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Sample records for rapid cycling bubble

  1. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  2. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be rapid, ultra-rapid or ultradian cycling. Biological rhythm disturbances: This theory proposes that people with rapid cycling have daily biological rhythms that are out of sync with typical “ ...

  3. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  4. Rapid compressions in a captive bubble apparatus are isothermal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenfei; Hall, Stephen B

    2003-11-01

    Captive bubbles are commonly used to determine how interfacial films of pulmonary surfactant respond to changes in surface area, achieved by varying hydrostatic pressure. Although assumed to be isothermal, the gas phase temperature (Tg) would increase by >100 degrees C during compression from 1 to 3 atm if the process were adiabatic. To determine the actual change in temperature, we monitored pressure (P) and volume (V) during compressions lasting <1 s for bubbles with and without interfacial films and used P x V to evaluate Tg. P x V fell during and after the rapid compressions, consistent with reductions in n, the moles of gas phase molecules, because of increasing solubility in the subphase at higher P. As expected for a process with first-order kinetics, during 1 h after the rapid compression P x V decreased along a simple exponential curve. The temporal variation of n moles of gas was determined from P x V >10 min after the compression when the two phases should be isothermal. Back extrapolation of n then allowed calculation of Tg from P x V immediately after the compression. Our results indicate that for bubbles with or without interfacial films compressed to >3 atm within 1 s, the change in Tg is <2 degrees C. PMID:12871969

  5. Handling cycle slips in GPS data during ionospheric plasma bubble events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banville, S.; Langley, R. B.; Saito, S.; Yoshihara, T.

    2010-12-01

    During disturbed ionospheric conditions such as the occurrence of plasma bubbles, the phase and amplitude of the electromagnetic waves transmitted by GPS satellites undergo rapid fluctuations called scintillation. When this phenomenon is observed, GPS receivers are more prone to signal tracking interruptions, which prevent continuous measurement of the total electron content (TEC) between a satellite and the receiver. In order to improve TEC monitoring, a study was conducted with the goal of reducing the effects of signal tracking interruptions by correcting for "cycle slips," an integer number of carrier wavelengths not measured by the receiver during a loss of signal lock. In this paper, we review existing cycle-slip correction methods, showing that the characteristics associated with ionospheric plasma bubbles (rapid ionospheric delay fluctuations, data gaps, increased noise, etc.) prevent reliable correction of cycle slips. Then, a reformulation of the "geometry-free" model conventionally used for ionospheric studies with GPS is presented. Geometric information is used to obtain single-frequency estimates of TEC variations during momentary L2 signal interruptions, which also provides instantaneous cycle-slip correction capabilities. The performance of this approach is assessed using data collected on Okinawa Island in Japan during a plasma bubble event that occurred on 23 March 2004. While an improvement in the continuity of TEC time series is obtained, we question the reliability of any cycle-slip correction technique when discontinuities on both GPS legacy frequencies occur simultaneously for more than a few seconds.

  6. Helium bubble linkage and the transition to rapid He release in aging Pd tritide.

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2006-02-01

    A model is presented for the linking of helium bubbles growing in aging metal tritides. Stresses created by neighboring bubbles are found to produce bubble growth toward coalescence. This process is interrupted by the fracture of ligaments between bubble arrays. The condition for ligament fracture percolates through the material to reach external surfaces, leading to material micro-cracking and the release of helium within the linked-bubble cluster. A comparison of pure coalescence and pure fracture mechanisms shows the critical HeM concentration for bubble linkage is not strongly dependent on details of the linkage process. The combined stress-directed growth and fracture process produces predictions for the onset of rapid He release and the He emission rate. Transition to this rapid release state is determined from the physical size of the linked-bubble clusters, which is calculated from dimensional invariants in classical percolation theory. The result is a transition that depends on material dimensions. The onset of bubble linkage and rapid He release are found to be quite sensitive to the bubble spacing distribution, which is log-normal for bubbles nucleated by self-trapping.

  7. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  8. OPTICAL FACTORS IN THE RAPID ANALYSIS OF CAPTIVE BUBBLES

    PubMed Central

    Khoojinian, Hamed; Goodarzi, Jim P.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles and droplets offer multiple advantages over Langmuir troughs for compressing interfacial films. Experiments, however, that manipulate films to maintain constant surface tension (γ) present problems because they require feedback. Measurements of bubbles and droplets calculate γ from the shape of the interface, and calculations in real time based on finding the Laplacian shape that best fits the interface can be difficult. Faster methods obtain γ from only the height and diameter, but the bubbles and droplets rest against a solid support, which obscures one section of the interface and complicates measurements of the height. The experiments here investigated a series of optical variables that affect the visualized location of the different surfaces for captive bubbles. The pitch of the support and camera as well as the collimation of illuminating light affected the accuracy of the measured dimensions. The wavelength of illumination altered the opacity of turbid subphases and hydrated gel used to form the solid support. The width of all visualized edges depended on the spectral width and collimation of the illuminating light. The intensity of illumination had little effect on the images as long as the grayscale remained within the dynamic range of the camera. With optimization of these optical factors, the width of all edges narrowed significantly. The surfaces away from the solid support approached the infinite sharpness of the physical interface. With these changes, the grayscale at the upper interface provided the basis for locating all surfaces, which improved real-time measurements based on the height and diameter. PMID:22950373

  9. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  10. Rapid cycling with true potato seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid generation cycling via true seed production can increase the efficiency of potato breeding programs and genetics studies. This study was carried out to determine the fruit ripening and seed treatment conditions needed for generating true potato seed (TPS) with a high germination rate in a shor...

  11. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2015-10-27

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  12. Rapid Cycling Synchrotron Option for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Weiren

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an 8 GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) option for Project X. It has several advantages over an 8 GeV SC linac. In particular, the cost could be lower. With a 2 GeV 10 mA pulsed linac as injector, the RCS would be able to deliver 4 MW beam power for a muon collider. If, instead, a 2 GeV 1 mA CW linac is used, the RCS would still be able to meet the Project X requirements but it would be difficult for it to serve a muon collider due to the very long injection time.

  13. Power Supply Systems for Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Toshikazu; Someya, Hirohiko; Koseki, Shoichiro; Ogawa, Shinichi

    JAEA and KEK are jointly constructing a high intensity proton accelerator project J-PARC. Its main accelerator is 3GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). Two types of resonant excitation systems, parallel and cascade, are introduced to excite DC biased 25Hz AC currents through its main magnets. The parallel excitation is adopted for dipole magnets power supply system, and the cascade excitations are adopted for seven family quadrupole magnets systems. In this paper, two systems are investigated and analyzed, and it is explained why different types are adopted to each system. Authors believe that such hybrid exciting systems are most suitable for high power RCS.

  14. Nitrogen cycling. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions. PMID:26045434

  15. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  16. Rapid-cycling bipolar disorder: cross-national community study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sing; Tsang, Adley; Kessler, Ronald C.; Jin, Robert; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura; Karam, Elie G.; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Merikangas, Kathleen; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Popovici, Daniela Georgeta; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Wells, J. Elisabeth; Zarkov, Zahari; Petukhova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in the community is largely unknown. Aims To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in a large cross-national community sample. Method The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI version 3.0) was used to examine the prevalence, severity, comorbidity, impairment, suicidality, sociodemographics, childhood adversity and treatment of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in ten countries (n = 54 257). Results The 12-month prevalence of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was 0.3%. Roughly a third and two-fifths of participants with lifetime and 12-month bipolar disorder respectively met criteria for rapid cycling. Compared with the non-rapid-cycling, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was associated with younger age at onset, higher persistence, more severe depressive symptoms, greater impairment from depressive symptoms, more out-of-role days from mania/hypomania, more anxiety disorders and an increased likelihood of using health services. Associations regarding childhood, family and other sociodemographic correlates were less clear cut. Conclusions The community epidemiological profile of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder confirms most but not all current clinically based knowledge about the illness. PMID:20194545

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

  18. Rapid carbon cycling in the oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. M.; Agustí, S.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of organic carbon production, release and bacterial use was examined across a range of communities spanning from highly oligotrophic ones in the Subtropical Atlantic Ocean, mesotrophic ones in the Mediterranean Sea and productive ones in the Northern African upwelling and the Southern Ocean. A comparative analysis of experiments examining total and particulate organic carbon production across a range of time scales (15 min to 24 h) for 20 communities with contrasting phytoplankton cell status, as assessed by cell lysis rates, and the use of a simple inverse model was used to resolve patterns of carbon flow in the microbial food web. Communities in productive ocean waters accumulated organic carbon over hourly time scales, whereas only a small fraction of net primary production accumulated in communities from oligotrophic waters. These communities supported high phytoplankton cell lysis rates leading to a rapid flux of organic carbon to bacteria, which had high affinity for phytoplankton-derived carbon, much of which was rapidly respired. Conventional assessments of primary production in the oligotrophic ocean severely underestimate net phytoplankton production, as carbon flow in microbial communities from oligotrophic ocean waters occurs within short (minutes) time scales. This explains difficulties to reconcile estimates of primary production with independent estimates of carbon use by bacteria in oligotrophic marine ecosystems.

  19. Rapid lithification masks the Venus sedimentary cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R.

    2015-10-01

    Venera lander data are usually assumed to indicate basaltic lavas but a significant fraction of the rock material must be volatiles, such as sulphur, implying at least strongly weathered basalts. The lander images most closely resemble sedimentary material, with layered strata (which may be pyroclastic in origin)that are sometimes broken into cobbles and fine grained sediment. The Magellan SAR was relatively insensitive to loose fine-grained material under Venus surface conditions but the reprocessed data reveal a range of weathering processes, particularly at higher elevations, and mass wasting of steep slopes. Mean wind speeds are strongly altitude dependent and are able to erode and transport material throughout the highland regions. In some areas, this material is deposited on adjacent plains where, under the extreme Venus surface conditions, lithification is an apparently rapid process. Thus the largely featureless plains may not be igneous at all but sedimentary in origin. The settling out and lithification of sedimentary material is consistent with observed crater degradation, in which low-lying crater floors are infilled first.

  20. The digital traces of bubbles: feedback cycles between socio-economic signals in the Bitcoin economy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David; Tessone, Claudio J; Mavrodiev, Pavlin; Perony, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    What is the role of social interactions in the creation of price bubbles? Answering this question requires obtaining collective behavioural traces generated by the activity of a large number of actors. Digital currencies offer a unique possibility to measure socio-economic signals from such digital traces. Here, we focus on Bitcoin, the most popular cryptocurrency. Bitcoin has experienced periods of rapid increase in exchange rates (price) followed by sharp decline; we hypothesize that these fluctuations are largely driven by the interplay between different social phenomena. We thus quantify four socio-economic signals about Bitcoin from large datasets: price on online exchanges, volume of word-of-mouth communication in online social media, volume of information search and user base growth. By using vector autoregression, we identify two positive feedback loops that lead to price bubbles in the absence of exogenous stimuli: one driven by word of mouth, and the other by new Bitcoin adopters. We also observe that spikes in information search, presumably linked to external events, precede drastic price declines. Understanding the interplay between the socio-economic signals we measured can lead to applications beyond cryptocurrencies to other phenomena that leave digital footprints, such as online social network usage. PMID:25100315

  1. The digital traces of bubbles: feedback cycles between socio-economic signals in the Bitcoin economy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David; Tessone, Claudio J.; Mavrodiev, Pavlin; Perony, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    What is the role of social interactions in the creation of price bubbles? Answering this question requires obtaining collective behavioural traces generated by the activity of a large number of actors. Digital currencies offer a unique possibility to measure socio-economic signals from such digital traces. Here, we focus on Bitcoin, the most popular cryptocurrency. Bitcoin has experienced periods of rapid increase in exchange rates (price) followed by sharp decline; we hypothesize that these fluctuations are largely driven by the interplay between different social phenomena. We thus quantify four socio-economic signals about Bitcoin from large datasets: price on online exchanges, volume of word-of-mouth communication in online social media, volume of information search and user base growth. By using vector autoregression, we identify two positive feedback loops that lead to price bubbles in the absence of exogenous stimuli: one driven by word of mouth, and the other by new Bitcoin adopters. We also observe that spikes in information search, presumably linked to external events, precede drastic price declines. Understanding the interplay between the socio-economic signals we measured can lead to applications beyond cryptocurrencies to other phenomena that leave digital footprints, such as online social network usage. PMID:25100315

  2. LIFE CYCLE BIOASSAY FOR ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF TOXIC CHEMICALS USING RAPID CYCLING OF BRASSICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initial evaluation of a new plant life cycle bioassay for the assessment of the effects of toxic chemicals is presented. he bioassay features a rapid cycling Brassica species that can complete its life cycle in as little as 36 days. he herbicide dalapon (2,2 dichloropropionic aci...

  3. A rapid-temperature-cycling apparatus for oxidation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, A.L.; Kirner, J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    An oxidation test with rapid temperature cycling was developed to evaluate small coated parts. The samples in the form of wire or foils are resistively heated with a high-current AC power supply, allowing fast heating and cooling of the samples. Fast temperature cycling of the samples permits to complete more than 100 cycles in one day. A variety of steels coated with silicon diffusion coatings were tested and the results compared with oxidation via traditional thermal cycling. The test accurately predicts enhanced performance for siliconized 1010 steel, an increase by a factor of three for the life of siliconized 302 stainless steel, and an inadequate siliconized coating for 410 stainless steel. Details of the rapid temperature cycling apparatus as well as testing of the coated steels are described in the paper.

  4. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  5. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Peggs, Stephen G.; Brennan, J. Michael; Tuozzolo, Joseph E.; Zaltsman, Alexander

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  6. Fluctuation emergence of bubbles under a rapid drop of pressure in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, P. A.; Vinogradov, V. E.

    2015-07-01

    Explosive cavitation at the front of a negative-pressure pulse has been studied. Conditions for the emergence of bubbles by the mechanism of homogeneous fluctuation nucleation were identified. Those conditions feature a high rate of the phase transformation, with the vapor formation process being concentrated in time at the instant of attainment of a certain pressure. Under such conditions, the liquid cavitation strength is maximal, and its value can be predicted by the homogeneous nucleation theory. For implementing the regime with high nucleation frequency, a method based on passing a negative-pressure pulse across a region with locally heated liquid was employed. The cavitation kinetics was examined by monitoring the perturbation of the heat flow from a miniature heater. The experimental data were generalized using the theory of explosive vapor formation in shock boiling mode. A method for calculating the cavitation in the regime of the fluctuation emergence of bubbles was approbated.

  7. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  8. Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications

    DOEpatents

    Scharman, Alan J.; Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

  9. Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Rao, Yuxiang; Wan, Haiying; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.

    2011-06-27

    MFI-type zeolite is an important family of materials used in today’s industries as catalysts and adsorbents. Preparation of this type of zeolite material as uniform and pure crystals of sizes from tens of nanometer to hundreds of nanometer are not only desired by current catalytic and adsorption processes for enhanced reaction kinetics and/or selectivity, but also much needed by some new applications, such as CO2 capture adsorbents and composite materials. However, it has been a major challenge in the zeolite synthesis field to prepare small crystals of MFI-type zeolite over a range of Si/Al ratio with very high throughput. In this work, a gas-bubbling flow reactor is used to conduct hydrothermal growth of the zeolite crystals with controllable Si/Al ratio and crystal sizes. Distinctive, uniform ZSM-5 crystals are successfully synthesized within two hours of reaction time, exceptionally short compared to the conventional synthesis process. The crystals are small enough to form a stable milk-like suspension in water. The Si/Al ratio can be controlled by adjusting the growth solution composition and reaction conditions over a range from about 9 to infinity. Characterization by SEM/EDS, XRD, TEM, N2 adsorption/desorption, and NMR confirms ZSM-5 crystal structures and reveals presence of meso-porosity in the resulting crystals.

  10. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, H.P.; Wittwer, C.T.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes an apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column. 6 figs.

  11. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, Harold P.; Wittwer, Carl T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column.

  12. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low-power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water (H2O) vapor, whereas during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and H2O vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low-power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA Johnson Space Center, Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design of RCA 2.0 was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA Johnson Space Center in September 2012. This paper provides an overview of the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  13. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA 2.0) System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; O'Coin, James; Wichowski, Robert; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system is a low power assembly capable of simultaneously removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. Two solid amine sorbent beds are alternated between an uptake mode and a regeneration mode. During the uptake mode, the sorbent is exposed to an air steam (ventilation loop) to adsorb CO2 and water vapor, while during the regeneration mode, the sorbent rejects the adsorbed CO2 and water vapor to a vacuum source. The two beds operate such that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. A novel valve assembly provides a simple means of diverting the process air flow through the uptake bed while simultaneously directing the vacuum source to the regeneration bed. Additionally, the valve assembly is designed to allow for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The process can be controlled by a compact, low power controller design with several modes of operation available to the user. Together with NASA, United Technologies Corporation Aerospace Systems has been developing RCA 2.0 based on performance and design feedback on several sorbent bed test articles and valve design concepts. A final design was selected in November 2011 and fabricated and assembled between March and August 2012, with delivery to NASA-JSC in September 2012. This paper will provide an overview on the RCA system design and results of pre-delivery testing.

  14. Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) 3.0 System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Hawes, Kevin; Wichowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) 3.0 system is currently under development by NASA, the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in conjunction with United Technologies Corporation Aerospace Systems (UTAS). The RCA technology is a new carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity removal system that has been baselined for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support System. The evolution of the RCA development has progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0 test articles. The RCA is an advancement over currently technologies due to its unique regeneration capability. The RCA is capable of simultaneously removing CO2 and humidity from an influent air steam and subsequent regeneration when exposed to a vacuum source. The RCA technology uses two solid amine sorbent beds in an alternating fashion to adsorb CO2 and water (uptake mode) and desorb CO2 and water (regeneration mode) at the same time. The two beds operate in an efficient manner so that while one bed is in the uptake mode, the other is in the regeneration mode, thus continuously providing an on-service sorbent bed by which CO2 and humidity may be removed. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a novel valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes with only one moving part while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source by means of an internal pressure equalization step during actuation. The RCA technology also is low power, small, and has performed extremely well in all development testing thus far. A final design was selected for the RCA 3.0, fabricated, assembled, and performance tested in 2014 with delivery to NASAJSC in January 2015. This paper will provide an overview on the RCA 3.0 system design and results of pre-delivery testing with references to the development of RCA 1.0 and RCA 2.0.

  15. Plant Growth and Development: An Outline for a Unit Structured Around the Life Cycle of Rapid-Cycling Brassica Rapa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Wayne M.

    This outline is intended for use in a unit of 10-12 lectures on plant growth and development at the introductory undergraduate level as part of a course on organismal biology. The series of lecture outlines is structured around the life cycle of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr). The unit begins with three introductory lectures on general plant…

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Applied with a Rapid Cycle Has More Profound Influence on Hippocampal Electrophysiology Than a Standard Cycle.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lars E; Wadman, Wytse J; Marinazzo, Daniele; van Mierlo, Pieter; Delbeke, Jean; Daelemans, Sofie; Sprengers, Mathieu; Thyrion, Lisa; Van Lysebettens, Wouter; Carrette, Evelien; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Raedt, Robrecht

    2016-07-01

    Although vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is widely used, therapeutic mechanisms and optimal stimulation parameters remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the effect of VNS on hippocampal field activity and compared the efficiency of different VNS paradigms. Hippocampal electroencephalography (EEG) and perforant path dentate field-evoked potentials were acquired before and during VNS in freely moving rats, using 2 VNS duty cycles: a rapid cycle (7 s on, 18 s off) and standard cycle (30 s on, 300 s off) and various output currents. VNS modulated the evoked potentials, reduced total power of the hippocampal EEG, and slowed the theta rhythm. In the hippocampal EEG, theta (4-8 Hz) and high gamma (75-150 Hz) activity displayed strong phase amplitude coupling that was reduced by VNS. Rapid-cycle VNS had a greater effect than standard-cycle VNS on all outcome measures. Using rapid cycle VNS, a maximal effect on EEG parameters was found at 300 μA, beyond which effects saturated. The findings suggest that rapid-cycle VNS produces a more robust outcome than standard cycle VNS and support already existing preclinical evidence that relatively low output currents are sufficient to produce changes in brain physiology and thus likely also therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27102987

  17. Rapid-fire improvement with short-cycle kaizen.

    PubMed

    Heard, E

    1999-05-01

    Continuous improvement is an attractive idea, but it is typically more myth than reality. SCK is no myth. It delivers dramatic improvements in traditional measures quickly. SCK accomplishes this via kaizens: rapid, repeated, time-compressed changes for the better in bite-sized chunks of the business. PMID:10387776

  18. The Hydrologic Cycle Response to Rapid Arctic Vegetation Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last fifty years, the Northern Hemisphere high latitude land areas have warmed at rates well in excess of what can be explained by the atmospheric rise in greenhouse gases alone. Changes in the albedo of the ocean and land, whether from the loss of Arctic Ocean sea ice, changes in land cover, or changes in winter precipitation patterns account for much of the amplified warming. Although the loss of sea ice is directly related to greenhouse gas warming and low-level winds, changes in the discharge of freshwater from Arctic river basins are also responsible. While changes in river discharge can be related to precipitation, snow and ice melt, and human modification of the landscape, natural vegetation changes due to warming may also be altering the land surface hydrologic cycle and contributing to changes in the flux of freshwater to the Arctic Ocean. Satellite imagery has shown that the Arctic is becoming greener, which not only affects the surface and lower-tropospheric energy budget, but also modifies the hydrologic cycle through altering the partitioning of transpiration and plant-soil evaporation. This leads to changes in precipitation recycling and runoff, which can ultimately affect the discharge of freshwater. To illustrate this mechanism, results of a land cover change and precipitation-recycling analysis using North American Regional Reanalysis data will be presented for the Mackenzie Basin in North America. Additionally, results from a dynamic global vegetation model will be presented to evaluate the potential consequences of continued extreme warming and land cover changes to the discharge of freshwater to the Arctic Ocean.

  19. Tropical Cyclone Structure Change Cycles during Rapid Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chi Mai; Reeder, Michael J.; Davidson, Noel E.; Smith, Roger K.; Montgomery, Michael T.

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution simulations of Hurricane Katrina (2005) using TCLAPS show that the modelled vortex vacillates between symmetric and asymmetric phases during periods of rapid intensification. During the Symmetric phase the eye-wall has a high degree of symmetry, comprising relatively uniform elongated convective bands. In this phase the low-level vorticity and equivalent potential temperature fields exhibit a ring-like structure, and the largest intensification rates occur near the radius of maximum tangential wind (RMW). In contrast, the Asymmetric phase is characterised by a highly asymmetric eyewall, having a polygonal form with vortical hot towers (VHTs) located at the vertices. The low-level vorticity and equivalent potential temperature fields have monopole structures with their maxima near the center. In this phase, the largest intensification rates occur inside the RMW. These two phases are very similar to Regimes 1 and 2 respectively found by Kossin and Eastin (2001) using aircraft observations. Symmetric to Asymmetric transitions are associated with the development of VHTs along the eyewall, resulting from a combination of barotropic and convective instability. These VHTs vigorously mix the air between the eye and eyewall, increasing the vorticity near the vortex center. In conrast, Asymmetric to Symmetric transitions occur as the potential energy available to the convection is consumed and the VHTs weaken. In the process the VHTs become strained in the horizontal and move radially outward as vortex Rossby waves (VRWs). High intensification rates resume near the RMW as result of increased horizontal vorticity fluxes associated with redevelopment of convection in the reduced rapid filamentation zone outside of the weakened VHTs, and through VRW wave-mean flow interactions.

  20. Rapid cycling of reactive nitrogen in the marine boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S; Apel, Eric C; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James N; Ortega, John; Knote, Christoph

    2016-04-28

    Nitrogen oxides are essential for the formation of secondary atmospheric aerosols and of atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical, which controls the self-cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitric acid, a major oxidation product of nitrogen oxides, has traditionally been considered to be a permanent sink of nitrogen oxides. However, model studies predict higher ratios of nitric acid to nitrogen oxides in the troposphere than are observed. A 'renoxification' process that recycles nitric acid into nitrogen oxides has been proposed to reconcile observations with model studies, but the mechanisms responsible for this process remain uncertain. Here we present data from an aircraft measurement campaign over the North Atlantic Ocean and find evidence for rapid recycling of nitric acid to nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides in the clean marine boundary layer via particulate nitrate photolysis. Laboratory experiments further demonstrate the photolysis of particulate nitrate collected on filters at a rate more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous nitric acid, with nitrous acid as the main product. Box model calculations based on the Master Chemical Mechanism suggest that particulate nitrate photolysis mainly sustains the observed levels of nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides at midday under typical marine boundary layer conditions. Given that oceans account for more than 70 per cent of Earth's surface, we propose that particulate nitrate photolysis could be a substantial tropospheric nitrogen oxide source. Recycling of nitrogen oxides in remote oceanic regions with minimal direct nitrogen oxide emissions could increase the formation of tropospheric oxidants and secondary atmospheric aerosols on a global scale. PMID:27064904

  1. Rapid cycling of reactive nitrogen in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Apel, Eric C.; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James N.; Ortega, John; Knote, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides are essential for the formation of secondary atmospheric aerosols and of atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical, which controls the self-cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitric acid, a major oxidation product of nitrogen oxides, has traditionally been considered to be a permanent sink of nitrogen oxides. However, model studies predict higher ratios of nitric acid to nitrogen oxides in the troposphere than are observed. A ‘renoxification’ process that recycles nitric acid into nitrogen oxides has been proposed to reconcile observations with model studies, but the mechanisms responsible for this process remain uncertain. Here we present data from an aircraft measurement campaign over the North Atlantic Ocean and find evidence for rapid recycling of nitric acid to nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides in the clean marine boundary layer via particulate nitrate photolysis. Laboratory experiments further demonstrate the photolysis of particulate nitrate collected on filters at a rate more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous nitric acid, with nitrous acid as the main product. Box model calculations based on the Master Chemical Mechanism suggest that particulate nitrate photolysis mainly sustains the observed levels of nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides at midday under typical marine boundary layer conditions. Given that oceans account for more than 70 per cent of Earth’s surface, we propose that particulate nitrate photolysis could be a substantial tropospheric nitrogen oxide source. Recycling of nitrogen oxides in remote oceanic regions with minimal direct nitrogen oxide emissions could increase the formation of tropospheric oxidants and secondary atmospheric aerosols on a global scale.

  2. Anxiety Disorders and Rapid Cycling Data From a Cohort of 8129 Youths With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Puentes, Ruby; Sala, Regina; Ng, Bernardo; Galvez, Juan; Camacho, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are common in youths with bipolar disorder (BD). We examine psychiatric comorbidity, hospitalization, and treatment in youths with versus without AD and rapid cycling (four or more cycles per year). Data from the Integrated Healthcare Information Services cohort were used and included 8129 youths (ages ≤18 years). Prevalence of AD, demographic, type of AD, hospitalization, and use of psychotropics were compared between rapid and nonrapid cycling. Overall, 51% of the youths met criteria for at least one comorbid AD; they were predominantly female and were between 12 and 17 years of age. The most common comorbid ADs were generalized ADs and separation ADs. In the patients with rapid cycling, 65.5%met criteria for comorbid AD. The BD youths with AD were more likely to have major depressive disorders and other comorbid ADs, to be given more psychotropics, and to be hospitalized for depression and medical conditions more often than were those without AD. PMID:24284641

  3. Subduction cycling of U, Th, and Pb [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Plank, Terry; Farr, Linda; Ludden, John; Staudigel, Hubert

    2005-06-01

    lost to the back-arc. Pb is lost shallow and U deep from subducted AOC, which may be a consequence of the stability of phases binding these elements during seafloor alteration: U in carbonate and Pb in sulfides. The upper end of these recycling estimates, which reflect maximum arc and back-arc growth rates, remove enough Pb and U from the slab to enable it to evolve rapidly (≪ 0.5 Ga) to sources suitable to explain the 208Pb/ 206Pb isotopic array of OIB, although these conditions fail to simultaneously satisfy the 207Pb/ 206Pb system. Lower growth rates would require additional U loss (29%) at depths beyond the zones of arc and back-arc magmagenesis, which would decrease upper mantle κ ( 232Th/ 238U) over time, consistent with one solution to the "kappa conundrum" [5] [T. Elliott, A. Zindler, B. Bourdon, Exploring the kappa conundrum: the role of recycling in the lead isotope evolution of the mantle. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 169 (1999) 129-145]. The net effects of alteration (doubling of μ [ 238U/ 204Pb]) and subduction (doubling of ω [ 232Th/ 204Pb]) are sufficient to create the Pb isotopic signatures of oceanic basalts.

  4. Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cellmembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

    2004-01-02

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes were developed in which zirconia-based electrolyte thin films were supported by a composite metal/ceramic electrode, and were subjected to rapid thermal cycling between 200 and 800 C. The effects of this cycling on membrane performance were evaluated. The membranes, not yet optimized for performance, showed a peak power density of 350mW/cm2at 900 C in laboratory-sized SOFCs that was not affected by the thermal cycling. This resistance to cycling degradation is attributed to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficient of the cermet support electrode with that of the zirconia electrolyte.

  5. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  6. Rapid thermal cycling of solar array blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been conducting rapid thermal cycling on blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom. This testing includes two designs (8 coupons total) of the solar array. Four coupons were fabricated as part of the Photovoltaic Array Environmental Protection Program (PAEP), NAS3-25079, at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. These coupons began cycling in early 1989 and have completed 172,000 thermal cycles. Four other coupons were fabricated a year later and included several design changes; cycling of these began in early 1990 and has reached 90,000 cycles. The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime (15 yrs.) of the welded interconnects within a low earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycling environment. The blanket coupons, design changes, test description, status to date including performance and observed anomalies, and any insights related to the testing of these coupons are described. The description of a third design is included.

  7. Rapid quantitative enrichment of carnosic acid from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) by isoelectric focused adsorptive bubble chromatography.

    PubMed

    Backleh, Marlène; Leupold, Günther; Parlar, Harun

    2003-02-26

    For the first time, the potent but unstable antioxidative diterpene carnosic acid could be enriched from an aqueous extract of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) by isoelectric focused adsorptive bubble chromatography. Enrichment of carnosic acid in the foam was influenced by the pH value and the flow rate of the foam-forming gas. Efficiency was highest with diluted samples at pH 4. Under these conditions, the conversion of carnosic acid to carnosol was negligible. Transfer of carnosic acid to the foam from a standard solution in the presence of saponin as surfactive substance was similar to that from the aqueous rosemary extract. PMID:12590472

  8. Thermal Behavior of Small Lithium-Ion Secondary Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles than the rated condition, when EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. During rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature rises significantly and may increase more than the allowable temperature. So we calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles using our battery thermal behavior model, which we have developed being confirmed its validity during discharge cycle at the smaller current than the discharge rate of 1C. The heat source factors were measured by the methods described in our previous study, because the present batteries have been improved in their performance and have low overpotential resistance. The battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient was measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, and was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The calculated temperature by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple. Therefore we can confirm the validity of this model again during rapid charge and discharge cycles.

  9. Impedance considerations for the Intense Pulse Neutron Source (IPNS) Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS).

    SciTech Connect

    Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; McMichael, G. E.

    1999-09-08

    The use of Second Harmonic (SH) rf is being investigated to increase the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) current limit. Hofmann-Pedersen distributions are employed to provide analytical guidance. The SH phase {theta}, is optimized using a numerical analysis to maximize transmission and minimize instabilities. The effect of the RCS stainless steel liner on the impedance of the machine is also discussed.

  10. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  11. Demonstrated Ways to Use Rapid Cycling "Brassica Rapa" in Ecology Instruction and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Martin G.

    2004-01-01

    The National Science Foundation has a long supported the use of "Wisconsin Fast Plants" (rapid cycling "B. rapa") in the teaching of Biology (K-12). I believe that the opportunity is at hand for biologists to significantly extend past efforts made by our colleagues at the K-12 level to higher education. Biology faculty can realize the many…

  12. Rapid subtropical North Atlantic salinity oscillations across Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthew W; Vautravers, Maryline J; Spero, Howard J

    2006-10-01

    Geochemical and sedimentological evidence suggest that the rapid climate warming oscillations of the last ice age, the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles, were coupled to fluctuations in North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through its regulation of poleward heat flux. The balance between cold meltwater from the north and warm, salty subtropical gyre waters from the south influenced the strength and location of North Atlantic overturning circulation during this period of highly variable climate. Here we investigate how rapid reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system across these cycles are linked to salinity changes in the subtropical North Atlantic gyre. We combine Mg/Ca palaeothermometry and oxygen isotope ratio measurements on planktonic foraminifera across four Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles (spanning 45.9-59.2 kyr ago) to generate a seawater salinity proxy record from a subtropical gyre deep-sea sediment core. We show that North Atlantic gyre surface salinities oscillated rapidly between saltier stadial conditions and fresher interstadials, covarying with inferred shifts in the Tropical Atlantic hydrologic cycle and North Atlantic overturning circulation. These salinity oscillations suggest a reduction in precipitation into the North Atlantic and/or reduced export of deep salty thermohaline waters during stadials. We hypothesize that increased stadial salinities preconditioned the North Atlantic Ocean for a rapid return to deep overturning circulation and high-latitude warming by contributing to increased North Atlantic surface-water density on interstadial transitions. PMID:17024090

  13. Methods for separation/purification utilizing rapidly cycled thermal swing sorption

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Monzyk, Bruce F.; Wang, Yong; VanderWiel, David P.; Perry, Steven T.; Fitzgerald, Sean P.; Simmons, Wayne W.; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Weller, Jr., Albert E.

    2004-11-09

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for separating fluid components. In preferred embodiments, the apparatus and methods utilize microchannel devices with small distances for heat and mass transfer to achieve rapid cycle times and surprisingly large volumes of fluid components separated in short times using relatively compact hardware.

  14. Thermal behavior of small lithium-ion battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Kazuo; Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto

    The secondary batteries for electric vehicles (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles at current levels exceeding the batteries' rating, such as when the EV quickly starts consuming battery power or when recovering inertia energy during sudden stops. During these rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature may increase above allowable limits. We calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. The heat-source factors were measured again by the methods described in our previous study, because the performance of the battery reported here has been improved, showing lower overpotential resistance. Battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient, measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The temperature calculated by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Also, battery radial temperature distributions were calculated to be small, and confirmed experimentally.

  15. Bubble dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Bliss, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical principles related to bubble dielectrophoresis are examined, taking into account the polarization force, aspects of bubble deformation, the electrostatic bubble levitation theorem, and the equation of motion. The measurement of the dielectrophoretic force on static and dynamic bubbles represents a convenient experimental method for the study of the general problem of dielectrophoresis. The experiments reported include static-force measurements, static-levitation experiments, and dynamic-force measurements.

  16. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  17. Degradation of Teflon(trademark) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  18. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon' FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon FEP.

  19. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno F.

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon' FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(registered trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(registered trademark) FEP.

  20. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(R) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(R) FEP.

  1. Long Pathways for Outgassing Generated by a Rapid and Large Shear Strain of Bubbly Fluids Reducing Effective Viscosity and Affecting Eruption Styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The styles of basaltic explosive eruptions have a wide variety, which is usually attributed to the separation of volcanic gas from the surrounding silicate melt. As a mechanism of gas separation, shear deformation has been suggested. However, the bubble shape evolution under large strain at high strain rate and its effects on viscosity have not yet understood well. We thus performed shear deformation experiments of bubbly liquid under high shear rate and large strain with in situ observation of bubble deformation and viscosity measurements. We used syrup solution as a magma analogue whose viscosity of 3, 50, 500 Pa s, similar to that of basaltic magma. We rotated disc-shaped bubbly syrup at shear rates of 0.03-10 s-1 with strains of 3-1000. Experiments show that deformed bubbles coalesce into larger bubbles and finally generate concentric air rings, resulting that the striped shape of air and liquid parts appears. The widths of air rings greatly exceed the bubble sizes and can be long outgassing pathways if those exist in a volcanic conduit. During the evolution of air rings the measured effective viscosity decreases, while after reaching to a steady state, viscous resistance increases again. At this stage, bubble volume and size in the liquid parts become considerably small. Time evolution of bubble size distribution suggests that most of bubbles are assimilated into the air rings and the remnants in the liquid parts break up into small bubbles. Similar shear deformation of bubbly magma could occur in volcanic conduits, which generates large bubbles at a depth where the lower effective viscosity enhances the ascending velocity. The large bubbles may originate Strombolian eruption or suppresses the explosive eruption by making the long outgassing pathways reaching to the Earth's surface. In both cases, bubble free dense melt accumulates at a shallow conduit. Our experiments suggest that, for larger melt viscosity and narrower conduit, the gas separation occurs

  2. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  3. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  4. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  5. Recalcitrant bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Martin E. R.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in ‘anomalous' mixtures. Unlike ‘ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just ‘downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in ‘anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  6. Thermal Behavior of Prismatic Lithium-Ion Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takuto; Wakahara, Kenji; Fukuda, Kenichi; Ohmori, Yositake; Nakayama, Masato; Onda, Kazuo

    The temperature of secondary batteries may increase above allowable limits and deteriorate its performance, during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Therefore, assessing thermal behavior of battery is essential. On the other hand, rectangular parallelepiped shape batteries are supposedly going to be used more commonly for cars and electrical devices because of their better space efficiency. Then, we constructed a two dimensional Cartesian coordinates battery thermal behavior model for a prismatic lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. It was extended from one dimensional cylindrical coordinates model, which had been developed and experimentally verified. As parameters of the numerical model, battery heat source factors such as overpotential resistance, entropy change, heat transfer coefficient and heat capacity have been measured. The radiation thermometer was used for obtaining battery surface temperature variance and distributions. Battery temperature generally increases as charge and discharge cycle proceeds, nevertheless temperature drops were observed at begging of low rate charge cycle and vicinity of SOC=0.8 in discharge cycle. Our modified model could predict these phenomena and agreed well with experimental results. Then the reliability of our numerical model and measuring techniques of heat source factors are confirmed each other.

  7. Thermal Behavior of Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles, when the EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. The generated heat increases significantly the cell temperature and causes possibly bad influences on the battery performance and the safely requirement. So we have studied the thermal behavior of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles, applying our previous battery thermal model, which have been confirmed to agree with the experimental results at smaller charge current than the rated current. The heat sources by the entropy change, the hydrogen occlusion and the side reaction have been referred to the published data, and the overpotential resistance and the current efficiency, the ratio of main reaction current to charge current, have been measured experimentally through the rapid charge and discharge characteristics with constant current. By using these data our thermal model for Ni/MH battery has estimated its temperature increase, which agrees well with the measured temperature rise, with the root mean square error of 1.5°C and 2.1°C for charge and discharge cycles, respectively.

  8. Design Challenges of a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron for Carbon/Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    The growing interest in radiation therapy with protons and light ions has driven demand for new methods of ion acceleration and the delivery of ion beams. One exciting new platform for ion beam acceleration and delivery is the rapid cycling synchrotron. Operating at 15Hz, rapid cycling achieves faster treatment times by making beam extraction possible at any energy during the cycle. Moreover, risk to the patient is reduced by requiring fewer particles in the beam line at a given time, thus eliminating the need for passive filtering and reducing the consequences of a malfunction. Lastly, the ability to switch between carbon ion and proton beam therapy provides the machine with an unmatched flexibility. However, these features do stipulate challenges in accelerator design. Maintaining a compact lattice requires careful tuning of lattice functions, tight focusing combined function magnets, and fast injection and extraction systems. Providing the necessary acceleration over a short cycle time also necessitates a five-fold frequency swing for carbon ions, further burdening the design requirements of ferrite-driven radiofrequency cavities. We will consider these challenges as well as some solutions selected for our current design.

  9. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography. PMID:16005238

  10. Rheology of dense bubble suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang-Yoon; Sangani, Ashok S.; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Koch, Donald L.

    1997-06-01

    The rheological behavior of rapidly sheared bubble suspensions is examined through numerical simulations and kinetic theory. The limiting case of spherical bubbles at large Reynolds number Re and small Weber number We is examined in detail. Here, Re=ργa2/μ and We=ργ2a3/s, a being the bubble radius, γ the imposed shear, s the interfacial tension, and μ and ρ, respectively, the viscosity and density of the liquid. The bubbles are assumed to undergo elastic bounces when they come into contact; coalescence can be prevented in practice by addition of salt or surface-active impurities. The numerical simulations account for the interactions among bubbles which are assumed to be dominated by the potential flow of the liquid caused by the motion of the bubbles and the shear-induced collision of the bubbles. A kinetic theory based on Grad's moment method is used to predict the distribution function for the bubble velocities and the stress in the suspension. The hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated in this theory only through their influence on the virtual mass and viscous dissipation in the suspension. It is shown that this theory provides reasonable predictions for the bubble-phase pressure and viscosity determined from simulations including the detailed potential flow interactions. A striking result of this study is that the variance of the bubble velocity can become large compared with (γa)2 in the limit of large Reynolds number. This implies that the disperse-phase pressure and viscosity associated with the fluctuating motion of the bubbles is quite significant. To determine whether this prediction is reasonable even in the presence of nonlinear drag forces induced by bubble deformation, we perform simulations in which the bubbles are subject to an empirical drag law and show that the bubble velocity variance can be as large as 15γ2a2.

  11. Influence of rapid thermal cycles in multipass welding on heat-affected-zone properties in ferritic cryogenic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Shin, H.K.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    The results of both welding and weld simulation studies on 2BT-treated 9Ni steel show that multiple rapid thermal cycles have a very beneficial effect on heat-affected zone toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The metallurgical sources of toughness are, however, different from those in the furnace-treated base plate. The rapidly cycled material contains no detectable austenite phase. The alloy is grain-refined by the rapid thermal cycle, and the matrix carbon content is relieved by the formation of interlathcementite precipitates which do not destroy toughness.

  12. DNA analysis on microfabricated electrophoretic devices with bubble cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lung; Lin, Yang-Wei; Chen, Ko-Chun; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2002-08-01

    Microfluidic devices with bubble cells have been fabricated on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates and have been employed for the analysis of DNA using polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions. First, the separation channel was fabricated using a wire-imprinting method. Then, wires with greater sizes or a razor blade glued in a polycarbonate plate was used to fabricate bubble cells, with sizes of 190-650 microm. The improvements in resolution and sensitivity have been achieved for large DNA (> 603 base pair, bp) using such devices, which depend on the geometry of the bubble cell. The main contributor for optimal resolution is mainly due to DNA migration at lower electric field strengths inside the bubble cell. On the other hand, slight losses of resolution for small DNA fragments have been found mainly due to diffusion, supported by the loss of resolution when separating two small solutes. With a bubble cell of 75 microm (width) x 500 microm (depth), the sensitivity improvement up to 17-fold has been achieved for the 271 bp fragment in the separation of PhiX-174/HaeIII DNA restriction fragments. We have also found that a microfluidic device with a bubble cell of 360 microm x 360 microm is appropriate for DNA analysis. Such a device has been used for separating DNA ranging from 8 to 2176 bp and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products amplified after 30 cycles, with rapidity and improvements in the sensitivity as well as resolution. PMID:12210206

  13. Incomplete Denitrification Causes Rapid Nitrous Oxide Cycling in the Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, A. R.; Ward, B. B.; Stocker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  14. The Rapid Transit System That Achieves Higher Performance with Lower Life-Cycle Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Satoru; Takagi, Ryo

    In the age of traction system made of inverter and ac traction motors, distributed traction system with pure electric brake of regenerative mode has been recognised very advantageous. This paper proposes a new system as the lowest life-cycle cost system for high performance rapid transit, a new architecture and optimum parameters of power feeding system, and a new running method of trains. In Japan, these components of this proposal, i.e. pure electric brake and various countermeasures of reducing loss of regeneration have been already popular but not as yet the new running method for better utilisation of the equipment and for lower life-cycle cost. One example of what are proposed in this paper will be made as Tsukuba Express, which is under construction as the most modern commuter railway in Greater Tokyo area.

  15. Magnetic Cycles and Buoyant Magnetic Structures in a Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Brown, B. P.; Brun, S.; Miesch, M. S.; Toomre, J.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of sun-like stars rotating faster than our current sun show that they exhibit solar-like magnetic cycles and features, such as star spots. Using global 3-D simulations to study the coupling of large-scale convection, rotation, and magnetism in a younger sun, we have probed the effects of more rapid rotation on stellar dynamos and the nature of magnetic cycles. Our anelastic spherical harmonics (ASH) code allows study of the convective envelope, occupying the outer 30% by radius of a sun-like star. Major MHD simulations carried out at three times the current solar rotation rate reveal magnetic dynamo action that can produce wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic field at low latitudes, often with opposite polarity in the two hemispheres. The presence of the wreaths is quite surprising, for they arise as quite persistent global structures amidst the vigorous and turbulent convection. We have recently explored behavior in systems with considerably lower diffusivities, achieved with a dynamic Smagorinsky treatment of unresolved turbulence. The lower levels of diffusion create magnetic wreaths that undergo prominent variations in field strength, even exhibiting global magnetic cycles that involve polarity reversals. Additionally, during the cycle maximum, when magnetic energies and mean magnetic fields peak, the wreaths possess buoyant magnetic structures that rise coherently through much of the convective envelope via a combination of advection by convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy. We explore aspects of these rising magnetic structures and the evolving global dynamo action which produces them.

  16. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  17. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Rapid Cycle Amine Repackaging and Sub-Scale Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Rivera, Fatonia L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing technologies to meet requirements for an extravehicular activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for exploration. The PLSS Ventilation Subsystem transports clean, conditioned oxygen to the pressure garment for space suit pressurization and human consumption, and recycles the ventilation gas, removing carbon dioxide, humidity, and trace contaminants. This paper provides an overview of the development efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center to redesign the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) canister and valve assembly into a radial flow, cylindrical package for carbon dioxide and humidity control of the PLSS ventilation loop. Future work is also discussed.

  18. Multi-function ring magnet power supply for rapid-cycling synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Praeg, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Ring magnet power supply (RMPS) circuits that produce a wide range of magnet current waveshapes for rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) are described. The shapes range from long flat-tops separated by a biased dual frequency cosine wave to those having a flat-bottom (injection), followed by a lower frequency cosine half wave (acceleration), a flat-top (extraction), and a higher frequency cosine half wave (magnet reset). Applications of these circuits for proposed synchrotrons are outlined. Solid-state switching circuits and the results of proof-of-concept tests are shown. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  20. Evaluation of rapid cell division in non-uniform cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juyun; Jeon, Wonju; Chang, Man; Han, Myung-Soo

    2015-10-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of development of harmful algal blooms (HABs), accurate estimates of species-specific in situ growth rates are needed. HABs are caused by rapid cell division by the causative microorganisms. To accurately estimate the in situ growth rates of harmful algae having non-uniform and/or irregular cell cycles, we modified a standard equation based on the cell cycle, and calculated the in situ growth rate to describe the process of bloom development in nature. Sampling of a developing bloom of Heterosigma akashiwo in Pohang Bay, Korea, was conducted every 3 h from 15:00 on August 2 to 07:00 on August 4, 2006. The amount of H. akashiwo DNA was measured using flow cytometry following tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization. On August 2, the percentage of G1 phase cells decreased from 15:00 to 19:00 then increased until 22:00; it then decreased until 07:00 on August 3, followed by an increase to 10:00. This indicates the ability of the cells in nature to undergo more than one round of division per day. During the following night two rounds of division did not occur. The in situ growth rates estimated using the modified equation ranged from 0.31 to 0.53 d(-1) . We conclude that the use of this equation enables more accurate estimates of bloom formation by rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26175341

  1. RAPID RELEASE OF N-LINKED GLYCANS FROM GLYCOPROTEINS BY PRESSURE CYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Zoltan; Guttman, András; Karger, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    The standard, well-established sample preparation protocol to release N-linked glycans from glycoproteins for downstream analysis requires relatively long deglycosylation times (from several hours to overnight) and relatively high endoglycosidase concentration (1:250 – 1:500 enzyme:substrate molar ratio). In this paper, we significantly improve this standard protocol by the use of pressure cycling technology (PCT) to increase the speed and decrease the relative amount of PNGase F during the release of N-linked glycans from denatured glycoproteins. With the application of pressure cycling from atmospheric to as high as 30 kPsi, >95% release of the asparagine linked glycans from bovine ribonuclease B, human transferrin and polyclonal human immunoglobulin was rapidly achieved in a few minutes using as low as 1:2500 enzyme:substrate molar ratio. The deglycosylation rate was first examined by SDS-PAGE at the protein level. The released glycans were then quantitated by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). This new sample preparation protocol readily supports large scale glycan analysis of biopharmaceuticals with rapid deglycosylation times. PMID:20170179

  2. Rapid alterations of avian medullary bone material during the daily egg-laying cycle.

    PubMed

    Kerschnitzki, Michael; Zander, Thomas; Zaslansky, Paul; Fratzl, Peter; Shahar, Ron; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which is continuously adapting not only to external mechanical stimuli but also to internal metabolic calcium demands. During normal bone remodeling, bone-resorbing osteoclasts release calcium from the bone and digest the collagenous bone matrix, after which bone-depositing osteoblasts form unmineralized collagen matrix, which subsequently mineralizes. The detailed mechanism by which calcium is deposited at the site of mineralization and removed from it during bone resorption is largely unknown. Experimental studies are difficult to conduct because in adult bone only a small fraction of bone tissue is remodeled at any moment in time. Thus, one promising approach is to study mineral deposition and resorption in model systems in which a large fraction of the bone mineral is mobilized in a relatively short period of time. We investigated the microscopic and nanoscopic alterations of avian medullary bone architecture during the egg-laying (oviposition) cycle of hens. Medullary bone forms a labile calcium reservoir for eggshell production and is characterized by an extremely rapid and high-flux calcium metabolism. It thus, provides the unique opportunity to study processes of bone remodeling in their most intensive form. We used a combination of synchrotron X-ray tomography together with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to correlate microscopic medullary bone attributes such as the mineral content, medullary bone volume fraction and medullary bone trabecular thickness with nanoscopic alterations in the mineral particle size (thickness parameter T and length parameter L) during the oviposition cycle. To identify the timing of the different stages of the cycle, ionic calcium, phosphorus and PTH concentrations in the blood of the layers were monitored. We found that the microscopic and nanoscopic architecture of avian medullary bone material changes rapidly during the oviposition

  3. Exploring Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Geary, Melissa A.

    Bubbles provide an enjoyable and festive medium through which to teach many concepts within the science topics of light, color, chemistry, force, air pressure, electricity, buoyancy, floating, density, among many others. In order to determine the nature of children's engagement within a museum setting and the learning opportunities of playing with bubbles, I went to a children's interactive museum located in a metropolitan city in the Northeastern part of the United States.

  4. Daytime spikes in dopaminergic activity drive rapid mood-cycling in mice.

    PubMed

    Sidor, M M; Spencer, S M; Dzirasa, K; Parekh, P K; Tye, K M; Warden, M R; Arey, R N; Enwright, J F; Jacobsen, J P R; Kumar, S; Remillard, E M; Caron, M G; Deisseroth, K; McClung, C A

    2015-11-01

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms and dopaminergic activity are involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, though their interaction remains unclear. Moreover, a lack of animal models that display spontaneous cycling between mood states has hindered our mechanistic understanding of mood switching. Here, we find that mice with a mutation in the circadian Clock gene (ClockΔ19) exhibit rapid mood-cycling, with a profound manic-like phenotype emerging during the day following a period of euthymia at night. Mood-cycling coincides with abnormal daytime spikes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic activity, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels and dopamine synthesis. To determine the significance of daytime increases in VTA dopamine activity to manic behaviors, we developed a novel optogenetic stimulation paradigm that produces a sustained increase in dopamine neuronal activity and find that this induces a manic-like behavioral state. Time-dependent dampening of TH activity during the day reverses manic-related behaviors in ClockΔ19 mice. Finally, we show that CLOCK acts as a negative regulator of TH transcription, revealing a novel molecular mechanism underlying cyclic changes in mood-related behavior. Taken together, these studies have identified a mechanistic connection between circadian gene disruption and the precipitation of manic episodes in bipolar disorder. PMID:25560763

  5. Daytime spikes in dopaminergic activity drive rapid mood-cycling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sidor, Michelle M.; Spencer, Sade M.; Dzirasa, Kafui; Parekh, Puja K.; Tye, Kay M.; Warden, Melissa R.; Arey, Rachel N.; Enwright, John F; Jacobsen, Jacob PR; Kumar, Sunil; Remillard, Erin M; Caron, Marc G.; Deisseroth, Karl; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms and dopaminergic activity are involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, though their interaction remains unclear. Moreover, a lack of animal models that display spontaneous cycling between mood states has hindered our mechanistic understanding of mood switching. Here we find that mice with a mutation in the circadian Clock gene (ClockΔ19) exhibit rapid mood-cycling, with a profound manic-like phenotype emerging during the day following a period of euthymia at night. Mood cycling coincides with abnormal daytime spikes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic activity, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and dopamine synthesis. To determine the significance of daytime increases in VTA dopamine activity to manic behaviors, we developed a novel optogenetic stimulation paradigm that produces a sustained increase in dopamine neuronal activity and find that this induces a manic-like behavioral state. Time-dependent dampening of TH activity during the day reverses manic-related behaviours in ClockΔ19 mice. Finally, we show that CLOCK acts as a negative regulator of TH transcription, revealing a novel molecular mechanism underlying cyclic changes in mood-related behaviour. Taken together, these studies have identified a mechanistic connection between circadian gene disruption and the precipitation of manic episodes in bipolar disorder. PMID:25560763

  6. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Mammini, Beth M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  7. The Investigation of the Effects of Gravity on Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzikowicz, Ben; Thiessen, David B.; Marston, Philip

    2000-01-01

    In single bubble following it's rapid collapse each cycle of oscillation of an ultrasonic field. Since widely varying length and time scales affect the bubble dynamics and optical emission processes, it is difficult to anticipate the importance of the effects of gravity present for observations on earth. Our bubble is driven in an acoustically resonating cavity at it's first harmonic mode. The acoustical radiation pressure (Bjerknes force) will then keep it suspended in the center near the pressure antinode. When driven in a region where the diffusive processes balance the bubble it acts in a nonlinear but regular way, emitting a short (approx. 200ps) burst of light each acoustic cycle. Balancing the Bjerknes force with buoyancy, as in, we can see that the bubble should be displaced from the velocity node approximately 20m at normal gravity. Therefore, water flows past the bubble at the time of collapse. Gravitation also changes the ambient pressure at the bubble's location, as Delta.P = rho.g.h this gives a change of approximately -0.5% in our experiment when going from 1.8g to 0g. Studies of ambient pressure changes were also done in order to assess these effects. Inside a pressure sealed chamber a spherical glass cell is filled with distilled water which has been degassed to 120mmHg. A bubble is then trapped in the center and driven by a piezoelectric transducer at 32.2kHz attached to the side of the cell. An optical system is then set up to take strobbed video images along and light emission data simultaneously. Temperature, pressure, drive voltage, and listener voltage are also monitored. PMT output in Volts The radii of the bubbles for both experiment s are fit using the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and the acoustic drive amplitude and the ambient bubble radius are found. There is little change in the acoustic drive amplitude as we expect, since we are not varying the drive voltage. However. the ambient bubble radius goes up considerably. These changes

  8. Realizing the potential of rapid-cycling Brassica as a model system for use in plant biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid-cycling Brassica populations were initially developed as a model for probing the genetic basis of plant disease. Paul Williams and co-workers selected accessions of the six main species for short time to flower and rapid seed maturation. Over multiple generations of breeding and selection, rapid-cycling populations of each of the six species were developed. Because of their close relationship with economically important Brassica species, rapid-cycling Brassica populations, especially those of B. rapa (RCBr) and B. oleracea, have seen wide application in plant and crop physiology investigations. Adding to the popularity of these small, short-lived plants for research applications is their extensive use in K-12 education and outreach.

  9. Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons and Accumulator Rings for High-Intensity Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingyu

    2014-02-01

    Boosted by the needs in high-energy physics and nuclear physics and also multidisciplinary applications, high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulator rings have been developed quickly around the world over the last 30 years. New projects and plans are proposed with even higher beam power. The proton beam power has increased from less than 10 kW in the 1970s to about 1 MW level today, and the required beam power in the coming decade is a few MW. This article reviews the achievements in designing and constructing rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) and accumulator rings (ARs) and the future development trends, principally on proton beams but also including heavy ion beams. It presents the evolution of RCS and AR machines, today's design philosophy, relevant accelerator physics, and also state-of-the-art accelerator technology.

  10. Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron extraction-kicker magent-drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) accelerator of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I (IPNS-I) at Argonne National Laboratory utilizes a fast kicker magnet to provide single-turn extraction for a 500-MeV proton beam at a 30 Hz rate. The single-turn, 0.89-m-long ferrite magnet is broken up into two identical cells with four individual windings. Each winding requires a 4863-A magnetizing current into a 7.0-..cap omega.. load with a rise time of less than 100 ns and a flattop of about 140 ns. Pulse forming network (PFN) charging and switching techniques along with the components used will be described.

  11. Reconsidering Tree Fruit as Candidate Crops Through the Use of Rapid Cycle Crop Breeding Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Gary Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Tree fruit, although desirable from a crew nutrition and menu diversity perspective, have long been dismissed as candidate crops based on their long juvenile phase, large architecture, low short-term harvest index, and dormancy requirements. Recent developments in Rapid Cycle Crop Breeding (RCCB) have overcome these historical limitations, opening the door to a new era in candidate crop research. Researchers at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have developed FT-construct (Flowering Locus T) dwarf plum lines that have a very short juvenile phase, vine-like architecture, and no obligate dormancy period. In a collaborative research effort, NASA and the USDA are evaluating the performance of these FT-lines under controlled environment conditions relevant to spaceflight.

  12. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  13. Proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the intense pulsed neutron source rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx.3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at: (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science; (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation; and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, we are now proposing a third cavity for the RF systems which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  14. β-Arrestin biosensors reveal a rapid, receptor-dependent activation/deactivation cycle.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Lorenz, Kristina; Nuber, Andreas; Milligan, Graeme; Tobin, Andrew B; Lohse, Martin J; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2016-03-31

    (β-)Arrestins are important regulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). They bind to active, phosphorylated GPCRs and thereby shut off 'classical' signalling to G proteins, trigger internalization of GPCRs via interaction with the clathrin machinery and mediate signalling via 'non-classical' pathways. In addition to two visual arrestins that bind to rod and cone photoreceptors (termed arrestin1 and arrestin4), there are only two (non-visual) β-arrestin proteins (β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2, also termed arrestin2 and arrestin3), which regulate hundreds of different (non-visual) GPCRs. Binding of these proteins to GPCRs usually requires the active form of the receptors plus their phosphorylation by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). The binding of receptors or their carboxy terminus as well as certain truncations induce active conformations of (β-)arrestins that have recently been solved by X-ray crystallography. Here we investigate both the interaction of β-arrestin with GPCRs, and the β-arrestin conformational changes in real time and in living human cells, using a series of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based β-arrestin2 biosensors. We observe receptor-specific patterns of conformational changes in β-arrestin2 that occur rapidly after the receptor-β-arrestin2 interaction. After agonist removal, these changes persist for longer than the direct receptor interaction. Our data indicate a rapid, receptor-type-specific, two-step binding and activation process between GPCRs and β-arrestins. They further indicate that β-arrestins remain active after dissociation from receptors, allowing them to remain at the cell surface and presumably signal independently. Thus, GPCRs trigger a rapid, receptor-specific activation/deactivation cycle of β-arrestins, which permits their active signalling. PMID:27007855

  15. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  16. Leverage bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  17. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  18. Parasitic slow extraction of extremely weak beam from a high-intensity proton rapid cycling synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ye; Tang, Jingyu; Yang, Zheng; Jing, Hantao

    2014-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to extract extremely weak beam from a high-intensity proton rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) in the parasitic mode, while maintaining the normal fast extraction. The usual slow extraction method from a synchrotron by employing third-order resonance cannot be applied in a high-intensity RCS due to a very short flat-top at the extraction energy and the strict control on beam loss. The proposed parasitic slow extraction method moves the beam to scrape a scattering foil prior to the fast beam extraction by employing either a local orbit bump or momentum deviation or their combination, so that the halo part of the beam will be scattered. A part of the scattered particles will be extracted from the RCS and guided to the experimental area. The slow extraction process can last about a few milliseconds before the beam is extracted by the fast extraction system. The method has been applied to the RCS of China Spallation Neutron Source. With 1.6 GeV in the extraction energy, 62.5 μA in the average current and 25 Hz in the repetition rate for the RCS, the proton intensity by the slow extraction method can be up to 2×104 protons per cycle or 5×105 protons per second. The extracted beam has also a good time structure of approximately uniform in a spill which is required for many applications such as detector tests. Detailed studies including the scattering effect in the foil, the local orbit bump by the bump magnets and dispersive orbit bump by modifying the RF pattern, the multi-particle simulations by ORBIT and TURTLE codes, and some technical features for the extraction magnets are presented.

  19. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures. PMID:27409013

  20. Rapid response of the steatosis-sensing hepatokine LECT2 during diet-induced weight cycling in mice.

    PubMed

    Chikamoto, Keita; Misu, Hirofumi; Takayama, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Ishii, Kiyo-Aki; Lan, Fei; Takata, Noboru; Tajima-Shirasaki, Natsumi; Takeshita, Yumie; Tsugane, Hirohiko; Kaneko, Shuichi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-09-23

    Dieting often leads to body weight cycling involving repeated weight loss and regain. However, little information is available regarding rapid-response serum markers of overnutrition that predict body weight alterations during weight cycling. Here, we report the rapid response of serum leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 (LECT2), a hepatokine that induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, during diet-induced weight cycling in mice. A switch from a high-fat diet (HFD) to a regular diet (RD) in obese mice gradually decreased body weight but rapidly decreased serum LECT2 levels within 10 days. In contrast, a switch from a RD to a HFD rapidly elevated serum LECT2 levels. Serum LECT2 levels showed a positive correlation with liver triglyceride contents but not with adipose tissue weight. This study demonstrates the rapid response of LECT2 preceding body weight alterations during weight cycling in mice and suggests that measurement of serum LECT2 may be clinically useful in the management of obesity. PMID:27562717

  1. Rapid Quench Cold-Seal Apparatus with Computer-Controlled Pressure and Temperature Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A.; Senkovich, D.

    2007-12-01

    We have constructed two computer-controlled, rapid quench, hydrothermal apparatuses that are ideal for experimentation on volcanological, geothermal, and ore deposit research problems. The devices can achieve maximum pressures of about 2 kbar and temperatures to 1100C, have the ability for experiments to be quenched very rapidly in a water-cooled environment, and are interfaced with computers which can control any regimen of pressure and/or temperature cycling that may be desired, accomplished via Lab-View software and data acquisition and motion control boards from National Instruments. The rapid quench aspects of the design were developed originally by Dr. Phil Ihinger and have subsequently been adopted by many labs around the world; a good summary description of these aspects of the equipment, and the use of filler-rods for controlling redox conditions in such equipment, are provided by Matthews et al. (2004, Am. Mineral., 88: 701-707). Our design has fixed Rene 41 pressure vessels, furnaces that are raised and lowered by computer controlled pneumatic cylinders and water cooling systems that are controlled by computer operated solenoid valves. The novel feature of our design is the pressure generation and control systems. We coupled the seal-ends of commercially available (HIP) pressure generators to shop-built linear actuators consisting of nearly frictionless ball lead screws within thick walled stainless steel housings. These in turn are driven by NEMA size 23 stepper motors coupled to 100:1 gear reduction units. The actuators require 21 revolutions to achieve their full stroke of 12.7 cm which displaces about 10 cc of fluid. Operating the motors at the relatively low resolution of 800 steps per revolution leads to about 132,000 steps per cm of travel of the pressure-generating piston, providing exceptionally high precision and excellent pressure control. Instantaneous decompression can be achieved by simply opening a valve while motor

  2. Continued Development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) System for Advanced Extravehicular Activity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer; Jeng, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Development activities related to the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Humidity control system have progressed to the point of integrating the RCA into an advanced Primary Life Support System (PLSS 2.0) to evaluate the interaction of the RCA among other PLSS components in a ground test environment. The RCA 2.0 assembly (integrated into PLSS 2.0) consists of a valve assembly with commercial actuator motor, a sorbent canister, and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based process node controller. Continued design and development activities for RCA 3.0 have been aimed at optimizing the canister size and incorporating greater fidelity in the valve actuator motor and valve position feedback design. Further, the RCA process node controller is envisioned to incorporate a higher degree of functionality to support a distributed PLSS control architecture. This paper will describe the progression of technology readiness levels of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 along with a review of the design and manufacturing successes and challenges for 2.0 and 3.0 units. The anticipated interfaces and interactions with the PLSS 2.0/2.5/3.0 assemblies will also be discussed.

  3. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently and the ventilation flow is adequate for maintaining CO2 washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, testing planned in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing. 1

  4. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  5. Assessment of the 60 km Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) with Near Real-Time Aircraft Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, R. E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  6. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  7. A Method to Teach Age-Specific Demography with Field Grown Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Martin G.; Terrana, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that rapid cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants) can be used in inquiry-based, student ecological fieldwork. We are the first to describe age-specific survival for field-grown Fast Plants and identify life history traits associated with individual survival. This experiment can be adapted by educators as a…

  8. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers, and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research efforts on genetic mapping in Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa have been disconnected, utilizing separate mapping populations and different sets of molecular markers. Here we present public immortal mapping populations, molecular markers and linkage maps for rapid cycling B. rapa a...

  9. Fast Plants for Finer Science--An Introduction to the Biology of Rapid-Cycling Brassica Campestris (rapa) L.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Stephen P.; Williams, Paul H.

    1990-01-01

    Rapid-cycling brassicas can be used in the classroom to teach concepts such as plant growth, tropisms, floral reproduction, pollination, embryonic development, and plant genetics. Directions on how to obtain them for classroom use and how they may be grown are included. Practical physiology and genetics exercises are listed. (KR)

  10. MiniMax, a new diminutive Glycine max genotype with a rapid life cycle, embryonic potential and transformation capabilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycine max cv MiniMax has a rapid life cycle, short stature and characteristic simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers that make it useful for genetic mapping studies. The development of MiniMax that has many properties of a desirable genetic system prompted the evaluation of its ability to be grown ...

  11. SU-E-T-303: Spot Scanning Dose Delivery with Rapid Cycling Proton Beams From RCMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C; Liu, H; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A rapid cycling proton beam has several distinct characteristics superior to a slow extraction synchrotron: The beam energy and energy spread, beam intensity and spot size can be varied spot by spot. The feasibility of using a spot scanning beam from a rapidc-ycling-medical-synchrotron (RCMS) at 10 Hz repetition frequency is investigated in this study for its application in proton therapy. Methods: The versatility of the beam is illustrated by two examples in water phantoms: (1) a cylindrical PTV irradiated by a single field and (2) a spherical PTV irradiated by two parallel opposed fields. A uniform dose distribution is to be delivered to the volumes. Geant4 Monte Carlo code is used to validate the dose distributions in each example. Results: Transverse algorithms are developed to produce uniform distributions in each transverseplane in the two examples with a cylindrical and a spherical PTV respectively. Longitudinally, different proton energies are used in successive transverse planes toproduce the SOBP required to cover the PTVs. In general, uniformity of dosedistribution within 3% is obtained for the cylinder and 3.5% for the sphere. The transversealgorithms requires only few hundred beam spots for each plane The algorithms may beapplied to larger volumes by increasing the intensity spot by spot for the same deliverytime of the same dose. The treatment time can be shorter than 1 minute for any fieldconfiguration and tumor shape. Conclusion: The unique beam characteristics of a spot scanning beam from a RCMS at 10 Hz repetitionfrequency are used to design transverse and longitudinal algorithms to produce uniformdistribution for any arbitrary shape and size of targets. The proposed spot scanning beam ismore versatile than existing spot scanning beams in proton therapy with better beamcontrol and lower neutron dose. This work is supported in part by grants from the US Department of Energy under contract; DE-FG02-12ER41800 and the National Science

  12. Real-Time Patient Survey Data During Routine Clinical Activities for Rapid-Cycle Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveying patients is increasingly important for evaluating and improving health care delivery, but practical survey strategies during routine care activities have not been available. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting routine patient surveys in a primary care clinic using commercially available technology (Web-based survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, cloud-based management of survey data) to expedite and enhance several steps in data collection and management for rapid quality improvement cycles. Methods We used a Web-based data management tool (survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, real-time data accumulation and display of survey results) to conduct four patient surveys during routine clinic sessions over a one-month period. Each survey consisted of three questions and focused on a specific patient care domain (dental care, waiting room experience, care access/continuity, Internet connectivity). Results Of the 727 available patients during clinic survey days, 316 patients (43.4%) attempted the survey, and 293 (40.3%) completed the survey. For the four 3-question surveys, the average time per survey was overall 40.4 seconds, with a range of 5.4 to 20.3 seconds for individual questions. Yes/No questions took less time than multiple choice questions (average 9.6 seconds versus 14.0). Average response time showed no clear pattern by order of questions or by proctor strategy, but monotonically increased with number of words in the question (<20 words, 21-30 words, >30 words)—8.0, 11.8, 16.8, seconds, respectively. Conclusions This technology-enabled data management system helped capture patient opinions, accelerate turnaround of survey data, with minimal impact on a busy primary care clinic. This new model of patient survey data management is feasible and sustainable in a busy office setting, supports and engages clinicians in the quality improvement process, and harmonizes with the vision of a learning health

  13. Generation of Bubbly Suspensions in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hoffmann, Monica I.; Hussey, Sam; Bell, Kimberly R.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of a uniform monodisperse bubbly suspension in low gravity is a rather difficult task because bubbles do not detach as easily as on Earth. Under microgravity, the buoyancy force is not present to detach the bubbles as they are formed from the nozzles. One way to detach the bubbles is to establish a detaching force that helps their detachment from the orifice. The drag force, established by flowing a liquid in a cross or co-flow configuration with respect to the nozzle direction, provides this additional force and helps detach the bubbles as they are being formed. This paper is concerned with studying the generation of a bubbly suspension in low gravity in support of a flight definition experiment titled "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension." Generation of a bubbly suspension, composed of 2 and 3 mm diameter bubbles with a standard deviation <10% of the bubble diameter, was identified as one of the most important engineering/science issues associated with the flight definition experiment. This paper summarizes the low gravity experiments that were conducted to explore various ways of making the suspension. Two approaches were investigated. The first was to generate the suspension via a chemical reaction between the continuous and dispersed phases using effervescent material, whereas the second considered the direct injection of air into the continuous phase. The results showed that the reaction method did not produce the desired bubble size distribution compared to the direct injection of bubbles. However, direct injection of air into the continuous phase (aqueous salt solution) resulted in uniform bubble-diameter distribution with acceptable bubble-diameter standard deviation.

  14. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  15. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  16. Arrested Bubble Rise in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamstaes, Catherine; Eggers, Jens

    2016-06-01

    If a long air bubble is placed inside a vertical tube closed at the top it can rise by displacing the fluid above it. However, Bretherton found that if the tube radius, R, is smaller than a critical value Rc=0.918 ℓ_c , where ℓ_c=√{γ /ρ g} is the capillary length, there is no solution corresponding to steady rise. Experimentally, the bubble rise appears to have stopped altogether. Here we explain this observation by studying the unsteady bubble motion for Rbubble and the tube goes to zero in limit of large t like t^{-4/5} , leading to a rapid slow-down of the bubble's mean speed U ∝ t^{-2} . As a result, the total bubble rise in infinite time remains very small, giving the appearance of arrested motion.

  17. How-to-Do-It. Fast Plants--Rapid-Cycling Brassicas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafner, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which the life cycle of a plant is investigated over a 20-day period. Included are background information, a list of materials, procedures, diagrams of the plant, apparatus, and pollination. An outline is suggested. (CW)

  18. Bubble nucleation in an explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broek, D. M.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2008-06-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a temperature close to the critical temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures spontaneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse. In this paper we take a closer look at the bubble nucleation. The moment of bubble nucleation was determined by both stroboscopic imaging and resistance thermometry. Two nucleation regimes could be distinguished. Several different heater designs were investigated under heat fluxes of hundreds of W mm-2. A close correspondence between current density in the heater and point of nucleation was found. This results in design rules for effective heaters.

  19. Acoustic bubble removal method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for removing bubbles from a liquid bath such as a bath of molten glass to be used for optical elements. Larger bubbles are first removed by applying acoustic energy resonant to a bath dimension to drive the larger bubbles toward a pressure well where the bubbles can coalesce and then be more easily removed. Thereafter, submillimeter bubbles are removed by applying acoustic energy of frequencies resonant to the small bubbles to oscillate them and thereby stir liquid immediately about the bubbles to facilitate their breakup and absorption into the liquid.

  20. Justification of rapid prototyping in the development cycle of thermoplastic-based lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Preywisch, Regina; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Drese, Klaus S; Röser, Tina

    2011-11-01

    During the developmental cycle of lab-on-a-chip devices, various microstructuring techniques are required. While in the designing and assay implementation phase direct structuring or so-called rapid-prototyping methods such as milling or laser ablation are applied, replication methods like hot embossing or injection moulding are favourable for large quantity manufacturing. This work investigated the applicability of rapid-prototyping techniques for thermoplastic chip development in general, and the reproducibility of performances in dependency of the structuring technique. A previously published chip for prenatal diagnosis that preconcentrates DNA via electrokinetic trapping and field-amplified-sample-stacking and afterwards separates it in CGE was chosen as a model. The impact of structuring, sealing, and the integration of membranes on the mobility of the EOF, DNA preconcentration, and DNA separation was studied. Structuring methods were found to significantly change the location where preconcentration of DNA occurs. However, effects on the mobility of the EOF and the separation quality of DNA were not observed. Exchange of the membrane has no effect on the chip performance, whereas the sealing method impairs the separation of DNA within the chip. The overall assay performance is not significantly influenced by different structuring methods; thus, the application of rapid-prototyping methods during a chip development cycle is well justified. PMID:22102495

  1. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of

  2. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by

  3. Effect of five cycle rapid freeze-thaw treatment in conjunction with various chemicals for the reduction of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Olson, V M; Swaminathan, B; Pratt, D E; Stadelman, W J

    1981-08-01

    A five cycle rapid freeze-rapid thaw process was used in conjunction with chemicals to reduce numbers of Salmonella typhimurium cells on poultry meat. The second portion of chicken wings consisting of ulna and radius with attached skin and muscle was inoculated with 400 to 900 colony forming units (CFU/g) of a nalidixic acid resistant strain of S. typhimurium. Chemicals used were 20 ppm chlorine, 5% potassium sorbate, 5% lactic acid, and 5% calcium propionate. The wings were either sprayed with or dipped into all chemicals before the freeze-thaw process. Wings were also chemically treated and not subjected to the freeze-thaw process. Numbers of S. typhimurium were determined by the most probable number procedure. The relative effectiveness of combinations of chemicals and the freeze-thaw process was compared to a control with the following percentage reductions of numbers of S. typhimurium cells: lactic acid, 98%; calcium propionate, 96%; potassium sorbate, 96%; chlorine, 95%; and freeze-thaw process without chemicals, 95%. There were no statistically significant differences among the treatments. In pilot plant study simulating commercial conditions, a carbon dioxide freezer was used for the rapid freeze and a microwave oven was used for the rapid thaw. Treatment of wings with 5% lactic acid plus freeze-thaw process resulted in statistically significant fewer numbers of S. typhimurium cells when compared to the freeze-thaw process without chemical treatment or to wings chemically treated without the freeze-thaw process. PMID:7322982

  4. Observation of a Sonoluminescing Bubble Using a Stroboscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuka, Teruyuki; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Yasui, Kyuichi; Mitome, Hideto

    2000-05-01

    A method to observe sonoluminescing bubble motion has been studied. By a single flash of a stroboscope much shorter than the acoustic cycle, a charge coupled device (CCD) camera captures an instantaneous image of the bubble, which includes the dancing condition. Changing the flash timing of the stroboscope slowly made it possible to observe periodical expansion and contraction of the bubble. It is clarified that the bubble size and the phase at the time the bubble collapses changes according to the amplitude of sound pressure.

  5. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-02-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  6. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  7. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  8. Kinetics of Bubble Generation in Mafic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. A.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanically erupted mafic enclaves are typically vesicular, with the bubbles forming when the mafic magma cools after it is injected and disaggregated into a cooler silicic magma. This study uses hydrothermal experiments to investigate the kinetics of pre-eruptive bubble nucleation and growth within mafic magmas, focused on the efficiency of nucleation on different minerals, and to quantify the growth rate of bubbles with varying cooling rates. Starting materials are natural mafic enclaves from Southwest Trident, Alaska. Experiments were initially equilibrated with H2O at 85 MPa and 1065 °C for 2 hours, producing a melt with blocky crystals of plagioclase and pyroxene, and spherical bubbles with a mean 30 μm diameter and number density (Nv) of 7.2x104 cm-3. Upon cooling to 1015 °C at 2 °C/h, the mineralogy and Nv did not change (although total crystallinity increased), while the mean bubble diameter increased to 90 μm. Cooling further to 985 °C at 2 °C/h, resulted in the crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides, along with an abrupt Nv increase (3.0x105 cm-3) of bubbles with a mean diameter of 60 μm. This abrupt bubble nucleation event, coinciding with the formation of Fe-Ti oxides, suggests that plagioclase and pyroxene are poor bubble nucleation sites in mafic melts, and that Fe-Ti oxides are good bubble nucleation sites, similar to previous results using rhyolite melts. Additionally, the occurrence of this nucleation event suggests that cooling related diffusive growth of bubbles in mafic enclaves, under magma chamber conditions, is too slow to keep up with increasing volatile saturation in the melt, and that the melt may become supersaturated until nucleation sites for new bubbles become available. Rapid cooling (1065-985 °C at 110 °C/h) produced abundant acicular plagioclase and pyroxene crystals (no Fe-Ti oxides), and bubbles with a nearly identical mean diameter and Nv to experiments equilibrated at 1065 °C. It is therefore likely that bubbles will not

  9. Mapping the Anthocyaninless (anl) Locus in Rapid-Cycling Brassica rapa (RBr) to Linkage Group R9

    PubMed Central

    Burdzinski, Carrie; Wendell, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    Background Anthocyanins are flavonoid pigments that are responsible for purple coloration in the stems and leaves of a variety of plant species. Anthocyaninless (anl) mutants of Brassica rapa fail to produce anthocyanin pigments. In rapid-cycling Brassica rapa, also known as Wisconsin Fast Plants, the anthocyaninless trait, also called non-purple stem, is widely used as a model recessive trait for teaching genetics. Although anthocyanin genes have been mapped in other plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana, the anl locus has not been mapped in any Brassica species. Results We tested primer pairs known to amplify microsatellites in Brassicas and identified 37 that amplified a product in rapid-cycling Brassica rapa. We then developed three-generation pedigrees to assess linkage between the microsatellite markers and anl. 22 of the markers that we tested were polymorphic in our crosses. Based on 177 F2 offspring, we identified three markers linked to anl with LOD scores ≥ 5.0, forming a linkage group spanning 46.9 cM. Because one of these markers has been assigned to a known B. rapa linkage group, we can now assign the anl locus to B. rapa linkage group R9. Conclusion This study is the first to identify the chromosomal location of an anthocyanin pigment gene among the Brassicas. It also connects a classical mutant frequently used in genetics education with molecular markers and a known chromosomal location. PMID:17894874

  10. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  11. Contrail life cycle and properties from 1 year of MSG/SEVIRI rapid-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Navarro, M.; Mannstein, H.; Kox, S.

    2015-08-01

    The automatic contrail tracking algorithm (ACTA) - developed to automatically follow contrails as they age, drift and spread - enables the study of a large number of contrails and the evolution of contrail properties with time. In this paper we present a year's worth of tracked contrails, from August 2008 to July 2009 in order to derive statistically significant mean values. The tracking is performed using the 5 min rapid-scan mode of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The detection is based on the high spatial resolution of the images provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on board the Terra satellite (Terra/MODIS), where a contrail detection algorithm (CDA) is applied. The results show the satellite-derived average lifetimes of contrails and contrail-cirrus along with the probability density function (PDF) of other geometric characteristics such as mean coverage, distribution and width. In combination with specifically developed algorithms (RRUMS; Rapid Retrieval of Upwelling irradiance from MSG/SEVIRI and COCS (Cirrus Optical properties derived from CALIOP and SEVIRI), explained below) it is possible to derive the radiative forcing (RF), energy forcing (EF), optical thickness (τ) and altitude of the tracked contrails. Mean values here retrieved are duration, 1 h; length, 130 km; width, 8 km; altitude, 11.7 km; optical thickness, 0.34. Radiative forcing and energy forcing are shown for land/water backgrounds in day/night situations.

  12. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  13. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  14. Geyser preplay and eruption in a laboratory model with a bubble trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelstein, E.; Tran, A.; Munoz Saez, C.; Shteinberg, A.; Manga, M.

    2013-12-01

    Geysers are springs that produce episodic eruptions of liquid water and vapor. Relatively short eruption cycles and accessibility of conduits make extensive observation of eruptive processes in geysers feasible. Along with field observations, laboratory models are useful for further describing geyser dynamics. Here we focus on the role of a 'bubble trap', a region in the geyser's plumbing system in which vapor can accumulate. We present measurements from a laboratory model. The model geyser consists of two reservoirs connected by a conduit with a central tight S-shaped bend to create a bubble trap. The conduit is thus divided into two sections: one extends into the upper reservoir and the other is connected to the lower reservoir. A second conduit returns erupted liquid to the lower reservoir. The apparatus is filled with water and heated below the lower reservoir. A period of quiescence follows each eruption. During this phase, a bubble is trapped in the lower S-bend. As the bubble grows, most of its volume remains in the bend while its edges oscillate and vapor is released into the upper conduit. Vapor occasionally reaches the top of the conduit and expels a small amount of liquid. This process may be analogous to geyser preplay. Eruption begins when the upper surface of the main bubble reaches the top of the conduit. We observe two modes of eruption: boiling occurs (1) in the entire system or (2) only in the conduit above the upper boundary of the trapped bubble. In the former case, the rapid hydrostatic pressure drop from filling the upper conduit with vapor results in boiling in the entire system. Eruption ends when enough cold erupted water has been recycled to the lower reservoir that the temperature drops below boiling. Though simpler than a natural geyser, our model provides insight into preplay and eruption styles in a conduit with a bubble trap, a feature that has been invoked to explain dynamics of geysers in Kamchatka and Yellowstone.

  15. Observations of electrons in the Intense Pulse Neutron Source (IPNS) Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS).

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, J. C.; Brumwell, F. R.; Czyz, W. S.; Harkay, K. C.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    In the process of accelerating protons from 50 to 450 MeV at 30 Hz, low-energy electrons are generated within the IPNS RCS vacuum chamber. Electrons from background gas stripping are detected using an Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM) to generate integrated, horizontal charge distributions of the single-harmonic bunch during acceleration. Recently, a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was installed in the RCS to look for evidence of beam-induced multipacting by measuring the electrons ejected by the space charge of the beam. A wide-band, high-gain transimpedance amplifier has been built to observe time structure in the electron signal detected with the RFA. Though a noisy power supply prevented full I-V characteristics from being obtained, interesting features are observed; especially, after the period of phase modulation between the rf cavities that is deliberately introduced during the cycle. The phase modulation generates a longitudinal quadrupole oscillation in the bunch, which is believed to enhance beam stability. Preliminary results indicate that electron multipacting is not significant in the RCS. The effects of background gas neutralization are considered and details of the RFA measurements are presented.

  16. Mass transport by buoyant bubbles in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Edward C. D.; Babul, Arif; Pavlovski, Georgi; Bower, Richard G.; Dotter, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the effect of three important processes by which active galactic nuclei (AGN)-blown bubbles transport material: drift, wake transport and entrainment. The first of these, drift, occurs because a buoyant bubble pushes aside the adjacent material, giving rise to a net upward displacement of the fluid behind the bubble. For a spherical bubble, the mass of upwardly displaced material is roughly equal to half the mass displaced by the bubble and should be ~ 107-9 Msolar depending on the local intracluster medium (ICM) and bubble parameters. We show that in classical cool-core clusters, the upward displacement by drift may be a key process in explaining the presence of filaments behind bubbles. A bubble also carries a parcel of material in a region at its rear, known as the wake. The mass of the wake is comparable to the drift mass and increases the average density of the bubble, trapping it closer to the cluster centre and reducing the amount of heating it can do during its ascent. Moreover, material dropping out of the wake will also contribute to the trailing filaments. Mass transport by the bubble wake can effectively prevent the buildup of cool material in the central galaxy, even if AGN heating does not balance ICM cooling. Finally, we consider entrainment, the process by which ambient material is incorporated into the bubble. Studies of observed bubbles show that they subtend an opening angle much larger than predicted by simple adiabatic expansion. We show that bubbles that entrain ambient material as they rise will expand faster than the adiabatic prediction; however, the entrainment rate required to explain the observed opening angle is large enough that the density contrast between the bubble and its surroundings would disappear rapidly. We therefore conclude that entrainment is unlikely to be a dominant mass transport process. Additionally, this also suggests that the bubble surface is much more stable against instabilities that promote

  17. Contrail life cycle and properties from one year of MSG/SEVIRI rapid-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Navarro, M.; Mannstein, H.; Kox, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Automatic Contrail Tracking Algorithm (ACTA) -developed to automatically follow contrails as they age, drift and spread- enables the study of a large number of contrails and the evolution of contrail properties with time. In this paper we present a year's worth of tracked contrails, from August 2008 to July 2009 in order to derive statistically significant mean values. The tracking is performed using the 5 min rapid-scan mode of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board of the Meteosat Second Generation satellites (MSG). The detection is based on the high spatial resolution of the images provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on board of the Terra satellite (Terra/MODIS), where a Contrail Detection Algorithm (CDA) is applied. The results show the satellite-derived average lifetimes of contrails and contrail-cirrus along with the probability density function (PDF) of other geometric characteristics such as mean coverage, distribution and width. In combination with specifically developed algorithms (RRUMS and COCS, explained below) it is possible to derive the radiative forcing (RF), energy forcing (EF), optical thickness (τ), and altitude of the tracked contrails. Mean values here retrieved are: duration, 1 h; length, 130 km; width, 8 km; altitude, 11.7 km; optical thickness, 0.34. Radiative forcing and energy forcing are shown for land/water backgrounds in day/night situations.

  18. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapic Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently enough and the ventilation flow is adequate enough to maintain CO2 1 Project Engineer, Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch, Crew and Thermal Systems Division, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058/EC5. washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, the testing results performed in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing.

  19. Dietary Deficiency of Essential Amino Acids Rapidly Induces Cessation of the Rat Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Makoto; Ichimaru, Toru; Nakano, Sayako; Murata, Takuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive functions are regulated by the sophisticated coordination between the neuronal and endocrine systems and are sustained by a proper nutritional environment. Female reproductive function is vulnerable to effects from dietary restrictions, suggesting a transient adaptation that prioritizes individual survival over reproduction until a possible future opportunity for satiation. This adaptation could also partially explain the existence of amenorrhea in women with anorexia nervosa. Because amino acid nutritional conditions other than caloric restriction uniquely alters amino acid metabolism and affect the hormonal levels of organisms, we hypothesized that the supply of essential amino acids in the diet plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the female reproductive system. To test this hypothesis, we examined ovulatory cyclicity in female rats under diets that were deficient in threonine, lysine, tryptophan, methionine or valine. Ovulatory cyclicity was monitored by daily cytological evaluations of vaginal smears. After continuous feeding of the deficient diet, a persistent diestrus or anovulatory state was induced most quickly by the valine-deficient diet and most slowly by the lysine-deficient diet. A decline in the systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 level was associated with a dietary amino acid deficiency. Furthermore, a paired group of rats that were fed an isocaloric diet with balanced amino acids maintained normal estrous cyclicity. These disturbances of the estrous cycle by amino acid deficiency were quickly reversed by the consumption of a normal diet. The continuous anovulatory state in this study is not attributable to a decrease in caloric intake but to an imbalance in the dietary amino acid composition. With a shortage of well-balanced amino acid sources, reproduction becomes risky for both the mother and the fetus. It could be viewed as an adaptation to the diet, diverting resources away from reproduction and reallocating them to

  20. Anti-AMPA-Receptor Encephalitis Presenting as a Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder in a Young Woman with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune encephalitis is a disorder characterised by the subacute onset of seizures, short-term memory loss, and psychiatric and behavioural symptoms. Initially, it was recognised as a paraneoplastic disorder, but recently a subgroup of patients without systemic cancer was identified. Case Description. We describe a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome presenting with a treatment-resistant rapid cycling bipolar disorder with cognitive impairment. She was diagnosed with anti-AMPA-receptor encephalitis. She showed marked improvement after starting memantine and valproic acid. Conclusion. This case description emphasises the importance of timely recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalitis in patients with psychiatric manifestations and a possible predisposition to autoimmune conditions, in order to rule out malignancy and to quickly initiate treatment. PMID:26495149

  1. Identification of pathogenic Leptospira genospecies by continuous monitoring of fluorogenic hybridization probes during rapid-cycle PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, T H; Patel, B K; Smythe, L D; Symonds, M L; Norris, M A; Dohnt, M F

    1997-01-01

    Partial sequences of 23S rRNA gene PCR products from 23 strains of 6 pathogenic Leptospira genospecies and from 8 strains of the saprophytic Leptospira biflexa were determined. Sequence analyses enabled Leptospira genus-specific amplification primers and pathogen-specific fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to be designed and synthesized. A PCR protocol was developed in which changes in fluorescence emission resulting from specific annealing of fluorogenic adjacent hybridization probes to the target DNA were continuously monitored. Nine strains of the pathogenic Leptospira genospecies could be differentiated from Leptonema illini, Escherichia coli, and eight strains of Leptospira biflexa. The PCR method was rapid, requiring 18 min for the completion of 45 cycles. It was also simple and flexible, as DNA templates prepared by four different methods, including the simple boiling method, could be used without adverse effects. Two hundred copies of target, equivalent to 100 cells, could be detected. PMID:9399509

  2. Impedance measurements of the extraction kicker system for the rapid cycling synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Yong; Liu, Ren-Hong; Xiao, Ou-Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The fast extraction kicker system is one of the most important accelerator components and the main source of impedance in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the China Spallation Neutron Source. It is necessary to understand the kicker impedance before its installation into the tunnel. Conventional and improved wire methods are employed in the impedance measurement. The experimental results for the kicker impedance are explained by comparison with simulation using CST PARTICLE STUDIO. The simulation and measurement results confirm that the window-frame ferrite geometry and the end plate are the important structures causing coupling impedance. It is proved in the measurements that the mismatching from the power form network to the kicker leads to a serious oscillation sideband of the longitudinal and vertical impedance and the oscillation can be reduced by ferrite absorbing material. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  3. Breakage-fusion-bridge Cycles and Large Insertions Contribute to the Rapid Evolution of Accessory Chromosomes in a Fungal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Croll, Daniel; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for adaptive evolution in

  4. Physical Processes for Single Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Ho-Young; Na, Jung

    1997-10-01

    Analytic solutions for a sonoluminescing gas bubble have been obtained, which provide density, pressure and temperature distributions for the gas inside bubble oscillating under ultrasonic field. The solutions have revealed that sonoluminescence should occur just prior to the bubble collapse and its duration is less than 300 ps and that increase and subsequent rapid decrease in bubble wall acceleration induce the quenching of gas, consequently of the optical emission followed by the substantial temperature rise up to 100,000 K, which can be regarded as a thermal spike. Also the solutions have revealed that Guderley's similarity solution is not valid just prior to the bubble collapse. The gas temperature inside the bubble near the collapse is determined primarily by the amount of radiation heat loss. It also turns out that the number of electrons ionized, the ion species and the kinetic energy of electrons affect the spectrum of light emission crucially. The calculated spectral radiance including the significant tails at short wavelengths, which shows a broad maximum, is in good agreement with observed data qualitatively. Further, it has been found that the bulk modulus of the liquid is the most important liquid property for the occurance of single bubble sonoluminescence.

  5. Bubble Manipulation by Self Organization of Bubbles inside Ultrasonic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Koganezawa, Masato

    2005-06-01

    Microbubble manipulation using ultrasonic waves is a promising technology in the fields of future medicine and biotechnology. For example, it is considered that bubble trapping using ultrasonic waves may play an important role in drug or gene delivery systems in order to trap the drugs or genes in the diseased tissue. Usually, when bubbles are designed so that they carry payloads, such as drug or gene, they tend to be harder than free bubbles. These hard bubbles receive a small acoustic radiation force, which is not sufficient for bubble manipulation. In this paper, a novel method of microbubble manipulation using ultrasonic waves is proposed. This method uses seed bubbles in order to manipulate target bubbles. When the seed bubbles are introduced into the ultrasonic wave field, they start to oscillate to produce a bubble aggregation of a certain size. Then the target bubbles are introduced, the target bubbles attach around the seed bubbles producing a bubble mass with bilayers (inner layer: seed bubbles, outer layer: target bubbles). The target bubbles are manipulated as a bilayered bubble mass. Basic experiments are carried out using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shell bubbles. No target bubbles are trapped when only the target bubbles are introduced. However, they are trapped if the seed bubbles are introduced in advance.

  6. Deploying Methane Bubble Traps at Varying Lake Depths to Validate Bubble Dissolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwiche, K.; Scandella, B.; Juanes, R.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and understanding environmental methane cycles is critical both to developing accurate estimates of current methane emission rates and to modeling how cycles may respond to climate change. While there are many natural sources of methane, bubbling from lake sediments, or ebullition, is considered an important emission pathway. Ebullition can transport methane directly to the atmosphere, bypassing potential chemical or biological degradation in the water column. Existing bubble models predict some methane dissolution from rising bubbles, though dissolution estimates depend on the particular equations chosen to parameterize bubble rise velocity and gas transfer rates. To test current bubble dissolution models we installed a series of bubble traps at multiple depths in Upper Mystic Lake near Boston, Massachusetts. Traps gathered bubbles continuously during the summer of 2013 and were periodically emptied for gas volume measurements and chemical composition analysis. The gathered trap data demonstrated that surface traps have a significantly reduced bubble volume and methane fraction when compared with lake-bottom traps. This difference allows us to quantify the amount of methane dissolved in the water column due to ebullition. Preliminary data suggest that dissolution from bubbles could account for approximately 5% of the previously observed hypolimnetic methane accumulation in Upper Mystic Lake. Bubble methane contents in surface traps are consistent with average bubble sizes in the 3-6 mm diameter range based on the bubble models of McGinnis et al, 2006, and suggest that on the order of 50% of methane released by ebullition in this lake is dissolved before reaching the atmosphere. Data also indicates that careful corrections may be needed to account for small amounts of potential gas losses associated with dissolution at the gas/water interface within the traps. Using the gathered data to understand bubble size distributions

  7. Bubble collisions and measures of the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    To compute the spectrum of bubble collisions seen by an observer in an eternally-inflating multiverse, one must choose a measure over the diverging spacetime volume, including choosing an ''initial'' hypersurface below which there are no bubble nucleations. Previous calculations focused on the case where the initial hypersurface is pushed arbitrarily deep into the past. Interestingly, the observed spectrum depends on the orientation of the initial hypersurface, however one's ability observe the effect rapidly decreases with the ratio of inflationary Hubble rates inside and outside one's bubble. We investigate whether this conclusion might be avoided under more general circumstances, including placing the observer's bubble near the initial hypersurface. We find that it is not. As a point of reference, a substantial appendix reviews relevant aspects of the measure problem of eternal inflation.

  8. Bubble Velocities in Slowly Sheared Bubble Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Many complex fluids, such as foams, emulsions, colloids, and granular matter, exhibit interesting flow behavior when subjected to slow, steady rates of strain. The flow is characterized by irregular fluctuations in the stress with corresponding nonlinear rearrangements of the individual particles. We focus on the flow behavior of a model two-dimensional system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts consist of a single layer of soap bubbles floating on the surface of a liquid subphase, usually a soap-water solution. The bubbles are sheared using a Couette geometry, i.e. concentric cylinders. We rotate the outer cylinder at a constant rate and measure the motions of individual bubbles and the stress on the inner cylinder. We will report on the velocity profiles of the bubbles averaged over long-times and averaged over individual stress events. The long-time average velocities are well described by continuum models for fluids with the one surprising feature that there exists a critical radius at which the shear-rate is discontinuous. The individual profiles are highly nonlinear and strongly correlated with the stress fluctuations. We will discuss a number of interesting questions. Can the average profiles be understood in a simple way given the individual velocities? Is there a clear "classification" for the individual profiles, or are they purely random? What sets the critical radius for a given set of flow conditions?

  9. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  10. Radio Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Robert J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with GHz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ''ghost bubbles'', i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10MHz and 10GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 {approx}< k/f {approx}< 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t{sub cool} {approx}< 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T{sub centre}/T{sub outer} < 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  11. Rapid changes in the seasonal sea level cycle along the US Gulf coast in the early 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, T.; Calafat, F. M.; Luther, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    annual amplitude and the rapid increase over the last decade in the eastern GOM. We have developed several multiple regression models (MRM) with a varying number of independent predictors to reconstruct the temporal changes back to the mid and early 20th century (depending on data availability of the predictors). The models are able to explain up to 85% of the observed variability (70% on average across sites) and major parts of the rapid increase in the early 21st century. Multicollinearity between the predictors makes it difficult to quantify the contribution of individual parameters to the increase but sensitivity tests outline that changes in the annual cycle of the air surface temperature (which in turn directly propagates into the sea surface temperature) played a dominant role. The MRMs allow us to reconstruct the seasonal sea level cycle back to the early 20th century at all tide gauge sites and will be used in a follow-up study in combination with regional climate model output to assess potential future changes.

  12. Electrowetting of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arscott, Steve

    2013-07-01

    A proof-of-concept demonstration of the electrowetting-on-dielectric of a sessile soap bubble is reported here. The bubbles are generated using a commercial soap bubble mixture—the surfaces are composed of highly doped, commercial silicon wafers covered with nanometer thick films of Teflon®. Voltages less than 40 V are sufficient to observe the modification of the bubble shape and the apparent bubble contact angle. Such observations open the way to inter alia the possibility of bubble-transport, as opposed to droplet-transport, in fluidic microsystems (e.g., laboratory-on-a-chip)—the potential gains in terms of volume, speed, and surface/volume ratio are non-negligible.

  13. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  14. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. PMID:25194210

  15. Mining Available Data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to Support Rapid Life Cycle Inventory Modeling of Chemical Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Sarah A; Meyer, David E; Edelen, Ashley N; Ingwersen, Wesley W; Abraham, John P; Barrett, William M; Gonzalez, Michael A; Randall, Paul M; Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo; Smith, Raymond L

    2016-09-01

    Demands for quick and accurate life cycle assessments create a need for methods to rapidly generate reliable life cycle inventories (LCI). Data mining is a suitable tool for this purpose, especially given the large amount of available governmental data. These data are typically applied to LCIs on a case-by-case basis. As linked open data becomes more prevalent, it may be possible to automate LCI using data mining by establishing a reproducible approach for identifying, extracting, and processing the data. This work proposes a method for standardizing and eventually automating the discovery and use of publicly available data at the United States Environmental Protection Agency for chemical-manufacturing LCI. The method is developed using a case study of acetic acid. The data quality and gap analyses for the generated inventory found that the selected data sources can provide information with equal or better reliability and representativeness on air, water, hazardous waste, on-site energy usage, and production volumes but with key data gaps including material inputs, water usage, purchased electricity, and transportation requirements. A comparison of the generated LCI with existing data revealed that the data mining inventory is in reasonable agreement with existing data and may provide a more-comprehensive inventory of air emissions and water discharges. The case study highlighted challenges for current data management practices that must be overcome to successfully automate the method using semantic technology. Benefits of the method are that the openly available data can be compiled in a standardized and transparent approach that supports potential automation with flexibility to incorporate new data sources as needed. PMID:27517866

  16. Rapid freeze-drying cycle optimization using computer programs developed based on heat and mass transfer models and facilitated by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS).

    PubMed

    Kuu, Wei Y; Nail, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    Computer programs in FORTRAN were developed to rapidly determine the optimal shelf temperature, T(f), and chamber pressure, P(c), to achieve the shortest primary drying time. The constraint for the optimization is to ensure that the product temperature profile, T(b), is below the target temperature, T(target). Five percent mannitol was chosen as the model formulation. After obtaining the optimal sets of T(f) and P(c), each cycle was assigned with a cycle rank number in terms of the length of drying time. Further optimization was achieved by dividing the drying time into a series of ramping steps for T(f), in a cascading manner (termed the cascading T(f) cycle), to further shorten the cycle time. For the purpose of demonstrating the validity of the optimized T(f) and P(c), four cycles with different predicted lengths of drying time, along with the cascading T(f) cycle, were chosen for experimental cycle runs. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to continuously measure the sublimation rate. As predicted, maximum product temperatures were controlled slightly below the target temperature of -25 degrees C, and the cascading T(f)-ramping cycle is the most efficient cycle design. In addition, the experimental cycle rank order closely matches with that determined by modeling. PMID:19504575

  17. Conditions for bubble elongation in cold ice-sheet ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, R.B.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Highly elongated bubbles are sometimes observed in ice-sheet ice. Elongation is favored by rapid ice deformation, and opposed by diffusive processes. We use simple models to show that vapor transport dominates diffusion except possibly very close to the melting point, and that latent-heat effects are insignificant. Elongation is favored by larger bubbles at pore close-off, but is nearly independent of bubble compression below close-off. The simple presence of highly elongated bubbles indicates only that a critical ice-strain rate has been exceeded for significant time, and provides no information on possible disruption of stratigraphic continuity by ice deformation.

  18. Assimilation of GOES Land Surface Data Within a Rapid Update Cycle Format: Impact on MM5 Warm Season QPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; Jedlovec, Gary; McNider, Richard T.; Dembek, Scott; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts simulations of near-surface meteorology on the 0-to 12-hour time scale when implemented within a local rapid update cycle (LRUC) format. The PSU/NCAR MM5 V34 is used and configured with a 36-km CONUS domain and a 12-km nest centered over the southeastern US. The LRUC format consists of a sequence of 12-hour forecasts initialized every hour between 12 and 18 UTC seven days a week. GOES skin temperature tendencies and solar insolation are assimilated in a 1-hour period prior to the start of each twelve-hour forecast. A unique aspect of the LRUC is the satellite assimilation and the continuous recycling of the adjusted moisture availability field from one forecast cycle to the next. Preliminary results for a seven-day trial period indicate that hourly LST tendencies assimilated in a 1 hour LRUC showed improved simulated air and dewpoint

  19. Effects of system pressure and heat flux on bubble nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chao; Zhang, Huichen

    2015-09-01

    Characteristics of bubble nucleation and growth are critical for its application. It is affected by several factors including viscosity, surface tension and temperature. However, the effect of pressure on bubble nucleation and growth has been underreported, although it processes significant effect on above characteristics. In this work, a micro copper electrode is etched on a slab covered with copper to produce bubble on the surface by current input. The nucleation time of bubble is measured under different heat flux and system pressures. The nucleation and growth processes are recorded with a high speed camera in order to discuss the effects of heat flux and system pressure on bubble characteristics. The experiment results indicate that the micro electrode with higher heat flux produces more thermal energy, which makes the time of bubble nucleation shorter and the speed of bubble growth faster. Higher system pressure causes the increase of the critical nucleation temperature and also baffles the bubble nucleation and growth. Bubble growth includes the stages of rapid growth and dynamic equilibrium, with the speed being from fast to slow. In the former part of rapid growth, heat flux plays a dominant role in bubble growth. While the effect of system pressure on bubble growth becomes significant in the latter part of rapid growth. Both the nucleation time and bubble growth agree well with the theoretical analysis. The obtained results help to accurately control bubble nucleation and growth required in different application.

  20. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  1. Electric Field Effect on Bubble Detachment in Variable Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacona, Estelle; Herman, Cila; Chang, Shinan

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the present study, the process of bubble detachment from an orifice in a plane surface, shows some resemblance to bubble departure in boiling. Because of the high heat transfer coefficients associated with phase change processes, boiling is utilized in many industrial operations and is an attractive solution to cooling problems in aerospace engineering. In terrestrial conditions, buoyancy is responsible for bubble removal from the surface. In space, the gravity level being orders of magnitude smaller than on earth, bubbles formed during boiling remain attached at the surface. As a result, the amount of heat removed from the heated surface can decrease considerably. The use of electric fields is proposed to control bubble behavior and help bubble removal from the surface on which they form. The objective of the study is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static electric field. Bubble cycle life were visualized in terrestrial conditions and for several reduced gravity levels. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment were measured and analyzed for different parameters as gravity level and electric field magnitude. Situations were considered with uniform or non-uni form electric field. Results show that these parameters significantly affect bubble behavior, shape, volume and dimensions.

  2. Personal and Societal Construction of Illness Among Individuals With Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder: A Life-Trajectory Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Jenkins, Janis H.; Safavi, Roknedin; West, Jane A.; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Meyer, William J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Bipolar disorder is a chronic mental illness associated with substantial impairment in quality of life and function. Although there has been tremendous growth in understanding bipolar disorder with respect to treatments, very little study has focused on the viewpoint of affected individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine the subjective experience of illness among 19 men and women with rapid cycling bipolar disorder receiving treatment at an academic psychiatry clinic. Methods Personal constructs of illness with respect to life-trajectory and societal reaction to the individual, specifically the issue of stigma, were evaluated using a semistructured, open-ended anthropological interview. Results Participants perceived bipolar disorder as a disease with biologic underpinnings. Stigma was a major issue for all individuals. In common with individuals without serious mental illness, individuals with bipolar disorder work at mastering developmental tasks appropriate for their life stage. At times, younger individuals appeared to have difficulty separating their own identity from the effects of illness. For older individuals with bipolar disorder, life was perceived to be disrupted by bipolar disorder, with early plans and dreams often “derailed.” Conclusion Although bipolar disorder may severely alter an individual’s planned life trajectory, accomplishment of life goals can at least partially offset the sense of loss that is often seen in bipolar illness. PMID:18070834

  3. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Slankster, Eryn E.; Chase, Jillian M.; Jones, Lauren A.; Wendell, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology. PMID:22675329

  4. DNA-Based Genetic Markers for Rapid Cycling Brassica Rapa (Fast Plants Type) Designed for the Teaching Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slankster, Eryn E; Chase, Jillian M; Jones, Lauren A; Wendell, Douglas L

    2012-01-01

    We have developed DNA-based genetic markers for rapid cycling Brassica rapa (RCBr), also known as Fast Plants. Although markers for B. rapa already exist, ours were intentionally designed for use in a teaching laboratory environment. The qualities we selected for were robust amplification in PCR, polymorphism in RCBr strains, and alleles that can be easily resolved in simple agarose slab gels. We have developed two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based markers and 14 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)-type markers spread over four chromosomes. The DNA sequences of these markers represent variation in a wide range of genomic features. Among the VNTR-type markers, there are examples of variation in a non-genic region, variation within an intron, and variation in the coding sequence of a gene. Among the SNP-based markers there are examples of polymorphism in intronic DNA and synonymous substitution in a coding sequence. Thus these markers can serve laboratory exercises in both transmission genetics and molecular biology. PMID:22675329

  5. Genetic analysis of morphological traits in a new, versatile, rapid-cycling Brassica rapa recombinant inbred line population

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Hedayat; El-Soda, Mohamed; van Oorschot, Inge; Hanhart, Corrie; Bonnema, Guusje; Jansen-van den Bosch, Tanja; Mank, Rolf; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.; Meng, Lin; Wu, Jian; Koornneef, Maarten; Aarts, Mark G. M.

    2012-01-01

    A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was produced based on a wide cross between the rapid-cycling and self-compatible genotypes L58, a Caixin vegetable type, and R-o-18, a yellow sarson oil type. A linkage map based on 160 F7 lines was constructed using 100 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 130 AFLP®, 27 InDel, and 13 publicly available SSR markers. The map covers a total length of 1150 centiMorgan (cM) with an average resolution of 4.3 cM/marker. To demonstrate the versatility of this new population, 17 traits, related to plant architecture and seed characteristics, were subjected to quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. A total of 47 QTLs were detected, each explaining between 6 and 54% of the total phenotypic variance for the concerned trait. The genetic analysis shows that this population is a useful new tool for analyzing genetic variation for interesting traits in B. rapa, and for further exploitation of the recent availability of the B. rapa whole genome sequence for gene cloning and gene function analysis. PMID:22912644

  6. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  7. Bubble formation in crabs induced by limb motions after decompression.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1984-07-01

    In vivo bubble formation was studied in the megalopal stage of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes. The animals were equilibrated with elevated argon, nitrogen, or helium pressures then rapidly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. Voluntary motions induced bubble nucleation in leg joints after exposures to as low as 2 atm nitrogen (gauge pressure). Delays of several minutes sometimes passed between decompression and bubble formation. Mechanically stimulating the animals to move their legs increased this bubble formation, whereas immobilizing the legs before gas equilibration prevented it, even in animals decompressed from 150 atm nitrogen. We conclude that preformed nuclei are not responsible for bubbles developing in the legs of this animal. Instead, tribonucleation of bubbles apparently occurs as a result of limb motions at relatively low gas supersaturations. PMID:6469773

  8. Plasmonic nanoparticle-generated photothermal bubbles and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lapotko, Dmitri

    2009-01-01

    This article is focused on the optical generation and detection of photothermal vapor bubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles. We report physical properties of such plasmonic nanobubbles and their biomedical applications as cellular probes. Our experimental studies of gold nanoparticle-generated photothermal bubbles demonstrated the selectivity of photothermal bubble generation, amplification of optical scattering and thermal insulation effect, all realized at the nanoscale. The generation and imaging of photothermal bubbles in living cells (leukemia and carcinoma culture and primary cancerous cells), and tissues (atherosclerotic plaque and solid tumor in animal) demonstrated a noninvasive highly sensitive imaging of target cells by small photothermal bubbles and a selective mechanical, nonthermal damage to the individual target cells by bigger photothermal bubbles due to a rapid disruption of cellular membranes. The analysis of the plasmonic nanobubbles suggests them as theranostic probes, which can be tuned and optically guided at cell level from diagnosis to delivery and therapy during one fast process. PMID:19839816

  9. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  10. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  11. Clustering in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Bernardo; Zenit, Roberto

    2004-11-01

    We are conducting experiments to determine the amount of clustering that occurs when small gas bubbles ascend in clean water. In particular, we are interested in flows for which the liquid motion around the bubbles can be described, with a certain degree of accuracy, using potential flow theory. This model is applicable for the case of bubbly liquids in which the Reynolds number is large and the Weber number is small. To clearly observe the formation of bubble clusters we propose the use of a Hele-Shaw-type channel. In this thin channel the bubbles cannot overlap in the depth direction, therefore the identification of bubble clusters cannot be misinterpreted. Direct video image analysis is performed to calculate the velocity and size of the bubbles, as well as the formation of clusters. Although the walls do affect the motion of the bubbles, the clustering phenomena does occur and has the same qualitative behavior as in fully three-dimensional flows. A series of preliminary measurements are presented. A brief discussion of our plans to perform PIV measurements to obtain the liquid velocity fields is also presented.

  12. Cost versus Enrollment Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard K.; Gillen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The defining characteristic of a bubble is unsustainable growth that eventually reverses. Bubbles typically arise when uncertainty leads to unsustainable trends, and the authors argue that there are two areas in which higher education has experienced what appear to be unsustainable trends, namely, college costs (the costs to students, parents, and…

  13. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  14. Beer tapping: dynamics of bubbles after impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantič-Lugo, V.; Cayron, A.; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, F.

    2015-12-01

    Beer tapping is a well known prank where a bottle of beer is impacted from the top by a solid object, usually another bottle, leading to a sudden foam overflow. A description of the shock-driven bubble dynamics leading to foaming is presented based on an experimental and numerical study evoking the following physical picture. First, the solid impact produces a sudden downwards acceleration of the bottle creating a strong depression in the liquid bulk. The existing bubbles undergo a strong expansion and a sudden contraction ending in their collapse and fragmentation into a large amount of small bubbles. Second, the bubble clouds present a large surface area to volume ratio, enhancing the CO2 diffusion from the supersaturated liquid, hence growing rapidly and depleting the CO2. The clouds of bubbles migrate upwards in the form of plumes pulling the surrounding liquid with them and eventually resulting in the foam overflow. The sudden pressure drop that triggers the bubble dynamics with a collapse and oscillations is modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The bubble dynamics from impact to collapse occurs over a time (tb ≃ 800 μs) much larger than the acoustic time scale of the liquid bulk (tac = 2H/c ≃ 80 μs), for the experimental container of height H = 6 cm and a speed of sound around c ≃ 1500 m/s. This scale separation, together with the comparison of numerical and experimental results, suggests that the pressure drop is controlled by two parameters: the acceleration of the container and the distance from the bubble to the free surface.

  15. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  16. Teaching Human Genetics with Mustard: Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Fast Plants Type) as a Model for Human Genetics in the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendell, Douglas L.; Pickard, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    We have developed experiments and materials to model human genetics using rapid cycling "Brassica rapa", also known as Fast Plants. Because of their self-incompatibility for pollination and the genetic diversity within strains, "B. rapa" can serve as a relevant model for human genetics in teaching laboratory experiments. The experiment presented…

  17. The Bubbling Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchwell, E.; Povich, M. S.; Allen, D.; Taylor, M. G.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Watson, C.; Whitney, B. A.; Wolfire, M. G.; Bania, T. M.; Benjamin, R. A.; Clemens, D. P.; Cohen, M.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Jackson, J. M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Mathis, J. S.; Mercer, E. P.; Stolovy, S. R.; Uzpen, B.; Watson, D. F.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-10-01

    A visual examination of the images from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) has revealed 322 partial and closed rings that we propose represent partially or fully enclosed three-dimensional bubbles. We argue that the bubbles are primarily formed by hot young stars in massive star formation regions. We have found an average of about 1.5 bubbles per square degree. About 25% of the bubbles coincide with known radio H II regions, and about 13% enclose known star clusters. It appears that B4-B9 stars (too cool to produce detectable radio H II regions) probably produce about three-quarters of the bubbles in our sample, and the remainder are produced by young O-B3 stars that produce detectable radio H II regions. Some of the bubbles may be the outer edges of H II regions where PAH spectral features are excited and may not be dynamically formed by stellar winds. Only three of the bubbles are identified as known SNRs. No bubbles coincide with known planetary nebulae or W-R stars in the GLIMPSE survey area. The bubbles are small. The distribution of angular diameters peaks between 1' and 3' with over 98% having angular diameters less than 10' and 88% less than 4'. Almost 90% have shell thicknesses between 0.2 and 0.4 of their outer radii. Bubble shell thickness increases approximately linearly with shell radius. The eccentricities are rather large, peaking between 0.6 and 0.7; about 65% have eccentricities between 0.55 and 0.85.

  18. Theory of bubble dynamics in condensed explosive during start-up transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benreuven, M.; Summerfield, M.

    1980-01-01

    Test firings with experimental liquid propellant gun systems indicate that the main concern standing in the way of practical application of LPG's is the possibility of unexpected explosions during start up when pressure is rapidly applied to the liquid monopropellant in the chamber. The phenomenon of many collapse-rebound cycles of imploding bubbles is theorized as the probable cause of explosions in LP systems. It may be concluded that LPG safety would be enhanced by choosing an LP with low bulk modulus, as well as low decomposition reaction rate, and that a benign looking DTA trace is not a sufficient quarantee of insensitivity to a pressure induced explosion. It is also shown that pre-pressurizing an LP charge, thus pre-compressing the bubbles near-isothermally, makes the system relatively insensitive to such pressure induced explosions. The applicability of this analysis to the question of acceleration induced explosion of explosive filled warheads is indicated.

  19. Estrous cycle variations in GABAA receptor phosphorylation enable rapid modulation by anabolic androgenic steroids in the medial preoptic area

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, JG; Porter, DM; Onakomaiya, MM; Penatti, CAA; Vithlani, M; Moss, SJ; Clark, AS; Henderson, LP

    2012-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic testosterone derivatives that are used for ergogenic purposes, alter neurotransmission and behaviors mediated by GABAA receptors. Some of these effects may reflect direct and rapid action of these synthetic steroids at the receptor. The ability of other natural allosteric steroid modulators to alter GABAA receptor-mediated currents is dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex. Here we show that phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor complex immunoprecipitated by β2/β3 subunit-specific antibodies from the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the mouse varies across the estrous cycle; with levels being significantly lower in estrus. Acute exposure to the AAS, 17α-testosterone (17α-MeT), had no effect on the amplitude or kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the mPOA of estrous mice when phosphorylation was low, but increased the amplitude of these currents from mice in diestrus, when it was high. Inclusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin, in the recording pipette eliminated the ability of 17α-MeT to enhance currents from diestrous animals, suggesting that PKC-receptor phosphorylation is critical for the allosteric modulation elicited by AAS during this phase. In addition, a single injection of 17α-MeT was found to impair an mPOA-mediated behavior (nest-building) in diestrus, but not in estrus. PKC is known to target specific serine residues in the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor. Although phosphorylation of these β3 serine residues showed a similar profile across the cycle, as did phosphoserine in mPOA lysates immunoprecipitated with β2/β3 antibody (lower in estrus than in diestrus or proestrus), the differences were not significant. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex regulates both the ability of AAS to modulate receptor function in the mPOA and the expression of a simple mPOA-dependent behavior through PKC-dependent mechanism

  20. Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations

    PubMed Central

    San-Jose, Luis M.; Peñalver-Alcázar, Miguel; Milá, Borja; Gonzalez-Jimena, Virginia; Fitze, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) dynamics, which maintain genetic polymorphisms over time through negative frequency-dependent (FD) selection, can evolve in short-lived species with no generational overlap, where they produce rapid morph frequency cycles. However, most species have overlapping generations and thus, rapid RPS dynamics are thought to require stronger FD selection, the existence of which yet needs to be proved. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two cumulative selective episodes, FD sexual selection reinforced by FD selection on offspring survival, generate sufficiently strong selection to generate rapid morph frequency cycles in the European common lizard Zootoca vivipara, a multi-annual species with major generational overlap. These findings show that the conditions required for the evolution of RPS games are fulfilled by almost all species exhibiting genetic polymorphisms and suggest that RPS games may be responsible for the maintenance of genetic diversity in a wide range of species. PMID:24943372

  1. Bubbles, Bubbles: Integrated Investigations with Floating Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Stacy

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes integrated science and mathematics activities developed for fourth-grade students to explore and investigate three-dimensional geometric shapes, Bernoulli's principle, estimation, and art with and through bubbles. Students were engaged in thinking and reflection on the questions their teachers asked and were…

  2. Development of a Rapid Cycling CO(sub 2) and H(sub 2)O Removal Sorbent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Alptekin, Goekhan; Cates, Matthew; Bernal, Casey; Dubovik, Margarita; Gershanovich, Yevgenia

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) planned future missions set stringent demands on the design of the Portable Life Support System (PLSS), requiring dramatic reductions in weight, decreased reliance on supplies and greater flexibility on the types of missions. Use of regenerable systems that reduce weight and volume of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is of critical importance to NASA, both for low orbit operations and for long duration manned missions. The carbon dioxide and humidity control unit in the existing PLSS design is relatively large, since it has to remove and store 8 hours worth of CO2. If the sorbent regeneration can be carried out during the extravehicular activity (EVA) with a relatively high regeneration frequency, the size of the sorbent canister and weight can be significantly reduced. The progress of regenerable CO2 and humidity control is leading us towards the use of a rapid cycling amine system. TDA Research, Inc. is developing compact, regenerable sorbent materials to control CO2 and humidity in the space suit ventilation loop. The sorbent can be regenerated using space vacuum during the EVA, eliminating all carbon dioxide and humidity duration-limiting elements in the life support system. The material also has applications in other areas of space exploration such as the Orion spacecraft and other longer duration exploration missions requiring regenerable technologies. This paper summarizes the results of the sorbent development, testing, and evaluation efforts to date. The results of a preliminary system analysis are also included, showing the size and volume reductions for PLSS provided by the new system.

  3. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  4. A modelling and experimental study of the bubble trajectory in a non-Newtonian crystal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, N. M. S.; Khan, M. M. K.; Rasul, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of air bubbles rising in a massecuite-equivalent non-Newtonian crystal suspension. The bubble trajectory inside the stagnant liquid of a 0.05% xanthan gum crystal suspension was investigated and modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to gain an insight into the bubble flow characteristics. The CFD code FLUENT was used for numerical simulation, and the bubble trajectory calculations were performed through a volume of fluid (VOF) model. The influences of the Reynolds number (Re), the Weber number (We) and the bubble aspect ratio (E) on the bubble trajectory are discussed. The conditions for the bubbles' path oscillations are identified. The experimental results showed that the path instability for the crystal suspension was less rapid than in water. The trajectory analysis indicated that 5.76 mm diameter bubbles followed a zigzag motion in the crystal suspension. Conversely, the smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) followed a path of least horizontal movement and larger bubbles (21.21 mm) produced more spiral motion within the crystal suspension. Path instability occurred for bubbles of 15.63 and 21.21 mm diameter, and they induced both zigzag and spiral trajectories within the crystal suspension. At low Re and We, smaller bubbles (5.76 mm) produced a zigzag trajectory, whereas larger bubbles (15.63 and 21.21 mm) showed both zigzag and spiral trajectories at intermediate and moderately high Re and We in the crystal suspension. The simulation results illustrated that a repeating pattern of swirling vortices was created for smaller bubbles due to the unstable wake and unsteady flow of these bubbles. This is the cause of the smaller bubbles moving in a zigzag way. Larger bubbles showed two counter-rotating trailing vortices at the back of the bubble. These vortices induced a velocity component to the gas-liquid interface and caused a deformation. Hence, the larger bubbles produced a path transition.

  5. Significance of viscoelastic effects on the rising of a bubble and bubble-to-bubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Arturo

    2011-11-01

    Numerical results for the rising of a bubble and the interaction between two bubbles in non-Newtonian fluids will be discussed. The computations are carried out using a multiscale method combining front-tracking with Brownian dynamics simulations. The evaluation of the material properties for the non-Newtonian fluid will be discussed firstly. The results from the computations of a single bubble show how elastic effects modify the deformation and rising of the bubble by pulling the tail of it. The relationship between the strength of the elastic forces and the discontinuity in the bubble terminal velocity, when plotted versus bubble volume, is also observed in the computations. The bubble-to-bubble interaction is dominated not only by elastic effects but also by the shear-thinning caused by the leading bubble, which leads the trailing bubble to accelerate faster and coalesce with the leading bubble.

  6. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  7. Geyser preplay and eruption in a laboratory model with a bubble trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelstein, Esther; Tran, Aaron; Saez, Carolina Muñoz; Shteinberg, Alexander; Manga, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We present visual observations and temperature measurements from a laboratory model of a geyser. Our model incorporates a bubble trap, a zone in which vapor can accumulate in the geyser's subsurface plumbing, in a vertical conduit connected to a basal chamber. Analogous features have been identified at several natural geysers. We observe three types of eruptions: 1) rising bubbles eject a small volume of liquid in a weak spout (small eruption); 2) boiling occurs in the conduit above the bubble trap (medium eruption); and 3) boiling occurs in the conduit and chamber (large eruption). In the last two cases, boiling in the conduit causes a rapid hydrostatic pressure drop that allows for the rise and eruption of liquid water in a vigorous spout. Boiling initiates at depth rather than propagating downward from the surface. In a single eruption cycle, multiple small eruptions precede every medium and large eruption. At least one eruption cycle that culminates in a medium eruption (i.e., a quiescent period followed by a series of small eruptions leading up to a medium eruption) precedes every eruption cycle that culminates in a large eruption. We find that the transfer of fluid with high enthalpy to the upper conduit during small and medium eruptions is necessary to heat the upper conduit and prepare the system for the full boiling required for a large eruption. The placement of the bubble trap midway up the conduit allows for more efficient heating of the upper conduit. Our model provides insight into the influence of conduit geometry on eruption style and the importance of heat transfer by smaller events in preparing the geyser system for eruption.

  8. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  9. Bubble cloud dynamics in a high-pressure spherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Phillip Andrew

    A bubble cloud is a population of bubbles confined to a region within a fluid. Bubble clouds play a large role in a variety of naturally occurring phenomena and man-made applications (e.g., ocean noise, cavitation damage, sonoluminescence, ultrasonic cleaning, drug delivery, lithotripsy). It is important, therefore, to understand the behavior of bubble clouds so that their effects may be enhanced or diminished as desired. This work explores and characterizes the properties of bubble clouds nucleated inside a high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator, in connection with recent interest in acoustic inertial confinement fusion (acoustic ICF). A laser system was developed to repeatably nucleate a cloud of bubbles inside the resonator. The resulting events were then observed, primarily with schlieren imaging methods. Preliminary studies of the bubble cloud dynamics showed the sensitivity of the initial cloud to nucleation parameters including the phase of nucleation, the laser energy, and the acoustic power. After many acoustic cycles, some bubble clouds are observed to evolve into a tight cluster. The formation of these clusters correlates with initial bubble distributions which have a large cloud interaction parameter, β. Cluster dynamics are seen to be largely driven by reconverging shock waves from previous collapses reflected from the resonator's interior surface. Initial expansion of the cluster boundary is on the order of 8 mm/µs and the maximum radius approaches 3 mm. Shock pressures are estimated to be > 10 GPa at a radius of 100 µm using weak shock theory.

  10. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations.

    PubMed

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50% lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25% below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth-typical for the cavitation regime-compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5%, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50%. Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime. PMID:25615216

  11. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50 % lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25 % below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth—typical for the cavitation regime—compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5 %, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50 % . Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime.

  12. Bubble formation in crustaceans following decompression from hyperbaric gas exposures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1984-02-01

    In vivo bubble formation was studied in various crustaceans equilibrated with high gas pressures and rapidly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. The species varied widely in susceptibility to bubble formation, and adults were generally more susceptible than larval stages. Bubbles did not form in early brine shrimp larvae unless equilibration pressures of at least 175 atm argon or 350 atm helium were used; for adult brine shrimp, copepods, and the larvae of crabs and shrimps, 100-125 atm argon or 175-225 atm helium were required. In contrast, bubbles formed in the leg joints of megalopa and adult crabs following decompression from only 3-10 atm argon; stimulation of limb movements increased this bubble formation, whereas inhibition of movements decreased it. High hydrostatic compressions applied before gas equilibration or slow compressions did not affect bubble formation. We concluded that circulatory systems, musculature, and storage lipids do not necessarily render organisms susceptible to bubble formation and that bubbles do not generally originate as preformed nuclei. In some cases, tribonucleation appears to be the cause of the bubbles. PMID:6706762

  13. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  14. Blowing magnetic skyrmion bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Guoqiang; Jungfleisch, M. Benjamin; Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.; Heinonen, Olle; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The formation of soap bubbles from thin films is accompanied by topological transitions. Here we show how a magnetic topological structure, a skyrmion bubble, can be generated in a solid-state system in a similar manner. Using an inhomogeneous in-plane current in a system with broken inversion symmetry, we experimentally “blow” magnetic skyrmion bubbles from a geometrical constriction. The presence of a spatially divergent spin-orbit torque gives rise to instabilities of the magnetic domain structures that are reminiscent of Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities in fluid flows. We determine a phase diagram for skyrmion formation and reveal the efficient manipulation of these dynamically created skyrmions, including depinning and motion. The demonstrated current-driven transformation from stripe domains to magnetic skyrmion bubbles could lead to progress in skyrmion-based spintronics.

  15. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  16. Bubble migration in a compacting crystal-liquid mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan

    2016-04-01

    . Bubbles can also move rapidly by `surfing' on porosity waves that can develop in a compacting mush.

  17. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  18. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype was delivered to NASA in 2006 and was notated as RCA 1.0 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The new RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two- bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorbtion and desorbsion. This process provides for an efficient operation of the RCA so that while one bed is in adsorb (uptake) mode, the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has now progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overreview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each.

  19. Design and Development Comparison of Rapid Cycle Amine 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin; Papale, William; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Conger, Bruce; McMillin, Summer

    2016-01-01

    The development of the Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing-bed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) removal has been in progress since favorable results were published in 1996. Shortly thereafter, a prototype was designed, developed, and tested successfully and delivered to Johnson Space Center in 1999. An improved prototype (RCA 1.0) was delivered to NASA in 2006 and sized for the extravehicular activity (EVA). The RCA swing-bed technology is a regenerative system which employs two alternating solid-amine sorbent beds to remove CO2 and water. The two-bed design employs a chemisorption process whereby the beds alternate between adsorption and desorption. This process provides for an efficient RCA operation that enables one bed to be in adsorb (uptake) mode, while the other is in the desorb (regeneration) mode. The RCA has progressed through several iterations of technology readiness levels. Test articles have now been designed, developed, and tested for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS) including RCA 1.0, RCA 2.0, and RCA 3.0. The RCA 3.0 was the most recent RCA fabrication and was delivered to NASA-JSC in June 2015. The RCA 1.0 test article was designed with a pneumatically actuated linear motion spool valve. The RCA 2.0 and 3.0 test articles were designed with a valve assembly which allows for switching between uptake and regeneration modes while minimizing gas volume losses to the vacuum source. RCA 2.0 and 3.0 also include an embedded controller design to control RCA operation and provide the capability of interfacing with various sensors and other ventilation loop components. The RCA technology is low power, small, and has fulfilled all test requirements levied upon the technology during development testing thus far. This paper will provide an overview of the design and development of RCA 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 including detail differences between the design specifications of each. Nomenclature.

  20. Major CO2 source and sink perturbations of the global carbon cycle due to rapid emplacement of Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M. F.; Wright, J. D.; Kent, D. V.

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence from the ~201.5 Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) in the Newark Rift Basin demonstrates that this Large Igneous Province (LIP) produced a transient doubling of atmospheric pCO2, followed by a ~300 kyr falloff to near pre-eruptive concentrations after each major eruptive episode (Schaller, Wright and Kent; Science, 2011). Here we similarly use pedogenic carbonates to test the million-year effects of the CAMP volcanism on Early Jurassic pCO2 in the corollary Hartford Basin of Eastern North America (ENA). In both basins we find a pre-CAMP pCO2 background of ~2000 ± 700 ppm, increasing to ~4500 ± 1600 ppm immediately above the first flow unit, followed by 300 kyr post-extrusive decrease to near background concentrations. The long post-extrusive section of the Hartford Basin shows the same ~300 kyr pCO2 decrease to pre-eruptive background, which continues to levels below pre-CAMP background over the subsequent 1.5 Myr following the final episode of eruptions. We use a geochemical model to demonstrate that the rapidity of the pCO2 decreases, and the fall to concentrations below background may be accounted for by a 1.5-fold amplification of the continental silicate weathering response due to the presence of the more highly weatherable CAMP basalts themselves. This indicates that continental flood basalts capable of producing a short-term perturbation of the carbon system may actually have an overall net-cooling effect on global climates due to a long-term net-decrease in pCO2 to below pre-eruptive levels. Analysis of the effusive potential for various submarine and continental LIPs based on reconstructed volumes suggests that those comparable to, or even larger than the CAMP may have had a significant effect on short term pCO2 concentrations, but this effect is highly dependent on effusive timescale. However, we pose the testable hypothesis that only continental flood basalts participate directly on both the CO2 source and sink side of the

  1. Characterizing the Performance of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer with a Rapid Cycling Tenax Preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.P.; Alexander, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are species of interest for atmospheric modeling, worker chemical exposure and medical studies. Sometimes the required detection limits for these compounds is below the capability of existing real-time instrumentation. Preconcentrators have been implemented as an inexpensive way to amplify chemical signals and improve detection limits. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used as a tool for studying low concentrations of VOCs, but it lacks the capability to differentiate chemical signal contributions from isobaric compounds. In this work, behavior of a newly designed Tenax TA preconcentrator when coupled with a PTRMS is characterized. This novel preconcentrator design allows rapid temperature cycling, maintaining near real-time response. The preconcentrator was exposed to a sample gas of toluene in varying concentrations and loading times between and then thermally desorbed for analysis by PTR-MS. The effects of preconcentrating multiple analytes simultaneously were also investigated as well as the chromatographic effects of the preconcentrator. A linear behavior was observed when the integrated ion count rates (ICPS) from thermal desorption peaks were regressed against both varying loading times at a constant toluene concentration and varying concentrations with constant loading times. From these trends, it is possible to determine the concentration of a VOC by knowing its ICPS from thermal desorption peaks from a known preconcentration time. Peak height ion count rates representing ultimate detectability were amplified by factors up to 257 times the original signal, extending the range of the PTR-MS from 50pptv to nearly 250 parts per quadrillion. This corresponds to an ultimate sensitivity of 200 parts per quadrillion with 20 minute time resolution. Quantitative preconcentrator behavior was demonstrated using ICPS from these ion peaks and were amplified as much as 148 times their original signal. Results

  2. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  3. Dynamics of bubble-bubble interaction in sheared low-viscosity magma imaged by X-ray computed micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helo, C.; Flaws, A.; Hess, K.-U.; Franz, A.; Clague, D. A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography of vesicles in basaltic pyroclastic glass fragments has been used to investigate the syn-eruptive shear environment and resulting bubble-bubble interaction during mild pyroclastic eruptions in a mid-ocean ridge environment. We have imaged vesicles present in two different types of pyroclastic fragments produced by mildly explosive activity on Axial Seamount, limu o Pele, that is, thin glass films often described as bubble walls, and tube scoria fragments. Rapid quenching of the glass has prevented extensive bubble relaxation preserving the syn-eruptive geometry of the bubbles in these fragments. Isolated, ellipsoid-shaped vesicles in low-vesicular limu o Pele indicate deformation in a simple shear environment. Under these shear conditions higher vesiculated parts of the erupting magma show strong bubble-bubble interactions partially leading to coalscence and formation of tubular vesicles. These tubular vesicles can reach significant lengths, exceeding the dimensions of the small glass fragments (2 mm). Their unreformed radius can be more then one order of magnitude larger than that of the isolated vesicles in the limu o Pele fragments. We can distinguish two principle modes of interaction based on the relative orientation of the bubbles. Interaction along the sidewalls of two bubbles, and tip-to-tip interaction. At interdistances of less than a few tens of micrometre, interaction of the sidewalls results in deformation of the bubbles to more irregular shapes, with depressions caused by close, small bubbles or in some cases bubbles being partially mantled around tubular bubbles. This often leads to a more close packing of bubbles. At distances of less than a few microns, the melt films between the bubbles destabilize leading to coalescence. This mechanism appears to involve a bulging of the larger bubble into the smaller, followed by melt film rapture and coalescence. The complete digestion of one bubble by the other is the slow rate

  4. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  5. Dynamical system theory of periodically collapsing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.; Sornette, D.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a reduced form set of two coupled continuous time equations linking the price of a representative asset and the price of a bond, the later quantifying the cost of borrowing. The feedbacks between asset prices and bonds are mediated by the dependence of their "fundamental values" on past asset prices and bond themselves. The obtained nonlinear self-referencing price dynamics can induce, in a completely objective deterministic way, the appearance of periodically exploding bubbles ending in crashes. Technically, the periodically explosive bubbles arise due to the proximity of two types of bifurcations as a function of the two key control parameters b and g, which represent, respectively, the sensitivity of the fundamental asset price on past asset and bond prices and of the fundamental bond price on past asset prices. One is a Hopf bifurcation, when a stable focus transforms into an unstable focus and a limit cycle appears. The other is a rather unusual bifurcation, when a stable node and a saddle merge together and disappear, while an unstable focus survives and a limit cycle develops. The lines, where the periodic bubbles arise, are analogous to the critical lines of phase transitions in statistical physics. The amplitude of bubbles and waiting times between them respectively diverge with the critical exponents γ = 1 and ν = 1/2, as the critical lines are approached.

  6. Low Temperature, Rapid Thermal Cycle Annealing of HgCdTe Grown on CdTe/Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simingalam, Sina; Brill, Gregory; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Rao, Mulpuri V.

    2015-05-01

    The HgCdTe(MCT) grown on CdTe/Si substrate has a high dislocation density due to lattice mismatch. Thermal cycle annealing (TCA) is effective in reducing the dislocation density. The TCA at high temperatures results in inter-diffusion of the constituent elements across the MCT/CdTe interface. In this study, we observed a reduction in dislocation density with good surface morphology due to proper design of the TCA system, low annealing temperature, and large number of annealing cycles. The ampoule containing the samples is placed in direct contact with the graphite heating tube which helps in increasing the heating and cooling rates of the annealing cycle. To maintain Hg overpressure, Hg is placed in the sample holder, instead of in the ampoule to avoid Hg condensation. The best results were obtained by cycling the annealing temperature between 290°C and 350°C. Anneals were performed by using 32, 64, 128 and 256 cycles. We obtained an etch pit density (EPD) as low as 1 × 106 cm-2. Lower EPD was not achieved either by increasing annealing temperature or number of annealing cycles. Through secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis, we observed very little inter-diffusion of Cd across the MCT/CdTe interface for the 128 cycle annealing. These results show promise in bridging the gap in the device performance between the MCT material grown on CdTe/Si and CdZnTe substrates.

  7. Analysis of S-locus and expression of S-alleles of self-compatible rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea 'TO1000DH3'.

    PubMed

    Hee-Jeong, Jung; Nasar Uddin, Ahmed; Jong-In, Park; Senthil Kumar, Thamilarasan; Hye-Ran, Kim; Yong-Gu, Cho; Ill-Sup, Nou

    2014-10-01

    Brassica oleracea is a strictly self-incompatible (SI) plant, but rapid-cycling B. oleracea 'TO1000DH3' is self-compatible (SC). Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is controlled by multiple alleles of the S-locus. Three S-locus genes, S-locus glycoprotein (SLG), S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and S-locus protein 11 or S-locus cysteine-rich (SP11/SCR), have been reported to date, all of which are classified into class I and II. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism behind alterations of SI to SC in rapid-cycling B. olerace 'TO1000DH3'. Class I SRK were identified by genomic DNA PCR and PCR-RFLP analysis using SRK specific markers and found to be homozygous. Cloning and sequencing of class I SRK revealed a normal kinase domain without any S-domain/transmembrane domain. Moreover, S-locus sequencing analysis revealed only an SLG sequence, but no SP11/SCR. Expression analysis showed no SRK expression in the stigma, although other genes involved in the SI recognition reaction (SLG, MLPK, ARC1, THL) were found to have normal expression in the stigma. Taken together, the above results suggest that structural aberrations such as deletion of the SI recognition genes may be responsible for the breakdown of SI in rapid-cycling B. oleracea 'TO1000DH3'. PMID:24969488

  8. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  9. Bubble transport in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owoeye, Eyitayo James

    Understanding the behavior of bubbles in subcooled flow boiling is important for optimum design and safety in several industrial applications. Bubble dynamics involve a complex combination of multiphase flow, heat transfer, and turbulence. When a vapor bubble is nucleated on a vertical heated wall, it typically slides and grows along the wall until it detaches into the bulk liquid. The bubble transfers heat from the wall into the subcooled liquid during this process. Effective control of this transport phenomenon is important for nuclear reactor cooling and requires the study of interfacial heat and mass transfer in a turbulent flow. Three approaches are commonly used in computational analysis of two-phase flow: Eulerian-Lagrangian, Eulerian-Eulerian, and interface tracking methods. The Eulerian- Lagrangian model assumes a spherical non-deformable bubble in a homogeneous domain. The Eulerian-Eulerian model solves separate conservation equations for each phase using averaging and closure laws. The interface tracking method solves a single set of conservation equations with the interfacial properties computed from the properties of both phases. It is less computationally expensive and does not require empirical relations at the fluid interface. Among the most established interface tracking techniques is the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. VOF is accurate, conserves mass, captures topology changes, and permits sharp interfaces. This work involves the behavior of vapor bubbles in upward subcooled flow boiling. Both laminar and turbulent flow conditions are considered with corresponding pipe Reynolds number of 0 -- 410,000 using a large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model and VOF interface tracking method. The study was performed at operating conditions that cover those of boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized water reactors (PWR). The analysis focused on the life cycle of vapor bubble after departing from its nucleation site, i.e. growth, slide, lift-off, rise

  10. Nitrogen cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests responds rapidly to indirect N and P fertilization.

    PubMed

    Matson, Amanda L; Corre, Marife D; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2014-12-01

    Although the canopy can play an important role in forest nutrient cycles, canopy-based processes are often overlooked in studies on nutrient deposition. In areas of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition, canopy soils may retain a significant proportion of atmospheric inputs, and also receive indirect enrichment through root uptake followed by throughfall or recycling of plant litter in the canopy. We measured net and gross rates of N cycling in canopy soils of tropical montane forests along an elevation gradient and assessed indirect effects of elevated nutrient inputs to the forest floor. Net N cycling rates were measured using the buried bag method. Gross N cycling rates were measured using (15) N pool dilution techniques. Measurements took place in the field, in the wet and dry season, using intact cores of canopy soil from three elevations (1000, 2000 and 3000 m). The forest floor had been fertilized biannually with moderate amounts of N and P for 4 years; treatments included control, N, P, and N + P. In control plots, gross rates of NH4 (+) transformations decreased with increasing elevation; gross rates of NO3 (-) transformations did not exhibit a clear elevation trend, but were significantly affected by season. Nutrient-addition effects were different at each elevation, but combined N + P generally increased N cycling rates at all elevations. Results showed that canopy soils could be a significant N source for epiphytes as well as contributing up to 23% of total (canopy + forest floor) mineral N production in our forests. In contrast to theories that canopy soils are decoupled from nutrient cycling in forest floor soil, N cycling in our canopy soils was sensitive to slight changes in forest floor nutrient availability. Long-term atmospheric N and P deposition may lead to increased N cycling, but also increased mineral N losses from the canopy soil system. PMID:24965673

  11. Endothelial dysfunction correlates with decompression bubbles in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongxin; Ning, Xiaowei; Buzzacott, Peter; Xu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have documented that decompression led to endothelial dysfunction with controversial results. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between endothelial dysfunction, bubble formation and decompression rate. Rats were subjected to simulated air dives with one of four decompression rates: one slow and three rapid. Bubble formation was detected ultrasonically following decompression for two hours, before measurement of endothelial related indices. Bubbles were found in only rapid-decompressed rats and the amount correlated with decompression rate with significant variability. Serum levels of ET-1, 6-keto-PGF1α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, lung Wet/Dry weight ratio and histological score increased, serum NO decreased following rapid decompression. Endothelial-dependent vasodilatation to Ach was reduced in pulmonary artery rings among rapid-decompressed rats. Near all the above changes correlated significantly with bubble amounts. The results suggest that bubbles may be the causative agent of decompression-induced endothelial damage and bubble amount is of clinical significance in assessing decompression stress. Furthermore, serum levels of ET-1 and MDA may serve as sensitive biomarkers with the capacity to indicate endothelial dysfunction and decompression stress following dives. PMID:27615160

  12. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  13. Turbulent bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Thomas H.; Luther, Stefan; Mazzitelli, Irene M.; Rensen, Judith M.; Toschi, Federico; Lohse, Detlef

    The effect of bubbles on fully developed turbulent flow is investigated numerically and experimentally, summarizing the results of our previous papers (Mazzitelli et al., 2003, Physics of Fluids15, L5. and Journal of Fluid Mechanics488, 283; Rensen, J. et al. 2005, Journal of Fluid Mechanics538, 153). On the numerical side, we simulate Navier Stokes turbulence with a Taylor Reynolds number of Re?˜60, a large large-scale forcing, and periodic boundary conditions. The point-like bubbles follow their Lagrangian paths and act as point forces on the flow. As a consequence, the spectral slope is less steep as compared to the Kolmogorov case. The slope decrease is identified as a lift force effect. On the experimental side, we do hot-film anemometry in a turbulent water channel with Re? ˜ 200 in which we have injected small bubbles up to a volume percentage of 3%. Here the challenge is to disentangle the bubble spikes from the hot-film velocity signal. To achieve this goal, we have developed a pattern recognition scheme. Furthermore, we injected microbubbles up to a volume percentage of 0.3%. Both in the counter flowing situation with small bubbles and in the co-flow situation with microbubbles, we obtain a less spectral slope, in agreement with the numerical result.

  14. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  15. Plasma in sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    An, Yu

    2006-12-22

    With the new accommodation coefficient of water vapor evaluated by molecular dynamics model, the maximum temperature of a sonoluminescing bubble calculated with the full partial differential equations easily reaches few tens of thousands degrees. Though at this temperature the gas is weakly ionized (10% or less), the gas density inside a sonoluminescing bubble at the moment of the bubble's flashing is so high that there still forms a dense plasma. The light emission of the bubble is calculated by the plasma model which is compared with that by the bremsstrahlung (electron-ion, electron-neutral atom) and recombination model. The calculation by the two models shows that for the relatively low maximum temperature (< 30,000 K) of the bubble, the pulse width is independent of the wavelength and the spectrum deviates the black body radiation type; while for the relatively high maximum temperature (approximately 60,000 K), the pulse width is dependent of the wavelength and the spectrum is an almost perfect black body radiation spectrum. The maximum temperature calculated by the gas dynamics equations is much higher than the temperature fitted by the black body radiation formula. PMID:16797657

  16. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  17. BLOWING COSMIC BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals an expanding shell of glowing gas surrounding a hot, massive star in our Milky Way Galaxy. This shell is being shaped by strong stellar winds of material and radiation produced by the bright star at the left, which is 10 to 20 times more massive than our Sun. These fierce winds are sculpting the surrounding material - composed of gas and dust - into the curve-shaped bubble. Astronomers have dubbed it the Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635). The nebula is 10 light-years across, more than twice the distance from Earth to the nearest star. Only part of the bubble is visible in this image. The glowing gas in the lower right-hand corner is a dense region of material that is getting blasted by radiation from the Bubble Nebula's massive star. The radiation is eating into the gas, creating finger-like features. This interaction also heats up the gas, causing it to glow. Scientists study the Bubble Nebula to understand how hot stars interact with the surrounding material. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  18. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  19. Helium nano-bubble evolution in aging metal tritides.

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-05-01

    A continuum-scale, evolutionary model of helium (He) nano-bubble nucleation, growth and He release for aging bulk metal tritides is presented which accounts for major features of the experimental database. Bubble nucleation, modeled as self-trapping of interstitially diffusing He atoms, is found to occur during the first few days following tritium introduction into the metal and is sensitive to the He diffusivity and pairing energy. An effective helium diffusivity of 0.3 x 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}/s at 300 K is required to generate the average bubble density of 5x 1017 bubbles/cm3 observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early bubble growth by dislocation loop punching with a l/radius bubble pressure dependence produces good agreement with He atomic volumes and bubble pressures determined from swelling data, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements, and hydride pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) shifts. The model predicts that later in life neighboring bubble interactions may first lower the loop punching pressure through cooperative stress effects, then raise the pressure by partial blocking of loops. It also accounts for the shape of the bubble spacing distribution obtained from NMR data. This distribution is found to remain fixed with age, justifying the separation of nucleation and growth phases, providing a sensitive test of the growth formulation, and indicating that further significant bubble nucleation does not occur throughout life. Helium generated within the escape depth of surfaces and surface-connected porosity produces the low-level early helium release. Accelerated or rapid release is modeled as inter-bubble fracture using an average ligament stress criterion. Good agreement is found between the predicted onset of fracture and the observed He-metal ratio (HeM) for rapid He release from bulk palladium tritide. An examination of how inter-bubble fracture varies over the bubble spacing distribution shows that the critical Hem will be

  20. Power Laws in Real Estate Prices during Bubble Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takaaki; Mizuno, Takayuki; Shimizu, Chihiro; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    How can we detect real estate bubbles? In this paper, we propose making use of information on the cross-sectional dispersion of real estate prices. During bubble periods, prices tend to go up considerably for some properties, but less so for others, so that price inequality across properties increases. In other words, a key characteristic of real estate bubbles is not the rapid price hike itself but a rise in price dispersion. Given this, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether developments in the dispersion in real estate prices can be used to detect bubbles in property markets as they arise, using data from Japan and the U.S. First, we show that the land price distribution in Tokyo had a power-law tail during the bubble period in the late 1980s, while it was very close to a lognormal before and after the bubble period. Second, in the U.S. data we find that the tail of the house price distribution tends to be heavier in those states which experienced a housing bubble. We also provide evidence suggesting that the power-law tail observed during bubble periods arises due to the lack of price arbitrage across regions.

  1. Bubble growth by rectified diffusion at high gas supersaturation levels.

    PubMed

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Wilson, Preston S; Hamilton, Mark F

    2008-10-01

    For high gas supersaturation levels in liquids, on the order of 300% as predicted in capillaries of marine mammals following a series of dives [D. S. Houser, R. Howard, and S. Ridgway, J. Theor. Biol. 213, 183-195 (2001)], standard mathematical models of both static and rectified diffusion are found to underestimate the rate of bubble growth by 10%-20%. The discrepancy is demonstrated by comparing predictions based on existing mathematical models with direct numerical solutions of the differential equations for gas diffusion in the liquid and thermal conditions in the bubble. Underestimation of bubble growth by existing mathematical models is due to the underlying assumption that the gas concentration in the liquid is given by its value for a bubble of constant equilibrium radius. This assumption is violated when high supersaturation causes the bubble to grow too fast in relation to the time scale associated with diffusion. Rapid bubble growth results in an increased gas concentration gradient at the bubble wall and therefore a growth rate in excess of predictions based on constant equilibrium bubble radius. PMID:19062834

  2. Coalescence In Draining Foams Made of Very Small Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-03-25

    We studied the stability of foams containing small bubbles (radius ≲ 50  μm). The foams are made from aqueous surfactant solutions containing various amounts of glycerol. The foams start breaking at their top, when the liquid volume fraction has decreased sufficiently during liquid drainage. Unlike in foams with larger bubbles, the liquid fraction at which the foam destabilizes is surprisingly high. In order to interpret this observation we propose that film rupture occurs during reorganization events (T1) induced by bubble coarsening, which is particularly rapid in the case of small bubbles. New films are therefore formed rapidly and if their thickness is too small, they cannot be sufficiently covered by surfactant and they break. Using literature data for the duration of T1 events and the thickness of the new films, we show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of the foams studied. PMID:27058106

  3. Coalescence In Draining Foams Made of Very Small Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    We studied the stability of foams containing small bubbles (radius ≲ 50 μ m ). The foams are made from aqueous surfactant solutions containing various amounts of glycerol. The foams start breaking at their top, when the liquid volume fraction has decreased sufficiently during liquid drainage. Unlike in foams with larger bubbles, the liquid fraction at which the foam destabilizes is surprisingly high. In order to interpret this observation we propose that film rupture occurs during reorganization events (T 1 ) induced by bubble coarsening, which is particularly rapid in the case of small bubbles. New films are therefore formed rapidly and if their thickness is too small, they cannot be sufficiently covered by surfactant and they break. Using literature data for the duration of T 1 events and the thickness of the new films, we show that this mechanism is consistent with the behavior of the foams studied.

  4. Effect of direct bubble-bubble interactions on linear-wave propagation in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, D.; Conoir, J. M.; Colonius, T.

    2014-12-01

    We study the influence of bubble-bubble interactions on the propagation of linear acoustic waves in bubbly liquids. Using the full model proposed by Fuster and Colonius [J. Fluid Mech. 688, 253 (2011), 10.1017/jfm.2011.380], numerical simulations reveal that direct bubble-bubble interactions have an appreciable effect for frequencies above the natural resonance frequency of the average size bubble. Based on the new results, a modification of the classical wave propagation theory is proposed. The results obtained are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data where the classical linear theory systematically overpredicts the effective attenuation and phase velocity.

  5. Bubbles from nothing

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Ramadhan, Handhika S.; Shlaer, Benjamin E-mail: handhika@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of flux compactifications, we construct an instanton describing the quantum creation of an open universe from nothing. The solution has many features in common with the smooth 6d bubble of nothing solutions discussed recently, where the spacetime is described by a 4d compactification of a 6d Einstein-Maxwell theory on S{sup 2} stabilized by flux. The four-dimensional description of this instanton reduces to that of Hawking and Turok. The choice of parameters uniquely determines all future evolution, which we additionally find to be stable against bubble of nothing instabilities.

  6. Heated Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Fluid Physics is study of the motion of fluids and the effects of such motion. When a liquid is heated from the bottom to the boiling point in Earth's microgravity, small bubbles of heated gas form near the bottom of the container and are carried to the top of the liquid by gravity-driven convective flows. In the same setup in microgravity, the lack of convection and buoyancy allows the heated gas bubbles to grow larger and remain attached to the container's bottom for a significantly longer period.

  7. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  8. DNS studies of bubbly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Esmaeeli, Asghar; Biswas, Souvik

    2004-11-01

    Recent stuies of bubbly flows, using direct numerical simulations, are discussed. The goal of this study is to examine the collective behavior of many bubbles as the rise Reynolds number is increased and and a single bubble rises unsteadily, as well as to examine the motion of bubbles in channels. A front-tracking/finite volume method is used to fully resolve all flow scales, including the bubbles and the flow around them. Two cases are simulated, for one the bubbles remain nearly spherical and for the other case the bubbles are deformable and wobble. The wobbly bubbles remains relatively uniformly distributed and are not susceptible to the streaming instability found by Bunner and Tryggvason (2003) for deformable bubbles at lower rise Reynolds numbers. The more spherical bubbles, on the other hand, form transients ``rafts'' somewhat similar to those seen in potential flow simulation of many bubbles. For channel flow we compare results from direct numerical simulations of bubbly flow with prediction of the steady-state two-fluid model of Antal, Lahey, and Flaherty (1991). The simulations are done assuming a two-dimensional system and the model coefficients are adjusted slightly to match the data for upflow. The results generally agree reasonably well, even though the simulated void fraction is considerably higher than the one assumed in the derivation of the model. Research supported by DOE.

  9. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  10. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  11. Double Bubble? No Trouble!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mike I.; Smith, Greg F.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a soap-solution activity involving formation of bubbles encasing the students that requires only readily available materials and can be adapted easily for use with various grade levels. Discusses student learning outcomes including qualitative and quantitative observations and the concept of surface tension. (JRH)

  12. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  13. The Bubble N10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, D.; Lepine, J.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, J.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the environment surrounding the infrared bubble N10 in molecular and infrared emission. There is an HII region at the center of this bubble. We investigated J=1-0 transitions of molecules ^{12}CO, ^{13}CO and C^{18}O towards N10. This object was detected by GLIMPSE, a survey carried out between 3.6 and 8.0 μ m. We also analyzed the emission at 24 μ m, corresponding to the emission of hot dust, with a contribution of small grains heated by nearby O stars. Besides, the contribution at 8 μ m is dominated by PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) excited by radiation from the PDRs of bubbles. In the case of N10, it is proposed that the excess at 4.5 μ m IRAC band indicate an outflow, a signature of early stages of massive star formation. This object was the target of observations at the PMO 13.7 m radio telescope. The bubble N10 presents clumps, from which we can derive physical features through the observed parameters. We also intended to discuss the evolutionary stage of the clumps and their distribution. It can lead us to understand the triggered star formation scenario in this region.

  14. The Liberal Arts Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2011-01-01

    The author expresses his doubt that the general higher education bubble will burst anytime soon. Although tuition, student housing, and book costs have all increased substantially, he believes it is still likely that the federal government will continue to pour billions into higher education, largely because Americans have been persuaded that it…

  15. The pulsatile motion of a semi-infinite bubble in a channel: flow fields, and transport of an inactive surface-associated contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Maximillian E.; Williams, Harvey A. R.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a theoretical model of the pulsatile motion of a contaminant-doped semi-infinite bubble in a rectangular channel. We examine the fluid mechanical behaviour of the pulsatile bubble, and its influence on the transport of a surface-inactive contaminant (termed surfinactant). This investigation is used to develop a preliminary understanding of surfactant responses during unsteady pulmonary airway reopening. Reopening is modelled as the pulsatile motion of a semi-infinite gas bubble in a horizontal channel of width 2a filled with a Newtonian liquid of viscosity mu and constant surface tension gamma. A modified Langmuir sorption model is assumed, which allows for the creation and respreading of a surface multilayer. The bubble is forced via a time-dependent volume flux Q(t) with mean and oscillatory components (Q_{M} and Q_{omega }, respectively) at frequency omega . The flow behaviour is governed by the dimensionless parameters: Ca_{M} {=} mu Q_{M}/(2agamma ), a steady-state capillary number, which represents the ratio of viscous to surface tension forces; Ca_{Omega } {=} mu Q_{omega }/(2agamma ), an oscillatory forcing magnitude; Omega {=} omega mu a/gamma , a dimensionless frequency that represents the ratio of viscous relaxation to oscillatory-forcing timescales; and A {=} 2Ca_{Omega }/Omega , a dimensionless oscillation amplitude. Our simulations indicate that contaminant deposition and retention in the bubble cap region occurs at moderate frequencies if retrograde bubble motion develops during the oscillation cycle. However, if oscillations are too rapid the ensuing large forward tip velocities cause a net loss of contaminant from the bubble tip. Determination of an optimal oscillation range may be important in reducing ventilator-induced lung injury associated with infant and adult respiratory distress syndromes by increasing surfactant transport to regions of collapsed airways.

  16. Micro bubble formation and bubble dissolution in domestic wet central heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fsadni, Andrew M.; Ge, Yunting

    2012-04-01

    16 % of the carbon dioxide emissions in the UK are known to originate from wet domestic central heating systems. Contemporary systems make use of very efficient boilers known as condensing boilers that could result in efficiencies in the 90-100% range. However, research and development into the phenomenon of micro bubbles in such systems has been practically non-existent. In fact, such systems normally incorporate a passive deaerator that is installed as a `default' feature with no real knowledge as to the micro bubble characteristics and their effect on such systems. High saturation ratios are known to occur due to the widespread use of untreated tap water in such systems and due to the inevitable leakage of air into the closed loop circulation system during the daily thermal cycling. The high temperatures at the boiler wall result in super saturation conditions which consequently lead to micro bubble nucleation and detachment, leading to bubbly two phase flow. Experiments have been done on a test rig incorporating a typical 19 kW domestic gas fired boiler to determine the expected saturation ratios and bubble production and dissolution rates in such systems.

  17. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  18. Bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Williams, James C; McAteer, James A

    2011-08-01

    Lithotripter shock waves (SWs) generated in non-degassed water at 0.5 and 2 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) were characterized using a fiber-optic hydrophone. High-speed imaging captured the inertial growth-collapse-rebound cycle of cavitation bubbles, and continuous recording with a 60 fps camcorder was used to track bubble proliferation over successive SWs. Microbubbles that seeded the generation of bubble clouds formed by the breakup of cavitation jets and by bubble collapse following rebound. Microbubbles that persisted long enough served as cavitation nuclei for subsequent SWs, as such bubble clouds were enhanced at fast PRF. Visual tracking suggests that bubble clouds can originate from single bubbles. PMID:21877776

  19. Effects of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle in rats: involvement of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type A in regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Daiji; Kotani, Makiko; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kaku, Shinsuke; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Honda, Kazuki

    2010-05-12

    The bioflavonoid quercetin is widely found in plants and exerts a large number of biological activities such as anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of quercetin on the sleep-wake cycle has not been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of quercetin on sleep-wake regulation. Intraperitoneal administration of quercetin (200mg/kg) significantly increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep during dark period in rats, while it significantly decreased REM sleep. The decrease in REM sleep induced by quercetin was blocked by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. In contrast, the increase in non-REM sleep induced by quercetin was not affected by i.c.v. injection of bicuculline. Therefore, the present results suggest that quercetin alters the sleep-wake cycle partly through activation of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:20303338

  20. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen S.; Skov, Julia; Sun, Yi; Duong Bang, Dang; Pedersen, Michael E.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Wolff, Anders

    2013-07-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence signal from Rhodamine B. The method was validated with the PCR amplification of mecA gene (162 bp) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (MRSA), where the time for 30 cycles was reduced from 50 min (without over- and undershooting) to 20 min.

  1. ERK1/2 MAP kinases promote cell cycle entry by rapid, kinase-independent disruption of retinoblastoma-lamin A complexes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Javier; Calvo, Fernando; González, José M; Casar, Berta; Andrés, Vicente; Crespo, Piero

    2010-11-29

    As orchestrators of essential cellular processes like proliferation, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals impact on cell cycle regulation. A-type lamins are major constituents of the nuclear matrix that also control the cell cycle machinery by largely unknown mechanisms. In this paper, we disclose a functional liaison between ERK1/2 and lamin A whereby cell cycle progression is regulated. We demonstrate that lamin A serves as a mutually exclusive dock for ERK1/2 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Our results reveal that, immediately after their postactivation entrance in the nucleus, ERK1/2 dislodge Rb from its interaction with lamin A, thereby facilitating its rapid phosphorylation and consequently promoting E2F activation and cell cycle entry. Interestingly, these effects are independent of ERK1/2 kinase activity. We also show that cellular transformation and tumor cell proliferation are dependent on the balance between lamin A and nuclear ERK1/2 levels, which determines Rb accessibility for phosphorylation/inactivation. PMID:21115804

  2. Reduced mRNA Expression of PTGDS in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder Patients Compared with Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Peijs, Lone; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disturbances related to the arachidonic acid cascade and prostaglandin metabolism may be involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, as supported by a recent genome-wide association study meta-analysis; however, evidence from clinical studies on a transcriptional level is lacking. Two enzymes in the arachidonic acid cascade are the prostaglandin D synthase (PTGDS), which catalyzes the conversion of prostaglandin H2 to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), and the aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3), which catalyzes the reduction of PGD2. We aimed to test the hypothesis that mRNA expression of PTGDS and AKR1C3 is deregulated in rapid-cycling disorder patients in a euthymic or current affective state compared with healthy control subjects, and that expression alters with affective states. Methods: PTGDS and AKR1C3 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured in 37 rapid-cycling bipolar disorder patients and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Repeated measurements of PTGDS and AKR1C3 mRNA expression were obtained in various affective states during 6–12 months and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Results: Adjusted for age and gender, PTGDS mRNA expression was down-regulated in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder patients in a euthymic, depressive, and manic/hypomanic state compared with healthy control subjects. No difference in PTGDS mRNA expression was observed between affective states. AKR1C3 mRNA expression did not differ between bipolar disorder patients in any affective state or in comparison with healthy control subjects. Conclusions: The results suggest a role for aberrantly-regulated PTGDS mRNA expression in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder. The sample size was limited; replication of the findings in larger, independent samples is warranted to further explore the role of the arachidonic acid cascade

  3. Cloud cavitation induced by shock-bubble interaction in a viscoelastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Ryota; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study a shock-bubble interaction problem in a viscoelastic solid, which is relevant to shock wave lithotripsy. A gas bubble is produced by focusing an infrared laser pulse into gelatin. A spherical shock is then created, through rapid expansion of plasma that results from the laser focusing, in the vicinity of the gas bubble. The shock-bubble interaction is recorded by a CCD camera with flash illumination of a nanosecond green laser pulse. The observation captures cavitation inception in the gelatin under tension that results from acoustic impedance mismatching at the bubble wall. Namely, the shock reflects at the bubble interface as a rarefaction wave, which induces the nucleation of cavitation bubbles as a result of rupturing the gelatin.

  4. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  5. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  6. Micro-bubble Enhanced Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Rie; Okamoto, Akio; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2010-03-01

    A gene transfer system that uses ultrasound, known as sonoporation, has recently been developed, and it is known that micro-bubbles can help gene transfection in this technique. However, the mechanism and optimal induction conditions have not yet been fully clarified. We examined the factors that affect the gene induction rate, and attempted to devise a method for high-efficiency gene induction. In vitro, we inducted a GFP-containing plasmid into fibroblast cells (NIH3T3) using an ultrasound contrast agent (Sonazoid®, or micro-bubbles) and piezoelectric transducer. Cells were cultured on 24-well plates. The GFP-containing plasmid (concentration: 15 mg/ml) and Sonazoid® were mixed with the cell suspension. Ultrasound frequency was 2.0 MHz (burst wave, duty cycle: 10%), ultrasound intensity was varied from 0 W/cm2 to 11.0 W/cm2, exposure time ranged from 0 s to 120 s, and burst repetition frequency was varied from 50 Hz to 50000 Hz. Gene induction ratio was higher with stronger or longer ultrasound exposure, and gene induction ratio was affected by ultrasound burst repetition frequency. However, the ratio was less than 1%. We also measured cell survival and visualized cells with holes using propidium iodide. We found that about 80% of cells were alive, and many cells developed holes with ultrasound exposure at a burst repetition frequency of 5 kHz. These results suggest that fewer genes enter the cells or are expressed under these conditions. These problems require further study.

  7. HIV-1 protein gp120 rapidly impairs memory in chicks by interrupting the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, S P; Edwards, T M; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    2007-01-01

    Learning and memory impairments are frequently observed in patients suffering from AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC). These effects have been linked to the presence of gp120, an HIV viral coat glycoprotein. The present study investigated the possibility that gp120 prevents the uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes, leading to an interruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a subsequent impairment of memory. Ten microliters of 10nM gp120 was bilaterally injected into the region of the intermediate medial mesopallium of day-old chicks at various times before, or after, training using a single-trial passive avoidance task. Gp120 was found to significantly impair memory retention when injected 10-40 min after training. Memory impairments were evident within 5 min of gp120 administration and remained evident 24h later. Further, the amnestic effect of gp120 could be overcome with glutamine or with precursors of glutamate synthesis, but only weakly by glutamate. These results support the conclusion that the amnestic effect of gp120 is due to an impaired uptake of glutamate by astrocytes and a subsequent interruption of glutamine supply to neurones. The data indicate that the glutamate-glutamine cycle may be a useful therapeutic target in the treatment of ADC. PMID:16714124

  8. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    is created either through flowing gas around the high voltage electrode in the discharge tube or self-generated by the plasma as in the steam discharge. This second method allows for large scale processing of contaminated water and for bulk chemical and optical analysis. Breakdown mechanisms of attached and unattached gas bubbles in liquid water were investigated using the first device. The breakdown scaling relation between breakdown voltage, pressure and dimensions of the discharge was studied. A Paschen-like voltage dependence for air bubbles in liquid water was discovered. The results of high-speed photography suggest the physical charging of the bubble due to a high voltage pulse; this charging can be significant enough to produce rapid kinetic motion of the bubble about the electrode region as the applied electric field changes over a voltage pulse. Physical deformation of the bubble is observed. This charging can also prevent breakdown from occurring, necessitating higher applied voltages to overcome the phenomenon. This dissertation also examines the resulting chemistry from plasma interacting with the bubble-liquid system. Through the use of optical emission spectroscopy, plasma parameters such as electron density, gas temperature, and molecular species production and intensity are found to have a time-dependence over the ac voltage cycle. This dependence is also source gas type dependent. These dependencies afford effective control over plasma-driven decomposition. The effect of plasma-produced radicals on various wastewater simulants is studied. Various organic dyes, halogenated compounds, and algae water are decomposed and assessed. Toxicology studies with melanoma cells exposed to plasma-treated dye solutions are completed, demonstrating the non-cytotoxic quality of the decomposition process. Thirdly, this dissertation examines the steam plasma system, developed through this research to circumvent the acidification associated with gas-feed discharges

  9. Elevated transcription of the p53 gene in early S-phase leads to a rapid DNA-damage response during S-phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Paula; Polson, Amanda; Reisman, David

    2011-09-01

    p53 induces the transcription of genes that negatively regulate progression of the cell cycle in response to DNA damage or other cellular stressors, and thus participates in maintaining genome stability. Under stress conditions, p53 must be activated to prohibit the replication of cells containing damaged DNA. However, in normal, non-stressed cells, p53 activity must be inhibited. Previous studies have demonstrated that p53 transcription is activated before or during early S-phase in cells progressing from G(0)/G(1) into S-phase. Since this is not what would be predicted from a gene involved in growth arrest and apoptosis, in this study, we provide evidence that this induction occurs to provide sufficient p53 mRNA to ensure a rapid response to DNA damage before exiting S-phase. When comparing exponentially growing Swiss3T3 cells to those synchronized to enter S-phase simultaneously and treated with the DNA damaging agent camptothecin, we found that with cells in S-phase, p53 protein levels increased earlier, Bax and p21 transcription was activated earlier and to a greater extent and apoptosis occurred earlier and to a greater extent. These findings are consistent with p53 transcription being induced in S-phase to provide for a rapid DNA-damage response during S-phase of the cell cycle. PMID:21710255

  10. Can bubbles sink ships?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueschen, Michael A.

    2010-02-01

    I investigate the interplay between the buoyancy force and the upwelling (or drag) force which act on a floating object when bubbles are rising through a body of water. Bubbles reduce the buoyant force by reducing the density of the water, but if they entrain an upwelling flow of water as they rise, they can produce a large upward drag force on the floating object. In an upwelling flow, our model ship (density=0.94 g/cm3) floats in a foam whose density is only 0.75 g/cm3. Comparing results with and without upwelling currents is an interesting demonstration and has real-world applications to ships in the ocean.

  11. Thermocapillary Flow and Aggregation of Bubbles on a Solid Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasumi, Hiroki; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Anderson, John L.; Sides, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    were equated by using a wall hindrance parameter q: U = qu [1] which shows the velocity of bubble is proportional to the entraining velocity. The hindrance parameter q can experimentally be measured independently. q can also be calculated by solving the equations of motion for a bubble translating parallel to a solid wall. The experimental cell is cylindrical with an ID of 10 cm and consists of a 1 cm deep main cell filled with silicone oil and flanked by two thermal reservoirs. The upper thermal reservoir was heated and the lower thermal reservoir was cooled so that the bubbles aggregate. Two types of silicone oil (eta = 0.02 and 0.50 Pa s) were used. Two equal sized air bubbles were injected into the cell with a syringe. The center-to-center distance of bubbles was observed through a microscope. Bubble radius ranged from 0.40 mm to 0.65 mm and the temperature gradients along with the cell ranged from 1400 to 5000 K/m. The bubbles aggregated when heat flows from the wall to the fluid. The velocities of bubbles were in the range of 1 - 10 microns/s. The separation r decreased more quickly when the temperature gradient was higher, bubble size was larger, and the oil viscosity was lower. r decreased more rapidly as the bubbles approached each other. Dimensionless time was arbitrarily set to be zero when the dimensionless center-to-center distance between the bubbles was 4. All the bubble trajectories fall onto one line, especially in the range of dimensionless distance from 4 to 3. This means the relative movement of the bubble pair is proportional to the temperature gradient and bubble size and it is inversely proportional to the viscosity of the oil. This result strongly suggests that the thermocapillary flow-based aggregation mechanism is correct. A value of q can be estimated by fitting the scaled data to Eq. [1]. A best fit value of q was obtained as q = 0.26 with a standard deviation of 0.03. Independent experimental results for q for a 0.5 mm radius bubble, give

  12. Rapid phase adjustment of melatonin and core body temperature rhythms following a 6-h advance of the light/dark cycle in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Barbara A; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Sessions, Dawn R; Vick, Mandi M; Kennedy, Erin L; Fitzgerald, Barry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Rapid displacement across multiple time zones results in a conflict between the new cycle of light and dark and the previously entrained program of the internal circadian clock, a phenomenon known as jet lag. In humans, jet lag is often characterized by malaise, appetite loss, fatigue, disturbed sleep and performance deficit, the consequences of which are of particular concern to athletes hoping to perform optimally at an international destination. As a species renowned for its capacity for athletic performance, the consequences of jet lag are also relevant for the horse. However, the duration and severity of jet lag related circadian disruption is presently unknown in this species. We investigated the rates of re-entrainment of serum melatonin and core body temperature (BT) rhythms following an abrupt 6-h phase advance of the LD cycle in the horse. Methods Six healthy, 2 yr old mares entrained to a 12 h light/12 h dark (LD 12:12) natural photoperiod were housed in a light-proofed barn under a lighting schedule that mimicked the external LD cycle. Following baseline sampling on Day 0, an advance shift of the LD cycle was accomplished by ending the subsequent dark period 6 h early. Blood sampling for serum melatonin analysis and BT readings were taken at 3-h intervals for 24 h on alternate days for 11 days. Disturbances to the subsequent melatonin and BT 24-h rhythms were assessed using repeated measures ANOVA and analysis of Cosine curve fitting parameters. Results We demonstrate that the equine melatonin rhythm re-entrains rapidly to a 6-h phase advance of an LD12:12 photocycle. The phase shift in melatonin was fully complete on the first day of the new schedule and rhythm phase and waveform were stable thereafter. In comparison, the advance in the BT rhythm was achieved by the third day, however BT rhythm waveform, especially its mesor, was altered for many days following the LD shift. Conclusion Aside from the temperature rhythm disruption, rapid

  13. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  14. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  15. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  16. Bubbling the newly grown black ring hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, Orestis

    2012-05-01

    New families of BPS black ring solutions with four electric and four dipole magnetic charges have recently been explicitly constructed and uplifted to M-theory. These solutions were found to belong to a CFT with central charge different compared to the one of the STU model. Because of their importance to AdS/CFT, here we give the microstate description of these geometries in terms of topological bubbles and supertubes. The fourth charge results in an additional flux through the topological cycles that resolve the brane singularities. The analog of these solutions in the IIB frame yield a generalized regular supertube with three electric charges and one dipole charge. Direct comparison is also made with the previously-known bubbled geometries.

  17. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-10-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles `on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  18. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles ‘on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  19. Bubble dissolution physics and the treatment of decompression sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkle, T.D.; Beckman, E.L.

    1983-03-01

    The treatment of decompression sickness often involves both recompressing the victim and administering hyperbaric oxygen in the hope of more rapidly dissolving the bubbles which cause this malady. Although many hundreds of such treatments are conducted each year in the United States alone, the underlying physical principles governing the dissolution of such bubbles are not well understood and only empirically tested. In this paper, we present a mathematical theory of bubble dissolution that is verified by comparison with laboratory experiments. This theory suggests that the commonly employed treatment techniques would be only marginally effective, and that in many situations the bubbles that cause the disease cannot be adequately dissolved using existing techniques and facilities.

  20. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Mendoza, D.P.; Miller, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    Retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns regarding double-shell tanks (DSTs) containing waste slurries. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry that has settled at the bottom of the DST. However, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. In addition, the presence of retained gas bubbles is expected to affect the physical properties of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of these bubbles. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to gas bubble retention and release from sludge such as is in Tank 241-SY-101, understand how the bubbles affect the physical properties of the sludge, develop correlations of these physical properties to include in computer models, and collect experimental data on the physical properties of simulated sludges with bubbles. This report presents a theory and experimental observations of bubble retention in simulated sludge and gives correlations and new data on the effect of gas bubbles on sludge yield strength.

  1. Rapid Ammonia Gas Transport Accounts for Futile Transmembrane Cycling under NH3/NH4+ Toxicity in Plant Roots1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T.; Li, Mingyuan; Becker, Alexander; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Futile transmembrane NH3/NH4+ cycling in plant root cells, characterized by extremely rapid fluxes and high efflux to influx ratios, has been successfully linked to NH3/NH4+ toxicity. Surprisingly, the fundamental question of which species of the conjugate pair (NH3 or NH4+) participates in such fluxes is unresolved. Using flux analyses with the short-lived radioisotope 13N and electrophysiological, respiratory, and histochemical measurements, we show that futile cycling in roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is predominately of the gaseous NH3 species, rather than the NH4+ ion. Influx of 13NH3/13NH4+, which exceeded 200 µmol g–1 h–1, was not commensurate with membrane depolarization or increases in root respiration, suggesting electroneutral NH3 transport. Influx followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for NH3 (but not NH4+), as a function of external concentration (Km = 152 µm, Vmax = 205 µmol g–1 h–1). Efflux of 13NH3/13NH4+ responded with a nearly identical Km. Pharmacological characterization of influx and efflux suggests mediation by aquaporins. Our study fundamentally revises the futile-cycling model by demonstrating that NH3 is the major permeating species across both plasmalemma and tonoplast of root cells under toxicity conditions. PMID:24134887

  2. Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles and the California Current System: Planktonic foraminiferal response to rapid climate change in Santa Barbara Basin, Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, Ingrid L.; Kennett, James P.

    2000-02-01

    High-resolution planktonic foraminiferal census data from Santa Barbara Basin (Ocean Drilling Program hole 893A) demonstrate major assemblage switches between 25 and 60 ka that were associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles. Stadials dominated by Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral), and Globigerinoides glutinata suggest a strong subpolar California Current influence, while interstadials marked by abundant N. pachyderma (dextral) and G. bulloides indicate a relative increase in subtropical countercurrent influence. Modern analog technique and transfer function (F-20RSC) temperature reconstructions support δ18O evidence of large rapid (70 years or less) sea surface temperature shifts (3° to 5°C) between stadials and interstadials. Changes in the vertical temperature gradient and water column structure (thermocline depth) are recorded by planktonic faunal oscillations suggest bimodal stability in the organization of North Pacific surface ocean circulation. Santa Barbara Basin surface water demonstrates the rapid response of the California Current System to reorganization of North Pacific atmospheric circulation during rapid climate change. Supporting assemblage data are, available on diskette or via Anonymous FTP from Kosmos.agu.org, Directory APEND (username = anonymous, Password = guest). Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by phone at 800-966-2481; $5.00. Payment must accompany order.

  3. Sheathless hydrodynamic positioning of buoyant drops and bubbles inside microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Guglielmini, Laura; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Caviezel, Daniel; Stone, Howard A.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-09-01

    Particles, bubbles, and drops carried by a fluid in a confined environment such as a pipe can be subjected to hydrodynamic lift forces, i.e., forces that are perpendicular to the direction of the flow. We investigated the positioning effect of lift forces acting on buoyant drops and bubbles suspended in a carrier fluid and flowing in a horizontal microchannel. We report experiments on drops of water in fluorocarbon liquid, and on bubbles of nitrogen in hydrocarbon liquid and silicone oil, inside microchannels with widths on the order of 0.1-1 mm. Despite their buoyancy, drops and bubbles could travel without contacting with the walls of channels; the most important parameters for reaching this flow regime in our experiments were the viscosity and the velocity of the carrier fluid, and the sizes of drops and bubbles. The dependencies of the transverse position of drops and bubbles on these parameters were investigated. At steady state, the trajectories of drops and bubbles approached the center of the channel for drops and bubbles almost as large as the channel, carried by rapidly flowing viscous liquids; among our experiments, these flow conditions were characterized by larger capillary numbers and smaller Reynolds numbers. Analytical models of lift forces developed for the flow of drops much smaller than the width of the channel failed to predict their transverse position, while computational fluid dynamic simulations of the experiments agreed better with the experimental measurements. The degrees of success of these predictions indicate the importance of confinement on generating strong hydrodynamic lift forces. We conclude that, inside microfluidic channels, it is possible to support and position buoyant drops and bubbles simply by flowing a single-stream (i.e., “sheathless”) carrier liquid that has appropriate velocity and hydrodynamic properties.

  4. Stable Multibubble Sonoluminescence Bubble Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Posakony, Gerald J.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2006-06-30

    Multibubble standing wave patterns can be generated from a flat piezoceramic transducer element propagating into water. By adding a second transducer positioned at 90 degrees from the transducer generating the standing wave, a 3-dimensional volume of stable single bubbles can be established. Further, the addition of the second transducer stabilizes the bubble pattern so that individual bubbles may be studied. The size of the bubbles and the separation of the standing waves depend on the frequency of operation. Two transducers, operating at frequencies above 500 kHz, provided the most graphic results for the configuration used in this study. At these frequencies stable bubbles exhibit a bright sonoluminescence pattern. Whereas stable SBSL is well-known, stable MBSL has not been previously reported. This paper includes discussions of the acoustic responses, standing wave patterns, and pictorial results of the separation of individual bubble of sonoluminescence in a multibubble sonoluminescence environment.

  5. In Search of the Big Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew; Wentzky, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    Freely rising air bubbles in water sometimes assume the shape of a spherical cap, a shape also known as the "big bubble". Is it possible to find some objective function involving a combination of a bubble's attributes for which the big bubble is the optimal shape? Following the basic idea of the definite integral, we define a bubble's surface as…

  6. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  7. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  8. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer. respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  9. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  10. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  11. Bubble Measuring Instrument and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting. distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receive, the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  12. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Thermocapillary migration is a method for moving bubbles in space in the absence of buoyancy. A temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase in which a bubble is situated, and the applied gradient impressed on the bubble surface causes one pole of the drop to be cooler than the opposite pole. As the surface tension is a decreasing function of temperature, the cooler pole pulls at the warmer pole, creating a flow which propels the bubble in the direction of the warmer fluid. A major impediment to the practical use of thermocapillarity to direct the movement of bubbles in space is the fact that surfactant impurities which are unavoidably present in the continuous phase can significantly reduce the migration velocity. A surfactant impurity adsorbed onto the bubble interface is swept to the trailing end of the bubble. When bulk concentrations are low (which is the case with an impurity), diffusion of surfactant to the front end is slow relative to convection, and surfactant collects at the back end of the bubble. Collection at the back lowers the surface tension relative to the front end setting up a reverse tension gradient. For buoyancy driven bubble motions in the absence of a thermocapillarity, the tension gradient opposes the surface flow, and reduces the surface and terminal velocities (the interface becomes more solid-like). When thermocapillary forces are present, the reverse tension gradient set up by the surfactant accumulation reduces the temperature tension gradient, and decreases to near zero the thermocapillary velocity. The objective of our research is to develop a method for enhancing the thermocapillary migration of bubbles which have been retarded by the adsorption onto the bubble surface of a surfactant impurity, Our remobilization theory proposes to use surfactant molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher

  13. A bubbling bolt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume; Katmadas, Stefanos

    2014-07-01

    We present a new solvable system, solving the equations of five-dimensional ungauged = 1 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets, that allows for non-extremal solutions and reduces to a known system when restricted to the floating brane Ansatz. A two-centre globally hyperbolic smooth geometry is obtained as a solution to this system, describing a bubble linking a Gibbons-Hawking centre to a charged bolt. However this solution turns out to violate the BPS bound, and we show that its generalisation to an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centres never admits a spin structure.

  14. Electrolysis-induced bubbling in soft solids for elastic-wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalescot, S.; Roger, B.; Zorgani, A.; Souchon, R.; Grasland-Mongrain, P.; Ben Haj Slama, R.; Bera, J.-C.; Catheline, S.

    2016-02-01

    Water electrolysis was discovered in 1800, with the famous experiment investigated here within soft tissue from an elastic-wave point of view. Indeed, we report that the rapid formation of hydrogen bubbles after transient (10 ms) electrolysis in water-based gels produces elastic waves. These bubbles are observed using an ultrafast optical camera. As the bubbles are trapped between the rigid electrode and the soft matter, they act as a source of elastic waves that are measured in the bulk using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. The elastic-wave amplitude is shown to be in good agreement with a simple bubble model.

  15. Swimming movements initiate bubble formation in fish decompressed from elevated gas pressures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1985-01-01

    Young specimens of trout, catfish, sculpin and salamanders were equilibrated with elevated gas pressures, then rapidly decompressed to ambient pressure. The newly hatched forms tolerated extremely high gas supersaturations; equilibration pressures of 80-120 atm argon or 150-250 atm helium were required for in vivo bubble formation. During subsequent larval development, the equilibration pressures required decreased to just 5-10 atm and bubbles originated in the fins. Anesthetising older fish before decompression prevented bubble formation in the fins; this suggests that swimming movements mechanically initiate bubbles, possibly by a tribonucleation mechanism. PMID:2859954

  16. Longitudinal painting with large amplitude second harmonic rf voltages in the rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito; Ohmori, Chihiro; Nomura, Masahiro; Schnase, Alexander; Toda, Makoto; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Taihei; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi

    2009-04-01

    In the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the longitudinal painting is important to alleviate the space-charge effects. It is known that the momentum offset injection and applying the second harmonic rf voltage improves the bunching factor, which is defined as the ratio of average and peak current. Our simulation studies show that the large-amplitude second harmonic, 80% to the fundamental, is optimum, and the second harmonic phase sweep improves the bunching factor at the beginning of the injection period. We performed the beam tests of longitudinal painting in the J-PARC RCS. We proved that the longitudinal painting with the 80% second harmonic, the momentum offset of -0.2%, and the second harmonic phase sweep improved bunching factors significantly.

  17. Effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochun

    2005-11-01

    The effect of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction was investigated experimentally in a high-speed turbulent channel flow of water. A variety of near-wall injection techniques were used to create a bubbly turbulent boundary layer. The resulting wall friction force was measured directly by a floating element force balance. The bubble size was determined from photographic imaging. Using compressed nitrogen to force flow through a slot injector located in the plate beneath the boundary layer of the tunnel test section, a surfactant solution (Triton X-100, 19ppm) and salt water solution (35ppt) generated bubbles of average size between ˜500 microns and ˜200 microns and ˜100 microns, respectively (40 < d^+ < 200). In addition hollow spherical glass beads (˜75 microns (d^+ = 30) and specific gravity 0.18) and previously prepared lipid stabilized gas bubbles of ˜ 30 micron (d^+ =12) were injected. The results indicate that the drag reduction is related strongly to the injected gas volume flux and the static pressure in the boundary layer. Changing bubble size had essentially no influence on the measured friction drag, suggesting that friction drag is not a strong function of bubble size. [Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  18. Dynamical response of helium bubble motion to irradiation with high-energy self-ions in aluminum at high temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2009-02-21

    Brownian-type motion of helium bubbles in aluminum and its dynamical response to irradiation with 100-keV Al{sup +} ions at high temperatures has been studied using in situ irradiation and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that, for most bubbles, the Brownian-type motion is retarded under irradiation, while the mobility returns when the irradiation is stopped. In contrast, under irradiation, a small number of bubbles display exceptionally rapid motion associated with the change in bubble size. These effects are discussed in terms of the dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage formed by the high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  19. Integration of BpMADS4 on various linkage groups improves the utilization of the rapid cycle breeding system in apple.

    PubMed

    Weigl, Kathleen; Wenzel, Stephanie; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2015-02-01

    Rapid cycle breeding in apple is a new approach for the rapid introgression of agronomically relevant traits (e.g. disease resistances) from wild apple species into domestic apple cultivars (Malus × domestica Borkh.). This technique drastically shortens the long-lasting juvenile phase of apple. The utilization of early-flowering apple lines overexpressing the BpMADS4 gene of the European silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) in hybridization resulted in one breeding cycle per year. Aiming for the selection of non-transgenic null segregants at the end of the breeding process, the flower-inducing transgene and the gene of interest (e.g. resistance gene) that will be introgressed by hybridization need to be located on different chromosomes. To improve the flexibility of the existing approach in apple, this study was focused on the development and characterization of eleven additional BpMADS4 overexpressing lines of four different apple cultivars. In nine lines, the flowering gene was mapped to different linkage groups. The differences in introgressed T-DNA sequences and plant genome deletions post-transformation highlighted the unique molecular character of each line. However, transgenic lines demonstrated no significant differences in flower organ development and pollen functionality compared with non-transgenic plants. Hybridization studies using pollen from the fire blight-resistant wild species accession Malus fusca MAL0045 and the apple scab-resistant cultivar 'Regia' indicated that BpMADS4 introgression had no significant effect on the breeding value of each transgenic line. PMID:25370729

  20. Bubble levitation and translation under single-bubble sonoluminescence conditions.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J

    2003-08-01

    Bubble levitation in an acoustic standing wave is re-examined for conditions relevant to single-bubble sonoluminescence. Unlike a previous examination [Matula et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1522-1527 (1997)], the stable parameter space [Pa,R0] is accounted for in this realization. Forces such as the added mass force and drag are included, and the results are compared with a simple force balance that equates the Bjerknes force to the buoyancy force. Under normal sonoluminescence conditions, the comparison is quite favorable. A more complete accounting of the forces shows that a stably levitated bubble does undergo periodic translational motion. The asymmetries associated with translational motion are hypothesized to generate instabilities in the spherical shape of the bubble. A reduction in gravity results in reduced translational motion. It is hypothesized that such conditions may lead to increased light output from sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:12942960

  1. Interaction of two spark-generated bubbles near a confined free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleki-Haselghoubi, Noureyeh; Shervani-Tabar, Mohammad Taghi; Taeibi-Rahni, Mohammad; Dadvand, Abdolrahman

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the oscillation of two spark-generated bubbles placed on a vertical column in close proximity to a confined free surface is considered. The confined free surface is accorded by the top opening of different configurations. These configurations include (i) a centrally perforated horizontal flat plate ({θ=90°)}, (ii) vertically placed cylinder ({θ=0°)} and (iii) nozzle ({θ >0°)}. The main objective of the present work is to study the effects of key parameters such as the nozzle geometry, the locations of the energy input (i.e., initial position of the bubbles with respect to each other and relative to the free surface) on the dynamics of the two bubbles and the free surface. It was found that the lifetime of the upper bubble decreases from the vertical cylinder to the flat plate case. In addition, by reducing the inter-bubble distance, the lifetime of the upper bubble becomes longer and the repulsion between two bubbles during the expansion phase is stronger. Finally, by reducing the upper bubble-free surface distance, the repulsion between two bubbles during expansion phase increases, the tendency of the upper bubble to rebound and initiate another oscillation cycle decreases, and the amplitude of elevation of the free surface increases.

  2. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles. PMID:22087995

  3. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  4. Experimental magma degassing: The revenge of the deformed bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxer, H.; Bellucci, P.; Ulmer, S.; Nowak, M.

    2013-12-01

    We performed decompression experiments with a hydrated phonolitic melt at a T of 1323 K in an internally heated pressure vessel to investigate the effect of decompression method and rate on melt degassing. Samples were decompressed from 200 to 75 MPa with step-wise and continuous decompression (SD/CD) at nominal decompression rates (DRs) of 0.0028-1.7 MPa/s. At target P the samples were quenched rapidly under isobaric conditions with 150 K/s. The vesiculated glass products were compared in terms of bubble number density (BND), bubble size distribution (BSD) and residual H2O content. Almost all capsules were deformed after decompression: the initially crimped headspaces were expanded and the walls were inflexed in the capsule center. We postulate that the deformation is primarily due to the change in molar volume V(m) of exsolved H2O during rapid quench. Bubble growth in the melt contributes to the deformation by capsule expansion, but the main problem is the shrinkage and collapse of bubbles during cooling. In first approximation, the texture of the vesiculated melt is not frozen until the glass transition T (~773 K for this composition, [1]) is reached. From 1323 K to T(g) the melt will display viscous behavior. For a final P of 75 MPa, V(m) of the exsolved H2O at T(g) is only ~25% of V(m) at 1323 K [2]. The fluid P in the bubbles is therefore continuously decreasing during quench. In combination with constant external P, the bubbles can either contract isometrically, get deformed (flattened) or even become dented by sucking melt inwards, which can be observed in some glass products. The shrinkage of bigger bubbles in the capsules is sometimes affecting the whole vesicle texture in a sample. FPA-FTIR measurements did not reveal H2O diffusion profiles towards bubbles [3]. H2O concentration gradients around bubbles are expected to be disturbed or annihilated due to melt transport. All derived BSDs of our samples were corrected to resemble the bubble sizes prior to

  5. Saccadic Performance and Cortical Excitability as Trait-Markers and State-Markers in Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder: A Two-Case Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Malsert, Jennifer; Guyader, Nathalie; Chauvin, Alan; Polosan, Mircea; Szekely, David; Bougerol, Thierry; Marendaz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background: The understanding of physiopathology and cognitive impairments in mood disorders requires finding objective markers. Mood disorders have often been linked to hypometabolism in the prefrontal dorsolateral cortex, and to GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission dysfunction. The present study aimed to discover whether saccadic tasks (involving DPLFC activity), and cortical excitability (involving GABA/Glutamate neurotransmission) could provide neuropsychophysical markers for mood disorders, and/or of its phases, in patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorders (rcBD). Methods: Two rcBD patients were followed for a cycle, and were compared to nine healthy controls. A saccade task, mixing prosaccades, antisaccades, and nosaccades, and an evaluation of cortical excitability using transcranial magnetic stimulation were performed. Results: We observed a deficit in antisaccade in patients independently of thymic phase, and in nosaccade in the manic phase only. Cortical excitability data revealed global intracortical deficits in all phases, switching according to cerebral hemisphere and thymic phase. Conclusion: Specific patterns of performance in saccade tasks and cortical excitability could characterize mood disorders (trait-markers) and its phases (state-markers). Moreover, a functional relationship between oculometric performance and cortical excitability is discussed. PMID:23293609

  6. Wrinkling in the deflation of elastic bubbles.

    PubMed

    Aumaitre, Elodie; Knoche, Sebastian; Cicuta, Pietro; Vella, Dominic

    2013-03-01

    The protein hydrophobin HFBII self-assembles into very elastic films at the surface of water; these films wrinkle readily upon compression. We demonstrate and study this wrinkling instability in the context of non-planar interfaces by forming HFBII layers at the surface of bubbles whose interfaces are then compressed by deflation of the bubble. By varying the initial concentration of the hydrophobin solutions, we are able to show that buckling occurs at a critical packing fraction of protein molecules on the surface. Independent experiments show that at this packing fraction the interface has a finite positive surface tension, and not zero surface tension as is usually assumed at buckling. We attribute this non-zero wrinkling tension to the finite elasticity of these interfaces. We develop a simple geometrical model for the evolution of the wrinkle length with further deflation and show that wrinkles grow rapidly near the needle (used for deflation) towards the mid-plane of the bubble. This geometrical model yields predictions for the length of wrinkles in good agreement with experiments independently of the rheological properties of the adsorbed layer. PMID:23504485

  7. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  8. Rapid acceleration of ferrous iron/peroxymonosulfate oxidation of organic pollutants by promoting Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle with hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Ma, Jun; Chen, Liwei; Li, Xuchun; Guan, Yinghong; Xie, Pengchao; Pan, Chao

    2013-10-15

    The reaction between ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS) generates reactive oxidants capable of degrading refractory organic contaminants. However, the slow transformation from ferric iron (Fe(III)) back to Fe(II) limits its widespread application. Here, we added hydroxylamine (HA), a common reducing agent, into Fe(II)/PMS process to accelerate the transformation from Fe(III) to Fe(II). With benzoic acid (BA) as probe compound, the addition of HA into Fe(II)/PMS process accelerated the degradation of BA rapidly in the pH range of 2.0-6.0 by accelerating the key reactions, including the redox cycle of Fe(III)/Fe(II) and the generation of reactive oxidants. Both sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals were considered as the primary reactive oxidants for the degradation of BA in HA/Fe(II)/PMS process with the experiments of electron spin resonance and alcohols quenching. Moreover, HA was gradually degraded to N2, N2O, NO2 (−), and NO3 (−), while the environmentally friendly gas of N2 was considered as its major end product in the process. The present study might provide a promising idea based on Fe(II)/PMS process for the rapid degradation of refractory organic contaminants in water treatment. PMID:24033112

  9. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  10. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  11. The Dynamics of Vapor Bubbles in Acoustic Pressure Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of a superficial similarity with gas bubbles, the intimate coupling between dynamical and thermal processes confers to oscillating vapor bubbles some unique characteristics. This paper examines numerically the validity of some asymptotic-theory predictions such as the existence of two resonant radii and a limit size for a given sound amplitude and frequency. It is found that a small vapor bubble in a sound field of sufficient amplitude grows quickly through resonance and continues to grow thereafter at a very slow rate, seemingly indefinitely. Resonance phenomena therefore play a role for a few cycles at most, and reaching a limit size-if one exists at all-is found to require far more than several tens of thousands of cycles. It is also found that some small bubbles may grow or collapse depending on the phase of the sound field. The model accounts in detail for the thermo-fluid-mechanic processes in the vapor. In the second part of the paper, an approximate formulation valid for bubbles small with respect to the thermal penetration length in the vapor is derived and its accuracy examined, The present findings have implications for acoustically enhanced boiling heat transfer and other special applications such as boiling in microgravity.

  12. Physical and chemical observations in underwater explosion bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Strahle, W.C.; Liou, S.G.

    1994-12-31

    Underwater explosion bubbles are created by nearly constant volume explosions of gaseous explosives in the C-H-O-diluent system. Contained initially in glass globes it 0.1 MPa pressure, the explosions create an oscillating bubble in two modes. First, the explosions are created in a free field, and second, the explosion takes place near a flat plate. These bubbles are intended as a subscale model of the actual bubbles created by detonation of a solid explosive in an underwater configuration. Of primary interest are the bubble energy loss mechanisms in the cycle-to-cycle oscillations in the free field explosions and the impact pressure of the water jet created when exploding near a flat plate. Using CO and H{sub 2} with stoichiometric O{sub 2} and various diluents, the curious fact emerges in the free field explosions that the molecular weight of the product gases has a primary effect upon the loss mechanism. In addition, the molecular weight strongly influences the impact pressure in the flat plate tests. In particular, the lower the molecular weight, the lower the loss and the higher the impact pressure. Alternatively, the water vapor mass fraction in the product gases has a primary effect upon the loss mechanism. Indicated are the presence of evaporative and Birkhoff instability but not Raleigh-Taylor instability.

  13. Acoustic Behavior of Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Oguz, Hasan N.

    1996-01-01

    In a microgravity environment vapor bubbles generated at a boiling surface tend to remain near it for a long time. This affects the boiling heat transfer and in particular promotes an early transition to the highly inefficient film boiling regime. This paper describes the physical basis underlying attempts to remove the bubbles by means of pressure radiation forces.

  14. Optical behavior of surface bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straulino, Samuele; Gambi, Cecilia M. C.; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    The observation of diamond-like light spots produced by surface bubbles obliquely illuminated is reported. The phenomenon is discussed in terms of geometrical optics, and an explanation is provided attributing the effect to the astigmatism introduced by the deformation of the liquid surface surrounding the bubble. An essential ray tracing program is outlined and used to reconstruct the observed phenomenon numerically.

  15. Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability

    SciTech Connect

    AJ Peurrung; RA Craig

    1999-11-15

    Despite a number of noteworthy achievements in other fields, superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) and bubble chambers (BCs) have not been used for nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. This report examines these two radiation-detection technologies in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be ''adapted'' for use in national security applications. These technologies involve closely related approaches to radiation detection in which an energetic charged particle deposits sufficient energy to initiate the process of bubble nucleation in a superheated fluid. These detectors offer complete gamma-ray insensitivity when used to detect neutrons. They also provide controllable neutron-energy thresholds and excellent position resolution. SDDs are extraordinarily simple and inexpensive. BCs offer the promise of very high efficiency ({approximately}75%). A notable drawback for both technologies is temperature sensitivity. As a result of this problem, the temperature must be controlled whenever high accuracy is required, or harsh environmental conditions are encountered. The primary findings of this work are listed and briefly summarized below: (1) SDDs are ready to function as electronics-free neutron detectors on demand for arms-control applications. The elimination of electronics at the weapon's location greatly eases the negotiability of radiation-detection technologies in general. (2) As a result of their high efficiency and sharp energy threshold, current BCs are almost ready for use in the development of a next-generation active assay system. Development of an instrument based on appropriately safe materials is warranted. (3) Both kinds of bubble detectors are ready for use whenever very high gamma-ray fields must be confronted. Spent fuel MPC and A is a good example where this need presents itself. (4) Both kinds of bubble detectors have the potential to function as low-cost replacements for conventional neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He

  16. Acoustic bubble: Controlled and selective micropropulsion and chemical waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Daniel

    have offered a higher level of sophistication in terms of liquid manipulation, however, due to low Reynolds number associated with these methods, precise temporal manipulation has remained a challenge. Furthermore, varying the sample concentration rapidly and controllably, an important task for a plethora of chemical and biological studies, has proven to be extremely difficult. Here I demonstrate (Chapter 3) a novel approach for generating chemical waveforms that permits continuous modulation of the signal characteristics including the shape, frequency, amplitude (sample concentration), and duty cycle, with frequencies reaching up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, using multiple bubbles of different sizes in a single microchannel, we show fast switching between multiple distinct stimuli, wherein the waveform of each stimulus is independently controlled. Using our device, we characterized the frequency-dependent activation and internalization of the -adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR), a prototypic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) due to epinephrine. We determined that beta2-AR internalization due to epinephrine occurs on timescales between 100 ms and 5sec. The chemical waveform generation and switching method presented herein is expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of fast biomolecular processes.

  17. Mechanotransductional Basis of Endothelial Cell Response to Intravascular Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Pichette, Benjamin; Sobolewski, Peter; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular air embolism resulting from too rapid decompression is a well-known risk in deep-sea diving, aviation and space travel. It is also a common complication during surgery or other medical procedures when air or other endogenously administered gas is entrained in the circulation. Preventive and post-event treatment options are extremely limited for this dangerous condition, and none of them address the poorly understood pathophysiology of endothelial response to intravascular bubble presence. Using a novel apparatus allowing precise manipulation of microbubbles in real time fluorescence microscopy studies, we directly measure human umbilical vein endothelial cell responses to bubble contact. Strong intracellular calcium transients requiring extracellular calcium are observed upon cell-bubble interaction. The transient is eliminated both by the presence of the stretch activated channel inhibitor, gadolinium, and the transient receptor potential vanilliod family inhibitor, ruthenium red. No bubble induced calcium upsurge occurs if the cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin-D. This study explores the biomechanical mechanisms at play in bubble interfacial interactions with endothelial surface layer (ESL) macromolecules, reassessing cell response after selective digestion of glycocalyx glycosoaminoglycans, hyaluran (HA) and heparin sulfate (HS). HA digestion causes reduction of cell-bubble adherence and a more rapid induction of calcium influx after contact. HS depletion significantly decreases calcium transient amplitudes, as does pharmacologically induced sydencan ectodomain shedding. The surfactant perfluorocarbon oxycyte abolishes any bubble induced calcium transient, presumably through direct competition with ESL macromolecules for interfacial occupancy, thus attenuating the interactions that trigger potentially deleterious biochemical pathways. PMID:21931900

  18. Influence of bubble size on micro-bubble drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaochun; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Micro-bubble drag reduction experiments were conducted in a turbulent water channel flow. Compressed nitrogen was used to force flow through a slot injector located in the plate beneath the boundary layer of the tunnel test section. Gas and bubbly mixtures were injected into a turbulent boundary layer (TBL), and the resulting friction drag was measured downstream of the injector. Injection into tap water, a surfactant solution (Triton X-100, 20 ppm), and a salt-water solution (35 ppt) yielded bubbles of average diameter 476, 322 and 254 μm, respectively. In addition, lipid stabilized gas bubbles (44 μm) were injected into the boundary layer. Thus, bubbles with d + values of 200 to 18 were injected. The results indicate that the measured drag reduction by micro-bubbles in a TBL is related strongly to the injected gas volumetric flow rate and the static pressure in the boundary layer, but is essentially independent of the size of the micro-bubbles over the size range tested.

  19. The bubble legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  20. Surface Bubble Nucleation Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, James R. T.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-02-01

    Recent research has revealed several different techniques for nanoscopic gas nucleation on submerged surfaces, with findings seemingly in contradiction with each other. In response to this, we have systematically investigated the occurrence of surface nanobubbles on a hydrophobized silicon substrate for various different liquid temperatures and gas concentrations, which we controlled independently. We found that nanobubbles occupy a distinct region of this parameter space, occurring for gas concentrations of approximately 100%-110%. Below the nanobubble region we did not detect any gaseous formations on the substrate, whereas micropancakes (micron wide, nanometer high gaseous domains) were found at higher temperatures and gas concentrations. We moreover find that supersaturation of dissolved gases is not a requirement for nucleation of bubbles.

  1. Constrained Vapor Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Plawsky, J.; Wayner, P. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The nonisothermal Constrained Vapor Bubble, CVB, is being studied to enhance the understanding of passive systems controlled by interfacial phenomena. The study is multifaceted: 1) it is a basic scientific study in interfacial phenomena, fluid physics and thermodynamics; 2) it is a basic study in thermal transport; and 3) it is a study of a heat exchanger. The research is synergistic in that CVB research requires a microgravity environment and the space program needs thermal control systems like the CVB. Ground based studies are being done as a precursor to flight experiment. The results demonstrate that experimental techniques for the direct measurement of the fundamental operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and interfacial curvature fields) have been developed. Fluid flow and change-of-phase heat transfer are a function of the temperature field and the vapor bubble shape, which can be measured using an Image Analyzing Interferometer. The CVB for a microgravity environment, has various thin film regions that are of both basic and applied interest. Generically, a CVB is formed by underfilling an evacuated enclosure with a liquid. Classification depends on shape and Bond number. The specific CVB discussed herein was formed in a fused silica cell with inside dimensions of 3x3x40 mm and, therefore, can be viewed as a large version of a micro heat pipe. Since the dimensions are relatively large for a passive system, most of the liquid flow occurs under a small capillary pressure difference. Therefore, we can classify the discussed system as a low capillary pressure system. The studies discussed herein were done in a 1-g environment (Bond Number = 3.6) to obtain experience to design a microgravity experiment for a future NASA flight where low capillary pressure systems should prove more useful. The flight experiment is tentatively scheduled for the year 2000. The SCR was passed on September 16, 1997. The RDR is tentatively scheduled for October, 1998.

  2. The geophysical importance of bubbles in the sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirpriano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Present knowledge of the mechanisms for production and enrichment and film drops by bursting bubbles is summarized, with particular emphasis on the unsolved problems. Sea salt is by far the major constituent cycled through the Earth's atmosphere each year. Bursting bubbles in the oceans appear to be primarily responsible. These salt particles play a role in the formation of maritime clouds, which in turn affect the Earth's radiation budget. Along with the salt are carried various chemical pollutants and potentially pathogenic microorganisms, often in highly enriched form.

  3. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L. It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V=L(3)/6π(2), and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V<αL(3)/6π(2), with α≈0.21, such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V<αL(3)/6π(2) cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance. PMID:26565252

  4. Doughnut-shaped soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Préve, Deison; Saa, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Soap bubbles are thin liquid films enclosing a fixed volume of air. Since the surface tension is typically assumed to be the only factor responsible for conforming the soap bubble shape, the realized bubble surfaces are always minimal area ones. Here, we consider the problem of finding the axisymmetric minimal area surface enclosing a fixed volume V and with a fixed equatorial perimeter L . It is well known that the sphere is the solution for V =L3/6 π2 , and this is indeed the case of a free soap bubble, for instance. Surprisingly, we show that for V <α L3/6 π2 , with α ≈0.21 , such a surface cannot be the usual lens-shaped surface formed by the juxtaposition of two spherical caps, but is rather a toroidal surface. Practically, a doughnut-shaped bubble is known to be ultimately unstable and, hence, it will eventually lose its axisymmetry by breaking apart in smaller bubbles. Indisputably, however, the topological transition from spherical to toroidal surfaces is mandatory here for obtaining the global solution for this axisymmetric isoperimetric problem. Our result suggests that deformed bubbles with V <α L3/6 π2 cannot be stable and should not exist in foams, for instance.

  5. Fuel system bubble dissipation device

    SciTech Connect

    Iseman, W.J.

    1987-11-03

    This patent describes a bubble dissipation device for a fuel system wherein fuel is delivered through a fuel line from a fuel tank to a fuel control with the pressure of the fuel being progressively increased by components including at least one pump stage and an ejector in advance of the pump state. The ejector an ejector casing with a wall defining an elongate tubular flow passage which forms a portion of the fuel line to have all of the fuel flow through the tubular flow passage in flowing from the fuel tank to the fuel control, a nozzle positioned entirely within the tubular flow passage and spaced from the wall to permit fuel flow. The nozzle has an inlet and an outlet with the inlet connected to the pump stage to receive fuel under pressure continuously from the pump stage, a bubble accumulation chamber adjoining and at a level above the ejector casing and operatively connected to the fuel line in advance of the ejector casing. The bubble accumulation chamber is of a size to function as a fuel reservoir and hold an air bubble containing vapor above the level of fuel therein and having an outlet adjacent the bottom thereof operatively connected to the tubular flow passage in the ejector casing at an inlet end, a bubble accumulation chamber inlet above the level of the bubble accumulation chamber outlet whereby fuel can flow through the bubble accumulation chamber from the inlet to the outlet thereof with a bubble in the fuel rising above the fuel level in the bubble accumulation chamber.

  6. Rapid changes in temperature and hydrology in the western Mediterranean during the last climatic cycle from the high resolution record ODP Site 976 (Alboran Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combourieu-Nebout, Nathalie; Peyron, Odile; Bout-Roumazeille, Viviane

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution pollen record, pollen-inferred climate reconstructions and clay mineralogy records were performed over the last climatic cycle from the ODP Site 976 located in the Alboran Sea Continental paleoenvironment proxies were provided on the same samples to depict the short and long term variability of Mediterranean vegetation and climate during the two last terminations and the last two interglacials. Pollen record highlights the vegetation changes associated to climate variability while clay mineralogy informs about the terrigenous inputs related to wind and/or river transport. During the last cycle, both vegetation and clay minerals data have recorded the response of continental ecosystems to all the climate events which characterized the last 135000 years. The Dansgaard/Oeschger oscillations and the rapid cold events evidenced in the North Atlantic (Bond et al., 1993; McManus et al., 1994) are well evidenced in the ODP sequence. Thus, warm interstadials show a strong colonisation of temperate Mediterranean forest while cold events are particularly well expressed by correlative increases in dry steppic to semi-desert formation with enhanced input from African desert dust (Bout-Roumazeilles et al, 2007 and in progress). A special attention has been paid on the two last glacial/interglacial transitions 1 and 2 that occurred before the interglacial inception in order to better understand what happened during these key-periods in continental areas and also better understand how reacts the Mediterranean climate regime through these two periods. The two high resolution records from the Terminaison 2/ Stage 5 and Terminaison 1/ Holocene are compared especially with regards to the wind regime modifications through atmospheric supply, and to hydrological and temperature changes reconstructed from pollen data. Therefore for these two key-periods, we aim to produce a robust climate reconstruction pollen-inferred precipitation and temperature from the 0DP 976 marine

  7. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  8. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  9. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. PMID:26061152

  10. Use of an ultrasonic reflectance technique to examine bubble size changes in dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strybulevych, A.; Leroy, V.; Shum, A. L.; Koksel, H. F.; Scanlon, M. G.; Page, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Bread quality largely depends on the manner in which bubbles are created and manipulated in the dough during processing. We have developed an ultrasonic reflectance technique to monitor bubbles in dough, even at high volume fractions, where near the bubble resonances it is difficult to make measurements using transmission techniques. A broadband transducer centred at 3.5 MHz in a normal incidence wave reflection set-up is used to measure longitudinal velocity and attenuation from acoustic impedance measurements. The technique is illustrated by examining changes in bubbles in dough due to two very different physical effects. In dough made without yeast, a peak in attenuation due to bubble resonance is observed at approximately 2 MHz. This peak diminishes rapidly and shifts to lower frequencies, indicative of Ostwald ripening of bubbles within the dough. The second effect involves the growth of bubble sizes due to gas generated by yeast during fermentation. This process is experimentally challenging to investigate with ultrasound because of very high attenuation. The reflectance technique allows the changes of the velocity and attenuation during fermentation to be measured as a function of frequency and time, indicating bubble growth effects that can be monitored even at high volume fractions of bubbles.

  11. A model of extravascular bubble evolution: effect of changes in breathing gas composition.

    PubMed

    Himm, J F; Homer, L D

    1999-10-01

    Observations of bubble evolution in rats after decompression from air dives (O. Hyldegaard and J. Madsen. Undersea Biomed. Res. 16: 185-193, 1989; O. Hyldegaard and J. Madsen. Undersea Hyperbaric Med. 21: 413-424, 1994; O. Hyldegaard, M. Moller, and J. Madsen. Undersea Biomed. Res. 18: 361-371, 1991) suggest that bubbles may resolve more safely when the breathing gas is a heliox mixture than when it is pure O(2). This is due to a transient period of bubble growth seen during switches to O(2) breathing. In an attempt to understand these experimental results, we have developed a multigas-multipressure mathematical model of bubble evolution, which consists of a bubble in a well-stirred liquid. The liquid exchanges gas with the bubble via diffusion, and the exchange between liquid and blood is described by a single-exponential time constant for each inert gas. The model indicates that bubbles resolve most rapidly in spinal tissue, in adipose tissue, and in aqueous tissues when the breathing gas is switched to O(2) after surfacing. In addition, the model suggests that switching to heliox breathing may prolong the existence of the bubble relative to breathing air for bubbles in spinal and adipose tissues. Some possible explanations for the discrepancy between model and experiment are discussed. PMID:10517787

  12. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  13. The Gene Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Is a Candidate for the anthocyaninless Locus of Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa (Fast Plants Type)

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Douglas L.; Vaziri, Anoumid; Shergill, Gurbaksh

    2016-01-01

    Rapid cycling Brassica rapa, also known as Wisconsin Fast Plants, are a widely used organism in both K-12 and college science education. They are an excellent system for genetics laboratory instruction because it is very easy to conduct genetic crosses with this organism, there are numerous seed stocks with variation in both Mendelian and quantitative traits, they have a short generation time, and there is a wealth of educational materials for instructors using them. Their main deficiency for genetics education is that none of the genetic variation in RCBr has yet been characterized at the molecular level. Here we present the first molecular characterization of a gene responsible for a trait in Fast Plants. The trait under study is purple/nonpurple variation due to the anthocyaninless locus, which is one of the Mendelian traits most frequently used for genetics education with this organism. We present evidence that the DFR gene, which encodes dihyroflavonol 4-reductase, is the candidate gene for the anthocyaninless (ANL) locus in RCBr. DFR shows complete linkage with ANL in genetic crosses with a total of 948 informative chromosomes, and strains with the recessive nonpurple phenotype have a transposon-related insertion in the DFR which is predicted to disrupt gene function. PMID:27548675

  14. The Gene Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Is a Candidate for the anthocyaninless Locus of Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa (Fast Plants Type).

    PubMed

    Wendell, Douglas L; Vaziri, Anoumid; Shergill, Gurbaksh

    2016-01-01

    Rapid cycling Brassica rapa, also known as Wisconsin Fast Plants, are a widely used organism in both K-12 and college science education. They are an excellent system for genetics laboratory instruction because it is very easy to conduct genetic crosses with this organism, there are numerous seed stocks with variation in both Mendelian and quantitative traits, they have a short generation time, and there is a wealth of educational materials for instructors using them. Their main deficiency for genetics education is that none of the genetic variation in RCBr has yet been characterized at the molecular level. Here we present the first molecular characterization of a gene responsible for a trait in Fast Plants. The trait under study is purple/nonpurple variation due to the anthocyaninless locus, which is one of the Mendelian traits most frequently used for genetics education with this organism. We present evidence that the DFR gene, which encodes dihyroflavonol 4-reductase, is the candidate gene for the anthocyaninless (ANL) locus in RCBr. DFR shows complete linkage with ANL in genetic crosses with a total of 948 informative chromosomes, and strains with the recessive nonpurple phenotype have a transposon-related insertion in the DFR which is predicted to disrupt gene function. PMID:27548675

  15. Teaching Human Genetics with Mustard: Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa (Fast Plants Type) as a Model for Human Genetics in the Classroom Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    We have developed experiments and materials to model human genetics using rapid cycling Brassica rapa, also known as Fast Plants. Because of their self-incompatibility for pollination and the genetic diversity within strains, B. rapa can serve as a relevant model for human genetics in teaching laboratory experiments. The experiment presented here is a paternity exclusion project in which a child is born with a known mother but two possible alleged fathers. Students use DNA markers (microsatellites) to perform paternity exclusion on these subjects. Realistic DNA marker analysis can be challenging to implement within the limitations of an instructional lab, but we have optimized the experimental methods to work in a teaching lab environment and to maximize the “hands-on” experience for the students. The genetic individuality of each B. rapa plant, revealed by analysis of polymorphic microsatellite markers, means that each time students perform this project, they obtain unique results that foster independent thinking in the process of data interpretation. PMID:17548880

  16. Direct observation of the phase space footprint of a painting injection in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Shobuda, Y.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Takayanagi, T.; Harada, H.; Irie, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The 3 GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex is nearly at the operational stage with regard to the beam commissioning aspects. Recently, the design painting injection study has been commenced with the aim of high output beam power at the extraction. In order to observe the phase space footprint of the painting injection, a method was developed utilizing a beam position monitor (BPM) in the so-called single pass mode. The turn-by-turn phase space coordinates of the circulating beam directly measured using a pair of BPMs entirely positioned in drift space, and the calculated transfer matrices from the injection point to the pair of BPMs with several successive turns were used together in order to obtain the phase space footprint of the painting injection. There are two such pairs of BPMs placed in two different locations in the RCS, the results from which both agreed and were quite consistent with what was expected.

  17. Transient bubbles, bublets and breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Giles; Blake, John

    1999-11-01

    The non-spherical nature of the collapse of bubbles has important ramifications in many practical situations such as ultrasonic cleaning, tanning of leather, and underwater explosions. In particular the high speed liquid jet that can thread a collapsing bubble is central to the functional performance. An impressive photographic record of a liquid jet was obtained by Crum using a bubble situated in the vicinity of a platform oscillating vertically at a frequency of 60 Hz. A boundary integral method is used to model this situation and is found to closely mimic some of the observations. However, a slight variation of parameters or a change in the phase of the driving frequency can lead to dramatically different bubble behaviour, a feature also observed by Crum.

  18. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  19. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  20. Pulling bubbles from a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Justin C. T.; Blakemore, Andrea L.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2010-06-01

    Deposition of bubbles on a wall withdrawn from a liquid bath is a phenomenon observed in many everyday situations—the foam lacing left behind in an emptied glass of beer, for instance. It is also of importance to the many industrial processes where uniformity of coating is desirable. We report work on an idealized version of this situation, the drag-out of a single bubble in Landau-Levich-Derjaguin flow. We find that a well-defined critical wall speed exists, separating the two regimes of bubble persistence at the meniscus and bubble deposition on the moving wall. Experiments show that this transition occurs at Ca∗˜Bo0.73. A similar result is obtained theoretically by balancing viscous stresses and gravity.

  1. Modeling the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. P.

    Modeling the Local Bubble is one of those activities fraught with danger. It is very easy to be too naive, to fail to consider the dependence of the model on assumptions about the nearby ambient state, or the likelihood of such a structure. It is similarly easy to become so caught up in the details of the vicinity that it is unclear where to begin a necessarily idealized modeling effort. And finally, it is important to remember that the data we have may in some cases be lying to us, and that we have not yet learned to read their facial expressions quite carefully enough. That said, I've tried in this paper to be helpful to those who may wish to take the risks. I surveyed the very most basic stories that the data seem to tell, and pointed out the standard coincidences that may be telling us a lot about what is happening, but may turn out once again to have been just coincidences. I've described 5 distinct conceptions that in one flavor or another pretty well survey the collection of mental images that have so far been carried by those who've attempted models. One may be right, or something entirely different may be more appropriate. It's at least vital to realize that a conception comes first, followed by a simplified model of details. I've also included a long list of questions directed at observers. Some have partial answers, some one wouldn't know today quite how to approach. But it is a list that students of the soft x-ray background, interstellar absorption lines, possible instrumentation, and the heliosphere may wish to review from time to time, just to see whether they can figure out how to be more helpful. There is another list for modelers, things the models must address, however-so-flimsily if necessary, because there are strong observational constraints (and stronger ones coming) on what can and cannot be present in the local ISM. To that I've added a few remarks concerning x-ray emission coming from beyond the Local Bubble, and another few on how x

  2. Effect of air, heliox, and oxygen breathing on air bubbles in aqueous tissues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Madsen, J

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose was to examine the behavior of air bubbles in three non-lipid tissues (skeletal muscle, tendon, and the anterior chamber of the eye) during breathing of air, helium-oxygen (heliox, 80:20), or oxygen. Air bubbles were injected into skeletal muscle or tendon in rats after decompression from a 1-h air exposure at 3.5 atm abs (355 kPa) or into the anterior chamber of the rat eye without any previous pressure exposure. The bubbles were studied by photomicroscopy at 1 atm abs (101 kPa) during either air breathing or during air breathing followed by heliox or O2 breathing. Muscle: during air breathing, all bubbles initially increased in size for a period of 55-100 min after decompression and then started to shrink. Both heliox and O2 breathing increased the shrinking rate as compared to air. Bubble size decreased more rapidly during O2 than heliox breathing. Tendon: during air breathing, bubble size decreased at a constant rate; in one bubble the decrease was preceded by a small increase. During heliox breathing most bubbles decreased faster than during breathing of air. O2 breathing caused a short-term increase in bubble size in 4 out of 10 bubbles. Otherwise, the shrinkage rate was increased in six bubbles and uninfluenced in four bubbles during breathing of O2. Rat eye: during air breathing all bubbles shrank in the observation period. When heliox breathing was started, all bubbles transiently grew for 10-35 min, after which they began shrinking faster than during air breathing. When O2 breathing was started, five out of seven bubbles initially grew or stopped shrinking for 5-15 min, after which they decreased in size faster than during both air and heliox breathing. We conclude that breathing of either heliox or O2 will cause air bubbles in aqueous tissues to disappear faster than during breathing of air. Since heliox breathing promoted bubble shrinking in both muscle and tendon, gas exchange was probably not primarily limited by extravascular diffusion in

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958), 10.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α -particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    PubMed

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes. PMID:26871185

  5. Dynamics of bubbles in supernovae and turbulent vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V.; Popov, M. V.; Oparin, A. M.; Stenflo, L.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2006-04-01

    We consider the motion of a bubble in a central acceleration field created by gravity or a centrifugal force. In the former case, the bubble moves outwards from and, in the latter, towards the center. We have calculated the characteristic time needed for a bubble to leave or reach the center. The solution obtained provides insight into the processes of thermonuclear supernovae and combustion; in other words, into the interaction between a flame and a turbulent vortex. In the case of combustion, a light bubble of burnt material propagates towards the axis of a strong turbulent vortex faster than it drifts in the direction of rotation of the vortex. It is expected that the development of bubbles should prevent the formation of “pockets” at the flame front, similar to those predicted by a simplified model of turbulent combustion in a constant density flux. In the case of a thermonuclear supernova in a deflagration burning regime, it is shown that light products of burning rise from the center of the white dwarf substantially more rapidly than the thermonuclear flame front propagates. As a result, a flame cannot completely burn the central part of the star, and instead is pushed to the outer layers of the white dwarf. The effect of bubble motion (large-scale convection) makes spherically symmetric models for thermonuclear supernovae unrealistic, which is of prime importance for the supernova spectrum and energy. The motion of bubbles is even faster in the case of a rotating white dwarf; under certain conditions, the centrifugal force may dominate over the gravitational force. To test this theory, we have carried out numerical simulations of supernovae explosions for various sizes of the burned region in the core of the presupernova. We have derived a relation between the rate of large-scale convection and the size of the burned region, which is specified by the rate of the deflagration in the thermonuclear burning.

  6. Segregating gas from melt: an experimental study of the Ostwald ripening of vapor bubbles in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lautze, Nicole C.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive coarsening (Ostwald ripening) of H2O and H2O-CO2 bubbles in rhyolite and basaltic andesite melts was studied with elevated temperature–pressure experiments to investigate the rates and time spans over which vapor bubbles may enlarge and attain sufficient buoyancy to segregate in magmatic systems. Bubble growth and segregation are also considered in terms of classical steady-state and transient (non-steady-state) ripening theory. Experimental results are consistent with diffusive coarsening as the dominant mechanism of bubble growth. Ripening is faster in experiments saturated with pure H2O than in those with a CO2-rich mixed vapor probably due to faster diffusion of H2O than CO2 through the melt. None of the experimental series followed the time1/3 increase in mean bubble radius and time-1 decrease in bubble number density predicted by classical steady-state ripening theory. Instead, products are interpreted as resulting from transient regime ripening. Application of transient regime theory suggests that bubbly magmas may require from days to 100 years to reach steady-state ripening conditions. Experimental results, as well as theory for steady-state ripening of bubbles that are immobile or undergoing buoyant ascent, indicate that diffusive coarsening efficiently eliminates micron-sized bubbles and would produce mm-sized bubbles in 102–104 years in crustal magma bodies. Once bubbles attain mm-sizes, their calculated ascent rates are sufficient that they could transit multiple kilometers over hundreds to thousands of years through mafic and silicic melt, respectively. These results show that diffusive coarsening can facilitate transfer of volatiles through, and from, magmatic systems by creating bubbles sufficiently large for rapid ascent.

  7. How does a bubble chamber work?

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, D.; Homsi, W.; Luzuriaga, J.; Su, C.K.; Weilert, M.A.; Maris, H.J.

    1998-11-01

    A charged particle passing through a bubble chamber produces a track of bubbles. The way in which these bubbles are produced has been a matter of some controversy. The authors consider the possibility that in helium and hydrogen bubble chambers the production of bubbles is primarily a mechanical process, rather than a thermal process as has often been assumed. The model the authors propose gives results which are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  8. Bubble gum simulating abdominal calcifications.

    PubMed

    Geller, E; Smergel, E M

    1992-01-01

    CT examination of the abdomens of two children demonstrated sites of high attenuation in the stomach, which were revealed to be bubble gum. Investigation of the CT appearance of samples of chewing gum showed that it consistently has high attenuation (178-345 HU). The attenuation of gum base, which contains calcium carbonate, was 476 HU. In addition, examination of a volunteer who had swallowed bubble gum confirmed the CT appearance. PMID:1523059

  9. Electrochemical 'bubble swarm' enhancement of ultrasonic surface cleaning.

    PubMed

    Birkin, P R; Offin, D G; Vian, C J B; Leighton, T G

    2015-09-01

    An investigation of surface cleaning using a swarm of gas bubbles within an acoustically activated stream is presented. Electrolysis of water at Pt microwires (100 μm diameter) to produce both hydrogen and oxygen bubbles is shown to enhance the extent of ultrasonic surface cleaning in a free flowing water stream containing an electrolyte (0.1 M Na2SO4) and low surfactant concentration (2 mM SDS). The surfactant was employed to allow control of the average size of the bubble population within the swarm. The electrochemical bubble swarm (EBS) is shown to perturb acoustic transmission through the stream. To optimise the cleaning process both the ultrasonic field and the electrochemical current are pulsed and synchronized but with different duty cycles. Cleaning action is demonstrated on structured surfaces (porcine skin and finger mimics) loaded with fluorescent particles. This action is shown to be significantly enhanced compared to that found with an inherent bubble population produced by the flow and acoustic regime alone under the same conditions. PMID:26234563

  10. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine. PMID:26678845

  11. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  12. Bubble dynamics in high-amplitude ultrasound therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Mancia, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in certain therapeutic ultrasound procedures, such as histotripsy in which megahertz pressure pulses are used to destroy tissue. The large tensions (> 25 MPa) nucleate bubbles in the tissue, which rapidly grow to radii on the order of hundreds of microns and subsequently collapse. To better understand potential cavitation-induced damage, we developed a numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue that includes liquid compressibility and full thermal effects, as well as a comprehensive viscoelastic model with elasticity, relaxation, viscosity and various nonlinearities. This framework has enabled us to understand the effects of the viscoelastic and thermal properties of the tissue on the bubble dynamics, and compute stress and temperature fields in the surroundings. Results indicate that different viscoelastic properties affect the bubble dynamics differently, but that overall the viscoelastic nature of tissue produces larger stresses and increased heating on the surroundings, compared to bubble dynamics in purely viscous liquids. This work was supported by NSF grant number CBET 1253157 and NIH grant number 1R01HL110990-01A1.

  13. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  14. The Bubble Transport Mechanism: Indications for a bubble-mediated transfer of microorganisms from the sediment into the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Leifer, Ira; Kießlich, Katrin; Krause, Stefan; Frahm, Andreas; Treude, Tina

    2015-04-01

    Gas releasing seep areas are known to impact the methane biogeochemistry in the surrounding sediment and water column. Due to microbial processes most of the methane is oxidized under anaerobic and aerobic conditions before the greenhouse gas can escape into the atmosphere. However, methane gas bubbles can largely bypass this microbial filter mechanism, enabling highly efficient transport of methane from the sediment towards the sea surface. Studies in the water column surrounding hydrocarbon seeps indicated an elevated abundance of methanotrophic microorganism in the near field of gas bubble plumes. The enhanced methane concentration in the seep-affected water column stimulates the activity of methane oxidizers and leads to a rapid rise in the abundance of methane-oxidizing microorganisms in the aging plume water. In our study we hypothesized that a bubble-mediated transport mechanisms between the benthic and pelagic habitats represents an exchange process, which transfers methanotrophic microorganisms from the sediment into the water column, a process we termed the "Bubble Transport Mechanism". This mechanism could eventually influence the pelagic methanotrophic community, thereby indirectly providing feedback mechanisms for dissolved methane concentrations in the water column and thus impacting the sea/atmosphere methane flux. To test our hypothesis, field studies were conducted at the "Rostocker Seep" site (Coal Oil Point seep area, California, USA). Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) analyzes were performed to determine the abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic microorganisms. Aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria were detected in the sediment and the water column, whereas anaerobic methanotrophs were detected exclusively in the sediment. The key device of the project was a newly developed "Bubble Catcher" used to collect naturally emanating gas bubbles at the sea floor together with particles attached to the

  15. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas

  16. Remobilizing the Interface of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded By the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher concentrations than the impurity, it adsorbs to the bubble surface much faster than the impurity when the bubble is formed, and thereby prevents the impurity from adsorbing onto the surface. In addition, the rapid kinetic exchange and high bulk concentration maintain a saturated surface with uniform surface concentrations. This prevents retarding surface tension gradients and keeps the thermocapillary velocity high. In our reports over the first 2 years, we presented numerical simulations of the bubble motion and surfactant transport which verified theoretically the concept of remobilization, and the development of an apparatus to track and measure the velocity of rising bubbles in a glycerol/water surfactant solution. This year, we detail experimental observations of remobilization. Two polyethylene oxide surfactants were studied, C12E6 (CH3(CH2)11(OCH2)6OH) and C10E8 (CH3(CH2)4(OCH2CH2)8OH). Measurements of the kinetic exchange for these surfactants show that the one with the longer hydrophobe chain C12E6 has a lower rate of kinetic exchange. In addition, this surfactant is much less soluble in the glycerol/water mixture because of the shorter ethoxylate chain. As a result, we found that C12E6 had only a very limited ability to remobilize rising bubbles because of the limited kinetic exchange and reduced solubility. However, C10E8, with its higher solubility and more rapid exchange was found to dramatically remobilize rising bubbles. We also compared our theoretical calculations to the experimental measurements of velocity for both the non-remobilizing and remobilizing surfactants and found excellent agreement. We further observed that for C10E8 at high concentrations, which exceeded the critical micelle concentrations, additional remobilization was measured. In this case the rapid exchange of

  17. Vibration Considerations for Cryogenic Tanks Using Glass Bubbles Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Fesmire, James E.; Sass, Jared P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system has been previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical, vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate has been reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationary tanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significant vibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles represent two harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulation materials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested for vibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjected to random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures of insulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particle analysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tank applications. A thermal performance update on field demonstration testing of a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank, retrofitted with glass bubbles, is presented. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, aerogel, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank, mobile tanker, vibration.

  18. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  19. Estrous cycle variations in GABA(A) receptor phosphorylation enable rapid modulation by anabolic androgenic steroids in the medial preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, J G; Porter, D M; Onakomaiya, M M; Penatti, C A A; Vithlani, M; Moss, S J; Clark, A S; Henderson, L P

    2012-12-13

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic testosterone derivatives that are used for ergogenic purposes, alter neurotransmission and behaviors mediated by GABA(A) receptors. Some of these effects may reflect direct and rapid action of these synthetic steroids at the receptor. The ability of other natural allosteric steroid modulators to alter GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents is dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex. Here we show that phosphorylation of the GABA(A) receptor complex immunoprecipitated by β(2)/β(3) subunit-specific antibodies from the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the mouse varies across the estrous cycle; with levels being significantly lower in estrus. Acute exposure to the AAS, 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-MeT), had no effect on the amplitude or kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the mPOA of estrous mice when phosphorylation was low, but increased the amplitude of these currents from mice in diestrus, when it was high. Inclusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin, in the recording pipette eliminated the ability of 17α-MeT to enhance currents from diestrous animals, suggesting that PKC-receptor phosphorylation is critical for the allosteric modulation elicited by AAS during this phase. In addition, a single injection of 17α-MeT was found to impair an mPOA-mediated behavior (nest building) in diestrus, but not in estrus. PKC is known to target specific serine residues in the β(3) subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. Although phosphorylation of these β(3) serine residues showed a similar profile across the cycle, as did phosphoserine in mPOA lysates immunoprecipitated with β2/β3 antibody (lower in estrus than in diestrus or proestrus), the differences were not significant. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex regulates both the ability of AAS to modulate receptor function in the mPOA and the expression of a simple mPOA-dependent behavior through a

  20. The distribution of bubble sizes during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin; Oh, S. Peng; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sutter, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    A key physical quantity during reionization is the size of H II regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble size which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm - widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys - which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte Carlo realizations of a known bubble size probability density function (PDF). We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect the volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, H II regions in simulations are significantly larger (by factors of 10-1000 in volume) than analytic predictions. The size PDF is narrower, and evolves more slowly with time, than predicted. It becomes more sharply peaked as reionization progresses. These effects are likely caused by bubble mergers, which are inadequately modelled by analytic theory. Our results have important consequences for high-redshift 21 cm observations, the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the visibility of Lyα emitters, and point to a fundamental failure in our understanding of the characteristic scales of the reionization process.

  1. Spark bubble interaction with a suspended particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Wu, Di Wei; Klaseboer, Evert; Cheong Khoo, Boo

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse is influenced by nearby surfaces or objects. A bubble near a rigid surface will move towards the surface and collapse with a high speed jet. When a hard particle is suspended near a bubble generated by electric spark, the bubble expands and collapses moving the particle. We found that within a limit of stand-off distance, the particle is propelled away from the bubble as it collapses. At a slightly larger stand-off distance, the bubble collapse causes the particle to move towards the bubble initially before moving away. The bubble does not move the particle if it is placed far away. This conclusion is important for applications such as drug delivery in which the particle is to be propelled away from the collapsing bubble.

  2. Inviscid Partial Coalescence from Bubbles to Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. H.; Taborek, P.; Burton, J.; Khoo, B. C.; Lim, K. M.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2010-11-01

    Coalescence of bubbles (drops) not only coarse the bubble (drop) sizes, but sometimes produces satellite bubbles (droplets), known as partial coalescence. To explore links between the drop and bubble cases, we experimentally study the partial coalescence of pressurized xenon gas bubbles in nano de-ionized water using high-speed video imaging. The size of these satellites relative to their mother bubbles is found to increase with the density ratio of the gas to the liquid. Moreover, sub-satellite bubbles are sometimes observed, whose size is also found to increase with the density ratio, while keeps about one quarter of the primary satellite. The time duration from start of the coalescence to formation of the satellites, scaled by the capillary time, increases with the density ratio too. In addition, as the size ratio of the father bubble to the mother bubble increases moderately, their coalescence proceeds faster and the sub-satellite is prone to form and relatively larger.

  3. Yield and seed oil content response of dwarf, rapid-cycling Brassica to nitrogen treatments, planting density, and carbon dioxide enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frick, J.; Nielsen, S. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of N level (15 to 30 mM), time of N increase (14 to 28 days after planting), and planting density (1163 to 2093 plants/m2) were determined for crop yield responses of dwarf, rapid-cycling brassica (Brassica napus L., CrGC 5-2, Genome: ACaacc). Crops were grown in solid-matrix hydroponic systems and under controlled-environment conditions, including nonsupplemented (ambient) or elevated CO2 concentrations (998 +/- 12 micromoles mol-1). The highest seed yield rate obtained (4.4 g m-2 day-1) occurred with the lowest N level (15 mM) applied at the latest treatment time (day 28). In all trials, CO2 enrichment reduced seed yield rate and harvest index by delaying the onset of flowering and senescence and stimulating vegetative shoot growth. The highest shoot biomass accumulation rate (55.5 g m-2 day-1) occurred with the highest N level (30 mM) applied at the earliest time (day 14). Seed oil content was not significantly affected by CO2 enrichment. Maximum seed oil content (30% to 34%, dry weight basis) was obtained using the lowest N level (15 mM) initiated at the latest treatment time (day 28). In general, an increase in seed oil content was accompanied by a decrease in seed protein. Seed carbohydrate, moisture, and ash contents did not vary significantly in response to experimental treatments. Effects of N level and time of N increase were consistently significant for most crop responses. Planting density was significant only under elevated CO2 conditions.

  4. Predictors of Non-Stabilization during the Combination Therapy of Lithium and Divalproex in Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder: A Post-hoc Analysis of Two Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Keming; Kemp, David E.; Wang, Zuowei; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Conroy, Carla; Serrano, Marry Beth; Sajatovic, Martha; Findling, Robert L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study predictors of non–stabilization (i.e., not bimodally stabilized for randomization or not randomized due to premature discontinuation) during open-label treatment with lithium and divalproex in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (RCBD) with or without comorbid recent substance use disorders (SUDs). Method Data from the open-label phase of two maintenance studies were used. The reasons for non-stabilization were compared between patients with a recent SUD and those without. Predictors for non-stabilization were explored with logistic regression analyses. Results Of 149 patients with recent SUD and 254 without recent SUD enrolled into the open-label acute stabilization phase, 21% and 24% were stabilized and randomized, respectively. Compared to those without recent SUD, patients with recent SUD were more likely to discontinue the study due to non-adherence to the protocol, 53% versus 37% (OR = 1.92) or refractory mania/hypomania, 15% versus 9% (OR = 1.87), but less likely due to refractory depression 16% versus 25% (OR = 0.58) or adverse events, 10% versus 19% (OR = 0.44). A history of recent SUDs, early life verbal abuse, female gender, and late onset of first depressive episode were associated with increased risk for non-stabilization with ORs of 1.85, 1.74, 1.10, and 1.04, respectively. Conclusions During open treatment with lithium and divalproex in patients with RCBD, a recent SUD, a lifetime history of verbal abuse, female gender, and late onset of first depression independently predicted non-stabilization. The non-stabilization for patients with SUD was related to non-adherence and refractory mania/hypomania. PMID:20581798

  5. Optical sensing for characterization of bubble plumes from methane seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, O.; Camilli, R.; Whelan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Methane seeps are potentially a key contributor to atmospheric methane and to the global greenhouse gas budget. Improved estimates of methane flux from ocean floor seeps is required to understand the magnitude and characteristics of this contribution to the carbon cycle. % State of the art In steady, slow seeps a large portion of the gas is dissolved and oxidized before reaching the surface. However, in high-intensity methane seeps the bubble density, speed and size are such that a significant fraction of the gas can reach the atmosphere. Dissolved methane can be measured fairly reliably at the sea surface with traditional equilibration techniques. New types of in-situ chemical sensors can quantify dissolved methane deeper in the water column. Quantifying methane within the water column in the free gas phase (i.e., in the form of bubbles) remains a challenging problem. Current approaches rely either on indirect acoustic methods or direct collection of bubbles. Acoustic methods have the disadvantage of requiring extensive calibration, and can fail to distinguish the bubble signal from other sources of acoustic noise. Gas-capture techniques are mechanically complex, have a surface expression that introduces some noise, and can potentially alias episodic events. %how slow ? In both cases the fine scale structure such as herogeneity of the bubbling plume is lost. % Proposed We propose a vision-based system to detect and track bubble plumes. High speed optical imagery is propenables precise measurements of the motion of bubbles through a process involving identification of the individual bubbles (and rejection of other particles). Additional image processing steps are then used to estimate each bubble's volume and velocity. These are then integrated to produce an estimate of volumetric flux rate. This technique can also reveal fine scale variabilities in the spatial and temporal structure within the plume. %We discuss sensing configurations based on a stereo setup and

  6. Using ionospheric scintillation observations for studying the morphology of equatorial ionospheric bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, B. S.; Groves, K. M.

    2004-06-01

    For a study of the equatorial ionosphere, ionospheric scintillation data at VHF and L-band frequencies have been routinely collected by ground-based receivers at Ancon, Peru, Antofagasta, Chile, and Ascension Island, UK, since May 1994. The receivers routinely monitor VHF transmissions from two geosynchronous satellites located at 100°W longitude and 23°W longitude, and L-band signals from satellites located at 75°W longitude and 15°W longitude. This combination provides a network of seven usable, reasonably separated links for monitoring ionospheric equatorial bubble activity in the South American longitude sector. A data set of seven years covering the period from 1995 to 2001 was studied to determine the temporal, diurnal, and seasonal behavior of equatorial bubbles. The results of our statistical study are presented here. In general the equatorial ionospheric bubble activity shows a strong systematic and primary dependence in temporal, diurnal, and seasonal variation, and a secondary weak dependence on geomagnetic and solar flux activity. At present, the dependence on solar and magnetic activity is not usable for near-time and short-term prediction of the equatorial bubble activity. Equatorial bubbles usually start 1 hour after sunset, the activity peaks before local midnight, and vanishes by early morning. The activity peaks in the months of November and January-February and is practically absent (weak) from May to August. On a daily basis on the average one sees 1 to 3 bubbles. The duration of bubbles is about 70 min, and the time spacing between the bubbles is 1 to 2 hours. The bubble activity in general follows the phase of solar cycle activity. The observed systematic behavior of the equatorial bubbles allows for a now cast and short-term forecast of the bubble activity in the South American sector.

  7. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  8. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Sheen S.; Apfelbaum, Evan P.; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L.; Zajac, Edward J.; Stark, David

    2014-01-01

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others’ decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  9. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  10. Capillarity-Driven Bubble Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Dreyer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Techniques for phase separation in the absence of gravity continue to be sought after 5 decades of space flight. This work focuses on the fundamental problem of gas bubble separation in bubbly flows through open wedge-shaped channel in a microgravity environment. The bubbles appear to rise in the channel and coalesce with the free surface. Forces acting on the bubble are the combined effects of surface tension, wetting conditions, and geometry; not buoyancy. A single dimensionless group is identified that characterizes the bubble behavior and supportive experiments are conducted in a terrestrial laboratory, in a 2.1 second drop tower, and aboard the International Space Station as part of the Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) experiments. The data is organized into regime maps that provide insight on passive phase separations for applications ranging from liquid management aboard spacecraft to lab-on-chip technologies. NASA NNX09AP66A, NASA Oregon Space Grant NNX10AK68H, NASA NNX12AO47A, DLR 50WM0535/0845/1145

  11. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles.

    PubMed

    Levine, Sheen S; Apfelbaum, Evan P; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L; Zajac, Edward J; Stark, David

    2014-12-30

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others' decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity. PMID:25404313

  12. A novel methodology to measure methane bubble sizes in the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemond, H.; Delwiche, K.; Senft-Grupp, S.; Manganello, T.

    2014-12-01

    The fate of methane ebullition from lake sediments is dependent on initial bubble size. Rising bubbles are subject to dissolution, reducing the fraction of methane that ultimately enters the atmosphere while increasing concentrations of aqueous methane. Smaller bubbles not only rise more slowly, but dissolve more rapidly larger bubbles. Thus, understanding methane bubble size distributions in the water column is critical to predicting atmospheric methane emissions from ebullition. However, current methods of measuring methane bubble sizes in-situ are resource-intensive, typically requiring divers, video equipment, sonar, or hydroacoustic instruments. The complexity and cost of these techniques points to the strong need for a simple, autonomous device that can measure bubble size distributions and be deployed unattended over long periods of time. We describe a bubble sizing device that can be moored in the subsurface and can intercept and measure the size of bubbles as they rise. The instrument uses a novel optical measurement technique with infrared LEDs and IR-sensitive photodetectors combined with a custom-designed printed circuit board. An on-board microcomputer handles raw optical signals and stores the relevant information needed to calculate bubble volume. The electronics are housed within a pressure case fabricated from standard PVC fittings and are powered by size C alkaline batteries. The bill of materials cost is less than $200, allowing us to deploy multiple sensors at various locations within Upper Mystic Lake, MA. This novel device will provide information on how methane bubble sizes may vary both spatially and temporally. We present data from tests under controlled laboratory conditions and from deployments in Upper Mystic Lake.

  13. Research on the measurement of bubble velocity based on cross-correlation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; He, Junhua; Chen, Liangyi

    2006-06-01

    Cross-correlation algorithm is based on information theory and stochastic process theory. It has been widely used in many research fields, such as, medical ultrasound, ocean engineering, signal detection, modal parameters under ambient excitation, etc., but its applications in research of bubble curtains are seldom seen in domestic released periodicals, so our work is attempting to use cross-correlation algorithm. Through computing the velocity vector of bubble curtains, the bubble movement character can be known, i.e. the details of the bubble curtains can also be known. After comparing the differences between it and Doppler method, the cross-correlation algorithm has been applied to the measurement of bubble curtains parameters from a new aspect. The He-Ne laser and high-speed CCD camera are used to acquire the images of dancing bubbles, the velocities of bubbles are computed from image post-processed. Through improving conventional cross-correlation algorithm commonly used for analysis of flow field, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) has been used to implement the cross-correlation algorithm rapidly. In order to enhance the computing accuracy, Gaussian curve fitting is used to modify the correlation peak location and the fitting equations are listed, so the bubbles displacement with subpixel accuracy is obtained. Noises are stochastically added from hardware when acquiring images and the cross-correlation algorithm may also introduce errors. The character of velocity vectors result can be entirely wrong with ambient vectors, so they must be corrected. In order to calibrate the cross-correlation algorithm, images with universal displacement are used to validate its feasibility and reliability. The algorithm is applied to the computation of parameters in bubble curtains, yielding the vector graph of bubble motion. The algorithm is expected to be a valuable tool in acquiring the real-time velocity information in bubble curtains.

  14. Effects of material properties on laser-induced bubble formation in absorbing liquids and on submerged targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Shearin, Alan; Paisley, Dennis L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of blood clots in a fluid-filled blood vessel is accomplished by an explosive evaporation process. The resulting vapor bubble rapidly expands and collapses to disrupt the thrombus (blood clot). The hydrodynamic pressures following the bubble expansion and collapse can also be used as a driving force to deliver clot-dissolving agents into thrombus for enhancement of laser thrombolysis. Thus, the laser-induced bubble formation plays an important role in the thrombus removal process. In this study the effects of material properties on laser-induced cavitation bubbles formed in liquids and on submerged targets have been visualized with a microsecond strobe or high speed framing camera.

  15. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  16. Vibration considerations for cryogenic tanks using glass bubbles insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werlink, Rudy John; Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system hasbeen previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical,vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate hasbeen reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationarytanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significantvibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles representtwo harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulationmaterials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested forvibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjectedto random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures ofinsulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particleanalysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tankapplications.

  17. Formation and Growth of Micro and Macro Bubbles on Copper-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    Micro scale boiling behavior in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on the coppergraphite composite boiling surfaces is investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the copper matrix in pool boiling. In virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each of which sitting on several tips. The growth processes of the micro and macro bubbles are analyzed and formulated followed by an analysis of bubble departure on the composite surfaces. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of the pool boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces is clearly revealed. Experimental results of pool boiling heat transfer both for water and Freon-113 on the composite surfaces convincingly demonstrate the enhancement effects of the unique structure of Cu-Gr composite surfaces on boiling heat transfer.

  18. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  19. A Study of Micro-bubble Enhanced Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Tachibana, R.; Yoshinaka, K.; Osada, K.; Takagi, S.; Kataoka, K.; Chung, U.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation is a recently developed system for gene induction that uses ultrasound. Micro-bubbles are known to aid gene transfection through the introduction of genes into cells by the collapse of cavitation-bubbles (or micro-bubbles). However, the underlying mechanism and optimal introduction conditions have not been clarified in detail. In this research, we improved the gene introduction rate by forming DNA/Block copolymer micelles. Micelle formation compacts the DNA and enhances its stability, thereby facilitating the passage of greater amounts of DNA through holes in the cell surface and improving gene expression. Cells were exposed to ultrasonic plane waves from a piezoceramic transducer with a frequency of 2.0 MHz and a duty cycle of 10% (400/3600). Mouse fibroblast cells (NIH3T3) were cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates. Plasmid DNA and Sonazoid® (micro-bubbles) were added to the culture media and the cells were subsequently exposed to ultrasound. In the system described herein, micelles are formed by combining DNA and block copolymer. Block copolymer is composed of polyethyleneglycol-group and poly-lysine. Naked DNA and polymer micelles are added to culture media with micro-bubbles, and then exposed to ultrasound. The experimental conditions were as follows: plasmid density of 15 μg/ml, micro-bubble density of 1.7×105/mm3, ultrasound intensity of 5.08 W/cm2, ultrasound exposure time of 60 seconds, and a sample number of 12. Our results show that the gene induction ratio is doubled by the formation of polymer micelles (from ˜1% to ˜2%), thereby confirming that the system is capable of generating polymer micelles for introducing DNA into cells.

  20. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  1. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  2. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Stefan; van den Berg, Thomas H.; Rensen, Judith; Lohse, Detlef

    2004-11-01

    The energy spectrum of single phase turbulent flow - apart from intermittency corrections - has been known since Kolomogorov 1941, E(k) ∝ k-5/3. How do bubbles modify this spectrum? To answer this question, we inject micro bubbles (radius 100 μm) in fully turbulent flow (Re_λ=200) up to volume concentrations of 0.3 %. Energy spectra and velocity structure functions are measured with hot-film anemometry. Under our experimental conditions, we find an enhancement of energy on small scales confirming numerical predictions by Mazzitelli, Lohse, and Toschi [Phys. Fluids 15, L5 (2003)]. They propose a mechanism in which bubbles are clustering most likely in downflow regions. This clustering is a lift force effect suppressing large vortical structures, while enhancing energy input on small scales.

  3. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  4. Influence of surface active substances on bubble motion and collision with various interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malysa, K; Krasowska, M; Krzan, M

    2005-06-30

    Bubble motion as a function of distance from a point of its detachment and phenomena occurring during the bubble approach and collision with liquid/gas and liquid/solid interfaces in pure water and solutions of various surface active substances are described and discussed. It is showed that presence of surface active substance has a profound influence on values of the terminal velocity and profiles of the local velocity. At low solutions concentrations there are three distinct stages in the bubble motion: (i) a rapid acceleration, (ii) a maximum velocity value followed by its monotonic decrease, and (iii) attainment of the terminal velocity, while at high concentrations (and in pure water) there are only stages (i) and (iii). It is showed that the bubble terminal velocity decreases rapidly at low surfactant concentration, but there can be found some characteristic concentrations (adsorption coverage's) above which the velocity almost stopped to decrease. Immobilization of the bubble surface resulting from adsorption of the surface active substances (surface tension gradients inducement) causes over twofold lowering of the bubble velocity. Presence of the maximum on the local velocity profiles is an indication that a stationary non-uniform distribution of adsorption coverage (needed for immobilization the bubble interface) was not established there. When the rising bubble arrives at liquid/gas interface or liquid/solid interface there can be formed either foam or wetting film or three-phase contact (TPC). It is showed that prior to the foam and/or wetting film formation the bubble colliding with the interfaces can bounce backward and simultaneously its shape pulsates rapidly with a frequency over 1000 Hz. It is rather unexpected that even in the case of the free surface the bubble's shape and consequently its surface area can vary so rapidly. It shows straightforward that on such a rapidly distorted interface the adsorption coverage can be very different from that

  5. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Levine, Edlyn V; Burns, Michael M; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics. PMID:26871171

  6. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn V.; Burns, Michael M.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics.

  7. The dissolution or growth of a gas bubble inside a drop in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondos, Pericles A.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The radius-time history of a gas bubble located concentrically within a spherical liquid drop in a space laboratory is analyzed within the framework of the quasi-stationary approximation. Illustrative results are calculated from the theory which demonstrate interesting qualitative features. For instance, when a pure gas bubble dissolves within a liquid drop in an environment containing the same gas and some inert species, the dissolution can be more or less rapid than that in an unbounded liquid depending on the initial relative size of the drop. Further, given a similar growth situation, indefinite growth is not possible, and the bubble will initially grow, but always dissolve in the end.

  8. Influence of sonication conditions on the efficiency of ultrasonic cleaning with flowing micrometer-sized air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Tuziuti, Toru

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the sizes of cleaned areas under different sonication conditions with the addition of flowing micrometer-sized air bubbles. The differences in the cleaned area of a glass plate pasted with silicon grease as a dirty material under different sonication conditions were investigated after tiny bubbles were blown on the dirty plate placed in an underwater sound field. The ultrasound was applied perpendicular to the bubble flow direction. The shape of the cleaned areas was nearly elliptical, so the lengths of the minor and major axes were measured. The length of the minor axis under sweep conditions (amplitude modulation), for which the average power was lower than that for continuous wave (CW) irradiation, was comparable to that for CW irradiation and was slightly larger than under bubble flow only. Not only the relatively high power for CW irradiation, but also the larger angular change of the bubble flow direction under sweep conditions contributed to the enlargement of the cleaned area in the direction of the minor axis. The combination of bubble flow and sonication under sweep or CW conditions produced a larger cleaned area compared with bubble flow only, although the increase was not higher than 20%. A rapid change from an air to water interface caused by the bubble flow and water jets caused by the collapse of bubbles due to violent pulsation is the main cleaning mechanism under a combination of ultrasound and bubble flow. PMID:26422770

  9. Scaling laws for bubbling bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tokman, Cecilia; Hunt, Brian R.

    2009-11-01

    We establish rigorous scaling laws for the average bursting time for bubbling bifurcations of an invariant manifold, assuming the dynamics within the manifold to be uniformly hyperbolic. This type of global bifurcation appears in nearly synchronized systems, and is conjectured to be typical among those breaking the invariance of an asymptotically stable hyperbolic invariant manifold. We consider bubbling precipitated by generic bifurcations of a fixed point in both symmetric and non-symmetric systems with a codimension one invariant manifold, and discuss their extension to bifurcations of periodic points. We also discuss generalizations to invariant manifolds with higher codimension, and to systems with random noise.

  10. Photodrive of magnetic bubbles via magnetoelastic waves.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Naoki; Koshibae, Wataru; Beekman, Aron Jonathan; Nagaosa, Naoto; Kubota, Masashi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-07-21

    Precise control of magnetic domain walls continues to be a central topic in the field of spintronics to boost infotech, logic, and memory applications. One way is to drive the domain wall by current in metals. In insulators, the incoherent flow of phonons and magnons induced by the temperature gradient can carry the spins, i.e., spin Seebeck effect, but the spatial and time dependence is difficult to control. Here, we report that coherent phonons hybridized with spin waves, magnetoelastic waves, can drive magnetic bubble domains, or curved domain walls, in an iron garnet, which are excited by ultrafast laser pulses at a nonabsorbing photon energy. These magnetoelastic waves were imaged by time-resolved Faraday microscopy, and the resultant spin transfer force was evaluated to be larger for domain walls with steeper curvature. This will pave a path for the rapid spatiotemporal control of magnetic textures in insulating magnets. PMID:26150487

  11. Photodrive of magnetic bubbles via magnetoelastic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Naoki; Koshibae, Wataru; Beekman, Aron Jonathan; Nagaosa, Naoto; Kubota, Masashi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Precise control of magnetic domain walls continues to be a central topic in the field of spintronics to boost infotech, logic, and memory applications. One way is to drive the domain wall by current in metals. In insulators, the incoherent flow of phonons and magnons induced by the temperature gradient can carry the spins, i.e., spin Seebeck effect, but the spatial and time dependence is difficult to control. Here, we report that coherent phonons hybridized with spin waves, magnetoelastic waves, can drive magnetic bubble domains, or curved domain walls, in an iron garnet, which are excited by ultrafast laser pulses at a nonabsorbing photon energy. These magnetoelastic waves were imaged by time-resolved Faraday microscopy, and the resultant spin transfer force was evaluated to be larger for domain walls with steeper curvature. This will pave a path for the rapid spatiotemporal control of magnetic textures in insulating magnets. PMID:26150487

  12. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF FINE BUBBLE AERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology assessment addresses design and evaluation of fine bubble aeration equipment. It discusses the associated gas transfer theory used as the basis for measuring water and wastewater oxygenation efficiency. Mixing requirements are also discussed. While bubble aeration...

  13. Removal of hydrogen bubbles from nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    Method proposed for removing large hydrogen bubbles from nuclear environment uses, in its simplest form, hollow spheres of palladium or platinum. Methods would result in hydrogen bubble being reduced in size without letting more radioactivity outside reactor.

  14. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model.

    PubMed

    Buogo, Silvano; Cannelli, Giovanni B

    2002-06-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from a collapsing/rebounding regime with sound-emitting implosions to a pulsating regime with no implosions. The motion of the bubble wall during the first collapses was found to be consistent with the Rayleigh model of a cavity in an incompressible liquid, with the inclusion of a vapor pressure term at constant temperature within each bubble cycle. An estimate of the pressure inside the bubble is obtained measuring the collapse time and maximum radius, and the amount of energy converted into acoustical energy upon each implosion is deduced. The resulting value of acoustic efficiency was found to be in agreement with measurements based on the emitted acoustic pulse. PMID:12083190

  15. The coenzyme A disulfide reductase of Borrelia burgdorferi is important for rapid growth throughout the enzootic cycle and essential for infection of the mammalian host

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Christian H.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Malizia, Robert A.; Kariu, Toru; Cusack, Brian; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Hazlett, Karsten R.O.; Claiborne, Al; Pal, Utpal; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In a microarray analysis of the RpoS regulon in mammalian host-adapted Borrelia burgdorferi, bb0728 (cdr) was found to be dually-transcribed by the sigma factors σ70 and RpoS. The cdr gene encodes a coenzyme A disulfide reductase (CoADR) that reduces CoA-disulfides to CoA in an NADH-dependent manner. Based on the abundance of CoA in B. burgdorferi and the biochemistry of the enzyme, CoADR has been proposed to play a role in the spirochete’s response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). To better understand the physiologic function(s) of Bb CoADR, we generated a B. burgdorferi mutant in which the cdr gene was disrupted. RT-PCR and 5′-RACE analysis revealed that cdr and bb0729 are co-transcribed from a single transcriptional start site upstream of the bb0729 coding sequence; a shuttle vector containing the bb0729-cdr operon and upstream promoter element was used to complement the cdr mutant. Although the mutant was no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than its parent, it did exhibit increased sensitivity to high concentrations of t -butyl-hydroperoxide, an oxidizing compound that damages spirochetal membranes. Characterization of the mutant during standard (15% oxygen, 6% CO2) and anaerobic (<1% O2, 9–13% CO2) cultivation at 37°C revealed a growth defect under both conditions that was particularly striking during anaerobiosis. The mutant was avirulent by needle inoculation and showed decreased survival in feeding nymphs, but displayed no survival defect in unfed flat nymphs. Based on these results, we propose that Bb CoADR is necessary to maintain optimal redox ratios for CoA/CoA-disulfide and NAD+/NADH during periods of rapid replication throughout the enzootic cycle, to support thiol-disulfide homeostasis, and to indirectly protect the spirochete against peroxide-mediated membrane damage; one or more of these functions are essential for infection of the mammalian host by B. burgdorferi. PMID:21923763

  16. Silent bubbles - Their effects and detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of the 'silent bubble' (a phenomenon due to gas phase formation in tissues, which does not lead to frank decompression sickness). Special attention is given to the conditions for silent bubbles formation, the methods of their detecton, and to their pathophysiology. Data relating the gas formation in blood and the symptoms of decompression sickness indicate that the distinction between the silent bubbles and clinical ones is often vague and that a bubble-free decompression never existed.

  17. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Daniele, M.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C.; Hess, K. U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths as has been demonstrated by analogue experiments in the past. Here, bubble-advection experiments are performed for the first time employing natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears as efficient mechanism to mingle contrasting melt compositions. MicroCT imaging shows bubbles trailing each other and trails of multiple bubbles having converged. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that subsequent bubbles rising are likely to follow the same pathways that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Fundamental implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing are thus a) an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and b) non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a filament. Inside these filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments are likely to have experienced multiple bubbles passing through

  18. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting

  19. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  20. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  1. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  2. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  3. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.

  4. Bubble-driven inertial micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torniainen, Erik D.; Govyadinov, Alexander N.; Markel, David P.; Kornilovitch, Pavel E.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental action of the bubble-driven inertial micropump is investigated. The pump has no moving parts and consists of a thermal resistor placed asymmetrically within a straight channel connecting two reservoirs. Using numerical simulations, the net flow is studied as a function of channel geometry, resistor location, vapor bubble strength, fluid viscosity, and surface tension. Two major regimes of behavior are identified: axial and non-axial. In the axial regime, the drive bubble either remains inside the channel, or continues to grow axially when it reaches the reservoir. In the non-axial regime, the bubble grows out of the channel and in all three dimensions while inside the reservoir. The net flow in the axial regime is parabolic with respect to the hydraulic diameter of the channel cross-section, but in the non-axial regime it is not. From numerical modeling, it is determined that the net flow is maximal when the axial regime crosses over to the non-axial regime. To elucidate the basic physical principles of the pump, a phenomenological one-dimensional model is developed and solved. A linear array of micropumps has been built using silicon-SU8 fabrication technology that is used to manufacture thermal inkjet printheads. Semi-continuous pumping across a 2 mm-wide channel has been demonstrated experimentally. Measured net flow with respect to viscosity variation is in excellent agreement with simulation results.

  5. Affirmative Discrimination and the Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, the author discusses how affirmative action contributed to an unnatural rise in enrollments in college. In considering the higher education bubble, he makes the case that as the opposition to preferences continues to build, the momentum of this trend will only increase as funding shrinks. He offers some tentative answers to a series…

  6. The Coming Law School Bubble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explains how forty years of politicized hiring in the law schools has left its destructive mark. The results are potentially catastrophic: Market forces and internal law school policies may be combining to produce a legal education bubble the likes of which the country has never seen. (Contains 11 footnotes.)

  7. Breaking waves, turbulence and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Vagle, Svein; Thomson, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, and gases are to a large extent affected by wave-induced turbulence in the near-surface ocean layer, and are generally increased over the fluxes in a law-of-the-wall type boundary layer. However, air-bubbles generated during the wave breaking process may affect the density stratification and in turn reduce turbulence intensity in the near-surface layer. The turbulence field beneath surface waves is rather complex and provides great challenges for detailed observations. We obtained high resolution near-surface velocity profiles, bubble cloud measurements and video recordings of the breaking activity in a coastal strait. Conditions ranged from moderate to strong wind forcing with wind speed ranging from 5 m/s to 20 m/s. Estimates of the dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are calculated from the in-situ velocity measurements. We find dissipation rates, fluctuating by more than two orders of magnitude, are closely linked to the air-fraction associated with micro-bubbles. Combining these turbulence estimates and the bubble cloud characteristics we infer differences in the strength of wave breaking and its effect on wave-induced mixing and air-sea exchange processes.

  8. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gateau, J; Aubry, J-F; Chauvet, D; Boch, A-L; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2011-11-21

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon. PMID:22015981

  9. Bursting Bubbles from Combustion of Thermoplastic Materials in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    Many thermoplastic materials in common use for a wide range of applications, including spacecraft, develop bubbles internally as they burn due to chemical reactions taking place within the bulk. These bubbles grow and migrate until they burst at the surface, forceably ejecting volatile gases and, occasionally, molten fuel. In experiments in normal gravity, Kashiwagi and Ohlemiller observed vapor jets extending a few centimeters from the surface of a radiatively heated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) sample, with some molten material ejected into the gas phase. These physical phenomena complicated the combustion process considerably. In addition to the non-steady release of volatiles, the depth of the surface layer affected by oxygen was increased, attributed to the roughening of the surface by bursting events. The ejection of burning droplets in random directions presents a potential fire hazard unique to microgravity. In microgravity combustion experiments on nylon Velcro fasteners and on polyethylene wire insulation, the presence of bursting fuel vapor bubbles was associated with the ejection of small particles of molten fuel as well as pulsations of the flame. For the nylon fasteners, particle velocities were higher than 30 cm/sec. The droplets burned robustly until all fuel was consumed, demonstrating the potential for the spread of fire in random directions over an extended distance. The sequence of events for a bursting bubble has been photographed by Newitt et al.. As the bubble reaches the fluid surface, the outer surface forms a dome while the internal bubble pressure maintains a depression at the inner interface. Liquid drains from the dome until it breaks into a cloud of droplets on the order of a few microns in size. The bubble gases are released rapidly, generating vortices in the quiescent surroundings and transporting the tiny droplets. The depression left by the escaping gases collapses into a central jet, which rises with a high velocity and may

  10. Use of overpressure to assess the role of bubbles in focused ultrasound lesion shape in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M R; Couret, L N; Sapozhnikov, O A; Khokhlova, V A; ter Haar, G; Vaezy, S; Shi, X; Martin, R; Crum, L A

    2001-05-01

    Overpressure--elevated hydrostatic pressure--was used to assess the role of gas or vapor bubbles in distorting the shape and position of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) lesion in tissue. The shift from a cigar-shaped lesion to a tadpole-shaped lesion can mean that the wrong area is treated. Overpressure minimizes bubbles and bubble activity by dissolving gas bubbles, restricting bubble oscillation and raising the boiling temperature. Therefore, comparison with and without overpressure is a tool to assess the role of bubbles. Dissolution rates, bubble dynamics and boiling temperatures were determined as functions of pressure. Experiments were made first in a low-overpressure chamber (0.7 MPa maximum) that permitted imaging by B-mode ultrasound (US). Pieces of excised beef liver (8 cm thick) were treated in the chamber with 3.5 MHz for 1 to 7 s (50% duty cycle). In situ intensities (I(SP)) were 600 to 3000 W/cm(2). B-mode US imaging detected a hyperechoic region at the HIFU treatment site. The dissipation of this hyperechoic region following HIFU cessation corresponded well with calculated bubble dissolution rates; thus, suggesting that bubbles were present. Lesion shape was then tested in a high-pressure chamber. Intensities were 1300 and 1750 W/cm(2) ( +/- 20%) at 1 MHz for 30 s. Hydrostatic pressures were 0.1 or 5.6 MPa. At 1300 W/cm(2), lesions were cigar-shaped, and no difference was observed between lesions formed with or without overpressure. At 1750 W/cm(2), lesions formed with no overpressure were tadpole-shaped, but lesions formed with high overpressure (5.6 MPa) remained cigar-shaped. Data support the hypothesis that bubbles contribute to the lesion distortion. PMID:11397534

  11. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  12. Tiny Bubbles in my BEC

    SciTech Connect

    Blinova, Alina A.

    2012-08-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide a unique way for exploring many-body quantum phenomena that are inaccessible to conventional low-temperature experiments. Nearly two decades ago the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - an ultracold gas of bosons in which almost all bosons occupy the same single-particle state - became experimentally feasible. Because a BEC exhibits superfluid properties, it can provide insights into the behavior of low-temperature helium liquids. We describe the case of a single distinguishable atom (an impurity) embedded in a BEC and strongly coupled to the BEC bosons. Depending on the strength of impurity-boson and boson-boson interactions, the impurity self-localizes into two fundamentally distinct regimes. The impurity atom can behave as a tightly localized 'polaron,' akin to an electron in a dielectric crystal, or as a 'bubble,' an analog to an electron bubble in superfluid helium. We obtain the ground state wavefunctions of the impurity and BEC by numerically solving the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations that characterize the system. We employ the methods of imaginary time propagation and conjugate gradient descent. By appropriately varying the impurity-boson and boson-boson interaction strengths, we focus on the polaron to bubble crossover. Our results confirm analytical predictions for the polaron limit and uncover properties of the bubble regime. With these results we characterize the polaron to bubble crossover. We also summarize our findings in a phase diagram of the BEC-impurity system, which can be used as a guide in future experiments.

  13. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  14. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  15. Exercise and nitric oxide prevent bubble formation: a novel approach to the prevention of decompression sickness?

    PubMed Central

    Wisløff, Ulrik; Richardson, Russell S; Brubakk, Alf O

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen dissolves in the blood during dives, but comes out of solution if divers return to normal pressure too rapidly. Nitrogen bubbles cause a range of effects from skin rashes to seizures, coma and death. It is believed that these bubbles form from bubble precursors (gas nuclei). Recently we have shown that a single bout of exercise 20 h, but not 48 h, before a simulated dive prevents bubble formation and protects rats from severe decompression sickness (DCS) and death. Furthermore, we demonstrated that administration of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a non-selective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), turns a dive from safe to unsafe in sedentary but not exercised rats. Therefore based upon previous data an attractive hypothesis is that it may be possible to use either exercise or NO-releasing agents before a dive to inhibit bubble formation and thus protect against DCS. Consequently, the aims of the present study were to determine whether protection against bubble formation in ‘diving’ rats was provided by (1) chronic and acute administration of a NO-releasing agent and (2) exercise less than 20 h prior to the dive. NO given for 5 days and then 20h prior to a dive to 700 kPa lasting 45 min breathing air significantly reduced bubble formation and prevented death. The same effect was seen if NO was given only 30 min before the dive. Exercise 20h before a dive surpressed bubble formation and prevented death, with no effect at any other time (48, 10, 5 and 0.5h prior to the dive). Pre-dive activities have not been considered to influence the growth of bubbles and thus the risk of serious DCS. The present novel findings of a protective effect against bubble formation and death by appropriately timed exercise and an NO-releasing agent may form the basis of a new approach to preventing serious decompression sickness. PMID:14724207

  16. Rise velocity of an air bubble in porous media: Theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Cihan, Abdullah; Drazenovic, Mirna

    2004-04-01

    The rise velocity of injected air phase from the injection point toward the vadose zone is a critical factor in in-situ air sparging operations. It has been reported in the literature that air injected into saturated gravel rises as discrete air bubbles in bubbly flow of air phase. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative technique to estimate the rise velocity of an air bubble in coarse porous media. The model is based on the macroscopic balance equation for forces acting on a bubble rising in a porous medium. The governing equation incorporates inertial force, added mass force, buoyant force, surface tension and drag force that results from the momentum transfer between the phases. The momentum transfer terms take into account the viscous as well as the kinetic energy losses at high velocities. Analytical solutions are obtained for steady, quasi-steady, and accelerated bubble rise velocities. Results show that air bubbles moving up through a porous medium equilibrate after a short travel time and very short distances of rise. It is determined that the terminal rise velocity of a single air bubble in an otherwise water saturated porous medium cannot exceed 18.5 cm/s. The theoretical model results compared favorably with the experimental data reported in the literature. A dimensional analysis conducted to study the effect of individual forces indicates that the buoyant force is largely balanced by the drag force for bubbles with an equivalent radius of 0.2-0.5 cm. With increasing bubble radius, the dimensionless number representing the effect of the surface tension force decreases rapidly. Since the total inertial force is quite small, the accelerated bubble rise velocity can be approximated by the terminal velocity.

  17. The effects of a soluble surfactant on the interfacial dynamics of stationary bubbles in inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Eckmann, David M.

    2002-10-01

    We have experimentally examined the effects of a common soluble surfactant on gas bubbles in liquid flows in inclined tubes. Air bubbles of known size ([lambda] = 0.8, 1.0, 1.5) are held stationary under minimum flow conditions in tubes inclined at fixed angles ([omega] = 25°, 45°, 65°, 90°). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is infused into the bulk flow at two bulk concentrations (C = 10% or 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC)). In addition to recording pressure and flow waveforms, we capture video images of bubbles before and during exposure to the surfactant. Modification of the interfacial properties by the surfactant results in extremely dynamic bubble behaviour including interfacial deformation, deformation plus axial translation, and bubble detachment from the wall plus translation. We measure the corresponding time-dependent pressure gradient within the tube. The surfactant mediated responses observed are dependent upon the interrelated effects of C, [lambda] and [omega]. A high bulk concentration of surfactant may produce more rapid modification of bubble shape and influence wetting, thus increasing the potential for bubble detachment. The likelihood that detachment will occur increases further as bubble volume in increased. In both vertical tubes in which contact forces are absent and in non-vertical tubes, the infusion of surfactant may result in axial translation either in the direction of, or opposite to, the direction of the bulk flow. Critical to the translation and/or detachment of the bubble is the surfactant-mediated modification of contact line mechanics. Contact line velocities corresponding to rates of shrinkage of dewetted surface area are extracted from experimental data. We also explore the potential effects of surfactants on interfacial remobilization. This investigation demonstrates the potential use of surfactants to be used for dislodging dewetted gas bubbles by the intentional manipulation of interfacial properties.

  18. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    is created either through flowing gas around the high voltage electrode in the discharge tube or self-generated by the plasma as in the steam discharge. This second method allows for large scale processing of contaminated water and for bulk chemical and optical analysis. Breakdown mechanisms of attached and unattached gas bubbles in liquid water were investigated using the first device. The breakdown scaling relation between breakdown voltage, pressure and dimensions of the discharge was studied. A Paschen-like voltage dependence for air bubbles in liquid water was discovered. The results of high-speed photography suggest the physical charging of the bubble due to a high voltage pulse; this charging can be significant enough to produce rapid kinetic motion of the bubble about the electrode region as the applied electric field changes over a voltage pulse. Physical deformation of the bubble is observed. This charging can also prevent breakdown from occurring, necessitating higher applied voltages to overcome the phenomenon. This dissertation also examines the resulting chemistry from plasma interacting with the bubble-liquid system. Through the use of optical emission spectroscopy, plasma parameters such as electron density, gas temperature, and molecular species production and intensity are found to have a time-dependence over the ac voltage cycle. This dependence is also source gas type dependent. These dependencies afford effective control over plasma-driven decomposition. The effect of plasma-produced radicals on various wastewater simulants is studied. Various organic dyes, halogenated compounds, and algae water are decomposed and assessed. Toxicology studies with melanoma cells exposed to plasma-treated dye solutions are completed, demonstrating the non-cytotoxic quality of the decomposition process. Thirdly, this dissertation examines the steam plasma system, developed through this research to circumvent the acidification associated with gas-feed discharges

  19. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments with water-air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ˜100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ˜30 μm in diameter can be "pushed" away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  20. Conditions for static bubbles in viscoplastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubash, Neville; Frigaard, Ian

    2004-12-01

    We consider the slow motion of a gas bubble in a cylindrical column filled with a viscoplastic fluid, modeled here as a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. Because of the yield stress of the fluid, it is possible that a bubble will remain trapped in the fluid indefinitely. We adapt Prager's two variational principles to our problem. From these variational principles we develop two general stopping conditions, i.e., for a given bubble we can calculate a critical Bingham number above which the bubble will not move. The first condition is derived by bounding the velocity field and the second condition by bounding the stress field. We illustrate these conditions by considering specific bubble shapes, e.g., axisymmetric bubbles. We also develop a condition for bubble motion.

  1. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  2. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore » annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  3. Bubble resorption in rhyolitic melts: Insight from open-system vesiculation experiments using bolt/nut cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, S.; Nakamura, M.

    2006-12-01

    The open-system degassing is an essential process in non-explosive eruption of hydrous silicic magmas. Permeable flow degassing through interconnected bubble networks is considered to be the main mode that enables rapid removal of bubbles, but additional processes are required for the formation of bubble-free magmas, as the networks become disconnected and bubbles get isolated when vesicularity decreases below the percolation threshold via progressive permeable flow. To investigate the behavior of bubbles in the late stage of permeable flow degassing, we conducted a series of vesiculation experiments on rhyolitic melts in a newly designed semipermeable bolt/nut cell. The starting material was natural rhyolitic obsidian with ca. 0.67 wt.% initial water content. The obsidian cores, which were typically 10 vol.% smaller than the sample chamber, were heated in the cell at 1000 ° C for 7 periods ranging from 1 to 288 hours. As the cell is strong enough to resist the inner pressure associated with the vesiculation of the obsidian, the volume of sample chamber is kept constant, while the vapor can escape the cell through a narrow interspace. The run charges generally show a zonal structure composed of two contrasting regions: a central region within which bubbles are concentrated (bubble-rich core; BC) and a bubble-free melt region surrounding the BC (bubble-free margin; BFM). With increasing duration of heating, the thickness of the BFM and vesicularity of the BC increased, while the water content of the BC decreased. The outermost bubbles (i.e., bubbles on the BFM-BC boundary) were significantly smaller than inner bubbles. Water content of melt was nearly uniform throughout the BC, whereas an outward-decreasing gradient was observed in the BFM. These observations can be explained by (1) uniform vesiculation of the starting obsidian with filling the sample chamber, (2) dehydration of melt at the sample surface via diffusion of water, (3) bubble resorption into the

  4. Understanding the plasma and power characteristics of a self-generated steam bubble discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Maria C.; Gucker, Sarah N.; Foster, John E.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma formation in a self-generated steam bubble is studied using a coaxial discharge tube with an axial powered electrode (nominal peak operating voltage 2000 V) and an external ground lead without any gas flow. The discharge is potentially attractive for water purification applications in that the production of reactive nitrogen species and the associated water acidification is avoided. The discharge was found to form after a finite delay, which is attributed to the vapor bubble formation necessary for plasma ignition. Steam bubble composition was confirmed using emission spectra. Plasma properties and power dissipated in the self-generated steam bubble were characterized using emission spectroscopy and Lissajous methods. Discharge density and gas temperature were found to vary significantly over the applied ac voltage cycle. The power dissipated as inferred from the Lissajous method was found to scale inversely with frequency over the low frequency range investigated (4 kHz and 5 kHz).

  5. Remobilizing the Interfaces of Thermocapillary Driven Bubbles Retarded by the Adsorption of a Surfactant Impurity on the Bubble Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaparthi, Ravi; Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Dimitri; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Thermocapillary migration is a method for moving bubbles in space in the absence of buoyancy. A temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase in which a bubble is situated, and the applied gradient impressed on the bubble surface causes one pole of the drop to be cooler than the opposite pole. As the surface tension is a decreasing function of temperature, the cooler pole pulls at the warmer pole, creating a flow which propels the bubble in the direction of the warmer fluid. A major impediment to the practical use of thermocapillarity to direct the movement of bubbles in space is the fact that surfactant impurities which are unavoidably present in the continuous phase can significantly reduce the migration velocity. A surfactant impurity adsorbed onto the bubble interface is swept to the trailing end of the bubble. When bulk concentrations are low (which is the case with an impurity), diffusion of surfactant to the front end is slow relative to convection, and surfactant collects at the back end of the bubble. Collection at the back lowers the surface tension relative to the front end setting up a reverse tension gradient. For buoyancy driven bubble motions in the absence of a thermocapillarity, the tension gradient opposes the surface flow, and reduces the surface and terminal velocities (the interface becomes more solid-like). When thermocapillary forces are present, the reverse tension gradient set up by the surfactant accumulation reduces the temperature tension gradient, and decreases to near zero the thermocapillary velocity. The objective of our research is to develop a method for enhancing the thermocapillary migration of bubbles which have been retarded by the adsorption onto the bubble surface of a surfactant impurity, Our remobilization theory proposes to use surfactant molecules which kinetically rapidly exchange between the bulk and the surface and are at high bulk concentrations. Because the remobilizing surfactant is present at much higher

  6. Bubble Behavior in Subcooled Pool Boiling of Water under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Suzuki, Motohiro; Takahash, Saika; Kawamura, Hirosi; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    Subcooled pool boiling of water was conducted in reduced gravity performed by a parabolic flight of aircraft and a drop-shaft facility. A small stainless steel plate was physically burned out in the subcooled water by AC electric power during the parabolic flight. Boiling bubbles grew with increasing heating power but did not detached from the heating surface. The burnout heat fluxes obtained were 200 ~ 400 percent higher than the existing theories. In the ground experiment, boiling bubbles were attached to the heating surface with a flat plate placed over the heating surface, and the experiment was performed by the same heating procedure as practiced under the reduced gravity. Same burnout heat fluxes as under the reduced gravity were obtained by adjusting the plate clearance to the heating surface. As the heating time extended longer than the reduced gravity duration, the burnout heat fluxes decreased gradually and became constant. Contact area of bubbles with heating surface was observed using a transparent heating surface in microgravity performed by a drop-shaft facility. The contact area of bubbles increased significantly at the start of microgravity. It is suggested by the experimental results that the boiling bubbles expand rapidly in the high heat flux region and the rapid evaporation of liquid layer remained between the bubbles and the heating surface raises up the critical heat flux higher than the existing theories in microgravity.

  7. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  8. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  9. Unsteady thermocapillary migration of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1988-01-01

    Upon the introduction of a gas bubble into a liquid possessing a uniform thermal gradient, an unsteady thermo-capillary flow begins. Ultimately, the bubble attains a constant velocity. This theoretical analysis focuses upon the transient period for a bubble in a microgravity environment and is restricted to situations wherein the flow is sufficiently slow such that inertial terms in the Navier-Stokes equation and convective terms in the energy equation may be safely neglected (i.e., both Reynolds and Marangoni numbers are small). The resulting linear equations were solved analytically in the Laplace domain with the Prandtl number of the liquid as a parameter; inversion was accomplished numerically using a standard IMSL routine. In the asymptotic long-time limit, the theory agrees with the steady-state theory of Young, Goldstein, and Block. The theory predicts that more than 90 percent of the terminal steady velocity is achieved when the smallest dimensionless time, i.e., the one based upon the largest time scale-viscous or thermal-equals unity.

  10. ORIGIN OF THE FERMI BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2011-04-10

    Fermi has discovered two giant gamma-ray-emitting bubbles that extend nearly 10 kpc in diameter north and south of the Galactic center. The existence of the bubbles was first evidenced in X-rays detected by ROSAT and later WMAP detected an excess of radio signals at the location of the gamma-ray bubbles. We propose that periodic star capture processes by the galactic supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, with a capture rate 3 x 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} and energy release {approx}3 x 10{sup 52} erg per capture can produce very hot plasma {approx}10 keV with a wind velocity {approx}10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1} injected into the halo and heat up the halo gas to {approx}1 keV, which produces thermal X-rays. The periodic injection of hot plasma can produce shocks in the halo and accelerate electrons to {approx}TeV, which produce radio emission via synchrotron radiation and gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering with the relic and the galactic soft photons.

  11. In situ TEM observation of helium bubble evolution in V/Ag multilayer during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxiu; Ren, Feng; Wang, Yongqiang; Hong, Mengqing; Xiao, Xiangheng; Qin, Wenjing; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-12-01

    Multilayers have been considered as promising candidates for nuclear materials. In this paper, an in situ study on the growth of helium bubbles during annealing was performed by transmission electron microscopy. Bubbles in the Ag layers grew rapidly by vacancy absorption mechanism and reached a size comparable to the layer thickness, whereas bubbles in the V layers evolved slowly due to the lower diffusion rate of vacancies and stopped growing at the size of 1.8 nm. The interfaces with more than one orientation relationship in the V/Ag multilayer contained pockets of excess volumes that can readily trap helium and exhibit high helium solubility. The interfaces prevent bubbles from growing into nearby layers.

  12. Soap bubbles in paintings: Art and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, F.

    2008-12-01

    Soap bubbles became popular in 17th century paintings and prints primarily as a metaphor for the impermanence and fragility of life. The Dancing Couple (1663) by the Dutch painter Jan Steen is a good example which, among many other symbols, shows a young boy blowing soap bubbles. In the 18th century the French painter Jean-Simeon Chardin used soap bubbles not only as metaphor but also to express a sense of play and wonder. In his most famous painting, Soap Bubbles (1733/1734) a translucent and quavering soap bubble takes center stage. Chardin's contemporary Charles Van Loo painted his Soap Bubbles (1764) after seeing Chardin's work. In both paintings the soap bubbles have a hint of color and show two bright reflection spots. We discuss the physics involved and explain how keenly the painters have observed the interaction of light and soap bubbles. We show that the two reflection spots on the soap bubbles are images of the light source, one real and one virtual, formed by the curved surface of the bubble. The faint colors are due to thin film interference effects.

  13. The recreation of a unique shrimp's mechanically induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ryan; Dougherty, Christopher; Eliasson, Veronica; Khanolkar, Gauri

    2014-11-01

    The Alpheus heterochaelis, appropriately nicknamed the ``pistol shrimp,'' possesses an oversized claw that creates a cavitation bubble upon rapid closure. The implosion of this bubble results in a shock wave that can stun or even kill the shrimp's prey (Versluis et al., 2000). Additionally, the implosion is so violent that sonoluminescence may occur. This light implies extreme temperatures, which have been recorded to reach as high as 10,000 K (Roach, 2001). By developing an analogous mechanism to the oversized claw, the goal of this experiment is to verify that cavitation can be produced similar to that of the pistol shrimp in nature as well as to analyze the resulting shock wave and sonoluminescence. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to observe the shock dynamics. Furthermore, results on cavitation collapse and light emission will be presented. USC Provost Undergraduate Research Fellowship/Rose Hills Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  14. Rapid and Specific Detection of Amantadine-Resistant Influenza A Viruses with a Ser31Asn Mutation by the Cycling Probe Method▿

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Saito, Reiko; Zaraket, Hassan; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Amantadine is one of the antiviral agents used to treat influenza A virus infections, but resistant strains have widely emerged worldwide. In the present study, we developed a novel method to detect amantadine-resistant strains harboring the Ser31Asn mutation in the M2 gene based on the cycling probe method and real-time PCR. We also studied the rate of amantadine resistance in the 2007-2008 influenza season in Japan. Two different primer and cycling probe sets were designed for A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 each to detect a single nucleotide polymorphism corresponding to Ser/Asn at residue 31 of the M2 protein. By using nasopharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like and other respiratory illnesses and virus isolates, the specificity and the sensitivity of the cycling probe method were evaluated. High frequencies of amantadine resistance were detected among the A/H1N1 (411/663, 62%) and A/H3N2 (56/56, 100%) virus isolates collected from six prefectures in Japan in the 2007-2008 influenza season. We confirmed that the cycling probe method is suitable for the screening of both nasopharyngeal swabs and influenza virus isolates for amantadine-resistant strains and showed that the incidence of amantadine resistance among both A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 viruses remained high in Japan during the 2007-2008 season. PMID:19889895

  15. Visualizing the Histotripsy Process: Bubble Cloud-Cancer Cell Interactions in a Tissue-Mimicking Environment.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Mancia, Lauren; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive ultrasonic ablation method that uses cavitation to mechanically fractionate tissue into acellular debris. With a sufficient number of pulses, histotripsy can completely fractionate tissue into a liquid-appearing homogenate with no cellular structures. The location, shape and size of lesion formation closely match those of the cavitation cloud. Previous work has led to the hypothesis that the rapid expansion and collapse of histotripsy bubbles fractionate tissue by inducing large stress and strain on the tissue structures immediately adjacent to the bubbles. In the work described here, the histotripsy bulk tissue fractionation process is visualized at the cellular level for the first time using a custom-built 2-MHz transducer incorporated into a microscope stage. A layer of breast cancer cells were cultured within an optically transparent fibrin-based gel phantom to mimic cells inside a 3-D extracellular matrix. To test the hypothesis, the cellular response to single and multiple histotripsy pulses was investigated using high-speed optical imaging. Bubbles were always generated in the extracellular space, and significant cell displacement/deformation was observed for cells directly adjacent to the bubble during both bubble expansion and collapse. The largest displacements were observed during collapse for cells immediately adjacent to the bubble, with cells moving more than 150-300 μm in less than 100 μs. Cells often underwent multiple large deformations (>150% strain) over multiple pulses, resulting in the bisection of cells multiple times before complete removal. To provide theoretical support to the experimental observations, a numerical simulation was conducted using a single-bubble model, which indicated that histotripsy exerts the largest strains and cell displacements in the regions immediately adjacent to the bubble. The experimental and simulation results support our hypothesis, which helps to explain the formation of the

  16. Bubble-induced aggregation of platelets: effects of gas species, proteins, and decompression.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, T; Klausen, H; Lie, R T; Holmsen, H

    1993-06-01

    We show that bubbles containing different gases (N2, He, Ne, Ar, or an O2-CO2-N2 mixture) are equally potent platelet agonists. The synergistic effect of different platelet antagonists does not seem to be affected by the type of gas in the bubbles. In contrast to aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), bubbles cause only a weak response in gel-filtered platelets (GFP), i.e., comparison of aggregation in protein-rich and protein-poor platelet suspensions may shed light on the role of different plasma proteins. Extracellular fibrinogen promotes bubble-induced platelet aggregation similar to known physiologic agonists, whereas albumin counteracts this aggregation. Bubble-induced aggregation is inhibited in GFP-fibrinogen by 2-deoxy-D-glucose plus antimycin A, suggesting dependency on ATP generation in the platelets and evidence for direct exposure of the "cryptic" fibrinogen receptor by bubbles. Hyperbaric compression and subsequent rapid, inadequate decompression of PRP caused little change in the aggregation response to gas bubbles and epinephrine at 1 bar, but reduced the response to ADP. Bubbles tended not to form before the surface film was broken. Pressure-induced aggregation was apparently metabolically active and not due to passive agglutination; electron microscopic studies and PRP with added glutaraldehyde did not show platelet activation, clumping, or reduced platelet count. In contrast to aggregation caused by pressure, bubble-induced aggregation in PRP at 1 bar (after treatment in the pressure chamber) was nearly completely inhibited by theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases intracellular platelet cyclic AMP. PMID:8392414

  17. Rotating bubble membrane radiator for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-05-01

    An advanced radiator concept for heat rejection in space is described which uses a two-phase working fluid to radiate waste heat. The development of new advanced materials and the large surface area per mass makes the Bubble Membrane Radiator an attractive alternative to both conventional heat pipes and liquid droplet radiators for mid-to-high-temperature applications. A system description, a discussion of design requirements, and a mass comparison with heat pipes and liquid droplet radiators is provided. To meet the increased demand for power, solar dynamic and nuclear power systems, which operate on a closed heat engine cycle or use direct conversion of thermal to electric power, are being investigated for their significant reduction in size and mass over comparable photovoltaic systems. This reduction in mass and size may translate into reduced initial and life cycle costs as well as improved orbital operations in the areas of stability, control, and maintenance. For any space-based activity, waste heat must ultimately be radiated to space. Spacecraft system studies by NASA and industry have shown that heat rejection radiator systems are a major weight and volume contributor to any power or thermal management system. The optimal design and development of future power or thermal management systems will require advanced heat rejection concepts utilizing new and innovative approaches to reduce overall system mass and size, while increasing system efficiency and thermodynamic performance. These advanced heat rejection systems will be required to withstand the detrimental effects of meteoroid and space debris impact, radiation, and ionizing atoms, in addition to addressing such pertinent mission requirements as reliability and maintainability, operation and control, system integration, and life cycle cost. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Deformed bubbles in inhomogeneous ultrasonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Stéphane; Popinet, Stéphane

    1998-11-01

    We study numerically a bubble undergoing expansions and contractions under an ultrasonic acoustic field. The bubble deforms under the influence of intrinsic instabilities as well as inhomogeneities in the pressure field. Interface kinematics through connected marker chains, with cut-cell reconstructions are used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric geometry. A series of embedded grids is used to follow large expansions and contractions. Test cases involve a bubble oscillating at a variable distance from a solid wall as well as a levitating bubble subject to a net force (the Bjerknes force). The numerical scheme is able to follow relatively small bubbles down to 3 μm, in the sonoluminescence regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability predicted in that regime is reproduced. Larger, millimeter size bubbles may also be followed. In that case the numerical results show a typical jet formation analogous to the experimental observations of Lauterborn. Preliminary observations of jet velocities are made and compared to experiment.

  19. Ostwald ripening in multiple-bubble nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Masaru; Inaoka, Hajime; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2014-12-01

    The Ostwald ripening of bubbles is studied by molecular dynamics simulations involving up to 679 × 106 Lennard-Jones particles. Many bubbles appear after depressurizing a system that is initially maintained in the pure-liquid phase, and the coarsening of bubbles follows. The self-similarity of the bubble-size distribution function predicted by Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory is directly confirmed. The total number of bubbles decreases asymptotically as t-x with scaling exponent x. As the initial temperature increases, the exponent changes from x = 3/2 to 1, which implies that the growth of bubbles changes from interface-limited (the t1/2 law) to diffusion-limited (the t1/3 law) growth.

  20. Microfluidics with compound ``bubble-drops''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saif A.; Duraiswamy, Suhanya

    2008-11-01

    ``Bubble-drops'' are compound fluid particles comprising a gas bubble and liquid drop that flow as a single fluid object through another immiscible liquid in a microchannel network. These fluid particles represent discrete multiphase `quanta', and expand the sphere of application of droplet microfluidics to inter-phase phenomena. We present here a simple method to generate monodisperse bubble-drop trains in microfabricated channel networks. The difference in drag force exerted on flowing bubbles and drops by the immiscible carrier liquid implies different translational speeds, thus providing the driving force for bubble-drop formation. We outline the criteria for stable generation and analyze factors influencing bubble-drop dynamics. We will also highlight several applications in chemical and biological synthesis and screening.

  1. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanoy, Maxime; Derec, Caroline; Leroy, Valentin; Tourin, Arnaud

    2015-11-23

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  2. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  3. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Kang, In Seok

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  4. Mechanics of Bubbles in Sludges and Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A; Terrones, Guillermo; Rossen, William R

    2001-12-31

    The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks that are known to retain and release bubbles composed of flammable gases. Characterizing and understanding the behavior of these bubbles is important for the safety issues associated with the flammable gases for both ongoing waste storage and future waste-retrieval operations. The retained bubbles are known to respond to small barometric pressure changes, though in a complex manner with unusual hysteresis occurring in some tanks in the relationship between bubble volume and pressure, or V-P hysteresis. With careful analysis, information on the volume of retained gas and the interactions of the waste and the bubbles can be determined. The overall objective of this study is to create a better understanding of the mechanics of bubbles retained in high-level waste sludges and slurries. Significant advancements have been made in all the major areas of basic theoretical and experimental method development.

  5. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  6. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  7. Bubble, Drop and Particle Unit (BDPU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication includes the following articles entitled: (1) Oscillatory Thermocapillary Instability; (2) Thermocapillary Convection in Multilayer Systems; (3) Bubble and Drop Interaction with Solidification Front; (4) A Liquid Electrohydrodynamics Experiment; (5) Boiling on Small Plate Heaters under Microgravity and a Comparison with Earth Gravity; (6) Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops; and (7) Nonlinear Surface Tension Driven Bubble Migration

  8. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  9. Bursting the bubble of melt inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Most silicate melt inclusions (MI) contain bubbles, whose significance has been alternately calculated, pondered, and ignored, but rarely if ever directly explored. Moore et al. (2015) analyze the bubbles, as well as their host glasses, and conclude that they often hold the preponderance of CO2 in the MI. Their findings entreat future researchers to account for the presence of bubbles in MI when calculating volatile budgets, saturation pressures, and eruptive flux.

  10. Core-shell Si/C nanospheres embedded in bubble sheet-like carbon film with enhanced performance as lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Tang, Yongbing; Kang, Wenpei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-03-18

    Due to its high theoretical capacity and low lithium insertion voltage plateau, silicon has been considered one of the most promising anodes for high energy and high power density lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, its rapid capacity degradation, mainly caused by huge volume changes during lithium insertion/extraction processes, remains a significant challenge to its practical application. Engineering Si anodes with abundant free spaces and stabilizing them by incorporating carbon materials has been found to be effective to address the above problems. Using sodium chloride (NaCl) as a template, bubble sheet-like carbon film supported core-shell Si/C composites are prepared for the first time by a facile magnesium thermal reduction/glucose carbonization process. The capacity retention achieves up to 93.6% (about 1018 mAh g(-1)) after 200 cycles at 1 A g(-1). The good performance is attributed to synergistic effects of the conductive carbon film and the hollow structure of the core-shell nanospheres, which provide an ideal conductive matrix and buffer spaces for respectively electron transfer and Si expansion during lithiation process. This unique structure decreases the charge transfer resistance and suppresses the cracking/pulverization of Si, leading to the enhanced cycling performance of bubble sheet-like composite. PMID:25346141

  11. Safety and efficacy of pegfilgrastim compared to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) supporting a dose-intensive, rapidly cycling anti-metabolite containing chemotherapy regimen (Hyper-CVAD) for lymphoid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Lane, Steven W; Crawford, Julie; Kenealy, Melita; Cull, Gavin; Seymour, John F; Prince, H Miles; Marlton, Paula; Gill, Devinder; Mollee, Peter N

    2006-09-01

    Pegfilgrastim (Neulasta) has proven efficacy as supportive therapy in a variety of 21-day chemotherapy regimens, but has not been studied in dose intensive, rapidly cycling regimens utilising cell-cycle active drugs (e.g. anti-metabolites) such as hyper-CVAD. This study examined whether pegfilgrastim was safe and lead to similar kinetics of neutrophil recovery as daily granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Using retrospective analysis, patients receiving pegfilgrastim (6 mg) were matched with controls (G-CSF 5 microg kg-1 per day) for a cycle of chemotherapy, prior chemotherapy, dose of cytarabine received, age (<60 or >60 years), diagnosis and bone marrow involvement. The primary endpoint was duration of grade IV neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count, ANC < 500 microl-1). Secondary endpoints included time to neutrophil recovery, incidence of febrile neutropenia, positive blood cultures and delay in subsequent chemotherapy. This study identified 124 pegfilgrastim supported cycles in 43 patients and successfully matched them to 124 G-CSF supported cycles from 38 patients treated between January 1999 and July 2005. There were no significant differences between pegfilgrastim and G-CSF groups in baseline or treatment-related variables. The median duration of grade IV neutropenia was 4 days in both groups (P = 0.55). Time to neutrophil recovery, incidence of febrile neutropenia, positive blood cultures and delay in subsequent chemotherapy were similar in both groups. Once per cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim appears safe and as effective as daily G-CSF for supporting the hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen. PMID:17064993

  12. Rapid and large-scale synthesis of bare Co3O4 porous nanostructures from an oleate precursor as superior Li-ion anodes with long-cycle lives.

    PubMed

    Ge, Danhua; Wu, Junjie; Qu, Genlong; Deng, Yaoyao; Geng, Hongbo; Zheng, Junwei; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-09-14

    In this study, we describe a rapid and environmentally friendly synthesis of bare Co3O4 nanocrystals derived from Co(ii) oleate complexes by calcination treatment. When directly used as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), the as-prepared nanocrystals could deliver a high reversible capacity of 980 mA h g(-1) after 250 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) and excellent cycling performance, which may be beneficial to promote the further development of the next generation of lithium ion batteries. The synthetic route can offer great advantages for the flash preparation of other metal oxide nanocrystals for energy storage application. PMID:27503555

  13. Some problems of the theory of bubble growth and condensation in bubble chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachev, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain the reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental values of bubble growth rate in an overheated liquid, and to provide a brief formulation of the main premises of the theory on bubble growth in liquid before making a critical analysis. To simplify the problem, the floating upward of bubbles is not discussed; moreover, the study is based on the results of the theory of the behavior of fixed bubbles.

  14. Anomalous bubble propagation in elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Alexandra; Juel, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Airway reopening is an important physiological event, as exemplified by the first breath of an infant that inflates highly collapsed airways by driving a finger of air through its fluid-filled lungs. Whereas fundamental models of airway reopening predict the steady propagation of only one type of bubble with a characteristic rounded tip, our experiments reveal a surprising selection of novel bubbles with counterintuitive shapes that reopen strongly collapsed, liquid-filled elastic tubes. Our multiple bubbles are associated with a discontinuous relationship between bubble pressure and speed that sets exciting challenges for modelers.

  15. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  16. The acoustic environment of a sonoluminescing bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzfuss, Joachim; Rüggeberg, Matthias; Holt, R. Glynn

    2000-07-01

    A bubble is levitated in water in a cylindrical resonator which is driven by ultrasound. It has been shown that in a certain region of parameter space the bubble is emitting light pulses (sonoluminescence). One of the properties observed is the enormous spatial stability leaving the bubble "pinned" in space allowing it to emit light with a timing of picosecond accuracy. We argue that the observed stability is due to interactions of the bubble with the resonator. A shock wave emitted at collapse time together with a self generated complex sound field, which is experimentally mapped with high resolution, is responsible for the observed effects.

  17. Relationship between thrombolysis efficiency induced by pulsed focused ultrasound and cavitation bubble size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, X.; Wang, S.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles has been studied. Firstly, the thrombolysis efficiency, evaluated by degree of mechanical fragmentation was investigated with varying duty cycle. Secondly, the size distribution of cavitation bubbles after the 1st, 103th and 105th pulse during experiments for various duty cycles was studied. It was revealed that the thrombolysis efficiency was highest when the cavitation bubble size distribution was centred around linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. Therefore, in cavitation enhanced therapeutic applications, the essential of using a pulsed FUS may be controlling the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range so as to increase the treatment efficiency.

  18. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 1; Basic Equations of Bubble Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider the behaviour of a vapour bubble formed at a nucleation site on a heated horizontal wall. There is no forced convection of an ambient liquid, and the bubble is presumably separated from the wall by a thin liquid microlayer. The energy conservation law results in a variational equation for the mechanical energy of the whole system consisting of the bubble and liquid. It leads to a set of two strongly nonlinear equations which govern bubble expansion and motion of its centre of mass. A supplementary equation to find out the vapour temperature follows from consideration of heat transfer to the bubble, both from the bulk of surrounding liquid and through the microlayer. The average thickness of the microlayer is shown to increase monotonously with time as the bubble meniscus spreads along the wall. Bubble expansion is driven by the pressure head between vapour inside and liquid far away from the bubble, with due allowance for surface tension and gravity effects. It is resisted by inertia of liquid being placed into motion as the bubble grows. The inertia originates also a force that presses the bubble to the wall. This force is counteracted by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force that tends to transform the bubble into a sphere. The analysis brings about quite a new formulation of the familiar problem of bubble growth and detachment under conditions of nucleate pool boiling.

  19. Mitigation of explosion bubble pulsation caused by the deep underwater detonation of a tapered charge. Final report 21 Apr-31 Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, J.M.; Ruhl, S.F.

    1980-10-31

    The dynamics of the explosion bubble growth and collapse due to the underwater detonation of a 5.3-m-long tapered charge containing 454 kg of TNT are examined calculationally. The burst was 305 m below the sea surface in deep water. The calculational method, using a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian finite-difference hydrodynamics computer code, was made credible by successfully calculating the explosion bubble dynamics of spherical TNT charges detonated at the same depth of burst. Results show the tapered charge explosion bubble exhibits characteristics that are very similar to an equal-weight spherical charge over the first bubble period. This implies that bubble pulses will be produced by tapered charge detonations at this depth and deeper. The bubble pulses emitted by deep tapered charge detonations are not characteristic of the underwater nuclear detonation that these charges are designed to simulate. In fact, for conventional charges, bubble reloading of models is severe, and can lead to their unplanned collapse. Three methods of tapered charge bubble pulse mitigation were examined: (1) injection of propellant gas into the bubble to prevent/cushion collapse, (2) dissipation of bubble energy through enhancement of turbulence at the first minimum by creating an asymmetric bubble, and (3) using an explosive that produces condensible/soluble detonation products, thereby allowing more rapid transfer of bubble energy to the water and preventing the creation of a substantial bubble pulse. Results show that 2 and 3 are promising methods of bubble pulse mitigation. Additional work must be done to quantify the effectiveness of these methods and produce specific test designs.

  20. Bubbles and denaturation in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Erp, T. S.; Cuesta-López, S.; Peyrard, M.

    2006-08-01

    The local opening of DNA is an intriguing phenomenon from a statistical-physics point of view, but is also essential for its biological function. For instance, the transcription and replication of our genetic code cannot take place without the unwinding of the DNA double helix. Although these biological processes are driven by proteins, there might well be a relation between these biological openings and the spontaneous bubble formation due to thermal fluctuations. Mesoscopic models, like the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model, have fairly accurately reproduced some experimental denaturation curves and the sharp phase transition in the thermodynamic limit. It is, hence, tempting to see whether these models could be used to predict the biological activity of DNA. In a previous study, we introduced a method that allows to obtain very accurate results on this subject, which showed that some previous claims in this direction, based on molecular-dynamics studies, were premature. This could either imply that the present PBD model should be improved or that biological activity can only be predicted in a more complex framework that involves interactions with proteins and super helical stresses. In this article, we give a detailed description of the statistical method introduced before. Moreover, for several DNA sequences, we give a thorough analysis of the bubble-statistics as a function of position and bubble size and the so-called l-denaturation curves that can be measured experimentally. These show that some important experimental observations are missing in the present model. We discuss how the present model could be improved.

  1. Biosynthesis within a bubble architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2006-05-01

    Sub-cellular compartmentalization is critical to life; it minimizes diffusion effects and enables locally high concentrations of biochemicals for improved reaction kinetics. We demonstrate an example of in vitro biochemical synthesis inside the water channels of foam using engineered artificial organelles (bacteriorhodopsin and F0F1-ATP synthase reconstituted polymer vesicles) as functional units to produce ATP. These results show that the interstitial space of bubbles serves as a metaphor for sub-cellular structure, providing a new platform for both investigating cellular metabolism and the engineering of biofunctional materials and systems.

  2. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-04-01

    That rising bubbles may significantly affect magma mixing paths has already been demon strated by analogue experiments. Here, for the first time, bubble-advection experiments are performed employing volcanic melts at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of basaltic glass were placed below cylinders of rhyolite glass. Upon melting, interstitial air formed bubbles that rose into the rhyolite melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. The formation of plume-like filaments of advected basalt within the rhyolite was characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. Melt entrainment by bubble ascent appears to be an efficient mechanism for mingling volcanic melts of highly contrasting compositions and properties. MicroCT imaging reveals bubbles trailing each other and multiple filaments coalescing into bigger ones. Rheological modelling of the filaments yields viscosities of up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the surrounding rhyolitic liquid. Such a viscosity contrast implies that bubbles rising successively are likely to follow this pathway of low resistance that previously ascending bubbles have generated. Filaments formed by multiple bubbles would thus experience episodic replenishment with mafic material. Inevitable implications for the concept of bubble advection in magma mixing include thereby both an acceleration of mixing because of decreased viscous resistance for bubbles inside filaments and non-conventional diffusion systematics because of intermittent supply of mafic material (instead of a single pulse) inside a material. Inside the filaments, the mafic material was variably hybridised to andesitic through rhyolitic composition. Compositional profiles alone are ambiguous, however, to determine whether single or multiple bubbles were involved during formation of a filament. Statistical analysis, employing concentration variance as measure of homogenisation, demonstrates that also filaments appearing as single-bubble filaments

  3. Neural basis of economic bubble behavior.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, A; Onozaki, T; Mizuno, T; Asamizuya, T; Ueno, K; Cheng, K; Iriki, A

    2014-04-18

    Throughout human history, economic bubbles have formed and burst. As a bubble grows, microeconomic behavior ceases to be constrained by realistic predictions. This contradicts the basic assumption of economics that agents have rational expectations. To examine the neural basis of behavior during bubbles, we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants traded shares in a virtual stock exchange with two non-bubble stocks and one bubble stock. The price was largely deflected from the fair price in one of the non-bubble stocks, but not in the other. Their fair prices were specified. The price of the bubble stock showed a large increase and battering, as based on a real stock-market bust. The imaging results revealed modulation of the brain circuits that regulate trade behavior under different market conditions. The premotor cortex was activated only under a market condition in which the price was largely deflected from the fair price specified. During the bubble, brain regions associated with the cognitive processing that supports order decisions were identified. The asset preference that might bias the decision was associated with the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The activity of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was correlated with the score of future time perspective, which would bias the estimation of future price. These regions were deemed to form a distinctive network during the bubble. A functional connectivity analysis showed that the connectivity between the DLPFC and the IPL was predominant compared with other connectivities only during the bubble. These findings indicate that uncertain and unstable market conditions changed brain modes in traders. These brain mechanisms might lead to a loss of control caused by wishful thinking, and to microeconomic bubbles that expand, on the macroscopic scale, toward bust. PMID:24468106

  4. A rapid and robust assay for detection of S-phase cell cycle progression in plant cells and tissues by using ethynyl deoxyuridine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Progress in plant cell cycle research is highly dependent on reliable methods for detection of cells replicating DNA. Frequency of S-phase cells (cells in DNA synthesis phase) is a basic parameter in studies on the control of cell division cycle and the developmental events of plant cells. Here we extend the microscopy and flow cytometry applications of the recently developed EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine)-based S-phase assay to various plant species and tissues. We demonstrate that the presented protocols insure the improved preservation of cell and tissue structure and allow significant reduction in assay duration. In comparison with the frequently used detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and tritiated-thymidine incorporation, this new methodology offers several advantages as we discuss here. Results Applications of EdU-based S-phase assay in microscopy and flow cytometry are presented by using cultured cells of alfalfa, Arabidopsis, grape, maize, rice and tobacco. We present the advantages of EdU assay as compared to BrdU-based replication assay and demonstrate that EdU assay -which does not require plant cell wall digestion or DNA denaturation steps, offers reduced assay duration and better preservation of cellular, nuclear and chromosomal morphologies. We have also shown that fast and efficient EdU assay can also be an efficient tool for dual parameter flow cytometry analysis and for quantitative assessment of replication in thick root samples of rice. Conclusions In plant cell cycle studies, EdU-based S-phase detection offers a superior alternative to the existing S-phase assays. EdU method is reliable, versatile, fast, simple and non-radioactive and it can be readily applied to many different plant systems. PMID:20181034

  5. High Speed Imaging of Bubble Clouds Generated in Pulsed Ultrasound Cavitational Therapy—Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (<20 μs), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: 1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; 2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and 3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions. PMID:18019247

  6. Colorful Demos with a Long-Lasting Soap Bubble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behroozi, F.; Olson, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that feature interaction of light with soap bubbles. Includes directions about how to produce a long-lasting stationary soap bubble with an easily changeable size and describes the interaction of white light with the bubble. (DDR)

  7. Memory encoding vibrations in a disconnecting air bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy

    2009-03-01

    The implosion that disconnects a submerged air bubble into several bubbles provides a simple example of energy focusing. The most efficient disconnection is an entirely symmetric one terminating in a finite-time singularity. At the final moment, the potential energy at the start of the disconnection is entirely condensed into the kinetic energy of a vanishingly small amount of liquid rushing inwards to disconnect the bubble. In reality, however, the initial shape always possesses slight imperfections. We show that a memory of the imperfection remains and controls the final fate of the focusing. Linear stability reveals that even an infinitesimal perturbation is remembered. A slight initial asymmetry excites vibrations in the cross-section shape of the bubble neck. The vibrations persist over time. Near the singularity, their amplitudes freeze, locking onto constant values, while their frequencies chirp, increasing more and more rapidly. The net effect is that the singularity remembers exactly half of the information about the initial imperfection, the half encoded by the vibration amplitudes. We check this scenario in an experiment by releasing an air bubble from a nozzle with an oblong cross-section. This excites an elongation-compression vibrational mode. We measure the vibration excited and find quantitative agreement with linear stability. When the initial distortion has a small, but finite, size, the saturation of the vibration amplitude causes the symmetric singularity to be pre-empted by an asymmetric contact between two distant points on the interface. Numerics reveal that the contact is typically smooth, corresponding to two inward-curving portions of the bubble surface colliding at finite speed. Both the contact speed and curvature vary non-monotonically with the initial distortion size, with abrupt jumps at specific values. This is because the vibration causes contact to occur at different values of the phase. A contact produced when the shape distortion

  8. Effect of a soluble surfactant on a finite sized bubble motion in a blood vessel

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, T. N.; Mukundakrishnan, K.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed results for the motion of a finite sized gas bubble in a blood vessel. The bubble (dispersed phase) size is taken to be such as to nearly occlude the vessel. The bulk medium is treated as a shear thinning Casson fluid and contains a soluble surfactant that adsorbs and desorbs from the interface. Three different vessel sizes, corresponding to a small artery, a large arteriole, and a small arteriole, in normal humans, are considered. The hematocrit (volume fraction of RBCs) has been taken to be 0.45. For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is taken into account. Bubble motion cause temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the cell surface lining the vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it and passes it by. Rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress imparted to the cell surface during this motion. Shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are associated with a recirculation vortex at the rear of the moving bubble. The presence of the surfactant reduces the level of the shear stress gradients imparted to the cell surface as compared to an equivalent surfactant-free system. Our numerical results for bubble shapes and wall shear stresses may help explain phenomena observed in experimental studies related to gas embolism, a significant problem in cardiac surgery and decompression sickness. PMID:20305744

  9. Fabrication of nano-emulsions by bursting bubble at a liquid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Roché, Matthieu; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben; Stoyanov, Simeon; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-11-01

    Bubbles bursting at interfaces is a familiar everyday occurrence and plays a role in important processes of transport across interfaces. Here we demonstrate that the bursting of air bubbles at an air-oil-water interface in the presence of a surfactant and a co-surfactant leads to the dispersion of nano-droplets in water. Using high-speed imaging we investigate the mechanism for the dispersion of objects and show that small droplets detach from the boundary of the bubble towards the bulk water during collapse of the bubble. We also characterize the size and stability of the dispersed objects with dynamic light scattering and microscopy techniques. The observations indicate that a well-defined population of few-hundred-nm-sized droplets is produced by bubble bursting, along with a broad range of sizes above 1 μm. We propose that the dispersed objects are formed because of the rapid motion of the bubble interface during collapse. By varying experimental conditions, we show that the size of the droplets is influenced mainly by the amount of surfactant in the oil phase.

  10. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K A

    2015-10-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  11. Freeze/Thaw-Induced Embolism: Probability of Critical Bubble Formation Depends on Speed of Ice Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sevanto, Sanna; Holbrook, N. Michele; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized) conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g., branches or outermost layer of the xylem). Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically. PMID:22685446

  12. High-Temporal Resolution Measurement of Methane Bubbling From a Eutrophic, Dimictic, Freshwater Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Hemond, H.

    2009-12-01

    Significant amounts of methane can be released to the atmosphere from freshwater lakes, particularly through bubbling. However, spatial and temporal heterogeneity in ebullition has complicated efforts to accurately measure such methane emissions. In investigating the methane cycle at the Upper Mystic Lake in Massachusetts, we hypothesized that ebullition is triggered when the total hydrostatic pressure at a lake bottom falls below a critical value, which is determined by the gas content and gas storage potential of the sediments. Conditions for bubble breakout from sediments should either involve a drop in hydrostatic pressure or/and an increase in the sediment gas phase, with ebullition continuing until hydrostatic pressure rises or sediments are depleted of gas. In 2008, bubbling fluxes at the Upper Mystic Lake were measured over 4-6 months at a resolution of 5-10 minutes using underwater traps equipped with pressure sensors. Total hydrostatic pressure, lake water level and atmospheric pressure were monitored at similar resolutions. The precise timing of bubbling episodes was identified from the automated trap data using a multi-resolution analysis based on the stationary wavelet transform. In addition, conventional statistical methods were used to examine the relationship between ebullition and hydrostatic pressure. Synchronous lake-wide bubbling episodes were triggered when total hydrostatic pressure (sum of atmospheric pressure plus water column depth) fell below a site-dependent threshold. The bubbling episodes occurred about 10% of the time in an aperiodic manner, during which most of the bubbled gas for the study period was released (50-70% depending on the site). The wavelet analysis revealed that some of these episodes, which could last for several days, actually consisted of several short 5-20 minute bubble bursts. The results indicate that sediment gas storage is also important in determining the patterns of methane released through ebullition.

  13. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    During the period of reionization that followed the dark ages of our universe, hydrogen was transformed from a neutral state, which is opaque to radiation, to an ionized one, which is transparent to radiation. But what generated the initial ionizing radiation? The recent discovery of multiple distant galaxies offers evidence for how this process occurred.Two Distant GalaxiesWe believe reionization occurred somewhere between a redshift of z = 6 and 7, because Ly-emitting galaxies drop out at roughly this redshift. Beyond this distance, were generally unable to see the light from these galaxies, because the universe is no longer transparent to their emission. This is not always the case, however: if a bubble of ionized gas exists around a distant galaxy, the radiation can escape, allowing us to see the galaxy.This is true of two recently-discovered Ly-emitting galaxies, confirmed to be at a redshift of z~7 and located near one another in a region known as the Bremer Deep Field. The fact that were able to see the radiation from these galaxies means that they are in an ionized HII region presumably one of the earlier regions to have become reionized in the universe.But on their own, neither of these galaxies is capable of generating an ionized bubble large enough for their light to escape. So what ionized the region around them, and what does this mean for our understanding of how reionization occurred in the universe?A Little Help From FriendsLocation in different filters of the objects in the Hubble Bremer Deep Field catalog. The z~7 selection region is outlined by the grey box. BDF-521 and BDF-3299 were the two originally discovered galaxies; the remaining red markers indicate the additional six galaxies discovered in the same region. [Castellano et al. 2016]A team of scientists led by Marco Castellano (Rome Observatory, INAF) investigated the possibility that there are other, faint galaxies near these two that have helped to ionize the region. Performing a survey

  14. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26382410

  16. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  17. The Physics of Foams, Droplets and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarker, Dipak K.

    2013-01-01

    Foams or bubble dispersions are common to milkshakes, bread, champagne froth, shaving mousse, shampoo, crude oil extraction systems, upholstery packing and bubble wrap, whereas the term droplet is often synonymous with either a small drop of water or a drop of oil--a type of coarse dispersion. The latter are seen in butter and milk, household…

  18. Oscillating plasma bubbles. II. Pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    Time-dependent phenomena have been investigated in plasma bubbles which are created by inserting spherical grids into an ambient plasma and letting electrons and ions form a plasma of different parameters than the ambient one. There are no plasma sources inside the bubble. The grid bias controls the particle flux. There are sheaths on both sides of the grid, each of which passes particle flows in both directions. The inner sheath or plasma potential develops self consistently to establish charge neutrality and divergence free charge and mass flows. When the electron supply is restricted, the inner sheath exhibits oscillations near the ion plasma frequency. When all electrons are excluded, a virtual anode forms on the inside sheath, reflects all ions such that the bubble is empty. By pulsing the ambient plasma, the lifetime of the bubble plasma has been measured. In an afterglow, plasma electrons are trapped inside the bubble and the bubble decays as slow as the ambient plasma. Pulsing the grid voltage yields the time scale for filling and emptying the bubble. Probes have been shown to modify the plasma potential. Using pulsed probes, transient ringing on the time scale of ion transit times through the bubble has been observed. The start of sheath oscillations has been investigated. The instability mechanism has been qualitatively explained. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on electrons in the sheath has been clarified.

  19. The rising bubble technique for discharge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxemburg, W.; Hilgersom, K.; van Eekelen, M.

    2010-12-01

    The rising bubble technique is an elegant method to determine the full discharge of a river or a canal in a short moment of time. The method is not new [Sargent, 1982], but hardly applied so far. The method applies air bubbles released from the bottom of a river or canal. While the bubbles rise to the surface they are dragged along by the current. The deeper the stream and the faster the current the longer will be the distance they are dragged along. The horizontal displacement L, of the bubbles can be observed at the surface of the stream. To obtain a discharge, the rising velocity vr, of the bubble is required additionally. When the rising velocity is assumed constant the discharge per unit width amounts to q= Lvr. Placing a tube on the bottom of the stream and releasing bubbles at regular intervals results in a complete discharge profile. The ongoing research is focusing on factors affecting the rising velocity, solving practicalities in applying the method in the field and how modern image processing techniques can enhance determining in a glance the distance travelled by the bubbles. Surfacing of air bubbles in a canal

  20. Videotaping the Lifespan of a Soap Bubble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramme, Goran

    1995-01-01

    Describes how the use of a videotape to record the history of a soap bubble allows a study of many interesting events in considerable detail including interference fringes, convection and turbulence patterns on the surface, formation of black film, and the ultimate explosion of the bubble. (JRH)

  1. Drops and Bubble in Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The formation of extended p-n junctions in semiconductors by drop migration, mechanisms and morphologies of migrating drops and bubbles in solids and nucleation and corrections to the Volmer-Weber equations are discussed. Bubble shrinkage in the processing of glass, the formation of glass microshells as laser-fusion targets, and radiation-induced voids in nuclear reactors were examined.

  2. Measuring the surface tension of soap bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are for students to gain an understanding of surface tension, to see that pressure inside a small bubble is larger than that inside a large bubble. These concepts can be used to explain the behavior of liquid foams as well as precipitate coarsening and grain growth. Equipment, supplies, and procedures are explained.

  3. Bubble behavior during solidification in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Wilcox, W. R.; Gutowski, R.

    1979-01-01

    The trapping and behavior of gas bubbles were studied during low-gravity solidification of carbon tetrabromide, a transparent metal-model material. The experiment was performed during a NASA-sponsored sounding rocket flight and involved gradient freeze solidification of a gas-saturated melt. Gas bubbles were evolved at the solid-liquid interface during the low-gravity interval. No large-scale thermal migration of bubbles, bubble pushing by the solid-liquid interface, or bubble detachment from the interface were observed during the low-gravity experiment. A unique bubble motion-fluid flow event occurred in one specimen: a large bubble moved downward and caused some circulation of the melt. The gas bubbles that were trapped by the solid in commercial-purity material formed voids that had a cylindrical shape, in contrast to the spherical shape that had been observed in a prior low-gravity experiment. These shapes were not influenced by the gravity level (0.0001 g-0 vs g-0), but were dependent upon the initial temperature gradient. In higher purity material, however, the shape of the voids changed from cylindrical in 1g to spherical in low gravity.

  4. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  5. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  6. The Minnaert Bubble: An Acoustic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Martin; Hocquet, Thierry; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We propose an "ab initio" introduction to the well-known Minnaert pulsating bubble at graduate level. After a brief recall of the standard stuff, we begin with a detailed discussion of the radial movements of an air bubble in water. This discussion is managed from an acoustic point of view, and using the Lagrangian rather than the Eulerian…

  7. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 2; Evolution of Thermally Controlled Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The previously developed dynamic theory of growth and detachment of vapour bubbles under conditions of nucleate pool boiling is applied to study motion and deformation of a bubble evolving at a single nucleation site. The bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled, and two components of heat transfer to the bubble are accounted of: the one from the bulk of surrounding liquid and the one due to heat conduction across a liquid microlayer formed underneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is governed by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force, both the forces making the bubble centre of mass move away from the wall and, thus, assisting its detachment. Buoyancy-controlled and surface-tension-controlled regimes are considered separately in a meticulous way. The duration of the whole process of bubble evolution till detachment, the rate of growth, and the bubble departure size are found as functions of time and physical and operating parameters. Some repeatedly observed phenomena, such as an influence of gravity on the growth rate, are explained. Inferences of the model agree qualitatively with available experimental evidence, and conclusions pertaining to the dependence on gravity of the bubble radius at detachment and the whole time of the bubble development when being attached to the wall are confirmed quantitatively.

  8. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  9. A new bubble dynamics model to study bubble growth, deformation, and coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Su, Y.; Nguyen, C. T.; Parmigiani, A.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Dufek, J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new bubble dynamics model to study the evolution of a suspension of bubbles over a wide range of vesicularity, and that accounts for hydrodynamical interactions between bubbles while they grow, deform under shear flow conditions, and exchange mass by diffusion coarsening. The model is based on a lattice Boltzmann method for free surface flows. As such, it assumes an infinite viscosity contrast between the exsolved volatiles and the melt. Our model allows for coalescence when two bubbles approach each other because of growth or deformation. The parameter (disjoining pressure) that controls the coalescence efficiency, i.e., drainage time for the fluid film between the bubbles, can be set arbitrarily in our calculations. We calibrated this parameter by matching the measured time for the drainage of the melt film across a range of Bond numbers (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension stresses) with laboratory experiments of a bubble rising to a free surface. The model is then used successfully to model Ostwald ripening and bubble deformation under simple shear flow conditions. The results we obtain for the deformation of a single bubble are in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. For a suspension, we observe that the collective effect of bubbles is different depending on the relative magnitude of viscous and interfacial stresses (capillary number). At low capillary number, we find that bubbles deform more readily in a suspension than for the case of a single bubble, whereas the opposite is observed at high capillary number.

  10. Moving with bubbles: a review of the interactions between bubbles and the microorganisms that surround them.

    PubMed

    Walls, Peter L L; Bird, James C; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2014-12-01

    Bubbles are ubiquitous in biological environments, emerging during the complex dynamics of waves breaking in the open oceans or being intentionally formed in bioreactors. From formation, through motion, until death, bubbles play a critical role in the oxygenation and mixing of natural and artificial ecosystems. However, their life is also greatly influenced by the environments in which they emerge. This interaction between bubbles and microorganisms is a subtle affair in which surface tension plays a critical role. Indeed, it shapes the role of bubbles in mixing or oxygenating microorganisms, but also determines how microorganisms affect every stage of the bubble's life. In this review, we guide the reader through the life of a bubble from birth to death, with particular attention to the microorganism-bubble interaction as viewed through the lens of fluid dynamics. PMID:25096288

  11. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Renggli, C. J.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.-U.; Ertel-Ingrisch, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the materials' complexity induced by bubbles rising through mixing magmas, bubble-advection experiments have been performed, employing natural silicate melts at magmatic temperatures. A cylinder of basaltic glass was placed below a cylinder of rhyolitic glass. Upon melting, bubbles formed from interstitial air. During the course of the experimental runs, those bubbles rose via buoyancy forces into the rhyolitic melt, thereby entraining tails of basaltic liquid. In the experimental run products, these plume-like filaments of advected basalt within rhyolite were clearly visible and were characterised by microCT and high-resolution EMP analyses. The entrained filaments of mafic material have been hybridised. Their post-experimental compositions range from the originally basaltic composition through andesitic to rhyolitic composition. Rheological modelling of the compositions of these hybridised filaments yield viscosities up to 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the host rhyolitic liquid. Importantly, such lowered viscosities inside the filaments implies that rising bubbles can ascend more efficiently through pre-existing filaments that have been generated by earlier ascending bubbles. MicroCT imaging of the run products provides textural confirmation of the phenomenon of bubbles trailing one another through filaments. This phenomenon enhances the relevance of bubble advection in magma mixing scenarios, implying as it does so, an acceleration of bubble ascent due to the decreased viscous resistance facing bubbles inside filaments and yielding enhanced mass flux of mafic melt into felsic melt via entrainment. In magma mixing events involving melts of high volatile content, bubbles may be an essential catalyst for magma mixing. Moreover, the reduced viscosity contrast within filaments implies repeated replenishment of filaments with fresh end-member melt. As a result, complex compositional gradients and therefore diffusion systematics can be

  12. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; McCreary, E.I.; Atencio, J.H.; McCown, A.W.; Sander, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquid has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10{sup 12} level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  13. Dynamics of charged hemispherical soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, J. E.; van der Net, A.

    2009-04-01

    Raising the potential of a charged hemispherical soap bubble over a critical limit causes deformation of the bubble into a cone and ejection of a charged liquid jet. This is followed by a mode which has not previously been observed in bubbles, in which a long cylindrical liquid film column is created and collapses due to a Rayleigh-Plateau instability creating child bubbles. We show that the formation of the column and subsequent creation of child bubbles is due to a drop in potential caused by the ejection of charge from the system via the jet. Similar dynamics may occur in microscopic charged liquid droplets (electrospray processes), causing the creation of daughter droplets and long liquid spindles.

  14. Bubble growth and rise in soft sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Bernard P.; Algar, Chris; Johnson, Bruce D.; Croudace, Ian; Reed, Allen; Furukawa, Yoko; Dorgan, Kelley M.; Jumars, Peter A.; Grader, Abraham S.; Gardiner, Bruce S.

    2005-06-01

    The mechanics of uncemented soft sediments during bubble growth are not widely understood and no rheological model has found wide acceptance. We offer definitive evidence on the mode of bubble formation in the form of X-ray computed tomographic images and comparison with theory. Natural and injected bubbles in muddy cohesive sediments are shown to be highly eccentric oblate spheroids (disks) that grow either by fracturing the sediment or by reopening preexisting fractures. In contrast, bubbles in soft sandy sediment tend to be spherical, suggesting that sand acts fluidly or plastically in response to growth stresses. We also present bubble-rise results from gelatin, a mechanically similar but transparent medium, that suggest that initial rise is also accomplished by fracture. Given that muddy sediments are elastic and yield by fracture, it becomes much easier to explain physically related phenomena such as seafloor pockmark formation, animal burrowing, and gas buildup during methane hydrate melting.

  15. Instability of the 2S electron bubbles.

    PubMed

    Grinfeld, Pavel; Kojima, Haruo

    2003-09-01

    The 2S electron bubble placed in liquid helium has been previously believed to be spherical. We show that the 2S bubble is morphologically unstable at pressures above -1.23 bars. The 2S state being known to be radially unstable at pressures below -1.33 bars, the result leaves only a very narrow pressure range in which it can be found in a spherical configuration. Our stability analysis indicates that the 2S bubble is unstable against perturbations proportional to any of the third spherical harmonics Y(3m). Our numerical simulations show that there exist nonspherical stable configurations, such as the ones Maris and Konstantinov predicted for the 1P, 1D, and 2P electron bubbles and confirmed experimentally for the 1P. We believe that the 2S bubbles can also be produced and that our prediction will yield itself to experimental verification. PMID:14525485

  16. Rapid onset of nucleolar disintegration preceding cell cycle arrest in roscovitine-induced apoptosis of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jacek; Horky, Marcel; Gueorguieva, Marieta; Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa

    2003-09-10

    The aim of our study was to explore the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic action of roscovitine (ROSC) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We examined the effect of ROSC on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, nucleolar morphology, posttranslational modifications of histones as well as on induction of apoptosis. The effects of ROSC on the argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and nucleolar RNA of MCF-7 cells were marked: ROSC treatment changed the pattern of AgNORs in a time-dependent manner. The disintegration of nucleoli manifested by increasing number of nucleolar fragments already began at 6 hr posttreatment. This was accompanied by a redistribution of the nucleolin from the nucleolus beginning after 6 hr and preceded a decrease of histone acetylation and phosphorylation. Inhibition of DNA synthesis and accumulation of G(2)/M-arrested cells starting 6 hr posttreatment coincided with a strong increase of the p53 level and with an appearance of a few cells committed to undergo apoptosis. However, all these changes preceded the main wave of apoptosis, which occurred after 24 hr ROSC treatment as assessed by determination of the frequency of Annexin binding, activation of caspases as well as of DNA fragmentation. Onset of PARP-1 cleavage detected by immunoblotting and by immunohistochemistry 6 hr or 9 hr posttreatment, respectively, preceded for a few hours the DNA fragmentation detected in situ by TUNEL assay. Reconstitution of MCF-7 cells with caspase-3 did not change the kinetics of ROSC-induced apoptosis. Our results show that disintegration of nucleoli is an early marker of ROSC-induced changes. Cell cycle arrest precedes the main wave of apoptosis. PMID:12845642

  17. Primary Particles from different bubble generation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, A. C.; King, S. M.; Rosenoern, T.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea spray aerosols (SSA) are of major interest to global climate models due to large uncertainty in their emissions and ability to form Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). In general, SSA are produced from wind breaking waves that entrain air and cause bubble bursting on the ocean surface. Preliminary results are presented for bubble generation, bubble size distribution, and CCN activity for laboratory generated SSA. In this study, the major processes of bubble formation are examined with respect to particle emissions. It has been suggested that a plunging jet closely resembles breaking wave bubble entrainment processes and subsequent bubble size distributions (Fuentes, Coe et al. 2010). Figure 1 shows the different particle size distributions obtained from the various bubble generation techniques. In general, frits produce a higher concentration of particles with a stronger bimodal particle size distribution than the various jet configurations used. The experiments consist of a stainless steel cylinder closed at both ends with fittings for aerosol sampling, flow connections for the recirculating jet, and air supply. Bubble generation included a recirculating jet with 16 mm or 4 mm nozzles, a stainless steel frit, or a ceramic frit. The chemical composition of the particles produced via bubble bursting processes has been probed using particle CCN activity. The CCN activity of sodium chloride, artificial sea salt purchased from Tropic Marin, and laboratory grade artificial sea salt (Kester, Duedall et al. 1967) has been compared. Considering the the limits of the shape factor as rough error bars for sodium chloride and bubbled sea salt, the CCN activity of artificial sea salt, Tropic Marin sea salt, and sodium chloride are not significantly different. This work has been supported by the Carlsberg Foundation.

  18. Gas bubble dynamics in soft materials.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Malcolm, John D; Goldman, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Epstein and Plesset's seminal work on the rate of gas bubble dissolution and growth in a simple liquid is generalized to render it applicable to a gas bubble embedded in a soft elastic solid. Both the underlying diffusion equation and the expression for the gas bubble pressure were modified to allow for the non-zero shear modulus of the medium. The extension of the diffusion equation results in a trivial shift (by an additive constant) in the value of the diffusion coefficient, and does not change the form of the rate equations. But the use of a generalized Young-Laplace equation for the bubble pressure resulted in significant differences on the dynamics of bubble dissolution and growth, relative to an inviscid liquid medium. Depending on whether the salient parameters (solute concentration, initial bubble radius, surface tension, and shear modulus) lead to bubble growth or dissolution, the effect of allowing for a non-zero shear modulus in the generalized Young-Laplace equation is to speed up the rate of bubble growth, or to reduce the rate of bubble dissolution, respectively. The relation to previous work on visco-elastic materials is discussed, as is the connection of this work to the problem of Decompression Sickness (specifically, "the bends"). Examples of tissues to which our expressions can be applied are provided. Also, a new phenomenon is predicted whereby, for some parameter values, a bubble can be metastable and persist for long times, or it may grow, when embedded in a homogeneous under-saturated soft elastic medium. PMID:25382720

  19. Mechanism of single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    An, Yu

    2006-08-01

    Considering almost all the effective processes of physics and chemical reaction in our numerical computation model, we investigate the mechanism of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). For those sonoluminescing single bubbles in water at its flashing phase, the numerical simulation reveals that if the temperature inside the bubble is not high enough which may result in the plenty oxygen molecules and OH radicals undissociated, such as the case of a single argon bubble in 20 degrees C or 34 degrees C water, the radiative attachment of electrons to oxygen molecules and OH radicals contributes most to the SBSL; if the temperature inside the bubble is higher which makes most of the water vapor inside the bubble dissociate into oxygen and hydrogen atoms, such as the case of an argon bubble or a helium bubble in 0 degrees C water, the radiative attachment of electrons to oxygen and hydrogen atoms dominates the SBSL; if the temperature is still higher, such as the case of a xenon bubble in 0 degrees C water, the contribution from electron-neutral atom bremsstrahlung and electron-ion bremsstrahlung and recombination would be comparable with the contribution from the radiative attachment of electrons to oxygen and hydrogen atoms, and they together dominate the SBSL. For sonoluminescing single bubbles in those low vapor pressure liquids, such as in 85 wt.% sulphuric acid, the electron-neutral atom bremsstrahlung and the electron-ion bremsstrahlung and recombination contribute most to the continuous spectrum part of SBSL. The present calculation also provides good interpretations to those observed phenomena, such as emitted photon numbers, the width of optical pulses, the blackbody radiation like spectra. The temperature fitted by the blackbody radiation formula is very different from that calculated by the gas dynamics equations. Besides, the effect of chemical dissociation on the shock wave is also discussed. PMID:17025536

  20. Gas bubble dynamics in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano-Altamirano, J. M.; Malcolm, John D.; Goldman, Saul

    Epstein and Plesset's seminal work on the rate of gas bubble dissolution and growth in a simple liquid is generalized to render it applicable to a gas bubble embedded in a soft elastic medium. Both the underlying diffusion equation and the expression for the gas bubble pressure were modified to allow for the non-zero shear modulus of the elastic medium. The extension of the diffusion equation results in a trivial shift (by an additive constant) in the value of the diffusion coefficient, and does not change the form of the rate equations. But the use of a Generalized Young-Laplace equation for the bubble pressure resulted in significant differences on the dynamics of bubble dissolution and growth, relative to a simple liquid medium. Depending on whether the salient parameters (solute concentration, initial bubble radius, surface tension, and shear modulus) lead to bubble growth or dissolution, the effect of allowing for a non-zero shear modulus in the Generalized Young-Laplace equation is to speed up the rate of bubble growth, or to reduce the rate of bubble dissolution, respectively. The relation to previous work on visco-elastic materials is discussed, as is the connection of this work to the problem of Decompression Sickness (specifically, "the bends"). Examples of tissues to which our expressions can be applied are provided. Also, a new phenomenon is predicted whereby, for some parameter values, a bubble can be metastable and persist for long times, or it may grow, when embedded in a homogeneous under-saturated soft elastic medium.

  1. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  2. Magma mixing enhanced by bubble ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmaier, S.; Morgavi, D.; Perugini, D.; De Campos, C. P.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the processes that affect the rate of liquid state homogenization provides fundamental clues on the otherwise inaccessible subsurface dynamics of magmatic plumbing systems. Compositional heterogeneities detected in the matrix of magmatic rocks represent the arrested state of a chemical equilibration. Magmatic homogenization has been divided into a) the mechanical interaction of magma batches (mingling) and b) the diffusive equilibration of compositional gradients, where diffusive equilibration is exponentially enhanced by progressive mechanical interaction [1]. The mechanical interaction between two distinct batches of magma has commonly been attributed to shear and folding movements between two liquids of distinct viscosities. A mode of mechanical interaction scarcely invoked is the advection of mafic material into a felsic one through bubble motion. Yet, experiments with analogue materials demonstrated that bubble ascent has the potential to enhance the fluid mechanical component of magma mixing [2]. Here, we present preliminary results from bubble-advection experiments. For the first time, experiments of this kind were performed using natural materials at magmatic temperatures. Cylinders of Snake River Plain (SRP) basalt were drilled with a cavity of defined volume and placed underneath cylinders of SRP rhyolite. Upon melting, the gas pocket, or bubble trapped within the cavity, rose into the rhyolite, so entraining a layer of basalt. Successive iterations of the same experiment at progressive intervals ensured a time series of magmatic interaction caused by bubble segregation. Variations in initial bubble size allowed the tracking of bubble volume to advected material ratio at defined viscosity contrast. The resulting plume-like structures that the advected basalt formed within the rhyolite were characterized by microCT and subsequent high-resolution EMP analyses. The mass of advected material per bubble correlated positively with bubble size. The

  3. Transient Rapid Changes in Nutrient Cycling at the Onset of Terrestrial Colonization by Rooted Plants in the Devonian Caithness Flagstone Group, Orkney Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Beshears, M.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    these events is transient—barring other changes in erosion, the release/retention fluxes of these elements tends toward a steady state. Nevertheless, these results support a flush of the bio-limiting nutrient P into the ocean at the onset of terrestrial colonization by rooting plants which might have temporarily increased global marine productivity, thus impacting carbon cycling and climate.; Modeled transformations in terrestrial P cycling during incipient soil development

  4. Carbon cycling in a rapidly changing High Arctic: Results from long-term climate experiments and observations of interannual variability in NW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Lupascu, M.; Csank, A. Z.; Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Xu, X.; Welker, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The High Arctic, a region dominated by polar semi-deserts underlain with continuous permafrost, is experiencing dramatic changes in climate associated with the loss of sea ice, including warming and shifts in precipitation regimes (i.e. wetting and changing snow cover). Here, we present findings from a set of studies that are addressing the sign and strength of the High Arctic's summertime carbon (C) cycle feedback. We explored magnitudes, patterns and sources of C losses through CO2 and CH4 fluxes and via leaching as dissolved organic C (DOC) and particulate organic C (POC) along with measurements of net ecosystem exchange and plant C uptake. From studying long-term summertime experimental warming and/or watering and interannual weather patterns we find that in polar semi-deserts: a) Summer precipitation regime is the key driver of current summertime C budgets. Warming plus wetting results in increased ecosystem C sequestration and reduced losses of older C as CO2, while warming alone decreases C uptake and increases losses of older soil C as CO2. The system is a sink for CH4, but the sink strength will decline with increasing soil moisture. Thus, the High Arctic has the potential to remain a strong summertime C sink even as the rest of the permafrost region transitions to a net C source to the atmosphere as climate continues to warm. b) Old C is diffusing out of the High Arctic landscape into the atmosphere. This C loss is especially evident in the spring before vegetation pumps fresh C into the soil system. Further, loss of older C from the deeper active layer is highly episodic and dominates C emissions during small precipitation events. c) Precipitation regime is also the key driver of that ancient C export from the land surface as DOC, higher precipitation in the later part of the growing season (July-August), when the active layer is deeper, results in a greater fraction of old C transported to the nearshore Arctic Ocean. Collectively these findings

  5. "Bubbles"--a spot diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Mattias; Ramsthaler, Frank; Schnabel, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Aspiration of blood is a phenomenon observed in violent and natural death scenarios. Bloodstain patterns evolving from expectoration of aspired blood may look suspicious of a violent genesis and thus mislead crime scene investigators. In the present case, a woman was found lying in a pool of blood on the kitchen floor. Furthermore, bloodstains covered her face, clothing, and surrounding furniture and walls. Bloodstain pattern analysis and medicolegal inspection of the suspected scene of crime were carried out and revealed dispersed stains with enclosed gas bubbles in the absence of signs of physical violence leading to the assessment of a natural manner of death. The bloodstains were attributed to expiration of blood because of an internal bleeding. Medicolegal autopsy confirmed the on-site diagnosis as a fatal esophageal varix rupture was found. PMID:20102472

  6. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now be placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light

  7. Modelling isothermal bubbly-cap flows using two-group averaged bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S. C. P.; Yeoh, G. H.; Tu, J. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Gas-liquid flows with wide range of bubble sizes are commonly encountered in many nuclear gas-liquid flow systems. In tracking the changes of gas volume fraction and bubble size distribution under complex flow conditions, numerical studies have been performed to predict the temporal and spatial evolution of two-phase geometrical structure caused by the effects of bubble interactions in gas-liquid flows. Within literatures, the development of most coalescence and break-up mechanisms were primarily focused on the interaction of spherical bubbles. Nevertheless, cap bubbles which are precursors to the formation of slug units in the slug flow regime with increasing volume fraction become ever more prevalent at high gas velocity conditions. It has been shown through many experiments that interaction behaviors between non-spherical bubbles in a liquid flow are remarkably different when compared to those of spherical bubbles. Based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework, a three-fluid model was solved, one set of conservation equations for the liquid phase while two sets of conservation equations for the gas phase with one being Group 1 spherical bubbles and the other depicting Group 2 cap bubbles. In this initial assessment, the bubble mechanistic models proposed by Hibiki and Ishii [1] have been adopted to describe the intra-group and inter-group interactions. The numerical predictions were evaluated against the experiment data of the TOPFLOW facility for vertical, upwards, airwater flows in a large pipe diameter [2].

  8. Calibration of a bubble evolution model to observed bubble incidence in divers.

    PubMed

    Gault, K A; Tikuisis, P; Nishi, R Y

    1995-09-01

    The method of maximum likelihood was used to calibrate a probabilistic bubble evolution model against data of bubbles detected in divers. These data were obtained from a diverse set of 2,064 chamber man-dives involving air and heliox with and without oxygen decompression. Bubbles were measured with Doppler ultrasound and graded according to the Kisman-Masurel code from which a single maximum bubble grade (BG) per diver was compared to the maximum bubble radius (Rmax) predicted by the model. This comparison was accomplished using multinomial statistics by relating BG to Rmax through a series of probability functions. The model predicted the formation of the bubble according to the critical radius concept and its evolution was predicted by assuming a linear rate of inert gas exchange across the bubble boundary. Gas exchange between the model compartment and blood was assumed to be perfusion-limited. The most successful calibration of the model was found using a trinomial grouping of BG according to no bubbles, low, and high bubble activity, and by assuming a single tissue compartment. Parameter estimations converge to a tissue volume of 0.00036 cm3, a surface tension of 5.0 dyne.cm-1, respective time constants of 27.9 and 9.3 min for nitrogen and helium, and respective Ostwald tissue solubilities of 0.0438 and 0.0096. Although not part of the calibration algorithm, the predicted evolution of bubble size compares reasonably well with the temporal recordings of BGs. PMID:7580766

  9. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications.

  10. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S.; Moore, M. J.; Fahlman, A.; Moore, K.; Sharp, S.; Harry, C. T.; Hoppe, J.; Niemeyer, M.; Lentell, B.; Wells, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber–muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness. PMID:21993505

  11. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  12. Acoustic Bubble Removal from Boiling Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The object of the study was the investigation of the forces generated by standing acoustic waves on vapor bubbles, both far and near boundaries. In order to accomplish this objective, in view of the scarcity of publications on the topic, it has been necessary to build an edifice of knowledge about vapor bubbles in sound and flow fields from the ground up, as it were. We have addressed problems of gradually greater difficulty as follows: 1. In the first place, the physics of an stationary isolated bubble subject to a sound field in an unbounded liquid was addressed; 2. The case of bubbles translating in a stationary pressure field was then considered; 3. This was followed by a study of the combined effects of sound and translation, 4. And of a neighboring boundary 5. Finally, a new method to deal with nonspherical bubbles was developed- In addition to the work on vapor bubbles, some studies on gas bubbles were conducted in view of NASA's interest in the phenomenon of sonoluminescence.

  13. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy.

    PubMed

    Raza, Md Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  14. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  15. Surfactants for Bubble Removal against Buoyancy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Md. Qaisar; Kumar, Nirbhay; Raj, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    The common phenomenon of buoyancy-induced vapor bubble lift-off from a heated surface is of importance to many areas of science and technology. In the absence of buoyancy in zero gravity of space, non-departing bubbles coalesce to form a big dry patch on the heated surface and heat transfer deteriorates despite the high latent heat of vaporization of water. The situation is worse on an inverted heater in earth gravity where both buoyancy and surface tension act upwards to oppose bubble removal. Here we report a robust passive technique which uses surfactants found in common soaps and detergents to avoid coalescence and remove bubbles downwards, away from an inverted heater. A force balance model is developed to demonstrate that the force of repulsion resulting from the interaction of surfactants adsorbed at the neighboring liquid-vapor interfaces of the thin liquid film contained between bubbles is strong enough to overcome buoyancy and surface tension. Bubble removal frequencies in excess of ten Hz resulted in more than twofold enhancement in heat transfer in comparison to pure water. We believe that this novel bubble removal mechanism opens up opportunities for designing boiling-based systems for space applications. PMID:26743179

  16. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins.

    PubMed

    Dennison, S; Moore, M J; Fahlman, A; Moore, K; Sharp, S; Harry, C T; Hoppe, J; Niemeyer, M; Lentell, B; Wells, R S

    2012-04-01

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber-muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness. PMID:21993505

  17. Rheology of bubble-bearing magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, A. M.; Bottinga, Y.; Trull, T. W.; Richet, P.

    1999-02-01

    The physical effects of air or argon bubbles on the rheology of a calcium aluminosilicate melt have been measured at temperatures ranging from 830° to 960°C, at 1 bar pressure. The melt composition is SiO 2:64, Al 2O 3:23, and CaO:13 (wt%), while bubble volume fractions are: 0, 0.06, 0.13, 0.32, 0.41 and 0.47. Measured Newtonian viscosities range from 10 10 to 10 14 dPa s. Melts with bubble fractions of 0.06 and 0.13 show with increasing temperature ( T) an increasing relative viscosity for T < 850°C. However at T > 850°C, for all bubble fractions the viscosity decreases markedly with temperature. The observed maximum decrease of the relative viscosity is 75% for a bubble fraction of 0.47 at 907°C. At all bubble fractions the viscosity is independent of the applied stress, which ranged from 11 to 677 bars. No clear indications were observed of non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Under our experimental conditions the relative viscosity of the two phase liquid depends primarily on the bubble fraction. Physical and volcanological implications of these measurements are discussed.

  18. MOBI: Microgravity Observations of Bubble Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2004-01-01

    One of the greatest uncertainties affecting the design of multiphase flow technologies for space exploration is the spatial distribution of phases that will arise in microgravity or reduced gravity. On Earth, buoyancy-driven motion predominates whereas the shearing of the bubble suspension controls its behavior in microgravity. We are conducting a series of ground-based experiments and a flight experiment spanning the full range of ratios of buoyancy to shear. These include: (1) bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid in a vertical channel; (2) weak shear flow induced by slightly inclining the channel; (3) moderate shear flow in a terrestrial vertical pipe flow; and (4) shearing of a bubble suspension in a cylindrical Couette cell in microgravity. We consider nearly monodisperse suspensions of 1 to 1.8 mm diameter bubbles in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The liquid velocity disturbance produced by bubbles in this size range can often be described using an inviscid analysis. Electrolytic solutions lead to hydrophilic repulsion forces that stabilize the bubble suspension without causing Marangoni stresses. We will discuss the mechanisms that control the flow behavior and phase distribution in the ground-based experiments and speculate on the factors that may influence the suspension flow and bubble volume fraction distribution in the flight experiment.

  19. Bubbly Suspension Generated in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.

    2000-01-01

    Bubbly suspensions are crucial for mass and heat transport processes on Earth and in space. These processes are relevant to pharmaceutical, chemical, nuclear, and petroleum industries on Earth. They are also relevant to life support, in situ resource utilization, and propulsion processes for long-duration space missions such as the Human Exploration and Development of Space program. Understanding the behavior of the suspension in low gravity is crucial because of factors such as bubble segregation, which could result in coalescence and affect heat and mass transport. Professors A. Sangani and D. Koch, principal investigators in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, are studying the physics of bubbly suspension. They plan to shear a bubbly suspension in a couette cell in microgravity to study bubble segregation and compare the bubble distribution in the couette gap with the one predicted by the suspension-averaged equations of motion. Prior to the Requirement Definition Review of this flight experiment, a technology for generating a bubbly suspension in microgravity has to be established, tested, and verified.

  20. Understanding Peat Bubbles: Biogeochemical-Hydrological Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, M.

    2009-05-01

    Decomposition of organic matter in peatland ecosystems produces gaseous end-products that can accumulate at depth and result in the build up of free-phase gas below the water table. This free-phase gas, or bubbles, reduces hydraulic conductivity, alters hydrologic and chemical gradients, and affects productivity surface vegetation through its role in peat buoyancy. In terms of greenhouse gas dynamics, these bubbles are likely the dominant subsurface stock of methane (CH4) and release of this CH4 to the atmosphere via ebullition may account for a significant portion of total efflux. Despite the importance of entrapped bubbles for peatland ecohydrological function there is still little known about how the quantity of bubbles varies between peatland types and at smaller scales within a peatland. Profiles of bubbles collected from several locations within four peatlands reveal that bubble volume varies significant among peatlands, between microforms and with depth. Previous studies also suggest that ebullition is spatially and temporally variable. This spatial variability may have important impacts on system ecohydrology and should be incorporated in models of peatland hydrology and development. This requires the difficult task of mapping bubble volume in three dimensions and over large areas. The potential for geophysical methods and the use of surface features to address this task will be discussed.