular nucleolin expression. Transfection of nonpermissive Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells with human nucleolin conferred susceptibility to RSV infection. RNAi-mediated knockdown of lung nucleolin was associated with a significant reduction in RSV infection in mice (P = 0.0004), confirming that nucleolin is a functional RSV receptor in vivo. PMID:21841784

  9. Influenza viruses in birds: rapid identification by counterimmunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, J; Berthiaume, L; Boudreault, A

    1979-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis with an antiserum raised in rabbits against the M protein of the avian N virus proved to be particularly useful for large-scale identification of influenza A virus isolates. Of a total of 231 hemagglutinating agents isolated from 1,656 rectal swabs collected from shore and open-country birds, 158 could be identified as influenza A viruses by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and 75 were serologically related to Newcastle disease virus by hemagglutination inhibition with an antiserum to Newcastle disease virus. Two isolates contained a mixture of influenza A virus and Newcastle disease virus; although the Newcastle disease virus virus particles outnumbered the influenza A virus particles in a ratio of 1,000:1, as seen by electron microscopy, the latter could be readily detected by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. This type of assay appears to be of potential use for epidemiological surveillance of influenza virus isolated from humans and animals. It combines specificity, sensitivity, and simplicity. Images PMID:85632

  10. Rapid Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Nikolic, Radina; Hoos, Holger H.; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed flowMeans, a time-efficient and accurate method for automated identification of cell populations in flow cytometry (FCM) data based on K-means clustering. Unlike traditional K-means, flowMeans can identify concave cell populations by modelling a single population with multiple clusters. flowMeans uses a change point detection algorithm to determine the number of sub-populations, enabling the method to be used in high throughput FCM data analysis pipelines. Our approach compares favourably to manual analysis by human experts and current state-of-the-art automated gating algorithms. flowMeans is freely available as an open source R package through Bioconductor. PMID:21182178

  11. Finding the right RNA: identification of cellular mRNA substrates for RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Trifillis, P; Day, N; Kiledjian, M

    1999-01-01

    Defects in RNA-binding proteins have been implicated in human genetic disorders. However, efforts in understanding the functions of these proteins have been hampered by the inability to obtain their mRNA substrates. To identify cognate cellular mRNAs associated with an RNA-binding protein, we devised a strategy termed isolation of specific nucleic acids associated with proteins (SNAAP). The SNAAP technique allows isolation and subsequent identification of these mRNAs. To assess the validity of this approach, we utilized cellular mRNA and protein from K562 cells and alphaCP1, a protein implicated in a-globin mRNA stability, as a model system. Immobilization of an RNA-binding protein with the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) domain enables isolation of mRNA within an mRNP context and the identity of the bound mRNAs is determined by the differential display assay. The specificity of protein-RNA interactions was considerably enhanced when the interactions were carried out in the presence of cellular extract rather than purified components. Two of the mRNAs specifically bound by alphaCP1 were mRNAs encoding the transmembrane receptor protein, TAPA-1, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II enzyme, coxII. A specific poly(C)-sensitive complex formed on the TAPA-1 and coxII 3' UTRs consistent with the binding of aCP1. Furthermore, direct binding of purified alphaCP proteins to these 3' UTRs was demonstrated and the binding sites determined. These results support the feasibility of the SNAAP technique and suggest a broad applicability for the approach in identifying mRNA targets for clinically relevant RNA-binding proteins that will provide insights into their possible functions. PMID:10445881

  12. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  13. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  14. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  15. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  16. Rapidly learned identification of epileptic seizures from sonified EEG.

    PubMed

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient's electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy. PMID:25352802

  17. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy. PMID:25352802

  18. Mycobacteria mobility shift assay: a method for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wildner, Letícia Muraro; Bazzo, Maria Luiza; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Segat, Gabriela; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Schlindwein, Aline Daiane; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Rovaris, Darcita B; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo CP

    2014-01-01

    The identification of mycobacteria is essential because tuberculosis (TB) and mycobacteriosis are clinically indistinguishable and require different therapeutic regimens. The traditional phenotypic method is time consuming and may last up to 60 days. Indeed, rapid, affordable, specific and easy-to-perform identification methods are needed. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction-based method called a mycobacteria mobility shift assay (MMSA) that was designed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species identification. The aim of this study was to assess the MMSA for the identification of MTC and NTM clinical isolates and to compare its performance with that of the PRA-hsp65 method. A total of 204 clinical isolates (102 NTM and 102 MTC) were identified by the MMSA and PRA-hsp65. For isolates for which these methods gave discordant results, definitive species identification was obtained by sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. Both methods correctly identified all MTC isolates. Among the NTM isolates, the MMSA alone assigned 94 (92.2%) to a complex or species, whereas the PRA-hsp65 method assigned 100% to a species. A 91.5% agreement was observed for the 94 NTM isolates identified by both methods. The MMSA provided correct identification for 96.8% of the NTM isolates compared with 94.7% for PRA-hsp65. The MMSA is a suitable auxiliary method for routine use for the rapid identification of mycobacteria. PMID:24821059

  19. Novel method for rapid identification of Nocardia species by detection of preformed enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Biehle, J R; Cavalieri, S J; Felland, T; Zimmer, B L

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to devise a method for the identification of Nocardia species that is more technically simple, accurate, and rapid than current standard methods of identification. We focused on a commercial bacteria identification system that contained chromogenic test substrates. Two MicroScan products were selected for use in the study on the basis of their content of chromogenic and conventional substrates. They were the Rapid Anaerobe Identification and the HNID panels. A total of 85 strains of Nocardia representing five species were used in the study. All isolates were identified as Nocardia species by the use of standard methods. The beta-naphthylamide-labeled substrate L-pyrrolidonyl-beta-naphthylamide (PYR), the nitrophenyl-labeled substrate p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (MNP), and indoxyl phosphate were found to be useful for identification purposes. N. farcinica and N. nova were the only species positive for PYR, whereas N. brasiliensis was the only species that hydrolyzed MNP. All strains of N. brasiliensis, N. otitidiscavarium, and N. farcinica were positive for indoxyl phosphate, whereas strains of N. nova and N. asteroides sensu stricto were always negative. Agreement between the standard and enzymatic identification methods was 100%. In summary, detection of preformed enzymes appears to be a simple and reproducible method for the identification of Nocardia spp. PMID:8748283

  20. Clinical impact of rapid in vitro susceptibility testing and bacterial identification.

    PubMed Central

    Doern, G V; Vautour, R; Gaudet, M; Levy, B

    1994-01-01

    During the past decade, a variety of instrument-assisted bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test systems have been developed which permit provision of test results in a matter of hours rather than days, as has been the case with traditional overnight procedures. These newer rapid techniques are much more expensive than older methods. It has been presumed but not proven that the clinical benefits of rapid testing to patients with infection offset the added cost. The intent of this study was to objectively define the clinical impact of rapid bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A 1-year study was performed in which infected, hospitalized patients in a tertiary-care, teaching, medical center were randomly assigned to one of two groups: patients for whom identification and susceptibility testing was performed by using a semi-automated, rapid, same-day procedure and those for whom testing was accomplished by using traditional overnight techniques. The two groups were compared with respect to numerous demographic descriptors, and then patients were monitored prospectively through the end of their hospitalization with the aim of determining whether there existed objectively defineable differences in management and outcome between the two groups. The mean lengths of time to provision of susceptibility and identification test results in the rapid test group were 11.3 and 9.6 h, respectively. In the overnight test group, these values were 19.6 and 25.9 h, respectively (P < 0.0005). There were 273 evaluable patients in the first group and 300 in the second group. Other than the length of time required to provide susceptibility and identification test results, no significant differences were noted between the two groups with respect to > 100 demographic descriptors. With regard to measures of outcome, the mean lengths of hospitalization were also the same in both groups. Mortality rates were however, lower in the rapid test

  1. Rapid identification of antibiotic resistance using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Keays, Marie C; O'Brien, Mark; Hussain, Anam; Kiely, Patrick A; Dalton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Culturing bacteria and monitoring bacterial cell growth is a critical issue when dealing with patients who present with bacterial infections. One of the main challenges that arises is the time taken to identify the particular strain of bacteria and consequently, decide the correct treatment. In the majority of cases, broad spectrum antibiotics are used to target infections when a narrow spectrum drug would be more appropriate. The efficient monitoring of bacterial growth and potential antibiotic resistance is necessary to identify the best treatment options for patients. Minturising the reactions into microfluidic droplets offers a novel method to rapidy analyze bacteria. Microfluidics facilitates low volume reactions that provide a unique system where each droplet reaction acts as an individual bioreactor. Here, we designed and built a novel platform that allowed us to create and monitor E.coli microfluidic droplet cultures. Optical capacity was built in and measurements of bacterial cultures were captured facilitating the continuous monitoring of individual reactions. The capacity of the instrument was demonstrated by the application of treatments to both bacteria and drug resistant strains of bacteria. We were able to detect responses within one hour in the droplet cultures, demonstrating the capacity of this workflow to the culture and rapid characterization of bacterial strains. PMID:26942773

  2. Growth medium for the rapid isolation and identification of anthrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Grubbs, Teri R.; Alls, John L.

    2000-07-01

    Anthrax has been recognized as a highly likely biological warfare or terrorist agent. The purpose of this work was to design a culture technique to rapidly isolate and identify `live' anthrax. In liquid or solid media form, 3AT medium (3-amino-L-tyrosine, the main ingredient) accelerated germination and growth of anthrax spores in 5 to 6 hours to a point expected at 18 to 24 hours with ordinary medium. During accelerated growth, standard definitive diagnostic tests such as sensitivity to lysis by penicillin or bacteriophage can be run. During this time, the bacteria synthesized a fluorescent and thermochemiluminescent polymer. Bacteria captured by specific antibody are, therefore, already labeled. Because living bacteria are required to generate the polymer, the test converts immunoassays for anthrax into viability assays. Furthermore, the polymer formation leads to the death of the vegetative form and non-viability of the spores produced in the medium. By altering the formulation of the medium, other microbes and even animal and human cells can be grown in it and labeled (including viruses grown in the animal or human cells).

  3. Rapid induction and persistence of paracrine-induced cellular antiviral states arrest viral infection spread in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Yin, John

    2016-09-01

    The virus/host interaction is a complex interplay between pro- and anti-viral factors that ultimately determines the spread or halt of virus infections in tissues. This interplay develops over multiple rounds of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine how cellular-level processes combine to impact the spatial spread of infection. We measured the kinetics of virus replication (VSV), antiviral paracrine signal upregulation and secretion, spatial spread of virus and paracrine antiviral signaling, and inhibition of virus production in antiviral-exposed A549 human lung epithelial cells. We found that initially infected cells released antiviral signals 4-to-7h following production of virus. However, the subsequent rapid dissemination of signal and fast induction of a robust and persistent antiviral state ultimately led to a suppression of infection spread. This work shows how cellular responses to infection and activation of antiviral responses can integrate to ultimately control infection spread across host cell populations. PMID:27254596

  4. Using Semantics, Grammar, Phonology, and Rapid Naming Tasks To Predict Word Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammill, Donald D.; Mather, Nancy; Allen, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Rhia

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the relative importance of semantic, grammatical, phonological, and rapid naming abilities in predicting word identification skills in 200 children (grades 1-6) using correlation, factor analysis, multiple regression, and predictive outcome analysis techniques. Composite measures of these abilities correlated significantly…

  5. Efficiency of a Multitest System (Enterotube) for Rapid Identification of Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Grunberg, E.; Titsworth, E.; Beskid, G.; Cleeland, R.; Delorenzo, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Enterotube, a multiple-test system which combines nine biochemical tests useful in the identification of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, was tested and compared with the PathoTec test system in the identification of gram-negative bacilli isolated from clinical specimens. It was found that both the Enterotube and the PathoTec systems rapidly and accurately defined the position of the organisms in the major groups of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Discrepancies were noted between the results of citrate tests on Simmons' citrate-agar and in the Enterotube, as well as between Simmons' citrate-agar and the PathoTec citrate test. It was concluded that the Enterotube system provides a simple, reliable, and rapid method for the presumptive identification of Enterobacteriaceae. The major advantage of the Enterotube is that all tests are done simultaneously by inoculation from a single isolated colony. PMID:4979941

  6. Evaluation of the rapid NFT system for identification of gram-negative, nonfermenting rods.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, P C; Leathers, D J

    1984-10-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the Rapid NFT system (API System SA, Montalieu-Vercieu, France) to accurately identify 262 clinically isolated, gram-negative, nonfermentative rods without additional tests. Identifications were classified as correct; low discrimination, with a spectrum of two or more possibilities (additional tests necessary for accurate identification); and incorrect. Correct identification rates were analyzed in two categories: (i) correct to species or biotype for all organism groups except Alcaligenes faecalis-odorans, Moraxella, Pseudomonas testosteroni-alcaligenes-pseudoalcaligenes, and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus biotype haemolyticus-alcaligenes (in this category, the latter four genus-biotype group identifications were taken as correct) and (ii) correct to species or biotype in all cases, including the above four groups. In category i, 87.4% of the strains were correctly identified, with 4.2% low discrimination and 8.4% incorrect. When the criteria of category ii were used, 71.8% of the strains were correctly identified, with 19.9% low discrimination. The Rapid NFT system provided excellent species identification of Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium spp., Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains. Within Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, differentiation between biotypes anitratus and lwoffi was satisfactory, but the system did not differentiate between biotypes haemolyticus and alcaligenes. Species resolution within the genera Moraxella and Alcaligenes was incomplete. All Alcaligenes faecalis strains were misidentified and accounted for 50% of misidentifications with the Rapid NFT system; however, these results may reflect taxonomic differences rather than true misidentifications. The Rapid NFT system is easy to inoculate and interpret and represents a worthwhile advance in the identification of gram-negative, nonfermentative rods. PMID:6490857

  7. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. Images PMID:6960359

  8. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-11-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. PMID:6960359

  9. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  10. Pyrosequencing as a tool for rapid fish species identification and commercial fraud detection.

    PubMed

    De Battisti, Cristian; Marciano, Sabrina; Magnabosco, Cristian; Busato, Sara; Arcangeli, Giuseppe; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The increased consumption of fish products, as well as the occurrence of exotic fish species in the Mediterranean Sea and in the fish market, has increased the risk of commercial fraud. Furthermore, the great amount of processed seafood products has greatly limited the application of classic identification systems. DNA-based identification allows a clear and unambiguous detection of polymorphisms between species, permitting differentiation and identification of both commercial fraud and introduction of species with potential toxic effects on humans. In this study, a novel DNA-based approach for differentiation of fish species based on pyrosequencing technology has been developed. Raw and processed fish products were tested, and up to 25 species of fish belonging to Clupeiformes and Pleuronectiformes groups were uniquely and rapidly identified. The proper identification based on short and unique genetic sequence signatures demonstrates that this approach is promising and cost-effective for large-scale surveys. PMID:24350776

  11. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, K. J.; Kaufmann, M. E.; Saunders, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    Biprobe identification assays based on real-time PCR were designed for 15 species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Three sets of primers and four biprobes were designed from two variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. An identification scheme was developed based on the pattern of melting peaks observed with the four biprobes that had been tested on 24 type strains. This scheme was then tested on 100 previously identified clinical isolates and 42 blindly tested isolates. For 125 of the 142 clinical isolates there was a perfect correlation between the biprobe identification and the result of the ID 32 Staph phenotypic tests and PCR. For 12 of the other isolates a 300-bp portion of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced to determine identity. The remaining five isolates could not be fully identified. LightCycler real-time PCR allowed rapid and accurate identification of the important CNS implicated in infection. PMID:11526126

  12. Identification of Parvalbumin Interneurons as Cellular Substrate of Fear Memory Persistence.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Iris; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Raza, Ahsan S; Hollnagel, Jan O; Rösler, Anton; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Meier, Jochen C

    2016-05-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic gain-of-function glycine receptor RNA variant GlyR α3L(185L)to genetically enhance the network activity of PV interneurons. These mice showed reduced extinction of contextual fear memory but normal auditory cued fear memory. They furthermore displayed increase of SPW-R activity in area CA3 and CA1 and facilitated propagation of this particular network activity pattern, as determined in ventral hippocampal slice preparations. Individual freezing levels during extinction and SPW-R propagation were correlated across genotypes. The same was true for parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the ventral hippocampus, which was generally augmented in the GlyR mutant mice and correlated with individual freezing levels. Together, these results identify PV interneurons as critical cellular substrate of fear memory persistence and associated SPW-R activity in the hippocampus. Our findings may be relevant for the identification and characterization of physiological correlates for posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. PMID:26908632

  13. Identification of Parvalbumin Interneurons as Cellular Substrate of Fear Memory Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Iris; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Raza, Ahsan S.; Hollnagel, Jan O.; Rösler, Anton; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Meier, Jochen C.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic gain-of-function glycine receptor RNA variant GlyR α3L185L to genetically enhance the network activity of PV interneurons. These mice showed reduced extinction of contextual fear memory but normal auditory cued fear memory. They furthermore displayed increase of SPW-R activity in area CA3 and CA1 and facilitated propagation of this particular network activity pattern, as determined in ventral hippocampal slice preparations. Individual freezing levels during extinction and SPW-R propagation were correlated across genotypes. The same was true for parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the ventral hippocampus, which was generally augmented in the GlyR mutant mice and correlated with individual freezing levels. Together, these results identify PV interneurons as critical cellular substrate of fear memory persistence and associated SPW-R activity in the hippocampus. Our findings may be relevant for the identification and characterization of physiological correlates for posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. PMID:26908632

  14. Evaluation of a rapid polymerase chain reaction based identification technique for Vibrio cholerae isolates.

    PubMed

    le Roux, W J; Masoabi, D; de Wet, C M E; Venter, S N

    2004-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of waterborne pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, in drinking-water sources is important to enable effective resource management and public health protection. Phenotypic systems currently being used for the identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates are time-consuming and the need exists for the development of suitable molecular techniques that can offer both fast and reliable identification. During this study, isolates identified as Vibrio cholerae by means of two different biochemical test systems (API 20E and VITEK 32) were analysed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the reliability of the various identification systems. The selected PCR technique amplified a sequence within the outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae, a gene specific for V. cholerae. It was found that out of 243 isolates biochemically identified as V. cholerae with either the API or VITEK system, 21 isolates did not give a positive result with the PCR detection method. Sequencing the 16S rDNA of more than half of these isolates and comparison of the sequences with Internet databases indicated that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Aeromonas. The results indicated that the rapid PCR procedure was more accurate than the API or VITEK systems currently being used for the phenotypic identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:15318514

  15. An Inducible System for Rapid Degradation of Specific Cellular Proteins Using Proteasome Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Wilmington, Shameika R.; Matouschek, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A common way to study protein function is to deplete the protein of interest from cells and observe the response. Traditional methods involve disrupting gene expression but these techniques are only effective against newly synthesized proteins and leave previously existing and stable proteins untouched. Here, we introduce a technique that induces the rapid degradation of specific proteins in mammalian cells by shuttling the proteins to the proteasome for degradation in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We present two implementations of the system in human culture cells that can be used individually to control protein concentration. Our study presents a simple, robust, and flexible technology platform for manipulating intracellular protein levels. PMID:27043013

  16. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kathrin; Davis, Lloyd; Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2012-04-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetrazine-based probes that exhibit ‘turn-on’ fluorescence on their rapid reaction with norbornenes. We demonstrate that the labelling of an encoded norbornene is specific with respect to the entire soluble E. coli proteome and thousands of times faster than established encodable bioorthogonal reactions. We show explicitly the advantages of this approach over state-of-the-art bioorthogonal reactions for protein labelling in vitro and on mammalian cells, and demonstrate the rapid bioorthogonal site-specific labelling of a protein on the mammalian cell surface.

  17. Simple and rapid multiplex PCR for identification of the main human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Vutukuru, Sreekanth-Reddy

    2012-10-12

    Establishment of a simple and rapid multiplex PCR system for identification of the main diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including enteroaggregative E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterohemorrhagic E. coli, is described. This two-step multiplex PCR system allows the identification by targeting CVD432, LT, STh, STp, Eae, Bfp, Stx1, and Stx2. By applying the developed multiplex PCR system, categorization of E. coli isolates isolated from stool samples of infants with diarrhea into the main diarrheagenic E. coli categories is also shown. PMID:22192837

  18. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  19. catRAPID signature: identification of ribonucleoproteins and RNA-binding regions

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Carmen Maria; Klus, Petr; Delli Ponti, Riccardo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Recent technological advances revealed that an unexpected large number of proteins interact with transcripts even if the RNA-binding domains are not annotated. We introduce catRAPID signature to identify ribonucleoproteins based on physico-chemical features instead of sequence similarity searches. The algorithm, trained on human proteins and tested on model organisms, calculates the overall RNA-binding propensity followed by the prediction of RNA-binding regions. catRAPID signature outperforms other algorithms in the identification of RNA-binding proteins and detection of non-classical RNA-binding regions. Results are visualized on a webpage and can be downloaded or forwarded to catRAPID omics for predictions of RNA targets. Availability and implementation: catRAPID signature can be accessed at http://s.tartaglialab.com/new_submission/signature. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es or gian@tartaglialab.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26520853

  20. Potential use of microarray technology for rapid identification of central nervous system pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Eric H; Niemeyer, Debra M; Folio, Les; Agan, Brian K; Rowley, Robb K

    2004-08-01

    Outbreaks of central nervous system (CNS) diseases result in significant productivity and financial losses, threatening peace and wartime readiness capabilities. To meet this threat, rapid clinical diagnostic tools for detecting and identifying CNS pathogens are needed. Current tools and techniques cannot efficiently deal with CNS pathogen diversity; they cannot provide real-time identification of pathogen serogroups and strains, and they require days, sometimes weeks, for examination of tissue culture. Rapid and precise CNS pathogen diagnostics are needed to provide the opportunity for tailored therapeutic regimens and focused preventive efforts to decrease morbidity and mortality. Such diagnostics are available through genetic and genomic technologies, which have the potential for reducing the time required in serogroup or strain identification from 500+ hours for some viral cultures to less than 3 hours for all pathogens. In the near future, microarray diagnostics and future derivations of these technologies will change the paradigm used for outbreak investigations and will improve health care for all. PMID:15379069

  1. Rapid Identification of Black Grain Eumycetoma Causative Agents Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van den Ende, Bert H. G. Gerrits; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; de Hoog, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycetoma causative agent is a priority for treatment. However, current identification tools are far from being satisfactory for both reliable diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. A rapid, simple, and highly efficient molecular based method for identification of agents of black grain eumycetoma is introduced, aiming to improve diagnostic in endemic areas. Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) uses species-specific padlock probes and isothermal DNA amplification. The tests were based on ITS sequences and developed for Falciformispora senegalensis, F. tompkinsii, Madurella fahalii, M. mycetomatis, M. pseudomycetomatis, M. tropicana, Medicopsis romeroi, and Trematosphaeria grisea. With the isothermal RCA assay, 62 isolates were successfully identified with 100% specificity and no cross reactivity or false results. The main advantage of this technique is the low-cost, high specificity, and simplicity. In addition, it is highly reproducible and can be performed within a single day. PMID:25474355

  2. Hsp90 Stress Potentiates Rapid Cellular Adaptation through Induction of Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangbo; Bradford, William D.; Seidel, Chris W.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Aneuploidy, a state of having uneven numbers of chromosomes, is a form of large-effect mutation able to confer adaptive phenotypes under diverse stress conditions1,2. Here we investigate whether pleiotropic stress could in turn induce aneuploidy in budding yeast. We show that while diverse stresses can induce an increase in chromosome instability (CIN), proteotoxic stress, caused by transient Hsp90 inhibition or heat-shock, drastically elevated CIN to produce karyotypically mosaic cell population. The latter effect is linked to an evolutionarily conserved role for Hsp90 chaperon complexes in kinetochore assembly3,4. Continued growth in the presence of Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in emergence of drug-resistant colonies with chromosome XV gain. This drug-resistance phenotype is a quantitative trait involving copy number increases of at least two genes located on chromosome XV. Short-term exposure to Hsp90 stress potentiated fast adaptation to unrelated cyto-toxic compounds through different aneuploid chromosome stoichiometries. These findings demonstrate that aneuploidy is a form of stress-inducible mutation in eukaryotes, capable of fueling rapid phenotypic evolution and drug resistance, and reveal a new role for Hsp90 in regulating the emergence of adaptive traits under stress. PMID:22286062

  3. Rapid chemical test for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, John C

    1932-01-01

    This note describes a simple, rapid, qualitative test which can be applied to solutions of drilling or chips for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel. The test is based on the orange-red compound which is formed when thiocyanate and inequivalent molybdenum react. This test is much more reliable than the potassium ethylxanthate test which has been recommended for a like purpose. A list of the apparatus and reagents which are required, and a description of the procedure follows.

  4. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Roitsch, Carolyn Ann; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60-80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  5. Evaluation of an Immunochromatographic Assay Kit for Rapid Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Clinical Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Young; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Hoi; Lee, Eun Yup; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Chang, Chulhun L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated a new immunochromatographic assay (ICA) using mouse monoclonal anti-MPT64 antibody for rapid discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria in clinical isolates. A study with mycobacteria and other organisms showed excellent sensitivity (≅99%) and specificity (100%) and an appropriate detection limit (105 CFU/ml) when tested with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. This ICA can simplify the identification of M. tuberculosis in clinical laboratories. PMID:19052177

  6. Rapid Identification of the Genus Fonsecaea by PCR with Specific Oligonucleotide Primers

    PubMed Central

    Abliz, Paride; Fukushima, Kazutaka; Takizawa, Kayoko; Nieda, Norikazu; Miyaji, Makoto; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    An oligonucleotide primer set based on internal transcribed spacer regions of ribosomal DNA for PCR which gives the amplicon for only the DNA from Fonsecaea species was designed. This set yielded an amplicon with 333 bp for all strains of Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Fonsecaea compacta examined but no amplicons for related dematiaceous fungi and pathogenic yeasts. PCR using this primer set was considered to be a useful method for the rapid identification of the genus Fonsecaea. PMID:12574304

  7. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Ann Roitsch, Carolyn; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60–80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  8. An integral strategy toward the rapid identification of analogous nontarget compounds from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Gong, Ping; Wu, Yuzheng; Liao, Ke; Shen, Hanyuan; Qi, Qu; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2013-08-16

    Identification of nontarget compounds in complex mixtures is of significant importance in various scientific fields. On the basis of the universal property that the compounds in complex mixtures can be classified to various analogous families, this study presents a general strategy for the rapid identification of nontarget compounds from complex matrixes using herbal medicine as an example. The proposed strategy consists of three sequential steps. First, a blank control sample is prepared for the purpose of removing interferences in the complex matrixes via automatic chromatographic and mass spectrometric data comparisons. Second, the diagnostic ions guided bridging network strategy is developed for the rapid classification of analogous compounds and structural characterizations. Finally, a quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) is built to validate the identifications and to differentiate isomers. Using this strategy, we have successfully identified a total of 45 organic acids from Mai-Luo-Ning and Flos Lonicerae injection, and 46 ginsenosides from Shen-Mai injection samples. The QSRR approach enabled a successful differentiation of most isomers. The proposed strategy will be expected to be applicable to the identification of nontarget compounds in complex mixtures. PMID:23838303

  9. Rapid Identification of Candida Species with Species-Specific DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Cheryl M.; Lott, Timothy J.; Reiss, Errol; Morrison, Christine J.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid identification of Candida species has become more important because of an increase in infections caused by species other than Candida albicans, including species innately resistant to azole antifungal drugs. We previously developed a PCR assay with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) format to detect amplicons from the five most common Candida species by using universal fungal primers and species-specific probes directed to the ITS2 region of the gene for rRNA. We designed probes to detect seven additional Candida species (C. guilliermondii, C. kefyr, C. lambica, C. lusitaniae, C. pelliculosa, C. rugosa, and C. zeylanoides) included in the API 20C sugar assimilation panel, five probes for species not identified by API 20C (C. haemulonii, C. norvegica, C. norvegensis, C. utilis, and C. viswanathii), and a probe for the newly described species C. dubliniensis, creating a panel of 18 Candida species probes. The PCR-EIA correctly identified multiple strains of each species tested, including five identified as C. albicans by the currently available API 20C database but determined to be C. dubliniensis by genotypic and nonroutine phenotypic characteristics. Species identification time was reduced from a mean of 3.5 days by conventional identification methods to 7 h by the PCR-EIA. This method is simple, rapid, and feasible for identifying Candida species in clinical laboratories that utilize molecular identification techniques and provides a novel method to differentiate the new species, C. dubliniensis, from C. albicans. PMID:9774576

  10. Assessment of the biocompatibility, stability, and suitability of novel thermoresponsive films for the rapid generation of cellular constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jamie A.

    2011-12-01

    Stimuli responsive polymers (SRP) are of great interest in the bioengineering community due to their use in applications such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. One example of an SRP is poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) or pNIPAM. This SRP has the capability of changing its conformation with a slight temperature change: adherent mammalian cells spontaneously release as a confluent cell sheet, which can be harvested for cell sheet engineering purposes. Since its initial use in 1968, many researchers have used pNIPAM to obtain a cell sheet composed of their cell type of interest. The differing protocols used for these diverse cell types, such as the conditions used for cell detachment, and the varying methods used for derivatizing substrates with pNIPAM have all led to conflicting reports on the utility of pNIPAM for cell sheet engineering purposes, as well as the relative cytotoxicity of the polymer. In this work, some of the key inconsistencies in the literature and previously unaddressed challenges when utilizing pNIPAM films are overcome for the purpose of rapid generation of cellular constructs, specifically spheroids. Pertinent characteristics of low temperature detachment are investigated for their effect on the kinetics of cell detachment. In addition, a novel, inexpensive method for obtaining pNIPAM films for mammalian cell detachment, combining pNIPAM with a sol-gel, was optimized and compared to plasma polymerization deposition. Furthermore, proper storage conditions (e.g. temperature and relative humidity) for these films were investigated to increase stability of the films for using tissue culture conditions. To increase the speed of generation of cell sheets, electrospun mats and hydrogels with a high surface area-to-volume ratio were developed. The result is a platform appropriate for the rapid formation of cellular constructs, such as engineered tissues and spheroids for cancer cell research.

  11. Physical properties and cellular responses to calcium phosphate coating produced by laser rapid forming on titanium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Hu, J; Guan, T H; Wu, J; Zhang, C B; Gao, B

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the surface bioactivity of titanium implants, CaCO₃ and CaHPO₄·2H₂O powder was used to fabricate a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating using laser rapid forming (LRF) technology. The surface characterization showed that a porous and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) layer with small amount of alpha-TCP was formed on commercial pure titanium (Ti). The bonding strength between the coating and the Ti substrate was above 40.17 MPa measured by the means of pull-off test. The elastic modulus and the average microhardness of the coating were 117.61 GPa and 431.2 HV₀.₁, respectively. Through the static immersion test, it was proved that the coating could not only prevent the corrosion of Ti but also promote the redeposition of beta-TCP in artificial saliva. Osteoblasts possessed good attachment performance and strong proliferation ability on the surface of LRF coating (p < 0.05) in our cell experiments. This result demonstrated that the LRF coating could improve the surface cytocompatibility of titanium. Using scanning electron microscopy observation, it was found that osteoblasts grown on LRF coating formed multiple layers in pours. The result of reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the expressions of ITGβ1 and BMP-2 were significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated on the LRF coating in a time-dependent manner, compared with uncoated Ti. These findings suggested that the LRF technology might be a promising potential treatment for fabricating CaP coatings on titanium implants. PMID:23139072

  12. Rapid identification of Candida species in blood cultures by a clinically useful PCR method.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J H; Nolte, F S; Morrison, C J

    1997-01-01

    Widespread use of fluconazole for the prophylaxis and treatment of candidiasis has led to a reduction in the number of cases of candidemia caused by Candida albicans but has also resulted in the emergence of candidemias caused by innately fluconazole-resistant, non-C. albicans Candida species. Given the fulminant and rapidly fatal outcome of acute disseminated candidiasis, rapid identification of newly emerging Candida species in blood culture is critical for the implementation of appropriately targeted antifungal drug therapy. Therefore, we used a PCR-based assay to rapidly identify Candida species from positive blood culture bottles. This assay used fungus-specific, universal primers for DNA amplification and species-specific probes to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, or C. glabrata amplicons. It also used a simpler and more rapid (1.5-h) sample preparation technique than those described previously and used detergent, heat, and mechanical breakage to recover Candida species DNA from blood cultures. A simple and rapid (3.5-h) enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA)-based format was then used for amplicon detection. One hundred fifty blood culture bottles, including 73 positive blood culture bottle sets (aerobic and anaerobic) from 31 patients with candidemia, were tested. The combined PCR and EIA methods (PCR-EIA) correctly identified all Candida species in 73 blood culture bottle sets, including bottles containing bacteria coisolated with yeasts and 3 cultures of samples from patients with mixed candidemias originally identified as single-species infections by routine phenotypic identification methods. Species identification time was reduced from a mean of 3.5 days by routine phenotypic methods to 7 h by the PCR-EIA method. No false-positive results were obtained for patients with bacteremias (n = 18), artificially produced non-Candida fungemias (n = 3), or bottles with no growth (n = 20). Analytical sensitivity was 1 cell per 2-microl

  13. Proteomic analysis and identification of cellular interactors of the giant ubiquitin ligase HERC2.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Jeffrey T; Martinez-Noël, Gustavo; Arndt, Verena; Hayes, Sebastian; Chittenden, Thomas W; Harper, J Wade; Howley, Peter M

    2015-02-01

    HERC2 is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase with multiple structural domains that has been implicated in an array of cellular processes. Mutations in HERC2 are linked to developmental delays and impairment caused by nervous system dysfunction, such as Angelman Syndrome and autism-spectrum disorders. However, HERC2 cellular activity and regulation remain poorly understood. We used a broad proteomic approach to survey the landscape of cellular proteins that interact with HERC2. We identified nearly 300 potential interactors, a subset of which we validated binding to HERC2. The potential HERC2 interactors included the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, the intracellular transport COPI coatomer complex, the glycogen regulator phosphorylase kinase, beta-catenin, PI3 kinase, and proteins involved in fatty acid transport and iron homeostasis. Through a complex bioinformatic analysis of potential interactors, we linked HERC2 to cellular processes including intracellular protein trafficking and transport, metabolism of cellular energy, and protein translation. Given its size, multidomain structure, and association with various cellular activities, HERC2 may function as a scaffold to integrate protein complexes and bridge critical cellular pathways. This work provides a significant resource with which to interrogate HERC2 function more deeply and evaluate its contributions to mechanisms governing cellular homeostasis and disease. PMID:25476789

  14. Proteomic Analysis and Identification of Cellular Interactors of the Giant Ubiquitin Ligase HERC2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HERC2 is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase with multiple structural domains that has been implicated in an array of cellular processes. Mutations in HERC2 are linked to developmental delays and impairment caused by nervous system dysfunction, such as Angelman Syndrome and autism-spectrum disorders. However, HERC2 cellular activity and regulation remain poorly understood. We used a broad proteomic approach to survey the landscape of cellular proteins that interact with HERC2. We identified nearly 300 potential interactors, a subset of which we validated binding to HERC2. The potential HERC2 interactors included the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, the intracellular transport COPI coatomer complex, the glycogen regulator phosphorylase kinase, beta-catenin, PI3 kinase, and proteins involved in fatty acid transport and iron homeostasis. Through a complex bioinformatic analysis of potential interactors, we linked HERC2 to cellular processes including intracellular protein trafficking and transport, metabolism of cellular energy, and protein translation. Given its size, multidomain structure, and association with various cellular activities, HERC2 may function as a scaffold to integrate protein complexes and bridge critical cellular pathways. This work provides a significant resource with which to interrogate HERC2 function more deeply and evaluate its contributions to mechanisms governing cellular homeostasis and disease. PMID:25476789

  15. Rapid identification of oral Actinomyces species cultivated from subgingival biofilm by MALDI-TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Stingu, Catalina S.; Borgmann, Toralf; Rodloff, Arne C.; Vielkind, Paul; Jentsch, Holger; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Eschrich, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinomyces are a common part of the residential flora of the human intestinal tract, genitourinary system and skin. Isolation and identification of Actinomyces by conventional methods is often difficult and time consuming. In recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has become a rapid and simple method to identify bacteria. Objective The present study evaluated a new in-house algorithm using MALDI-TOF-MS for rapid identification of different species of oral Actinomyces cultivated from subgingival biofilm. Design Eleven reference strains and 674 clinical strains were used in this study. All the strains were preliminarily identified using biochemical methods and then subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis using both similarity-based analysis and classification methods (support vector machine [SVM]). The genotype of the reference strains and of 232 clinical strains was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Results The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of all references strains confirmed their previous identification. The MALDI-TOF-MS spectra obtained from the reference strains and the other clinical strains undoubtedly identified as Actinomyces by 16S rRNA sequencing were used to create the mass spectra reference database. Already a visual inspection of the mass spectra of different species reveals both similarities and differences. However, the differences between them are not large enough to allow a reliable differentiation by similarity analysis. Therefore, classification methods were applied as an alternative approach for differentiation and identification of Actinomyces at the species level. A cross-validation of the reference database representing 14 Actinomyces species yielded correct results for all species which were represented by more than two strains in the database. Conclusions Our results suggest that a combination of MALDI-TOF-MS with powerful

  16. Rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products based on DNA sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Shibayama, H; Suzuki, Y; Karita, S; Takamatsu, S

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop rapid and accurate procedures to identify microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products, based on the identity of the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA coding DNA (rDNA). Five types of microorganisms were isolated from the inner portion of lotion bottle caps, skin care lotions, and cleansing gels. The rDNA ITS region of microorganisms was amplified through the use of colony-direct PCR or ordinal PCR using DNA extracts as templates. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified DNA were determined and subjected to homology search of a publicly available DNA database. Thereby, we obtained DNA sequences possessing high similarity with the query sequences from the databases of all the five organisms analyzed. The traditional identification procedure requires expert skills, and a time period of approximately 1 month to identify the microorganisms. On the contrary, 3-7 days were sufficient to complete all the procedures employed in the current method, including isolation and cultivation of organisms, DNA sequencing, and the database homology search. Moreover, it was possible to develop the skills necessary to perform the molecular techniques required for the identification procedures within 1 week. Consequently, the current method is useful for rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms, contaminating cosmetics. PMID:18492168

  17. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool. PMID:27153070

  18. A novel multiplex isothermal amplification method for rapid detection and identification of viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nyan, Dougbeh-Chris; Swinson, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid multiplex isothermal amplification assay has been developed for detection and identification of multiple blood-borne viruses that infect millions of people world-wide. These infections may lead to chronic diseases or death if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Sets of virus-specific oligonucleotides and oligofluorophores were designed and used in a reverse-transcription loop-mediated multiplexed isothermal amplification reaction for detection and gel electrophoretic identification of human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis-B virus (HBV), hepatitis-C virus (HCV), hepatitis-E virus (HEV), dengue virus (DENV), and West Nile (WNV) virus infection in blood plasma. Amplification was catalyzed with two thermostable enzymes for 30–60 minutes under isothermal condition, utilizing a simple digital heat source. Electrophoretic analysis of amplified products demonstrated simultaneous detection of 6 viruses that were distinctly identified by unique ladder-like banding patterns. Naked-eye fluorescent visualization of amplicons revealed intensely fluorescing products that indicated positive detection. The test demonstrated a 97% sensitivity and a 100% specificity, with no cross-reaction with other viruses observed. This portable detection tool may have clinical and field utility in the developing and developed world settings. This may enable rapid diagnosis and identification of viruses for targeted therapeutic intervention and prevention of disease transmission. PMID:26643761

  19. Rapid Multi-Damage Identification for Health Monitoring of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Wafer Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Si, Liang; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Through the use of the wave reflection from any damage in a structure, a Hilbert spectral analysis-based rapid multi-damage identification (HSA-RMDI) technique with piezoelectric wafer sensor arrays (PWSA) is developed to monitor and identify the presence, location and severity of damage in carbon fiber composite structures. The capability of the rapid multi-damage identification technique to extract and estimate hidden significant information from the collected data and to provide a high-resolution energy-time spectrum can be employed to successfully interpret the Lamb waves interactions with single/multiple damage. Nevertheless, to accomplish the precise positioning and effective quantification of multiple damage in a composite structure, two functional metrics from the RMDI technique are proposed and used in damage identification, which are the energy density metric and the energy time-phase shift metric. In the designed damage experimental tests, invisible damage to the naked eyes, especially delaminations, were detected in the leftward propagating waves as well as in the selected sensor responses, where the time-phase shift spectra could locate the multiple damage whereas the energy density spectra were used to quantify the multiple damage. The increasing damage was shown to follow a linear trend calculated by the RMDI technique. All damage cases considered showed completely the developed RMDI technique potential as an effective online damage inspection and assessment tool. PMID:27153070

  20. Etiological Analysis of Fungal Keratitis and Rapid Identification of Predominant Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    He, Dan; Hao, Jilong; Gao, Song; Wan, Xue; Wang, Wanting; Shan, Qiushi; Wang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is a worldwide-distributed refractory and potentially blinding ocular infection caused by various fungi. It is necessary to investigate the etiological and epidemiological characteristics of this disease and establish a rapid and specific pathogenic identification method. Here, we isolated and identified fungal pathogens of 275 patients with presumed fungal keratitis from Jilin Province, China, and conducted statistical analyses of epidemiological information. The positive rate of fungal culture was 72.0 %. Fusarium sp. was the most common genus among 210 fungal isolates. The predominant species were Fusarium solani, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida glabrata, which accounted for over 50 % of the isolated organisms. Corneal trauma and previous use of drugs were the most important predisposing factors. In addition, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed with species-specific primers of the three species that could identify them with amplicons of approximately 330 bp from F. solani, 275 bp from A. fumigatus, and 230 bp from C. glabrata. Additionally, PCR with fungal universal primers and multiplex PCR were performed using DNA prepared by an improved DNA extraction method from corneal scrapings. With this method, fungal pathogens from corneal scrapings could be specifically and rapidly identified within 8 h. The culture-independent rapid identification of corneal scrapings may have great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment of fungal keratitis. PMID:26446032

  1. Rapid urine preparation prior to identification of uropathogens by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Veron, L; Mailler, S; Girard, V; Muller, B H; L'Hostis, G; Ducruix, C; Lesenne, A; Richez, A; Rostaing, H; Lanet, V; Ghirardi, S; van Belkum, A; Mallard, F

    2015-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) has been introduced in clinical routine microbiology laboratories. For the rapid diagnosis of urinary tract infections, culture-independent methods prior MALDI-mediated identification have been described. Here, we describe a comparison of three of these methods based on their performance of bacterial identification and their potential as a routine tool for microbiology labs : (i) differential centrifugation, (ii) urine filtration and (iii) a 5-h bacterial cultivation on solid culture media. For 19 urine samples, all methods were directly compared and correct bacterial species identification by MALDI was used as performance indicator. A higher percentage of correct MALDI identification was obtained after filtration (78.9 %) and the growth-based method (84.2 %) as compared to differential centrifugation (68.4 %). Additional testing of 76 mono-microbial specimens (bacteriuria > 10(5) CFU/mL) confirmed the good performance of short growth with a 90.8 % correct MALDI score, with a potentially better fit to the routine workflow of microbiology labs. PMID:26054715

  2. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  3. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures. PMID:26904669

  4. Clinical evaluation of a simple, rapid procedure for the presumptive identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J W; Gagnet, S M; Lewis, S A; Stauffer, L R

    1977-01-01

    A simple, rapid procedure for the presumptive identification of anaerobic bacteria has been evaluated. Two hundred and thirty-five clinical isolates were identified using gas-liquid chromatography and 3-ml volumes of a few selected test media. These test media were stored aerobically and incubated in GasPak anaerobic jars. The average incubation time was 39 h. This procedure, when compared to the results of our standard identification procedure, correctly identified 98% of the isolates to the genus level, 83% to the species level, and 83% of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus to the subspecies level. Fifty-three of the isolates were also identified by using 0.5-ml volumes of test media stored, inoculated, and incubated in an anaerobic glove box. The 3-ml-and the 0.5-ml-volume procedures correctly identified comparable percentages of the 53 isolates. PMID:323283

  5. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a ‘magic bullet’ that is capable of binding at many of the ligand ‘hot spots’ found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are ‘hidden’ in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals. PMID:26870381

  6. Evaluation of the MS-2 system for rapid identification of Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, A W; Martin, W J; McCarthy, L R; Schwab, D A; Cooper, B H; Helgeson, N G; Prowant, S; Robson, J

    1980-01-01

    The precision, accuracy, and other performance characteristics of the MS-2 (Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic Division, Dallas, Tex.) system for the identification of Enterobacteriaceae were evaluated in a collaborative study involving three clinical laboratories. When identifying 150 unknown, coded organisms, the MS-2 system was 97%, 98%, and 93% accurate, respectively, in three laboratories. The system showed an overall accuracy of 94% when compared with conventional manual tube methods in identifying 1,154 clinical isolates of 26 species of Enterobacteriaceae. Discrepancies between automated and conventional methods were chiefly caused by biochemical variants, especially among Enterobacter species. The MS-2 system was rapid and simple to operate and produced printed results of bacterial identification in 5 h. The cost of disposable components compared favorably with commercial, visually read systems for identifying Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:7024299

  7. Rapid identification of acetic acid bacteria using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Benagli, Cinzia; Chappuis, Malou; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Tonolla, Mauro; Barja, François

    2013-03-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are widespread microorganisms characterized by their ability to transform alcohols and sugar-alcohols into their corresponding organic acids. The suitability of matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of cultured AAB involved in the industrial production of vinegar was evaluated on 64 reference strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter. Analysis of MS spectra obtained from single colonies of these strains confirmed their basic classification based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. MALDI-TOF analyses of isolates from vinegar cross-checked by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments allowed AAB to be identified, and it was possible to differentiate them from mixed cultures and non-AAB. The results showed that MALDI-TOF MS analysis was a rapid and reliable method for the clustering and identification of AAB species. PMID:23182036

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients. PMID:16954289

  9. Systematic Identification of Cellular Signals Reactivating Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fuqu; Harada, Josephine N; Brown, Helen J; Deng, Hongyu; Song, Moon Jung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Nelson, Christian G; Vieira, Jeffrey; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Chanda, Sumit K; Sun, Ren

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma–derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:17397260

  10. Identification of Novel Cellular Targets in Biliary Tract Cancers Using Global Gene Expression Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Donna E.; Rahman, Ayman; Hidalgo, Manuel; Thuluvath, Paul J.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Shulick, Richard; Ku, Ja-Lok; Park, Jae-Gahb; Miyazaki, Kohje; Ashfaq, Raheela; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Varma, Ram; Hawthorne, Lesleyann; Geradts, Joseph; Argani, Pedram; Maitra, Anirban

    2003-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinoma carries a poor prognosis, and difficulties with clinical management in patients with advanced disease are often due to frequent late-stage diagnosis, lack of serum markers, and limited information regarding biliary tumor pathogenesis. RNA-based global analyses of gene expression have led to the identification of a large number of up-regulated genes in several cancer types. We have used the recently developed Affymetrix U133A gene expression microarrays containing nearly 22,000 unique transcripts to obtain global gene expression profiles from normal biliary epithelial scrapings (n = 5), surgically resected biliary carcinomas (n = 11), and biliary cancer cell lines (n = 9). Microarray hybridization data were normalized using dCHIP (http://www.dCHIP.org) to identify differentially up-regulated genes in primary biliary cancers and biliary cancer cell lines and their expression profiles was compared to that of normal epithelial scrapings using the dCHIP software as well as Significance Analysis of Microarrays or SAM (http://www-stat.stanford.edu/∼tibs/SAM/). Comparison of the dCHIP and SAM datasets revealed an overlapping list of 282 genes expressed at greater than threefold levels in the cancers compared to normal epithelium (t-test P <0.1 in dCHIP, and median false discovery rate <10 in SAM). Several pathways integral to tumorigenesis were up-regulated in the biliary cancers, including proliferation and cell cycle antigens (eg, cyclins D2 and E2, cdc2/p34, and geminin), transcription factors (eg, homeobox B7 and islet-1), growth factors and growth factor receptors (eg, hepatocyte growth factor, amphiregulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), and enzymes modulating sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (eg, cystathionine β synthase, dCMP deaminase, and CTP synthase). In addition, we identified several “pathway” genes that are rapidly emerging as novel therapeutic targets in cancer (eg, cytosolic phospholipase A2, an upstream

  11. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel GGA/C-binding protein, GBP-i, that is rapidly inducible by cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Raj, G V; Khalili, K

    1994-01-01

    Immunosuppressive states with accompanying alterations in cytokine profiles have been postulated to play a vital role in the reactivation of viruses from latency. Cytokines regulate gene expression by activating transcription factors via well-characterized signal transduction pathways. In this study, we report the identification of a novel inducible protein, GBP-i, that binds to a double-stranded GGA/C-rich region of the transcriptional control region of the human papovavirus JC virus (JCV), specifically within the origin of viral DNA replication. GBP-i is distinct from previously characterized GC-box-binding proteins with respect to both its sequence specificity and its electrophoretic mobility on native and denaturing gels. GBP-i responds within 90 min to phorbol myristate acetate stimulation; however, unlike typical phorbol myristate acetate-inducible factors, this rapid induction is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. Further, the induction of GBP-i appears to be widespread and mediated by many inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, and transforming growth factor beta. Interestingly, the induced protein acts as a transcriptional repressor in its native context in the JCVL promoter. However, when its binding sequence is transposed to a heterologous promoter, GBP-i appears to function as a transcriptional activator. The data presented here suggest a role for GBP-i in cytokine-mediated induction of viral and cellular genes. Images PMID:7969118

  13. Identification of the Species of Origin for Meat Products by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balog, Julia; Perenyi, Dora; Guallar-Hoyas, Cristina; Egri, Attila; Pringle, Steven D; Stead, Sara; Chevallier, Olivier P; Elliott, Chris T; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-06-15

    Increasingly abundant food fraud cases have brought food authenticity and safety into major focus. This study presents a fast and effective way to identify meat products using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS). The experimental setup was demonstrated to be able to record a mass spectrometric profile of meat specimens in a time frame of <5 s. A multivariate statistical algorithm was developed and successfully tested for the identification of animal tissue with different anatomical origin, breed, and species with 100% accuracy at species and 97% accuracy at breed level. Detection of the presence of meat originating from a different species (horse, cattle, and venison) has also been demonstrated with high accuracy using mixed patties with a 5% detection limit. REIMS technology was found to be a promising tool in food safety applications providing a reliable and simple method for the rapid characterization of food products. PMID:27167240

  14. Identification of GI cancers utilising rapid mid-infrared spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Kendall, Catherine; Barr, Hugh; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nick

    2016-03-01

    Pathologists find it notoriously difficult to provide both inter- and intra-observer agreement on a diagnosis of early gastrointestinal cancers. Vibrational spectroscopic approaches have shown their value in providing molecular compositional data from tissue samples and therefore enabling the identification of disease specific changes, when combined with multivariate techniques. Mid-infrared microscopic imaging is undergoing rapid developments in sources, detectors and spectrometers. Here we explore the use of high magnification FTIR for GI cancers and consider how the MINERVA (MId- to NEaR infrared spectroscopy for improVed medical diAgnostics) project, which is developing discrete frequency IR imaging tools will enable histopathologists to obtain rapid molecular images form unstained tissue sections.

  15. ERP and Adaptive Autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition to study rapid auditory processing in infants.

    PubMed

    Piazza, C; Cantiani, C; Tacchino, G; Molteni, M; Reni, G; Bianchi, A M

    2014-01-01

    The ability to process rapidly-occurring auditory stimuli plays an important role in the mechanisms of language acquisition. For this reason, the research community has begun to investigate infant auditory processing, particularly using the Event Related Potentials (ERP) technique. In this paper we approach this issue by means of time domain and time-frequency domain analysis. For the latter, we propose the use of Adaptive Autoregressive (AAR) identification with spectral power decomposition. Results show EEG delta-theta oscillation enhancement related to the processing of acoustic frequency and duration changes, suggesting that, as expected, power modulation encodes rapid auditory processing (RAP) in infants and that the time-frequency analysis method proposed is able to identify this modulation. PMID:25571014

  16. Evaluation of the VITEK 2 system for rapid identification of yeasts and yeast-like organisms.

    PubMed

    Graf, B; Adam, T; Zill, E; Göbel, U B

    2000-05-01

    The new VITEK 2 system is a fully automated system dedicated to the identification and susceptibility testing of microorganisms. In conjunction with the VITEK ID-YST card the VITEK 2 system allows the identification of clinically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms in 15 h due to a sensitive fluorescence-based technology. The ID-YST card consists of 47 biochemical reactions. The database comprises 51 taxa, including newly described species. In this study we evaluated the reliability of the VITEK ID-YST card for the identification of yeasts and yeast-like organisms encountered in a clinical microbiology laboratory. A total of 241 strains representing 21 species were studied. The strains were isolated from clinical samples within a period of 60 days prior to the identification. The tests were performed using 24-h to 55-h subcultures on Sabouraud-gentamicin-chloramphenicol agar. Each strain was tested in parallel using the ID 32C strip as a comparison method combined with microscopic morphology and an agglutination test for C. krusei. Overall, 222 strains (92.1%) were unequivocally identified including 11 isolates (4.6%) identified with low discrimination resolved by simple additional tests. Ten strains (4. 1%) for which results were given with low discrimination could not be unequivocally identified with supplemental tests, 4 strains (1. 7%) were misidentified and 5 strains (2.1%) could not be identified. In conclusion, we found that the VITEK 2 system is a rapid and accurate method for the identification of medically important yeasts and yeast-like organisms. PMID:10790099

  17. SIMULTANEOUS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMONIUM BY SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of rapid and routine identification methods for foodborne bacteria is of considerable importance due to concerns regarding bio-/agro-terrorism, public health, and economic loss. The traditional techniques are time consuming and are not sufficiently rapid to assure the safety of ready...

  18. Rapid Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis from Food Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Shields, Michael J; Goji, Noriko; Paquet, Chantal; Thomas, Matthew C; Janzen, Timothy W; Bin Kingombe, Cesar I; Kell, Arnold J; Hahn, Kristen R

    2012-01-01

    Interest has recently been renewed in the possible use of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague, as a biological weapon by terrorists. The vulnerability of food to intentional contamination coupled with reports of humans having acquired plague through eating infected animals that were not adequately cooked or handling of meat from infected animals makes the possible use of Y. pestis in a foodborne bioterrorism attack a reality. Rapid, efficient food sample preparation and detection systems that will help overcome the problem associated with the complexity of the different matrices and also remove any ambiguity in results will enable rapid informed decisions to be made regarding contamination of food with biothreat agents. We have developed a rapid detection assay that combines the use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing in generating results for the unambiguous identification of Y. pestis from milk (0.9 CFU/mL), bagged salad (1.6 CFU/g), and processed meat (10 CFU/g). The low detection limits demonstrated in this assay provide a novel tool for the rapid detection and confirmation of Y. pestis in food without the need for enrichment. The combined use of the iCropTheBug system and pyrosequencing for efficient capture and detection of Y. pestis is novel and has potential applications in food biodefence. PMID:23091729

  19. Rapid Identification of Pseudallescheria and Scedosporium Strains by Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Michaela; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Sun, Jiufeng; Lu, Qiaoyun

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudallescheria boydii complex, comprising environmental pathogens with Scedosporium anamorphs, has recently been subdivided into five main species: Scedosporium dehoogii, S. aurantiacum, Pseudallescheria minutispora, P. apiosperma, and P. boydii, while the validity of some other taxa is being debated. Several Pseudallescheria and Scedosporium species are indicator organisms of pollution in soil and water. Scedosporium dehoogii in particular is enriched in soils contaminated by aliphatic hydrocarbons. In addition, the fungi may cause life-threatening infections involving the central nervous system in severely impaired patients. For screening purposes, rapid and economic tools for species recognition are needed. Our aim is to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a screening tool for species-specific identification of Pseudallescheria and Scedosporium. With this aim, a set of padlock probes was designed on the basis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, differing by up to 13 fixed mutations. Padlock probes were unique as judged from sequence comparison by BLAST search in GenBank and in dedicated research databases at CBS (Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures Fungal Biodiversity Centre). RCA was applied as an in vitro tool, tested with pure DNA amplified from cultures. The species-specific padlock probes designed in this study yielded 100% specificity. The method presented here was found to be an attractive alternative to identification by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) or sequencing. The rapidity (<1 day), specificity, and low costs make RCA a promising screening tool for environmentally and clinically relevant fungi. PMID:22057865

  20. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Trangoni, Marcos D; Gioffré, Andrea K; Cerón Cucchi, María E; Caimi, Karina C; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J; Cravero, Silvio L

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR Green(TM) allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries. PMID:26273282

  1. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Allows Rapid Identification of Microorganisms in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Autenrieth, Ingo B.

    2000-01-01

    Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes, pathogens were rapidly detected and identified in positive blood culture bottles without cultivation and biotyping. In this study, 115 blood cultures with a positive growth index as determined by a continuous-reading automated blood culture system were examined by both conventional laboratory methods and FISH. For this purpose, oligonucleotide probes that allowed identification of approximately 95% of those pathogens typically associated with bacteremia were produced. The sensitivity and specificity of these probes were 100%. From all 115 blood cultures, microorganisms were grown after 1 day and identification to the family, genus, or species level was achieved after 1 to 3 days while 111 samples (96.5%) were similarly identified by FISH within 2.5 h. Staphylococci were identified in 62 of 62 samples, streptococci and enterococci were identified in 19 of 20 samples, gram-negative rods were identified in 28 of 30 samples, and fungi were identified in two of two samples. Thus, FISH is an appropriate method for identification of pathogens grown in blood cultures from septicemic patients. PMID:10655393

  2. Rapid Electrochemical Detection and Identification of Microbiological and Chemical Contaminants for Manned Spaceflight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane; Botkin, Douglas; Gazda, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial control in the spacecraft environment is a daunting task, especially in the presence of human crew members. Currently, assessing the potential crew health risk associated with a microbial contamination event requires return of representative environmental samples that are analyzed in a ground-based laboratory. It is therefore not currently possible to quickly identify microbes during spaceflight. This project addresses the unmet need for spaceflight-compatible microbial identification technology. The electrochemical detection and identification platform is expected to provide a sensitive, specific, and rapid sample-to-answer capability for in-flight microbial monitoring that can distinguish between related microorganisms (pathogens and non-pathogens) as well as chemical contaminants. This will dramatically enhance our ability to monitor the spacecraft environment and the health risk to the crew. Further, the project is expected to eliminate the need for sample return while significantly reducing crew time required for detection of multiple targets. Initial work will focus on the optimization of bacterial detection and identification. The platform is designed to release nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from microorganisms without the use of harmful chemicals. Bacterial DNA or RNA is captured by bacteria-specific probe molecules that are bound to a microelectrode, and that capture event can generate a small change in the electrical current (Lam, et al. 2012. Anal. Chem. 84(1): 21-5.). This current is measured, and a determination is made whether a given microbe is present in the sample analyzed. Chemical detection can be accomplished by directly applying a sample to the microelectrode and measuring the resulting current change. This rapid microbial and chemical detection device is designed to be a low-cost, low-power platform anticipated to be operated independently of an external power source, characteristics optimal for manned spaceflight and areas where power

  3. Identification of cellular proteome using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis in ST cells infected with transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is an enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes diarrhea in pigs, which is correlated with high morbidity and mortality in suckling piglets. Information remains limited about the comparative protein expression of host cells in response to TGEV infection. In this study, cellular protein response to TGEV infection in swine testes (ST) cells was analyzed, using the proteomic method of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identification. Results 33 differentially expressed protein spots, of which 23 were up-regulated and 10 were down-regulated were identified. All the protein spots were successfully identified. The identified proteins were involved in the regulation of essential processes such as cellular structure and integrity, RNA processing, protein biosynthesis and modification, vesicle transport, signal transduction, and the mitochondrial pathway. Western blot analysis was used to validate the changes of alpha tubulin, keratin 19, and prohibitin during TGEV infection. Conclusions To our knowledge, we have performed the first analysis of the proteomic changes in host cell during TGEV infection. 17 altered cellular proteins that differentially expressed in TGEV infection were identified. The present study provides protein-related information that should be useful for understanding the host cell response to TGEV infection and the underlying mechanism of TGEV replication and pathogenicity. PMID:23855489

  4. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  5. Rapid Detection and Identification of Human Hookworm Infections through High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Methods Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. Conclusion The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species. PMID:22844538

  6. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson M; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 10(6) copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  7. Rapid Identification of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Sporothrix Species with Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson M.; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix infections are emerging as an important human and animal threat among otherwise healthy patients, especially in Brazil and China. Correct identification of sporotrichosis agents is beneficial for epidemiological surveillance, enabling implementation of adequate public-health policies and guiding antifungal therapy. In areas of limited resources where sporotrichosis is endemic, high-throughput detection methods that are specific and sensitive are preferred over phenotypic methods that usually result in misidentification of closely related Sporothrix species. We sought to establish rolling circle amplification (RCA) as a low-cost screening tool for species-specific identification of human-pathogenic Sporothrix. We developed six species-specific padlock probes targeting polymorphisms in the gene encoding calmodulin. BLAST-searches revealed candidate probes that were conserved intraspecifically; no significant homology with sequences from humans, mice, plants or microorganisms outside members of Sporothrix were found. The accuracy of our RCA-based assay was demonstrated through the specificity of probe-template binding to 25 S. brasiliensis, 58 S. schenckii, 5 S. globosa, 1 S. luriei, 4 S. mexicana, and 3 S. pallida samples. No cross reactivity between closely related species was evident in vitro, and padlock probes yielded 100% specificity and sensitivity down to 3 × 106 copies of the target sequence. RCA-based speciation matched identifications via phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding calmodulin and the rDNA operon (kappa 1.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-1.0), supporting its use as a reliable alternative to DNA sequencing. This method is a powerful tool for rapid identification and specific detection of medically relevant Sporothrix, and due to its robustness has potential for ecological studies. PMID:26696992

  8. Rapid context-based identification of target sounds in an auditory scene

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Marissa L.; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2015-01-01

    To make sense of our dynamic and complex auditory environment, we must be able to parse the sensory input into usable parts and pick out relevant sounds from all the potentially distracting auditory information. While it is unclear exactly how we accomplish this difficult task, Gamble and Woldorff (2014) recently reported an ERP study of an auditory target-search task in a temporally and spatially distributed, rapidly presented, auditory scene. They reported an early, differential, bilateral activation (beginning ~60 ms) between feature-deviating Target stimuli and physically equivalent feature-deviating Nontargets, reflecting a rapid Target-detection process. This was followed shortly later (~130 ms) by the lateralized N2ac ERP activation, reflecting the focusing of auditory spatial attention toward the Target sound and paralleling attentional-shifting processes widely studied in vision. Here we directly examined the early, bilateral, Target-selective effect to better understand its nature and functional role. Participants listened to midline-presented sounds that included Target and Nontarget stimuli that were randomly either embedded in a brief rapid stream or presented alone. The results indicate that this early bilateral effect results from a template for the Target that utilizes its feature deviancy within a stream to enable rapid identification. Moreover, individual-differences analysis showed that the size of this effect was larger for subjects with faster response times. The findings support the hypothesis that our auditory attentional systems can implement and utilize a context-based relational template for a Target sound, making use of additional auditory information in the environment when needing to rapidly detect a relevant sound. PMID:25848684

  9. Rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18 by multiplex nested PCR-immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Bin; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are known to be high-risk viruses that cause cervical cancer. An HPV rapid testing kit that could help physicians to make early and more informed decisions regarding patient care is needed urgently but not yet available. This study aimed to develop a multiplex nested polymerase chain reaction-immunochromatographic test (PCR-ICT) for the rapid identification of HPV 16 and 18. A multiplex nested PCR was constructed to amplify the HPV 16 and 18 genotype-specific L1 gene fragments and followed by ICT which coated with antibodies to identify rapidly the different PCR products. The type-specific gene regions of high-risk HPV 16 and 18 could be amplified successfully by multiplex nested PCR at molecular sizes of approximately 99 and 101bp, respectively. The capture antibodies raised specifically against the moleculars labeled on the PCR products could be detected simultaneously both HPV 16 and 18 in one strip. Under optimal conditions, this PCR-ICT assay had the capability to detect HPV in a sample with as low as 100 copies of HPV viral DNA. The PCR-ICT system has the advantage of direct and simultaneous detection of two high-risk HPV 16 and 18 DNA targets in one sample, which suggested a significant potential of this assay for clinical application. PMID:25446515

  10. Rapid condition assessment of structural condition after a blast using state-space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskew, Edward; Jang, Shinae

    2015-04-01

    After a blast event, it is important to quickly quantify the structural damage for emergency operations. In order improve the speed, accuracy, and efficiency of condition assessments after a blast, the authors have previously performed work to develop a methodology for rapid assessment of the structural condition of a building after a blast. The method involved determining a post-event equivalent stiffness matrix using vibration measurements and a finite element (FE) model. A structural model was built for the damaged structure based on the equivalent stiffness, and inter-story drifts from the blast are determined using numerical simulations, with forces determined from the blast parameters. The inter-story drifts are then compared to blast design conditions to assess the structures damage. This method still involved engineering judgment in terms of determining significant frequencies, which can lead to error, especially with noisy measurements. In an effort to improve accuracy and automate the process, this paper will look into a similar method of rapid condition assessment using subspace state-space identification. The accuracy of the method will be tested using a benchmark structural model, as well as experimental testing. The blast damage assessments will be validated using pressure-impulse (P-I) diagrams, which present the condition limits across blast parameters. Comparisons between P-I diagrams generated using the true system parameters and equivalent parameters will show the accuracy of the rapid condition based blast assessments.

  11. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  12. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N.; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance – currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO – is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  13. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Lena K; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  14. Age-Related Declines in Early Sensory Memory: Identification of Rapid Auditory and Visual Stimulus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E.; Busey, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related temporal-processing declines of rapidly presented sequences may involve contributions of sensory memory. This study investigated recall for rapidly presented auditory (vowel) and visual (letter) sequences presented at six different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) that spanned threshold SOAs for sequence identification. Younger, middle-aged, and older adults participated in all tasks. Results were investigated at both equivalent performance levels (i.e., SOA threshold) and at identical physical stimulus values (i.e., SOAs). For four-item sequences, results demonstrated best performance for the first and last items in the auditory sequences, but only the first item for visual sequences. For two-item sequences, adults identified the second vowel or letter significantly better than the first. Overall, when temporal-order performance was equated for each individual by testing at SOA thresholds, recall accuracy for each position across the age groups was highly similar. These results suggest that modality-specific processing declines of older adults primarily determine temporal-order performance for rapid sequences. However, there is some evidence for a second amodal processing decline in older adults related to early sensory memory for final items in a sequence. This selective deficit was observed particularly for longer sequence lengths and was not accounted for by temporal masking. PMID:27199737

  15. Neuronal apoptosis in rats is accompanied by rapid impairment of cellular respiration and is prevented by scavengers of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Marra, E; Calissano, P

    1998-04-10

    Apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells induced by potassium withdrawal is accompanied by a very rapid decrease in both cell and mitochondrial respiration supported by glucose and succinate, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which is an index of oxidative phosphorylation and therefore reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 2 h after the beginning of apoptosis, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), actinomicin D or cycloheximide, previously reported to inhibit apoptosis, fully prevent the impairment of cellular respiration while scavengers of reactive oxygen species partially inhibit apoptosis and restore cellular respiration. PMID:9605472

  16. Catheter-related Mycobacterium fortuitum bloodstream infection: rapid identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Reinoso, M J; Olbrich, P; Solano-Paéz, P; Ybot-Gonzalez, P; Lepe, J A; Neth, O; Aznar, J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with stage III mediastinal Non Hodgkin Lymphoblastic T cell Lymphoma who suffered from catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBI) due to Mycobacterium fortuitum whilst receiving chemotherapy. Isolation of this rare pathogen was done directly from blood culture and identification was made rapidly within 48 h using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectro-metry as well as specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse hybridization method. This allowed prompt directed antibiotic therapy apart from central venous catheter removal and resulted in an excellent clinical response. This case highlights the potential benefit of using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a fast, cost-effective and precise methodology, in the diagnosis and subsequent management of invasive bacterial infection. PMID:24554588

  17. Rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, A; Marchesi, F; Balz, M; Bally, F; Böttger, E C; Bodmer, T

    1993-01-01

    A method for the rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level was developed on the basis of evaluation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gene encoding for the 65-kDa protein. The method involves restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products obtained with primers common to all mycobacteria. Using two restriction enzymes, BstEII and HaeIII, medically relevant and other frequent laboratory isolates were differentiated to the species or subspecies level by PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis. PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis was performed on isolates (n = 330) from solid and fluid culture media, including BACTEC, or from frozen and lyophilized stocks. The procedure does not involve hybridization steps or the use of radioactivity and can be completed within 1 working day. Images PMID:8381805

  18. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  19. Rapid profiling and identification of anthocyanins in fruits with Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H; Yin, Dulin

    2015-06-15

    The use of Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry (HT-IMMS) in the profiling of anthocyanins from different fruits is presented. Samples extracted with acidic methanol and purified with solid phase extraction were analyzed with direct IMMS infusion. The separation of various anthocyanins was achieved within 30s with resolving powers up to 110. The ion mobility drift times correlated with their mass-to-charge ratios with a correlation coefficient of 0.979 to produce a trend line that was characteristic for anthocyanins. Isomers with the same anthocyanidin but different hexoses were differentiated by ion mobility spectrometry. Furthermore, mobility separated ions underwent collision induced dissociation at the IMMS interface to provide MS/MS spectra. These fragmentation spectra aided in the identification of anthocyanidins via the loss of the saccharide groups. IMMS appears to be a rapid and efficient approach for profiling and identifying anthocyanins. PMID:25660880

  20. ID Learning Unit—Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Matthew P.; Hanson, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24–72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48–96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  1. ID Learning Unit-Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Matthew P; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24-72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48-96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  2. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s) is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82%) and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner. PMID:19664269

  3. Evaluation of Three Rapid Diagnostic Methods for Direct Identification of Microorganisms in Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Raquel M.; Bauerle, Elizabeth R.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of organisms from positive blood cultures generally takes several days. However, recently developed rapid diagnostic methods offer the potential for organism identification within only a few hours of blood culture positivity. In this study, we evaluated the performance of three commercial methods to rapidly identify organisms directly from positive blood cultures: QuickFISH (AdvanDx, Wolburn, MA), Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP; Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with Sepsityper processing (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA). A total of 159 blood cultures (VersaTREK Trek Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH) positive for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast were analyzed with QuickFISH and MALDI-TOF MS. In all, 102 blood cultures were analyzed using the BC-GP assay. For monomicrobial cultures, we observed 98.0% concordance with routine methods for both QuickFISH (143/146) and the BC-GP assay (93/95). MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated 80.1% (117/146) and 87.7% (128/146) concordance with routine methods to the genus and species levels, respectively. None of the methods tested were capable of consistently identifying polymicrobial cultures in their entirety or reliably differentiating Streptococcus pneumoniae from viridans streptococci. Nevertheless, the methods evaluated in this study are convenient and accurate for the most commonly encountered pathogens and have the potential to dramatically reduce turnaround time for the provision of results to the treating physician. PMID:24808235

  4. Identification of new quinic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase inhibitors by fluorescence-based cellular assay.

    PubMed

    Son, Dohyun; Kim, Chung Sub; Lee, Kang Ro; Park, Hyun-Ju

    2016-05-01

    A fluorescence-based cellular assay system was established to identify potential epigenetic modulator ligands. This assay method is to detect the de-repression of an EGFP reporter in cancer cells by the treatment of HDAC (histone deacetylase) or DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) inhibitor. Using this system, we conducted a preliminary screening of in-house natural product library containing extracts and pure compounds, and identified several active compounds. Among them, novel quinic acid derivatives were recognized as excellent HDAC inhibitors by both enzymatic and cell-based HDAC assays. PMID:26996372

  5. Improved protocol for rapid identification of certain spa types using high resolution melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  6. Improved Protocol for Rapid Identification of Certain Spa Types Using High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Stöger, Anna; Pietzka, Ariane T.; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Prewein, Bernhard; Sorschag, Sieglinde; Kunert, Renate; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant pathogens associated with health care. For efficient surveillance, control and outbreak investigation, S. aureus typing is essential. A high resolution melting curve analysis was developed and evaluated for rapid identification of the most frequent spa types found in an Austrian hospital consortium covering 2,435 beds. Among 557 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates 38 different spa types were identified by sequence analysis of the hypervariable region X of the protein A gene (spa). Identification of spa types through their characteristic high resolution melting curve profiles was considerably improved by double spiking with genomic DNA from spa type t030 and spa type t003 and allowed unambiguous and fast identification of the ten most frequent spa types t001 (58%), t003 (12%), t190 (9%), t041 (5%), t022 (2%), t032 (2%), t008 (2%), t002 (1%), t5712 (1%) and t2203 (1%), representing 93% of all isolates within this hospital consortium. The performance of the assay was evaluated by testing samples with unknown spa types from the daily routine and by testing three different high resolution melting curve analysis real-time PCR instruments. The ten most frequent spa types were identified from all samples and on all instruments with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Compared to classical spa typing by sequence analysis, this gene scanning assay is faster, cheaper and can be performed in a single closed tube assay format. Therefore it is an optimal screening tool to detect the most frequent endemic spa types and to exclude non-endemic spa types within a hospital. PMID:25768007

  7. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers. PMID:26199284

  8. Rapid Intrinsic Fluorescence Method for Direct Identification of Pathogens in Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John D.; Hyman, Jay M.; Borzhemskaya, Larisa; Bowen, Ann; McKellar, Caroline; Ullery, Michael; Mathias, Erin; Ronsick, Christopher; Link, John; Wilson, Mark; Clay, Bradford; Robinson, Ron; Thorpe, Thurman; van Belkum, Alex; Dunne, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A positive blood culture is a critical result that requires prompt identification of the causative agent. This article describes a simple method to identify microorganisms from positive blood culture broth within the time taken to perform a Gram stain (<20 min). The method is based on intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS) of whole cells and required development of a selective lysis buffer, aqueous density cushion, optical microcentrifuge tube, and reference database. A total of 1,121 monomicrobial-positive broth samples from 751 strains were analyzed to build a database representing 37 of the most commonly encountered species in bloodstream infections or present as contaminants. A multistage algorithm correctly classified 99.6% of unknown samples to the Gram level, 99.3% to the family level, and 96.5% to the species level. There were no incorrect results given at the Gram or family classification levels, while 0.8% of results were discordant at the species level. In 8/9 incorrect species results, the misidentified isolate was assigned to a species of the same genus. This unique combination of selective lysis, density centrifugation, and IFS can rapidly identify the most common microbial species present in positive blood cultures. Faster identification of the etiologic agent may benefit the clinical management of sepsis. Further evaluation is now warranted to determine the performance of the method using clinical blood culture specimens. PMID:24255123

  9. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  10. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers. PMID:26199284

  11. Evaluation of Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis for Rapid Identification of Candida Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Obručová, Hana; Tihelková, Radka; Kotásková, Iva; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Němcová, Eva; Freiberger, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical for initiating antifungal therapy and reducing the high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. In this study, we focused on rapid and sensitive identification of clinically important Candida species, utilizing the variability in the length of the ITS2 rRNA gene and fluorescent capillary electrophoresis (f-ITS2-PCR-CE). The method was developed and optimized on 29 various Candida reference strains from which 26 Candida species were clearly identified, while Candida guilliermondii, C. fermentati, and C. carpophila, which are closely related, could not be distinguished. The method was subsequently validated on 143 blinded monofungal clinical isolates (comprising 26 species) and was able to identify 88% of species unambiguously. This indicated a higher resolution power than the classical phenotypic approach which correctly identified 73%. Finally, the culture-independent potential of this technique was addressed by the analysis of 55 retrospective DNA samples extracted directly from clinical material. The method showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared to those of the combined results of cultivation and panfungal PCR followed by sequencing used as a gold standard. In conclusion, this newly developed f-ITS2-PCR-CE analytical approach was shown to be a fast, sensitive, and highly reproducible tool for both culture-dependent and culture-independent identification of clinically important Candida strains, including species of the "psilosis" complex. PMID:26935732

  12. Rapid identification and source-tracking of Listeria monocytogenes using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Snehal; Gulati, Vandana; Fox, Edward M; Karpe, Avinash; Beale, David J; Sevior, Danielle; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for the sometimes fatal disease listeriosis. Public health concerns and stringent regulations associated with the presence of this pathogen in food and food processing environments underline the need for rapid and reliable detection and subtyping techniques. In the current study, the application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a single identification and source-tracking tool for a collection of L. monocytogenes isolates, obtained predominantly from dairy sources within Australia, was explored. The isolates were cultured on different growth media and analysed using MALDI-TOF MS at two incubation times (24 and 48 h). Whilst reliable genus-level identification was achieved from most media, identification at the species level was found to be dependent on culture conditions. Successful speciation was highest for isolates cultured on the chromogenic Agar Listeria Ottaviani Agosti agar (ALOA, 91% of isolates) and non-selective horse blood agar (HBA, 89%) for 24h. Chemometric statistical analysis of the MALDI-TOF MS data enabled source-tracking of L. monocytogenes isolates obtained from four different dairy sources. Strain-level discrimination was also observed to be influenced by culture conditions. In addition, t-test/analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify potential biomarker peaks that differentiated the isolates according to their source of isolation. Source-tracking using MALDI-TOF MS was compared and correlated with the gold standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. The discriminatory index and the congruence between both techniques were compared using the Simpsons Diversity Index and adjusted Rand and Wallace coefficients. Overall, MALDI-TOF MS based source-tracking (using data obtained by culturing the isolates on HBA) and PFGE demonstrated good congruence with a Wallace coefficient of 0.71 and

  13. Noninvasive forward-scattering system for rapid detection, characterization, and identification of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwa, Bartek; Bayraktar, Bulent; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Huff, Karleigh; Bae, Euiwon; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial contamination of food products puts the public at risk and also generates a substantial cost for the food-processing industry. One of the greatest challenges in the response to these incidents is rapid recognition of the bacterial agents involved. Only a few currently available technologies allow testing to be performed outside of specialized microbiological laboratories. Most current systems are based on the use of expensive PCR or antibody-based techniques, and require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Herein, we report our efforts to develop a noninvasive optical forward-scattering system for rapid, automated identification of bacterial colonies grown on solid surfaces. The presented system employs computer-vision and pattern-recognition techniques to classify scatter patterns produced by bacterial colonies irradiated with laser light. Application of Zernike and Chebyshev moments, as well as Haralick texture descriptors for image feature extraction, allows for a very high recognition rate. An SVM algorithm was used for classification of patterns. Low error rates determined by cross-validation, reproducibility of the measurements, and robustness of the system prove that the proposed technology can be implemented in automated devices for bacterial detection.

  14. Species-specific PCR primers for the rapid identification of yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Muir, Alastair; Stratford, Malcolm; Wheals, Alan

    2011-06-01

    Species-specific primer pairs that produce a single band of known product size have been developed for members of the Zygosaccharomyces clade including Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces bisporus, Zygosaccharomyces kombuchaensis, Zygosaccharomyces lentus, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. An existing primer pair for the provisional new species Zygosaccharomyces pseudorouxii has been confirmed as specific. The HIS3 gene, encoding imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratase, was used as the target gene. This housekeeping gene evolves slowly and is thus well conserved among different isolates, but shows a significant number of base pair changes between even closely related species, sufficient for species-specific primer design. The primers were tested on type and wild strains of the genus Zygosaccharomyces and on members of the Saccharomycetaceae. Sequencing of the D1/D2 region of rDNA was used to confirm the identification of all nonculture collection isolates. This approach used extracted genomic DNA, but in practice, it can be used efficiently with a rapid colony PCR protocol. The method also successfully detected known and new hybrid strains of Z. rouxii and Z. pseudorouxii. The method is rapid, robust and inexpensive. It requires little expertise by the user and is thus useful for preliminary, large-scale screens. PMID:21332639

  15. Rapid detection and identification of Bacillus anthracis in food using pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Janzen, Timothy W; Shields, Michael J; Hahn, Kristen R; Thomas, Matthew C; Goji, Noriko

    2013-08-01

    The development of advanced methodologies for the detection of Bacillus anthracis has been evolving rapidly since the release of the anthrax spores in the mail in 2001. Recent advances in detection and identification techniques could prove to be an essential component in the defense against biological attacks. Sequence based such as pyrosequencing, which has the capability to determine short DNA stretches in real-time using biotinylated PCR amplicons, has potential biodefense applications. Using markers from the virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2) and chromosomal regions, we have demonstrated the power of this technology in the rapid, specific and sensitive detection of B. anthracis spores in food matrices including milk, juice, bottled water, and processed meat. The combined use of immunomagnetic separation and pyrosequencing showed positive detection when liquid foods (bottled water, milk, juice), and processed meat were experimentally inoculated with 6CFU/mL and 6CFU/g, respectively, without an enrichment step. Pyrosequencing is completed in about 60min (following PCR amplification) and yields accurate and reliable results with an added layer of confidence. The entire assay (from sample preparation to sequencing information) can be completed in about 7.5h. A typical run on food samples yielded 67-80bp reads with 94-100% identity to the expected sequence. This sequence based approach is a novel application for the detection of anthrax spores in food with potential application in foodborne bioterrorism response and biodefense involving the use of anthrax spores. PMID:23810955

  16. Rapid and field-deployable biological and chemical Raman-based identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Paxon, Tracy L.; Boudries, Hacene

    2011-06-01

    Pathogen detection using Raman spectroscopy is achieved through the use of a sandwich immunoassay. Antibody-modified magnetic beads are used to capture and concentrate target analytes in solution and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) tags are conjugated with antibodies and act as labels to enable specific detection of biological pathogens. The rapid detection of biological pathogens is critical to first responders, thus assays to detect E.Coli and Anthrax have been developed and will be reported. The problems associated with pathogen detection resulting from the spectral complexity and variability of microorganisms are overcome through the use of SERS tags, which provide an intense, easily recognizable, and spectrally consistent Raman signal. The developed E. coli assay has been tested with 5 strains of E. coli and shows a low limit of detection, on the order of 10 and 100 c.f.u. per assay. Additionally, the SERS assay utilizes magnetic beads to collect the labeled pathogens into the focal point of the detection laser beam, making the assay robust to commonly encountered white powder interferants such as flour, baking powder, and corn starch. The reagents were also found to be stable at room temperature over extended periods of time with testing conducted over a one year period. Finally, through a specialized software algorithm, the assays are interfaced to the Raman instrument, StreetLab Mobile, for rapid-field-deployable biological identification.

  17. FT-IR microspectroscopy in rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Inglid; Belo, Ricardo; Sakane, Kumiko; Cardoso, Maria Angélica Gargione; Khouri, Sônia; Uehara, Mituo; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2010-02-01

    In recent years FT-IR microspectroscopy has been developed for microbiology analysis and applied successfully in pure cultures of microorganisms to rapidly identify strains of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The investigation and characterization of microorganism mixed cultures is also of growing importance, especially in hospitals where it is common to poly-microbial infections. In this work, the rapid identification of bacteria in pure and mixed cultures was studied. The bacteria were obtained from the Institute Oswaldo Cruz culture collection at Brazil. Escherichia coli ATCC 10799 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 14456 were analyzed, 3 inoculations were examined in triplicate: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and a mixed culture of them. The inoculations were prepared according to McFarland 0.5, incubated at 37 ° C for 6 hours, diluted in saline, placed in the CaF2 window and store for one hour at 50°C to obtain thin film. The measurement was performed by Spectrum Spotlight 400 (Perkin-Elmer) equipment in the range of 4000-900 cm-1, with 32 scans using a transmittance technique with point and image modes. The data were processed (baseline, normalization, calculation of first derivate followed by smoothing with 9 point using a Savitzky-Golay algorithm) and a cluster analysis were done by Ward's algorithm and an excellent discrimination between pure and mixed culture was obtained. Our preliminary results indicate that the FT-IR microspectroscopy associated with cluster analysis can be used to discriminate between pure and mixed culture.

  18. Identification of cellular genes critical to recombinant protein production using a Gaussia luciferase-based siRNA screening system.

    PubMed

    Lwa, Teng Rhui; Tan, Chuan Hao; Lew, Qiao Jing; Chu, Kai Ling; Tan, Janice; Lee, Yih Yean; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2010-04-15

    Development of high-throughput functional genomic screening, including siRNA screening, provides a novel approach for quick identification of critical factors involved in biological processes. Here, we apply this strategy to search for cellular genes involved in recombinant protein production. Since most of biopharmaceutical proteins are secreted proteins, we develop a cell-based reporter assay using a secreted luciferase, Gaussia luciferase (Gluc), as the reporter. Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transiently transfected with the Gluc reporter plasmid are used to screen our siRNA panel. Three cellular genes, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein gamma (CEBPG), potassium channel tetramerisation domain containing 2 (KCTD2), transmembrane protein 183A (TMEM183A), were isolated from the screening. Production of erythropoietin (EPO) was significantly inhibited when CEBPG, KCTD2, and TMEM183A were knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of CEBPG is shown to significantly improve production of recombinant EPO, interferon gamma, and monoclonal antibody in HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Collectively, this novel Gluc-based siRNA screening system is proven to be a useful tool for investigation of secreted protein production in mammalian cells. PMID:20188772

  19. An Innovative Method for Rapid Identification and Detection of Vibrio alginolyticus in Different Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kaifei; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiao; Liu, Jianfei; Yan, He; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is one of the most common pathogenic marine Vibrio species, and has been found to cause serious seafood-poisoning or fatal extra-intestinal infections in humans, such as necrotizing soft-tissue infections, bacteremia, septic shock, and multiple organ failures. Delayed accurate diagnosis and treatment of most Vibrio infections usually result to high mortality rates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid diagnostic method to detect and identify the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples, so as to facilitate timely treatment. The widely employed conventional methods for detection of V. alginolyticus include biochemical identification and a variety of PCR methods. The former is of low specificity and time-consuming (2–3 days), while the latter has improved accuracy and processing time. Despite such advancements, these methods are still complicated, time-consuming, expensive, require expertise and advanced laboratory systems, and are not optimal for field use. With the goal of providing a simple and efficient way to detect V. alginolyticus, we established a rapid diagnostic method based on loop-mediated Isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology that is feasible to use in both experimental and field environments. Three primer pairs targeting the toxR gene of V. alginolyticus were designed, and amplification was carried out in an ESE tube scanner and Real-Time PCR device. We successfully identified 93 V. alginolyticus strains from a total of 105 different bacterial isolates and confirmed their identity by 16s rDNA sequencing. We also applied this method on infected mouse blood and contaminated scallop samples, and accurate results were both easily and rapidly (20–60 min) obtained. Therefore, the RT-LAMP assay we developed can be conveniently used to detect the presence of V. alginolyticus in different samples. Furthermore, this method will also fulfill the gap for real-time screening of V. alginolyticus infections

  20. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds. PMID:10504413

  1. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  2. Identification of microRNAs dysregulated in cellular senescence driven by endogenous genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nidadavolu, Lolita S.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2013-01-01

    XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging caused by deficiency in the DNA repair endonuclease XPF-ERCC1, is modeled by Ercc1 knockout and hypomorphic mice. Tissues and primary cells from these mice senesce prematurely, offering a unique opportunity to identify factors that regulate senescence and aging. We compared microRNA (miRNA) expression in Ercc1−/− primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and wild-type (WT) MEFs in different growth conditions to identify miRNAs that drive cellular senescence. Microarray analysis showed three differentially expressed miRNAs in passage 7 (P7) Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 20% O2 compared to Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 3% O2. Thirty-six differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in Ercc1−/− MEFs at P7 compared to early passage (P3) in 3% O2. Eight of these miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455*, miR-128, miR-497, miR-543, miR-450b-3p, miR-872 and miR-10b) were similarly downregulated in the liver of progeroid Ercc1−/Δ and old WT mice compared to adult WT mice, a tissue that senesces with aging. Three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455* and miR-128) were also downregulated in Ercc1−/Δ and WT old mice kidneys compared to young WT mice. We also discovered that the miRNA expression regulator Dicer is significantly downregulated in tissues of old mice and late passage cells compared to young controls. Collectively these results support the conclusion that the miRNAs identified may play an important role in staving off cellular senescence and their altered expression could be indicative of aging. PMID:23852002

  3. A benchmark for evaluation of algorithms for identification of cellular correlates of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Chikina, Maria; Dhaene, Tom; Van Gassen, Sofie; Kursa, Miron; Lambrecht, Bart N; Malek, Mehrnoush; McLachlan, G J; Qian, Yu; Qiu, Peng; Saeys, Yvan; Stanton, Rick; Tong, Dong; Vens, Celine; Walkowiak, Sławomir; Wang, Kui; Finak, Greg; Gottardo, Raphael; Mosmann, Tim; Nolan, Garry P; Scheuermann, Richard H; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2016-01-01

    The Flow Cytometry: Critical Assessment of Population Identification Methods (FlowCAP) challenges were established to compare the performance of computational methods for identifying cell populations in multidimensional flow cytometry data. Here we report the results of FlowCAP-IV where algorithms from seven different research groups predicted the time to progression to AIDS among a cohort of 384 HIV+ subjects, using antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples analyzed with a 14-color staining panel. Two approaches (FlowReMi.1 and flowDensity-flowType-RchyOptimyx) provided statistically significant predictive value in the blinded test set. Manual validation of submitted results indicated that unbiased analysis of single cell phenotypes could reveal unexpected cell types that correlated with outcomes of interest in high dimensional flow cytometry datasets. PMID:26447924

  4. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  5. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins interacting with Hepatitis E virus untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Paingankar, Mandar S; Arankalle, Vidya A

    2015-10-01

    Lack of robust cell culture systems for Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has hampered understanding of HEV biology. We attempted to identify the host cellular factors that interact with HEV 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) by RNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry analysis. Hepatitis E virus genotype-1 (HEV-1) and Hepatitis E virus genotype-4 (HEV-4) and three cell lines (HepG2/C3A, A549 and Caco2) were employed to understand the UTR-host protein interaction. RNA pull-down and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI TOF/TOF) analysis revealed that DHX9, PTK-7, DIS3 and TCR E chain (CD3ɛ) of all the three cell lines interacted with HEV 3'UTR while RAD50 and TLE-4 interacted with HEV 5'UTR. RNA immuno-precipitation studies further confirmed the interaction of DHX9, DIS3 and TCR E chain. The expression changes in genes associated with the identified proteins were quantitated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Hepatitis E patients during acute and recovery phases. The data revealed that HEV infection influences the exosomes, T cell receptor signalling and Wnt signalling pathways. Interactions of DIS3 with HEV UTRs suggest that exosomes might have important implication in HEV life cycle. PMID:26087402

  6. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Vang, Søren; Stenbroen, Vibeke; Pedersen, Christina B; Christensen, Jane H; Bross, Peter; Gregersen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress. PMID:19476632

  7. Examining the Importance of Assessing Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) for the Identification of Children with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno; Manolitsis, George; Kirby, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of rapid automatized naming (RAN) in the identification of poor readers in two alphabetic orthographies: English and Greek. Ninety-seven English-speaking Canadian (mean age = 66.70 months) and 70 Greek children (mean age = 67.60 months) were followed from Kindergarten until Grade 3. In…

  8. Rapid Identification of Food-borne Pathogens by Top-Down Proteomics Using MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid identification of bacterial microorganisms is particularly relevant to efforts to monitor the safety and security of domestically grown and imported foods. Mass spectrometry (MS) is increasingly utilized to identify and characterize bacterial microorganisms and in particular food-borne pathog...

  9. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in some countries of South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Differentiat...

  10. An integrated high resolution mass spectrometric and informatics approach for the rapid identification of phenolics in plant extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integrated approach based on high resolution MS analysis (orbitrap), database (db) searching and MS/MS fragmentation prediction for the rapid identification of plant phenols is reported. The approach was firstly validated by using a mixture of phenolic standards (phenolic acids, flavones, flavono...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SERS SPECTROSCOPY FOR ROUTINE AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES ON SILVER COLLOIDAL NANOPARTICLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SERS spectra were collected to explore its potential for rapid and routine identification of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures. Ratios of SERS peaks from K3PO4 were used to evaluate the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storag...

  12. Rapid identification of fluorochrome modification sites in proteins by LC ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manikwar, Prakash; Zimmerman, Tahl; Blanco, Francisco J; Williams, Todd D; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2011-07-20

    Conjugation of either a fluorescent dye or a drug molecule to the ε-amino groups of lysine residues of proteins has many applications in biology and medicine. However, this type of conjugation produces a heterogeneous population of protein conjugates. Because conjugation of fluorochrome or drug molecule to a protein may have deleterious effects on protein function, the identification of conjugation sites is necessary. Unfortunately, the identification process can be time-consuming and laborious; therefore, there is a need to develop a rapid and reliable way to determine the conjugation sites of the fluorescent label or drug molecule. In this study, the sites of conjugation of fluorescein-5'-isothiocyanate and rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate to free amino groups on the insert-domain (I-domain) protein derived from the α-subunit of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) were determined by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF MS) along with peptide mapping using trypsin digestion. A reporter fragment of the fluorochrome moiety that is generated in the collision cell of the Q-TOF without explicit MS/MS precursor selection was used to identify the conjugation site. Selected ion plots of the reporter ion readily mark modified peptides in chromatograms of the complex digest. Interrogation of theses spectra reveals a neutral loss/precursor pair that identifies the modified peptide. The results show that one to seven fluorescein molecules or one to four rhodamine molecules were attached to the lysine residue(s) of the I-domain protein. No modifications were found in the metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), which is an important binding region of the I-domain. PMID:21612301

  13. Phylogenetic Species Identification in Rattus Highlights Rapid Radiation and Morphological Similarity of New Guinean Species

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Judith H.; Tintinger, Vernon; Aplin, Ken P.; Hingston, Melanie; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Penny, David; Lavery, Shane D.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rattus is highly speciose, the taxonomy is complex, and individuals are often difficult to identify to the species level. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of phylogenetic approaches to identification in Rattus but some species, especially among the endemics of the New Guinean region, showed poor resolution. Possible reasons for this are simple misidentification, incomplete gene lineage sorting, hybridization, and phylogenetically distinct lineages that are unrecognised taxonomically. To assess these explanations we analysed 217 samples, representing nominally 25 Rattus species, collected in New Guinea, Asia, Australia and the Pacific. To reduce misidentification problems we sequenced museum specimens from earlier morphological studies and recently collected tissues from samples with associated voucher specimens. We also reassessed vouchers from previously sequenced specimens. We inferred combined and separate phylogenies from two mitochondrial DNA regions comprising 550 base pair D-loop sequences and both long (655 base pair) and short (150 base pair) cytochrome oxidase I sequences. Our phylogenetic species identification for 17 species was consistent with morphological designations and current taxonomy thus reinforcing the usefulness of this approach. We reduced misidentifications and consequently the number of polyphyletic species in our phylogenies but the New Guinean Rattus clades still exhibited considerable complexity. Only three of our eight New Guinean species were monophyletic. We found good evidence for either incomplete mitochondrial lineage sorting or hybridization between species within two pairs, R. leucopus/R. cf. verecundus and R. steini/R. praetor. Additionally, our results showed that R. praetor, R. niobe and R. verecundus each likely encompass more than one species. Our study clearly points to the need for a revised taxonomy of the rats of New Guinea, based on broader sampling and informed by both morphology and

  14. Rapid and economical method for species identification of clinically significant coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Verhoeven, J; Pattyn, S R; Goossens, H

    1995-01-01

    Four methods for the species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the medical microbiology laboratory were compared with 444 consecutive isolates. The methods included (i) the reference method based on growth tests, (ii) API ID 32 Staph (bioMérieux), (iii) Staph-Zym (Rosco), and (iv) a rapid 4-h method developed in our laboratory (UZA method). The last method is based on the detection within 4 h of enzymatic activity of heavy bacterial suspensions in three substrate solutions (nongrowth tests). For 16.5% of the isolates some supplementary growth tests read after 24 h had to be added to the enzyme data for satisfactory identification. The reference method failed to identify four isolates. Of the 440 isolates identified by the reference method, API ID 32 Staph, Staph-Zym, and the UZA method correctly identified 419 (95.2%), 429 (97.5%), and 430 (97.7%) and misidentified 8 (1.8%), 4 (0.9%), and 1 (0.2%), respectively. Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, S. schleiferi, and S. capitis were identified with an accuracy of 98 to 100% by all the systems tested. S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus was not recognized by the API ID 32 system because the biochemical profiles for it are not yet included in the corresponding database. Whereas API ID 32 identified all 13 S. warneri isolates, both Staph-Zym and the UZA method missed 2 of these. S. hominis was identified with the least accuracy by the API ID 32 system (26 of 39 isolates), whereas the UZA and Staph-Zym methods identified 36 of the isolates belonging to this species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615705

  15. Functional Classification of Cellular Proteome Profiles Support the Identification of Drug Resistance Signatures in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in melanoma treatment. Recognition of specific resistance patterns, the understanding of the patho-physiology of drug resistance, and identification of remaining options for individual melanoma treatment would greatly improve therapeutic success. We performed mass spectrometry-based proteome profiling of A375 melanoma cells and HeLa cells characterized as sensitive to cisplatin in comparison to cisplatin resistant M24met and TMFI melanoma cells. Cells were fractionated into cytoplasm, nuclei and secretome and the proteome profiles classified according to Gene Ontology. The cisplatin resistant cells displayed increased expression of lysosomal as well as Ca2+ ion binding and cell adherence proteins. These findings were confirmed using Lysotracker Red staining and cell adhesion assays with a panel of extracellular matrix proteins. To discriminate specific survival proteins, we selected constitutively expressed proteins of resistant M24met cells which were found expressed upon challenging the sensitive A375 cells. Using the CPL/MUW proteome database, the selected lysosomal, cell adherence and survival proteins apparently specifying resistant cells were narrowed down to 47 proteins representing a potential resistance signature. These were tested against our proteomics database comprising more than 200 different cell types/cell states for its predictive power. We provide evidence that this signature enables the automated assignment of resistance features as readout from proteome profiles of any human cell type. Proteome profiling and bioinformatic processing may thus support the understanding of drug resistance mechanism, eventually guiding patient tailored therapy. PMID:23713901

  16. Screening and Identification of Cryopreservative Agents for Human Cellular Biotechnology Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love,J.; Elliott, T.; Das, G. C.; Hammond, D. K.; Schwarzkopf, R. J.; Jones, L. B.; Baker, T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been used as a standard cryopreservative agent for mammalian cell culture; however, prolonged exposure of thawed cells to DMSO can alter cell growth. While DMSO is easily eliminated in ground-based experiments, removal of DMSO in flight-based experiments is more difficult due to various on-orbit constraints. Failure of cryopreservation is due to a number of factors, including intracellular ice formation, solute effect, and apoptotic cell death following thawing. One objective of this study is to identify and characterize an alternative cryopreservative that could be used on the International Space Station (ISS). We systematically screened for potential permeating and non-permeating agents using a human colorectal carcinoma cell line, MIP-101. Cells were suspended in cryopreservation solution and frozen either following a two-step procedure involving initial cooling at -1 C/min overnight followed by storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor, or by freezing cells directly in the LN2 vapor phase at -10 C/min. Ability to preserve cellular function after one cycle of freeze-thawing was assessed by the recovery of viable cells in short and long-term cell culture experiments. Results showed that permeating preservatives glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) had an efficacy (80-110%) comparable to, if not better than, 7.5% DMSO; but, propylene glycol (PG) had a somewhat lesser efficacy. Among the non-permeating preservatives, trehalose, raffinose, and dextran exhibited significant protective effect (50-80%) relative to that offered by 7.5% DMSO, but at -10 C and not at -1 C/min cooling rate. Preliminary data thus suggest that a combination of permeating and non-permeating agents may have improved efficacy as a cryoprotectant and serve as an alternate to DMSO for experimentation on ISS.

  17. Pyrosequencing for rapid molecular identification of Schistosoma japonicum and S. mekongi eggs and cercariae.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Limpanont, Yanin; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Tourtip, Somjintana; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-09-01

    Schistosomiasis, which is caused by Schistosoma japonicum and S. mekongi, is a chronic and dangerous widespread disease affecting several countries in Asia. Differentiation between S. japonicum and S. mekongi eggs and/or cercariae via microscopic examination is difficult due to morphological similarities. It is important to identify these etiological agents isolated from animals and humans at the species or genotype level. In this study, a pyrosequencing assay designed to detect S. japonicum and S. mekongi DNA in fecal samples and infected snails was developed and evaluated as an alternative tool to diagnose schistosomiasis. New primers targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene were designated for specific amplification. S. japonicum and S. mekongi were identified using a 43-nucleotide pattern of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and were differentiated using 7 nucleotides within this region. S. japonicum and S. mekongi-infected snails and fecal samples derived from infected mice and rats were differentially detected within a short period of time. The analytical sensitivity of the method enabled the identification of as little as a single cercaria artificially introduced into a pool of 10 non-infected snails and 2 eggs inoculated in 100mg of non-infected fecal sample. To evaluate the comparative efficacy of the assay, identical samples were also analyzed via microscopy and Sanger sequencing. The pyrosequencing technique was found to be superior to the microscopy method and more rapid than the Sanger sequencing method. These results suggest that the pyrosequencing assay is rapid, simple, sensitive and accurate in identifying S. japonicum and S. mekongi in intermediate hosts and fecal samples of the final host. PMID:23831037

  18. A trans-well-based cellular model for the rapid pre-evaluation of tympanic membrane repair materials.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui; Tseng, How

    2016-08-01

    It is important to have a standardized tympanic membrane (TM) perforation platform to evaluate the various myringoplasty materials that have been studied and developed extensively during recent years. However, currently there are no cellular models specifically designed for this purpose, and animal models remain unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study is to propose an inexpensive, readily available, well-controlled, and easy-to-create cellular model as a substitute for use in the evaluation of TM repairing materials. A trans-well model was created using a cell culture insert with a round hole created at the center of the polycarbonate membrane. HaCaT cells were cultured on the fenestrated culture insert, and the desired myringoplasty graft was placed at the center of the window for one week and observed by fluorescent microscopy under vital staining. Under this cellular model, there was notable migration of HaCaT cells onto the positive control graft (rabbit fascia), while only a few cell clusters were observed on the negative control graft (paper). Model validation showed that the cell migration ratio for the PLLA + 1% hyaluronic acid (HA) graft is significantly higher than using myringoplasty paper, poly L-lactide (PLLA), or PLLA + 0.5% HA (p < 0.05). This trans-well-based cellular model might be a useful pre-evaluation platform for the evaluation of TM repairing materials. The model is inexpensive, readily available, easy to create, and standardized for use. PMID:26335291

  19. Identification of the Bacterial Cellular Lipid Fraction by Using Fast GC × GC-MS and Innovative MS Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondello, Luigi; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Fanali, Chiara; Dugo, Paola; La Camera, Erminia; Bisignano, Carlo

    The bacteria fatty acid (FA) profile has been extensively studied for taxonomic classification purposes, since bacteria, in general, contain particular and rare fatty acids, compared to animal and plant tissues. In the last few years, the concern about pathogenic microorganisms used as bioterrorist agents has increased; therefore, rapid methods for the characterization of bacteria are necessary. In the present research, a half-an-hour procedure, to analyze bacteria, was developed: a 2-min one-step sample preparation step, was followed by a relatively fast comprehensive 2D GC-MS separation (25 min). Furthermore, dedicated mass spectrometry libraries were constructed for bacteria and FA identification. Finally, data-processing was carried out with the support of novel comprehensive 2D GC software.

  20. Automated Identification of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection and Impact of Resolution on Related Mesoscale Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Gustafson, W. I.; Yang, Q.; Xiao, H.

    2013-12-01

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. Cloud resolving models begin to resolve some, but not all, of these processes with less of the mesoscale dynamics resolved as one progresses from <1 km to 10 km grid spacing. While limited domain cloud resolving models can use high resolution to simulate MCC, global cloud resolving models must resort to using grid spacings closer to 5 to 10 km. This effectively truncates the scales through which the dynamics can act and impacts the MCC characteristics, potentially altering the climate impact of these clouds in climate models. To understand the impact of this truncation, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the Southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 1-, 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have lower liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. When compared to observed liquid water paths from GOES and MODIS, the 3-km simulation has better agreement over the coastal regions while the 9-km simulation better agrees over remote regions. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we developed a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This has the advantage of ensuring that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC and helps minimize false detections from secondary circulations. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between

  1. Rapid Identification of Malaria Vaccine Candidates Based on α-Helical Coiled Coil Protein Motif

    PubMed Central

    Villard, Viviane; Agak, George W.; Frank, Géraldine; Jafarshad, Ali; Servis, Catherine; Nébié, Issa; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Felger, Ingrid; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Socrates; Heitz, Frederic; Bäcker, Volker; Druilhe, Pierre; Kajava, Andrey V.; Corradin, Giampietro

    2007-01-01

    To identify malaria antigens for vaccine development, we selected α-helical coiled coil domains of proteins predicted to be present in the parasite erythrocytic stage. The corresponding synthetic peptides are expected to mimic structurally “native” epitopes. Indeed the 95 chemically synthesized peptides were all specifically recognized by human immune sera, though at various prevalence. Peptide specific antibodies were obtained both by affinity-purification from malaria immune sera and by immunization of mice. These antibodies did not show significant cross reactions, i.e., they were specific for the original peptide, reacted with native parasite proteins in infected erythrocytes and several were active in inhibiting in vitro parasite growth. Circular dichroism studies indicated that the selected peptides assumed partial or high α-helical content. Thus, we demonstrate that the bioinformatics/chemical synthesis approach described here can lead to the rapid identification of molecules which target biologically active antibodies, thus identifying suitable vaccine candidates. This strategy can be, in principle, extended to vaccine discovery in a wide range of other pathogens. PMID:17653272

  2. Development of an overnight rapid bovine identification test (ORBIT) for field use.

    PubMed

    Mageau, R P; Cutrufelli, M E; Schwab, B; Johnston, R W

    1984-01-01

    An Overnight Rapid Bovine Identification Test (ORBIT) has been developed as a serological screen test for species verification of raw, whole tissue, bovine meat products. The test, an agar-gel immunodiffusion technique, uses stabilized reagent paper discs and prepared agar plates that have a printed template for correct placement of test components. This test is reliable, practical, economical, and easily performed in the field, such as at a meat import inspection station. The only nonbovine species found to react in the test are the bovine-related species of American bison (buffalo) and water buffalo (from Australia); however, these rare-occurring species do not present a problem for the intended application of the test. Stability of all test components, when stored in a refrigerator, is excellent for at least 1 year. The nature and stability of the test make it suitable for commercial development into test kits which should be highly practical and economical for wide availability and application of this procedure to meat inspection programs concerned with species verification. PMID:6438051

  3. Rapid identification of cholinesterase inhibitors from the seedcases of mangosteen using an enzyme affinity assay.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Lee, Ji Hye; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Park, Ki Hun

    2014-02-12

    Enzyme binding affinity has been recently introduced as a selective screening method to identify bioactive substances within complex mixtures. We used an assay which identified small molecule binders of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using the following series of steps: incubation of enzyme with extract; centrifugation and filtration; identification of small molecule content in the flow through. The crude extract contained 10 peaks in the UPLC chromatogram. However, after incubation the enzyme, six peaks were reduced, indicating these compounds bound AChE. All these isolated compounds (2, 3, and 5-8) significantly inhibited human AChE with IC₅₀s = 5.4-15.0 μM and butyrylcholinsterase (IC₅₀s = 0.7-11.0 μM). All compounds exhibited reversible mixed kinetics. Consistent with the binding screen and fluorescence quenching, γ-mangostin 6 had a much higher affinity for AChE than 9-hydroxycalabaxanthone 9. This validates this screening protocol as a rapid method to identify inhibitors of AChE. PMID:24446804

  4. Rapid Identification of Medically Important Candida Isolates Using High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nemcova, Eva; Cernochova, Michaela; Ruzicka, Filip; Malisova, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in non albicans infections and various susceptibility patterns to antifungal agents implies a requirement for the quick and reliable identification of a number of medically important Candida species. Real-time PCR followed by high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) was developed, tested on 25 reference Candida collection strains and validated on an additional 143 clinical isolates in this study. All reference strains and clinical isolates inconclusive when using phenotypic methods and/or HRMA were analysed using ITS2 sequencing. Considering reference and clinical strains together, 23 out of 27 Candida species could be clearly distinguished by HRMA, while the remaining 4 species were grouped in 2 pairs, when applying the mean Tm ± 3 SD values, the shape of the derivative melting curve (dMelt curve) and, in some cases, the normalized and temperature—shifted difference plot against C. krusei. HRMA as a simple, rapid and inexpensive tool was shown to be useful in identifying a wide spectrum of clinically important Candida species. It may complement the current clinical diagnostic approach based on commercially available biochemical kits. PMID:25689781

  5. Potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the rapid identification of carious teeth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Rai, Awadhesh K

    2011-05-01

    The importance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the rapid identification of teeth affected by caries has been demonstrated. The major and minor elemental constituents of teeth samples were analyzed using the prominent transitions of the atomic lines present in the sample. The elements detected in the tooth sample were: calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, titanium, carbon, phosphorous, hydrogen, oxygen, sodium, and potassium. The results revealed that the caries-affected part contained a less amount of calcium and phosphorous in comparison to the healthy part of the tooth sample, whereas higher content of magnesium, copper, zinc, strontium, carbon, sodium, and potassium were present in the caries-affected part. For the first time, we have observed that hydrogen and oxygen were less in healthy parts compared to the caries-affected part of the tooth sample. The density of calcium and phosphorous, which are the main matrix of teeth, was less in the caries-affected part than in the healthy part. The variation in densities of the trace constituents like magnesium and carbon, etc., in caries and healthy parts of the tooth sample are also discussed. The presence of different metal elements in healthy and caries-affected parts of the tooth samples and the possible role of different metal elements in the formation of caries have been discussed. PMID:20414707

  6. Network understanding of herb medicine via rapid identification of ingredient-target interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power. PMID:24429698

  7. Rapid identification of transience in streambed conductance by inversion of floodwave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianni, Guillaume; Richon, Julien; Perrochet, Pierre; Vogel, Alexandre; Brunner, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Streambed conductance controls the interaction between surface and groundwater. However, the streambed conductance is often subject to transience. Directly measuring hydraulic properties in a river yields only point values, is time-consuming and therefore not suited to detect transience of physical properties. Here, we present a method to continuously monitor transience in streambed conductance. Input data are time series of stream stage and near stream hydraulic head. The method is based on the inversion of floodwave responses. The analytical model consists of three parameters: x, the distance between streambank and an observation well, α, the aquifer diffusivity, and a the retardation coefficient that is inversely proportional to the streambed conductance. Estimation of a is carried out over successive time steps in order to identify transience in streambed conductance. The method is tested using synthetic data and is applied to field data from the Rhône River and its alluvial aquifer (Switzerland). The synthetic method demonstrated the robustness of the proposed methodology. Application of the method to the field data allowed identifying transience in streambed properties, following flood events in the Rhône. This method requires transience in the surface water, and the river should not change its width significantly with a rising water level. If these conditions are fulfilled, this method allows for a rapid and effective identification of transience in streambed conductance.

  8. Rapid LC-TOFMS method for identification of binding sites of covalent acylglucuronide-albumin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, T; Norikura, R; Yoshikawa, T

    2003-04-10

    A method for rapid identification of binding sites of covalent adducts was developed using delta bilirubin as a model compound. Delta bilirubin, containing intact human serum albumin (HSA), was digested with trypsin and the peptide fragments were monitored at 436 nm, but no predominant peaks were detected indicating the instability of the digested peptides containing bilirubin-related compounds. Therefore, the high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-TOFMS) data of digested fragments of delta bilirubin were compared with those of control digests of HSA, revealing a characteristic peptide in the digest mixture of delta bilirubin. This peptide was sequenced by high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS/MS) and identified as LDELRDEGKASSAK (Leu182 to Lys195) with a modification of a 178 Da increase at Lys190. This indicated the Lys190 to be a predominant covalent binding site of BGs on HSA via the imine mechanism and the binding between the bilirubin moiety and the glucuronic acid moiety to be unstable to digestion with trypsin. The method of comparing LC-TOFMS data requires no specific detection such as fluorescence or radioactivity for every compound. This should accelerate the structure elucidation of covalent adducts and be helpful for studying the relationship between the structure of ligands and specific binding sites. PMID:12667932

  9. Network Understanding of Herb Medicine via Rapid Identification of Ingredient-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Pan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Chi; Ji, Nan; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Today, herb medicines have become the major source for discovery of novel agents in countermining diseases. However, many of them are largely under-explored in pharmacology due to the limitation of current experimental approaches. Therefore, we proposed a computational framework in this study for network understanding of herb pharmacology via rapid identification of putative ingredient-target interactions in human structural proteome level. A marketing anti-cancer herb medicine in China, Yadanzi (Brucea javanica), was chosen for mechanistic study. Total 7,119 ingredient-target interactions were identified for thirteen Yadanzi active ingredients. Among them, about 29.5% were estimated to have better binding affinity than their corresponding marketing drug-target interactions. Further Bioinformatics analyses suggest that simultaneous manipulation of multiple proteins in the MAPK signaling pathway and the phosphorylation process of anti-apoptosis may largely answer for Yadanzi against non-small cell lung cancers. In summary, our strategy provides an efficient however economic solution for systematic understanding of herbs' power.

  10. Rapid and non-destructive identification of water-injected beef samples using multispectral imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Cao, Yue; Wang, Qiu; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Water-injected beef has aroused public concern as a major food-safety issue in meat products. In the study, the potential of multispectral imaging analysis in the visible and near-infrared (405-970 nm) regions was evaluated for identifying water-injected beef. A multispectral vision system was used to acquire images of beef injected with up to 21% content of water, and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm was employed to establish prediction model, leading to quantitative estimations of actual water increase with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.923. Subsequently, an optimized model was achieved by integrating spectral data with feature information extracted from ordinary RGB data, yielding better predictions (r = 0.946). Moreover, the prediction equation was transferred to each pixel within the images for visualizing the distribution of actual water increase. These results demonstrate the capability of multispectral imaging technology as a rapid and non-destructive tool for the identification of water-injected beef. PMID:26213059

  11. Ultrasensitive detection and rapid identification of multiple foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yankui; Liang, Tongwen; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Jinfeng; Yue, Zhenfeng; Lv, Jingzhang; Jiang, Qing; Yi, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a novel approach for ultrasensitive detection and rapid high-throughput identification of a panel of common foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes is presented. As a proof-of-concept application, a multiple pathogen analysis array is fabricated through immobilizing three specific polyT-capture probes which can respectively recognize rfbE gene (Escherichia coli O157:H7), invA gene (Salmonella enterica), inlA gene (Listeria monocytogenes) on the plastic substrates. PCR has been developed for amplification and labeling target genes of rfbE, invA, inlA with biotin. The biotinated target DNA is then captured onto the surface of plastic strips through specific DNA hybridization. The succeeding staining of biotinated DNA duplexes with avidin-horseradish peroxidise (AV-HRP) and biotinated anti-HRP antibody greatly amplifies the detectable signal through the multiple cycle signal amplification strategy, and thus realizing ultrasensitive and specific detection of the above three pathogens in food samples with the naked eyes. Results showed approximately 5 copies target pathogenic DNA could be detected with the naked eyes. This simple but very efficient colorimetric assay also show excellent anti-interference capability and good stability, and can be readily applied to point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:25909338

  12. Rapid identification using pyrolysis mass spectrometry and artificial neural networks of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R; Neal, M J; Kell, D B; Greenham, L W; Noble, W C; Harvey, R G

    1994-02-01

    Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectra were obtained from reference Propionibacterium strains and canine isolates. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were trained by supervised learning (with the back-propagation algorithm) to recognize these strains from their pyrolysis mass spectra; all the strains isolated from dogs were identified as human wild type P. acnes. This is an important nosological discovery, and demonstrates that the combination of pyrolysis mass spectrometry and ANNs provides an objective, rapid and accurate identification technique. Bacteria isolated from different biopsy specimens from the same dog were found to be separate strains of P. acnes, demonstrating a within-animal variation in microflora. The classification of the canine isolates by Kohonen artificial neural networks (KANNs) was compared with the classical multivariate techniques of canonical variates analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, and found to give similar results. This is the first demonstration, within microbiology, of KANNs as an unsupervised clustering technique which has the potential to group pyrolysis mass spectra both automatically and relatively objectively. PMID:8144414

  13. RAPHIDOPHYCEAE [CHADEFAUD EX SILVA] SYSTEMATICS AND RAPID IDENTIFICATION: SEQUENCE ANALYSES AND REAL-TIME PCR ASSAYS

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Holly A.; Tomas, Carmelo; Tengs, Torstein; Kempton, Jason W.; Lewitus, Alan J.; Oldach, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Species within the class Raphidophyceae were associated with fish kill events in Japanese, European, Canadian, and U.S. coastal waters. Fish mortality was attributable to gill damage with exposure to reactive oxygen species (peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxide radicals), neurotoxins, physical clogging, and hemolytic substances. Morphological identification of these organisms in environmental water samples is difficult, particularly when fixatives are used. Because of this difficulty and the continued global emergence of these species in coastal estuarine waters, we initiated the development and validation of a suite of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Sequencing was used to generate complete data sets for nuclear encoded small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA; 18S); internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, 5.8S; and plastid encoded SSU rRNA (16S) for confirmed raphidophyte cultures from various geographic locations. Sequences for several Chattonella species (C. antiqua, C. marina, C. ovata, C. subsalsa, and C. verruculosa), Heterosigma akashiwo, and Fibrocapsa japonica were generated and used to design rapid and specific PCR assays for several species including C. verruculosa Hara et Chihara, C. subsalsa Biecheler, the complex comprised of C. marina Hara et Chihara, C. antiqua Ono and C. ovata, H. akashiwo Ono, and F. japonica Toriumi et Takano using appropriate loci. With this comprehensive data set, we were also able to perform phylogenetic analyses to determine the relationship between these species. PMID:20411032

  14. Cellular fatty acid composition as an adjunct to the identification of asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods.

    PubMed

    Bernard, K A; Bellefeuille, M; Ewan, E P

    1991-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (CFA) compositions of 561 asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography as an adjunct to their identification when grown on blood agar at 35 degrees C. The organisms could be divided into two groups. In the first group (branched-chain type), which included coryneform CDC groups A-3, A-4, and A-5; some strains of B-1 and B-3; "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; Brevibacterium liquefaciens; Rothia dentocariosa; and Listeria spp., the rods had sizable quantities of antiesopentadecanoic (Ca15:0) and anteisoheptadecanoic (Ca17:0) acids. Other species with these types of CFA included B. acetylicum, which contained large amounts of isotridecanoic (Ci13:0) and anteisotridecanoic (Ca13:0) acids. CFAs useful for distinguishing among Jonesia denitrificans, Oerskovia spp., some strains of CDC groups B-1 and B-3, Kurthia spp., and Propionibacterium avidum were hexadecanoic (C 16:0) acid, isopentadecanoic (Ci15:0) acid, and Ca15:0). The second group (straight-chained type), which included Actinomyces pyogenes; Arcanobacterium haemolyticum; C. bovis; C. cystitidis; C. diphtheriae; C. flavescens, "C. gentalium"; C. jeikeium; C. kutscheri; C. matruchotii; C .minutissimum; C. mycetoides; C. pilosum; C. pseudodiphtheriticum; "C. pseudogenitalium"; C. pseudotuberculosis; C. renale; CDC groups 1, 2, ANF-1, D-2, E, F-1, F-2, G-1, G-2, and I-2; C. striatum; "C. tuberculostearicum"; C. ulcerans; C. vitarumen; C. xerosis; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, was typified by significant quantities of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and oleic acids (C18:cis9), with differences in the amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2), stearic acid (C18:0), an unnamed peak (equivalent chain length, 14.966), and small quantities of other known saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. CFA composition of these organisms was sufficiently discriminatory to assist in classification but could not be used as the sole means of identification. PMID:1899679

  15. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution. PMID:26876827

  16. Genomes to Life''Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems'': A research program for identification and characterization of protein complexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, M V.; Larimer, Frank; Wiley, H S.; Kennel, S J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Ramsey, John M.; Rodland, Karin D.; Hurst, G B.; Smith, Richard D.; Xu, Ying; Dixon, David A.; Doktycz, M J.; Colson, Steve D.; Gesteland, R; Giometti, Carol S.; Young, Mark E.; Giddings, Ralph M.

    2002-02-01

    Goal 1 of Department of Energy's Genomes to Life (GTL) program seeks to identify and characterize the complete set of protein complexes within a cell. Goal 1 forms the foundation necessary to accomplish the other objectives of the GTL program, which focus on gene regulatory networks and molecular level characterization of interactions in microbial communities. Together this information would allow cells and their components to be understood in sufficient detail to predict, test, and understand the responses of a biological system to its environment. The Center for Molecular and Cellular Systems has been established to identify and characterize protein complexes using high through-put analytical technologies. A dynamic research program is being developed that supports the goals of the Center by focusing on the development of new capabilities for sample preparation and complex separations, molecular level identification of the protein complexes by mass spectrometry, characterization of the complexes in living cells by imaging techniques, and bioinformatics and computational tools for the collection and interpretation of data and formation of databases and tools to allow the data to be shared by the biological community.

  17. Development of an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test for the identification of blowfly (Calliphoridae) species of forensic significance.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Laura; Thornton, Chris; Wallman, James F; Stevens, Jamie R

    2009-06-01

    In this study we examine the limitations of currently used sequence-based approaches to blowfly (Calliphoridae) identification and evaluate the utility of an immunological approach to discriminate between blowfly species of forensic importance. By investigating antigenic similarity and dissimilarity between the first instar larval stages of four forensically important blowfly species, we have been able to identify immunoreactive proteins of potential use in the development of species-specific immuno-diagnostic tests. Here we outline our protein-based approach to species determination, and describe how it may be adapted to develop rapid diagnostic assays for the 'on-site' identification of blowfly species. PMID:19414163

  18. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences. PMID:25224362

  19. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  20. Treponemal antibody in CSF and cellular immunity in peripheral blood of syphilitic patients with persisting positive rapid plasma regain

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Huan-Li; Zhong, Dao-Qing; Lin, Lu-Yang; Qiu, Xiao-Shan; Yang, Ri-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of patients with RPR constant positive more than 2 years despite receiving standard syphilis treatment has been reported to be 11.54%~31.3%. The current interpretations on this phenomenon are cellular immune function restrained and the existence of neurosyphilis or asymptomatic neurosyphilis. We conducted this study to detect the treponemal antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of syphilis patients with persisting RPR positive more than 2 years without neurologic signs, and then explore their relationship. In this study, Treponemal antibody in CSF of 46 syphilitic with HIV negative were measured by syphilis serum test and compared with that of 5 neurosyphilis. Lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and compared with that of 30 healthy controls. We observed that treponemal antibody in CSF was detected not only in 12 cases (25.21%) of 46 treated patients, but also in 5 neurosyphilis. The ratio of lymphocyte subsets revealed that CD3+, CD4+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells showed no significant differences between the patient and healthy controls (P > 0.05), while CD8+ T cells in patients were significant higher than that in healthy controls (P < 0.001). Lymphocyte subsets showed no significant differences between the patients with treponemal antibody positive and negative in CSF (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the treponemal antibody in CSF of treated patients suggests that part of them were asymptomatic neurosyphilis and with cellular immunodifeciency. And there is no significant relationship between asymptomatic neurosyphilis and cellular immunodeficiency in peripheral blood. PMID:26191296

  1. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic assay for identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis.

    PubMed

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-11-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrille, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  2. Evaluation of a Rapid Immunochromatographic Assay for Identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Marot-Leblond, Agnes; Grimaud, Linda; David, Sandrine; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.; Ponton, Jose; Robert, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first established as a novel yeast species in 1995. It is particularly associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but it has also been detected at other anatomical sites and at a low incidence level in non-HIV-infected patients. It shares so many phenotypic characteristics with C. albicans that it is easily misidentified as such. No rapid, simple, and commercial test that allows differentiation between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans has been developed, until now. Accurate species identification requires the use of genotype-based techniques that are not routinely available in most clinical microbiology diagnostic laboratories. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of a new test (the immunochromatographic membrane [ICM] albi-dubli test; SR2B, Avrillé, France) to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. The organisms evaluated were strains whose identities had previously been confirmed by PCR tests and freshly isolated clinical strains and included 58 C. albicans isolates, 60 C. dubliniensis isolates, and 82 isolates belonging to other species of yeast. The ICM albi-dubli test is based on the principle of immunochromatographic analysis and involves the use of two distinct monoclonal antibodies that recognize two unrelated epitopes expressed by both species or specific to only one species. The assay requires no complex instrumentation for analysis and can be recommended for routine use in clinical microbiology laboratories. Results are obtained within 2 h and 30 min and are easy to interpret. This evaluation demonstrated the good performance of this immunochromatographic test for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolated on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHOROMagar Candida, and CandidaSelect, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 93.1 to 100%. These parameters decreased, however, to 91.4% when the test was performed with yeast isolated

  3. Rapid identification of an antibody DNA construct rearrangement sequence variant by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rebecca A; Rogers, Rich; Balland, Alain; Brady, Lowell J

    2014-01-01

    During cell line development for an IgG1 antibody candidate (mAb1), a C-terminal extension was identified in 2 product candidate clones expressed in CHO-K1 cell line. The extension was initially observed as the presence of anomalous new peaks in these clones after analysis by cation exchange chromatography (CEX-HPLC) and reduced capillary electrophoresis (rCE-SDS). Reduced mass analysis of these CHO-K1 clones revealed that a larger than expected mass was present on a sub-population of the heavy chain species, which could not be explained by any known chemical or post-translational modifications. It was suspected that this additional mass on the heavy chain was due to the presence of an additional amino acid sequence. To identify the suspected additional sequence, de novo sequencing in combination with proteomic searching was performed against translated DNA vectors for the heavy chain and light chain. Peptides unique to the clones containing the extension were identified matching short sequences (corresponding to 9 and 35 amino acids, respectively) from 2 non-coding sections of the light chain vector construct. After investigation, this extension was observed to be due to the re-arrangement of the DNA construct, with the addition of amino acids derived from the light chain vector non-translated sequence to the C-terminus of the heavy chain. This observation showed the power of proteomic mass spectrometric techniques to identify an unexpected antibody sequence variant using de novo sequencing combined with database searching, and allowed for rapid identification of the root cause for new peaks in the cation exchange and rCE-SDS assays. PMID:25484040

  4. Rapid Identification of Novel Immunodominant Proteins and Characterization of a Specific Linear Epitope of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Sebastian; Bier, Frank F.; Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus v.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni remains one of the major gut pathogens of our time. Its zoonotic nature and wide-spread distribution in industrialized countries calls for a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Antibody-based detection presents a suitable means to identify pathogenic bacteria. However, the knowledge about immunodominant targets is limited. Thus, an approach is presented, which allows for the rapid screening of numerous cDNA derived expression clones to identify novel antigens. The deeper understanding of immunodominant proteins assists in the design of diagnostic tools and furthers the insight into the bacterium’s pathogenicity as well as revealing potential candidates for vaccination. We have successfully screened 1536 clones of an expression library to identify 22 proteins that have not been described as immunodominant before. After subcloning the corresponding 22 genes and expression of full-length proteins, we investigated the immunodominant character by microarrays and ELISA. Subsequently, seven proteins were selected for epitope mapping. For cj0669 and cj0920c linear epitopes were identified. For cj0669, specificity assays revealed a specific linear epitope site. Consequently, an eleven amino acid residue sequence TLIKELKRLGI was analyzed via alanine scan, which revealed the glycine residue to be significant for binding of the antibody. The innovative approach presented herein of generating cDNAs of prokaryotes in combination with a microarray platform rendering time-consuming purification steps obsolete has helped to illuminate novel immunodominant proteins of C.jejuni. The findings of a specific linear epitope pave the way for a plethora of future research and the potential use in diagnostic applications such as serological screenings. Moreover, the current approach is easily adaptable to other highly relevant bacteria making it a formidable tool for the future discovery of antigens and potential biomarkers. Consequently, it is desirable to simplify

  5. An Integrated Lab-on-Chip for Rapid Identification and Simultaneous Differentiation of Tropical Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L.; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H.; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  6. An integrated lab-on-chip for rapid identification and simultaneous differentiation of tropical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeslin J L; Capozzoli, Monica; Sato, Mitsuharu; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Ling, Clare L; Mauduit, Marjorie; Malleret, Benoît; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Tan, Rosemary; Nosten, François H; Snounou, Georges; Rénia, Laurent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2014-01-01

    Tropical pathogens often cause febrile illnesses in humans and are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. The similarities in clinical symptoms provoked by these pathogens make diagnosis difficult. Thus, early, rapid and accurate diagnosis will be crucial in patient management and in the control of these diseases. In this study, a microfluidic lab-on-chip integrating multiplex molecular amplification and DNA microarray hybridization was developed for simultaneous detection and species differentiation of 26 globally important tropical pathogens. The analytical performance of the lab-on-chip for each pathogen ranged from 102 to 103 DNA or RNA copies. Assay performance was further verified with human whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum and Chikungunya virus that yielded a range of detection from 200 to 4×105 parasites, and from 250 to 4×107 PFU respectively. This lab-on-chip was subsequently assessed and evaluated using 170 retrospective patient specimens in Singapore and Thailand. The lab-on-chip had a detection sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 100% for P. falciparum; a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 99.3% for P. vivax; a positive 90.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Chikungunya virus; and a positive 85.0% agreement and a specificity of 100% for Dengue virus serotype 3 with reference methods conducted on the samples. Results suggested the practicality of an amplification microarray-based approach in a field setting for high-throughput detection and identification of tropical pathogens. PMID:25078474

  7. Rapid Identification of Pseudomonas spp. via Raman Spectroscopy Using Pyoverdine as Capture Probe.

    PubMed

    Pahlow, Susanne; Stöckel, Stephan; Pollok, Sibyll; Cialla-May, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Pyoverdine is a substance which is excreted by fluorescent pseudomonads in order to scavenge iron from their environment. Due to specific receptors of the bacterial cell wall, the iron loaded pyoverdine molecules are recognized and transported into the cell. This process can be exploited for developing efficient isolation and enrichment strategies for members of the Pseudomonas genus, which are capable of colonizing various environments and also include human pathogens like P. aeruginosa and the less virulent P. fluorescens. A significant advantage over antibody based systems is the fact that siderophores like pyoverdine can be considered as "immutable ligands," since the probability for mutations within the siderophore uptake systems of bacteria is very low. While each species of Pseudomonas usually produces structurally unique pyoverdines, which can be utilized only by the producer strain, cross reactivity does occur. In order to achieve a reliable identification of the captured pathogens, further investigations of the isolated cells are necessary. In this proof of concept study, we combine the advantages of an isolation strategy relying on "immutable ligands" with the high specificity and speed of Raman microspectroscopy. In order to isolate the bacterial cells, pyoverdine was immobilized covalently on planar aluminum chip substrates. After capturing, single cell Raman spectra of the isolated species were acquired. Due to the specific spectroscopic fingerprint of each species, the bacteria can be identified. This approach allows a very rapid detection of potential pathogens, since time-consuming culturing steps are unnecessary. We could prove that pyoverdine based isolation of bacteria is fully Raman compatible and further investigated the capability of this approach by isolating and identifying P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens from tap water samples, which are both opportunistic pathogens and can pose a threat for immunocompromised patients. PMID:26705822

  8. Rapid detection and identification of Brachyspira aalborgi from rectal biopsies and faeces of a patient.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Conter, Mauro; Ragni, Patrizia; Piccolo, Giovanna; Zuelli, Claudia; Bommezzadri, Simona; Guégan, Rozenn; Zambelli, Claudia; Perandin, Francesca; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Manca, Nino; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2003-03-01

    This study reports for the first time the detection of Brachyspira aalborgi in faeces and rectal biopsies of a female suffering for 3-4 months of abdominal pain with long-standing mucosal diarrhoea, rectal bleeding and suspected carcinoma of the rectum. After pre-treatment of samples (faeces and biopsies) with a liquid medium (trypticase soy broth-TSB) containing foetal calf serum (FCS, 10%) and spectinomycin and rifampicin (TSB-SR) the first detection of B. aalborgi isolate HBS1 was observed after 48 h in the primary plates of selective blood agar modified medium (BAM) containing spectinomycin and rifampicin (BAM-SR), where growth zones were signalled by a small weakly beta-haemolytic halo. Attempts to subculture spirochaetes in agar media failed. The new HBS1 isolate was only propagated in TSB broth and at electron microscopy it showed 4 endoflagella inserted at each tapered end. The phenotypic characterization of HBS1 demonstrated absence of hippurate hydrolysis, indole production, alpha-galactosidase, alpha- and beta-glucosidase activities in accordance with the B. aalborgi type strain. Rapid identification of B. aalborgi isolate HBS1 was performed directly from faeces and rectal biopsies and subsequently from pure cultures by a genetic method based on 16S DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequence of 16S DNA amplicon of the isolate HBS1 was found 99.2% corresponding to that of the B. aalborgi type strain. Our results encourage further investigations for the development of a suitable selective agar medium for the isolating and cultivating B. aalborgi from human specimens. PMID:12648729

  9. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  10. Rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus equorum by a species-specific PCR assay targeting the sodA gene.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ercolini, Danilo; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Salzano, Giovanni; Villani, Francesco

    2004-11-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus (S.) equorum was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. A set of primers targeting the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene of S. equorum was designed. Species-specificity of the primer set was evaluated by using a total of 112 strains (including 27 reference strains of the DSM collection), representing 26 different species of the genus Staphylococcus, 3 species of the genus Kocuria, and different strains of Macrococcus caseolyticus. By using primers SdAEqF and SdAEqR the expected PCR fragment was obtained only when DNA from S. equorum strains was used as template. The rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and reliability of the PCR procedures established suggests that the method may be profitably applied for specific detection and identification of S. equorum strains. PMID:15612627

  11. PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Rapid, Low-Cost Identification of Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Caws, Maxine; Tho, Dau Quang; Duy, Phan Minh; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Hoa, Dai Viet; Torok, Mili Estee; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Farrar, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    PCR-restriction fragment length poymorphism (PCR-RFLP) is a simple, robust technique for the rapid identification of isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. One hundred consecutive isolates from a Vietnamese tuberculosis hospital were tested by MspA1I PCR-RFLP for the detection of isoniazid-resistant katG_315 mutants. The test had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 100% against conventional phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. The positive and negative predictive values were 1 and 0.86, respectively. None of the discrepant isolates had mutant katG_315 codons by sequencing. The test is cheap (less than $1.50 per test), specific, and suitable for the rapid identification of isoniazid resistance in regions with a high prevalence of katG_315 mutants among isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. PMID:17428939

  12. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  13. Development of a Multiplex-PCR assay for the rapid identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus.

    PubMed

    Pennacchia, Carmela; Breeuwer, Pieter; Meyer, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    The presence of thermophilic bacilli in dairy products is indicator of poor hygiene. Their rapid detection and identification is fundamental to improve the industrial reactivity in the implementation of corrective and preventive actions. In this study a rapid and reliable identification of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Anoxybacillus flavithermus was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. Two primer sets, targeting the ITS 16S-23S rRNA region and the rpoB gene sequence of the target species respectively, were employed. Species-specificity of both primer sets was evaluated by using 53 reference strains of DSMZ collection; among them, 13 species of the genus Geobacillus and 15 of the genus Anoxybacillus were represented. Moreover, 99 wild strains and 23 bulk cells collected from 24 infant formula powders gathered from several countries worldwide were included in the analyses. Both primer sets were highly specific and the expected PCR fragments were obtained only when DNA from G. stearothermophilus or A. flavithermus was used. After testing their specificity, they were combined in a Multiplex-PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of the two target species. The specificity of the Multiplex-PCR was evaluated by using both wild strains and bulk cells. Every analysis confirmed the reliable identification results provided by the single species-specific PCR methodology. The easiness, the rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and the reliability of the PCR procedures developed in this study highlight the advantage of their application for the specific detection and identification of the thermophilic species G. stearothermophilus and A. flavithermus. PMID:24929881

  14. Assessment of an abbreviated odorant identification task for children: a rapid screening device for schools and clinics.

    PubMed

    Richman, R A; Wallace, K; Sheehe, P R

    1995-04-01

    To validate the level of olfactory performance of children, we tested 825 volunteers, aged 4-17 years, with an abbreviated form of our pediatric odorant identification task. The test consisted of sniffing and identifying five odorants (baby powder, bubble gum, candy cane, licorice and peach). Mean olfactory scores increased as a function of age, reaching a plateau of about 94-95% correct at 8 years of age. In general, girls out-performed boys. Physicians require a test instrument such as the one we have devised to allow them to diagnose olfactory dysfunction in children. The present task is particularly applicable in screening large numbers of children in clinics or schools because it can be administered easily and rapidly. Adult subjects with olfactory dysfunction also performed poorly on this odorant identification task designed for children. Therefore, we expect that our odorant identification task will also detect children with severe olfactory dysfunction. PMID:7795355

  15. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) from colony and blood culture material

    PubMed Central

    Essig, A.; Hagen, R. M.; Riecker, M.; Jerke, K.; Ellison, D.; Poppert, S.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant strains of the Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause nosocomial infections. Rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. is desirable in order to facilitate therapeutic or hygiene decisions. We evaluated a newly designed DNA probe that can be used under standard conditions in both a microwave oven and a slide chamber for the rapid identification of Acinetobacter spp. by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using FISH, the new probe correctly identified 81/81 Acinetobacter spp. isolates and excluded 109/109 tested non-target organisms from agar culture. Furthermore, the new probe correctly identified 7/7 Acinetobacter spp. in 214 blood cultures determined to contain Gram-negative bacteria by Gram staining. Using either the microwave oven or slide chamber technique, the new probe was able to identify Acinetobacter spp. in 100% of the samples tested. FISH used in conjunction with our newly designed probe provides an easy, cheap, precise, and rapid method for the preliminary identification of Acinetobacter spp., especially in laboratories where more sophisticated methods like matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) are not available. PMID:24516735

  16. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S.; Mills, Robert W.; Macri, Vincenzo S.; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Milan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  17. Rapid cellular phenotyping of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S; Mills, Robert W; Macri, Vincenzo S; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N; Ellinor, Patrick T; Milan, David J

    2014-02-11

    In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  18. Rapid Identification of Microorganisms from Sterile Body Fluids by Use of FilmArray

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Osman; Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Ullberg, Måns

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel in the identification of microorganisms from positive blood culture bottles inoculated with sterile body fluids. All organisms included in the FA BCID panel were accurately identified in 84/84 (100%) and 18/24 (75%) samples with mono- and polymicrobial growth, respectively. PMID:25520440

  19. SNP Identification through Transcriptome Analysis of the European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus): Cellular Energetics and Mother’s Curse

    PubMed Central

    Moutou, Katerina A.; Psarra, Anna-Maria G.; Stamatis, Costas; Tsipourlianos, Andreas; Mamuris, Zissis

    2016-01-01

    The European brown hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas 1778) is an important small game species in Europe. Due to its size and position in the food chain, as well as its life history, phenotypic variation and the relatively recent speciation events, brown hare plays an important role in the structure of various ecosystems and has emerged as an important species for population management and evolutionary studies. In order to identify informative SNPs for such studies, heart and liver tissues of three samples from the European lineage and a three-sample pool from the Anatolian lineage were subjected to RNA-Sequencing analysis. This effort resulted in 9496 well-assembled protein-coding sequences with close homology to human. After applying very stringent filtering criteria, 66185 polymorphic sites were identified in 7665 genes/cds and 2050 of those polymorphic sites are potentially capable of distinguishing the European from the Anatolian lineage. From these distinguishing mutations we focused on those in genes that are involved in cellular energy production, namely the glycolysis, Krebs cycle and the OXPHOS machinery. A selected set of SNPs was also validated by Sanger sequencing. By simulating the three European individuals as one pool, no substantial informative-SNP identification was lost, making it a cost-efficient approach. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to correlate the differentiation in both nuclear and mitochondrial genome between the two different lineages of L. europaeus with the observed spatial partitioning of the lineages of the species, proposing a possible mechanism that is maintaining the reproductive isolation of the lineages. PMID:27459096

  20. SNP Identification through Transcriptome Analysis of the European Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus): Cellular Energetics and Mother's Curse.

    PubMed

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Giannoulis, Themistoklis; Moutou, Katerina A; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Stamatis, Costas; Tsipourlianos, Andreas; Mamuris, Zissis

    2016-01-01

    The European brown hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas 1778) is an important small game species in Europe. Due to its size and position in the food chain, as well as its life history, phenotypic variation and the relatively recent speciation events, brown hare plays an important role in the structure of various ecosystems and has emerged as an important species for population management and evolutionary studies. In order to identify informative SNPs for such studies, heart and liver tissues of three samples from the European lineage and a three-sample pool from the Anatolian lineage were subjected to RNA-Sequencing analysis. This effort resulted in 9496 well-assembled protein-coding sequences with close homology to human. After applying very stringent filtering criteria, 66185 polymorphic sites were identified in 7665 genes/cds and 2050 of those polymorphic sites are potentially capable of distinguishing the European from the Anatolian lineage. From these distinguishing mutations we focused on those in genes that are involved in cellular energy production, namely the glycolysis, Krebs cycle and the OXPHOS machinery. A selected set of SNPs was also validated by Sanger sequencing. By simulating the three European individuals as one pool, no substantial informative-SNP identification was lost, making it a cost-efficient approach. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to correlate the differentiation in both nuclear and mitochondrial genome between the two different lineages of L. europaeus with the observed spatial partitioning of the lineages of the species, proposing a possible mechanism that is maintaining the reproductive isolation of the lineages. PMID:27459096

  1. Application of replica plating and computer analysis for rapid identification of bacteria in some foods. I. Identification scheme.

    PubMed

    Corlett, D A; Lee, J S; Sinnhuber, R O

    1965-09-01

    A method was devised and tested for a quantitative identification of microbial flora in foods. The colonies developing on the initial isolation plates were picked with sterile toothpicks and inoculated on a master plate in prearranged spacing and order. The growth on the master plates was then replicated on a series of solid-agar plates containing differential or selective agents. The characteristic growth and physiological responses of microbial isolates to penicillin, tylosin, vancomycin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, colistin, and to S S Agar, Staphylococcus Medium No. 110, and Potato Dextrose Agar were recorded, together with Gram reaction and cell morphology. This information was then fed into an IBM 1410 digital computer which grouped and analyzed each isolate into 10 microbial genera, or groups, according to the identification key. The identification scheme was established by use of reference culture studies and from the literature. This system was used to analyze the microbial flora in dover sole (Microstomus pacificus) and ground beef. The method described in this article enables one to examine large numbers of microbial isolates with simplicity. PMID:5325942

  2. Rapid and reliable identification of waterborne Legionella species by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dilger, Thorsten; Melzl, Holger; Gessner, André

    2016-08-01

    Detection and enumeration of Legionella bacteria in drinking water is regulated in Germany by ISO 11731-2. The mandatory method for species identification employs parallel subculturing of suspicious colonies on selective media requiring the handling of a large number of cultivation plates. After changes to the drinking water quality regulation in Germany in 2012 the demand for Legionella contamination testing increased drastically. A more reliable, faster and less laborious method for species identification is therefore desirable. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization followed by time of flight detection mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) promises an accelerated identification of bacteria with high reliability and reduced expenditure. Our study shows that MS-based species identification results are in full concordance with cultural and biochemical detection and differentiation and that valuable additional information can be gained, even though the ISO regulation demands an extended incubation period for primary bacterial cultures that is actually in contrast to the prerequisites of the MALDI Biotyper system. In addition, the established identification algorithm is very economical and improves time-to-result. Based on our findings, the amendment of MALID-TOF MS identification to ISO11731-2 as an alternative identification method should be taken into consideration. PMID:27260989

  3. Effect of the internal microstructure in rapid-prototyped polycaprolactone scaffolds on physical and cellular properties for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojun; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Biomedical scaffolds should be designed to optimize their inter-microstructure to enable cell infiltration and nutrient/waste transport. To acquire these properties, several structural parameters, such as pore size, pore shape, porosity, pore interconnectivity, permeability, and tortuosity are required. In this study, we explored the effect of tortuosity on the viable cell proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like-cells (MG63) in polycaprolactone scaffolds. For analysis, we designed four different scaffolds of various tortuosities ranging from 1.0 to 1.3 under the same porosity (56 %) and 100 % pore interconnectivity. The pore size of the scaffolds was set as 150 and 300 µm, and a mixture of these sizes. We found that despite the porosity being same, the elastic modulus was dependent on the pore size of the scaffolds due to the distributed stress concentration. In addition, the relative water movement within scaffolds was also related to the internal microstructure. Cell viability and Ca2+ deposition of the cell-seeded scaffolds showed that the proliferation of viable cells and mineralization in the scaffolds with appropriate tortuosity (1.2) was relatively high compared to those of the scaffolds displaying low (1.05 and 1.1) or high (1.3) tortuosity. Our findings indicated that the internal microstructure of the scaffolds may influence not only the physical properties, but in addition the cellular behavior.

  4. Use of the VITEK 2 System for Rapid Identification of Clinical Isolates of Staphylococci from Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Spanu, Teresa; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ciccaglione, Daniela; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Romano, Lucio; Leone, Fiammetta; Fadda, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococci are an increasing cause of bloodstream infections. Rapid reliable identification of these organisms is essential for accurate diagnosis and prompt effective treatment. We evaluated the ability of the VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux, Inc, Hazelwood, Mo.) to identify these organisms rapidly and accurately. A total of 405 clinically relevant nonduplicate staphylococcal isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, n = 130; coagulase-negative staphylococci, n = 275) collected from blood cultures were tested. VITEK 2 results were considered correct when they were identical to those furnished by the comparison method based on the ID 32 STAPH system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) plus supplementary manual testing. When discrepancies occurred, isolate identity was verified by molecular typing. The VITEK 2 correctly identified 387 (95.6%) isolates at the species level: 379 (including all but one [99.2%] of 130 S. aureus isolates and 249 of 275 [90.5%] coagulase-negative isolates) were identified by the automated reading; for the other eight, supplemental tests suggested by the manufacturer had to be used. Only one strain (0.2%) was misidentified (Staphylococcus hominis as Staphylococcus epidermidis), and four (1%), all S. epidermidis, were not identified. For the remaining 13 strains (including 10 S. hominis), the VITEK 2 system was unable to discriminate among two species, and no supplemental tests were suggested for conclusive identification. Over 90% of results were obtained within 4 h. These results suggest that the VITEK 2 system can provide rapid, accurate, and reliable species-level identification of staphylococci responsible for bloodstream infections, although there is room for improvement in the identification of certain coagulase-negative species, especially S. hominis. PMID:12958254

  5. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  6. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida Medium with Pal's Medium for Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Sahand, Ismail H.; Moragues, María D.; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures. PMID:16272515

  7. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel “melting temperature (Tm) mapping method” for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a “match” or “broad match” with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment. PMID:26218169

  8. Microbial Protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology: A Proteomics-Based Strategy for Rapid Identification of Microbial Targets of Host Humoral Immune Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunogenic, pathogen-specific proteins have excellent potential for development of novel management modalities. Here, we describe an innovative application of proteomics called Microbial protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology for rapid identification of native microbial proteins that eli...

  9. Microbial Protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology: A Proteomics-Based Strategy for Rapid Identification of Microbial Targets of Host Humoral Immune Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunogenic, pathogen-specific proteins have excellent potential for development of novel management modalities. Here, we describe an innovative application of proteomics called Microbial protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology for rapid identification of native microbial proteins that el...

  10. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry - a rapid method for the identification of dermatophyte species.

    PubMed

    Nenoff, Pietro; Erhard, Marcel; Simon, Jan C; Muylowa, Grace K; Herrmann, Jürgen; Rataj, Waldemar; Gräser, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Altogether 285 dermatophyte isolates of 21 different species - including both Trichophyton rubrum and T. interdigitale, but also eight additional Trichophyton species, Microsporum canis and seven other Microsporum species, as well as Epidermophyton floccosum and Arthroderma spp. - were analyzed using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the AnagnosTec 'SARAMIS' (Spectral Archiving and Microbial Identification System) software. In addition, sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA was performed for a high number of the tested strains. Sufficient agreement was found between the results obtained with standard identification methods and those with the MALDI-TOF MS for species identification of dermatophytes. A mass spectra database was constructed which contained the species identifications of all 285 isolates. The results were confirmed for 164 of the isolates by sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA. Statistical analysis of all 285 dermatophyte strains showed that conventional identification matched the results of MALDI-TOF MS for 78.2% of the isolates tested. In the case of the 164 isolates for which the identifications were confirmed by PCR, the results of their conventional diagnosis and MALDI-TOF MS were in agreement for only 68.9 % (113 of 164 strains) of the test isolates. In contrast, there was agreement of 99.3 % or 98.8 % in the identifications obtained with PCR and MALDI-TOF MS techniques (283/285 or 162/164). The two exceptions were isolates that proved to be T. violaceum which could not be identified by the MALDI-TOF MS technique. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy represents a fast and very specific method for species differentiation of dermatophytes grown in culture. PMID:22574631

  11. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  12. MALDI-TOF MS is more accurate than VITEK II ANC card and API Rapid ID 32 A system for the identification of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Hae-Geun; Park, Dongchul; Song, Sae Am; Lee, Hee Joo; Yong, Dongeun; Choi, Jun Yong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kim, Hye Ran; Shin, Jeong Hwan

    2016-08-01

    All 50 Clostridium difficile strains were definitely identified by Vitek2 system, Rapid ID 32A system, and MALDI-TOF. For 18 non-difficile Clostridium strains, the identification results were correct in 0, 2, and 17 strains by Vitek2, Rapid ID 32A, and MALDI-TOF, respectively. MALDI-TOF could be used as the primary tool for identification of Clostridium species. PMID:27296834

  13. Identification of SNPs in Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 and Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 3 Genes and Their Associations with Laying Performance Traits in Erlang Mountainous Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xiao, Li-Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    CRBP1 (cellular retinol binding protein 1) and CRBP3 (cellular retinol binding protein 3), are important components of the retinoid signaling pathway and take part in vitamin A absorption, transport and metabolism. Based on the role of vitamin A in chicken laying performance, we investigated the polymorphism of CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes in 349 chickens using single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. Only one polymorphism was identified in the third intron of CRBP1, two polymorphisms were detected in CRBP3; they were located in the second intron and the third intron respectively. The association studies between these three SNPs and laying performance traits were performed in Erlang mountainous chicken. Notably, the SNP g.14604G>T of CRBP1 was shown to be significantly associated with body weight at first egg (BWFE), age at first egg (AFE), weight at first egg (WFE) and total number of eggs with 300 age (EN). The CRBP3 polymorphism g.934C>G was associated with AFE, and the g.1324A>G was associated with AFE and BWFE, but none of these polymorphisms were associated with egg quality traits. Haplotype combinations constructed on these two SNPs of CRBP3 gene were associated with BWFE and AFE. In particular, diplotype H2H2 had positive effect on AFE, BWFE, EN, and average egg-laying interval. We herein describe for the first time basic research on the polymorphism of chicken CRBP1 and CRBP3 genes that is predictive of genetic potential for laying performance in chicken. PMID:25083100

  14. Rapid solid-phase microwave synthesis of highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for Fe(3+) detection and cellular bioimaging.

    PubMed

    He, Guili; Xu, Minghan; Shu, Mengjun; Li, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Liling; Su, Yanjie; Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-09-30

    Recently, carbon dots (CDs) have been playing an increasingly important role in industrial production and biomedical field because of their excellent properties. As such, finding an efficient method to quickly synthesize a large scale of relatively high purity CDs is of great interest. Herein, a facile and novel microwave method has been applied to prepare nitrogen doped CDs (N-doped CDs) within 8 min using L-glutamic acid as the sole reaction precursor in the solid phase condition. The as-prepared N-doped CDs with an average size of 1.64 nm are well dispersed in aqueous solution. The photoluminescence of N-doped CDs is pH-sensitive and excitation-dependent. The N-doped CDs show a strong blue fluorescence with relatively high fluorescent quantum yield of 41.2%, which remains stable even under high ionic strength. Since the surface is rich in oxygen-containing functional groups, N-doped CDs can be applied to selectively detect Fe(3+) with the limit of detection of 10(-5) M. In addition, they are also used for cellular bioimaging because of their high fluorescent intensity and nearly zero cytotoxicity. The solid-phase microwave method seems to be an effective strategy to rapidly obtain high quality N-doped CDs and expands their applications in ion detection and cellular bioimaging. PMID:27573680

  15. Rapid screening of guar gum using portable Raman spectral identification methods.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Hirsch K; Wolfgang, Steven; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Guar gum is a well-known inactive ingredient (excipient) used in a variety of oral pharmaceutical dosage forms as a thickener and stabilizer of suspensions and as a binder of powders. It is also widely used as a food ingredient in which case alternatives with similar properties, including chemically similar gums, are readily available. Recent supply shortages and price fluctuations have caused guar gum to come under increasing scrutiny for possible adulteration by substitution of cheaper alternatives. One way that the U.S. FDA is attempting to screen pharmaceutical ingredients at risk for adulteration or substitution is through field-deployable spectroscopic screening. Here we report a comprehensive approach to evaluate two field-deployable Raman methods--spectral correlation and principal component analysis--to differentiate guar gum from other gums. We report a comparison of the sensitivity of the spectroscopic screening methods with current compendial identification tests. The ability of the spectroscopic methods to perform unambiguous identification of guar gum compared to other gums makes them an enhanced surveillance alternative to the current compendial identification tests, which are largely subjective in nature. Our findings indicate that Raman spectral identification methods perform better than compendial identification methods and are able to distinguish guar gum from other gums with 100% accuracy for samples tested by spectral correlation and principal component analysis. PMID:26609678

  16. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control. PMID:26948045

  17. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  18. A Rapid and Simple LC-MS Method Using Collagen Marker Peptides for Identification of the Animal Source of Leather.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yuki; Taga, Yuki; Iwai, Kenji; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Identification of the animal source of leather is difficult using traditional methods, including microscopic observation and PCR. In the present study, a LC-MS method was developed for detecting interspecies differences in the amino acid sequence of type I collagen, which is a major component of leather, among six animals (cattle, horse, pig, sheep, goat, and deer). After a dechroming procedure and trypsin digestion, six tryptic peptides of type I collagen were monitored by LC-MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode for the animal source identification using the patterns of the presence or absence of the marker peptides. We analyzed commercial leathers from various production areas using this method, and found some leathers in which the commercial label disagreed with the identified animal source. Our method enabled rapid and simple leather certification and could be applied to other animals whether or not their collagen sequences are available in public databases. PMID:27397145

  19. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  20. Rapid Sanger Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of Some Common Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangbiao; Shi, Xiaojun; Su, Jianhui; Chen, Guanwu; Lin, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Conventional Sanger sequencing remains time-consuming and laborious. In this study, we developed a rapid improved sequencing protocol of 16S rRNA for pathogens identification by using a new combination of SYBR Green I real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing with FTA® cards. To compare the sequencing quality of this method with conventional Sanger sequencing, 12 strains, including three kinds of strains (1 reference strain and 3 clinical strains, which were previously identified by biochemical tests), which have 4 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4 Staphyloccocus aureus and 4 Escherichia coli, were targeted. Additionally, to validate the sequencing results and bacteria identification, expanded specimens with 90 clinical strains, also comprised of the three kinds of strains which included 30 samples respectively, were performed as just described. The results showed that although statistical differences (P<0.05) were found in sequencing quality between the two methods, their identification results were all correct and consistent. The workload, the time consumption and the cost per batch were respectively light versus heavy, 8 h versus 11 h and $420 versus $400. In the 90 clinical strains, all of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphyloccocus aureus strains were correctly identified, but only 26.7% of the Escherichia coli strains were recognized as Escherichia coli, while 33.3% as Shigella sonnei and 40% as Shigella dysenteriae. The protocol described here is a rapid, reliable, stable and convenient method for 16S rRNA sequencing, and can be used for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphyloccocus aureus identification, yet it is not completely suitable for discriminating Escherichia coli and Shigella strains. PMID:24551186

  1. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Biofilms and Biofilm Wound Models Using a Multichannel Nanosensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of infectious bacteria responsible for biofilm-associated infections is challenging due to the complex and heterogeneous biofilm matrix. To address this issue and minimize the impact of heterogeneity on biofilm identification, we developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based multichannel sensor to detect and identify biofilms based on their physicochemical properties. Our results showed that the sensor can discriminate six bacterial biofilms including two composed of uropathogenic bacteria. The capability of the sensor was further demonstrated through discrimination of biofilms in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell in vitro wound model. PMID:25454256

  2. Rapid and correct identification of intestinal Bacteroides spp. with chromosomal DNA probes by whole-cell dot blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi, M.; Ohno, T.; Mutai, M.

    1988-05-01

    A dot blot hybridization procedure with /sup 32/P-labeled whole chromosomal DNA of the type strains as probes was developed as a rapid and simple method for identification of intestinal Bacteroides species. Bacterial cells were fixed onto membrane filters by slight suction, treated with 0.5 N NaOH, and hybridized with these probes. Of 65 Bacteroides strains isolated from 19 human fecal specimens, which were identified as B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. caccae, B. uniformis, B. stercoris, B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. merdae by conventional phenotypic characterization, 62 (95%) were correctly identified with this hybridization procedure.

  3. Cellular mechanism of the insulin-like effect of growth hormone in adipocytes. Rapid translocation of the HepG2-type and adipocyte/muscle glucose transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, J W; Leingang, K A; Mueckler, M M; Glenn, K C

    1992-01-01

    The cellular mechanism whereby growth hormone (GH) acutely stimulates adipocyte glucose uptake was studied in cultures of primary rat adipocytes differentiated in vitro. Preadipocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion of inguinal fat-pads from young rats and were differentiated in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, insulin and dexamethasone. The development of an adipocyte morphology (i.e. lipid inclusions) was observed over 6 days after initiation of differentiation. Coincident with this phenotypic change was an increase in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity and in cellular content of the HepG2-type (Glut1) and adipocyte/muscle (Glut4) glucose transporter isoforms as determined by Western immunoblotting of total cellular protein. Age-matched undifferentiated cells expressed the Glut1 transporter and low levels of GPDH, but neither accumulated lipid nor exhibited measurable expression of the Glut4 protein. On day 6 after the initiation of differentiation, GH and insulin stimulated 2-deoxy[14C]glucose uptake in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in adipocytes cultured under serum-free conditions for at least 15 h. Western-blot analysis of subcellular fractions revealed that both GH and insulin rapidly (within 20 min) stimulated translocation of the Glut1 and Glut4 proteins from a low-density microsomal fraction to the plasma membrane. Confirmatory evidence was provided in immunocytochemical experiments utilizing antisera directed against the C-terminal region of the Glut4 protein and a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled second antibody. Observation of the cells via confocal laser microscopic imaging was consistent with glucose transporter redistribution from an intracellular region to the plasma membrane after treatment with GH or insulin. On the basis of these data, we suggest that the insulin-like effect of GH on adipocyte glucose transport involves translocation of the Glut1 and Glut4 proteins to the plasma membrane

  4. Identification of the related substances in ampicillin capsule by rapid resolution liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Xian Long; Liu, Yang; Liang, Miao; Dong, Honghuan; Lv, Beiran; Yang, Wenning; Luo, Zhiqiang; Tang, Mingmin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-MS(n)) was used to separate and identify related substances in ampicillin capsule. The fragmentation behaviors of related substances were used to identify their chemical structures. Finally, a total of 13 related substances in ampicillin capsule were identified, including four identified components for the first time and three groups of isomers on the basis of the exact mass, fragmentation behaviors, retention time, and chemical structures in the literature. This study avoided time-consuming and complex chemosynthesis of related substances of ampicillin and the results could be useful for the quality control of ampicillin capsule to guarantee its safety in clinic. In the meantime, it provided a good example for the rapid identification of chemical structures of related substances of drugs. PMID:25530907

  5. Identification of the Related Substances in Ampicillin Capsule by Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xian Long; Liu, Yang; Liang, Miao; Dong, Honghuan; Lv, Beiran; Luo, Zhiqiang; Tang, Mingmin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid Resolution Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (RRLC-ESI-MSn) was used to separate and identify related substances in ampicillin capsule. The fragmentation behaviors of related substances were used to identify their chemical structures. Finally, a total of 13 related substances in ampicillin capsule were identified, including four identified components for the first time and three groups of isomers on the basis of the exact mass, fragmentation behaviors, retention time, and chemical structures in the literature. This study avoided time-consuming and complex chemosynthesis of related substances of ampicillin and the results could be useful for the quality control of ampicillin capsule to guarantee its safety in clinic. In the meantime, it provided a good example for the rapid identification of chemical structures of related substances of drugs. PMID:25530907

  6. Innovative applications of bacteriophages in rapid detection and identification of foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to traditional microbiological approaches, biosensors are a rapid method for foodborne bacterial pathogen detection. Biosensors function by detecting the interaction of the target pathogen, or pathogen derived molecule, with a biological recognition component which must have sufficient aff...

  7. Rapid genotyping assays for the identification and differentiation of Yersinia ruckeri biotype 2 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel assays for the identification and differentiation of biotype 2 phenotype-causing alleles among emerging strains of Yersinia ruckeri are presented. Assays were validated against isolates previously genotyped by DNA sequencing. The methods employed are simple to perform and interpret and thus co...

  8. Tailor-Made pH-Responsive Poly(choline phosphate) Prodrug as a Drug Delivery System for Rapid Cellular Internalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Bo; Ma, Xiaojing; Liu, Sanrong; Shang, Xudong; Yu, Xifei

    2016-06-13

    Rapid cellular uptake and efficient drug release in tumor cells are two of the major challenges for cancer therapy. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel pH-responsive polymer-drug conjugate system poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl choline phosphate)-b-poly(2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl methacrylate-hydrazide-doxorubicin) (PCP-Dox) to overcome these two challenges simultaneously. It has been proved that PCP-Dox can be easily and rapidly internalized by various cancer cells due to the strong interaction between multivalent choline phosphate (CP) groups and cell membranes. Furthermore, Dox, linked to the polymer carrier via acid-labile hydrazone bond, can be released from carriers due to the increased acidity in lysosome/endosome (pH 5.0-5.5) after the polymer prodrug was internalized into the cancer cells. The cell viability assay demonstrated that this novel polymer prodrug has shown enhanced cytotoxicity in various cancer cells, indicating its great potential as a new drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:27151282

  9. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.

    PubMed

    Kloos, W E; George, C G

    1991-04-01

    The accuracies of the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems (Baxter Diagnostic Inc., MicroScan Division, West Sacramento, Calif.) were compared with each other and with the accuracies of conventional methods for the identification of 25 Staphylococcus species and 4 subspecies. Conventional methods included those used in the original descriptions of species and subspecies and DNA-DNA hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus species. The Pos ID panel has modified conventional and chromogenic tests that can be read after 15 to 48 h of incubation; the Rapid Pos ID panel has tests that use fluorogenic substrates or fluorometric indicators, and test results can be read after 2 h of incubation in the autoSCAN-W/A. Results indicated that both MicroScan systems had a high degree of congruence (greater than or equal to 90%) with conventional methods for the species S. capitis, S. aureus, S. auricularis, S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. arlettae, S. carnosus, S. lentus, and S. sciuri and, in particular, the subspecies S. capitis subsp. capitis and S. cohnii subsp. cohnii. The Rapid Pos ID panel system also had greater than or equal to 90% congruence with conventional methods for S. epidermidis, S. caprae, S. warneri subsp. 2, S. xylosus, S. kloosii, and S. caseolyticus. For both MicroScan systems, congruence with conventional methods was 80 to 90% for S. haemolyticus subsp. 1, S. equorum, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus; and in addition, with the Rapid Pos ID panel system congruence was 80 to 89% for S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus, S. warneri subsp. 1, S. hominis, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticum, and S. simulans. The MicroScan systems identified a lower percentage (50 to 75%) of strains of S. lugdunensis, S. gallinarum, S. schleiferi, and S. chromogenes, although the addition of specific tests to the systems might increase the accuracy of identification

  10. Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.

    PubMed Central

    Kloos, W E; George, C G

    1991-01-01

    The accuracies of the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems (Baxter Diagnostic Inc., MicroScan Division, West Sacramento, Calif.) were compared with each other and with the accuracies of conventional methods for the identification of 25 Staphylococcus species and 4 subspecies. Conventional methods included those used in the original descriptions of species and subspecies and DNA-DNA hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus species. The Pos ID panel has modified conventional and chromogenic tests that can be read after 15 to 48 h of incubation; the Rapid Pos ID panel has tests that use fluorogenic substrates or fluorometric indicators, and test results can be read after 2 h of incubation in the autoSCAN-W/A. Results indicated that both MicroScan systems had a high degree of congruence (greater than or equal to 90%) with conventional methods for the species S. capitis, S. aureus, S. auricularis, S. saprophyticus, S. cohnii, S. arlettae, S. carnosus, S. lentus, and S. sciuri and, in particular, the subspecies S. capitis subsp. capitis and S. cohnii subsp. cohnii. The Rapid Pos ID panel system also had greater than or equal to 90% congruence with conventional methods for S. epidermidis, S. caprae, S. warneri subsp. 2, S. xylosus, S. kloosii, and S. caseolyticus. For both MicroScan systems, congruence with conventional methods was 80 to 90% for S. haemolyticus subsp. 1, S. equorum, S. intermedius, and S. hyicus; and in addition, with the Rapid Pos ID panel system congruence was 80 to 89% for S. capitis subsp. ureolyticus, S. warneri subsp. 1, S. hominis, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticum, and S. simulans. The MicroScan systems identified a lower percentage (50 to 75%) of strains of S. lugdunensis, S. gallinarum, S. schleiferi, and S. chromogenes, although the addition of specific tests to the systems might increase the accuracy of identification

  11. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Facilitates Rapid Identification of Both Young and Mature Amazonian Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Carla; Costa, Flávia Regina Capellotto; Camargo, José Luís Campana; Durgante, Flávia Machado; Vicentini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Precise identification of plant species requires a high level of knowledge by taxonomists and presence of reproductive material. This represents a major limitation for those working with seedlings and juveniles, which differ morphologically from adults and do not bear reproductive structures. Near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR) has previously been shown to be effective in species discrimination of adult plants, so if young and adults have a similar spectral signature, discriminant functions based on FT-NIR spectra of adults can be used to identify leaves from young plants. We tested this with a sample of 419 plants in 13 Amazonian species from the genera Protium and Crepidospermum (Burseraceae). We obtained 12 spectral readings per plant, from adaxial and abaxial surfaces of dried leaves, and compared the rate of correct predictions of species with discriminant functions for different combinations of readings. We showed that the best models for predicting species in early developmental stages are those containing spectral data from both young and adult plants (98% correct predictions of external samples), but even using only adult spectra it is still possible to attain good levels of identification of young. We obtained an average of 75% correct identifications of young plants by discriminant equations based only on adults, when the most informative wavelengths were selected. Most species were accurately predicted (75–100% correct identifications), and only three had poor predictions (27–60%). These results were obtained despite the fact that spectra of young individuals were distinct from those of adults when species were analyzed individually. We concluded that FT-NIR has a high potential in the identification of species even at different ontogenetic stages, and that young plants can be identified based on spectra of adults with reasonable confidence. PMID:26312996

  12. Rapid and Efficient Identification of Caenorhabditis elegans Legacy Mutations Using Hawaiian SNP-Based Mapping and Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fuchsman, Abigail S; Fabritius, Amy S; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2015-05-01

    The production of viable embryos requires the coordination of many cellular processes, including protein synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, establishment of polarity, cell migration, cell division, and in Caenorhabditis elegans, eggshell formation. Defects in any of these processes can lead to embryonic lethality. We examined six temperature-sensitive mutants as well as one nonconditional mutant that were previously identified in genetic screens as either embryonic lethal (maternal-effect or zygotic lethal) or eggshell defective. The responsible molecular lesion for each had never been determined. After confirmation of temperature sensitivity and lethality, we performed whole-genome sequencing using a single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping strategy to pinpoint the molecular lesions. Gene candidates were confirmed by RNA interference phenocopy and/or complementation tests and one mutant was further validated by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palidromic Repeats)/Cas9 gene editing. This approach identified new alleles of several genes that had only been previously studied by RNA interference depletion. Our identification of temperature-sensitive alleles for all of these essential genes provides an extremely useful tool for further investigation for the C. elegans community, such as the ability to address mutant phenotypes at various developmental stages and the ability to carry out suppressor/enhancer screens to identify other genes that function in a specific cellular process. PMID:25740937

  13. Rapid and Efficient Identification of Caenorhabditis elegans Legacy Mutations Using Hawaiian SNP-Based Mapping and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fuchsman, Abigail S.; Fabritius, Amy S.; Smith, Harold E.; Golden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The production of viable embryos requires the coordination of many cellular processes, including protein synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, establishment of polarity, cell migration, cell division, and in Caenorhabditis elegans, eggshell formation. Defects in any of these processes can lead to embryonic lethality. We examined six temperature-sensitive mutants as well as one nonconditional mutant that were previously identified in genetic screens as either embryonic lethal (maternal-effect or zygotic lethal) or eggshell defective. The responsible molecular lesion for each had never been determined. After confirmation of temperature sensitivity and lethality, we performed whole-genome sequencing using a single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping strategy to pinpoint the molecular lesions. Gene candidates were confirmed by RNA interference phenocopy and/or complementation tests and one mutant was further validated by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palidromic Repeats)/Cas9 gene editing. This approach identified new alleles of several genes that had only been previously studied by RNA interference depletion. Our identification of temperature-sensitive alleles for all of these essential genes provides an extremely useful tool for further investigation for the C. elegans community, such as the ability to address mutant phenotypes at various developmental stages and the ability to carry out suppressor/enhancer screens to identify other genes that function in a specific cellular process. PMID:25740937

  14. [Rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine with MRM by LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Ru; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Song, Geng-Shen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the establishment of a method for rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine (paracetamol, aminophenazone, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, methylephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, amantadine hydrochloride, phenazone, guaifenesin, chlorphenamine maleate, dextromethorphen hydrobromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride, propyphenazone, benorilate and diclofenac sodium) with MRM by LC-MS/MS. The samples were extracted by methanol and were separated from a Altantis T3 column within 15 min with a gradient of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (containing 0.25% glacial acetic acid), a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source (ESI) was used in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed for qualitative analysis of these compounds. The minimum detectable quantity were 0.33-2.5 microg x kg(-1) of the 15 compounds. The method is simple, accurate and with good reproducibility for rapid identification many components in the same chromatographic condition, and provides a reference for qualitative analysis illegally added chemicals in anti common cold medicine. PMID:23600148

  15. Rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants by in vivo nanospray high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Peng, Yue'e; Dan, Conghui; Shuai, Qin; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-03-25

    A method for the rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in fresh plants has been developed using in vivo nanospray coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Using a homemade in vivo nanospray ion source, the plant liquid was drawn out from a target region and ionized in situ. The ionized bioactive compounds were then identified using Q-Orbitrap HR-MS. The accurate mass measurements of these bioactive compounds were performed by full-scan or selected ion monitoring (SIM), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used in the structural elucidation. Without sample pretreatment, 12 bioactive compounds in 7 different plant species were identified, namely, isoalliin in onion; butylphthalide in celery; N-methylpelletierine, pelletierine, and pseudopelletierine in pomegranate; chlorogenic acid in crabapple; solamargine, solasonine, and solasodine in nightshade; aloin and aloe-emodin in aloe; and menthone in mint. This work demonstrates that in vivo nanospray HR-MS is a good method for rapid in situ identification of bioactive compounds in plants. PMID:25749134

  16. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid and sensitive identification of ostrich meat.

    PubMed

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes. PMID:24963709

  17. A novel method for the rapid and prospective identification of Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M; Navarro, Y; Barletta, F; Martínez Lirola, M; Gotuzzo, E; Bouza, E; García de Viedma, D

    2011-03-01

    Genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has enabled the definition of several lineages. The Beijing family, which is considered highly virulent and transmissible, has been associated with resistance in certain settings and involved in severe outbreaks, making it one of the most closely-monitored lineages. Therefore, rapid prospective identification of Beijing MTB strains could be relevant. In the present study, we evaluate a real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting (HRM) based on the identification of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the Rv2629 gene which defines Beijing lineage (A191C for Beijing genotype and A191A for non-Beijing genotype). This combined methodology efficiently differentiated Beijing and non-Beijing strains in 100% of the isolates from a collection of reference strains without requiring specific DNA probes. Additionally, HRM was able to assign a Beijing/non-Beijing genotype in 90.9% of the respiratory specimens assayed. Its applicability was tested on a Peruvian sample of circulating MTB strains, in which it identified 10.7% as belonging to the Beijing genotype; this proportion reached 20% in the North Lima area. HRM analysis of the A191C SNP is a rapid, reliable, and sensitive method for the efficient prospective survey of high-risk Beijing MTB strains, even in developing settings where MTB culture is often not available. PMID:20384709

  18. Development of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Rapid and Sensitive Identification of Ostrich Meat

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmawjood, Amir; Grabowski, Nils; Fohler, Svenja; Kittler, Sophie; Nagengast, Helga; Klein, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Animal species identification is one of the primary duties of official food control. Since ostrich meat is difficult to be differentiated macroscopically from beef, therefore new analytical methods are needed. To enforce labeling regulations for the authentication of ostrich meat, it might be of importance to develop and evaluate a rapid and reliable assay. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on the cytochrome b gene of the mitochondrial DNA of the species Struthio camelus was developed. The LAMP assay was used in combination with a real-time fluorometer. The developed system allowed the detection of 0.01% ostrich meat products. In parallel, a direct swab method without nucleic acid extraction using the HYPLEX LPTV buffer was also evaluated. This rapid processing method allowed detection of ostrich meat without major incubation steps. In summary, the LAMP assay had excellent sensitivity and specificity for detecting ostrich meat and could provide a sampling-to-result identification-time of 15 to 20 minutes. PMID:24963709

  19. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Human-Associated Staphylococci by Use of Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirotaki, Shintaro; Sasaki, Takashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Although staphylococci are identified by phenotypic analysis in many clinical laboratories, these results are often incorrect because of phenotypic variation. Genetic analysis is necessary for definitive species identification. In the present study, we developed a simple multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) for species identification of human-associated staphylococci, which were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus, S. capitis, S. caprae, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, and S. warneri. This method was designed on the basis of nucleotide sequences of the thermonuclease (nuc) genes that were universally conserved in staphylococci except the S. sciuri group and showed moderate sequence diversity. In order to validate this assay, 361 staphylococcal strains were studied, which had been identified at the species levels by sequence analysis of the hsp60 genes. In consequence, M-PCR demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100%. By virtue of simplicity and accuracy, this method will be useful in clinical research. PMID:21832022

  20. Rapid and Accurate Identification by Real-Time PCR of Biotoxin-Producing Dinoflagellates from the Family Gymnodiniaceae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kirsty F.; de Salas, Miguel; Adamson, Janet; Rhodes, Lesley L.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of toxin-producing dinoflagellates for monitoring programmes and bio-compound discovery requires considerable taxonomic expertise. It can also be difficult to morphologically differentiate toxic and non-toxic species or strains. Various molecular methods have been used for dinoflagellate identification and detection, and this study describes the development of eight real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) gene of species from the genera Gymnodinium, Karenia, Karlodinium, and Takayama. Assays proved to be highly specific and sensitive, and the assay for G. catenatum was further developed for quantification in response to a bloom in Manukau Harbour, New Zealand. The assay estimated cell densities from environmental samples as low as 0.07 cells per PCR reaction, which equated to three cells per litre. This assay not only enabled conclusive species identification but also detected the presence of cells below the limit of detection for light microscopy. This study demonstrates the usefulness of real-time PCR as a sensitive and rapid molecular technique for the detection and quantification of micro-algae from environmental samples. PMID:24608972

  1. Single-Step PCR Using (GACA)4 Primer: Utility for Rapid Identification of Dermatophyte Species and Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Atef S.; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Aboulatta, Hassan N.; El Akhras, Atef I.; Abbadi, Said H.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2008-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that belong to three genera: Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Identification of dermatophyte species is essential for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis. Routine identification depends on macroscopic and microscopic morphology, which is time-consuming and does not identify dermatophyte strains. In this study, two PCR-based methods were compared for their abilities to identify 21 dermatophyte isolates obtained from Egyptian patients to the species and strain levels. The first method employed a two-step method: PCR amplification, using ITS1 and ITS4 as primers, followed by restriction enzyme digestion using the endonuclease MvaI. The second method employed a one-step approach employing the repetitive oligonucleotide (GACA)4 as a primer. Dermatophyte strains were also identified using a conventional culture method. Our results showed that the conventional culture method identified four species: Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton violaceum. Moreover, both PCR methods agreed with the diagnosis made using the conventional approach. Furthermore, ITS1/ITS4-based PCR provided no strain differentiation, while (GACA)4-based PCR identified different varieties among the T. mentagrophytes isolates. Taken together, our results suggest that (GACA)4-based PCR has utility as a simple and rapid method for identification of dermatophyte species as well as utility for differentiation of T. mentagrophytes variants. PMID:18579714

  2. Development of conductive polymer analysis for the rapid detection and identification of phytopathogenic microbes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Lester, D G; Oberle, C S

    2004-05-01

    ABSTRACT Conductive polymer analysis, a type of electronic aroma detection technology, was evaluated for its efficacy in the detection, identification, and discrimination of plant-pathogenic microorganisms on standardized media and in diseased plant tissues. The method is based on the acquisition of a diagnostic electronic fingerprint derived from multisensor responses to distinct mixtures of volatile metabolites released into sampled headspace. Protocols were established to apply this technology specifically to plant disease diagnosis. This involved development of standardized cultural methods, new instrument architecture for sampling, sample preparation, prerun procedures, run parameters and schedules, recognition files and libraries, data manipulations, and validation protocols for interpretations of results. The collective output from a 32-sensor array produced unique electronic aroma signature patterns diagnostic of individual microbial species in culture and specific pathogen-host combinations associated with diseased plants. The level of discrimination applied in identifications of unknowns was regulated by confidence level and sensitivity settings during construction of application-specific reference libraries for each category of microbe or microbe-host combination identified. Applications of this technology were demonstrated for the diagnosis of specific disease systems, including bacterial and fungal diseases and decays of trees; for host identifications; and for determinations of levels of infection and relatedness between microbial species. Other potential applications to plant pathology are discussed with some advantages and limitations for each type of diagnostic application. PMID:18943759

  3. Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  4. Rapid presumptive identification of anaerobes in blood cultures by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Sondag, J E; Ali, M; Murray, P R

    1980-01-01

    Production of volatile and nonvolatile metabolic acids in blood culture broths by aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and obligate anaerobic bacteria was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Anaerobic blood culture isolates were presumptively identified by the qualitative analysis of volatile fatty acids. Isolates, with a characteristic Gram stain reaction and cellular morphology, were identified by the following acid patterns: Bacteriodes fragilis group with acetic and propionic acids; Fusobacterium with acetic, butyric, and usually propionic acids; Veillonella with acetic and propionic acids; gram-positive cocci with acetic and butyric acids; and Clostridium with acetic and butyric acids. PMID:7381002

  5. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  6. Rapid identification of salmonella serotypes with stereo and hyperspectral microscope imaging Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  7. Rapid Identification of Salmonella Serotypes with Stereo and Hyperspectral Microscope Imaging Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method can reduce detection time within 8 hours including incubation process. The early and rapid detection with this method in conjunction with the high throughput capabilities makes HMI method a prime candidate for implementation for the food industry. Th...

  8. A simple, rapid and inexpensive screening method for the identification of Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Tondolo, Juliana Simoni Moraes; Loreto, Erico Silva; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Santurio, Janio Morais

    2013-04-01

    Growth of Pythium insidiosum mycelia around minocycline disks (30μg) did not occur within 7days of incubation at 35°C when the isolates were grown on Sabouraud, corn meal, Muller-Hinton or RPMI agar. This technique offers a simple and rapid method for the differentiation of P. insidiosum from true filamentous fungi. PMID:23419825

  9. Rapid Screening and Species Identification of E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal susp...

  10. Identification of Cellular Calcium Binding Protein Calmodulin as a Regulator of Rotavirus A Infection during Comparative Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Basak, Trayambak; Nayak, Mukti Kant; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Mukherjee, Anupam; Bhowmick, Rahul; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakrabarti, Oishee; Chatterjee, Nabendu S.; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) being the major diarrhoegenic virus causes around 527000 children death (<5years age) worldwide. In cellular environment, viruses constantly adapt and modulate to survive and replicate while the host cell also responds to combat the situation and this results in the differential regulation of cellular proteins. To identify the virus induced differential expression of proteins, 2D-DIGE (Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis) based proteomics was used. For this, HT-29 cells were infected with RV strain SA11 for 0 hours, 3 hours and 9 hours post infection (hpi), differentially expressed spots were excised from the gel and identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. 2D-DIGE based proteomics study identified 32 differentially modulated proteins, of which 22 were unique. Some of these were validated in HT-29 cell line and in BALB/c mice model. One of the modulated cellular proteins, calmodulin (CaM) was found to directly interact with RV protein VP6 in the presence of Ca2+. Ca2+-CaM/VP6 interaction positively regulates RV propagation since both CaM inhibitor (W-7) and Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM) resulted in decreased viral titers. This study not only identifies differentially modulated cellular proteins upon infection with rotavirus in 2D-DIGE but also confirmed positive engagement of cellular Ca2+/CaM during viral pathogenesis. PMID:23437200

  11. Rapid identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis by using enzymatic profiles.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amato, R F; Eriquez, L A; Tomfohrde, K M; Singerman, E

    1978-01-01

    The enzymatic profiles of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, and related species were determined, using a total of 48 chromogenic substrates. Enzyme classes assayed for included glycosidases, aminopeptidases, phosphoamidases, proteases, lipases, esterases, and aryl sulfatase. A final test selection of 10 substrates, based upon their differential and reproducible characteristics, allowed the separation of N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis from each other and from all species tested within 4 h after primary isolation on modified Thayer-Martin medium. The need for subculturing suspect colonies from modified Thayer-Martin medium to chocolate medium with a subsequent loss of 18 to 24 h of identification is eliminated. PMID:203607

  12. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  13. Rapid identification of a narcotic plant Papaver bracteatum using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Aragane, Masako; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Yoshida, Masao; Yoshizawa, Masao; Abe, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Rei; Suzuki, Jin; Moriyasu, Takako; Nakae, Dai; Sudo, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hishida, Atuyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Makabe, So; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    In May 2011, numerous poppy plants closely resembling Papaver bracteatum Lindl., a type of narcotic plant that is illegal in Japan, were distributed directly from several large flower shops or through online shopping throughout Japan, including the Tokyo Metropolitan area. In order to better identify the narcotic plants, the relative nuclear DNA content at the vegetative stage was measured by flow cytometric (FCM) analysis in 3 closely-related species of the genus Papaver section Oxytona, namely P. orientale, P. pseudo-orientale, and P. bracteatum, based on the difference between the chromosome numbers of these species. The results showed that the nuclear DNA content differed between these 3 species, and that most of the commercially distributed plants examined in this study could be identified as P. bracteatum. The remaining plants were P. pseudo-orientale, a non-narcotic plant. In addition, the FCM results for the identification of P. bracteatum completely agreed with the results obtained by the morphological analysis, the inter-genic spacer sequence of rpl16-rpl14 (PS-ID sequence) of chloroplast DNA, and the presence of thebaine. These results clearly indicate the usefulness of FCM analysis for the identification of P. bracteatum plants, including when they are in their vegetative stage. PMID:24952707

  14. Challenges to the rapid identification of children who have been trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Child trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation (CSE) is a complex phenomenon, requiring multifaceted programs and policies by various stakeholders. A number of publications have focused on preventing this heinous crime. Less attention, however, has been paid to the recovery and rehabilitation of children who have been traumatized as a result of being trafficked for CSE. This article focuses on the first step in the protection and recovery process, which is to ensure that procedures are in place for their identification, so that they might access timely and appropriate assistance. It highlights three situational and two child-related challenges to identification. In addition, it describes the additional victimization experienced by children who are wrongly arrested for crimes associated with prostitution or illegal border crossings, rather than being identified as victims. An extensive literature review was conducted, and included academic publications, as well as governmental and non-governmental reports. In addition, field-based qualitative research was undertaken in South and Southeast Asia, and involved interviews with representatives from United Nations and governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and aftercare recovery programs. PMID:26718261

  15. Rapid Identification of Ginseng Cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer) Using Novel SNP-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Bang, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Jei-Wan; Seo, A-Yeon; Seong, Bong-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Cha, Seon-Woo; Cho, Yong-Gu; Kim, Hong-Sig

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a novel system for the discrimination of five ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer), single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays with real-time polymerase chain reaction were conducted. Nucleotide substitution in gDNA library clones of P. ginseng cv. Yunpoong was targeted for the SNP genotyping assay. From these SNP sites, a set of modified SNP specific fluorescence probes (PGP74, PGP110, and PGP130) and novel primer sets have been developed to distinguish among five ginseng cultivars. The combination of the SNP type of the five cultivars, Chungpoong, Yunpoong, Gopoong, Kumpoong, and Sunpoong, was identified as ‘ATA’, ‘GCC’, ‘GTA’, ‘GCA’, and ‘ACC’, respectively. This study represents the first report of the identification of ginseng cultivars by fluorescence probes. An SNP genotyping assay using fluorescence probes could prove useful for the identification of ginseng cultivars and ginseng seed management systems and guarantee the purity of ginseng seed. PMID:23717098

  16. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells. PMID:27406324

  17. A convenient cellular assay for the identification of the molecular target of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors and quantification of their effects on total ergosterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Staudacher, Verena; Krauss, Jürgen; Giera, Martin; Bracher, Franz

    2013-05-01

    Increasing resistance of clinically relevant fungi is causing major problems in anti-mycotic therapy. Particularly for immunosuppressed patients fungal infections are of concern and increasing resistance against clinically used antimycotic drugs is hampering successful treatment. In the search for new antifungals ergosterol biosynthesis still is the most prominent target. However, several pitfalls in the bioactivity testing of such substances remain. Two of the major drawbacks certainly are the membrane association of most enzymes participating in ergosterol biosynthesis, and the difficulty to selectively associate growth inhibitory effects with the target pathway (ergosterol biosynthesis). Here we describe a GC-MS based cellular assay for target identification and selective potency determination of test components. In the qualitative part of the assay GC-MS analysis of cell lysates allows target identification by analysis of the changes in the sterol pattern. The quantitative part of the assay makes use of 13C-acetate feeding combined with GC-MS analysis allowing the selective quantification of a compound's effect on total ergosterol biosynthesis. The described cellular assay was analytically and biologically validated and used to characterize the novel ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor JK-250. PMID:23454215

  18. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  19. Structural identification of short/middle span bridges by rapid impact testing: theory and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Q. Q.; Guo, S. L.; Xu, D. W.; Wu, Z. S.

    2015-06-01

    A structural strain flexibility identification method by processing the multiple-reference impact testing data is proposed. First, a kind of novel long-gauge fiber optic sensor is developed for structural macro-strain monitoring. Second, the multiple-reference impact testing technology is employed, during which both the impacting force and structural strain responses are measured. The impact testing technology has unique merit because it is able to extract exact structural frequency response functions (FRFs), while other test methods, for instance ambient tests, can only output the FRFs with scaled magnitudes. Most importantly, the originality of the article is that a method of identifying the structural strain flexibility characteristic from the impact test data has been proposed, which is useful for structural static strain prediction and capacity evaluation. Examples of a six meter simple supported beam and a multiple-span continuous beam bridge have successfully verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method for rapid mushroom species identification.

    PubMed

    Vaagt, Franziska; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2013-02-27

    Toxic mushroom species, such as the death cap ( Amanita phalloides ), are responsible for most mushroom poisonings. In the present work, novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were used for the differentiation of even closely related edible and toxic mushroom species. The applicability of these methods was tested by cross-reaction studies and analysis of spiked mushroom samples (raw and fried material). Contaminations at the level of 2% (w/w) could be detected in different mushroom blends. Three detection methods were used: agarose gel analysis, fluorimetric real-time detection, and visual detection by lateral flow dipsticks (LFD). The LAMP assay combined with LFD detection allows the identification of A. phalloides in about 2 h (including DNA extraction) at a very low level of technical equipment (micropestle, water bath, and mobile centrifuge), which makes this technique perfectly suited for on-site applications. PMID:23350919

  1. Rapid detection and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by PCR based on flagellin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Uchida, I; Sekizaki, T; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Tamura, Y

    2001-02-26

    We developed a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that specifically detects Clostridium chauvoei. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 516-bp fragment of the structural flagellin gene. The specificity of the PCR was investigated by analyzing 59 strains of clostridia, and seven strain of other genera. A 516-bp fragment could be amplified from all the C. chauvoei strains tested, and no amplification was observed by using DNAs from the other strains tested, including Clostridium septicum. Similarly, this PCR-based method specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA sequences in samples of muscle and exudate of obtained from mice within 12h of inoculation. In tests using samples of muscle or liver, the limit of detection was about 200 organisms per reaction. These results suggest that the one-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection and identification of C. chauvoei in clinical specimens. PMID:11182502

  2. Rapid identification of phthalates in blood bags and food packaging using ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching Yuan; Ghule, Anil Vithal; Chen, Wen Yin; Wang, Chiung Chi; Chiang, Yi Shin; Ling, Yong Chien

    2004-06-01

    ToF-SIMS with Ga + ion as primary source is used to analyze plasticizers like bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) from the inner surface of the blood bags and their migration into the blood. Food packing materials were also analyzed for the presence of DEHP. The simplicity of using ToF-SIMS with high mass resolution as an aid in the identification and analysis are discussed. The ToF-SIMS results, the fragmentation pattern, and the ratio of ions were comparable to those obtained from traditional GC-MS analysis. This indicates that ToF-SIMS could be a promising technique for direct detection of DEHP (and phthalates in general) in blood bags and food packaging polymeric materials.

  3. Extraction and identification of cyclobutanones from irradiated cheese employing a rapid direct solvent extraction method.

    PubMed

    Tewfik, Ihab

    2008-01-01

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (cyclobutanones) are accepted as chemical markers for irradiated foods containing lipid. However, current extraction procedures (Soxhlet-florisil chromatography) for the isolation of these markers involve a long and tedious clean-up regime prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry identification. This paper outlines an alternative isolation and clean-up method for the extraction of cyclobutanones in irradiated Camembert cheese. The newly developed direct solvent extraction method enables the efficient screening of large numbers of food samples and is not as resource intensive as the BS EN 1785:1997 method. Direct solvent extraction appears to be a simple, robust method and has the added advantage of a considerably shorter extraction time for the analysis of foods containing lipid. PMID:19382334

  4. Rapid, Bioassay-Guided Process for the Detection and Identification of Antibacterial Neem Oil Compounds.

    PubMed

    Krüzselyi, Dániel; Nagy, Róbert; Ott, Péter G; Móricz, Ágnes M

    2016-08-01

    Bioassay guidance was used along the whole process including method development, isolation and identification of antibacterial neem (Azadirachta indica) oil compounds. The biomonitoring was performed by direct bioautography (DB), a combination of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and antimicrobial detection. DB of neem oil showed one antibacterial zone that was not UV-active; therefore, the TLC separation was improved under DB control. The chromatographic zone that exhibited activity against Bacillus subtilis, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, Aliivibrio fischeri, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was characterized by TLC reagents, indicating a lipophilic, fatty acid-like chemical feature. Two compounds were found and identified in the active zone by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry as linoleic and oleic acids. Both fatty acids inhibited B. subtilis, but A. fischeri was sensitive only against linoleic acid. PMID:26951543

  5. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  6. Rapid identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum using an oligonucleotide probe complementary to 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, J G; Gersdorf, H; Jansson, E; Hongslo, T; Göbel, U B; Johansson, K E

    1993-02-01

    Bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish is caused by the slow-growing Gram-positive rod, Renibacterium salmoninarum. The partial sequence of 16S rRNA from R. salmoninarum was determined and compared with published bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. From this sequence information, a 30-bases-long oligonucleotide was designed and used as a specific probe for identification of R. salmoninarum in filter hybridization experiments. Strong specific hybridization signals were observed for all strains of R. salmoninarum tested. Furthermore, no cross-hybridization could be seen against 22 other bacterial species, among them other salmonid fish pathogens. The detection limit for the probe in direct filter hybridization by the dot-blot technique was 2.5 x 10(4) bacteria. It was also possible to detect R. salmoninarum in clinical samples by direct filter hybridization. PMID:8455640

  7. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omaththage P; Allen, Kerry C; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S; Luttrell, Randall G

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  8. Rapid Identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Using Ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Omaththage P.; Allen, Kerry C.; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S.; Luttrell, Randall G.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  9. Phage Library Screening for the Rapid Identification and In Vivo Testing of Candidate Genes for a DNA Vaccine against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Small Colony Biotype

    PubMed Central

    March, John B.; Jepson, Catherine D.; Clark, Jason R.; Totsika, Makrina; Calcutt, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A new strategy for rapidly selecting and testing genetic vaccines has been developed, in which a whole genome library is cloned into a bacteriophage λ ZAP Express vector which contains both prokaryotic (Plac) and eukaryotic (PCMV) promoters upstream of the insertion site. The phage library is plated on Escherichia coli cells, immunoblotted, and probed with hyperimmune and/or convalescent-phase antiserum to rapidly identify vaccine candidates. These are then plaque purified and grown as liquid lysates, and whole bacteriophage particles are then used directly to immunize the host, following which PCMV-driven expression of the candidate vaccine gene occurs. In the example given here, a semirandom genome library of the bovine pathogen Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (SC) biotype was cloned into λ ZAP Express, and two strongly immunodominant clones, λ-A8 and λ-B1, were identified and subsequently tested for vaccine potential against M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC biotype-induced mycoplasmemia. Sequencing and immunoblotting indicated that clone λ-A8 expressed an isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC biotype protein with a 28-kDa apparent molecular mass, identified as a previously uncharacterized putative lipoprotein (MSC_0397). Clone λ-B1 contained several full-length genes from the M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC biotype pyruvate dehydrogenase region, and two IPTG-independent polypeptides, of 29 kDa and 57 kDa, were identified on immunoblots. Following vaccination, significant anti-M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC biotype responses were observed in mice vaccinated with clones λ-A8 and λ-B1. A significant stimulation index was observed following incubation of splenocytes from mice vaccinated with clone λ-A8 with whole live M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC biotype cells, indicating cellular proliferation. After challenge, mice vaccinated with clone λ-A8 also exhibited a reduced level of mycoplasmemia

  10. A rapid chemical odour profiling method for the identification of rhinoceros horns.

    PubMed

    Ueland, Maiken; Ewart, Kyle; Troobnikoff, Amanda N; Frankham, Greta; Johnson, Rebecca N; Forbes, Shari L

    2016-09-01

    Illegal poaching causes great harm to species diversity and conservation. A vast amount of money is involved in the trade of illegal or forged animal parts worldwide. In many cases, the suspected animal part is unidentifiable and requires costly and invasive laboratory analysis such as isotopic fingerprinting or DNA testing. The lack of rapid and accurate methods to identify wildlife parts at the point of detection represents a major hindrance in the enforcement and prosecution of wildlife trafficking. The ability of wildlife detector dogs to alert to different wildlife species demonstrates that there is a detectable difference in scent profile of illegally traded animal parts. This difference was exploited to develop a rapid, non-invasive screening method for distinguishing rhinoceros horns of different species. The method involved the collection of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). It was hypothesised that the use of the specific odour profile as a screening method could separate and differentiate geographic origin or exploit the difference in diets of different species within a family (such as white rhinoceros and black rhinoceros from the Rhinocerotidae family). Known black and white rhinoceros horn samples were analysed using HS-SPME-GC×GC-TOFMS and multivariate statistics were applied to identify groupings in the data set. The black rhinoceros horn samples were distinctly different from the white rhinoceros horn samples. This demonstrated that seized rhinoceros horn samples can be identified based on their distinct odour profiles. The chemical odour profiling method has great potential as a rapid and non-invasive screening method in order to combat and track illegal trafficking of wildlife parts. PMID:27240958

  11. Identification of pollutant sources in a rapidly developing urban river catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingshui; Yin, Hailong; Jomma, Seifeddine; Rode, Michael; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Rapid economic development and urbanization worldwide cause serious ecological and environmental problems. A typical region that is in transition and requires systemic research for effective intervention is the rapidly developing city of Hefei in central P. R. China. In order to investigate the sources of pollutants over a one-year period in Nanfei River catchment that drains the city of Hefei, discharges were measured and water samples were taken and measured along the 14km river section at 10 sites for 4 times from 2013 to 2014. Overflow concentrations of combined sewer and separate storm drains were also measured by selecting 15 rain events in 4 typical drainage systems. Loads and budgets of water and different pollutant sources i.e., wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, urban drainage overflow, unknown wastewater were calculated. The water balance demonstrated that >70% of the discharge originated from WWTP effluent. Lack of clean upstream inflow thereby is threatening ecological safety and water quality. Furthermore, mass fluxes calculations revealed that >40% of the COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) loads were from urban drainage overflow because of a large amount of discharge of untreated wastewater in pumping stations during rain events. WWTP effluent was the predominant source of the total nitrogen loads (>60%) and ammonia loads (>45%). However, the total phosphorous loads from three different sources are similar (˜1/3). Thus, our research provided a basis for appropriate and prior mitigation strategies (state-of-art of WWTP upgrade, sewer systems modification, storm water regulation and storage capacity improvement, etc.) for different precedence-controlled pollutants with the limited infrastructure investments in these rapidly developing urban regions.

  12. [Rapid identification of chemical composition in safflower with UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-song; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Li, De-feng; Yang, Hong-jun; Liang, Ri-xin

    2015-04-01

    The UHPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometer was used to explore the chemical compositions in safflower. The rapid separation of the compositions was conducted by the UHPLC, following by high resolution full scan and MS2 scan, under the positive and negative ion mode. The chemical formula of compositions were deduced by full scan data in less than 5, then the potential structures were confirmed by the MS2 data. Forty-nine compounds were detected, of which 26 was identified, and 5 compounds was validated by the standard substances. PMID:26281560

  13. Rapid identification of microorganisms for biodegradation of alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethercarboxylates

    SciTech Connect

    Hemming, B.; Williams, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Alkylphenols, especially nonylphenol and octylphenol, are used in a wide variety of applications. These compounds, and alkylphenol ethercarboxylates, are also believed to be formed during the biodegradation of alkylphenol ethoxylates in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems. Microbe Inotech Laboratories has developed a rapid assay to identify the microorganisms present in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems (GC-FAME) and a screening assay to measure the biodegradation of compounds. These assays were used to show that alkylphenols and their corresponding ethercarboxylates were degraded aerobically even when these compounds were the sole carbon source.

  14. Rapid identification of bacterial resistance to Ciprofloxacin using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Costas

    2014-02-01

    Due to its effectiveness and broad coverage, Ciprofloxacin is the fifth most prescribed antibiotic in the US. As current methods of infection diagnosis and antibiotic sensitivity testing (i.e. an antibiogram) are very time consuming, physicians prescribe ciprofloxacin before obtaining antibiogram results. In order to avoid increasing resistance to the antibiotic, a method was developed to provide both a rapid diagnosis and the sensitivity to the antibiotic. Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, an antibiogram was obtained after exposing the bacteria to Ciprofloxacin for just two hours. Spectral analysis revealed clear separation between sensitive and resistant bacteria and could also offer some inside into the mechanisms of resistance.

  15. Rapid Identification and Classification of Listeria spp. and Serotype Assignment of Listeria monocytogenes Using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Romanolo, K. F.; Gorski, L.; Wang, S.; Lauzon, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in conjunction with Artificial Neural Network software NeuroDeveloper™ was examined for the rapid identification and classification of Listeria species and serotyping of Listeria monocytogenes. A spectral library was created for 245 strains of Listeria spp. to give a biochemical fingerprint from which identification of unknown samples were made. This technology was able to accurately distinguish the Listeria species with 99.03% accuracy. Eleven serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes including 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b were identified with 96.58% accuracy. In addition, motile and non-motile forms of Listeria were used to create a more robust model for identification. FT-IR coupled with NeuroDeveloper™ appear to be a more accurate and economic choice for rapid identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. than current methods. PMID:26600423

  16. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  17. Rapid identification of osmolytes in tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zea Obando, Claudia; Linossier, Isabelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Zubia, Mayalen; Turquet, Jean; Faÿ, Fabienne; Rehel, Karine

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the chemical characterization of 47 tropical microalgae and cyanobacteria by HR-MAS. The generated data confirm the interest of HR-MAS as a rapid screening technique with the major advantage of its easiness. The sample is used as powder of freeze-dried microalgae without any extraction process before acquisition. The spectral fingerprints of strains are then tested as variables for a chemotaxonomy study to discriminate cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The individual factor map generated by PCA analysis succeeds in separating the two groups, essentially thanks to the presence of specific carbohydrates. Furthermore, more resolved signals enable to identify many osmolytes. More precisely the characteristics δ of 2-O-alpha-D-glucosylglycerol (GG) are observed in all 21 h-MAS spectra of tropical cyanobacteria. After specific extraction, complementary analysis by 1D and 2D-NMR spectroscopies validates the identification of this osmolyte. PMID:27130130

  18. Evaluation of the RapID CB Plus System for Identification of Coryneform Bacteria and Listeria spp.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, Guido; Peters, Katja; Aravena-Roman, Max

    1998-01-01

    In a stress test, the recently introduced RapID CB Plus system (Remel Inc. [formerly Innovative Diagnostic Systems], Norcross, Ga.) was challenged with a diverse set of gram-positive rods comprising 345 strains of coryneform bacteria and 33 strains of Listeria spp. representing a total of 49 different taxa. Overall, within 4 h, the system correctly identified 80.9% of the strains on the species level and 12.2% of the strains on the genus level. Only 3.7% strains were misidentified, and for 3.2% of the strains no identification was provided. Difficulties with the system were mainly due to occasional uncertainties in reading reactions for acid production from carbohydrates and, to a lesser extent, aminopeptidase reactions. It is concluded that the system may also perform well under the conditions of a routine clinical laboratory. PMID:9705370

  19. Rapid identification of haloarchaea and methanoarchaea using the matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chao-Jen; Chen, Sheng-Chung; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Lai, Mei-Chin; Yang, Yu-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to classify certain environmental haloarchaea and methanoarchaea using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and to expand the archaeal mass spectral database. A total of 69 archaea were collected including type strains and samples isolated locally from different environments. For extraction of the haloarchaeal total cell peptides/proteins, a simple method of acetonitrile extraction was developed. Cluster analysis conducted with the MALDI-TOF MS data overcame the high divergence in intragenomic 16S rRNA sequences in haloarchaea and clearly distinguished Methanohalophilus mahii from M. portucalensis. Putative biomarkers that can distinguish several particular archaeal genera were also assigned. In conclusion, this study expands the mass spectral database of peptide/protein fingerprints from bacteria and fungi to the archaea domain and provides a rapid identification platform for environmental archaeal samples. PMID:26541644

  20. Rapid screening and species identification of E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongliang; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.; Nou, Xiangwu

    2008-04-01

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of P-O SERS peaks from small molecule (K3PO4) were used to assess the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storage process. The results suggested the reproducibility of silver colloids over batch process and also stability and consistent binding effectiveness over 60-day storage period. Notably, although silver colloidal nanoparticles were stable for at least 90 days, their binding effectiveness began to decrease slightly after 60-day storage, with a binding reduction of about 12% at 90th day. Colloidal silver SERS, as demonstrated here, could be an important alternative technique in the rapid and simultaneous screening of the presence of three most outbreak bacteria due to the exclusive biomarkers, label-free and easy sampling attribute.

  1. Rapid identification and quantitation for oral bacteria based on short-end capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Ni, Yi; Liu, Chenchen; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chen, Qinmiao; Sekine, Shinichi; Zhu, Xifang; Dou, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    High-speed capillary electrophoresis (HSCE) is a promising technology applied in ultra-rapid and high-performance analysis of biomolecules (such as nucleic acids, protein). In present study, the short-end capillary electrophoresis coupled with one novel space domain internal standard method (SDIS) was employed for the rapid and simultaneous analysis of specific genes from three oral bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g), Treponema denticola (T.d) and Tannerela forsythia (T.f)). The reliability, reproducibility and accuracy properties of above mentioned SDIS method were investigated in detail. The results showed the target gene fragments of P.g, T.d and T.f could be precisely, fast identified and quantitated within 95s via present short-end CE system. The analyte concentration and the ratio of space domain signals (between target sample and internal standard sample) featured a well linear relationship calculated via SDIS method. And the correlation coefficients R(2) and detection limits for P.g, T.d, T.f genes were 0.9855, 0.9896, 0.9969 and 0.077, 0.114 and 0.098ng/μl, respectively. PMID:27591633

  2. FAST CARS: Engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A. V.; Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time. PMID:12177405

  3. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    2014-05-01

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market. PMID:24566115

  4. Rapid identification of illegal synthetic adulterants in herbal anti-diabetic medicines using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yanchun; Lei, Deqing; Hu, Changqin

    We created a rapid detection procedure for identifying herbal medicines illegally adulterated with synthetic drugs using near infrared spectroscopy. This procedure includes a reverse correlation coefficient method (RCCM) and comparison of characteristic peaks. Moreover, we made improvements to the RCCM based on new strategies for threshold settings. Any tested herbal medicine must meet two criteria to be identified with our procedure as adulterated. First, the correlation coefficient between the tested sample and the reference must be greater than the RCCM threshold. Next, the NIR spectrum of the tested sample must contain the same characteristic peaks as the reference. In this study, four pure synthetic anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., metformin, gliclazide, glibenclamide and glimepiride), 174 batches of laboratory samples and 127 batches of herbal anti-diabetic medicines were used to construct and validate the procedure. The accuracy of this procedure was greater than 80%. Our data suggest that this protocol is a rapid screening tool to identify synthetic drug adulterants in herbal medicines on the market.

  5. Rapid identification of compound mutations in patients with Ph-positive leukemias by long-range next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, R.; Zopf, A.; Preuner, S.; Pröll, J.; Niklas, N.; Foskett, P.; Valent, P.; Lion, T.; Gabriel, C.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging problem in patients with Ph-positive leukemias is the occurrence of cells with multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) associated with high resistance to different tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Rapid and sensitive detection of leukemic subclones carrying such changes, referred to as compound mutations, is therefore of increasing clinical relevance. However, current diagnostic methods including next generation sequencing (NGS) of short fragments do not optimally meet these requirements. We have therefore established a long-range (LR) NGS approach permitting massively parallel sequencing of the entire TKD length of 933bp in a single read using 454 sequencing with the GS FLX+ instrument (454 Life Sciences). By testing a series of individual and consecutive specimens derived from six patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, we demonstrate that long-range NGS analysis permits sensitive identification of mutations and their assignment to the same or to separate subclones. This approach also facilitates readily interpretable documentation of insertions and deletions in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD. The long-range NGS findings were reevaluated by an independent technical approach in select cases. PCR amplicons of the BCR-ABL1 TKD derived from individual specimens were subcloned into pGEM®-T plasmids, and >100 individual clones were subjected to analysis by Sanger sequencing. The NGS results were confirmed, thus documenting the reliability of the new technology. Long-range NGS analysis therefore provides an economic approach to the identification of compound mutations and other genetic alterations in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD, and represents an important advancement of the diagnostic armamentarium for rapid assessment of impending resistant disease. PMID:24365090

  6. [Rapid Identification of Epicarpium Citri Grandis via Infrared Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology Combined with Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Pan, Sha-sha; Huang, Fu-rong; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Rui-yi; Ma, Zhi-guo

    2015-10-01

    To explore rapid reliable methods for detection of Epicarpium citri grandis (ECG), the experiment using Fourier Transform Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR/ATR) and Fluorescence Spectrum Imaging Technology combined with Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) Neural Network pattern recognition, for the identification of ECG, and the two methods are compared. Infrared spectra and fluorescence spectral images of 118 samples, 81 ECG and 37 other kinds of ECG, are collected. According to the differences in tspectrum, the spectra data in the 550-1 800 cm(-1) wavenumber range and 400-720 nm wavelength are regarded as the study objects of discriminant analysis. Then principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to reduce the dimension of spectroscopic data of ECG and MLP Neural Network is used in combination to classify them. During the experiment were compared the effects of different methods of data preprocessing on the model: multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variable correction (SNV), first-order derivative(FD), second-order derivative(SD) and Savitzky-Golay (SG). The results showed that: after the infrared spectra data via the Savitzky-Golay (SG) pretreatment through the MLP Neural Network with the hidden layer function as sigmoid, we can get the best discrimination of ECG, the correct percent of training set and testing set are both 100%. Using fluorescence spectral imaging technology, corrected by the multiple scattering (MSC) results in the pretreatment is the most ideal. After data preprocessing, the three layers of the MLP Neural Network of the hidden layer function as sigmoid function can get 100% correct percent of training set and 96.7% correct percent of testing set. It was shown that the FTIR/ATR and fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with MLP Neural Network can be used for the identification study of ECG and has the advantages of rapid, reliable effect. PMID:26904814

  7. Evaluation of the 4-hour RapID NF Plus method for identification of 345 gram-negative nonfermentative rods.

    PubMed

    Kitch, T T; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1992-05-01

    The ability of the RapID NF Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.) to identify 345 nonfermentative gram-negative rods was evaluated. Kits were inoculated with no. 1 McFarland suspensions, and reactions were interpreted after a 4-h incubation at 35 degrees C. Overall, the method correctly identified 311 strains (90.1%) without additional tests and 21 strains (6.1%) with additional tests, and 13 strains (3.8%) were misidentified. Five of 13 misidentified strains were Alcaligenes faecalis-Alcaligenes odorans misidentified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans; however, all strains were xylose negative but nitrate positive and could have been A. faecalis group I-Alcaligenes piechaudii. The system does not differentiate between Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and all Acinetobacter species are identified as Acetinobacter calcoaceticus. Additionally, no subspecies differentiation is made between A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans and A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. All strains of the former Flavobacterium group IIb are identified as Flavobacterium indologenes-Flavobacterium gleum, and no species identification of the genus Methylobacterium is attempted. The system is easy to set up and interpret and provides an accurate commercial nonautomated method for same-day identification of gram-negative nonfermenters. PMID:1583129

  8. Noninvasive forward-scattering system for rapid detection, characterization, and identification of Listeria colonies: image processing and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwa, Bartek; Bayraktar, Bulent; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Huff, Karleigh; Bae, Euiwon; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial contamination by Listeria monocytogenes puts the public at risk and is also costly for the food-processing industry. Traditional methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Previously, we have reported development of a noninvasive optical forward-scattering system for rapid identification of Listeria colonies grown on solid surfaces. The presented system included application of computer-vision and patternrecognition techniques to classify scatter pattern formed by bacterial colonies irradiated with laser light. This report shows an extension of the proposed method. A new scatterometer equipped with a high-resolution CCD chip and application of two additional sets of image features for classification allow for higher accuracy and lower error rates. Features based on Zernike moments are supplemented by Tchebichef moments, and Haralick texture descriptors in the new version of the algorithm. Fisher's criterion has been used for feature selection to decrease the training time of machine learning systems. An algorithm based on support vector machines was used for classification of patterns. Low error rates determined by cross-validation, reproducibility of the measurements, and robustness of the system prove that the proposed technology can be implemented in automated devices for detection and classification of pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Testing human hair for Cannabis. III. rapid screening procedure for the simultaneous identification of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol, and cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Sachs, H; Kintz, P; Mangin, P

    1996-01-01

    delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN) are three constituents of the 16 that can be currently isolated from some Cannabis spp plants. Their identification in decontaminated hair can indicate exposure to cannabis. In this study, we propose a rapid, simple, and direct (without derivatization) screening procedure for the simultaneous identification and quantitation of CBD, CBN, and THC in hair of chronic cannabis abusers. Hair samples were washed with methylene chloride, hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide, extracted with n-hexane-ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), evaporated to dryness, and injected directly on a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric system operating in electron-impact mode. THC-d3 was used as the internal standard. Thirty hair samples were tested. CBD was detected 23 times, CBN was detected 22 times, and THC was detected five times. Concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 3.00 ng/mg (mean, 0.44 ng/mg), from 0.01 to 1.07 ng/mg (mean, 0.13 ng/mg), and from 0.1 to 0.29 ng/mg hair (mean, 0.15 ng/mg) for CBD, CBN, and THC, respectively. These results show that this new screening procedure is suitable for the detection of CBD and CBN in the hair of cannabis abusers. PMID:8837945

  10. Identification of a gene at 16q24.3 that restores cellular senescence in immortal mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reddy, D E; Sandhu, A K; DeRiel, J K; Athwal, R S; Kaur, G P

    1999-09-01

    We have mapped a cellular senescence gene, SEN16, within a genetic distance of 3 - 7 cM, at 16q24.3. Microcell mediated transfer of a normal human chromosome 16, 16q22-qter or 16q23-qter restored cellular senescence in four immortal cell lines, derived from human and rat mammary tumors. The resumption of indefinite cell proliferation, concordant with the segregation of the donor chromosome, confirmed the presence of a senescence gene at 16q23-qter. While microcell hybrids were maintained in selection medium to retain the donor chromosome, sporadic immortal revertant clones arose among senescent cells. Reversion to immortal growth could occur due to inactivation of the senescence gene either by a mutation or a deletion. The analysis for chromosome 16 specific DNA markers, in revertant clones of senescent microcell hybrids, revealed a consensus deletion, spanning a genetic interval of approximately 3 - 7 cM at 16q24.3. PMID:10490846

  11. Environmental monitoring using next generation sequencing: rapid identification of macroinvertebrate bioindicator species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Invertebrate communities are central to many environmental monitoring programs. In freshwater ecosystems, aquatic macroinvertebrates are collected, identified and then used to infer ecosystem condition. Yet the key step of species identification is often not taken, as it requires a high level of taxonomic expertise, which is lacking in most organizations, or species cannot be identified as they are morphologically cryptic or represent little known groups. Identifying species using DNA sequences can overcome many of these issues; with the power of next generation sequencing (NGS), using DNA sequences for routine monitoring becomes feasible. Results In this study, we test if NGS can be used to identify species from field-collected samples in an important bioindicator group, the Chironomidae. We show that Cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and Cytochrome B (CytB) sequences provide accurate DNA barcodes for chironomid species. We then develop a NGS analysis pipeline to identifying species using megablast searches of high quality sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing against comprehensive reference libraries of Sanger-sequenced voucher specimens. We find that 454 generated COI sequences successfully identified up to 96% of species in samples, but this increased up to 99% when combined with CytB sequences. Accurate identification depends on having at least five sequences for a species; below this level species not expected in samples were detected. Incorrect incorporation of some multiplex identifiers (MID’s) used to tag samples was a likely cause, and most errors could be detected when using MID tags on forward and reverse primers. We also found a strong quantitative relationship between the number of 454 sequences and individuals showing that it may be possible to estimate the abundance of species from 454 pyrosequencing data. Conclusions Next generation sequencing using two genes was successful for identifying chironomid species. However, when detecting

  12. Rapid Genus- and Species-Specific Identification of Cronobacter spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry▿

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Roger; Ziegler, Dominik; Pflüger, Valentin; Vogel, Guido; Lehner, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are Gram-negative opportunistic food-borne pathogens and are known as rare but important causes of life-threatening neonatal infections. Rapid and reliable identification of Cronobacter species and their differentiation from phenotypically similar, nonpathogenic Enterobacter turicensis, Enterobacter helveticus, and Enterobacter pulveris have become increasingly important. We evaluated here the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid genus and species identification of the six Cronobacter species recognized so far. To this end, we developed a reference MS database library that includes 54 Cronobacter target strains as well as 17 nontarget strains. The strains provided reproducible and unique mass spectra profiles covering a wide molecular mass range (2,000 to 30,000 Da). Genus- and species-specific biomarker protein mass patterns were determined. The defined biomarker mass patterns (Spectral Archive and Microbial Identification System [SARAMIS] SuperSpectrum) were validated using 36 strains from various Cronobacter species as well as eight nontarget strains. For all strains the mass spectrometry-based identification scheme yielded identical results as with a PCR-based identification system. All strains were correctly identified, and no nontarget strain was misidentified as Cronobacter. Our study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS is a reliable and powerful tool for the rapid identification of Cronobacter strains to the genus and species level. PMID:20554814

  13. Three isothermal amplification techniques for rapid identification of Cladophialophora carrionii, an agent of human chromoblastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuwen; de Hoog, G Sybren; Pan, Weihua; Chen, Min; van den Ende, A H G Gerrits; Yang, Liyue; Sun, Jiufeng; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Liao, Wanqing; Li, Ruoyu

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we developed rapid and sensitive assays for the detection of Cladophialophora carrionii, a common agent of human chromoblastomycosis. The isothermal techniques evaluated were rolling-circle amplification (RCA), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The probes for RCA and MLPA were designed with target sequences in the rDNA internal transcribed spacer gene (ITS) region, and LAMP primers were designed using the elongation factor 1α gene (EF1); these probes and primers specifically amplified DNA of isolates of the species. The three techniques were sufficiently specific and sensitive for discriminating target DNA of C. carrionii from that of related Cladophialophora species and other agents of chromoblastomycosis. RCA, MLPA, and LAMP are advantageous in their reliability and ease of operation compared to standard PCR and conventional methods. PMID:25009046

  14. Utilizing web-based geodata for rapid disaster identification and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Schmitt, Michael; Sickert, Salomon; Metzger, Alex; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Developing methods to rapidly locate and quantify the impact of natural disasters can aid both the coordination of emergency response, and the long-term understanding of natural hazards in a range of environmental settings. Gaining such quantitative data in the aftermath of landslide events is particularly challenging, as the localized nature, steep terrain, and frequent damage to infrastructure caused by common triggering events (e.g. earthquakes, storms) complicates traditional methods of survey and data communication. As a result, the first, and often best overview of disastrous events is typically provided by eyewitness or first-responder photographs distributed through official, or social media networks. Although these images allow for an initial qualitative assessment of the event, their ad-hoc nature does not currently allow for either precise location, or quantitative evaluation of key event parameters (e.g. structural setting, geology, geometry, size, transport path, or total fall height). Here we present two tools designed to facilitate initial location and assessment of key event parameters using a combination of freely available geodata and information derived from eyewitness observations. These tools are currently under development, and rely on the adaptation of existing photogrammetric techniques in order to allow users to rapidly map and quantify event parameters from a combination of ad-hoc media photographs, and existing orthophoto and digital terrain model data (e.g. LiDAR, SRTM, ASTER). By incorporating results in freely-available GIS platforms such as Google Earth, local authorities will be able to to better assess and disseminate information regarding the impact of natural disasters in the critical hours following an event. We expect that quantitative data derived from events will provide important information to allow geohazard researchers to better assess landslide generation, and authorities to better plan responses to future triggering

  15. Rapid diagnostic method for the identification of Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kato, Tadashi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2016-05-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests are useful tools in the early diagnosis of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) caused by a specific pathogens. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid and simple antigen test for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Ribotest Mycoplasma(®) in adolescent and adult patients with RTIs. In addition, we evaluated the accuracy of clinical and laboratory findings for the early presumptive diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI. We compared 55 cases with laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection using serology, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 346 cases without laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection. Pneumonia cases were excluded in this study. Among patients with M. pneumoniae infection, the incidences of cough, sore throat, and sputum production were high, with rates of 98%, 61%, and 67%, respectively, but the specificity was low. The prevalence of nasal symptoms was significantly lower in patients with M. pneumoniae infection (9%) than in non-M. pneumoniae infection (70%; p < 0.0001). When PCR was used as the control test, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates with Ribotest(®) were 71%, 89%, and 87%, respectively. Clinical symptoms and laboratory data were of limited value in making the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI in adolescent and adult patients. Our results suggested that Ribotest(®) may be helpful in distinguishing M. pneumoniae RTI patients from those without the disease. Physicians should consider the use of Ribotest(®) when patients have a persistent cough without nasal symptoms. PMID:26993174

  16. A novel technique for the rapid identification of alpha emitters released during a radiological incident.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, George A; Taylor, Bud; Leitch, Jerrold; Silverstone, Marina; Moore, Brian; Honsa, Patricia

    2006-10-01

    Before the May 2003 TOPOFF II exercise in Seattle, the U.S. EPA's Laboratory in Las Vegas prepared five spiked samples to be analyzed by the Washington State Department of Health's (WSDOH) Radiation Laboratory. Two of these were simulated deposition samples prepared on packaging tape. Laboratories throughout the world are investigating rapid methods for analyzing plume-borne radioactive materials. While measuring gamma emitters in environmental samples is fairly straightforward, the potential presence of alpha emitters adds complexity. The short range of alpha particles and the high degree of energy interference between nuclides usually require chemical separations and very thin mounts for alpha spectrometry. Work published on Frisch-Grid alpha counting of transuranics in soil and the commercial development of radon-rejection for air filters indicate that alpha spectrometry can be used directly on some media with success. This suggests that plume-borne material sampled from air or freshly deposited surface layers may be counted directly by alpha spectrometry, making it possible to identify both alpha and gamma emitters and determine their relative concentrations. The long-range objective is to propose a sampling method that can be used for rapid qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses using conventional radioanalytical instruments, with minimal preparation. This paper describes experimentation with this approach during a real-time exercise. All samples were prepared by spiking with (137)Cs, (241)Am, (238)Pu, and (239)Pu and presented to the WSDOH's Radiation Laboratory for analysis during TOPOFF II. The laboratory quickly identified and determined the ratios of all four contaminants on the tape samples using sequential alpha spectrometry and gamma-ray spectroscopy without chemical separations. PMID:16966874

  17. Rapid Identification of Novel Inhibitors of the Human Aquaporin-1 Water Channel.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajkumar V; Xu, Shouxi; van Hoek, Alfred N; Rusinko, Andrew; Feng, Zixia; May, Jesse; Hellberg, Mark; Sharif, Najam A; Wax, Martin B; Irigoyen, Macarena; Carr, Grant; Brittain, Tom; Brown, Peter; Colbert, Damon; Kumari, Sindhu; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan; Mitra, Alok K

    2016-05-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of membrane proteins that function as channels facilitating water transport in response to osmotic gradients. These play critical roles in several normal physiological and pathological states and are targets for drug discovery. Selective inhibition of the AQP1 water channel may provide a new approach for the treatment of several disorders including ocular hypertension/glaucoma, congestive heart failure, brain swelling associated with a stroke, corneal and macular edema, pulmonary edema, and otic disorders such as hearing loss and vertigo. We developed a high-throughput assay to screen a library of compounds as potential AQP1 modulators by monitoring the fluorescence dequenching of entrapped calcein in a confluent layer of AQP1-overexpressing CHO cells that were exposed to a hypotonic shock. Promising candidates were tested in a Xenopus oocyte-swelling assay, which confirmed the identification of two lead classes of compounds belonging to aromatic sulfonamides and dihydrobenzofurans with IC50 s in the low micromolar range. These selected compounds directly inhibited water transport in AQP1-enriched stripped erythrocyte ghosts and in proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified AQP1. Validation of these lead compounds, by the three independent assays, establishes a set of attractive AQP1 blockers for developing novel, small-molecule functional modulators of human AQP1. PMID:26685080

  18. Enumeration and rapid identification of yeasts during extraction processes of extra virgin olive oil in Tuscany.

    PubMed

    Mari, Eleonora; Guerrini, Simona; Granchi, Lisa; Vincenzini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeast populations during different olive oil extraction processes, carried out in three consecutive years in Tuscany (Italy), by analysing crushed pastes, kneaded pastes, oil from decanter and pomaces. The results showed yeast concentrations ranging between 10(3) and 10(5) CFU/g or per mL. Seventeen dominant yeast species were identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA with primer M13 and their identification was confirmed by restriction fragments length polymorphism of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and sequencing rRNA genes. The isolation frequencies of each species in the collected samples pointed out that the occurrence of the various yeast species in olive oil extraction process was dependent not only on the yeasts contaminating the olives but also on the yeasts colonizing the plant for oil extraction. In fact, eleven dominant yeast species were detected from the washed olives, but only three of them were also found in oil samples at significant isolation frequency. On the contrary, the most abundant species in oil samples, Yamadazyma terventina, did not occur in washed olive samples. These findings suggest a phenomenon of contamination of the plant for oil extraction that selects some yeast species that could affect the quality of olive oil. PMID:27116959

  19. Rapid Leptospira identification by direct sequencing of the diagnostic PCR products in New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most of the current knowledge of leptospirosis epidemiology originates from serological results obtained with the reference Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). However, inconsistencies and weaknesses of this diagnostic technique are evident. A growing use of PCR has improved the early diagnosis of leptospirosis but a drawback is that it cannot provide information on the infecting Leptospira strain which provides important epidemiologic data. Our work is aimed at evaluating if the sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products could be used to identify the infecting Leptospira strains in the New Caledonian environment. Results Both the lfb1 and secY diagnostic PCR products displayed a sequence polymorphism that could prove useful in presumptively identifying the infecting leptospire. Using both this polymorphism and MLST results with New Caledonian isolates and clinical samples, we confirmed the epidemiological relevance of the sequence-based identification of Leptospira strains. Additionally, we identified one cluster of L. interrogans that contained no reference strain and one cluster of L. borgpetersenii found only in the introduced Rusa deer Cervus timorensis russa that is its probable reservoir. Conclusions The sequence polymorphism of diagnostic PCR products proved useful in presumptively identifying the infecting Leptospira strains. This could contribute to a better understanding of leptospirosis epidemiology by providing epidemiological information that cannot be directly attained from the use of PCR as an early diagnostic test for leptospirosis. PMID:21176235

  20. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsienchyang Tsien; Hanson, R.S. )

    1992-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Baath also produces a soluble MMO.

  1. Rapid molecular identification of armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) on Mexican 'Hass' avocado.

    PubMed

    Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Morse, Joseph G; Stouthamer, Richard

    2009-10-01

    'Hass' avocado, Persea americana Mill., fruit imported into California from Mexico are infested with high levels of armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), constituting several species. The paucity and delicate nature of morphological characters traditionally used to diagnose armored scales often require careful preparation of slide-mounted specimens and expert knowledge of the group, for their accurate identification. Here, we present a simple, quick, and accurate means to identify armored scales on Mexican avocados, based on amplification of the internal transcribed spacer two of ribosomal DNA, by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This region seems to show a high level of intraspecific conformity among scale specimens originating from different localities. A suite of species-specific reverse PCR primers are combined in a single reaction, with a universal forward primer, and produce a PCR product of a unique size, that after standard gel electrophoresis, allows the direct diagnosis of six diaspidid species: Abgrallaspis aguacatae Evans, Watson & Miller; Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret); Hemiberlesia sp. near latania; Hemiberlesia rapax (Comstock); Acutaspis albopicta (Cockerell); and Pinnaspis strachani (Cooley). Two additional species, Diaspis miranda (Cockerell) and Diaspis sp. near miranda, also are separated from the others by using this method and are subsequently diagnosed by secondary digestion of the PCR product with the restriction endonuclease smaI. PMID:19886461

  2. Rapid identification of Campylobacter jejuni from poultry carcasses and slaughtering environment samples by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Mirena; Singh, Randhir; Dharmasena, Muthu; Gong, Chao; Krastanov, Albert; Jiang, Xiuping

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Campylobacter jejuni and to apply the method in analyzing samples from poultry processing. A C. jejuni-specific primer set targeting a portion of the C. jejuni hippuricase gene was developed. The specificity of the newly designed primer pair was verified using 5 C. jejuni strains and 20 other bacterial strains. Sensitivity was determined to be as low as 1 genome copy per reaction. A total of 73 samples were collected at different sites along the processing line during 2 visits to a poultry slaughterhouse and were examined by direct plating onto modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar or after enrichment in Bolton broth followed by plating on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar. The newly developed real-time PCR assay was used to identify the presumptive colonies as belonging to C. jejuni. A real-time PCR assay targeting 16S ribosomal RNA was also applied to determine Campylobacter spp. prevalence. Results from the real-time PCR analysis indicated considerable variability in Campylobacter contamination, with incidence rates of 72.7 and 27.6% for sampling days A and B, respectively. Campylobacter was isolated from 100% of prescalded and preeviscerated carcasses on sampling day A. In contrast, on sampling day B, the highest number of Campylobacter-positive carcasses was recovered after evisceration (60%). The chilling process significantly reduced (P < 0.05) Campylobacter population, but the percentage of positive samples on sampling day A increased to 80%. All samples collected from the processing environment, except scalding tank 3 and the prechiller and chiller tanks, were 100% positive on day A, whereas no campylobacters were isolated from machinery on sampling day B. Our results revealed the widespread of C. jejuni in poultry processing and proved that the newly developed real-time PCR assay is a simple, specific, and inexpensive method for rapid C

  3. Rapid Identification of Carbapenemase Genes in Gram-Negative Bacteria with an Oligonucleotide Microarray-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sascha D.; Monecke, Stefan; Thürmer, Alexander; Ruppelt, Antje; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pletz, Mathias; Reißig, Annett; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Rapid molecular identification of carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria is crucial for infection control and prevention, surveillance and for epidemiological purposes. Furthermore, it may have a significant impact upon determining the appropriate initial treatment and greatly benefit for critically ill patients. A novel oligonucleotide microarray-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect genes encoding clinically important carbapenemases as well as selected extended (ESBL) and narrow spectrum (NSBL) beta-lactamases directly from clonal culture material within few hours. Additionally, a panel of species specific markers was included to identify Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii/braakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. The assay was tested using a panel of 117 isolates collected from urinary, blood and stool samples. For these isolates, phenotypic identifications and susceptibility tests were available. An independent detection of carbapenemase, ESBL and NSBL genes was carried out by various external reference laboratories using PCR methods. In direct comparison, the microarray correctly identified 98.2% of the covered carbapenemase genes. This included blaVIM (13 out of 13), blaGIM (2/2), blaKPC (27/27), blaNDM (5/5), blaIMP-2/4/7/8/13/14/15/16/31 (10/10), blaOXA-23 (12/13), blaOXA-40-group (7/7), blaOXA-48-group (32/33), blaOXA-51 (1/1) and blaOXA-58 (1/1). Furthermore, the test correctly identified additional beta-lactamases [blaOXA-1 (16/16), blaOXA-2 (4/4), blaOXA-9 (33/33), OXA-10 (3/3), blaOXA-51 (25/25), blaOXA-58 (2/2), CTX-M1/M15 (17/17) and blaVIM (1/1)]. In direct comparison to phenotypical identification obtained by VITEK or MALDI-TOF systems, 114 of 117 (97.4%) isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii (28/28), Enterobacter spec. (5/5), Escherichia coli (4/4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/63), Klebsiella oxytoca (0/2), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12/12), Citrobacter freundii (1/1) and

  4. HabiSign: a novel approach for comparison of metagenomes and rapid identification of habitat-specific sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the primary goals of comparative metagenomic projects is to study the differences in the microbial communities residing in diverse environments. Besides providing valuable insights into the inherent structure of the microbial populations, these studies have potential applications in several important areas of medical research like disease diagnostics, detection of pathogenic contamination and identification of hitherto unknown pathogens. Here we present a novel and rapid, alignment-free method called HabiSign, which utilizes patterns of tetra-nucleotide usage in microbial genomes to bring out the differences in the composition of both diverse and related microbial communities. Results Validation results show that the metagenomic signatures obtained using the HabiSign method are able to accurately cluster metagenomes at biome, phenotypic and species levels, as compared to an average tetranucleotide frequency based approach and the recently published dinucleotide relative abundance based approach. More importantly, the method is able to identify subsets of sequences that are specific to a particular habitat. Apart from this, being alignment-free, the method can rapidly compare and group multiple metagenomic data sets in a short span of time. Conclusions The proposed method is expected to have immense applicability in diverse areas of metagenomic research ranging from disease diagnostics and pathogen detection to bio-prospecting. A web-server for the HabiSign algorithm is available at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/HabiSign/. PMID:22373355

  5. Rapid identification of bacteria utilizing amplified dielectrophoretic force-assisted nanoparticle-induced surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.-Fang; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Lu, Rong-Ji; Wu, Hung-Wei

    2014-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been widely used to manipulate, separate, and concentrate microscale particles. Unfortunately, DEP force is difficult to be used in regard to the manipulation of nanoscale molecules/particles. For manipulation of 50- to 100-nm particles, the electrical field strength must be higher than 3 × 106 V/m, and with a low applied voltage of 10 Vp-p, the electrode gap needs to be reduced to submicrons. Our research consists of a novel and simple approach, using a several tens micrometers scale electrode (low cost and easy to fabricate) to generate a dielectrophoretic microparticle assembly to form nanogaps with a locally amplified alternating current (AC) electric field gradient, which is used to rapidly trap nanocolloids. The results show that the amplified DEP force could effectively trap 20-nm colloids in the nanogaps between the 5-μm particle aggregates. The concentration factor at the local detection region was shown to be approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than the bulk solution. This approach was also successfully used in bead-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for the rapid identification of bacteria from diluted blood.

  6. Rapid identification of causative species in patients with Old World leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Minodier, P; Piarroux, R; Gambarelli, F; Joblet, C; Dumon, H

    1997-01-01

    Conventional methods for the identification of species of Leishmania parasite causing infections have limitations. By using a DNA-based alternative, the present study tries to develop a new tool for this purpose. Thirty-three patients living in Marseilles (in the south of France) were suffering from visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis. DNA of the parasite in clinical samples (bone marrow, peripheral blood, or skin) from these patients were amplified by PCR and were directly sequenced. The sequences observed were compared to these of 30 strains of the genus causing Old World leishmaniasis collected in Europe, Africa, or Asia. In the analysis of the sequences of the strains, two different sequence patterns for Leishmania infantum, one sequence for Leishmania donovani, one sequence for Leishmania major, two sequences for Leishmania tropica, and one sequence for Leishmania aethiopica were obtained. Four sequences were observed among the strains from the patients: one was similar to the sequence for the L. major strains, two were identical to the sequences for the L. infantum strains, and the last sequence was not observed within the strains but had a high degree of homology with the sequences of the L. infantum and L. donovani strains. The L. infantum strains from all immunocompetent patients had the same sequence. The L. infantum strains from immunodeficient patients suffering from visceral leishmaniasis had three different sequences. This fact might signify that some variants of L. infantum acquire pathogenicity exclusively in immunocompromised patients. To dispense with the sequencing step, a restriction assay with HaeIII was used. Some restriction patterns might support genetic exchanges in members of the genus Leishmania. PMID:9316906

  7. Evaluation of the RapidHIT™ 200, an automated human identification system for STR analysis of single source samples.

    PubMed

    Holland, Mitchell; Wendt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The RapidHIT™ 200 Human Identification System was evaluated to determine its suitability for STR analysis of single source buccal swabs. Overall, the RapidHIT™ 200 performed as well as our traditional capillary electrophoresis based method in producing useable profile information on a first-pass basis. General observations included 100% concordance with known profile information, consistent instrument performance after two weeks of buccal swab storage, and an absence of contamination in negative controls. When data analysis was performed by the instrument software, 95.3% of the 85 samples in the reproducibility study gave full profiles. Including the 81 full profiles, a total of 2682 alleles were correctly called by the instrument software, or 98.6% of 2720 possible alleles tested. Profile information was generated from as little as 10,000 nucleated cells, with swab collection technique being a major contributing factor to profile quality. The average peak-height-ratio for heterozygote profiles (81%) was comparable to conventional STR analysis, and while a high analytical threshold was required when offline profile analysis was performed (800 RFU), it was proportionally consistent with traditional methods. Stochastic sampling effects were evaluated, and a manageable approach to address limits of detection for homozygote profiles is provided. These results support consideration of the RapidHIT™ 200 as an acceptable alternative to conventional, laboratory based STR analysis for the testing of single source buccal samples, with review of profile information as a requirement until an expert software system is incorporated, and when proper developmental and internal validation studies have been completed. PMID:25286443

  8. Rapid Classification and Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Strains Using MALDI-TOF MS and Polygenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Wei; Jiang, Wen-Jing; Sato, Hiroaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Lu, Xi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to establish a rapid, simple, and accurate method to differentiate among strains of Microcystis aeruginosa, one of the most prevalent types of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. M. aeruginosa NIES-843, for which a complete genome has been sequenced, was used to characterize ribosomal proteins as biomarkers and to optimize conditions for observing ribosomal proteins as major peaks in a given mass spectrum. Thirty-one of 52 ribosomal subunit proteins were detected and identified along the mass spectrum. Fifty-five strains of M. aeruginosa from different habitats were analyzed using MALDI-TOF MS; among these samples, different ribosomal protein types were observed. A polygenetic analysis was performed using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means and different ribosomal protein types to classify the strains into five major clades. Two clades primarily contained toxic strains, and the other three clades contained exclusively non-toxic strains. This is the first study to differentiate cyanobacterial strains using MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:27227555

  9. Rapid Identification of Potential Drugs for Diabetic Nephropathy Using Whole-Genome Expression Profiles of Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jingsong; Jiang, Song; Qiu, Dandan; Le, Weibo; Wang, Xiao; Lu, Yinhui; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate potential drugs for diabetic nephropathy (DN) using whole-genome expression profiles and the Connectivity Map (CMAP). Methodology. Eighteen Chinese Han DN patients and six normal controls were included in this study. Whole-genome expression profiles of microdissected glomeruli were measured using the Affymetrix human U133 plus 2.0 chip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between late stage and early stage DN samples and the CMAP database were used to identify potential drugs for DN using bioinformatics methods. Results. (1) A total of 1065 DEGs (FDR < 0.05 and fold change > 1.5) were found in late stage DN patients compared with early stage DN patients. (2) Piperlongumine, 15d-PGJ2 (15-delta prostaglandin J2), vorinostat, and trichostatin A were predicted to be the most promising potential drugs for DN, acting as NF-κB inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), PI3K pathway inhibitors, or PPARγ agonists, respectively. Conclusion. Using whole-genome expression profiles and the CMAP database, we rapidly predicted potential DN drugs, and therapeutic potential was confirmed by previously published studies. Animal experiments and clinical trials are needed to confirm both the safety and efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of DN. PMID:27069916

  10. Rapid identification and classification of Campylobacter spp. using laser optical scattering technology.

    PubMed

    He, Yiping; Reed, Sue; Bhunia, Arun K; Gehring, Andrew; Nguyen, Ly-Huong; Irwin, Peter L

    2015-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the two important species responsible for most of the Campylobacter infections in humans. Reliable isolation and detection of Campylobacter spp. from food samples are challenging due to the interferences from complex food substances and the fastidious growth requirements of this organism. In this study, a novel biosensor-based detection called BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical scattering Technology) was developed for high-throughput screening of Campylobacter colonies grown on an agar plate without disrupting the intact colonies. Image pattern characterization and principal component analysis (PCA) of 6909 bacterial colonies showed that the light scatter patterns of C. jejuni and C. coli were strikingly different from those of Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. Examination of a mixed culture of these microorganisms revealed 85% (34/40) accuracy in differentiating Campylobacter from the other three major foodborne pathogens based on the similarity to the scatter patterns in an established library. The application of BARDOT in real food has been addressed through the analysis of Campylobacter spiked ground chicken and naturally contaminated fresh chicken pieces. Combined with real-time PCR verification, BARDOT was able to identify Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken. Moreover, applying passive filtration to food samples facilitated the isolation of pure Campylobacter colonies and therefore overcame the interference of the food matrix on BARDOT analysis. PMID:25583335

  11. Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations for Membrane Proteins: Rapid Method Based on Statistical Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yuta; Takamuku, Yuuki; Suzuki, Nanao; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-04-28

    Membrane proteins are responsible for the communication between cells and their environments. They are indispensable to the expression of life phenomena and also implicated in a number of diseases. Nevertheless, the studies on membrane proteins are far behind those on water-soluble proteins, primarily due to their low structural stability. Introduction of mutations can enhance their thermostability and stability in detergents, but the stabilizing mutations are currently identified by experiments. The recently reported computational methods suffer such drawbacks as the exploration of only limited mutational space and the empiricism whose results are difficult to physically interpret. Here we develop a rapid method that allows us to treat all of the possible mutations. It employs a free-energy function (FEF) that takes into account the translational entropy of hydrocarbon groups within the lipid bilayer as well as the protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The method is illustrated for the adenosine A2a receptor whose wild-type structure is known and utilized. We propose a reliable strategy of finding key residues to be mutated and selecting their mutations, which will lead to considerably higher stability. Representative single mutants predicted to be stabilizing or destabilizing were experimentally examined and the success rate was found to be remarkably high. The melting temperature Tm for two of them was substantially higher than that of the wild type. A double mutant with even higher Tm was also obtained. Our FEF captures the essential physics of the stability changes upon mutations. PMID:27056055

  12. Rapid Classification and Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Strains Using MALDI–TOF MS and Polygenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Wei; Jiang, Wen-Jing; Sato, Hiroaki; Kawachi, Masanobu; Lu, Xi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF MS) was used to establish a rapid, simple, and accurate method to differentiate among strains of Microcystis aeruginosa, one of the most prevalent types of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. M. aeruginosa NIES-843, for which a complete genome has been sequenced, was used to characterize ribosomal proteins as biomarkers and to optimize conditions for observing ribosomal proteins as major peaks in a given mass spectrum. Thirty-one of 52 ribosomal subunit proteins were detected and identified along the mass spectrum. Fifty-five strains of M. aeruginosa from different habitats were analyzed using MALDI–TOF MS; among these samples, different ribosomal protein types were observed. A polygenetic analysis was performed using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means and different ribosomal protein types to classify the strains into five major clades. Two clades primarily contained toxic strains, and the other three clades contained exclusively non-toxic strains. This is the first study to differentiate cyanobacterial strains using MALDI–TOF MS. PMID:27227555

  13. Rapid and label-free screening and identification of Anthrax simulants by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Antonia; Almaviva, Salvatore; Spizzichino, Valeria; Palucci, Antonio; Addari, Lorella; Luciani, Domenico; Mengali, Sandro; Marquette, Christophe; Berthuy, Ophélie; Jankiewicz, Bartlomiej; Pierno, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of RAMBO (Rapid-Air Monitoring particle against biological threats) project of the European Defense Agency (EDA), the feasibility of an unattended Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) sensor for biological threats detection was investigated. Its main goal concern Bacillus anthrax detection, both as vegetative cells and endospores. However since such bacteria are classified in Risk Group 3 (very dangerous microorganism), Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus atrophaeus were used as simulants. In order to bind selectively the target bacilli, Phages properly selected were immobilized on an active commercially available SERS substrate (functionalization). The Phages are a type of virus that infect selectively, by means of receptors, specific bacteria. Moreover they can resist on water or air environments without losing their binding capabilities. The sensing surface was characterized by standard micro-Raman equipments to assess the background Raman features. The Raman measurements have been carried out from 10X to 100X of magnification to differentiate between average and local features. Moreover the fast response was acquired by limiting the measure time at less than 1 minute. Samples of vegetative cells and endospores of Bacilli were randomly dispersed on the functionalized SERS substrates. The results obtained are promising: samples with and without bacilli could be distinguished one from the other. This is a step toward the use of SERS as an effective and fast technique for early warning of biological threats.

  14. Identification of a Non-Pentapeptide Region Associated with Rapid Mycobacterial Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warholm, Per; Light, Sara

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of the coding capacity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is devoted to the production of proteins containing several copies of the pentapeptide-2 repeat, namely the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins. Protein domain repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. They are not as common in prokaryotes, compared to eukaryotes, but the enrichment of pentapeptide-2 repeats in Mycobacteria constitutes an exception to that rule. The genes encoding the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins have undergone many rearrangements and here we have identified the expansion patterns across the Mycobacteria. We have performed a reclassification of the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins using cohesive regions rather than sparse domain architectures. It is clear that these proteins have undergone large insertions of several pentapeptide-2 domains appearing adjacent to one another in a repetitive pattern. Further, we have identified a non-pentapeptide motif associated with rapid mycobacterial evolution. The sequence composition of this region suggests a different structure compared to pentapeptide-2 repeats. By studying the evolution of the PE/PPE_MPTR proteins, we have distinguished features pertaining to tuberculosis-inducing species. Further studies of the non-pentapeptide region associated with repeat expansions promises to shed light on the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27149271

  15. A distributed national network for label-free rapid identification of emerging pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. Paul; Rajwa, Bartek P.; Dundar, M. Murat; Bae, Euiwon; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Roumani, Ali; Bhunia, Arun K.; Dietz, J. Eric; Davisson, V. Jo; Thomas, John G.

    2011-05-01

    Typical bioterrorism prevention scenarios assume well-known and well-characterized pathogens like anthrax or tularemia, which are serious public concerns if released into food and/or water supplies or distributed using other vectors. Common governmental contingencies include rapid response to these biological threats with predefined treatments and management operations. However, bioterrorist attacks may follow a far more sophisticated route. With the widely known and immense progress in genetics and the availability of molecular biology tools worldwide, the potential for malicious modification of pathogenic genomes is very high. Common non-pathogenic microorganisms could be transformed into dangerous, debilitating pathogens. Known pathogens could also be modified to avoid detection, because organisms are traditionally identified on the basis of their known physiological or genetic properties. In the absence of defined primers a laboratory using genetic biodetection methods such as PCR might be unable to quickly identify a modified microorganism. Our concept includes developing a nationwide database of signatures based on biophysical (such as elastic light scattering (ELS) properties and/or Raman spectra) rather than genetic properties of bacteria. When paired with a machine-learning system for emerging pathogen detection these data become an effective detection system. The approach emphasizes ease of implementation using a standardized collection of phenotypic information and extraction of biophysical features of pathogens. Owing to the label-free nature of the detection modalities ELS is significantly less costly than any genotypic or mass spectrometry approach.

  16. [Real time PCR hybridization for the rapid and specific identification of Francisella tularensis].

    PubMed

    Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Gaweł, Jerzy; Bartoszcze, Michał; Graniak, Grzegorz; Joniec, Justyna; Kołodziej, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Tularemia is highly infectious and fatal zoonotic disease caused by Gram negative bacteria Francisella tularensis. The necessity to undergo medical treatment in early phase of illness in humans and possibility of making use of bacterial aerosol by terrorists in an attack create an urgent need to implement a rapid and effective method which enables to identify the agent. In our study two primers FopA F/R and hybridization probes FopA S1/S2 designed from fopA gene sequence, were tested for their potential applicability to identify F. tularensis. In this research 50 strains of F. tularensis were used and the test gave positive results. Reaction specificity was confirmed by using of non-Francisella tularensis bacterial species. The results obtained in the real-time PCR reaction with primers Tul4 F/R and hybridization probes Tul4 S1/S2, designed from tul4 gene, were comparable to the results from previous experiment with fopA - primers set. Investigation of fopA and tul4 primers and hybridization probes properties revealed characteristic Tm (melting temperature) value of the products--61 degrees C and 60 degrees C, respectively. Detection sensitivity was remarkably higher when fopA primers set was used 1 fg/microl, and for tul4 primers set, minimal detectable concentration is 10 fg/microl. PMID:21473100

  17. A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood.

    PubMed

    Patel, E; Cicatiello, P; Deininger, L; Clench, M R; Marino, G; Giardina, P; Langenburg, G; West, A; Marshall, P; Sears, V; Francese, S

    2016-01-01

    Blood evidence is frequently encountered at the scene of violent crimes and can provide valuable intelligence in the forensic investigation of serious offences. Because many of the current enhancement methods used by crime scene investigators are presumptive, the visualisation of blood is not always reliable nor does it bear additional information. In the work presented here, two methods employing a shotgun bottom up proteomic approach for the detection of blood are reported; the developed protocols employ both an in solution digestion method and a recently proposed procedure involving immobilization of trypsin on hydrophobin Vmh2 coated MALDI sample plate. The methods are complementary as whilst one yields more identifiable proteins (as biomolecular signatures), the other is extremely rapid (5 minutes). Additionally, data demonstrate the opportunity to discriminate blood provenance even when two different blood sources are present in a mixture. This approach is also suitable for old bloodstains which had been previously chemically enhanced, as experiments conducted on a 9-year-old bloodstain deposited on a ceramic tile demonstrate. PMID:26596622

  18. Optogenetic identification of a rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep modulatory circuit in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Jego, Sonia; Glasgow, Stephen D.; Herrera, Carolina Gutierrez; Ekstrand, Mats; Reed, Sean J.; Boyce, Richard; Friedman, Jeffrey; Burdakov, Denis; Adamantidis, Antoine R.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid-Eye Movement (REM) sleep correlates with neuronal activity in the brainstem, basal forebrain and lateral hypothalamus (LH). LH melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons are active during sleep, however, their action on REM sleep remains unclear. Using optogenetic tools in newly-generated Tg(Pmch-Cre) mice, we found that acute activation of MCH neurons (ChETA, SSFO) at the onset of REM sleep extended the duration of REM, but not non-REM sleep episode. In contrast, their acute silencing (eNpHR3.0, ArchT) reduced the frequency and amplitude of hippocampal theta rhythm, without affecting REM sleep duration. In vitro activation of MCH neuron terminals induced GABAA-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in wake-promoting histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), while in vivo activation of MCH neuron terminals in TMN or medial septum also prolonged REM sleep episodes. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of MCH neurons maintains REM sleep, possibly through inhibition of arousal circuits in the mammalian brain. PMID:24056699

  19. Rapid Microarray-Based Identification of Different mecA Alleles in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Elke; Schwarz, Stefan; Hotzel, Helmut; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To screen isolates and to identify mecA alleles, published mecA sequences were analyzed, and a microarray for the rapid discrimination of mecA alleles was designed. A GenBank analysis yielded 135 full-length gene sequences annotated as mecA. These sequences clustered into 32 different alleles corresponding to 28 unique amino acid sequences and to 15 distinct hybridization patterns on this microarray. A collection of 78 clinical and veterinary isolates of Staphylococcus spp. was characterized using this assay. Nine of the 15 expected patterns, as well as one as-yet-unknown pattern, were identified. These patterns were detected in various epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, in S. pseudintermedius, and in coagulase-negative species such as S. epidermidis, S. fleurettii, or S. haemolyticus. There was no correlation between the different mecA hybridization patterns and the SCCmec type. Determination of MICs showed that mecA alleles corresponding to only four of these nine patterns were associated with β-lactam resistance. The mecA alleles that did not confer β-lactam resistance were largely restricted to coagulase-negative staphylococci of animal origin, such as S. sciuri and S. vitulinus. Because of the diversity of sequences and the different impact on β-lactam susceptibility, the existence of different mecA alleles needs to be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays for the detection of mecA. PMID:22890767

  20. A rapid extraction procedure of human hair proteins and identification of phosphorylated species.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akira; Arimoto, Makoto; Takeuchi, Keiji; Fujii, Toshihiro

    2002-05-01

    We developed a rapid and convenient extraction procedure of human hair proteins to examine their biochemical properties in detail. This procedure is based upon the fact that the combination of thiourea and urea in the presence of a reductant can effectively remove proteins from the cortex part of human hair. The extracted fraction mainly consisted of hard alpha-keratins with molecular masses of 40-60 kDa, matrix proteins with 12-18kDa, and minor components with 110-115kDa and 125-135kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The protein phosphorylation in human hair was investigated by immunoblotting with antibodies against phosphoserine, phosphothreonine and phosphotyrosine. We found serine phosphorylation in alpha-keratins and matrix proteins and threonine phosphorylation in alpha-keratins. The extraction was also found to be effective when wool, chicken feathers, rat hair and human nails were used as starting materials. PMID:12033494

  1. Rapid Identification and Enumeration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Wine by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, P.; Querol, A.; Fernández-Espinar, M. T.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the beneficial role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the food industry for food and beverage production, it is able to cause spoilage in wines. We have developed a real-time PCR method to directly detect and quantify this yeast species in wine samples to provide winemakers with a rapid and sensitive method to detect and prevent wine spoilage. Specific primers were designed for S. cerevisiae using the sequence information obtained from a cloned random amplified polymorphic DNA band that differentiated S. cerevisiae from its sibling species Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces pastorianus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus. The specificity of the primers was demonstrated for typical wine spoilage yeast species. The method was useful for estimating the level of S. cerevisiae directly in sweet wines and red wines without preenrichment when yeast is present in concentrations as low as 3.8 and 5 CFU per ml. This detection limit is in the same order as that obtained from glucose-peptone-yeast growth medium (GPY). Moreover, it was possible to quantify S. cerevisiae in artificially contaminated samples accurately. Limits for accurate quantification in wine were established, from 3.8 × 105 to 3.8 CFU/ml in sweet wine and from 5 × 106 to 50 CFU/ml in red wine. PMID:16269715

  2. Rapid identification of Chinese Sauce liquor from different fermentation positions with FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changwen; Wei, Jiping; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Suqin

    2008-07-01

    FT-IR and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) technology were applied to discriminate Chinese Sauce liquor from different fermentation positions (top, middle and bottom of fermentation cellar) for the first time. The liquors at top, middle and bottom of fermentation cellar, possessed the characteristic peaks at 1731 cm -1, 1733 cm -1 and 1602 cm -1, respectively. In the 2D correlation infrared spectra, the differences were amplified. A strong auto-peak at 1725 cm -1 showed in the 2D spectra of the Top Liquor, which indicated that the liquor might contain some ester compounds. Different from Top Liquor, three auto-peaks at 1695, 1590 and 1480 cm -1 were identified in 2D spectra of Middle Liquor, which were the characteristic absorption of acid, lactate. In 2D spectra of Bottom Liquor, two auto-peaks at 1570 and 1485 cm -1 indicated that lactate was the major component. As a result, FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectra technology provided a rapid and effective method for the quality analysis of the Sauce liquor.

  3. AOTF-based near-infrared imaging spectrometer for rapid identification of camouflaged target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhifan; Zeng, Libo; Wu, Qiongshui

    2014-11-01

    Acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is a novel device for spectrometer. The electronic tunability qualifies it with the most compelling advantages of higher wavelength scan rate over the conventional spectrometers that are mechanically tuned, and the feature of large angular aperture makes the AOTF particularly suitable in imaging applications. In this research, an AOTF-based near-infrared imaging spectrometer was developed. The spectrometer consists of a TeO2 AOTF module, a near-infrared imaging lens assembly, an AOTF controller, an InGaAs array detector, an image acquisition card, and a PC. A precisely designed optical wedge is placed at the emergent surface of the AOTF to deal with the inherent dispersion of the TeO2 that may degrade the spatial resolution. The direct digital synthesizer (DDS) techniques and the phase locked loop (PLL) techniques are combined for radio frequency (RF) signal synthesis. The PLL is driven by the DDS to take advantage of both their merits of high frequency resolution, high frequency scan rate and strong spurious signals resistance capability. All the functions relating to wavelength scan, image acquisition, processing, storge and display are controlled by the PC. Calibration results indicate that the spectral range is 898~1670 nm, the spectral resolution is 6.8 nm(@1064 nm), the wavelength separation between frames in the spectral image assembly is 1.0 nm, and the processing time of a single image is less than 1 ms if a TV camera with 640×512 detector is incorporated. A prototype device was assembled to test the capability of differentiating samples with similar appearances, and satisfactory results were achieved. By this device, the chemical compositions and the distribution information can be obtained simultaneously. This system has the most advantages of no moving parts, fast wavelength scan and strong vibration resistance. The proposed imaging spectrometer has a significant application prospect in the area of identification of

  4. Hyperspectral imaging techniques for rapid identification of Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayako; Fujita, Takao; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-01

    The spectral reflectance signature of living organisms provides information that closely reflects their physiological status. Because of its high potential for the estimation of geomorphic biological parameters, particularly of gross photosynthesis of plants, two-dimensional spectroscopy, via the use of hyperspectral instruments, has been widely used in remote sensing applications. In genetics research, in contrast, the reflectance phenotype has rarely been the subject of quantitative analysis; its potential for illuminating the pathway leading from the gene to phenotype remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed hyperspectral imaging techniques to identify Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status. The techniques are comprised of two modes; the first is referred to as the 'targeted mode' and the second as the 'non-targeted mode'. The 'targeted' mode is aimed at visualizing individual concentrations and compositional parameters of leaf pigments based on reflectance indices (RIs) developed for Chls a and b, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The 'non-targeted' mode highlights differences in reflectance spectra of leaf samples relative to reference spectra from the wild-type leaves. Through the latter approach, three mutant lines with weak irregular reflectance phenotypes, that are hardly identifiable by simple observation, were isolated. Analysis of these and other mutants revealed that the RI-based targeted pigment estimation was robust at least against changes in trichome density, but was confounded by genetic defects in chloroplast photorelocation movement. Notwithstanding such a limitation, the techniques presented here provide rapid and high-sensitive means to identify genetic mechanisms that coordinate leaf pigment status with developmental stages and/or environmental stress conditions. PMID:22470059

  5. Rapid and Sensitive Identification of Bacterial Infection and Bacteria Gram Types in Pleural Fluid of Children

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Dong; Li, Wei; Gao, Hui-Hui; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Du, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques have been increasingly used to detect microbial DNA in clinic for the diagnosis of bacterial infection. This study aims to developing an RT-PCR method to detect bacteria in pleural fluid (PF). We performed a method to simultaneously detect and classify the clinically relevant bacterial pathogens in hydrothorax with Gram probe RT-PCR (GRT-PCR), which targets the conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene. Our results showed this method could specifically and correctly identify 14 clinically important bacterial strains in hydrothorax including 7 gram-positive and 7 gram-negative bacteria. And the sensitivity of this GRT-PCR method in serial dilution can reach 10 CFU/mL. In clinical trial, 180 PF samples from children who were clinically suspected to suffer from bacterial pneumonia and empyema were collected. These samples were detected by GRT-PCR, standard culture, and biochemical routine analysis. The positive rate of the GRT-PCR array was 17.78% (32/180), significantly higher than that of PF culture (11.67%; 21/180; P = .003). When PF culture was used as control, the sensitivity of GRT-PCR was 95.24% (95% confidence interval = 74.13-99.75), and the specificity was 92.45% (95% confidence interval = 86.89-95.86). Our study showed that GRT-PCR is a more effective method for rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of bacterial infection in hydrothorax compared with other traditional methods. PMID:27335942

  6. Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques for Rapid Identification of Arabidopsis Mutants with Altered Leaf Pigment Status

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayako; Fujita, Takao; Iba, Koh

    2012-01-01

    The spectral reflectance signature of living organisms provides information that closely reflects their physiological status. Because of its high potential for the estimation of geomorphic biological parameters, particularly of gross photosynthesis of plants, two-dimensional spectroscopy, via the use of hyperspectral instruments, has been widely used in remote sensing applications. In genetics research, in contrast, the reflectance phenotype has rarely been the subject of quantitative analysis; its potential for illuminating the pathway leading from the gene to phenotype remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed hyperspectral imaging techniques to identify Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status. The techniques are comprised of two modes; the first is referred to as the ‘targeted mode’ and the second as the ‘non-targeted mode’. The ‘targeted’ mode is aimed at visualizing individual concentrations and compositional parameters of leaf pigments based on reflectance indices (RIs) developed for Chls a and b, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The ‘non-targeted’ mode highlights differences in reflectance spectra of leaf samples relative to reference spectra from the wild-type leaves. Through the latter approach, three mutant lines with weak irregular reflectance phenotypes, that are hardly identifiable by simple observation, were isolated. Analysis of these and other mutants revealed that the RI-based targeted pigment estimation was robust at least against changes in trichome density, but was confounded by genetic defects in chloroplast photorelocation movement. Notwithstanding such a limitation, the techniques presented here provide rapid and high-sensitive means to identify genetic mechanisms that coordinate leaf pigment status with developmental stages and/or environmental stress conditions. PMID:22470059

  7. Identification of Circular RNAs from the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Darbani, Behrooz; Noeparvar, Shahin; Borg, Søren

    2016-01-01

    RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts. PMID:27375638

  8. Identification of Circular RNAs from the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley.

    PubMed

    Darbani, Behrooz; Noeparvar, Shahin; Borg, Søren

    2016-01-01

    RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts. PMID:27375638

  9. Rapid Identification of E. coli O157:H7 by "Top-Down" Proteomics Using MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This abstract was presented as an oral presentation on June 2nd 2009 at the 57th American Society of Mass Spectrometry Conference (May 31-June 4, 2009, Philadelphia, PA). Rapid identification of bacterial microorganisms is of importance for food safety and security. Mass spectrometry is at the for...

  10. POTENTIAL OF SURFACE-ENHANCED RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES CULTURES ON SILVER COLLOIDAL NANOPARTICLES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SERS spectra of various batches of bacteria adsorbed on silver colloidal nanoparticles were collected to explore the potential of SERS technique for rapid and routine identification of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal susp...

  11. Rapid identification and classification of Listeria spp. and serotype assignment of Listeria monocytogenes using fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural network analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) in conjunction with Artificial Neural Network software, NeuroDeveloper™ was examined for the rapid identification and classification of Listeria species and serotyping of Listeria monocytogenes. A spectral library was created for 245 strains...

  12. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard E.; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C.; Zhang, Sean X.; Avornu, Gideon D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J.; Blyn, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. Disclaimer: The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States. PMID:27384540

  13. Rapid and simple identification of Beijing genotype strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuhki; Iwade, Yoshito; Nakano, Manabu; Akachi, Shigehiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nishinaka, Takamichi

    2016-07-01

    Beijing genotype strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are geographically widespread and pose a notorious public health problem, these strains causing outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB); some studies have reported an association with drug resistance. Because the prevalence of Beijing strain has a substantial impact on TB control programs, the availability of a rapid and reliable method for detecting these strains is important for epidemiological monitoring of their circulation. The main methods currently used to identify Beijing genotype strains are IS6110 DNA fingerprinting, spoligotyping and PCR to detect specific deletions such as region of difference (RD)207. More recently, multiplex PCR assay using a Beijing-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been developed for detecting Beijing lineage strains. However, these methods are time-consuming and technically demanding. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that allows specific identification of Beijing genotype strain was developed. This Beijing genotype strain-identifying LAMP assay was performed 214 clinical isolates and the results compared with those of conventional PCR that targeted RD207 and Rv0679c-targreting multiplex PCR for Beijing lineage identification. LAMP assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared with RD207-PCR. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity were 99.3% and 100%, respectively, compared with Rv0679c-multiplex PCR. This LAMP assay could be used routinely in local laboratories to monitor the prevalence of the Beijing genotype strain and thereby used to help control the spread of these potentially highly virulent and drug resistant strains. PMID:27213686

  14. Identification of large-scale cellular structures on the Sun based on the SDO and PSPT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. I.; Parfinenko, L. D.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Three independent sets of data: (i) series of filtergrams obtained in line CaII K (393.416 nm) with the ground-based telescope Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) of Mauna Loa Solar Observatory; (ii) series of filtergrams of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in λ160 nm and (iii) series of magnetograms of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of SDO have been processed to reveal reliably the existence of spatial cellular structures on the solar photosphere at scale about of 300 arcsec. This scale is intermediate between supergranules and giant cells (˜30,000 and ˜300,000 km across, respectively). To identify the different spatial structures the tens of two-dimensional power spectra ( 2DFFT) have been averaged. For one-dimensional photometric cross sections of frames, the Fourier power spectra ( FFT) and wavelet transforms (Morlet 5-th order) have been calculated.

  15. Evaluation of Pastorex meningitis kit performance for the rapid identification of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Uadiale, Kennedy; Bestman, Agatha; Kamau, Charity; Caugant, Dominique A.; Greig, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (NmC) has caused outbreaks in Nigeria of increasing size in three consecutive years since 2013. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for meningitis can facilitate quick identification of the causative pathogen; Pastorex can detect N. meningitidis serogroups A, C (NmC), Y/W135, N. meningitidis serogroup B/Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae, and group B Streptococcus. There is no published field evaluation of Pastorex in the identification of NmC. We report our experience with Pastorex in detecting NmC in field conditions. Methods During sequential outbreaks of NmC in Nigeria in 2013, 2014 and 2015, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from suspected cases of meningitis that met the case definition. Pastorex latex agglutination rapid test was done in the field and trans-isolate media were inoculated with CSF for culture and/or PCR, which was used as the reference standard for 63 paired samples. Results The sensitivity of Pastorex for NmC was 80.0% (95% CI 65.4–90.4%) and the specificity was 94.4% (95% CI 72.7–99.9%). The positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 14.4 (95% CI 2.1–97.3) and negative LR was 0.2 (95% CI 0.1–0.4). The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 97.3% (95% CI 85.8–99.9) and 65.4% (95% CI 44.3–82.8), respectively, with a prevalence estimate of 71.4% (95% CI 58.6–82.1). Conclusion Pastorex showed good performance in detecting NmC under field conditions. Prepositioning Pastorex at peripheral health facilities during non-epidemic periods is constrained by a short shelf-life of 1 month after the kit is opened. There is need for development of RDTs that are cheaper and with less challenging requirements for storage and usage. PMID:27496511

  16. Rapid identification of Brucella isolates to the species level by real time PCR based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Koylass, Mark S; Smith, Catherine J; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2008-01-01

    Background Brucellosis, caused by members of the genus Brucella, remains one of the world's major zoonotic diseases. Six species have classically been recognised within the family Brucella largely based on a combination of classical microbiology and host specificity, although more recently additional isolations of novel Brucella have been reported from various marine mammals and voles. Classical identification to species level is based on a biotyping approach that is lengthy, requires extensive and hazardous culturing and can be difficult to interpret. Here we describe a simple and rapid approach to identification of Brucella isolates to the species level based on real-time PCR analysis of species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were identified following a robust and extensive phylogenetic analysis of the genus. Results Seven pairs of short sequence Minor Groove Binding (MGB) probes were designed corresponding to SNPs shown to possess an allele specific for each of the six classical Brucella spp and the marine mammal Brucella. Assays were optimised to identical reaction parameters in order to give a multiple outcome assay that can differentiate all the classical species and Brucella isolated from marine mammals. The scope of the assay was confirmed by testing of over 300 isolates of Brucella, all of which typed as predicted when compared to other phenotypic and genotypic approaches. The assay is sensitive being capable of detecting and differentiating down to 15 genome equivalents. We further describe the design and testing of assays based on three additional SNPs located within the 16S rRNA gene that ensure positive discrimination of Brucella from close phylogenetic relatives on the same platform. Conclusion The multiple-outcome assay described represents a new tool for the rapid, simple and unambiguous characterisation of Brucella to the species level. Furthermore, being based on a robust phylogenetic framework, the assay provides a platform

  17. Identification of Cellular Proteins that Interact with Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Protein 1 by Protein Array Assay

    PubMed Central

    Puerta Martínez, Francisco; Tang, Qiyi

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression during infection is characterized as a sequential process including immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L)-stage gene expression. The most abundantly expressed gene at the IE stage of infection is the major IE (MIE) gene that produces IE1 and IE2. IE1 has been the focus of study because it is an important protein, not only for viral gene expression but also for viral replication. It is believed that IE1 plays important roles in viral gene regulation by interacting with cellular proteins. In the current study, we performed protein array assays and identified 83 cellular proteins that interact with IE1. Among them, seven are RNA-binding proteins that are important in RNA processing; more than half are nuclear proteins that are involved in gene regulations. Tumorigenesis-related proteins are also found to interact with IE1, implying that the role of IE1 in tumorigenesis might need to be reevaluated. Unexpectedly, cytoplasmic proteins, such as Golgi autoantigen and GGA1 (both related to the Golgi trafficking protein), are also found to be associated with IE1. We also employed a coimmunoprecipitation assay to test the interactions of IE1 and some of the proteins identified in the protein array assays and confirmed that the results from the protein array assays are reliable. Many of the proteins identified by the protein array assay have not been previously reported. Therefore, the functions of the IE1-protein interactions need to be further explored in the future. PMID:24385082

  18. Identification, molecular characterization, and cellular studies of an apolipoprotein E mutant (E1) in three unrelated families with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Miller, D B; Hegele, R A; Wolfe, B M; Huff, M W

    1995-03-01

    Remnants of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins accumulate in plasma of subjects with type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) due to defective clearance by hepatic receptors. Although most subjects with type III HLP are homozygous for apolipoprotein (apo) E2 (arg158-->cys, R158C), a variant that binds defectively to cell surface receptors, some individuals with type III HLP have rare mutations of apo E. We identified six subjects from three families with type III HLP who had either an apo E3/1 or E4/1 phenotype by isoelectric focusing. Using DNA restriction isotyping with HhaI, all six subjects were determined to have only one apo E allele encoding cys158 and the other encoding arg158. Subsequently, digestion of polymerase chain reaction-amplified portions of exon 4 of the apo E gene with endonucleases HaeIII, TaqI, and Sau3AI demonstrated a second DNA variant that encoded a single amino acid substitution (gly127-->asp, G127D) due to a guanosine-to-adenosine nucleotide change resulting in the apo E1 isoform (G127D, R158C), which had arisen from a parent apo E2 allele. This mutation was confirmed with direct DNA sequencing. Incubation of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) isolated from hyperlipidemic apo E1 subjects with J774 macrophages resulted in a 7- to 12-fold increase in cellular cholesterol ester compared with VLDL from apo E2/2 subjects. Although heterozygosity for apo E1 alone did not impair the interaction of VLDL with cellular receptors in vitro, its presence in subjects with type III HLP suggests that apo E1, perhaps in combination with secondary factors, may be causative for the dyslipidemia. PMID:7883834

  19. Rapid identification of goblet cells in unstained colon thin sections by means of quantum cascade laser-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kröger-Lui, N; Gretz, N; Haase, K; Kränzlin, B; Neudecker, S; Pucci, A; Regenscheit, A; Schönhals, A; Petrich, W

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the volume covered by mucin-secreting goblet cell regions within colon thin sections may serve as a means to differentiate between ulcerative colitis and infectious colitis. Here we show that rapid, quantum cascade laser-based mid-infrared microspectroscopy might be able to contribute to the differential diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa, an inflammatory bowel disease. Infrared hyperspectral images of mouse colon thin sections were obtained within 7.5 minutes per section with a pixel size of 3.65 × 3.65 μm(2) and a field of view of 2.8 × 3.1 mm(2). The spectra were processed by training a random decision forest classifier on the basis of k-means clustering on one thin section. The trained algorithm was then applied to 5 further thin sections for a blinded validation and it was able to identify goblet cells in all sections. The rapid identification of goblet cells within these unstained, paraffinized thin sections of colon tissue was enabled by the high content of glycopeptides within the goblet cells as revealed by the pronounced spectral signatures in the 7.6 μm-8.6 μm and the 9.2 μm-9.7 μm wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. More so, the simple calculation of the ratio between the absorbance values at 9.29 μm and 8.47 μm provides the potential to further shorten the time for measurement and analysis of a thin section down to well below 1 minute. PMID:25649324

  20. A rapid method for the identification of nitrocellulose in high explosives and smokeless powders using GC-EI-MS.

    PubMed

    Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Bakeas, Evangelos B

    2016-05-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) is one of the most common ingredients in explosive mixtures, however because of its non-volatility, its detection using Gas Chromatography-Electron Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) has not been achieved until today. A rapid method for the identification of NC in bulk explosives using GC-EI-MS was developed. The sample preparation is simple and takes place in a test tube, employing standard equipment of a forensics laboratory. The protocol was optimized and applied to seven, both high and low, commercial explosives, which contained the substance of interest. Moreover, three explosives in the absence of NC were tested to cross check for false positives. Fourteen different standard explosive substances that are usually found in explosive mixtures were then employed in order to monitor the effect of the method on these compounds and check for interferences. Results showed that NC was detected, by its trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives, in all the explosive mixtures analyzed and no false positives were observed. The proposed method showed selectivity for NC, as it had no interference coming from other ingredients of explosive mixtures. The protocol introduced offers considerable improvement in identifying the individual components of an explosive mixture and contributes in successful classification of explosives. PMID:26946027

  1. Knockout confirmation for Hurries: rapid genotype identification of Trypanosoma cruzi transfectants by polymerase chain reaction directly from liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Monica Visnieski; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Picchi, Gisele Fernanda Assine

    2014-07-01

    Gene knockout is a widely used approach to evaluate loss-of-function phenotypes and it can be facilitated by the incorporation of a DNA cassette having a drug-selectable marker. Confirmation of the correct knockout cassette insertion is an important step in gene removal validation and has generally been performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays following a time-consuming DNA extraction step. Here, we show a rapid procedure for the identification of Trypanosoma cruzi transfectants by PCR directly from liquid culture - without prior DNA extraction. This simple approach enabled us to generate PCR amplifications from different cultures varying from 106-108 cells/mL. We also show that it is possible to combine different primer pairs in a multiplex detection reaction and even to achieve knockout confirmation with an extremely simple interpretation of a real-time PCR result. Using the "culture PCR" approach, we show for the first time that we can assess different DNA sequence combinations by PCR directly from liquid culture, saving time in several tasks for T. cruzi genotype interrogation. PMID:24936912

  2. Rapid extraction, identification and quantification of oral hypoglycaemic drugs in serum and hair using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Binz, Tina M; Villani, Nicholas; Neels, Hugo; Schneider, Serge

    2012-11-30

    A sensitive and accurate LC-MS/MS method for the identification and quantification of 5 oral anti-diabetics (glipizide, glibenclamide, gliclazide, gliquidone and metformin) in serum and hair was developed using glibornuride as the internal standard. We have developed a rapid and robust extraction procedure by using acetonitrile for serum protein precipitation and methanol for the extraction of anti-diabetics from hair. Anti-diabetics (ADs) were separated by UPLC over a C18 column and detection was performed on a Waters Xevo TQ MS mass spectrometer in positive ionization mode using electrospray ionization. Each AD was identified by three specific ion transitions in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method was validated according to international guidelines. For all compounds the variation coefficient (CV) was <20%, and accuracies ranged from 85 to 115% in serum and hair. The limits of detection (LODs) were <1.5 ng/mL for all ADs in serum and <3.59 pg/mg in hair. Recoveries varied from 56.41% (gliclazide) to 67.58% (glipizide) in serum and from 68% (gliclazide) to 91.2% (metformin) in hair. The method was successfully applied to quantify ADs in serum of 33 patients and in hair of 15 patients. PMID:22940189

  3. Rapid isolation and identification of active antioxidant ingredients from Gongju using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) and postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Gang; Niu, Yaru; Wang, Hong; Dong, Jing; Yuki, Hashi; Chen, Shizhong

    2012-05-30

    Flos Chrysanthemi (Gongju, GJ) is used to prepare a herbal tea that is commonly consumed as a health beverage in Asia and is believed to contain abundant beneficial antioxidants. To rapidly identify the chemical constituents and to obtain the profile related to antioxidant activity, an online analytical method combining high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-electrospray ionization-ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n)) and postcolumn derivatization (PCD) has been applied for a precise and thorough identification of the chemical constituents. Meanwhile, the antioxidant profile has also been characterized by directly measuring the scavenging activity of each compound for the free radical produced by DPPH. As a result, 13 compounds have been identified in GJ, 7 of which account for its antioxidant activity. The established LC-MS(n)-PCD system has proved to offer a useful strategy for correlating the chemical profile with the bioactivities of the components without their isolation and purification, and may be used for multicomponent analysis of active substances in other foods and herbs. PMID:22540938

  4. Rapid Identification and Assignation of the Active Ingredients in Fufang Banbianlian Injection Using HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Sensen; Lin, Zongtao; Jiang, Haixiu; Tong, Lingkun; Wang, Hong; Chen, Shizhong

    2016-08-01

    Fufang Banbianlian Injection (FBI) is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine formula composed of three herbal medicines. However, the systematic investigation on its chemical components has not been reported yet. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography combined with diode-array detector, and coupled to an electrospray ionization with ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS) method, was established for the identification of chemical profile in FBI. Sixty-six major constituents (14 phenolic acids, 14 iridoids, 20 flavonoids, 2 benzylideneacetone compounds, 3 phenylethanoid glycosides, 1 coumarin, 1 lignan, 3 nucleosides, 1 amino acids, 1 monosaccharides, 2 oligosaccharides, 3 alduronic acids and citric acid) were identified or tentatively characterized by comparing their retention times and MS spectra with those of standards or literature data. Finally, all constituents were further assigned in the individual herbs (InHs), although some of them were from multiple InHs. As a result, 11 compounds were from Lobelia chinensis Lour, 33 compounds were from Scutellaria barbata D. Don and 38 compounds were from Hedyotis diffusa Willd. In conclusion, the developed HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS method is a rapid and efficient technique for analysis of FBI sample, and could be a valuable method for the further study on the quality control of the FBI. PMID:27107094

  5. A glutathione S-transferase inducer from papaya: rapid screening, identification and structure-activity relationship of isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Morimitsu, Y; Uzu, T; Ohigashi, H; Murakami, A; Naito, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Osawa, T; Uchida, K

    2000-09-01

    We have developed a simple system for rapid detection and measurement of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GSTP1) that detoxify polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using the cultured rat normal liver epithelial cell line, (RL34) cells. Survey of fruit extracts for GST inducing ability identified both papaya and avocado as significant sources. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) was isolated from papaya methanol extract as a principal inducer of GST activity. Further, the GST inducing ability of a total of 20 isothiocyanates (ITCs) and their derivatives was investigated. Some ITCs showed significant induction, and BITC was one of the most potent inducers among all compounds tested in the present study. The modification of isothiocyanate group (-NCS) or introduction of substituent group to the alpha-carbon modifies GST induction. Moreover, a significant correlation (P<0.01, r=0.913) between the GST activity enrichment and GSTP1 protein induction by ITCs was observed. We also indicated that phenethyl ITC and nitrophenyl ITC, potently inducing GST activity, but not inactive benzyl isocyanate, are potential inducers of intracellular reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs). Our system of GSTP1 induction is appropriate for the chemical research such as screening and identification of novel type of inducers as well as the structure-activity relationship studies, providing mechanistic insight into essential structural elements for GSTP1 induction. PMID:10936680

  6. Rapid (<5 min) Identification of Pathogen in Human Blood by Electrokinetic Concentration and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    I-Fang Cheng; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Hu, Chenming; Yang, Fu-Liang

    2013-08-01

    This study reports a novel microfluidic platform for rapid and long-ranged concentration of rare-pathogen from human blood for subsequent on-chip surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) identification/discrimination of bacteria based on their detected fingerprints. Using a hybrid electrokinetic mechanism, bacteria can be concentrated at the stagnation area on the SERS-active roughened electrode, while blood cells were excluded away from this region at the center of concentric circular electrodes. This electrokinetic approach performs isolation and concentration of bacteria in about three minutes; the density factor is increased approximately a thousand fold in a local area of ~5000 μm2 from a low bacteria concentration of 5 × 103 CFU/ml. Besides, three genera of bacteria, S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa that are found in most of the isolated infections in bacteremia were successfully identified in less than one minute on-chip without the use of any antibody/chemical immobilization and reaction processes.

  7. Mode identification based on time-series spectrophotometry for the bright rapid sdB pulsator EC 01541-1409

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. K.; Fontaine, G.; Geier, S.; Van Grootel, V.; Brassard, P.

    2014-03-01

    We present an analysis of time-resolved spectrophotometry gathered with FORS/VLT for the rapidly pulsating hot B subdwarf EC 01541-1409 with the aim of identifying the degree index ℓ of the larger amplitude modes. This mode identification can be extremely useful in detailed searches for viable asteroseismic models in parameter space, and can be crucial for testing the validity of a solution a posteriori. To achieve it, we exploit the ℓ-dependence of the monochromatic amplitude, phase, and velocity-to-amplitude ratio of a mode as a function of wavelength. We use the ℓ-sensitive phase lag between the flux perturbation and the radial velocity as an additional diagnostic tool. On this basis, we are able to unambiguously identify the dominant 140.5 s pulsation of our target as a radial mode, and the second-highest amplitude periodicity at 145.8 s as an ℓ = 2 mode. We further exploit the exceptionally high-sensitivity data that we gathered for the dominant mode to infer modal properties that are usually quite difficult to estimate in sdB pulsators, namely the physical values of the dimensionless radius, temperature, and surface gravity perturbations. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal ID 087.D-0047).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Performances of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Rapid Identification of Bacteria in Routine Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Grare, Marion; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Segonds, Christine; Marty, Nicole; Oswald, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and cost-effective matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based systems will replace conventional phenotypic methods for routine identification of bacteria. We report here the first evaluation of the new MALDI-TOF MS-based Vitek MS system in a large clinical microbiology laboratory. This system uses an original spectrum classifier algorithm and a specific database designed for the identification of clinically relevant species. We have tested 767 routine clinical isolates representative of 50 genera and 124 species. Vitek MS-based identifications were performed by means of a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step and compared with reference identifications obtained mainly with the VITEK2 phenotypic system; if the identifications were discordant, molecular techniques provided reference identifications. The Vitek MS system provided 96.2% correct identifications to the species level (86.7%), to the genus level (8.2%), or within a range of species belonging to different genera (1.3%). Conversely, 1.3% of isolates were misidentified and 2.5% were unidentified, partly because the species was not included in the database; a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.8% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. The Vitek MS system is a simple, convenient, and accurate method for routine bacterial identification with a single deposit, considering the high bacterial diversity studied and as evidenced by the low prevalence of species without correct identification. In addition to a second deposit in uncommon cases, expanding the spectral database is expected to further enhance performances. PMID:22593596

  9. Performances of the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for rapid identification of bacteria in routine clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Damien; Grare, Marion; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Segonds, Christine; Marty, Nicole; Oswald, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Rapid and cost-effective matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based systems will replace conventional phenotypic methods for routine identification of bacteria. We report here the first evaluation of the new MALDI-TOF MS-based Vitek MS system in a large clinical microbiology laboratory. This system uses an original spectrum classifier algorithm and a specific database designed for the identification of clinically relevant species. We have tested 767 routine clinical isolates representative of 50 genera and 124 species. Vitek MS-based identifications were performed by means of a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step and compared with reference identifications obtained mainly with the VITEK2 phenotypic system; if the identifications were discordant, molecular techniques provided reference identifications. The Vitek MS system provided 96.2% correct identifications to the species level (86.7%), to the genus level (8.2%), or within a range of species belonging to different genera (1.3%). Conversely, 1.3% of isolates were misidentified and 2.5% were unidentified, partly because the species was not included in the database; a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.8% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. The Vitek MS system is a simple, convenient, and accurate method for routine bacterial identification with a single deposit, considering the high bacterial diversity studied and as evidenced by the low prevalence of species without correct identification. In addition to a second deposit in uncommon cases, expanding the spectral database is expected to further enhance performances. PMID:22593596

  10. Evaluating Reflectance Spectroscopy as a Method of Rapid Cryptotephra Identification using Component Analysis: Tephrochronology of the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    al. 2008; Cassidy et al. 2014). This suggests that reflectance spectroscopy is an effective means of identifying cryptotephra in situ, and when employed in concert with other core scanning techniques could facilitate widespread rapid identification of cryptotephra in future tephrochronology studies.

  11. Characterisation of equine matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9; and identification of the cellular sources of these enzymes in joints.

    PubMed

    Clegg, P D; Burke, R M; Coughlan, A R; Riggs, C M; Carter, S D

    1997-09-01

    The cellular production by resident articular cells and infiltrating inflammatory cells of the gelatinase matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) was investigated by tissue culture methods and analysis of cell supernatants by gelatin zymography. Peripheral blood neutrophils in short term culture produced MMP-9, as did peripheral blood monocytes in culture. Isolated articular chondrocytes in monolayer culture produced both MMP-2 and MMP-9, although articular cartilage maintained as explant culture produced MMP-2 alone. Synovial fibroblasts grown in monolayer culture produced MMP-2 alone, although synovial membrane in explant culture produced both MMP-2 and the active form of MMP-2. Lysis of blood polymorph neutrophils produced large quantities of MMP-9, but lysis of blood monocytes, synovial fibroblasts and articular chondrocytes produced little enzyme indicating that, unlike the other cell types, polymorph neutrophils store MMPs intracellularly. Equine MMP-2 was purified from synovial fibroblast cell culture supernatant, and equine MMP-9 from polymorph neutrophil cell culture supernatant, by gelatin-sepharose affinity chromatography. The 2 enzymes were identified from their molecular weights and by their respective N-terminal amino acid sequences which showed homology with the enzymes from other species. The demonstration that invasive cells and resident articular cells can produce enzymes which are capable of digestion of certain component molecules of the articular cartilage matrix, shows that therapeutic targeting of these enzymes could be a valid proposition in the prevention of cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis. PMID:9306058

  12. Unambiguous Identification of β-Tubulin as the Direct Cellular Target Responsible for the Cytotoxicity of Chalcone by Photoaffinity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yu, Xingxin; Zhuang, Chunlin; Villalta, Peter; Lin, Yong; Lu, Junxuan; Xing, Chengguo

    2016-07-01

    Chalcone is a simple and potentially privileged structure in medicinal chemistry with a diverse repertoire of biological activities, among which cytotoxicity is of particular interest. The sharp structure-activity relationship (SAR) for chalcone's cytotoxicity suggests structure-specific target interactions. Despite the numerous putative targets proposed, evidence for direct target interactions in cells is unavailable. In this study, guided by the sharp cytotoxic SAR, we developed a cytotoxic chalcone-based photoaffinity labeling (PAL) probe, (E)-3-(3-azidophenyl)-1-[3,5-dimethoxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl]-2-methylprop-2-en-1-one (C95; IC50 : 0.38±0.01 μm), along with two structurally similar non-cytotoxic probes. These probes were used to search for the direct cellular target responsible for chalcone's cytotoxicity through intact cell-based PAL experiments, in which β-tubulin was identified to specifically interact with the cytotoxic probe (i.e., C95) but not the non-cytotoxic probes. A set of phenotypical and biochemical assays further reinforced β-tubulin as the cytotoxic target of chalcones. Peptide mass quantitation by mass spectrometric analysis revealed one peptide potentially labeled by C95, providing information on chalcone's binding site on β-tubulin. PMID:27203512

  13. Identification of a key role for permeability glycoprotein in enhancing the cellular defense mechanisms of fertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jacinta H; Nixon, Brett; Lord, Tessa; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Aitken, R John

    2016-09-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly damaging DNA lesions that can destabilize the genome and generate a suite of adverse physiological outcomes in the oocyte and early embryo. While it is therefore likely that these cells possess a sophisticated suite of protective mechanisms to ameliorate such damage, the precise nature of these defense systems are yet to be fully elucidated. This study characterizes the sensitivity of the oocyte to etoposide, a chemotherapeutic agent with the ability to elicit DSBs. We demonstrate significant developmental changes in etoposide vulnerability, with fertilization of the oocyte leading to an enhancement of its cellular defense machinery. Using a parthenogenic model we show that this response is mediated, at least in part, by permeability glycoprotein (PGP), an endogenous multidrug efflux transporter that is up-regulated, translocated to the oolemma and phosphorylated upon oocyte activation. Moreover, evidence from dye exclusion assays in the presence of a specific PGP pharmacological inhibitor (PSC833), illustrates that these events effectively increase oocyte efflux activity, thereby enhancing the ability of these cells to exclude genotoxicants capable of eliciting DSB formation. PMID:27397031

  14. Multiplex Imaging and Cellular Target Identification of Kinase Inhibitors via an Affinity-Based Proteome Profiling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Pan, Sijun; Li, Zhengqiu; Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Hao, Piliang; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    MLN8237 is a highly potent and presumably selective inhibitor of Aurora kinase A (AKA) and has shown promising antitumor activities. Like other kinase inhibitors which target the ATP-binding site of kinases, MLN8237 might be expected to have potential cellular off-targets. Herein, we report the first photoaffinity-based, small molecule AKA probe capable of both live-cell imaging of AKA activities and in situ proteome profiling of potential off-targets of MLN8237 (including AKA-associating proteins). By using two mutually compatible, bioorthogonal reactions (copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry and TCO-tetrazine ligation), we demostrate small molecule-based multiplex bioimaging for simultaneous in situ monitoring of two important cell-cycle regulating kinases (AKA and CDK1). A broad range of proteins, as potential off-targets of MLN8237 and AKA's-interacting partners, is subsequently identified by affinity-based proteome profiling coupled with large-scale LC-MS/MS analysis. From these studies, we discover novel AKA interactions which were further validated by cell-based immunoprecipitation (IP) experiments. PMID:25579846

  15. Increased origin activity in transformed versus normal cells: identification of novel protein players involved in DNA replication and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Chan, Man Kid; Arvanitis, Dina N.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Using libraries of replication origins generated previously, we identified three clones that supported the autonomous replication of their respective plasmids in transformed, but not in normal cells. Assessment of their in vivo replication activity by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays revealed that the chromosomal loci corresponding to these clones coincided with chromosomal replication origins in all cell lines, which were more active by 2–3-fold in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Evaluation of pre-replication complex (pre-RC) protein abundance at these origins in transformed and normal cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, using anti-ORC2, -cdc6 and -cdt1 antibodies, showed that they were bound by these pre-RC proteins in all cell lines, but a 2–3-fold higher abundance was observed in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the most efficiently replicating clone, using nuclear extracts from the transformed and normal cells, revealed the presence of a DNA replication complex in transformed cells, which was barely detectable in normal cells. Subsequent supershift EMSAs suggested the presence of transformation-specific complexes. Mass spectrometric analysis of these complexes revealed potential new protein players involved in DNA replication that appear to correlate with cellular transformation. PMID:20064876

  16. Application of Whole-Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Identification and Clustering Analysis of Pantoea Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Vogel, Guido; Duffy, Brion; Tonolla, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an ecologically diverse taxon that includes commercially important plant-beneficial strains and opportunistic clinical isolates. Standard biochemical identification methods in diagnostic laboratories were repeatedly shown to run into false-positive identifications of P. agglomerans, a fact which is also reflected by the high number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in public databases that are incorrectly assigned to this species. More reliable methods for rapid identification are required to ascertain the prevalence of this species in clinical samples and to evaluate the biosafety of beneficial isolates. Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) methods and reference spectra (SuperSpectrum) were developed for accurate identification of P. agglomerans and related bacteria and used to detect differences in the protein profile within variants of the same strain, including a ribosomal point mutation conferring streptomycin resistance. MALDI-TOF MS-based clustering was shown to generally agree with classification based on gyrB sequencing, allowing rapid and reliable identification at the species level. PMID:20453125

  17. Identification of dually acylated proteins from complementary DNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Koko; Kimoto, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kiwado, Aya; Takamitsu, Emi; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2016-10-15

    To establish a strategy to identify dually fatty acylated proteins from cDNA resources, seven N-myristoylated proteins with cysteine (Cys) residues within the 10 N-terminal residues were selected as potential candidates among 27 N-myristoylated proteins identified from a model human cDNA resource. Seven proteins C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP were generated and their susceptibility to protein N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation were evaluated by metabolic labeling with [(3)H]myristic acid or [(3)H]palmitic acid either in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system or in transfected mammalian cells. As a result, EEPD1, one of five proteins (RFTN1, EEPD1, GNAI1, PDE2A, RNF11) found to be dually acylated, was shown to be a novel dually fatty acylated protein. Metabolic labeling experiments using G2A and C7S mutants of EEPD1-EGFP revealed that the palmitoylation site of EEPD1 is Cys at position 7. Analysis of the intracellular localization of EEPD1 C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP and its G2A and C7S mutants revealed that the dual acylation directs EEPD1 to localize to the plasma membrane. Thus, dually fatty acylated proteins can be identified from cDNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling of N-myristoylated proteins with Cys residue(s) close to the N-myristoylated N-terminus. PMID:27480498

  18. Real-Time PCR and Sequencing Assays for Rapid Detection and Identification of Avian Schistosomes in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Bonnie J.; Brant, Sara V.; Loker, Eric S.; Collinson, Jeremy; Secor, W. Evan; Hill, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis, also known as swimmer's itch, is an allergenic skin reaction followed by intense itching caused by schistosome cercariae penetrating human skin. Cercarial dermatitis outbreaks occur globally and are frequently associated with freshwater lakes and are occasionally associated with marine or estuarine waters where birds reside year-round or where migratory birds reside. In this study, a broadly reactive TaqMan assay targeting 18S rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA [rDNA]) sequences that was based on a genetically diverse panel of schistosome isolates representing 13 genera and 20 species (the 18S rDNA TaqMan assay) was developed. A PCR assay was also developed to amplify a 28S rDNA region for subsequent sequencing to identify schistosomes. When applied to surface water samples seeded with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, the 18S rDNA TaqMan assay enabled detection at a level of 5 S. mansoni cercariae in 100 liters of lake water. The 18S rDNA TaqMan and 28S rDNA PCR sequencing assays were also applied to 100-liter water samples collected from lakes in Nebraska and Wisconsin where there were reported dermatitis outbreaks. Avian schistosome DNA was detected in 11 of 34 lake water samples using the TaqMan assay. Further 28S rDNA sequence analysis of positive samples confirmed the presence of avian schistosome DNA and provided a preliminary identification of the avian schistosomes in 10 of the 11 samples. These data indicate that the broadly schistosome-reactive TaqMan assay can be effective for rapid screening of large-volume water samples for detection of avian schistosomes, thereby facilitating timely response actions to mitigate or prevent dermatitis outbreaks. Additionally, samples positive by the 18S rDNA TaqMan assay can be further assayed using the 28S rDNA sequencing assay to both confirm the presence of schistosomes and contribute to their identification. PMID:25862226

  19. Identification of PM10 characteristics involved in cellular responses in human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas-2B).

    PubMed

    Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Den Hond, Elly; Govarts, Eva; Colles, Ann; Koppen, Gudrun; Staelens, Jeroen; Mampaey, Maja; Janssen, Nicole; Schoeters, Greet

    2016-08-01

    reduction in cell viability was significantly correlated with BC, Cd and Pb. The induction of IL-8 in Beas-2B cells was significantly associated with Cu, Ni and Zn and endotoxin. Endotoxin levels explained 33% of the variance in IL-8 induction. A significant interaction between ambient temperature and endotoxin on the pro-inflammatory activity was seen. No association was found between OP and the cellular responses. This study supports the hypothesis that, on an equal mass basis, PM10 induced biological effects differ due to differences in PM10 characteristics. Metals (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn), BC, and endotoxin were among the main determinants for the observed biological responses. PMID:27177354

  20. Identification of novel cellular targets for therapeutic intervention against Ebola virus infection by siRNA screening.

    PubMed

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Saeed, Mohammad F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Davey, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    While much progress has been made in developing drugs against a few prominent viruses such as HIV, few examples exist for emerging infectious agents. In some cases broad spectrum anti-viral drugs, such as ribavirin, are effective, but for some groups of viruses, these show little efficacy in animal models. Traditional methods focus on screening small molecule libraries to identify drugs that target virus factors, with the intention that side-effects to the host can be minimized. However, this greatly limits potential drug targets and virus genes can rapidly mutate to avoid drug action. Recent advances in siRNA gene targeting technologies have provided a powerful tool to specifically target and suppress the expression of cell genes. Since viruses are completely dependent upon host cell proteins for propagation, siRNA screening promises to reveal novel cell proteins and signaling pathways that may be viable targets for drug therapy regimens. Here we used an siRNA screening approach to identify gene products that play critical roles in Ebola virus infection. By gene cluster analysis, proteins in phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and calcium/calmodulin kinase related networks were identified as important for Zaire Ebola virus infection and prioritized for further evaluation. Key roles of each were confirmed by testing available drugs specific for members of each pathway. Interestingly, both sets of proteins are also important in cancer and subject to intense investigation. Thus development of new drugs against these cancer targets may also prove useful in combating Ebola virus. PMID:20930947

  1. Identification and prioritization of candidate genes for symptom variability in breast cancer survivors based on disease characteristics at the cellular level

    PubMed Central

    Koleck, Theresa A; Conley, Yvette P

    2016-01-01

    Research is beginning to suggest that the presence and/or severity of symptoms reported by breast cancer survivors may be associated with disease-related factors of cancer. In this article, we present a novel approach to the identification and prioritization of biologically plausible candidate genes to investigate relationships between genomic variation and symptom variability in breast cancer survivors. Cognitive dysfunction is utilized as a representative breast cancer survivor symptom to elucidate the conceptualization of and justification for our cellular, disease-based approach to address symptom variability in cancer survivors. Initial candidate gene identification was based on genes evaluated as part of multigene expression profiles for breast cancer, which are commonly used in the clinical setting to characterize the biology of cancer cells for the purpose of describing overall tumor aggressiveness, prognostication, and individualization of therapy. A list of genes evaluated within five multigene expression profiles for breast cancer was compiled. In order to prioritize candidate genes for investigation, genes used in each profile were compared for duplication. Twenty-one genes (BAG1, BCL2, BIRC5, CCNB1, CENPA, CMC2, DIAPH3, ERBB2, ESR1, GRB7, MELK, MKI67, MMP11, MYBL2, NDC80, ORC6, PGR, RACGAP1, RFC4, RRM2, and SCUBE2) are utilized in two or more profiles, including five genes (CCNB1, CENPA, MELK, MYBL2, and ORC6) used in three profiles. To ensure that the parsimonious 21 gene set is representative of the more global biological hallmarks of cancer, an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted. Evaluation of genes known to impact pathways involved with cancer development and progression provide a means to evaluate the overlap between the biological underpinnings of cancer and symptom development within the context of cancer. PMID:27022301

  2. Identification and prioritization of candidate genes for symptom variability in breast cancer survivors based on disease characteristics at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Koleck, Theresa A; Conley, Yvette P

    2016-01-01

    Research is beginning to suggest that the presence and/or severity of symptoms reported by breast cancer survivors may be associated with disease-related factors of cancer. In this article, we present a novel approach to the identification and prioritization of biologically plausible candidate genes to investigate relationships between genomic variation and symptom variability in breast cancer survivors. Cognitive dysfunction is utilized as a representative breast cancer survivor symptom to elucidate the conceptualization of and justification for our cellular, disease-based approach to address symptom variability in cancer survivors. Initial candidate gene identification was based on genes evaluated as part of multigene expression profiles for breast cancer, which are commonly used in the clinical setting to characterize the biology of cancer cells for the purpose of describing overall tumor aggressiveness, prognostication, and individualization of therapy. A list of genes evaluated within five multigene expression profiles for breast cancer was compiled. In order to prioritize candidate genes for investigation, genes used in each profile were compared for duplication. Twenty-one genes (BAG1, BCL2, BIRC5, CCNB1, CENPA, CMC2, DIAPH3, ERBB2, ESR1, GRB7, MELK, MKI67, MMP11, MYBL2, NDC80, ORC6, PGR, RACGAP1, RFC4, RRM2, and SCUBE2) are utilized in two or more profiles, including five genes (CCNB1, CENPA, MELK, MYBL2, and ORC6) used in three profiles. To ensure that the parsimonious 21 gene set is representative of the more global biological hallmarks of cancer, an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted. Evaluation of genes known to impact pathways involved with cancer development and progression provide a means to evaluate the overlap between the biological underpinnings of cancer and symptom development within the context of cancer. PMID:27022301

  3. Rapid Identification of Bacteria from Positive Blood Culture Bottles by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Fingerprinting▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Christner, Martin; Rohde, Holger; Wolters, Manuel; Sobottka, Ingo; Wegscheider, Karl; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Early and adequate antimicrobial therapy has been shown to improve the clinical outcome in bloodstream infections (BSI). To provide rapid pathogen identification for targeted treatment, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry fingerprinting to bacteria directly recovered from blood culture bottles. A total of 304 aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures, reported positive by a Bactec 9240 system, were subjected in parallel to differential centrifugation with subsequent mass spectrometry fingerprinting and reference identification using established microbiological methods. A representative spectrum of bloodstream pathogens was recovered from 277 samples that grew a single bacterial isolate. Species identification by direct mass spectrometry fingerprinting matched reference identification in 95% of these samples and worked equally well for aerobic and anaerobic culture bottles. Application of commonly used score cutoffs to classify the fingerprinting results led to an identification rate of 87%. Mismatching mostly resulted from insufficient bacterial numbers and preferentially occurred with Gram-positive samples. The respective spectra showed low concordance to database references and were effectively rejected by score thresholds. Spiking experiments and examination of the respective study samples even suggested applicability of the method to mixed cultures. With turnaround times around 100 min, the approach allowed for reliable pathogen identification at the day of blood culture positivity, providing treatment-relevant information within the critical phase of septic illness. PMID:20237093

  4. Genetic markers for rapid PCR-based identification of gull, Canada goose, duck, and chicken fecal contamination in water.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; Dick, Linda K; Gilpin, Brent; Samadpour, Mansour; Field, Katharine G

    2012-01-01

    Avian feces contaminate waterways but contribute fewer human pathogens than human sources. Rapid identification and quantification of avian contamination would therefore be useful to prevent overestimation of human health risk. We used subtractive hybridization of PCR-amplified gull fecal 16S RNA genes to identify avian-specific fecal rRNA gene sequences. The subtracters were rRNA genes amplified from human, dog, cat, cow, and pig feces. Recovered sequences were related to Enterobacteriaceae (47%), Helicobacter (26%), Catellicoccus (11%), Fusobacterium (11%), and Campylobacter (5%). Three PCR assays, designated GFB, GFC, and GFD, were based on recovered sequence fragments. Quantitative PCR assays for GFC and GFD were developed using SYBR green. GFC detected down to 0.1 mg gull feces/100 ml (corresponding to 2 gull enterococci most probable number [MPN]/100 ml). GFD detected down to 0.1 mg chicken feces/100 ml (corresponding to 13 Escherichia coli MPN/100 ml). GFB and GFC were 97% and 94% specific to gulls, respectively. GFC cross-reacted with 35% of sheep samples but occurred at about 100,000 times lower concentrations in sheep. GFD was 100% avian specific and occurred in gulls, geese, chickens, and ducks. In the United States, Canada, and New Zealand, the three markers differed in their geographic distributions but were found across the range tested. These assays detected four important bird groups contributing to fecal contamination of waterways: gulls, geese, ducks, and chickens. Marker distributions across North America and in New Zealand suggest that they will have broad applicability in other parts of the world as well. PMID:22081573

  5. Identification of G-Quadruplex Inducers Usinga Simple, Inexpensiveand Rapid High Throughput Assay, and TheirInhibition of Human Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Sassano, Maria Florencia; Schlesinger, Alexander P; Jarstfer, Michael B

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are protein and DNA complexes located atchromosome ends. Telomeric DNA is composed of a double stranded region of repetitive DNA followed by single-stranded 3' extension of aG-rich sequence. Single-stranded G-rich sequencescan fold into G-quadruplex structures,and molecules that stabilize G-quadruplexes are known to inhibit the enzyme telomerase and disrupt telomere maintenance. Because telomere maintenance is required for proliferation of cancer cells, G-quadruplex stabilizers have become attractive prospects for anticancer drug discovery.However, telomere-targeting G-quadruplex ligands have yet to enter the clinic owing in part to poor pharmacokinetics and target selectivity. Increasing the pharmacophore diversity of G-quadruplex and specifically telomeric-DNA targeting agents should assist in overcoming these shortcomings. In this work, we report the identification and validation ofligands that bind telomeric DNA and induce G-quadruplex formationusing the NCI Diversity Set I, providing validation of anextremely simple, rapid and high-throughput screen using FRET technology. Hits from the screen were validated by examining telomerase inhibition and G-quadruplex inductionusing CD spectroscopy and DNA polymerase stop assays. We show that two known DNA binding molecules, ellipticine derivativeNSC 176327 (apyridocarbazole) and NSC 305831 (an antiparasitic hetero-cyclediamidine referred to as furamidine and DB75),are selective induceG-quadruplex formation in the human telomeric sequence and bind telomeric DNA quadruplexes in the absence of stabilizing monovalent cations with molar ratios(molecule: DNA)of 4:1and 1.5:1, respectively. PMID:23173022

  6. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology. PMID:26999436

  7. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology. PMID:26999436

  8. Rapid field identification of subjects involved in firearm-related crimes based on electroanalysis coupled with advanced chemometric data treatment.

    PubMed

    Cetó, Xavier; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Windmiller, Joshua R; del Valle, Manel; Wang, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel system for the detection and discrimination of varying levels of exposure to gunshot residue from subjects in various control scenarios. Our aim is to address the key challenge of minimizing the false positive identification of individuals suspected of discharging a firearm. The chemometric treatment of voltammetric data from different controls using Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) provides several distinct clusters for each scenario examined. Multiple samples were taken from subjects in controlled tests such as secondary contact with gunshot residue (GSR), loading a firearm, and postdischarge of a firearm. These controls were examined at both bare carbon and gold-modified screen-printed electrodes using different sampling methods: the 'swipe' method with integrated sampling and electroanalysis and a more traditional acid-assisted q-tip swabbing method. The electroanalytical fingerprint of each sample was examined using square-wave voltammetry; the resulting data were preprocessed with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), followed by CVA treatment. High levels of discrimination were thus achieved in each case over 3 classes of samples (reflecting different levels of involvement), achieving maximum accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 100% employing the leave-one-out validation method. Further validation with the 'jack-knife' technique was performed, and the resulting values were in good agreement with the former method. Additionally, samples from subjects in daily contact with relevant metallic constituents were analyzed to assess possible false positives. This system may serve as a potential method for a portable, field-deployable system aimed at rapidly identifying a subject who has loaded or discharged a firearm to verify involvement in a crime, hence providing law enforcement personnel with an invaluable forensic tool in the field. PMID:23121395

  9. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Identification of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci▿

    PubMed Central

    Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Emonet, Stéphane; Fernandez, José; Schorderet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the rapid identification of beta-hemolytic streptococci. We compared Bruker Biotyper 2.0 with Vitek2 coupled to the agglutination test. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of 386 beta-hemolytic streptococcal isolates yielded high-confidence identification to the species level for all 386 isolates. The Vitek2 gave high-confidence identification to the species level for 88% of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates (n = 269/306), 92% of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates (n = 48/52), and 39% of isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae serogroups C and G (n = 11/28). PMID:21697322

  10. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for rapid identification of Beta-hemolytic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Emonet, Stéphane; Fernandez, José; Schorderet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the rapid identification of beta-hemolytic streptococci. We compared Bruker Biotyper 2.0 with Vitek2 coupled to the agglutination test. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of 386 beta-hemolytic streptococcal isolates yielded high-confidence identification to the species level for all 386 isolates. The Vitek2 gave high-confidence identification to the species level for 88% of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates (n = 269/306), 92% of Streptococcus pyogenes isolates (n = 48/52), and 39% of isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae serogroups C and G (n = 11/28). PMID:21697322

  11. A reference substance free diagnostic fragment ion-based approach for rapid identification of non-target components in Pudilan Xiaoyan oral liquid by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Guoxiang; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jun; Guo, Bin; Yang, Tianshu; Cai, Bo

    2016-05-30

    Rapid and reliable identification of non-target components in herbal preparations remains a primary challenge, especially when corresponding reference substances are inaccessible. In this work, an efficient post-experiment data processing methodology, named reference substance free diagnostic fragment ion (RSFDFI), was developed based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/LTQ-Orbitrap). The first step of this approach was to cluster the components that share common fragment ions into several groups. After querying the database using a predicted chemical formula, the component with the fewest primary hits was preferentially deduced based on its MS/MS spectrum. Once the structure was characterized, its common fragment ions could be used as the prior structural information to select the possible candidates that would facilitate the subsequent identification for each group. Taking Pudilan Xiaoyan oral liquid (PDL) as a model herbal preparation, which has been extensively used for the treatment of epidemic parotitis and children with hand-foot-mouth diseases, this strategy enables a nearly eight-fold narrowing of the database hits, with fifty-two components, including lignans, flavonoids, alkaloids and steroids, being rapidly identified. In conclusion, our work clearly demonstrates that integrating RSFDFI with high-resolution mass spectrometry is a powerful methodology for rapid identification of non-target components from herbal prescriptions and may open new avenues for chemical analysis in other complex mixtures. PMID:26938159

  12. Rapid Identification of Bacteria from Positive Blood Cultures by Fluorescence-Based PCR–Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Turenne, Christine Y.; Witwicki, Evelyn; Hoban, Daryl J.; Karlowsky, James A.; Kabani, Amin M.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteremia continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients who are immunocompromised. Currently, patients with suspected bacteremia are empirically administered broad-spectrum antibiotics, as definitive diagnosis relies upon the use of blood cultures, which impose significant delays in and limitations to pathogen identification. To address the limitations of growth-based identification, the sequence variability of the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria was targeted for rapid identification of bacterial pathogens isolated directly from blood cultures using a fluorescence-based PCR–single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) protocol. Species-specific SSCP patterns were determined for 25 of the most common bacterial species isolated from blood cultures; these isolates subsequently served as a reference collection for bacterial identification for new cases of bacteremia. A total of 272 blood-culture-positive patient specimens containing bacteria were tested. A previously determined SSCP pattern was observed for 251 (92%) specimens, with 21 (8%) specimens demonstrating SSCP patterns distinct from those in the reference collection. Time to identification from blood culture positivity ranged from 1 to 8 days with biochemical testing, whereas identification by fluorescence-based capillary electrophoresis was obtained as early as 7 h at a calculated cost of $10 (U.S. currency) per specimen when tested in batches of 10. Limitations encountered included the inability to consistently detect mixed cultures as well as some species demonstrating identical SSCP patterns. This method can be applied directly to blood cultures or whole-blood specimens, where early pathogen identification would result in a timely diagnosis with possible implications for patient management costs and the mortality and morbidity of infections. PMID:10655337

  13. Rapid and reliable species identification of wild mushrooms by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ryota; Yamada, Sayumi; Tu, Zhihao; Sugawara, Akiko; Suzuki, Kousuke; Hoshiba, Toshihiro; Eisaka, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    2016-08-31

    Mushrooms are a favourite natural food in many countries. However, some wild species cause food poisoning, sometimes lethal, due to misidentification caused by confusing fruiting bodies similar to those of edible species. The morphological inspection of mycelia, spores and fruiting bodies have been traditionally used for the identification of mushrooms. More recently, DNA sequencing analysis has been successfully applied to mushrooms and to many other species. This study focuses on a simpler and more rapid methodology for the identification of wild mushrooms via protein profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A preliminary study using 6 commercially available cultivated mushrooms suggested that a more reproducible spectrum was obtained from a portion of the cap than from the stem of a fruiting body by the extraction of proteins with a formic acid-acetonitrile mixture (1 + 1). We used 157 wild mushroom-fruiting bodies collected in the centre of Hokkaido from June to November 2014. Sequencing analysis of a portion of the ribosomal RNA gene provided 134 identifications of mushrooms by genus or species, however 23 samples containing 10 unknown species that had lower concordance rate of the nucleotide sequences in a BLAST search (less than 97%) and 13 samples that had unidentifiable poor or mixed sequencing signals remained unknown. MALDI-TOF MS analysis yielded a reproducible spectrum (frequency of matching score ≥ 2.0 was ≥6 spectra from 12 spectra measurements) for 114 of 157 samples. Profiling scores that matched each other within the database gave correct species identification (with scores of ≥2.0) for 110 samples (96%). An in-house prepared database was constructed from 106 independent species, except for overlapping identifications. We used 48 wild mushrooms that were collected in autumn 2015 to validate the in-house database. As a result, 21 mushrooms were identified at the species level with

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry: rapid identification of bacteria isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Baillie, S; Ireland, K; Warwick, S; Wareham, D; Wilks, M

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research into the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis (CF) over the past decades, sufferers still have a median life expectancy of less than 37 years. Respiratory tract infections have a significant role in increasing the morbidity and mortality of patients with CF via a progressive decline in lung function. Rapid identification of organisms recovered from CF sputum is necessary for effective management of respiratory tract infections; however, standard techniques of identification are slow, technically demanding and expensive. The aim of this study is to asses the suitability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in identifying bacteria isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with CF, and is assessed by testing the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS in identifying samples from a reference collection of rare CF strains in conjunction with comparing MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques in identifying clinical isolates from sputum samples of CF patients. MALDI-TOF MS accurately identified 100% of isolates from the reference collection of rare CF pathogens (EuroCare CF collection). The isolate identification given by MALDI-TOF MS agreed with that given by standard techniques for 479/481 (99.6%) clinical isolates obtained from respiratory samples provided by patients with CE In two (0.4%) of 481 samples there was a discrepancy in identification between MALDI-TOF MS and standard techniques. One organism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by MALDI-TOF but could only be identified by the laboratory's standard methods as of the Pseudomonas genus. The second organism was identified as P. beteli by MALDI-TOF MS and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by standard methods. This study shows that MALDI-TOF MS is superior to standard techniques in providing cheap, rapid and accurate identification of CF sputum isolates. PMID:24400425

  15. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  16. Rat Mitochondrion-Neuron Focused Microarray (rMNChip) and Bioinformatics Tools for Rapid Identification of Differential Pathways in Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan A.; Zhang, Qiuyang; Su, David M.; Tang, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is of particular importance in brain because of its high demand for energy (ATP) and efficient removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We developed rat mitochondrion-neuron focused microarray (rMNChip) and integrated bioinformatics tools for rapid identification of differential pathways in brain tissues. rMNChip contains 1,500 genes involved in mitochondrial functions, stress response, circadian rhythms and signal transduction. The bioinformatics tool includes an algorithm for computing of differentially expressed genes, and a database for straightforward and intuitive interpretation for microarray results. Our application of these tools to RNA samples derived from rat frontal cortex (FC), hippocampus (HC) and hypothalamus (HT) led to the identification of differentially-expressed signal-transduction-bioenergenesis and neurotransmitter-synthesis pathways with a dominant number of genes (FC/HC = 55/6; FC/HT = 55/4) having significantly (p<0.05, FDR<10.70%) higher (≥1.25 fold) RNA levels in the frontal cortex than the others, strongly suggesting active generation of ATP and neurotransmitters and efficient removal of ROS. Thus, these tools for rapid and efficient identification of differential pathways in brain regions will greatly facilitate our systems-biological study and understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying complex and multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21494430

  17. Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis by Indirect Immunofluorescence Based on Differential Localization of Antigens on C. dubliniensis Blastospores and Candida albicans Germ Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Bikandi, Joseba; Millán, Rosario San; Moragues, María D.; Cebas, Gontzal; Clarke, Mary; Coleman, David C.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    1998-01-01

    There is a clear need for the development of a rapid and reliable test for the identification of Candida dubliniensis and for the discrimination of this species from Candida albicans. In the present study we have investigated the potential use of C. dubliniensis-specific antigens as a basis for its identification. We produced an anti-C. dubliniensis serum which, after adsorption with C. albicans blastospores, was found to differentially label C. dubliniensis isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence test. In this test, the antiserum reacted with blastospores and germ tubes of C. dubliniensis and with blastospores of Candida krusei and Rhodotorula rubra but did not react with blastospores of several other Candida species including C. albicans. The antiserum also reacted with C. albicans germ tubes. The anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum reacted with specific components of 25, 28, 37, 40, 52, and 62 kDa in the C. dubliniensis extract and with a variety of antigens from other yeast species. The antigens from non-C. dubliniensis yeasts showing reactivity with the anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum are mostly expressed within the cell walls of these yeast species, and this reactivity does not interfere with the use of the anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum in an indirect immunofluorescence test for the rapid identification of C. dubliniensis. PMID:9705368

  18. Improved Identification of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria by a 16S–23S Internal Transcribed Spacer Region PCR and Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Timothy J.; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C-A.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) remains problematic because of evolving taxonomy, limitations of current phenotypic methods and absence of a universal gene target for reliable speciation. This study evaluated a novel method of identification of RGM by amplification of the mycobacterial 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) followed by resolution of amplified fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). Nineteen American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) Mycobacterium strains and 178 clinical isolates of RGM (12 species) were studied. All RGM ATCC strains generated unique electropherograms with no overlap with slowly growing mycobacteria species, including M. tuberculosis. A total of 47 electropherograms for the 178 clinical isolates were observed allowing the speciation of 175/178 (98.3%) isolates, including the differentiation of the closely related species, M. massiliense (M. abscessus subspecies bolletii) and M. abscessus (M. abscessus sensu stricto). ITS fragment size ranged from 332 to 534 bp and 33.7% of clinical isolates generated electropherograms with two distinct peaks, while the remainder where characterized with a single peak. Unique peaks (fragment lengths) were identified for 11/12 (92%) RGM species with only M. moriokaense having an indistinguishable electropherogram from a rarely encountered CGE subtype of M. fortuitum. We conclude that amplification of the 16S–23S ITS gene region followed by resolution of fragments by CGE is a simple, rapid, accurate and reproducible method for species identification and characterization of the RGM. PMID:25013955

  19. Microbial agent detection using near-IR electrophoretic and spectral signatures (MADNESS) for rapid identification in detect-to-warn applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Anthony Lee; Bambha, Ray P.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2009-10-01

    Rapid identification of aerosolized biological agents following an alarm by particle triggering systems is needed to enable response actions that save lives and protect assets. Rapid identifiers must achieve species level specificity, as this is required to distinguish disease-causing organisms (e.g., Bacillus anthracis) from benign neighbors (e.g., Bacillus subtilis). We have developed a rapid (1-5 minute), novel identification methodology that sorts intact organisms from each other and particulates using capillary electrophoresis (CE), and detects using near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and scattering. We have successfully demonstrated CE resolution of Bacillus spores and vegetative bacteria at the species level. To achieve sufficient sensitivity for detection needs ({approx}10{sup 4} cfu/mL for bacteria), we have developed fiber-coupled cavity-enhanced absorbance techniques. Using this method, we have demonstrated {approx}two orders of magnitude greater sensitivity than published results for absorbing dyes, and single particle (spore) detection through primarily scattering effects. Results of the integrated CE-NIR system for spore detection are presented.

  20. Rapid identification of anti-inflammatory compounds from Tongmai Yangxin Pills by liquid chromatography with high-resolution mass spectrometry and chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shan; Huang, Yi; Chen, Zhui; Chen, Yaqi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    We present an integrated approach to rapidly identify anti-inflammatory compounds of TongmaiYangxin Pills (TMYXP), a botanical drug for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to analyze the chemical composition of TMYXP. Eighty compounds of TMYXP including flavonoids, coumarins, iridoid glycosides, saponins, and lignans, were identified unambiguously or tentatively. After the rapid isolation and bioassay, 18 fractions of TMYXP were obtained and their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We performed chemometric analysis to reveal the correlation between the chemical and pharmacological information of the fractions to facilitate the identification of active compounds. To verify the reliability of the proposed method in discovering active components from a complex mixture, activities of seven compounds, which were positively or negatively related to bioactivity according to calculation, were validated in vitro. Results indicated that six active compounds with high R values exerted certain anti-inflammatory effects in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 53.6-204.1 μM. Our findings suggest that the integrated use of identification based on high-resolution mass spectrometry and chemometric methods could rapidly identify active compounds from complex mixture of natural products. PMID:25943824

  1. Thermoluminescence of Antarctic meteorites: A rapid screening technique for terrestrial age estimation, pairing studies and identification of specimens with unusual prefall histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) is a promising technique for rapid screening of the large numbers of Antarctic meteorites, permitting identification of interesting specimens that can then be studied in detail by other, more definite techniques. Specifically, TL permits determination of rough terrestrial age, identification of potential paired groups and location of specimens with unusual pre-fall histories. Meteorites with long terrestrial ages are particularly valuable for studying transport and weathering mechanisms. Pairing studies are possible because TL variations among meteorites are large compared to variations within individual objects, especially for natural TL. Available TL data for several L3 fragments, three of which were paired by other techniques, are presented as an example of the use of TL parameters in pairing studies. Additional TL measurements, specifically a blind test, are recommended to satisfactorily establish the reliability of this pairing property. The TL measurements also identify fragments with unusual pre-fall histories, such an near-Sun orbits.

  2. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lambirth, Kevin C.; Whaley, Adam M.; Schlueter, Jessica A.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  3. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lambirth, Kevin C; Whaley, Adam M; Schlueter, Jessica A; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  4. Development of a rapid diagnostic method for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and antimicrobial resistance in positive blood culture bottles using a PCR-DNA-chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takeya; Miyagi, Chihiro; Tamaki, Yoshikazu; Mizuno, Takuya; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Blood culturing and the rapid reporting of results are essential for infectious disease clinics to obtain bacterial information that can affect patient prognosis. When gram-positive coccoid cells are observed in blood culture bottles, it is important to determine whether the strain is Staphylococcus aureus and whether the strain has resistance genes, such as mecA and blaZ, for proper antibiotic selection. Previous work led to the development of a PCR method that is useful for rapid identification of bacterial species and antimicrobial susceptibility. However, that method has not yet been adopted in community hospitals due to the high cost and methodological complexity. We report here the development of a quick PCR and DNA-chromatography test, based on single-tag hybridization chromatography, that permits detection of S. aureus and the mecA and blaZ genes; results can be obtained within 1 h for positive blood culture bottles. We evaluated this method using 42 clinical isolates. Detection of S. aureus and the resistance genes by the PCR-DNA-chromatography method was compared with that obtained via the conventional identification method and actual antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Our method had a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 100% for the identification of the bacterial species. For the detection of the mecA gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 95.2%. For the detection of the blaZ gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 88.9%. The speed and simplicity of this PCR-DNA-chromatography method suggest that our method will facilitate rapid diagnoses. PMID:27056092

  5. Comparative Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Yeast ID Panel and Remel RapID Yeast Plus System for Yeast Identification

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michelle L.; Parajuli, Shobha; Deleon-Gonsalves, Raquel; Potula, Raghava; Truant, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    Becton Dickinson Phoenix Yeast ID Panel was compared to the Remel RapID Yeast Plus System using 150 recent clinical yeast isolates and the API 20C AUX system to resolve discrepant results. The concordance rate between the Yeast ID Panel and the RapID Yeast Plus System (without arbitration) was 93.3% with 97.3% (146/150) and 95.3% (143/150) of the isolates correctly identified by the Becton Dickinson Phoenix and the Remel RapID, respectively, with arbitration. PMID:27366167

  6. Comparative Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Yeast ID Panel and Remel RapID Yeast Plus System for Yeast Identification.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michelle L; Parajuli, Shobha; Deleon-Gonsalves, Raquel; Potula, Raghava; Truant, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    Becton Dickinson Phoenix Yeast ID Panel was compared to the Remel RapID Yeast Plus System using 150 recent clinical yeast isolates and the API 20C AUX system to resolve discrepant results. The concordance rate between the Yeast ID Panel and the RapID Yeast Plus System (without arbitration) was 93.3% with 97.3% (146/150) and 95.3% (143/150) of the isolates correctly identified by the Becton Dickinson Phoenix and the Remel RapID, respectively, with arbitration. PMID:27366167

  7. Evaluation of the BD Max StaphSR Assay for Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus in Positive Blood Culture Broths

    PubMed Central

    Hofko, Marjeta; Hamilton, Fiona; Mackenzie, Laura; Zimmermann, Stefan; Templeton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the BD Max StaphSR assay for the direct detection of Staphylococcus aureus from blood culture medium. In a two-center trial, 155 blood cultures from the BD Bactec FX system and 212 from the bioMérieux BacT/Alert system were tested; 170 bottles yielded S. aureus, and all were identified correctly by the BD Max StaphSR assay. The assay required approximately 2.5 h, thus allowing rapid identification of blood cultures flagged positive. PMID:26292311

  8. Development of a Multiplexed, Bead-Based Assessment Tool for Rapid Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in Field Samples. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; Halden, R.

    2002-10-09

    This was the final report for DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-01ER63264 (PI Mary Lowe). The grant was entitled ''Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Assessment Tool for Rapid Identification and Quantitation of Microorganisms in Field Samples.'' The grant duration was one year. The purpose was to develop a bead-based assay for measuring analyte DNAs in environmental PCR products and to apply the method to a field experiment. The primary experiment was located at the UMTRA Old Rifle site.

  9. An outbreak of salmonella chester infection in Canada: rare serotype, uncommon exposure, and unusual population demographic facilitate rapid identification of food vehicle.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John; Galanis, Eleni; Wilcott, Lynn; Hoang, Linda; Stone, Jason; Ekkert, Judi; Quibell, Doug; Huddleston, Mark; McCormick, Rachel; Whitfield, Yvonne; Adhikari, Bijay; Grant, Christopher C R; Sharma, Davendra

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella Chester infection has rarely been reported in the literature. In 2010, 33 case patients were reported in 2 months in four Canadian provinces. We conducted an outbreak investigation in collaboration with public health agencies, food safety specialists, regulatory agencies, grocery store chains, and the product distributor. We used case patient interviews, customer loyalty cards, and microbiological testing of clinical and food samples to identify nationally distributed head cheese as the food vehicle responsible for the outbreak. The rare serotype, a limited affected demographic group, and an uncommon exposure led to the rapid identification of the source. Control measures were implemented within 9 days of notification of the outbreak. PMID:22488063

  10. [Rapid identification of crude and sweated dipsaci radix based on near-infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis-mahalanobis distance].

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Feng; Jia, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Dong-Jing; Zhang, Hao

    2014-12-01

    In order to discriminate the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix correctly and rapidly, the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix were scanned by the NIR spectrometer, and an identifying model was developed by near infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component-Mahalanobis distance pattern recognition method. The pretreated spectra data of 129 crude samples and 86 sweated ones were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA). The identifying model was developed by choosing the spectrum for 9 881.46-4 119.20 cm(-1) and "SNV + spectrum + S-G" to the original spectral preprocessing with 14 principal components, and then was verified by prediction set, identifying with 100% accuracy. The rapid identification model of the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix by NIR is feasible and efficient, and could be used as an assistant means for identifying the crude and sweated Dipsaci Radix. PMID:25911809

  11. Antibiotic treatment algorithm development based on a microarray nucleic acid assay for rapid bacterial identification and resistance determination from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Jürgen; Karrasch, Matthias; Edel, Birgit; Stoll, Sylvia; Bohnert, Jürgen; Löffler, Bettina; Saupe, Angela; Pfister, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections remains a challenge for the early targeting of an antibiotic therapy in sepsis patients. In recent studies, the reliability of the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive and Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GP and BC-GN) assays for the rapid identification of bacteria and resistance genes directly from positive BCs has been demonstrated. In this work, we have developed a model to define treatment recommendations by combining Verigene test results with knowledge on local antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens. The data of 275 positive BCs were analyzed. Two hundred sixty-three isolates (95.6%) were included in the Verigene assay panels, and 257 isolates (93.5%) were correctly identified. The agreement of the detection of resistance genes with subsequent phenotypic susceptibility testing was 100%. The hospital antibiogram was used to develop a treatment algorithm on the basis of Verigene results that may contribute to a faster patient management. PMID:26712265

  12. Rapid identification of vinca alkaloids by direct-injection electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry and confirmation by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Tai, Yuanpo; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2005-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the identification of Vinca alkaloids from a crude extract of Catharanthus roseus G. Don (Apocynaceae) by direct-injection electrospray ionisation (ESI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed. The alkaloids vindoline, vindolidine, vincristine and vinblastine were evaluated in a commercial extract of C. roseus using this method. Catharanthine and its isomers 19S-vindolinine and vindolinine were detected in the commercial product by direct injection ESI/MS/MS and confirmed by preparation and by HPLC-ESI/MS. For the characterisation of different fragment fingerprints, ESI/MS/MS is a sensitive, rapid and convenient technique by which to identify some constituents in complex and mixed plant extracts. PMID:16223089

  13. Sensitivity and Specificity of an Improved Rapid Latex Agglutination Test for Identification of Methicillin-Sensitive and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Smole, Sandra C.; Aronson, Elyssa; Durbin, Annette; Brecher, Stephen M.; Arbeit, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of a second-generation rapid agglutination kit, Slidex Staph Plus (SSP; bioMérieux), was compared to those of the Slidex Staph (SS; bioMérieux), Staphaurex (SRX; Murex Diagnostics), and BBL Staphyloslide (BBL; Becton Dickinson) kits by using 508 clinical isolates composed of 150 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) organisms, 154 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) organisms, and 204 non-S. aureus Staphylococcus spp. Of the 508 isolates tested, 75% were fresh clinical isolates, with the remainder taken from five different freezer collections. All four agglutination tests had comparable sensitivities for MSSA and MRSA. However, the SS kit was significantly less specific (93.1%) than the three other tests (P > 0.05, McNemar test). These results demonstrate that the new rapid latex agglutination kit, SSP, was more specific for the identification of S. aureus than the previous version and performed comparably to the SRX and BBL kits. PMID:9542948

  14. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 5S-rRNA-NTS region: a rapid and precise method for plant identification.

    PubMed

    Bertea, Cinzia Margherita; Gnavi, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Molecular genetic methods have several advantages over classical morphological and chemical analyses. The genetic method requires genotype instead than phenotype, therefore PCR-based techniques have been widely used for a rapid identification of plant species, varieties and chemotypes. Recently, the molecular discrimination of some higher plant species has been evaluated using sequences of a 5S-rRNA gene spacer region. The variation in the nontranscribed sequence (NTS) region has been used in a number of plant species for studying intraspecific variation, genome evolution, and phylogenetic reconstruction. Here, we describe a rapid method based on the use of the 5S-rRNA-NTS region as a tool for plant DNA fingerprinting, which combines PCR, sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. PMID:22419491

  15. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  16. Rapid O serogroup identification of the ten most clinically relevant STECs by Luminex microbead-based suspension array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and serotyping of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli during foodborne outbreaks can aid in matching clinical, food, and environmental isolates when trying to identify the sources of illness and ultimately food contamination. Herein we describe a Luminex microbead-based suspension ...

  17. Evaluation of Performance of the Real-Q NTM-ID Kit for Rapid Identification of Eight Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Kyung Sun; Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Ji-Youn; Kwon, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis assay (Real-Q NTM-ID kit; Biosewoom, Seoul, South Korea) for the identification of eight common nontuberculous mycobacterial species, using 30 type strains and 230 consecutive clinical isolates. The concordance rate of this assay with multigene sequence-based typing was 97.0% (223/230 isolates). PMID:25165078

  18. Application of monoclonal antibodies in a rapid sandwich dot-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for identification and antigen detection of Leptospira serovars.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Tuteja, Urmil; Khushiramani, Rekha; Shukla, Jyoti; Batra, H V

    2008-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced by fusing SP2/0 myeloma cells with spleen cells of BALB/c mice that were immunized with live whole cells of the four most prevalent Leptospira serovars--namely, autumnalis, australis, grippotyphosa, and icterohaemorrhagiae. A total of 26 MAbs (10 autumnalis, 5 australis, 4 grippotyphosa, and 7 icterohaemorrhagiae) were produced that showed specific, restricted, or broad cross-reactivity when tested with 19 standard pathogenic and 3 standard saprophytic serovars by MAT and dot-ELISA. Monoclonal antibodies like AT4 and AT5 against serovar autumnalis; AS1 and AS2 against serovar australis; GR1, GR3, and GR4 raised against serovar grippotyphosa; and also the MAbs IC3 to IC7 against serovar icterohaemorrhagiae were all usable as typing reagents in a rapid dot-ELISA. Selected MAbs were subsequently utilized in a rapid sandwich dot-ELISA for identification of Leptospira serovars as well as for antigen detection in experimentally infected mice and guinea pigs. Results of rapid sandwich dot-ELISA were compared with dark field microscopy, culture, and PCR in experimentally infected animals and sandwich dot-ELISA detected the presence of Leptospira antigen during the bacteremia stage in all experimental animals. Besides detecting antigens in animals infected with homologous serovars, the sandwich dot-ELISA employing pooled capture and revealing antibodies also detected Leptospira in the group of animals infected separately with the serovars australis and icterohaemorrhagiae. Results showed PCR to be a reliable and rapid test for demonstration of Leptospira in the plasma samples. The rapid sandwich dot-ELISA appeared more advantageous over PCR in being simple, rapid, field based, and economical. This method shows better promise of being used as a bedside test for routine diagnostic purposes. PMID:18642676

  19. Design and evaluation of specific PCR primers for rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus xylosus strains isolated from dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Pennacchia, Carmelina; Parente, Eugenio; Villani, Francesco

    2003-11-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Staphylococcus xylosus was achieved by species-specific PCR assays. Two sets of primers, targeting on xylulokinase (xylB) and 60 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp60) genes of S. xylosus, respectively, were designed. Species-specificity of both sets of primers was evaluated by using 27 reference strains of the DSM collection, representing 23 different species of the Staphylococcus genus and 3 species of the Kocuria genus. Moreover, 90 wild strains isolated from different fermented dry sausages were included in the analysis. By using primers xylB-F and xylB-R the expected PCR fragment was obtained only when DNA from S. xylosus was used. By contrast, amplification performed by using primers xylHs-F and xylHs-R produced a single PCR fragment, of the expected length, when DNA from S. xylosus, S. haemolyticus, S. intermedius and S. kloosii were used as template. Nevertheless, AluI digestion of the xylHs-F/xylHs-R PCR fragment allowed a clear differentiation of these 4 species. The rapidity (about 4 h from DNA isolation to results) and reliability of the PCR procedures established suggests that the method may be profitably applied for specific detection and identification of S. xylosus strains. PMID:14666989

  20. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid and sensitive identification of Arcanobacterium pluranimalium.

    PubMed

    Abdulmawjood, A; Wickhorst, J; Sammra, O; Lämmler, C; Foster, G; Wragg, P N; Prenger-Berninghoff, E; Klein, G

    2015-12-01

    In the present study 28 Arcanobacterium pluranimalium strains isolated from various origins could successfully be identified with a newly designed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay based on gene pla encoding pluranimaliumlysin. No comparable reaction could be observed with control strains representing five species of genus Arcanobacterium and five species of genus Trueperella. The presented pla LAMP assay might allow a reliable and low cost identification of this bacterial pathogen also in laboratories with less specified equipment. PMID:26093093

  1. Internal transcribed spacer sequence-based rapid molecular identification of Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca blaschkeae directly from milk of infected cows.

    PubMed

    Marques, S; Huss, V A R; Pfisterer, K; Grosse, C; Thompson, G

    2015-05-01

    The increasing incidence of rare mastitis-causing pathogens has urged the implementation of fast and efficient diagnostic and control measures. Prototheca algae are known to be associated with diseases in humans and animals. In the latter, the most prevalent form of protothecosis is bovine mastitis with Prototheca zopfii and Prototheca blaschkeae representing the most common pathogenic species. These nonphotosynthetic and colorless green algae are ubiquitous in different environments and are widely resistant against harmful conditions and antimicrobials. Hence, the association of Prototheca with bovine mastitis represents a herd problem, requiring fast and easy identification of the infectious agent. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and rapid method, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of ribosomal DNA, for molecular identification and discrimination between P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae in bovine mastitic milk. The complete ITS sequences of 32 Prototheca isolates showed substantial interspecies but moderate intraspecies variability facilitating the design of species-specific PCR amplification primers. The species-specific PCR was successfully applied to the identification of P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae directly from milk samples. The intraspecific ITS phylogeny was compared for each species with the geographical distribution of the respective Prototheca isolates, but no significant correlation was found. PMID:25726118

  2. Potential of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid detection technique in plant pathology: identification of plant-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faheem; Babalola, Olubukola O; Tak, Hamid I

    2012-09-01

    Plant diseases caused by plant pathogens substantially reduce crop production every year, resulting in massive economic losses throughout the world. Accurate detection and identification of plant pathogens is fundamental to plant pathogen diagnostics and, thus, plant disease management. Diagnostics and disease-management strategies require techniques to enable simultaneous detection and quantification of a wide range of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. Over the past decade, rapid development of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) techniques for characterization of microorganisms has enabled substantially improved detection and identification of microorganisms. In the biological sciences, MALDI-TOF MS is used to analyze specific peptides or proteins directly desorbed from intact bacteria, fungal spores, nematodes, and other microorganisms. The ability to record biomarker ions, in a broad m/z range, which are unique to and representative of individual microorganisms, forms the basis of taxonomic identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have initiated new research, i.e. analysis of more complex microbial communities. Such studies are just beginning but have great potential for elucidation not only of the interactions between microorganisms and their host plants but also those among different microbial taxa living in association with plants. There has been a recent effort by the mass spectrometry community to make data from large scale mass spectrometry experiments publicly available in the form of a centralized repository. Such a resource could enable the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a universal technique for detection of plant pathogens and non-pathogens. The effects of experimental conditions are sufficiently understood, reproducible spectra can be obtained from computational database search, and microorganisms can be rapidly characterized by genus, species

  3. LABEL-FREE SERS FOR RAPID AND SIMULTANEOUS SPECIES IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES, AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMONIUM BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for rapid detection of foodborne bacteria has long been a hot topic from policy makers to manufacturers. Traditional method, nucleic acid based on PCR, and antibody based biosensors have been developed as viable tools to identify the bacteria. Generally, these methods are labor-intensive an...

  4. Rapid Identification and Multiple Susceptibility Testing of Pathogens from Positive-Culture Sterile Body Fluids by a Combined MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Vitek Susceptibility System.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yueru; Zheng, Bing; Wang, Bei; Lin, Yong; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the bloodstream, central nervous system, peritoneum, joints, and other sterile areas are associated with high morbidity and sequelae risk. Timely initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is crucial to improving patient prognosis. However, standard final identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests (ASTs) are reported 16-48 h after a positive alert. For a rapid, effective and low-cost diagnosis, we combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with a Vitek AST system, and performed rapid microbial identification (RMI) and rapid multiple AST (RMAST) on non-duplicated positive body fluid cultures collected from a hospital in Shanghai, China. Sterile body fluid positive culture and blood positive culture caused by Gram negative (GN) or polymicrobial were applied to the MALDI-TOF measurement directly. When positive blood culture caused by Gram positive (GP) bacteria or yeasts, they were resuspended in 1 ml brain heart infusion for 2 or 4 h enrichment, respectively. Regardless of enrichment, the RMI (completed in 40 min per sample) accurately identified GN and GP bacteria (98.9 and 87.2%, respectively), fungi (75.7%), and anaerobes (94.7%). Dominant species in multiple cultures and bacteria that failed to grow on the routing plates were correctly identified in 81.2 and 100% of cases, respectively. The category agreements of RMAST results, determined in the presence of various antibiotics, were similarly to previous studies. The RMI and RMAST results not only reduce the turnaround time of the patient report by 18-36 h, but also indicate whether a patient's antibiotic treatment should be accelerated, ceased or de-escalated, and adjusted the essential drugs modification for an optimized therapy. PMID:27148212

  5. Rapid Identification and Multiple Susceptibility Testing of Pathogens from Positive-Culture Sterile Body Fluids by a Combined MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Vitek Susceptibility System

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yueru; Zheng, Bing; Wang, Bei; Lin, Yong; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the bloodstream, central nervous system, peritoneum, joints, and other sterile areas are associated with high morbidity and sequelae risk. Timely initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is crucial to improving patient prognosis. However, standard final identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests (ASTs) are reported 16–48 h after a positive alert. For a rapid, effective and low-cost diagnosis, we combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with a Vitek AST system, and performed rapid microbial identification (RMI) and rapid multiple AST (RMAST) on non-duplicated positive body fluid cultures collected from a hospital in Shanghai, China. Sterile body fluid positive culture and blood positive culture caused by Gram negative (GN) or polymicrobial were applied to the MALDI–TOF measurement directly. When positive blood culture caused by Gram positive (GP) bacteria or yeasts, they were resuspended in 1 ml brain heart infusion for 2 or 4 h enrichment, respectively. Regardless of enrichment, the RMI (completed in 40 min per sample) accurately identified GN and GP bacteria (98.9 and 87.2%, respectively), fungi (75.7%), and anaerobes (94.7%). Dominant species in multiple cultures and bacteria that failed to grow on the routing plates were correctly identified in 81.2 and 100% of cases, respectively. The category agreements of RMAST results, determined in the presence of various antibiotics, were similarly to previous studies. The RMI and RMAST results not only reduce the turnaround time of the patient report by 18–36 h, but also indicate whether a patient's antibiotic treatment should be accelerated, ceased or de-escalated, and adjusted the essential drugs modification for an optimized therapy. PMID:27148212

  6. Use of Padlock Probes and Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) for Rapid Identification of Trichophyton Species, Related to Human and Animal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Hamideh; Shokohi, Tahereh; Badali, Hamid; Mayahi, Saba; Didehdar, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: The high degree of phenotypic similarity among Trichophyton species makes their identification difficult. Objectives: The current study aims to establish the use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) based on internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) as a powerful, simple, and rapid procedure for distinguishing closely related organisms, and specifically to identify Trichophyton species, which cause human and animal disorders. Materials and Methods: A total of sixty-one isolates belonging to three species of Trichophyton were identified to the species level based on microscopic and macroscopic examinations and their ITS rDNA regions were sequenced. Three specific circular oligonucleotide probes targeting the ITS1 and ITS2 regions were designed to differentiate Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, and T. tonsurans. Results: Of the 61 putative Trichophyton clinical isolates, 52 were identified to the species level. The most common species was T. mentagrophytes var. interdigitale (31 isolates), followed by T. rubrum (11 isolates), T. tonsurans (9 isolates), and T. violaceum (1 isolates); moreover, 9 isolates were identified as non-Trichophyton species. The RCA method correctly identified four Trichophyton species and was 100% specific for each species. Neither cross-reaction between the examined species of Trichophyton nor false positive or false negative results were observed. Conclusions: Species identification of Trichophyton is crucially important for epidemiological and phylogenetic purposes and for genotype delineation. RCA based on ITS polymorphisms can be used to generate identification barcodes and as an alternative to DNA sequencing; it is a very fast, specific, and economical tool for species identification. PMID:26421127

  7. Purification of a cellular, double-stranded DNA-binding protein required for initiation of adenovirus DNA replication by using a rapid filter-binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, J F; Stillman, B

    1986-01-01

    A rapid and quantitative nitrocellulose filter-binding assay is described for the detection of nuclear factor I, a HeLa cell sequence-specific DNA-binding protein required for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. In this assay, the abundant nonspecific DNA-binding activity present in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts was greatly reduced by preincubation of these extracts with a homopolymeric competitor DNA. Subsequently, specific DNA-binding activity was detected as the preferential retention of a labeled 48-base-pair DNA fragment containing a functional nuclear factor I binding site compared with a control DNA fragment to which nuclear factor I did not bind specifically. This specific DNA-binding activity was shown to be both quantitative and time dependent. Furthermore, the conditions of this assay allowed footprinting of nuclear factor I in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts and quantitative detection of the protein during purification. Using unfrozen HeLa cells and reagents known to limit endogenous proteolysis, nuclear factor I was purified to near homogeneity from HeLa nuclear extracts by a combination of standard chromatography and specific DNA affinity chromatography. Over a 400-fold purification of nuclear factor I, on the basis of the specific activity of both sequence-specific DNA binding and complementation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro, was affected by this purification. The most highly purified fraction was greatly enriched for a polypeptide of 160 kilodaltons on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, this protein cosedimented with specific DNA-binding activity on glycerol gradients. That this fraction indeed contained nuclear factor I was demonstrated by both DNase I footprinting and its function in the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Finally, the stoichiometry of specific DNA binding by nuclear factor I is shown to be most consistent with 2 mol of the 160-kilodalton polypeptide

  8. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Produces Long-Term Detrimental Effects in Spatial Memory and Modifies the Cellular Composition of the Subgranular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rodriguez, Sofia; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Luquin, Sonia; Ramos-Zuñiga, Rodrigo; Jauregui-Huerta, Fernando; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gonzalez-Castañeda, Rocio E.

    2016-01-01

    . Highlight Sleep deprivation affects spatial memory and proliferation in the dentate gyrus. To date it is unknown whether these deleterious effects are persistent over a long period of time. We analyzed the effects of sleep deprivation in the hippocampus after 21 days of recovery sleep. Our findings indicate that after sleep recovery, the detrimental effects of SD can be observed for at least 2 weeks, as shown by a reduction in memory performance, changes in the hippocampal cellular composition and higher apoptotic rate over a long period of time. PMID:27303266

  9. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Produces Long-Term Detrimental Effects in Spatial Memory and Modifies the Cellular Composition of the Subgranular Zone.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rodriguez, Sofia; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Luquin, Sonia; Ramos-Zuñiga, Rodrigo; Jauregui-Huerta, Fernando; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gonzalez-Castañeda, Rocio E

    2016-01-01

    . Highlight Sleep deprivation affects spatial memory and proliferation in the dentate gyrus. To date it is unknown whether these deleterious effects are persistent over a long period of time. We analyzed the effects of sleep deprivation in the hippocampus after 21 days of recovery sleep. Our findings indicate that after sleep recovery, the detrimental effects of SD can be observed for at least 2 weeks, as shown by a reduction in memory performance, changes in the hippocampal cellular composition and higher apoptotic rate over a long period of time. PMID:27303266

  10. A Rapid Genetic Assay for the Identification of the Most Common Pocillopora damicornis Genetic Lineages on the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Torda, Gergely; Schmidt-Roach, Sebastian; Peplow, Lesa M.; Lundgren, Petra; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Pocillopora damicornis (Linnaeus, 1758; Scleractinia, Pocilloporidae) has recently been found to comprise at least five distinct genetic lineages in Eastern Australia, some of which likely represent cryptic species. Due to similar and plastic gross morphology of these lineages, field identification is often difficult. Here we present a quick, cost effective genetic assay as well as three novel microsatellite markers that distinguish the two most common lineages found on the Great Barrier Reef. The assay is based on PCR amplification of two regions within the mitochondrial putative control region, which show consistent and easily identifiable fragment size differences for the two genetic lineages after Alu1 restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicons. PMID:23505507

  11. Rapid Identification of Pathogens in Positive Blood Culture of Patients with Sepsis: Review and Meta-Analysis of the Performance of the Sepsityper Kit

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Nils G.; Kostrzewa, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of deaths, and rapid identification (ID) of blood stream infection is mandatory to perform adequate antibiotic therapy. The advent of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry for the rapid ID of pathogens was a major breakthrough in microbiology. Recently, this method was combined with extraction methods for pathogens directly from positive blood cultures. This review summarizes the results obtained so far with the commercial Sepsityper sample preparation kit, which is now approved for in vitro diagnostic use. Summarizing data from 21 reports, the Sepsityper kit allowed a reliable ID on the species level of 80% of 3320 positive blood culture bottles. Gram negative bacteria resulted consistently in higher ID rates (90%) compared to Gram positive bacteria (76%) or yeast (66%). No relevant misidentifications on the genus level were reported at a log(score)cut-off of 1.6. The Sepsityper kit is a simple and reproducible method which extends the MALDI-TOF technology to positive blood culture specimens and shortens the time to result by several hours or even days. In combination with antibiotic stewardship programs, this rapid ID allows a much faster optimization of antibiotic therapy in patients with sepsis compared to conventional workflows. PMID:26000017

  12. Improved rapid and efficient method for Staphylococcus aureus DNA extraction from milk for identification of mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hirotaka; Inada, Mika; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Hashimoto, Michie; Ito, Keiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Nikaido, Masaru; Hayashi, Tomohito; Hata, Eiji; Katsuda, Ken; Kiku, Yoshio; Tagawa, Yuichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    A rapid and efficient DNA extraction method was developed for detecting mastitis pathogens in milk. The first critical step involved cell wall disruption by bead-beating, as physical disruption using beads was more effective for DNA extraction from Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, than enzymatic disruption using proteinase K. The second critical step involves the use of acetic acid and ammonium sulfate in the purification process, as these reagents effectively and efficiently remove the lipids and proteins in milk. Using these methods, DNA suitable for loop-mediated isothermal amplification was obtained within 30 min. Also, the rapid and sensitive detection of S. aureus in milk was possible at levels as low as 200 cfu/ml. PMID:25843742

  13. Rapid Method To Determine Intracellular Drug Concentrations in Cellular Uptake Assays: Application to Metformin in Organic Cation Transporter 1-Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Huan-Chieh; Zur, Arik A; Maurer, Tristan S; Yee, Sook Wah; Tolsma, John; Jasper, Paul; Scott, Dennis O; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    Because of the importance of intracellular unbound drug concentrations in the prediction of in vivo concentrations that are determinants of drug efficacy and toxicity, a number of assays have been developed to assess in vitro unbound concentrations of drugs. Here we present a rapid method to determine the intracellular unbound drug concentrations in cultured cells, and we apply the method along with a mechanistic model to predict concentrations of metformin in subcellular compartments of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Intracellular space (ICS) was calculated by subtracting the [(3)H]-inulin distribution volume (extracellular space, ECS) from the [(14)C]-urea distribution volume (total water space, TWS). Values obtained for intracellular space (mean ± S.E.M.; μl/10(6) cells) of monolayers of HEK cells (HEK-empty vector [EV]) and cells overexpressing human organic cation transporter 1 (HEK-OCT1), 1.21± 0.07 and 1.25±0.06, respectively, were used to determine the intracellular metformin concentrations. After incubation of the cells with 5 µM metformin, the intracellular concentrations were 26.4 ± 7.8 μM and 268 ± 11.0 μM, respectively, in HEK-EV and HEK-OCT1. In addition, intracellular metformin concentrations were lower in high K(+) buffer (140 mM KCl) compared with normal K(+) buffer (5.4 mM KCl) in HEK-OCT1 cells (54.8 ± 3.8 μM and 198.1 ± 11.2 μM, respectively; P < 0.05). Our mechanistic model suggests that, depending on the credible range of assumed physiologic values, the positively charged metformin accumulates to particularly high levels in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. This method together with the computational model can be used to determine intracellular unbound concentrations and to predict subcellular accumulation of drugs in other complex systems such as primary cells. PMID:26700958

  14. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  15. A rapid interleukin-6 bedside test for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation in preterm labor with intact membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chaemsaithong, Piya; Romero, Roberto; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Martinez-Varea, Alicia; Dong, Zhong; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Yeo, Lami

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Preterm birth is associated with 5–18% of pregnancies and is the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Amniotic fluid (AF) interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation, and patients with an elevated AF IL-6 are at risk for impending preterm delivery. However, results of the conventional method of measurement (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; ELISA) are usually not available in time to inform care. The objective of this study was to determine whether a point of care (POC) test or lateral-flow-based immunoassay for measurement of AF IL-6 concentrations can identify patients with intra-amniotic inflammation and/or infection and those destined to deliver spontaneously before term among women with preterm labor and intact membranes. Methods: One-hundred thirty-six women with singleton pregnancies who presented with symptoms of preterm labor and underwent amniocentesis were included in this study. Amniocentesis was performed at the time of diagnosis of preterm labor. AF Gram stain and AF white blood cell counts were determined. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) was defined according to the results of AF culture (aerobic and anaerobic as well as genital mycoplasmas). AF IL-6 concentrations were determined by both lateral flow-based immunoassay and ELISA. The primary outcome was intra-amniotic inflammation, defined as AF ELISA IL-6 ≥ 2600 pg/ml. Results: (1) AF IL-6 concentrations determined by a POC test have high sensitivity (93%), specificity (91%) and a positive likelihood ratio of 10 for the identification of intra-amniotic inflammation by using a threshold of 745 pg/ml; (2) the POC test and ELISA for IL-6 perform similarly in the identification of MIAC, acute inflammatory lesions of placenta and patients at risk of impending spontaneous preterm delivery. Conclusion: A POC AF IL-6 test can identify intra-amniotic inflammation in women who present with preterm

  16. Rapid identification of airborne biological particles by flow cytometry, gas chromatography, and genetic probes. Final report, January 1995-January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, C.H.; Carlon, H.R.; Edmonds, R.L.; Robert, L.; Blew, J.

    1997-09-01

    Detection of airborne biological particulates is a primary mission of the U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center biological defense program. If biological particles could be characterized according to their unique physical and biochemical profiles, detection and perhaps even identification of the particles might be possible. This study focused upon microbial particles, more specifically upon fungal spores, yeast cells, and bacterial cells. Physical characteristics of the particles, it was proposed, could be detected by flow cytometry, while their biochemical profiles could be determined by gas chromatography, and their genetic identity could be obtained by either a suitable genetic probe or by matching its genetic fingerprint. Genetic techniques were not attempted in the work reported here, but the approach was investigated further. Trial results were encouraging.

  17. Atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry for the rapid identification of pollens and semi-quantification of flavonoid fingerprints

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Miller, Lance L.; Parchert, Kylea J.; Hayes, Dulce; Hochrein, James M.

    2016-06-08

    From allergies to plant reproduction, pollens have important impacts on the health of human and plant populations, yet identification of pollen grains remains difficult and time-consuming. Low-volatility flavonoids generated from pollens cannot be easily characterized and quantified with current analytical techniques. Here we demonstrate the novel use of atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) for the characterization of flavonoids in pollens. Flavonoid patterns were generated for pollens collected from different plant types (trees and bushes) in addition to bee pollens from distinct geographic regions. Standard flavonoids (kaempferol and rhamnazin) and those produced from pollens were compared and assessed withmore » ASAP-MS using low-energy collision MS/MS. Results for a semi-quantitative method for assessing the amount of a flavonoid in pollens are also presented.« less

  18. Identification of rapidly induced genes in the response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) to water deficit and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an important crop, but droughts often affect peanut production. There is a lack of genomic information available for peanut; therefore, little is known about the molecular basis of its drought stress response. Results Previously, we found that peanut stomata close rapidly during water deficit and in response to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, and many genes show changes in their expression levels. To screen for candidate genes involved in the water deficit response, we used the Illumina HiSeq2000/MiSeq sequencing platform to conduct a global transcriptome analysis of peanut seedlings under water deficit with or without an ABA pretreatment. Three peanut tissues (leaves, roots, and stems) collected at each of three developmental stages (four-leaf, flowering, and podding stages) were used to construct sequence libraries. Then, 4.96 × 107 raw sequence reads were generated and the high quality reads were assembled into 47,842 unigenes. We analyzed these sequence libraries to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) under water deficit with or without ABA pretreatment. In total, 621 genes were induced rapidly (≥1.5 fold change compared with control) under water deficit, 2,665 genes were induced rapidly under water deficit + ABA pretreatment, and 279 genes overlapped between water deficit and water deficit + ABA pretreatment. Of the 279 overlapping genes, 264 showed the same expression pattern and 15 showed opposite expression patterns. Among the DEGs, 257 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit + ABA pretreatment, while 19 were highly induced (>5 fold) by water deficit alone. The genes induced under water deficit + ABA pretreatment included 100 putative transcription factor (TF) genes, while those induced under water deficit alone included only 22 putative TF genes. To validate the transcriptome results, we conducted quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to quantify the transcript levels of nine

  19. A multiplex PCR protocol for rapid identification of Candida glabrata and its phylogenetically related species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Scordino, Fabio; Pernice, Ida; Lo Passo, Carla; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a multiplex PCR protocol for the detection of Candida glabrata and its closely related species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis. The method uses four PCR primers, targeting the ITS1 region and the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene. The combination of these primers yielded unique results to all Candida species tested. The PCR assay we developed was found to be a rapid, specific and easy to perform method and it will be useful for characterizing large numbers of isolates for epidemiological studies. PMID:19635503

  20. A HRM Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid and Specific Identification of the Emerging Pest Spotted-Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii)

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Manpreet K.; Kumarasinghe, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    Spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) is an emerging pest that began spreading in 2008 and its distribution now includes 13 countries across two continents. Countries where it is established have reported significant economic losses of fresh produce, such as cherries due to this species of fly. At larval stages, it is impossible to identify due to its striking similarities with other cosmopolitan and harmless drosophilids. Molecular methods allow identification but the current technique of DNA barcoding is time consuming. We developed and validated a rapid, highly sensitive and specific assay based on real-time PCR and high resolution melt (HRM) analysis using EvaGreen DNA intercalating dye chemistry. Performance characteristics of this qualitative assay, validation and applicability in a New Zealand quarantine framework are discussed. Application of this robust and independently validated assay across the spectrum of key food production and border protection industries will allow us to reduce the further spread of this damaging species worldwide. PMID:24927410

  1. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  2. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2016-03-21

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  3. Rapid identification of adulterated cow milk by non-linear pattern recognition methods based on near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Guo; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Li-Jun; Xue, Zhi-Bin; Gu, Xin; Huang, Shi-Xin

    2014-02-15

    More than 800 representative milk samples, which consisted of 287 raw cow milk samples from different pastures surrounding Shanghai of China and 526 adulteration milk samples containing different pseudo proteins and thickeners, were collected and designed to demonstrate a method for rapidly discriminating adulterated milks based on near infrared (NIR) spectra. The NIR classification models were built by two non-linear supervised pattern recognition methods of improved support vector machine (I-SVM) and improved and simplified K nearest neighbours (IS-KNN). Uniform design theory was applied to optimize the parameters of SVM and thus the computation amount was reduced 90%. Both two methods exhibit good adaptability in discriminating adulterated milks from raw cow milks. Further investigation showed that the correction ratio for discriminating milk samples increased with the increasing of adulteration solutions' level in the adulterated milk. The concentration of adulterants is an important factor of influencing milk discrimination results of the NIR pattern recognition models. The results demonstrated the usefulness of NIR spectra combined with non-linear pattern recognition methods as an objective and rapid method for the authentication of complicated raw cow milks. PMID:24128487

  4. Rapid Identification of Fungi by Using the ITS2 Genetic Region and an Automated Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis System

    PubMed Central

    Turenne, Christine Y.; Sanche, Steven E.; Hoban, Daryl J.; Karlowsky, James A.; Kabani, Amin M.

    1999-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease often plays an important role in the morbidity and mortality of immunocompromised patients. The poor sensitivity of current fungal blood culture and histological practices has led to the development of highly sensitive and specific molecular techniques, such as the PCR. Sequence variability of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of fungi is potentially useful in rapid and accurate diagnosis of clinical fungal isolates. PCR with fungus-specific primers targeted toward conserved sequences of the 5.8S and 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) results in amplification of the species-specific ITS2 regions, which are variable in amplicon length. We have made use of the ABI PRISM 310 genetic analyzer and the ABI PRISM 310 GeneScan analysis software for the determination of variable size differences of the ITS2 region of clinically important fungi, including Candida and non-Candida yeasts, Aspergillus species, and a variety of dermatophytes. No cross-reaction occurred when samples were tested against human and bacterial genomic DNA. We have found that most clinically significant fungal isolates can be differentiated by this method, and it therefore serves to be a promising tool for the rapid (<7 h) diagnosis of fungemia and other invasive fungal infections. PMID:10325335

  5. Rapid identification of thousands of copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) microsatellite loci from modest amounts of 454 shotgun genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Poole, Alexander W; Gu, Wanjun; Jason de Koning, A P; Daza, Juan M; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2010-03-01

    Optimal integration of next-generation sequencing into mainstream research requires re-evaluation of how problems can be reasonably overcome and what questions can be asked. One potential application is the rapid acquisition of genomic information to identify microsatellite loci for evolutionary, population genetic and chromosome linkage mapping research on non-model and not previously sequenced organisms. Here, we report on results using high-throughput sequencing to obtain a large number of microsatellite loci from the venomous snake Agkistrodon contortrix, the copperhead. We used the 454 Genome Sequencer FLX next-generation sequencing platform to sample randomly ∼27 Mbp (128 773 reads) of the copperhead genome, thus sampling about 2% of the genome of this species. We identified microsatellite loci in 11.3% of all reads obtained, with 14 612 microsatellite loci identified in total, 4564 of which had flanking sequences suitable for polymerase chain reaction primer design. The random sequencing-based approach to identify microsatellites was rapid, cost-effective and identified thousands of useful microsatellite loci in a previously unstudied species. PMID:21565030

  6. A rapid and reliable PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker for the identification of Amaranthus cruentus species

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Nishikawa, Tomotaro; Matsushima, Kenichi; Minami, Mineo; Nemoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and reliable PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker was developed to identify the Amaranthus cruentus species by comparing sequences of the starch branching enzyme (SBE) locus among the three cultivated grain amaranths. We determined the partial SBE genomic sequence in 72 accessions collected from diverse locations around the world by direct sequence analysis. Then, we aligned the gene sequences and searched for restriction enzyme cleavage sites specific to each species for use in the PCR-RFLP analysis. The result indicated that MseI would recognize the sequence 5′-T/TAA-3′ in intron 11 from A. cruentus SBE. A restriction analysis of the amplified 278-bp portion of the SBE gene using the MseI restriction enzyme resulted in species-specific RFLP patterns among A. cruentus, Amaranthus caudatus and Amaranthus hypochondriacus. Two different bands, 174-bp and 104-bp, were generated in A. cruentus, while A. caudatus and A. hypochondriacus remained undigested (278-bp). Thus, we propose that the PCR-RFLP analysis of the amaranth SBE gene provides a sensitive, rapid, simple and useful technique for identifying the A. cruentus species among the cultivated grain amaranths. PMID:25914599

  7. Advantages of Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Diagnostic Tool for Identification of Yeasts and Mycobacteria in the Clinical Microbiological Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Woo, Wai-Lan; Yan, Mei-Kum; Choi, Garnet K. Y.; Ho, Pak-Leung; Cheng, Vincent C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast and mycobacteria can cause infections in immunocompromised patients and normal hosts. The rapid identification of these organisms can significantly improve patient care. There has been an increasing number of studies on using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid yeast and mycobacterial identifications. However, studies on direct comparisons between the Bruker Biotyper and bioMérieux Vitek MS systems for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria have been limited. This study compared the performance of the two systems in their identification of 98 yeast and 102 mycobacteria isolates. Among the 98 yeast isolates, both systems generated species-level identifications in >70% of the specimens, of which Candida albicans was the most commonly cultured species. At a genus-level identification, the Biotyper system identified more isolates than the Vitek MS system for Candida (75/78 [96.2%]versus 68/78 [87.2%], respectively; P = 0.0426) and non-Candida yeasts (18/20 [90.0%]versus 7/20 [35.0%], respectively; P = 0.0008). For mycobacterial identification, the Biotyper system generated reliable identifications for 89 (87.3%) and 64 (62.8%) clinical isolates at the genus and species levels, respectively, from solid culture media, whereas the Vitek MS system did not generate any reliable identification. The MS method differentiated 12/21 clinical species, despite the fact that no differentiation between Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae was found by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method provides short turnaround times and a standardized working protocol for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria. Our study demonstrates that MALDI-TOF MS is suitable as a first-line test for the identification of yeast and mycobacteria in clinical laboratories. PMID:24048537

  8. Rapid Identification and Drug Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Standard Operating Procedure for Non-Commercial Assays: Part 2: Nitrate Reductase Assay v1.3.12

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Kumar, Parveen; Sharma, Shreya; Mumbowa, Francis; Martin, Anandi; Durier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    In the previous part, we presented the standard operating procedure (SOP) of the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay drug susceptibility testing (DST) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The present SOP is devoted to another non-commercial culture and DST method known as nitrate reductase assay (NRA). As the name implies, the NRA detects the ability of M. tuberculosis to reduce nitrate to nitrite. In the assay, the presence of nitrite is detected by the addition of p-nitrobenzoate into the growth yield. The reaction is detected by the naked eye. The incorporation of drugs in the medium allows to use the test for DST, which can be interpreted with naked eyes. The identification and drug susceptibility results can be obtained in 2-3 weeks. This SOP document has been developed through the culture and DST subgroup of the STOP tuberculosis (TB) Partnership New Diagnostic Working Group. It is intended for laboratories that would want to use or already using this rapid non-commercial method for culture identification and DST of M. tuberculosis, notably in resource-constraint settings in Asia and Africa. PMID:23440455

  9. Rapid identification of amino acid types in proteins using phase modulated 2D HN(CACB) and 2D HN(COCACB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Abhinav; Mondal, Somnath; Chandra, Kousik; Atreya, Hanudatta S.

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple approach to rapidly identify amino acid types in proteins from a 2D spectrum. The method is based on the fact that 13Cβ chemical shifts of different amino acid types fall in distinct spectral regions. By evolving the 13C chemical shifts in the conventional HNCACB or HN(CO)CACB type experiment for a single specified delay period, the phase of the cross peaks of different amino acid residues are modulated depending on their 13Cβ shift values. Following this specified evolution period, the 2D HN projections of these experiments are acquired. The 13C evolution period can be chosen such that all residues belonging to a given set of amino acid types have the same phase pattern (positive or negative) facilitating their identification. This approach does not require the preparation of any additional samples, involves the analysis of 2D [15N-1H] HSQC-type spectra obtained from the routinely used triple resonance experiments with minor modifications, and is applicable to deuterated proteins. The method will be useful for quick assignment of signals that shift during ligand binding or in combination with selective labeling/unlabeling approaches for identification of amino acid types to aid the sequential assignment process.

  10. Accuracy of the VITEK® 2 system for a rapid and direct identification and susceptibility testing of Gramnegative rods and Gram-positive cocci in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Nimer, N A; Al-Saa'da, R J; Abuelaish, O

    2016-03-01

    The performance of the VITEK® 2 system for direct rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria responsible for blood infections was determined. The isolates studied included 166 Gram-negative rods and 74 Gram-positive cocci from inpatients. Specially treated monomicrobial samples from positive blood culture bottles were directly inoculated into the VITEK 2 system and the results were compared with those from cards inoculated with standardized bacterial suspensions. Compared with the standard method, 95.8% of Gram-negative rods were correctly identified by VITEK 2 and the overall level of agreement between the two methods in susceptibility testing was 92.0%. For Gram-positive bacteria, 89.2% were correctly identified by VITEK 2 and susceptibility testing revealed an overall agreement rate of 91.3%. These results suggest that VITEK 2 cards inoculated with fluids sampled directly from positive blood culture bottles are suitable for speedy identification and susceptibility testing of Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci. PMID:27334076

  11. Rapid Identification and Drug Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Standard Operating Procedure for Non-Commercial Assays: Part 3: Colorimetric Redox Indicator Assay v1.3.12

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Kumar, Parveen; Sharma, Shreya; Mumbowa, Francis; Martin, Anandi; Durier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The previous two standard operating procedures (SOPs) related to the culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (Part 1) and nitrate reductase assay (Part 2). The present SOP is devoted to a third non-commercial culture and DST method known as colorimetric redox indicator assay (CRI). As its name indicates, the CRI detects the ability of the M. tuberculosis to reduce the colored oxidation-reduction indicator when added to a liquid culture of M. tuberculosis, after exposing the growth to different anti-mycobacterial drugs. The change in the color of the indicator denotes the proportionate number of viable Mycobacteria in the medium. The identification and DST results can be obtained in 7-8 days. This SOP document has been developed through the culture and DST subgroup of the STOP tuberculosis (TB) Partnership New Diagnostic Working Group. It is intended for laboratories that would want to use or already use this rapid non-commercial method for culture identification and DST of M. tuberculosis, notably in resource-constraint settings in Asia and Africa. PMID:23440615

  12. Rapid identification of amino acid types in proteins using phase modulated 2D HN(CACB) and 2D HN(COCACB).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Mondal, Somnath; Chandra, Kousik; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple approach to rapidly identify amino acid types in proteins from a 2D spectrum. The method is based on the fact that (13)C(β) chemical shifts of different amino acid types fall in distinct spectral regions. By evolving the (13)C chemical shifts in the conventional HNCACB or HN(CO)CACB type experiment for a single specified delay period, the phase of the cross peaks of different amino acid residues are modulated depending on their (13)C(β) shift values. Following this specified evolution period, the 2D HN projections of these experiments are acquired. The (13)C evolution period can be chosen such that all residues belonging to a given set of amino acid types have the same phase pattern (positive or negative) facilitating their identification. This approach does not require the preparation of any additional samples, involves the analysis of 2D [(15)N-(1)H] HSQC-type spectra obtained from the routinely used triple resonance experiments with minor modifications, and is applicable to deuterated proteins. The method will be useful for quick assignment of signals that shift during ligand binding or in combination with selective labeling/unlabeling approaches for identification of amino acid types to aid the sequential assignment process. PMID:27078090

  13. Rapid Identification of Bacteria Directly from Positive Blood Cultures by Use of a Serum Separator Tube, Smudge Plate Preparation, and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Porter, Vanessa; Mubareka, Samira; Kotowich, Leona; Simor, Andrew E

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of smudge plate growth for bacterial identification from 400 blood cultures. Ninety-seven percent of Gram-negative bacilli and 85% of Gram-positive organisms were correctly identified within 4 h; only eight isolates (2.0%) were misidentified. This method provided rapid and accurate microbial identification from positive blood cultures. PMID:26202115

  14. Rapid identification of Aedes albopictus, Aedes scutellaris, and Aedes aegypti life stages using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lydia A; Davis, Joseph B; Hapgood, George; Whelan, Peter I; Smith, Greg A; Ritchie, Scott A; Cooper, R D; van den Hurk, Andrew F

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, a widespread infestation of Aedes albopictus was discovered in the Torres Strait, the region between northern Australia and New Guinea. To contain this species, an eradication program was implemented in 2006. However, the progress of this program is impeded by the difficulty of morphologically separating Ae. albopictus larvae from the endemic species Aedes scutellaris. In this study, three real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assays that target the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 region were developed to rapidly identify Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, and Ae. scutellaris from northern Australia. Individual eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults, as well as the species composition of mixed pools were accurately identified. The assay method was validated using 703 field-collected specimens from the Torres Strait. PMID:19052295

  15. Rapid identification of myxoma virus variants by long-range PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kevin P; Ringleb, Franziska; Martín Alonso, Jose Manuel; Parra, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    A long-range PCR method directed at the Myxoma virus (MV) left hand and right hand terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) for rapid amplification of genomic DNA and MV isolate differentiation by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis is described. The efficacy of this method was tested by comparing the results from full genome RFLPs with those from TIRs amplified separately using reference strain Lausanne (Lu) and a field MV strain characterised previously for its virulence in rabbits. The usefulness of this method was also demonstrated by amplifying MV DNA directly from the eyelid tissue of an infected rabbit and comparative RFLP analysis with respect to Lu. The results proved the long-range PCR technique to be a simple highly efficient method for identifying mutations between MV genomes by RFLP analyses of the amplified TIRs and may be used in future studies to identify variable regions for phylogenetic studies. PMID:19591871

  16. Rapid and sensitive identification of the herbal tea ingredient Taraxacum formosanum using loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guan-Hua; Chao, Jung; Lin, Ming-Kuem; Chang, Wen-Te; Peng, Wen-Huang; Sun, Fang-Chun; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Lee, Meng-Shiou

    2015-01-01

    Taraxacum formosanum (TF) is a medicinal plant used as an important component of health drinks in Taiwan. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for authenticating TF was established. A set of four specific LAMP primers was designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) of TF. LAMP amplicons were successfully amplified and detected when purified genomic DNA of TF was added in the LAMP reaction under isothermal condition (65 °C) within 45 min. These specific LAMP primers have high specificity and can accurately discriminate Taraxacum formosanum from other adulterant plants; 1 pg of genomic DNA was determined to be the detection limit of the LAMP assay. In conclusion, using this novel approach, TF and its misused plant samples obtained from herbal tea markets were easily identified and discriminated by LAMP assay for quality control. PMID:25584616

  17. Identification of pathogenic Leptospira genospecies by continuous monitoring of fluorogenic hybridization probes during rapid-cycle PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, T H; Patel, B K; Smythe, L D; Symonds, M L; Norris, M A; Dohnt, M F

    1997-01-01

    Partial sequences of 23S rRNA gene PCR products from 23 strains of 6 pathogenic Leptospira genospecies and from 8 strains of the saprophytic Leptospira biflexa were determined. Sequence analyses enabled Leptospira genus-specific amplification primers and pathogen-specific fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to be designed and synthesized. A PCR protocol was developed in which changes in fluorescence emission resulting from specific annealing of fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to the target DNA were continuously monitored. Nine strains of the pathogenic Leptospira genospecies could be differentiated from Leptonema illini, Escherichia coli, and eight strains of Leptospira biflexa. The PCR method was rapid, requiring 18 min for the completion of 45 cycles. It was also simple and flexible, as DNA templates prepared by four different methods, including the simple boiling method, could be used without adverse effects. Two hundred copies of target, equivalent to 100 cells, could be detected. PMID:9399509

  18. Rapid Virulence Annotation (RVA): Identification of virulence factors using a bacterial genome library and multiple invertebrate hosts

    PubMed Central

    Waterfield, Nicholas R.; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Dowling, Andrea; Yang, Guowei; Wilkinson, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Bode, Helge B.; Dorus, Steven; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    Current sequence databases now contain numerous whole genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria. However, many of the predicted genes lack any functional annotation. We describe an assumption-free approach, Rapid Virulence Annotation (RVA), for the high-throughput parallel screening of genomic libraries against four different taxa: insects, nematodes, amoeba, and mammalian macrophages. These hosts represent different aspects of both the vertebrate and invertebrate immune system. Here, we apply RVA to the emerging human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica using “gain of toxicity” assays of recombinant Escherichia coli clones. We describe a wealth of potential virulence loci and attribute biological function to several putative genomic islands, which may then be further characterized using conventional molecular techniques. The application of RVA to other pathogen genomes promises to ascribe biological function to otherwise uncharacterized virulence genes. PMID:18838673

  19. Rapid identification of molecular changes in tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn) upon ageing using leaf spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Depanjan; Srimany, Amitava; Pradeep, T

    2012-10-01

    Tulsi or Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum Linn) is a medicinally important plant. Ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) are among its major constituents which account for many medicinal activities of the plant. In the present work, we deployed a new ambient ionization method, leaf spray ionization, for rapid detection of UA, OA and their oxidation products from tulsi leaves. Tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been performed on tulsi leaf extracts in methanol to establish the identity of the compounds. We probed changes occurring in the relative amounts of the parent compounds (UA and OA) with their oxidized products and the latter show an increasing trend upon ageing. The findings are verified by ESI-MS analysis of tulsi leaf extracts, which shows the same trend proving the reliability of the leaf spray method. PMID:22900261

  20. Rapid and Sensitive Identification of the Herbal Tea Ingredient Taraxacum formosanum Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Guan-Hua; Chao, Jung; Lin, Ming-Kuem; Chang, Wen-Te; Peng, Wen-Huang; Sun, Fang-Chun; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Lee, Meng-Shiou

    2015-01-01

    Taraxacum formosanum (TF) is a medicinal plant used as an important component of health drinks in Taiwan. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for authenticating TF was established. A set of four specific LAMP primers was designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) of TF. LAMP amplicons were successfully amplified and detected when purified genomic DNA of TF was added in the LAMP reaction under isothermal condition (65 °C) within 45 min. These specific LAMP primers have high specificity and can accurately discriminate Taraxacum formosanum from other adulterant plants; 1 pg of genomic DNA was determined to be the detection limit of the LAMP assay. In conclusion, using this novel approach, TF and its misused plant samples obtained from herbal tea markets were easily identified and discriminated by LAMP assay for quality control. PMID:25584616

  1. Rapid identification of dengue virus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using field-deployable instrumentation.

    PubMed

    McAvin, James C; Escamilla, Elizabeth M; Blow, Jamie A; Turell, Michael J; Quintana, Miguel; Bowles, David E; Swaby, James A; Barnes, William J; Huff, William B; Lohman, Kenton L; Atchley, Daniel H; Hickman, John R; Niemeyer, Debra M

    2005-12-01

    Dengue virus universal and dengue serotype 1 to 4, fluorogenic probe hydrolysis (TaqMan), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays were developed for screening and serotype identification of infected mosquito vectors and human sera using a field-deployable, fluorometric thermocycler. Dengue universal and dengue 1 to 4 serotype assay in vitro sensitivity and specificity results were 100% concordant when tested with total nucleic acid extracts of multiple strains of dengue serotype 1 to 4, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses. The in vitro sensitivity and specificity results for all five assays were concordant when tested with a blind panel of 27 dengue virus-infected mosquitoes, 21 non-dengue (yellow fever, West Nile, or St. Louis encephalitis) flavivirus-infected mosquitoes, and 11 uninfected mosquitoes and with clinical specimens consisting of a human serum panel of eight dengue viremic and 31 non-dengue-infected febrile patient serum samples. No cross-reaction occurred with vector species or human genomic DNA. Sample processing and polymerase chain reaction required <2 hours. PMID:16491947

  2. Microbiological diagnosis of Eggerthella lenta blood culture isolates in a Swedish tertiary hospital: Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profile.

    PubMed

    Liderot, Karin; Ratcliffe, Paul; Lüthje, Petra; Thidholm, Ellinor; Özenci, Volkan

    2016-04-01

    Eggerthella lenta is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacillus. Improved diagnostics and increased awareness of rare pathogens have revealed its potential to cause serious invasive infections. In this study, 18 clinical E. lenta isolates derived from positive blood cultures were included. Underlying problems of the patients were in the majority of cases related to the gastrointestinal tract. The performance of two MALDI-TOF MS systems, i.e. Bruker and Vitek MS, in identification of E. lenta was analyzed. In addition, the minimal inhibitory concentrations for clinically relevant antimicrobial agents were determined by routine procedures using E-test. 17 of the 18 E. lenta isolates investigated in this study were correctly identified to species level by the Bruker MS system, while the Vitek MS system identified all 18 isolates. Antimicrobial sensitivity towards the tested agents was in general good. However, high resistance rates were observed for penicillin G and piperacillin-tazobactam based on EUCAST breakpoints. PMID:26612006

  3. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  4. Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid and Specific Identification of ACT Producing Alternaria alternata, the Agent of Brown Spot Disease in Tangerine.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Hamid; Moradi, Amir; Hamedi, Javad; Basiri, Mina

    2016-03-01

    Rapid, accurate, and easy identification of pathogenic agents has always been important in medicine, veterinary, and agriculture. The brown spot infection is among the most common diseases in tangerine caused by Alternaria alternata. Due to the existence of seven various pathotypes of A. alternata species, it is challenging and time consuming to detect a pathotype responsible for citrus brown spot. In this study, we were seeking a rapid and specific approach to identify the tangerine pathotype within the A. alternata-pathogenic species, using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method and actts2 gene as a marker molecule. Nine pathogenic samples were obtained from the region of Ramsar, Iran, and certified as A. alternata-pathogenic isolates. Specific primers were designed for regions coding for Alternaria citri toxin (ACT), and the PCR and LAMP reactions were performed. Our data showed that the primers designed for the tangerine pathotype of A. alternata were specific, and in both reactions, positive results were only observed in desired pathotypes. In the other pathotypes of this species as well as other standard fungal samples as negative controls, no positive result was observed. Therefore, our results suggest the possibility to detect the tangerine-specific A. alternata pathotype from other related species with a high accuracy and in early stages of the disease. PMID:26638210

  5. Use of a Conformational Switching Aptamer for Rapid and Specific Ex Vivo Identification of Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Mooney, Michael A.; Joy, Anna; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.; Anderson, Trent; Yan, Hao; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Improved tools for providing specific intraoperative diagnoses could improve patient care. In neurosurgery, intraoperatively differentiating non-operative lesions such as CNS B-cell lymphoma from operative lesions can be challenging, often necessitating immunohistochemical (IHC) procedures which require up to 24-48 hours. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of generating rapid ex vivo specific labeling using a novel lymphoma-specific fluorescent switchable aptamer. Our B-cell lymphoma-specific switchable aptamer produced only low-level fluorescence in its unbound conformation and generated an 8-fold increase in fluorescence once bound to its target on CD20-positive lymphoma cells. The aptamer demonstrated strong binding to B-cell lymphoma cells within 15 minutes of incubation as observed by flow cytometry. We applied the switchable aptamer to ex vivo xenograft tissue harboring B-cell lymphoma and astrocytoma, and within one hour specific visual identification of lymphoma was routinely possible. In this proof-of-concept study in human cell culture and orthotopic xenografts, we conclude that a fluorescent switchable aptamer can provide rapid and specific labeling of B-cell lymphoma, and that developing aptamer-based labeling approaches could simplify tissue staining and drastically reduce time to histopathological diagnoses compared with IHC-based methods. We propose that switchable aptamers could enhance expeditious, accurate intraoperative decision-making. PMID:25876071

  6. Rapid detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples by high resolution melting real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  7. An approach for rapid development of nasal delivery of analgesics--identification of relevant features, in vitro screening and in vivo verification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Chow, Moses S S; Zuo, Zhong

    2011-11-25

    Drug delivery via the nasal route is gaining increasing interest over the last two decades as an alternative to oral or parenteral drug administration. In the current study an approach for rapid identification of relevant features, screening and in vivo verification of potential therapeutic agents for nasal delivery was carried out using "analgesic agents" as an example. Four such drug candidates (rizatriptan, meloxicam, lornoxicam and nebivolol) were initially identified as potentially viable agents based on their therapeutic use and physicochemical characteristics. An in vitro screening was then carried out using the Calu-3 cell line model. Based on the in vitro screening results and the reported pharmacokinetic and the stability data, meloxicam was predicted to be the most promising drug candidate and was subsequently verified using an in vivo animal model. The in vivo results showed that nasal administration of meloxicam was comparable to its intravenous administration, with respect to plasma drug concentration and AUC(0-2h). In addition, nasal absorption of meloxicam was much more rapid with higher plasma drug concentration and AUC(0-2h) than that of oral administration. The current approach appears to be capable of developing "analgesic agents" suitable for nasal delivery. Further studies are needed to prove the clinical advantage of the specific selected agent, meloxicam, by nasal administration in patients. PMID:21871544

  8. Rapid identification of a novel complex I MT-ND3 m.10134C>A mutation in a Leigh syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Miller, David K; Menezes, Minal J; Simons, Cas; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Grimmond, Sean M; Thorburn, David R; Christodoulou, John; Taft, Ryan J

    2014-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive multi-system neurodegenerative disorder, the genetics of which is frequently difficult to resolve. Rapid determination of the genetic etiology of LS in a 5-year-old girl facilitated inclusion in Edison Pharmaceutical's phase 2B clinical trial of EPI-743. SNP-arrays and high-coverage whole exome sequencing were performed on the proband, both parents and three unaffected siblings. Subsequent multi-tissue targeted high-depth mitochondrial sequencing was performed using custom long-range PCR amplicons. Tissue-specific mutant load was also assessed by qPCR. Complex I was interrogated by spectrophotometric enzyme assays and Western Blot. No putatively causal mutations were identified in nuclear-encoded genes. Analysis of low-coverage off-target mitochondrial reads revealed a previously unreported mitochondrial mutation in the proband in MT-ND3 (m.10134C>A, p.Q26K), a Complex I mitochondrial gene previously associated with LS. Targeted investigations demonstrated that this mutation was 1% heteroplasmic in the mother's blood and homoplasmic in the proband's blood, fibroblasts, liver and muscle. Enzyme assays revealed decreased Complex I activity. The identification of this novel LS MT-ND3 variant, the genomics of which was accomplished in less than 3.5 weeks, indicates that rapid genomic approaches may prove useful in time-sensitive cases with an unresolved genetic diagnosis. PMID:25118196

  9. Rapid Detection and Identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, B. pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in Mosquito Vectors and Blood Samples by High Resolution Melting Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Kaewkong, Worasak; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Choochote, Wej

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and high-throughput method for detection and identification of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, and Dirofilaria immitis in mosquito vectors and blood samples was developed using a real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Amplicons of the 4 filarial species were generated from 5S rRNA and spliced leader sequences by the real-time PCR and their melting temperatures were determined by the HRM method. Melting of amplicons from W. bancrofti, B. malayi, D. immitis, and B. pahangi peaked at 81.5±0.2℃, 79.0±0.3℃, 76.8±0.1℃, and 79.9±0.1℃, respectively. This assay is relatively cheap since it does not require synthesis of hybridization probes. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100%. It is a rapid and technically simple approach, and an important tool for population surveys as well as molecular xenomonitoring of parasites in vectors. PMID:24516268

  10. Novel, rapid DNA-based on-chip bacterial identification system combining dielectrophoresis and amplification-free fluorescent resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Michelle M.; Shusteff, Maxim; Alocilja, Evangelyn

    2011-10-01

    Although real-time PCR (RT-PCR) has become a diagnostic standard for rapid identification of bacterial species, typical methods remain time-intensive due to sample preparation and amplification cycle times. The assay described in this work incorporates on-chip dielectrophoretic capture and concentration of bacterial cells, thermal lysis, cell permeabilization, and nucleic acid denaturation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assisted in-situ hybridization (FRET-ISH) species identification. Identification is achieved completely on chip in less than thirty minutes from receipt of sample compared to multiple hours required by traditional RT-PCR and its requisite sample preparation.

  11. Rapid identification of siderophores by combined thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hayen, Heiko; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of a combined thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (TLC/MALDI-MS) method for the analysis of siderophores from microbial samples is described. The investigated siderophores were enterobactin, ferrioxamine B, ferrichrome, ferrirhodin, rhodotorulic acid and coprogen. Solid-phase extraction was employed to recover the siderophores from the microbial samples. After visualization of the spots via spraying with ferric chloride or chrome azurol sulfonate assay solution, the MALDI matrix was applied to the gel surface. Several TLC/MALDI experimental parameters were optimized, such as type and concentration of MALDI matrix, as well as the type and composition of solvent to facilitate analyte transport from the inside of the TLC gel to the surface. The impact of these parameters on sensitivity, precision and ion formation of the various siderophores was studied. The detection limits for the investigated siderophores were in the range 1-4 pmol. These values were about 4-24 times higher than the detection limits obtained directly from stainless steel MALDI targets. The differences were most likely due to incomplete transport of the 'trapped' analyte molecules from the deeper layers of the TLC gel to the surface and into the matrix layer. In addition, chromatographic band broadening spread the analyte further in TLC as compared with the steel plates, resulting in less analyte per surface area. The identification of the siderophores was aided by concurrently applying a Ga(III) nitrate solution to the TLC plate during the visualization step. The resulting formation of Ga(III) complexes lead to distinctive (69)Ga/(71)Ga isotope patterns in the mass spectra. The versatility of the TLC/MALDI-MS assay was demonstrated by using it to analyze siderophores in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa sample. An iron-binding compound was identified in the sample, namely pyochelin (2-(2-o-hydroxyphenyl-2-thiazolin-4-yl)-3

  12. Use of a Suspension Array for Rapid Identification of the Varieties and Genotypes of the Cryptococcus neoformans Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Mara R.; Fell, Jack W.

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungal pathogen known to cause severe disease in immunocompromised patients. The disease, cryptococcosis, is mostly acquired by inhalation and can result in a chronic meningoencephalitis, which can be fatal. Here, we describe a molecular method to identify the varieties and genotypic groups within the C. neoformans species complex from culture-based assays. The method employs a novel flow cytometer with a dual laser system that allows the simultaneous detection of different target sequences in a multiplex and high-throughput format. The assay uses a liquid suspension hybridization format with specific oligonucleotide probes that are covalently bound to the surface of fluorescent color-coded microspheres. Biotinylated target amplicons, which hybridized to their complementary probe sequences, are quantified by the addition of the conjugate, streptavidin R-phycoerythrin. In this study we developed and validated eight probes derived from sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene region. The assay proved to be specific and sensitive, allowed discrimination of a 1-bp mismatch with no apparent cross-reactivity, and detected 101 to 103 genome copies. The described protocol, which can be used directly with yeast cells or isolated DNA, can be undertaken in less than 1 h following PCR amplification and permits identification of species in a multiplex format. In addition to a multiplex capability, the assay allows the simultaneous detection of target sequences in a single reaction. The accuracy, speed, flexibility, and sensitivity of this technology are a few of the advantages that will make this assay useful for the diagnosis of human cryptococcal infections and other pathogenic diseases. PMID:16081894

  13. Impact of the Mycobaterium africanum West Africa 2 Lineage on TB Diagnostics in West Africa: Decreased Sensitivity of Rapid Identification Tests in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Anyinam, Boatema; Kanuteh, Fatoumatta; Okoi, Catherine; Dolganov, Gregory; Schoolnik, Gary; Secka, Ousman; Antonio, Martin; de Jong, Bouke C.; Gehre, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background MPT64 rapid speciation tests are increasingly being used in diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). Mycobacterium africanum West Africa 2 (Maf 2) remains an important cause of TB in West Africa and causes one third of disease in The Gambia. Since the introduction of MPT64 antigen tests, a higher than expected rate of suspected non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) was seen among AFB smear positive TB suspects, which led us to prospectively assess sensitivity of the MPT64 antigen test in our setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the abundance of mRNA encoded by the mpt64 gene in sputa of patients with u