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Sample records for rapid genomic characterization

  1. Prospective Genomic Characterization of the German Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O104:H4 Outbreak by Rapid Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zentz, Emily B.; Leopold, Shana R.; Rico, Alain; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Ji, Yongmei; Zhang, Wenlan; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Henkhaus, John K.; Leopold, Benjamin; Bielaszewska, Martina; Prager, Rita; Brzoska, Pius M.; Moore, Richard L.; Guenther, Simone; Rothberg, Jonathan M.; Karch, Helge

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing outbreak of exceptionally virulent Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 centered in Germany, has caused over 830 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and 46 deaths since May 2011. Serotype O104:H4, which has not been detected in animals, has rarely been associated with HUS in the past. To prospectively elucidate the unique characteristics of this strain in the early stages of this outbreak, we applied whole genome sequencing on the Life Technologies Ion Torrent PGM™ sequencer and Optical Mapping to characterize one outbreak isolate (LB226692) and a historic O104:H4 HUS isolate from 2001 (01-09591). Reference guided draft assemblies of both strains were completed with the newly introduced PGM™ within 62 hours. The HUS-associated strains both carried genes typically found in two types of pathogenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). Phylogenetic analyses of 1,144 core E. coli genes indicate that the HUS-causing O104:H4 strains and the previously published sequence of the EAEC strain 55989 show a close relationship but are only distantly related to common EHEC serotypes. Though closely related, the outbreak strain differs from the 2001 strain in plasmid content and fimbrial genes. We propose a model in which EAEC 55989 and EHEC O104:H4 strains evolved from a common EHEC O104:H4 progenitor, and suggest that by stepwise gain and loss of chromosomal and plasmid-encoded virulence factors, a highly pathogenic hybrid of EAEC and EHEC emerged as the current outbreak clone. In conclusion, rapid next-generation technologies facilitated prospective whole genome characterization in the early stages of an outbreak. PMID:21799941

  2. Genomic Epidemiology of the Haitian Cholera Outbreak: a Single Introduction Followed by Rapid, Extensive, and Continued Spread Characterized the Onset of the Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Talima; Koenig, Sara S. K.; Pearson, Ofori; Hicks, Nathan; Agrawal, Sonia; Sanjar, Fatemeh; Galens, Kevin; Daugherty, Sean; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Price, Lance B.; Upadhyay, Bishnu P.; Shakya, Geeta; Fraser, Claire M.; Ravel, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT For centuries, cholera has been one of the most feared diseases. The causative agent Vibrio cholerae is a waterborne Gram-negative enteric pathogen eliciting a severe watery diarrheal disease. In October 2010, the seventh pandemic reached Haiti, a country that had not experienced cholera for more than a century. By using whole-genome sequence typing and mapping strategies of 116 serotype O1 strains from global sources, including 44 Haitian genomes, we present a detailed reconstructed evolutionary history of the seventh pandemic with a focus on the Haitian outbreak. We catalogued subtle genomic alterations at the nucleotide level in the genome core and architectural rearrangements from whole-genome map comparisons. Isolates closely related to the Haitian isolates caused several recent outbreaks in southern Asia. This study provides evidence for a single-source introduction of cholera from Nepal into Haiti followed by rapid, extensive, and continued clonal expansion. The phylogeographic patterns in both southern Asia and Haiti argue for the rapid dissemination of V. cholerae across the landscape necessitating real-time surveillance efforts to complement the whole-genome epidemiological analysis. As eradication efforts move forward, phylogeographic knowledge will be important for identifying persistent sources and monitoring success at regional levels. The results of molecular and epidemiological analyses of this outbreak suggest that an indigenous Haitian source of V. cholerae is unlikely and that an indigenous source has not contributed to the genomic evolution of this clade. PMID:25370488

  3. GRAT--genome-scale rapid alignment tool.

    PubMed

    Kindlund, Ellen; Tammi, Martti T; Arner, Erik; Nilsson, Daniel; Andersson, Björn

    2007-04-01

    Modern alignment methods designed to work rapidly and efficiently with large datasets often do so at the cost of method sensitivity. To overcome this, we have developed a novel alignment program, GRAT, built to accurately align short, highly similar DNA sequences. The program runs rapidly and requires no more memory and CPU power than a desktop computer. In addition, specificity is ensured by statistically separating the true alignments from spurious matches using phred quality values. An efficient separation is especially important when searching large datasets and whenever there are repeats present in the dataset. Results are superior in comparison to widely used existing software, and analysis of two large genomic datasets show the usefulness and scalability of the algorithm. PMID:17292508

  4. Rapid genomic DNA changes in allotetraploid fish hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, L H; Liu, Q Z; Peng, L Y; Liu, W; Yi, X G; Wang, Y D; Xiao, J; Xu, K; Hu, F Z; Ren, L; Tao, M; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Hong, Y H; Liu, S J

    2015-06-01

    Rapid genomic change has been demonstrated in several allopolyploid plant systems; however, few studies focused on animals. We addressed this issue using an allotetraploid lineage (4nAT) of freshwater fish originally derived from the interspecific hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n=100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n=100). We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from allotetraploid hybrids in the 20th generation (F20) and sequenced 14 BAC clones representing a total of 592.126 kb, identified 11 functional genes and estimated the guanine-cytosine content (37.10%) and the proportion of repetitive elements (17.46%). The analysis of intron evolution using nine orthologous genes across a number of selected fish species detected a gain of 39 introns and a loss of 30 introns in the 4nAT lineage. A comparative study based on seven functional genes among 4nAT, diploid F1 hybrids (2nF1) (first generation of hybrids) and their original parents revealed that both hybrid types (2nF1 and 4nAT) not only inherited genomic DNA from their parents, but also demonstrated rapid genomic DNA changes (homoeologous recombination, parental DNA fragments loss and formation of novel genes). However, 4nAT presented more genomic variations compared with their parents than 2nF1. Interestingly, novel gene fragments were found for the iqca1 gene in both hybrid types. This study provided a preliminary genomic characterization of allotetraploid F20 hybrids and revealed evolutionary and functional genomic significance of allopolyploid animals. PMID:25669608

  5. Rapid Continuous Fractionation of Genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Kraeft, Jessica; Cox, Edward; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    2002-03-01

    The analysis and fractionation of large DNA molecules plays a key role in genome projects. The standard method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, is extremely time-consuming, with running times of typically 16 to more than 240 hrs (1-4). Here we report on a thumbnail-sized device fabricated entirely on a silicon wafer that sorts 60-210 kbp DNA molecules in a few seconds. It uses microfabricated posts as the separation matrix, and asymmetric pulsed-fields to permit continuous-flow fractionation.

  6. CRISPR Immunity Drives Rapid Phage Genome Evolution in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Espino, David; Sharon, Itai; Morovic, Wesley; Stahl, Buffy; Thomas, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacteria rely on CRISPR-Cas systems to provide adaptive immunity against phages, predation by which can shape the ecology and functioning of microbial communities. To characterize the impact of CRISPR immunization on phage genome evolution, we performed long-term bacterium-phage (Streptococcus thermophilus-phage 2972) coevolution experiments. We found that in this species, CRISPR immunity drives fixation of single nucleotide polymorphisms that accumulate exclusively in phage genome regions targeted by CRISPR. Mutation rates in phage genomes highly exceed those of the host. The presence of multiple phages increased phage persistence by enabling recombination-based formation of chimeric phage genomes in which sequences heavily targeted by CRISPR were replaced. Collectively, our results establish CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity as a key driver of phage genome evolution under the conditions studied and highlight the importance of multiple coexisting phages for persistence in natural systems. PMID:25900652

  7. Roary: rapid large-scale prokaryote pan genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew J.; Cummins, Carla A.; Hunt, Martin; Wong, Vanessa K.; Reuter, Sandra; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Fookes, Maria; Falush, Daniel; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Parkhill, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A typical prokaryote population sequencing study can now consist of hundreds or thousands of isolates. Interrogating these datasets can provide detailed insights into the genetic structure of prokaryotic genomes. We introduce Roary, a tool that rapidly builds large-scale pan genomes, identifying the core and accessory genes. Roary makes construction of the pan genome of thousands of prokaryote samples possible on a standard desktop without compromising on the accuracy of results. Using a single CPU Roary can produce a pan genome consisting of 1000 isolates in 4.5 hours using 13 GB of RAM, with further speedups possible using multiple processors. Availability and implementation: Roary is implemented in Perl and is freely available under an open source GPLv3 license from http://sanger-pathogens.github.io/Roary Contact: roary@sanger.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26198102

  8. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yukuto; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post–teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70–80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis. PMID:26578810

  9. Characterization of the genome of bald cypress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum var. distichum) is a coniferous tree of tremendous ecological and economic importance. It is a member of the family Cupressaceae which also includes cypresses, redwoods, sequoias, thujas, and junipers. While the bald cypress genome is more than three times the size of the human genome, its 1C DNA content is amongst the smallest of any conifer. To learn more about the genome of bald cypress and gain insight into the evolution of Cupressaceae genomes, we performed a Cot analysis and used Cot filtration to study Taxodium DNA. Additionally, we constructed a 6.7 genome-equivalent BAC library that we screened with known Taxodium genes and select repeats. Results The bald cypress genome is composed of 90% repetitive DNA with most sequences being found in low to mid copy numbers. The most abundant repeats are found in fewer than 25,000 copies per genome. Approximately 7.4% of the genome is single/low-copy DNA (i.e., sequences found in 1 to 5 copies). Sequencing of highly repetitive Cot clones indicates that most Taxodium repeats are highly diverged from previously characterized plant repeat sequences. The bald cypress BAC library consists of 606,336 clones (average insert size of 113 kb) and collectively provides 6.7-fold genome equivalent coverage of the bald cypress genome. Macroarray screening with known genes produced, on average, about 1.5 positive clones per probe per genome-equivalent. Library screening with Cot-1 DNA revealed that approximately 83% of BAC clones contain repetitive sequences iterated 103 to 104 times per genome. Conclusions The BAC library for bald cypress is the first to be generated for a conifer species outside of the family Pinaceae. The Taxodium BAC library was shown to be useful in gene isolation and genome characterization and should be an important tool in gymnosperm comparative genomics, physical mapping, genome sequencing, and gene/polymorphism discovery. The single/low-copy (SL) component of

  10. Neutral and adaptive genomic signatures of rapid poleward range expansion.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Van Geystelen, A; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Stoks, R

    2015-12-01

    Many species are expanding their range polewards, and this has been associated with rapid phenotypic change. Yet, it is unclear to what extent this reflects rapid genetic adaptation or neutral processes associated with range expansion, or selection linked to the new thermal conditions encountered. To disentangle these alternatives, we studied the genomic signature of range expansion in the damselfly Coenagrion scitulum using 4950 newly developed genomic SNPs and linked this to the rapidly evolved phenotypic differences between core and (newly established) edge populations. Most edge populations were genetically clearly differentiated from the core populations and all were differentiated from each other indicating independent range expansion events. In addition, evidence for genetic drift in the edge populations, and strong evidence for adaptive genetic variation in association with the range expansion was detected. We identified one SNP under consistent selection in four of the five edge populations and showed that the allele increasing in frequency is associated with increased flight performance. This indicates collateral, non-neutral evolutionary changes in independent edge populations driven by the range expansion process. We also detected a genomic signature of adaptation to the newly encountered thermal regimes, reflecting a pattern of countergradient variation. The latter signature was identified at a single SNP as well as in a set of covarying SNPs using a polygenic multilocus approach to detect selection. Overall, this study highlights how a strategic geographic sampling design and the integration of genomic, phenotypic and environmental data can identify and disentangle the neutral and adaptive processes that are simultaneously operating during range expansions. PMID:26561985

  11. A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    FitzGerald, Michael [Broad Institute

    2013-02-12

    Michael FitzGerald on "A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Michael FitzGerald on "A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. Rapid evolutionary turnover underlies conserved lncRNA–genome interactions

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Qiangfeng C.; Georgiev, Plamen; Ilik, Ibrahim A.; Akhtar, Asifa; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can regulate chromatin states, but the evolutionary origin and dynamics driving lncRNA–genome interactions are unclear. We adapted an integrative strategy that identifies lncRNA orthologs in different species despite limited sequence similarity, which is applicable to mammalian and insect lncRNAs. Analysis of the roX lncRNAs, which are essential for dosage compensation of the single X chromosome in Drosophila males, revealed 47 new roX orthologs in diverse Drosophilid species across ∼40 million years of evolution. Genetic rescue by roX orthologs and engineered synthetic lncRNAs showed that altering the number of focal, repetitive RNA structures determines roX ortholog function. Genomic occupancy maps of roX RNAs in four species revealed conserved targeting of X chromosome neighborhoods but rapid turnover of individual binding sites. Many new roX-binding sites evolved from DNA encoding a pre-existing RNA splicing signal, effectively linking dosage compensation to transcribed genes. Thus, dynamic change in lncRNAs and their genomic targets underlies conserved and essential lncRNA–genome interactions. PMID:26773003

  14. Rapid evolutionary turnover underlies conserved lncRNA-genome interactions.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jeffrey J; Zhang, Qiangfeng C; Georgiev, Plamen; Ilik, Ibrahim A; Akhtar, Asifa; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-15

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can regulate chromatin states, but the evolutionary origin and dynamics driving lncRNA-genome interactions are unclear. We adapted an integrative strategy that identifies lncRNA orthologs in different species despite limited sequence similarity, which is applicable to mammalian and insect lncRNAs. Analysis of the roX lncRNAs, which are essential for dosage compensation of the single X chromosome in Drosophila males, revealed 47 new roX orthologs in diverse Drosophilid species across ∼40 million years of evolution. Genetic rescue by roX orthologs and engineered synthetic lncRNAs showed that altering the number of focal, repetitive RNA structures determines roX ortholog function. Genomic occupancy maps of roX RNAs in four species revealed conserved targeting of X chromosome neighborhoods but rapid turnover of individual binding sites. Many new roX-binding sites evolved from DNA encoding a pre-existing RNA splicing signal, effectively linking dosage compensation to transcribed genes. Thus, dynamic change in lncRNAs and their genomic targets underlies conserved and essential lncRNA-genome interactions. PMID:26773003

  15. Rapid modeling of cooperating genetic events in cancer through somatic genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rivera, Francisco J.; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Romero, Rodrigo; Tammela, Tuomas; Bauer, Matthew R.; Bhutkar, Arjun; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bronson, Roderick T.; Xue, Wen; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multistep process that involves mutations and other alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes1. Genome sequencing studies have identified a large collection of genetic alterations that occur in human cancers2–4. However, the determination of which mutations are causally related to tumorigenesis remains a major challenge. Here we describe a novel CRISPR/Cas9-based approach for rapid functional investigation of candidate genes in well-established autochthonous mouse models of cancer. Using a KrasG12D-driven lung cancer model5, we performed functional characterization of a panel of tumor suppressor genes with known loss-of-function alterations in human lung cancer. Cre-dependent somatic activation of oncogenic KrasG12D combined with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of tumor suppressor genes resulted in lung adenocarcinomas with distinct histopathological and molecular features. This rapid somatic genome engineering approach enables functional characterization of putative cancer genes in the lung and other tissues using autochthonous mouse models. We anticipate that this approach can be used to systematically dissect the complex catalog of mutations identified in cancer genome sequencing studies. PMID:25337879

  16. Rapid Characterization of Large Earthquakes in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, S. E.; Team, C.

    2015-12-01

    Chile, along 3000 km of it 4200 km long coast, is regularly affected by very large earthquakes (up to magnitude 9.5) resulting from the convergence and subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate. These megathrust earthquakes exhibit long rupture regions reaching several hundreds of km with fault displacements of several tens of meters. Minimum delay characterization of these giant events to establish their rupture extent and slip distribution is of the utmost importance for rapid estimations of the shaking area and their corresponding tsunami-genic potential evaluation, particularly when there are only few minutes to warn the coastal population for immediate actions. The task of a rapid evaluation of large earthquakes is accomplished in Chile through a network of sensors being implemented by the National Seismological Center of the University of Chile. The network is mainly composed approximately by one hundred broad-band and strong motion instruments and 130 GNSS devices; all will be connected in real time. Forty units present an optional RTX capability, where satellite orbits and clock corrections are sent to the field device producing a 1-Hz stream at 4-cm level. Tests are being conducted to stream the real-time raw data to be later processed at the central facility. Hypocentral locations and magnitudes are estimated after few minutes by automatic processing software based on wave arrival; for magnitudes less than 7.0 the rapid estimation works within acceptable bounds. For larger events, we are currently developing automatic detectors and amplitude estimators of displacement coming out from the real time GNSS streams. This software has been tested for several cases showing that, for plate interface events, the minimum magnitude threshold detectability reaches values within 6.2 and 6.5 (1-2 cm coastal displacement), providing an excellent tool for earthquake early characterization from a tsunamigenic perspective.

  17. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  18. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Mackey, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. PMID:8751850

  19. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Mackey, D.A. |

    1996-09-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A Rapid Turnaround Cryogenic Detector Characterization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic j.; Dipirro, Michael J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Jackson, Clifton E.; Jackson, Michael L.; Kogut, Al; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shirron, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Upcoming major NASA missions such as the Einstein Inflation Probe and the Single Aperture Far-Infrared Observatory require arrays of detectors with thousands of elements, operating at temperatures near l00 mK and sensitive to wavelengths from approx. 100 microns to approx. 3 mm. Such detectors represent a substantial enabling technology for these missions, and must be demonstrated soon in order for them to proceed. In order to make rapid progress on detector development, the cryogenic testing cycle must be made convenient and quick. We have developed a cryogenic detector characterization system capable of testing superconducting detector arrays in formats up to 8 x 32, read out by SQUID multiplexers. The system relies on the cooling of a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator immersed in a liquid helium bath. This approach permits a detector to be cooled from 300K to 50 mK in about 4 hours, so that a test cycle begun in the morning will be over by the end of the day. Tine system is modular, with two identical immersible units, so that while one unit is cooling, the second can be reconfigured for the next battery of tests. We describe the design, construction, and performance of this cryogenic detector testing facility.

  1. Integrated Genomic Characterization of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary We performed an integrated genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic characterization of 373 endometrial carcinomas using array- and sequencing-based technologies. Uterine serous tumors and ~25% of high-grade endometrioid tumors have extensive copy number alterations, few DNA methylation changes, low ER/PR levels, and frequent TP53 mutations. Most endometrioid tumors have few copy number alterations or TP53 mutations but frequent mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, ARID1A, KRAS and novel mutations in the SWI/SNF gene ARID5B. A subset of endometrioid tumors we identified had a dramatically increased transversion mutation frequency, and newly identified hotspot mutations in POLE. Our results classified endometrial cancers into four categories: POLE ultramutated, microsatellite instability hypermutated, copy number low, and copy number high. Uterine serous carcinomas share genomic features with ovarian serous and basal-like breast carcinomas. We demonstrated that the genomic features of endometrial carcinomas permit a reclassification that may impact post-surgical adjuvant treatment for women with aggressive tumors. PMID:23636398

  2. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise sub-classification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  3. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise subclassification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase-driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  4. Genomic Characterization of Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis (Amoebozoa) and Its Kinetoplastid Endosymbiont▿

    PubMed Central

    Tanifuji, Goro; Kim, Eunsoo; Onodera, Naoko T.; Gibeault, Rebecca; Dlutek, Marlena; Cawthorn, Richard J.; Fiala, Ivan; Lukeš, Julius; Greenwood, Spencer J.; Archibald, John M.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a genomic characterization of a kinetoplastid protist living within the amoebozoan Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis. The genome of this “Ichthyobodo-related organism” was found to be unexpectedly large, with at least 11 chromosomes between 1.0 and 3.5 Mbp and a total genome size of at least 25 Mbp. PMID:21666073

  5. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  6. Genomic Characterization of the Taylorella Genus

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Pons, Nicolas; Duquesne, Fabien; Breuil, Marie-France; Goux, Didier; Batto, Jean-Michel; Laugier, Claire; Renault, Pierre; Petry, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    The Taylorella genus comprises two species: Taylorella equigenitalis, which causes contagious equine metritis, and Taylorella asinigenitalis, a closely-related species mainly found in donkeys. We herein report on the first genome sequence of T. asinigenitalis, analyzing and comparing it with the recently-sequenced T. equigenitalis genome. The T. asinigenitalis genome contains a single circular chromosome of 1,638,559 bp with a 38.3% GC content and 1,534 coding sequences (CDS). While 212 CDSs were T. asinigenitalis-specific, 1,322 had orthologs in T. equigenitalis. Two hundred and thirty-four T. equigenitalis CDSs had no orthologs in T. asinigenitalis. Analysis of the basic nutrition metabolism of both Taylorella species showed that malate, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate may be their main carbon and energy sources. For both species, we identified four different secretion systems and several proteins potentially involved in binding and colonization of host cells, suggesting a strong potential for interaction with their host. T. equigenitalis seems better-equipped than T. asinigenitalis in terms of virulence since we identified numerous proteins potentially involved in pathogenicity, including hemagluttinin-related proteins, a type IV secretion system, TonB-dependent lactoferrin and transferrin receptors, and YadA and Hep_Hag domains containing proteins. This is the first molecular characterization of Taylorella genus members, and the first molecular identification of factors potentially involved in T. asinigenitalis and T. equigenitalis pathogenicity and host colonization. This study facilitates a genetic understanding of growth phenotypes, animal host preference and pathogenic capacity, paving the way for future functional investigations into this largely unknown genus. PMID:22235352

  7. Rapid Virulence Annotation (RVA): Identification of virulence factors using a bacterial genome library and multiple invertebrate hosts

    PubMed Central

    Waterfield, Nicholas R.; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Dowling, Andrea; Yang, Guowei; Wilkinson, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Bode, Helge B.; Dorus, Steven; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    Current sequence databases now contain numerous whole genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria. However, many of the predicted genes lack any functional annotation. We describe an assumption-free approach, Rapid Virulence Annotation (RVA), for the high-throughput parallel screening of genomic libraries against four different taxa: insects, nematodes, amoeba, and mammalian macrophages. These hosts represent different aspects of both the vertebrate and invertebrate immune system. Here, we apply RVA to the emerging human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica using “gain of toxicity” assays of recombinant Escherichia coli clones. We describe a wealth of potential virulence loci and attribute biological function to several putative genomic islands, which may then be further characterized using conventional molecular techniques. The application of RVA to other pathogen genomes promises to ascribe biological function to otherwise uncharacterized virulence genes. PMID:18838673

  8. Rapid reconstruction and annotation of vaccinium macrocarpon organellar genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondria genome of the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) cultivar “HyRed” is being reconstructed using sequence 454 shotgun data and in silico procedures. We previously reconstructed and annotated a putative plastid cranberry genome with an approximate length of 176kb. The reli...

  9. Genomics of Rapid Incipient Speciation in Sympatric Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Marques, David A.; Lucek, Kay; Meier, Joana I.; Mwaiko, Salome; Wagner, Catherine E.; Excoffier, Laurent; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes have focused on advanced stages of the speciation process after thousands of generations of divergence. As a consequence, we still do not know what genomic signatures of the early onset of ecological speciation look like. Here, we examined genomic differentiation among migratory lake and resident stream ecotypes of threespine stickleback reproducing in sympatry in one stream, and in parapatry in another stream. Importantly, these ecotypes started diverging less than 150 years ago. We obtained 34,756 SNPs with restriction-site associated DNA sequencing and identified genomic islands of differentiation using a Hidden Markov Model approach. Consistent with incipient ecological speciation, we found significant genomic differentiation between ecotypes both in sympatry and parapatry. Of 19 islands of differentiation resisting gene flow in sympatry, all were also differentiated in parapatry and were thus likely driven by divergent selection among habitats. These islands clustered in quantitative trait loci controlling divergent traits among the ecotypes, many of them concentrated in one region with low to intermediate recombination. Our findings suggest that adaptive genomic differentiation at many genetic loci can arise and persist in sympatry at the very early stage of ecotype divergence, and that the genomic architecture of adaptation may facilitate this. PMID:26925837

  10. Rapid lithography: Photopolymerization characterizations and initiation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Michael Paul

    In order to improve upon the resolution of photolithography, a technique that is used to produce features for today's micro and nanodevices, techniques must move beyond e-beam and deep-UV sources. Multiphoton absorption polymerization (MAP) uses near-infrared light for the creation of complex, three-dimensional features on the sub-100 nm scale. The resolution of MAP can be enhanced further using a two-beam technique called resolution augmentation through photo-induced deactivation (RAPID) to the reach feature sizes as small as 40 nm. The mechanism and kinetics of photo-induced deactivation are not well understood. To better understand these processes, studies of different photoinitiators have been performed. We find that some photoinitiators are so efficient at deactivation that they are capable of undergoing self-deactivation by addition of another photon from the excitation source. This phenomenon is manifested in a polymerization trend in which feature size has a proportional velocity (PROVE) dependence, the opposite of the conventional velocity dependence. We also demonstrate that the velocity dependence can also be tuned between PROVE and conventional dependences. Kinetic models have been formulated to account for the observed deactivation. By reconciling experimental data for some sample photoinitiators with the kinetic model through the use of simulations, kinetic rate constants are determined. The self-deactivation efficiency of each photoinitiator was determined. The lifetimes of intermediates in the radical photopolymerization process were also determined. The kinetic rate constants associated with photoinitiators should allow for the customization of photoinitiators for specific applications and make RAPID a more efficient process capable of reaching resolution on the level of 30 nm and below.

  11. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Investigation of a Neonatal MRSA Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Köser, Claudio U.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Ellington, Matthew J.; Cartwright, Edward J.P.; Brown, Nicholas M.; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda L.; Hsu, Li Yang; Chewapreecha, Claire; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Harris, Simon R.; Sanders, Mandy; Enright, Mark C.; Dougan, Gordon; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Fraser, Louise J.; Betley, Jason R.; Schulz-Trieglaff, Ole B.; Smith, Geoffrey P.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to a single lineage are often indistinguishable by means of current typing techniques. Whole-genome sequencing may provide improved resolution to define transmission pathways and characterize outbreaks. Methods We investigated a putative MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit. By using rapid high-throughput sequencing technology with a clinically relevant turnaround time, we retrospectively sequenced the DNA from seven isolates associated with the outbreak and another seven MRSA isolates associated with carriage of MRSA or bacteremia in the same hospital. Results We constructed a phylogenetic tree by comparing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the core genome to a reference genome (an epidemic MRSA clone, EMRSA-15 [sequence type 22]). This revealed a distinct cluster of outbreak isolates and clear separation between these and the nonoutbreak isolates. A previously missed transmission event was detected between two patients with bacteremia who were not part of the outbreak. We created an artificial “resistome” of antibiotic-resistance genes and demonstrated concordance between it and the results of phenotypic susceptibility testing; we also created a “toxome” consisting of toxin genes. One outbreak isolate had a hypermutator phenotype with a higher number of SNPs than the other outbreak isolates, highlighting the difficulty of imposing a simple threshold for the number of SNPs between isolates to decide whether they are part of a recent transmission chain. Conclusions Whole-genome sequencing can provide clinically relevant data within a time frame that can influence patient care. The need for automated data interpretation and the provision of clinically meaningful reports represent hurdles to clinical implementation. (Funded by the U.K. Clinical Research Collaboration Translational Infection Research Initiative and others.) PMID:22693998

  12. Genome Sequence of Rapid Beer-Spoiling Isolate Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464

    PubMed Central

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Baecker, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The genome of brewery-isolate Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 was sequenced and assembly produced a chromosome and eight plasmids. This bacterium tolerates dissolved CO2/pressure and can rapidly spoil packaged beer. This genome is useful for analyzing the genetics associated with beer spoilage by lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26634759

  13. Genome Sequence of Rapid Beer-Spoiling Isolate Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464.

    PubMed

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Baecker, Nina; Ziola, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The genome of brewery-isolate Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 was sequenced and assembly produced a chromosome and eight plasmids. This bacterium tolerates dissolved CO2/pressure and can rapidly spoil packaged beer. This genome is useful for analyzing the genetics associated with beer spoilage by lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26634759

  14. Rapid Intraoperative Molecular Characterization of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Francis, Joshua M.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Huang, Franklin W.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Kang, Yun Jee; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Brown, Loreal E.; Charbonneau, Sarah K.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Hoang, Mai P.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Garraway, Levi A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Hahn, William C.; Nahed, Brian V.; Ligon, Keith L.; Louis, David N.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conclusive intraoperative pathologic confirmation of diffuse infiltrative glioma guides the decision to pursue definitive neurosurgical resection. Establishing the intraoperative diagnosis by histologic analysis can be difficult in low-cellularity infiltrative gliomas. Therefore, we developed a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay to detect somatic single-nucleotide variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). OBSERVATIONS This assay was applied to tissue samples from 190 patients with diffuse gliomas, including archived fixed and frozen specimens and tissue obtained intraoperatively. Results demonstrated 96% sensitivity (95% CI, 90%–99%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 95%–100%) for World Health Organization grades II and III gliomas. In a series of live cases, glioma-defining mutations could be identified within 60 minutes, which could facilitate the diagnosis in an intraoperative timeframe. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The genotyping method described herein can establish the diagnosis of low-cellularity tumors like glioma and could be adapted to the point-of-care diagnosis of other lesions that are similarly defined by highly recurrent somatic mutations. PMID:26181761

  15. The population genomics of rapid adaptation: disentangling signatures of selection and demography in white sands lizards.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stefan; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Settles, Matthew L; Hunter, Samuel S; Hardwick, Kayla M; Ormond, Louise; Sousa, Vitor C; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process of adaptation during rapid environmental change remains one of the central focal points of evolutionary biology. The recently formed White Sands system of southern New Mexico offers an outstanding example of rapid adaptation, with a variety of species having rapidly evolved blanched forms on the dunes that contrast with their close relatives in the surrounding dark soil habitat. In this study, we focus on two of the White Sands lizard species, Sceloporus cowlesi and Aspidoscelis inornata, for which previous research has linked mutations in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (Mc1r) to blanched coloration. We sampled populations both on and off the dunes and used a custom sequence capture assay based on probed fosmid libraries to obtain >50 kb of sequence around Mc1r and hundreds of other random genomic locations. We then used model-based statistical inference methods to describe the demographic and adaptive history characterizing the colonization of White Sands. We identified a number of similarities between the two focal species, including strong evidence of selection in the blanched populations in the Mc1r region. We also found important differences between the species, suggesting different colonization times, different genetic architecture underlying the blanched phenotype and different ages of the beneficial alleles. Finally, the beneficial allele is dominant in S. cowlesi and recessive in A. inornata, allowing for a rare empirical test of theoretically expected patterns of selective sweeps under these differing models. PMID:26363411

  16. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lambirth, Kevin C.; Whaley, Adam M.; Schlueter, Jessica A.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  17. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lambirth, Kevin C; Whaley, Adam M; Schlueter, Jessica A; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  18. Rapid genome resequencing of an atoxigenic strain of Aspergillus carbonarius

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cabañes, F. Javier; Sanseverino, Walter; Castellá, Gemma; Bragulat, M. Rosa; Cigliano, Riccardo Aiese; Sánchez, Armand

    2015-03-13

    In microorganisms, Ion Torrent sequencing technology has been proved to be useful in whole-genome sequencing of bacterial genomes (5 Mbp). In our study, for the first time we used this technology to perform a resequencing approach in a whole fungal genome (36 Mbp), a non-ochratoxin A producing strain of Aspergillus carbonarius. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent nephrotoxin which is found mainly in cereals and their products, but it also occurs in a variety of common foods and beverages. Due to the fact that this strain does not produce OTA, we focused some of the bioinformatics analyses in genes involvedmore » in OTA biosynthesis, using a reference genome of an OTA producing strain of the same species. This study revealed that in the atoxigenic strain there is a high accumulation of nonsense and missense mutations in several genes. Importantly, a two fold increase in gene mutation ratio was observed in PKS and NRPS encoding genes which are suggested to be involved in OTA biosynthesis.« less

  19. A primer on rapid prototyping of genomic databases in Prolog

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kaoru; Smith, C.L.; Overbeek, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a tutorial on how one might create an integrated database of genomic information. We outline the required steps for implementation, give a brief introduction to Prolog, and discuss the query facility supported by our system. Our goal is to enable researchers to being constructing their own biological information system.

  20. Rapid calculation of genomic evaluations for new animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method was developed to calculate preliminary genomic evaluations daily or weekly before the release of official monthly evaluations by processing only newly genotyped animals using estimates of SNP effects from the previous official evaluation. To minimize computing time, reliabilities and genomi...

  1. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  2. Genomic characterization of recurrent high-grade astroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bale, Tejus A; Abedalthagafi, Malak; Bi, Wenya Linda; Kang, Yun Jee; Merrill, Parker; Dunn, Ian F; Dubuc, Adrian; Charbonneau, Sarah K; Brown, Loreal; Ligon, Azra H; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Ligon, Keith L

    2016-01-01

    Astroblastomas are rare primary brain tumors, diagnosed based on histologic features. Not currently assigned a WHO grade, they typically display indolent behavior, with occasional variants taking a more aggressive course. We characterized the immunohistochemical characteristics, copy number (high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization, OncoCopy) and mutational profile (targeted next-generation exome sequencing, OncoPanel) of a cohort of seven biopsies from four patients to identify recurrent genomic events that may help distinguish astroblastomas from other more common high-grade gliomas. We found that tumor histology was variable across patients and between primary and recurrent tumor samples. No common molecular features were identified among the four tumors. Mutations commonly observed in astrocytic tumors (IDH1/2, TP53, ATRX, and PTEN) or ependymoma were not identified. However one case with rapid clinical progression displayed mutations more commonly associated with GBM (NF1(N1054H/K63)*, PIK3CA(R38H) and ERG(A403T)). Conversely, another case, originally classified as glioblastoma with nine-year survival before recurrence, lacked a GBM mutational profile. Other mutations frequently seen in lower grade gliomas (BCOR, BCORL1, ERBB3, MYB, ATM) were also present in several tumors. Copy number changes were variable across tumors. Our findings indicate that astroblastomas have variable growth patterns and morphologic features, posing significant challenges to accurate classification in the absence of diagnostically specific copy number alterations and molecular features. Their histopathologic overlap with glioblastoma will likely confound the observation of long-term GBM "survivors". Further genomic profiling is needed to determine whether these tumors represent a distinct entity and to guide management strategies. PMID:27425854

  3. Genome size reduction can trigger rapid phenotypic evolution in invasive plants

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Sébastien; Muenke, Nikolas J.; Molofsky, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The study of rapid evolution in invasive species has highlighted the fundamental role played by founder events, emergence of genetic novelties through recombination and rapid response to new selective pressures. However, whether rapid adaptation of introduced species can be driven by punctual changes in genome organization has received little attention. In plants, variation in genome size, i.e. variation in the amount of DNA per monoploid set of chromosomes through loss or gain of repeated DNA sequences, is known to influence a number of physiological, phenological and life-history features. The present study investigated whether change in genome size has contributed to the evolution of greater potential of vegetative growth in invasive populations of an introduced grass. Methods The study was based on the recent demonstration that invasive genotypes of reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) occurring in North America have emerged from recombination between introduced European strains. The genome sizes of more than 200 invasive and native genotypes were measured and their genome size was related to their phenotypic traits measured in a common glasshouse environment. Population genetics data were used to infer phylogeographical relationships between study populations, and the evolutionary history of genome size within the study species was inferred. Key Results Invasive genotypes had a smaller genome than European native genotypes from which they are derived. This smaller genome size had phenotypic effects that increased the species' invasive potential, including a higher early growth rate, due to a negative relationship between genome size and rate of stem elongation. Based on inferred phylogeographical relationships of invasive and native populations, evolutionary models were consistent with a scenario of genome reduction by natural selection during the invasion process, rather than a scenario of stochastic change. Conclusions Punctual

  4. Eight New Genomes and Synthetic Controls Increase the Accessibility of Rapid Melt-MAMA SNP Typing of Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Janse, Ingmar; Larsson, Pär; Lindgren, Petter; Öhrman, Caroline; van Rotterdam, Bart; Sjödin, Andreas; Myrtennäs, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The case rate of Q fever in Europe has increased dramatically in recent years, mainly because of an epidemic in the Netherlands in 2009. Consequently, there is a need for more extensive genetic characterization of the disease agent Coxiella burnetii in order to better understand the epidemiology and spread of this disease. Genome reference data are essential for this purpose, but only thirteen genome sequences are currently available. Current methods for typing C. burnetii are criticized for having problems in comparing results across laboratories, require the use of genomic control DNA, and/or rely on markers in highly variable regions. We developed in this work a method for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing of C. burnetii isolates and tissue samples based on new assays targeting ten phylogenetically stable synonymous canonical SNPs (canSNPs). These canSNPs represent previously known phylogenetic branches and were here identified from sequence comparisons of twenty-one C. burnetii genomes, eight of which were sequenced in this work. Importantly, synthetic control templates were developed, to make the method useful to laboratories lacking genomic control DNA. An analysis of twenty-one C. burnetii genomes confirmed that the species exhibits high sequence identity. Most of its SNPs (7,493/7,559 shared by >1 genome) follow a clonal inheritance pattern and are therefore stable phylogenetic typing markers. The assays were validated using twenty-six genetically diverse C. burnetii isolates and three tissue samples from small ruminants infected during the epidemic in the Netherlands. Each sample was assigned to a clade. Synthetic controls (vector and PCR amplified) gave identical results compared to the corresponding genomic controls and are viable alternatives to genomic DNA. The results from the described method indicate that it could be useful for cheap and rapid disease source tracking at non-specialized laboratories, which requires accurate genotyping

  5. Characterization of the pufferfish (Fugu) genome as a compact model vertebrate genome.

    PubMed

    Brenner, S; Elgar, G; Sandford, R; Macrae, A; Venkatesh, B; Aparicio, S

    1993-11-18

    Cloning and sequencing techniques now allow us to characterize genes directly instead of having to deduce their properties from their effects. This new genetics reaches its apotheosis in the plan to obtain the complete DNA sequence of the human genome, but this is far beyond the capacity of present sequencing methods. Small 'model' genomes, 'such as those of Escherichia coli (4.7 megabases (Mb) and yeast (14 Mb), or even those of Caenorhabditis elegans (100 Mb) and Drosophila (165 Mb), are better scaled to existing technology. The yeast genome will contain genes with functions common to all eukaryotic cells, and those of simple multicellular organisms may throw light on the genetic specification of more complex functions. However, vertebrates differ in their morphology and development, so the ideal model would be a vertebrate genome of minimum size and complexity but with maximum homology to the human genome. Here we report the characterization of the small genome (400 Mb) of the tetraodontoid fish, Fugu rubripes. A random sequencing approach supported by gene probing shows that the haploid genome contains 400 Mb of DNA, of which more that 90% is unique. This genome is 7.5 times smaller than the human genome and because it has a similar gene repertoire it is the best model genome for the discovery of human genes. PMID:8232585

  6. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing for Genetic Disease Diagnosis in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Carol Jean; Miller, Neil Andrew; Soden, Sarah Elizabeth; Dinwiddie, Darrell Lee; Noll, Aaron; Alnadi, Noor Abu; Andraws, Nevene; Patterson, Melanie LeAnn; Krivohlavek, Lisa Ann; Fellis, Joel; Humphray, Sean; Saffrey, Peter; Kingsbury, Zoya; Weir, Jacqueline Claire; Betley, Jason; Grocock, Russell James; Margulies, Elliott Harrison; Farrow, Emily Gwendolyn; Artman, Michael; Safina, Nicole Pauline; Petrikin, Joshua Erin; Hall, Kevin Peter; Kingsmore, Stephen Francis

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are frequent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and disease presentations are often undifferentiated at birth. More than 3500 monogenic diseases have been characterized, but clinical testing is available for only some of them and many feature clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Hence, an immense unmet need exists for improved molecular diagnosis in infants. Because disease progression is extremely rapid, albeit heterogeneous, in newborns, molecular diagnoses must occur quickly to be relevant for clinical decision-making. We describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) that features automated bioinformatic analysis and is intended to be a prototype for use in neonatal intensive care units. Retrospective 50-hour WGS identified known molecular diagnoses in two children. Prospective WGS disclosed potential molecular diagnosis of a severe GJB2-related skin disease in one neonate; BRAT1-related lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome in another infant; identified BCL9L as a novel, recessive visceral heterotaxy gene (HTX6) in a pedigree; and ruled out known candidate genes in one infant. Sequencing of parents or affected siblings expedited the identification of disease genes in prospective cases. Thus, rapid WGS can potentially broaden and foreshorten differential diagnosis, resulting in fewer empirical treatments and faster progression to genetic and prognostic counseling. PMID:23035047

  7. Genomics of Rapid Adaptation to Antibiotics: Convergent Evolution and Scalable Sequence Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Laehnemann, David; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Rosenstiel, Philip; Beardmore, Robert; Jansen, Gunther; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary adaptation can be extremely fast, especially in response to high selection intensities. A prime example is the surge of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The genomic underpinnings of such rapid changes may provide information on the genetic processes that enhance fast responses and the particular trait functions under selection. Here, we use experimentally evolved Escherichia coli for a detailed dissection of the genomics of rapid antibiotic resistance evolution. Our new analyses demonstrate that amplification of a sequence region containing several known antibiotic resistance genes represents a fast genomic response mechanism under high antibiotic stress, here exerted by drug combination. In particular, higher dosage of such antibiotic combinations coincided with higher copy number of the sequence region. The amplification appears to be evolutionarily costly, because amplification levels rapidly dropped after removal of the drugs. Our results suggest that amplification is a scalable process, as copy number rapidly changes in response to the selective pressure encountered. Moreover, repeated patterns of convergent evolution were found across the experimentally evolved bacterial populations, including those with lower antibiotic selection intensities. Intriguingly, convergent evolution was identified on different organizational levels, ranging from the above sequence amplification, high variant frequencies in specific genes, prevalence of individual nonsynonymous mutations to the unusual repeated occurrence of a particular synonymous mutation in Glycine codons. We conclude that constrained evolutionary trajectories underlie rapid adaptation to antibiotics. Of the identified genomic changes, sequence amplification seems to represent the most potent, albeit costly genomic response mechanism to high antibiotic stress. PMID:24850796

  8. Use of Unamplified RNA/cDNA-Hybrid Nanopore Sequencing for Rapid Detection and Characterization of RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; Roth, Pierce A; Liem, Alvin T; Hill, Jessica M; Willis, Kristen L; Rossmaier, Rebecca D; Marinich, Andrew V; Maughan, Michele N; Karavis, Mark A; Kuhn, Jens H; Honko, Anna N; Rosenzweig, C Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing, a novel genomics technology, has potential applications for routine biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and outbreak investigation of virus infections. Using rapid sequencing of unamplified RNA/cDNA hybrids, we identified Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and Ebola virus in 3 hours from sample receipt to data acquisition, demonstrating a fieldable technique for RNA virus characterization. PMID:27191483

  9. Use of Unamplified RNA/cDNA–Hybrid Nanopore Sequencing for Rapid Detection and Characterization of RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Roth, Pierce A.; Liem, Alvin T.; Hill, Jessica M.; Willis, Kristen L.; Rossmaier, Rebecca D.; Marinich, Andrew V.; Maughan, Michele N.; Karavis, Mark A.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Honko, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing, a novel genomics technology, has potential applications for routine biosurveillance, clinical diagnosis, and outbreak investigation of virus infections. Using rapid sequencing of unamplified RNA/cDNA hybrids, we identified Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and Ebola virus in 3 hours from sample receipt to data acquisition, demonstrating a fieldable technique for RNA virus characterization. PMID:27191483

  10. Polyploid formation in cotton is not accompanied by rapid genomic changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Brubaker, C L; Mergeai, G; Cronn, R C; Wendel, J F

    2001-06-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that allopolyploid speciation in plants may be associated with non-Mendelian genomic changes in the early generations following polyploid synthesis. To address the question of whether rapid genomic changes also occur in allopolyploid cotton (Gossypium) species, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was performed to evaluate nine sets of newly synthesized allotetraploid and allohexaploid plants, their parents, and the selfed progeny from colchicine-doubled synthetics. Using both methylation-sensitive and methylation-insensitive enzymes, the extent of fragment additivity in newly combined genomes was ascertained for a total of approximately 22,000 genomic loci. Fragment additivity was observed in nearly all cases, with the few exceptions most likely reflecting parental heterozygosity or experimental error. In addition, genomic Southern analysis on six sets of synthetic allopolyploids probed with five retrotransposons also revealed complete additivity. Because no alterations were observed using methylation-sensitive isoschizomers, epigenetic changes following polyploid synthesis were also minimal. These indications of genomic additivity and epigenetic stasis during allopolyploid formation provide a contrast to recent evidence from several model plant allopolyploids, most notably wheat and Brassica, where rapid and unexplained genomic changes have been reported. In addition, the data contrast with evidence from repetitive DNAs in Gossypium, some of which are subject to non-Mendelian molecular evolutionary phenomena in extant polyploids. These contrasts indicate polyploid speciation in plants is accompanied by a diverse array of molecular evolutionary phenomena, which will vary among both genomic constituents and taxa. PMID:11444689

  11. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  12. A BIOINFORMATIC STRATEGY TO RAPIDLY CHARACTERIZE CDNA LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Bioinformatic Strategy to Rapidly Characterize cDNA Libraries

    G. Charles Ostermeier1, David J. Dix2 and Stephen A. Krawetz1.
    1Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, & Institute for Scientific Computing, Wayne State Univer...

  13. Genome-wide characterization of centromeric satellites from multiple mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Can; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Antonacci, Francesca; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryder, Oliver A; Purgato, Stefania; Zoli, Monica; Della Valle, Giuliano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance in cell biology and evolution, the centromere has remained the final frontier in genome assembly and annotation due to its complex repeat structure. However, isolation and characterization of the centromeric repeats from newly sequenced species are necessary for a complete understanding of genome evolution and function. In recent years, various genomes have been sequenced, but the characterization of the corresponding centromeric DNA has lagged behind. Here, we present a computational method (RepeatNet) to systematically identify higher-order repeat structures from unassembled whole-genome shotgun sequence and test whether these sequence elements correspond to functional centromeric sequences. We analyzed genome datasets from six species of mammals representing the diversity of the mammalian lineage, namely, horse, dog, elephant, armadillo, opossum, and platypus. We define candidate monomer satellite repeats and demonstrate centromeric localization for five of the six genomes. Our analysis revealed the greatest diversity of centromeric sequences in horse and dog in contrast to elephant and armadillo, which showed high-centromeric sequence homogeneity. We could not isolate centromeric sequences within the platypus genome, suggesting that centromeres in platypus are not enriched in satellite DNA. Our method can be applied to the characterization of thousands of other vertebrate genomes anticipated for sequencing in the near future, providing an important tool for annotation of centromeres. PMID:21081712

  14. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells’ magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells. This method utilizes a cross-correlation algorithm to analyze the cells’ motion in a simple fluidic channel to obtain their magnetophoretic velocity, and is effective even when the magnetic moments of cells are small. This rapid characterization is proven useful in optimizing our microfabricated magnetic sifter procedures for magnetic cell capture. PMID:24771946

  15. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2013-07-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells' magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells. This method utilizes a cross-correlation algorithm to analyze the cells' motion in a simple fluidic channel to obtain their magnetophoretic velocity, and is effective even when the magnetic moments of cells are small. This rapid characterization is proven useful in optimizing our microfabricated magnetic sifter procedures for magnetic cell capture. PMID:24771946

  16. Rapid Genome Response of Malus to Infection by Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of apple, pear, and other plants in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rosaceae. The goal of this study was to use a global analysis of gene expression to characterize the temporal response of apple to infection by E. amyl...

  17. Genomic and phylogenetic characterization of Shuni virus.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Charmaine; Harders, Frank; Kortekaas, Jeroen; Bossers, Alex; Venter, Marietjie

    2014-11-01

    Shuni virus (SHUV), a member of the genus Orthobunyavirus, has in a recent study been associated with neurological disease in horses in South Africa. After its first isolation in 1966 from an asymptomatic bovine, very little attention was given to the genetic characterisation of SHUV. The association of SHUV with severe neurological disease in several horses in South Africa prompted us to determine the full genome sequence of a horse neurovirulent isolate to compare it to other members of the genus Orthobunyavirus, as well as the partially sequenced genome of the prototype SHUV strain. The availability of a full genome sequence will facilitate the development of a reverse genetics system to study SHUV molecular biology and pathogenesis. PMID:24957652

  18. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate. PMID:21164539

  19. Genomic characterization of chromosome 8 pericentric trisomy

    PubMed Central

    Vander Pluym, Juliana H; O’Sullivan, Julia; Andrew, Gail; Bolduc, Francois V

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a patient with trisomy 8p11.21q11.21 associated with language, gross motor, fine motor, and cognitive delay. Furthermore, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we identify the specific genes duplicated in our patient. PMID:26273445

  20. Rapid behavioral and genomic responses to social opportunity.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Sabrina S; Jarvis, Erich D; Fernald, Russell D

    2005-11-01

    From primates to bees, social status regulates reproduction. In the cichlid fish Astatotilapia (Haplochromis) burtoni, subordinate males have reduced fertility and must become dominant to reproduce. This increase in sexual capacity is orchestrated by neurons in the preoptic area, which enlarge in response to dominance and increase expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), a peptide critical for reproduction. Using a novel behavioral paradigm, we show for the first time that subordinate males can become dominant within minutes of an opportunity to do so, displaying dramatic changes in body coloration and behavior. We also found that social opportunity induced expression of the immediate-early gene egr-1 in the anterior preoptic area, peaking in regions with high densities of GnRH1 neurons, and not in brain regions that express the related peptides GnRH2 and GnRH3. This genomic response did not occur in stable subordinate or stable dominant males even though stable dominants, like ascending males, displayed dominance behaviors. Moreover, egr-1 in the optic tectum and the cerebellum was similarly induced in all experimental groups, showing that egr-1 induction in the anterior preoptic area of ascending males was specific to this brain region. Because egr-1 codes for a transcription factor important in neural plasticity, induction of egr-1 in the anterior preoptic area by social opportunity could be an early trigger in the molecular cascade that culminates in enhanced fertility and other long-term physiological changes associated with dominance. PMID:16216088

  1. Rapid Behavioral and Genomic Responses to Social Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    From primates to bees, social status regulates reproduction. In the cichlid fish Astatotilapia (Haplochromis) burtoni, subordinate males have reduced fertility and must become dominant to reproduce. This increase in sexual capacity is orchestrated by neurons in the preoptic area, which enlarge in response to dominance and increase expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), a peptide critical for reproduction. Using a novel behavioral paradigm, we show for the first time that subordinate males can become dominant within minutes of an opportunity to do so, displaying dramatic changes in body coloration and behavior. We also found that social opportunity induced expression of the immediate-early gene egr-1 in the anterior preoptic area, peaking in regions with high densities of GnRH1 neurons, and not in brain regions that express the related peptides GnRH2 and GnRH3. This genomic response did not occur in stable subordinate or stable dominant males even though stable dominants, like ascending males, displayed dominance behaviors. Moreover, egr-1 in the optic tectum and the cerebellum was similarly induced in all experimental groups, showing that egr-1 induction in the anterior preoptic area of ascending males was specific to this brain region. Because egr-1 codes for a transcription factor important in neural plasticity, induction of egr-1 in the anterior preoptic area by social opportunity could be an early trigger in the molecular cascade that culminates in enhanced fertility and other long-term physiological changes associated with dominance. PMID:16216088

  2. Characterizing genomic alterations in cancer by complementary functional associations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Wook; Botvinnik, Olga B; Abudayyeh, Omar; Birger, Chet; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Shrestha, Yashaswi; Abazeed, Mohamed E; Hammerman, Peter S; DiCara, Daniel; Konieczkowski, David J; Johannessen, Cory M; Liberzon, Arthur; Alizad-Rahvar, Amir Reza; Alexe, Gabriela; Aguirre, Andrew; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Greulich, Heidi; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Tsherniak, Aviad; Shao, Diane D; Zack, Travis I; Noble, Michael; Getz, Gad; Beroukhim, Rameen; Garraway, Levi A; Ardakani, Masoud; Romualdi, Chiara; Sales, Gabriele; Barbie, David A; Boehm, Jesse S; Hahn, William C; Mesirov, Jill P; Tamayo, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Systematic efforts to sequence the cancer genome have identified large numbers of mutations and copy number alterations in human cancers. However, elucidating the functional consequences of these variants, and their interactions to drive or maintain oncogenic states, remains a challenge in cancer research. We developed REVEALER, a computational method that identifies combinations of mutually exclusive genomic alterations correlated with functional phenotypes, such as the activation or gene dependency of oncogenic pathways or sensitivity to a drug treatment. We used REVEALER to uncover complementary genomic alterations associated with the transcriptional activation of β-catenin and NRF2, MEK-inhibitor sensitivity, and KRAS dependency. REVEALER successfully identified both known and new associations, demonstrating the power of combining functional profiles with extensive characterization of genomic alterations in cancer genomes. PMID:27088724

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium wolinskyi, a Rapid-Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perry, K. Allison; Lawsin, Adrian; Coulliette, Angela D.; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Limbago, Brandi M.; Noble-Wang, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium wolinskyi is a nonpigmented, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium species that is associated with bacteremia, peritonitis, infections associated with implants/prostheses, and skin and soft tissue infections often following surgical procedures in humans. Here, we report the first functionally annotated draft genome sequence of M. wolinskyi CDC_01. PMID:26988052

  4. Dexamethasone rapidly inhibits glucose uptake via non-genomic mechanisms in contracting myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hong; Liu, Lei; Ni, Chen-Xu; Zhang, Yi; Su, Wen-Jun; Lian, Yong-Jie; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Ping; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are a class of steroid hormones that regulate multiple aspects of glucose homeostasis. In skeletal muscle, it is well established that prolonged GC excess inhibits glucose uptake and utilization through glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcriptional changes. However, it remains obscure that whether the rapid non-genomic effects of GC on glucose uptake are involved in acute exercise stress. Therefore, we used electric pulse stimulation (EPS)-evoked contracting myotubes to determine whether the non-genomic actions of GC were involved and its underlying mechanism(s). Pretreatment with dexamethasone (Dex, 10 μM) significantly prevented contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) translocation within 20 min in C2C12 myotubes. Neither GC nuclear receptor antagonist (RU486) nor protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide, Chx) affected the rapid inhibition effects of Dex. AMPK and CaMKII-dependent signaling pathways were associated with the non-genomic effects of Dex. These results provide evidence that GC rapidly suppresses glucose uptake in contracting myotubes via GR-independent non-genomic mechanisms. AMPK and CaMKII-mediated Glut4 translocation may play a critical role in GC-induced rapid inhibition of glucose uptake. PMID:27246478

  5. Genomic characterization of Italian Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Pittiglio, Valentina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Lista, Florigio

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a gram-positive bacterium capable of producing the botulinum neurotoxin, a powerful poison that causes botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Its genome has been sequenced entirely and its gene content has been analyzed. To date, 19 full genomes and 64 draft genomes are available. The geographical origin of these genomes is predominantly from the US. In the present study, 10 Italian genomes of C. botulinum group I were analyzed and compared with previously sequenced group I genomes, in order to genetically characterize the Italian population of C. botulinum group I and to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among different lineages. Using the suites of software ClonalFrame and ClonalOrigin to perform genomic analysis, we demonstrated that Italian C. botulinum group I population is phylogenetically heterogeneous encompassing different and distant lineages including overseas strains, too. Moreover, a high recombination rate was demonstrated in the evolution of C. botulinum group I species. Finally, genome sequencing of the strain 357 led us to identify a novel botulinum neurotoxin subtype, F8. PMID:26341861

  6. A rapid and gentle method for isolation of genomic DNA from pathogenic Nocardia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, R D; Oletta, C A; Zlotnik, H

    1996-01-01

    The lack of simple and efficient methods for extraction of DNA from Nocardia spp. has hampered molecular manipulation of the DNA for diagnostic purposes. In the present study, a method for the rapid extraction of undegraded genomic nocardial DNA was established. Briefly, 14 pathogenic Nocardia strains were grown at 37 degrees C for 3 to 5 days in Sauton broth containing 0.05% Tween 80. Subsequently, the cultures were treated for 48 h with 1.2 mg of cycloserine per ml (final concentration). Cells were then harvested by centrifugation and treated with a lysis solution containing 3 mg of lysozyme per ml. This was followed by the addition of proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulfate to final concentrations of 0.2 mg/ml and 0.5%, respectively, and incubation for 1 h at 50 degrees C. DNA was precipitated with isopropanol after phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol extractions and RNase treated before being quantitated and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The average undegraded DNA yields obtained were 101 micrograms for Nocardia brasiliensis and 121 micrograms for N. asteroides. This DNA was suitable for restriction endonuclease digestion and PCR amplification, which are methods being applied to the characterization and diagnosis of slowly growing organisms such as Nocardia spp. PMID:8877144

  7. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  8. Evidence from phylogenetic and genome fingerprinting analyses suggests rapidly changing variation in Halorubrum and Haloarcula populations

    PubMed Central

    Ram Mohan, Nikhil; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Wheeler, Ryan; Ventosa, Antonio; Naor, Adit; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2014-01-01

    Halobacteria require high NaCl concentrations for growth and are the dominant inhabitants of hypersaline environments above 15% NaCl. They are well-documented to be highly recombinogenic, both in frequency and in the range of exchange partners. In this study, we examine the genetic and genomic variation of cultured, naturally co-occurring environmental populations of Halobacteria. Sequence data from multiple loci (~2500 bp) identified many closely and more distantly related strains belonging to the genera Halorubrum and Haloarcula. Genome fingerprinting using a random priming PCR amplification method to analyze these isolates revealed diverse banding patterns across each of the genera and surprisingly even for isolates that are identical at the nucleotide level for five protein coding sequenced loci. This variance in genome structure even between identical multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) haplotypes indicates that accumulation of genomic variation is rapid: faster than the rate of third codon substitutions. PMID:24782838

  9. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  10. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Kurt H; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A; Rice, Brandon J; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M; Bharti, Arvind K; Donahoo, Ryan S; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R; Affourtit, Jason P; Han, Cliff S; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2012-10-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  11. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  12. Genome characterization of feline morbillivirus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Marcacci, Maurilia; De Luca, Eliana; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Di Tommaso, Morena; Mangone, Iolanda; Aste, Giovanni; Savini, Giovanni; Boari, Andrea; Lorusso, Alessio

    2016-08-01

    Feline morbillivirus (FeMV) has been recently identified by RT-PCR in the urine sample of a nephropathic cat in Italy. In this report, we describe the whole genome sequence of strain Piuma/2015 obtained by combination of sequence independent single primer amplification method (SISPA) and next generation sequencing (NGS) starting from RNA purified from the infected urine sample. The existence in Germany and Turkey of FeMVs from cats divergent from Piuma/2015, suggests the presence of FeMV heterogeneity in Europe as it has been described previously in Japan and China. PMID:27155238

  13. Integrated genomic characterization of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-23

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. Here, we describe the genomic landscape of 496 PTCs. We observed a low frequency of somatic alterations (relative to other carcinomas) and extended the set of known PTC driver alterations to include EIF1AX, PPM1D, and CHEK2 and diverse gene fusions. These discoveries reduced the fraction of PTC cases with unknown oncogenic driver from 25% to 3.5%. Combined analyses of genomic variants, gene expression, and methylation demonstrated that different driver groups lead to different pathologies with distinct signaling and differentiation characteristics. Similarly, we identified distinct molecular subgroups of BRAF-mutant tumors, and multidimensional analyses highlighted a potential involvement of oncomiRs in less-differentiated subgroups. Our results propose a reclassification of thyroid cancers into molecular subtypes that better reflect their underlying signaling and differentiation properties, which has the potential to improve their pathological classification and better inform the management of the disease. PMID:25417114

  14. Integrated Genomic Characterization of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nishant; Akbani, Rehan; Aksoy, B. Arman; Ally, Adrian; Arachchi, Harindra; Asa, Sylvia L.; Auman, J. Todd; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Baylin, Stephen B.; Behera, Madhusmita; Bernard, Brady; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bishop, Justin A.; Black, Aaron D.; Bodenheimer, Tom; Boice, Lori; Bootwalla, Moiz S.; Bowen, Jay; Bowlby, Reanne; Bristow, Christopher A.; Brookens, Robin; Brooks, Denise; Bryant, Robert; Buda, Elizabeth; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carling, Tobias; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott L.; Carty, Sally E.; Chan, Timothy A.; Chen, Amy Y.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Cheung, Dorothy; Chin, Lynda; Cho, Juok; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ciriello, Giovanni; Clarke, Amanda; Clayman, Gary L.; Cope, Leslie; Copland, John; Covington, Kyle; Danilova, Ludmila; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; DiCara, Daniel; Dhalla, Noreen; Dhir, Rajiv; Dookran, Sheliann S.; Dresdner, Gideon; Eldridge, Jonathan; Eley, Greg; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Eng, Stephanie; Fagin, James A.; Fennell, Timothy; Ferris, Robert L.; Fisher, Sheila; Frazer, Scott; Frick, Jessica; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Ganly, Ian; Gao, Jianjiong; Garraway, Levi A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Getz, Gad; Gehlenborg, Nils; Ghossein, Ronald; Gibbs, Richard A.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Gomez-Hernandez, Karen; Grimsby, Jonna; Gross, Benjamin; Guin, Ranabir; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Harper, Hollie A.; Hayes, D. Neil; Heiman, David I.; Herman, James G.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hofree, Matan; Holt, Robert A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Huang, Franklin W.; Huang, Mei; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ideker, Trey; Iype, Lisa; Jacobsen, Anders; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Kasaian, Katayoon; Kebebew, Electron; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kim, Jaegil; Kramer, Roger; Kreisberg, Richard; Kucherlapati, Raju; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Ladanyi, Marc; Lai, Phillip H.; Laird, Peter W.; Lander, Eric; Lawrence, Michael S.; Lee, Darlene; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Semin; Lee, William; Leraas, Kristen M.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Lin, Pei; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Jinze; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yingchun; LiVolsi, Virginia A.; Lu, Yiling; Ma, Yussanne; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; McFadden, David G.; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Miller, Michael; Mills, Gordon; Moore, Richard A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Murray, Bradley A.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Noble, Michael S.; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Park, Peter J.; Parker, Joel S.; Paull, Evan O.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Ramirez, Ricardo; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Ren, Xiaojia; Reynolds, Sheila M.; Rheinbay, Esther; Ringel, Matthew D.; Rivera, Michael; Roach, Jeffrey; Robertson, A. Gordon; Rosenberg, Mara W.; Rosenthall, Matthew; Sadeghi, Sara; Saksena, Gordon; Sander, Chris; Santoso, Netty; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Schumacher, Steven E.; Seethala, Raja R.; Seidman, Jonathan; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Seth, Sahil; Sharpe, Samantha; Mills Shaw, Kenna R.; Shen, John P.; Shen, Ronglai; Sherman, Steven; Sheth, Margi; Shi, Yan; Shmulevich, Ilya; Sica, Gabriel L.; Simons, Janae V.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Smallridge, Robert C.; Sofia, Heidi J.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Song, Xingzhi; Sougnez, Carrie; Stewart, Chip; Stojanov, Petar; Stuart, Joshua M.; Tabak, Barbara; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Tang, Jiabin; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Taylor, Barry S.; Thiessen, Nina; Thorne, Leigh; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Tuttle, R. Michael; Umbricht, Christopher B.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Vandin, Fabio; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Vinco, Michelle; Voet, Doug; Walter, Vonn; Wang, Zhining; Waring, Scot; Weinberger, Paul M.; Weinstein, John N.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Wheeler, David; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wilson, Jocelyn; Williams, Michelle; Winer, Daniel A.; Wise, Lisa; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Xu, Andrew W.; Yang, Liming; Yang, Lixing; Zack, Travis I.; Zeiger, Martha A.; Zeng, Dong; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Zhao, Ni; Zhang, Hailei; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiashan (Julia); Zhang, Wei; Zmuda, Erik; Zou., Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. Here, we describe the genomic landscape of 496 PTCs. We observed a low frequency of somatic alterations (relative to other carcinomas) and extended the set of known PTC driver alterations to include EIF1AX, PPM1D and CHEK2 and diverse gene fusions. These discoveries reduced the fraction of PTC cases with unknown oncogenic driver from 25% to 3.5%. Combined analyses of genomic variants, gene expression, and methylation demonstrated that different driver groups lead to different pathologies with distinct signaling and differentiation characteristics. Similarly, we identified distinct molecular subgroups of BRAF-mutant tumors and multidimensional analyses highlighted a potential involvement of oncomiRs in less-differentiated subgroups. Our results propose a reclassification of thyroid cancers into molecular subtypes that better reflect their underlying signaling and differentiation properties, which has the potential to improve their pathological classification and better inform the management of the disease. PMID:25417114

  15. Genome scan for cognitive trait loci of dyslexia: Rapid naming and rapid switching of letters, numbers, and colors.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Kevin B; Raskind, Wendy H; Berninger, Virginia W; Matsushita, Mark M; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-06-01

    Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a common developmental disorder that affects 5-12% of school-aged children. Dyslexia and its component phenotypes, assessed categorically or quantitatively, have complex genetic bases. The ability to rapidly name letters, numbers, and colors from rows presented visually correlates strongly with reading in multiple languages and is a valid predictor of reading and spelling impairment. Performance on measures of rapid naming and switching, RAN and RAS, is stable throughout elementary school years, with slowed performance persisting in adults who still manifest dyslexia. Targeted analyses of dyslexia candidate regions have included RAN measures, but only one other genome-wide linkage study has been reported. As part of a broad effort to identify genetic contributors to dyslexia, we performed combined oligogenic segregation and linkage analyses of measures of RAN and RAS in a family-based cohort ascertained through probands with dyslexia. We obtained strong evidence for linkage of RAN letters to the DYX3 locus on chromosome 2p and RAN colors to chromosome 10q, but were unable to confirm the chromosome 6p21 linkage detected for a composite measure of RAN colors and objects in the previous genome-wide study. PMID:24807833

  16. Characterizing the citrus cultivar Carrizo genome through 454 shotgun sequencing.

    PubMed

    Belknap, William R; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Wu, Jiajie; Rockhold, David R; Gu, Yong Q; Stover, Ed

    2011-12-01

    The citrus cultivar Carrizo is the single most important rootstock to the US citrus industry and has resistance or tolerance to a number of major citrus diseases, including citrus tristeza virus, foot rot, and Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). A Carrizo genomic sequence database providing approximately 3.5×genome coverage (haploid genome size approximately 367 Mb) was populated through 454 GS FLX shotgun sequencing. Analysis of the repetitive DNA fraction indicated a total interspersed repeat fraction of 36.5%. Assembly and characterization of abundant citrus Ty3/gypsy elements revealed a novel type of element containing open reading frames encoding a viral RNA-silencing suppressor protein (RNA binding protein, rbp) and a plant cytokinin riboside 5′-monophosphate phosphoribohydrolase-related protein (LONELY GUY, log). Similar gypsy elements were identified in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Gene-coding region analysis indicated that 24.4% of the nonrepetitive reads contained genic regions. The depth of genome coverage was sufficient to allow accurate assembly of constituent genes, including a putative phloem-expressed gene. The development of the Carrizo database (http://citrus.pw.usda.gov/) will contribute to characterization of agronomically significant loci and provide a publicly available genomic resource to the citrus research community. PMID:22133378

  17. Rapid Characterization of Shorelines using a Georeferenced Video Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael G.; Judd, Chaeli; Marcoe, K.

    2012-09-01

    Increased understanding of shoreline conditions is needed, yet current approaches are limited in ability to characterize remote areas or document features at a finer resolution. Documentation using video mapping may provide a rapid and repeatable method for assessing the current state of the environment and determining changes to the shoreline over time. In this study, we compare two studies using boat-based, georeferenced video mapping in coastal Washington and the Columbia River Estuary to map and characterize coastal stressors and functional data. In both areas, mapping multiple features along the shoreline required approximation of the coastline. However, characterization of vertically oriented features such as shoreline armoring and small features such as pilings and large woody debris was possible. In addition, end users noted that geovideo provides a permanent record to allow a user to examine recorded video anywhere along a transect or at discrete points.

  18. Genome-wide association study using whole-genome sequencing rapidly identifies new genes influencing agronomic traits in rice.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kenji; Yamamoto, Eiji; Aya, Koichiro; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Lo, Pei-Ching; Hu, Li; Yamasaki, Masanori; Yoshida, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Hirano, Ko; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) can be a powerful tool for the identification of genes associated with agronomic traits in crop species, but it is often hindered by population structure and the large extent of linkage disequilibrium. In this study, we identified agronomically important genes in rice using GWAS based on whole-genome sequencing, followed by the screening of candidate genes based on the estimated effect of nucleotide polymorphisms. Using this approach, we identified four new genes associated with agronomic traits. Some genes were undetectable by standard SNP analysis, but we detected them using gene-based association analysis. This study provides fundamental insights relevant to the rapid identification of genes associated with agronomic traits using GWAS and will accelerate future efforts aimed at crop improvement. PMID:27322545

  19. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  20. Allopolyploidy-induced rapid genome evolution in the wheat (Aegilops-Triticum) group.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Levy, A A; Feldman, M

    2001-08-01

    To better understand genetic events that accompany allopolyploid formation, we studied the rate and time of elimination of eight DNA sequences in F1 hybrids and newly formed allopolyploids of Aegilops and TRITICUM: In total, 35 interspecific and intergeneric F1 hybrids and 22 derived allopolyploids were analyzed and compared with their direct parental plants. The studied sequences exist in all the diploid species of the Triticeae but occur in only one genome, either in one homologous pair (chromosome-specific sequences [CSSs]) or in several pairs of the same genome (genome-specific sequences [GSSs]), in the polyploid wheats. It was found that rapid elimination of CSSs and GSSs is a general phenomenon in newly synthesized allopolyploids. Elimination of GSSs was already initiated in F1 plants and was completed in the second or third allopolyploid generation, whereas elimination of CSSs started in the first allopolyploid generation and was completed in the second or third generation. Sequence elimination started earlier in allopolyploids whose genome constitution was analogous to natural polyploids compared with allopolyploids that do not occur in nature. Elimination is a nonrandom and reproducible event whose direction was determined by the genomic combination of the hybrid or the allopolyploid. It was not affected by the genotype of the parental plants, by their cytoplasm, or by the ploidy level, and it did not result from intergenomic recombination. Allopolyploidy-induced sequence elimination occurred in a sizable fraction of the genome and in sequences that were apparently noncoding. This finding suggests a role in augmenting the differentiation of homoeologous chromosomes at the polyploid level, thereby providing the physical basis for the diploid-like meiotic behavior of newly formed allopolyploids. In our view, this rapid genome adjustment may have contributed to the successful establishment of newly formed allopolyploids as new species. PMID:11487689

  1. Genomic Plasticity in Ralstonia eutropha and Ralstonia pickettii: Evidence for Rapid Genomic Change and Adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Terence L. MArsh

    2007-06-27

    The proposed foci of our investigations were on Ralstonia eutropha and Rasltonia pickettii. We have 18 derived lineages of the former as well as their progenitor and eleven isolates of the latter. Our goal was to measure the level of plasticity in these strains and attempt to derive a mechanistic understanding of how genomic plasticity formed. Extensive attempts to reproducibly induce conformational changes in the genome of R. eutropha were unsuccessful. We thought that we had a reasonable lead on this inasmuch as we had shown that the ancestral strain along with many of the derivative lineages exhibited “temperature induced mutation and mortality akin to R. metallodurans. However we were unable to get subtractive hybridization working to the degree that it revealed differences between the lineages. During this time the R. pickettii analysis was proving quite fruitful and so we concentrated our efforts on our analyses of R. pickettii. These strains were isolated from a copper-contaminated lake sediment and were resistant to copper at 800 µg/ml (CuSO4). Our results in the investigation of R. pickettii permitted a view into the adaptation of a beta-proteobacteria to an extreme environment. Our worked revealed that within the same ecosystem two genomovars with structurally different genomes and genome sizes were present and apparently filling similar if not identical niches. The genomovars were detected with REP & BOX-PCR, pulse field gel electrophoresis, and DNA:DNA hybridizations. Moreover there were different metal resistance patterns associated with the different genomovars, one showing resistance to Zn and Cd while the other had resistance to Ni. Five of the isolates had a high-copy number extrachromosomal element that was identified as the replicative form of a filamentous phage. Mature virions were isolated from culture broth using PEG precipitation and CsCl density centrifugation. The DNA associated with the filamentous particles was single stranded and had

  2. Rapid diversification of five Oryza AA genomes associated with rice adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Zhu, Ting; Xia, En-Hua; Shi, Chao; Liu, Yun-Long; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Kai; Zhao, You-Jie; Mao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Huang, Hui; Jiao, Jun-Ying; Xu, Ping-Zhen; Yao, Qiu-Yang; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Yang, Li-Li; Gao, Ju; Tao, Da-Yun; Wang, Yue-Ju; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses among closely related species can greatly enhance our understanding of plant gene and genome evolution. We report de novo-assembled AA-genome sequences for Oryza nivara, Oryza glaberrima, Oryza barthii, Oryza glumaepatula, and Oryza meridionalis. Our analyses reveal massive levels of genomic structural variation, including segmental duplication and rapid gene family turnover, with particularly high instability in defense-related genes. We show, on a genomic scale, how lineage-specific expansion or contraction of gene families has led to their morphological and reproductive diversification, thus enlightening the evolutionary process of speciation and adaptation. Despite strong purifying selective pressures on most Oryza genes, we documented a large number of positively selected genes, especially those genes involved in flower development, reproduction, and resistance-related processes. These diversifying genes are expected to have played key roles in adaptations to their ecological niches in Asia, South America, Africa and Australia. Extensive variation in noncoding RNA gene numbers, function enrichment, and rates of sequence divergence might also help account for the different genetic adaptations of these rice species. Collectively, these resources provide new opportunities for evolutionary genomics, numerous insights into recent speciation, a valuable database of functional variation for crop improvement, and tools for efficient conservation of wild rice germplasm. PMID:25368197

  3. Rapid diversification of five Oryza AA genomes associated with rice adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Zhu, Ting; Xia, En-Hua; Shi, Chao; Liu, Yun-Long; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Kai; Zhao, You-Jie; Mao, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Li-Ping; Huang, Hui; Jiao, Jun-Ying; Xu, Ping-Zhen; Yao, Qiu-Yang; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Yang, Li-Li; Gao, Ju; Tao, Da-Yun; Wang, Yue-Ju; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2014-11-18

    Comparative genomic analyses among closely related species can greatly enhance our understanding of plant gene and genome evolution. We report de novo-assembled AA-genome sequences for Oryza nivara, Oryza glaberrima, Oryza barthii, Oryza glumaepatula, and Oryza meridionalis. Our analyses reveal massive levels of genomic structural variation, including segmental duplication and rapid gene family turnover, with particularly high instability in defense-related genes. We show, on a genomic scale, how lineage-specific expansion or contraction of gene families has led to their morphological and reproductive diversification, thus enlightening the evolutionary process of speciation and adaptation. Despite strong purifying selective pressures on most Oryza genes, we documented a large number of positively selected genes, especially those genes involved in flower development, reproduction, and resistance-related processes. These diversifying genes are expected to have played key roles in adaptations to their ecological niches in Asia, South America, Africa and Australia. Extensive variation in noncoding RNA gene numbers, function enrichment, and rates of sequence divergence might also help account for the different genetic adaptations of these rice species. Collectively, these resources provide new opportunities for evolutionary genomics, numerous insights into recent speciation, a valuable database of functional variation for crop improvement, and tools for efficient conservation of wild rice germplasm. PMID:25368197

  4. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  5. Genome Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats in Cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whole genome sequence of the cucumber cultivar Gy14 was recently sequenced at 15× coverage with the Roche 454 Titanium technology. The microsatellite DNA sequences (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) in the assembled scaffolds were computationally explored and characterized. A total of 112,073 SSRs ...

  6. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC) is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in lung SqCC have not been comprehensively characterized and no molecularly targeted agents have been developed specifically for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we profiled 178 lung SqCCs to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. Lung SqCC is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumor. We found statistically recurrent mutations in 18 genes in including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations were seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2/KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, PI3K/AKT in 47%, and CDKN2A/RB1 in 72% of tumors. We identified a potential therapeutic target in the majority of tumors, offering new avenues of investigation for lung SqCC treatment. PMID:22960745

  7. Rapid turnover of antimicrobial-type cysteine-rich protein genes in closely related Oryza genomes.

    PubMed

    Shenton, Matthew R; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Nagata, Toshifumi; Feng, Qi; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2015-10-01

    Defensive and reproductive protein genes undergo rapid evolution. Small, cysteine-rich secreted peptides (CRPs) act as antimicrobial agents and function in plant intercellular signaling and are over-represented among reproductively expressed proteins. Because of their roles in defense, reproduction and development and their presence in multigene families, CRP variation can have major consequences for plant phenotypic and functional diversification. We surveyed the CRP genes of six closely related Oryza genomes comprising Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and ssp. indica, Oryza glaberrima and three accessions of Oryza rufipogon to observe patterns of evolution in these gene families and the effects of variation on their gene expression. These Oryza genomes, like other plant genomes, have accumulated large reservoirs of CRP sequences, comprising 26 groups totaling between 676 and 843 genes, in contrast to antimicrobial CRPs in animal genomes. Despite the close evolutionary relationships between the genomes, we observed rapid changes in number and structure among CRP gene families. Many CRP sequences are in gene clusters generated by local duplications, have undergone rapid turnover and are more likely to be silent or specifically expressed. By contrast, conserved CRP genes are more likely to be highly and broadly expressed. Variable CRP genes created by repeated duplication, gene modification and inactivation can gain new functions and expression patterns in newly evolved gene copies. For the CRP proteins, the process of gain/loss by deletion or duplication at gene clusters seems to be an important mechanism in evolution of the gene families, which also contributes to their expression evolution. PMID:25842177

  8. Full Genomic Characterization of a Saffold Virus Isolated in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Leguia, Mariana; Loyola, Steev; Rios, Jane; Juarez, Diana; Guevara, Carolina; Silva, Maria; Prieto, Karla; Wiley, Michael; Kasper, Matthew R.; Palacios, Gustavo; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    While studying respiratory infections of unknown etiology we detected Saffold virus in an oropharyngeal swab collected from a two-year-old female suffering from diarrhea and respiratory illness. The full viral genome recovered by deep sequencing showed 98% identity to a previously described Saffold strain isolated in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the Peruvian Saffold strain belongs to genotype 3 and is most closely related to strains that have circulated in Asia. This is the first documented case report of Saffold virus in Peru and the only complete genomic characterization of a Saffold-3 isolate from the Americas. PMID:26610576

  9. Methodology for Quantitative Rapid Multi-Tracer PET Tumor Characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Hoffman, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can image a wide variety of functional and physiological parameters in vivo using different radiotracers. As more is learned about the molecular basis for disease and treatment, the potential value of molecular imaging for characterizing and monitoring disease status has increased. Characterizing multiple aspects of tumor physiology by imaging multiple PET tracers in a single patient provides additional complementary information, and there is a significant body of literature supporting the potential value of multi-tracer PET imaging in oncology. However, imaging multiple PET tracers in a single patient presents a number of challenges. A number of techniques are under development for rapidly imaging multiple PET tracers in a single scan, where signal-recovery processing algorithms are employed to recover various imaging endpoints for each tracer. Dynamic imaging is generally used with tracer injections staggered in time, and kinetic constraints are utilized to estimate each tracers' contribution to the multi-tracer imaging signal. This article summarizes past and ongoing work in multi-tracer PET tumor imaging, and then organizes and describes the main algorithmic approaches for achieving multi-tracer PET signal-recovery. While significant advances have been made, the complexity of the approach necessitates protocol design, optimization, and testing for each particular tracer combination and application. Rapid multi-tracer PET techniques have great potential for both research and clinical cancer imaging applications, and continued research in this area is warranted. PMID:24312149

  10. Forward Genetics by Genome Sequencing Reveals That Rapid Cyanide Release Deters Insect Herbivory of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Krothapalli, Kartikeya; Buescher, Elizabeth M.; Li, Xu; Brown, Elliot; Chapple, Clint; Dilkes, Brian P.; Tuinstra, Mitchell R.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing has allowed rapid progress in the application of forward genetics in model species. In this study, we demonstrated an application of next-generation sequencing for forward genetics in a complex crop genome. We sequenced an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutant of Sorghum bicolor defective in hydrogen cyanide release and identified the causal mutation. A workflow identified the causal polymorphism relative to the reference BTx623 genome by integrating data from single nucleotide polymorphism identification, prior information about candidate gene(s) implicated in cyanogenesis, mutation spectra, and polymorphisms likely to affect phenotypic changes. A point mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of dhurrinase2, which encodes a protein involved in the dhurrin catabolic pathway, was responsible for the acyanogenic phenotype. Cyanogenic glucosides are not cyanogenic compounds but their cyanohydrins derivatives do release cyanide. The mutant accumulated the glucoside, dhurrin, but failed to efficiently release cyanide upon tissue disruption. Thus, we tested the effects of cyanide release on insect herbivory in a genetic background in which accumulation of cyanogenic glucoside is unchanged. Insect preference choice experiments and herbivory measurements demonstrate a deterrent effect of cyanide release capacity, even in the presence of wild-type levels of cyanogenic glucoside accumulation. Our gene cloning method substantiates the value of (1) a sequenced genome, (2) a strongly penetrant and easily measurable phenotype, and (3) a workflow to pinpoint a causal mutation in crop genomes and accelerate in the discovery of gene function in the postgenomic era. PMID:23893483

  11. Discovery and genomic characterization of a novel bat sapovirus with unusual genomic features and phylogenetic position.

    PubMed

    Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Li, Kenneth S M; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    Sapovirus is a genus of caliciviruses that are known to cause enteric disease in humans and animals. There is considerable genetic diversity among the sapoviruses, which are classified into different genogroups based on phylogenetic analysis of the full-length capsid protein sequence. While several mammalian species, including humans, pigs, minks, and dogs, have been identified as animal hosts for sapoviruses, there were no reports of sapoviruses in bats in spite of their biological diversity. In this report, we present the results of a targeted surveillance study in different bat species in Hong Kong. Five of the 321 specimens from the bat species, Hipposideros pomona, were found to be positive for sapoviruses by RT-PCR. Complete or nearly full-length genome sequences of approximately 7.7 kb in length were obtained for three strains, which showed similar organization of the genome compared to other sapoviruses. Interestingly, they possess many genomic features atypical of most sapoviruses, like high G+C content and minimal CpG suppression. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral proteins suggested that the bat sapovirus descended from an ancestral sapovirus lineage and is most closely related to the porcine sapoviruses. Codon usage analysis showed that the bat sapovirus genome has greater codon usage bias relative to other sapovirus genomes. In summary, we report the discovery and genomic characterization of the first bat calicivirus, which appears to have evolved under different conditions after early divergence from other sapovirus lineages. PMID:22514697

  12. Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Campylobacter Genus Reveals Some Underlying Mechanisms for its Genomic Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yizhuang; Bu, Lijing; Guo, Min; Zhou, Chengran; Wang, Yongdong; Chen, Liyu; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter species.are phenotypically diverse in many aspects including host habitats and pathogenicities, which demands comprehensive characterization of the entire Campylobacter genus to study their underlying genetic diversification. Up to now, 34 Campylobacter strains have been sequenced and published in public databases, providing good opportunity to systemically analyze their genomic diversities. In this study, we first conducted genomic characterization, which includes genome-wide alignments, pan-genome analysis, and phylogenetic identification, to depict the genetic diversity of Campylobacter genus. Afterward, we improved the tetranucleotide usage pattern-based naïve Bayesian classifier to identify the abnormal composition fragments (ACFs, fragments with significantly different tetranucleotide frequency profiles from its genomic tetranucleotide frequency profiles) including horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explore the mechanisms for the genetic diversity of this organism. Finally, we analyzed the HGTs transferred via bacteriophage transductions. To our knowledge, this study is the first to use single nucleotide polymorphism information to construct liable microevolution phylogeny of 21 Campylobacter jejuni strains. Combined with the phylogeny of all the collected Campylobacter species based on genome-wide core gene information, comprehensive phylogenetic inference of all 34 Campylobacter organisms was determined. It was found that C. jejuni harbors a high fraction of ACFs possibly through intraspecies recombination, whereas other Campylobacter members possess numerous ACFs possibly via intragenus recombination. Furthermore, some Campylobacter strains have undergone significant ancient viral integration during their evolution process. The improved method is a powerful tool for bacterial genomic analysis. Moreover, the findings would provide useful information for future research on Campylobacter genus. PMID:23940551

  13. Genomic characterization of phenotypic variants of beet curly top virus.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D C; Carbonaro, D; Duffus, J E

    1990-10-01

    Full-length infectious DNA clones were constructed for four distinct phenotypic variants of beet curly top virus (BCTV). Southern hybridization assays indicated that each cloned BCTV genome shared sequence homology with pBCT-028, a full-length infectious DNA clone of a California isolate of BCTV previously characterized by others. Restriction endonuclease maps of the cloned BCTV genomes were distinct from one another. Infectivity assays determined that plasmids containing tandem repeats of BCTV genomes were generally more infectious than excised linear DNA inserts. Progeny virus, derived from plants inoculated with cloned DNAs, differed in their ability to infect sugarbeet, Beta vulgaris L., and the severity of symptoms produced in B. vulgaris and other experimental hosts. PMID:2230726

  14. Comprehensive Pan-Genomic Characterization of Adrenocortical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Siyuan; Cherniack, Andrew D; Dewal, Ninad; Moffitt, Richard A; Danilova, Ludmila; Murray, Bradley A; Lerario, Antonio M; Else, Tobias; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Ciriello, Giovanni; Kim, Seungchan; Assie, Guillaume; Morozova, Olena; Akbani, Rehan; Shih, Juliann; Hoadley, Katherine A; Choueiri, Toni K; Waldmann, Jens; Mete, Ozgur; Robertson, A Gordon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Raphael, Benjamin J; Shao, Lina; Meyerson, Matthew; Demeure, Michael J; Beuschlein, Felix; Gill, Anthony J; Sidhu, Stan B; Almeida, Madson Q; Fragoso, Maria C B V; Cope, Leslie M; Kebebew, Electron; Habra, Mouhammed A; Whitsett, Timothy G; Bussey, Kimberly J; Rainey, William E; Asa, Sylvia L; Bertherat, Jérôme; Fassnacht, Martin; Wheeler, David A; Hammer, Gary D; Giordano, Thomas J; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive genomic characterization of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Using this dataset, we expand the catalogue of known ACC driver genes to include PRKAR1A, RPL22, TERF2, CCNE1, and NF1. Genome wide DNA copy-number analysis revealed frequent occurrence of massive DNA loss followed by whole-genome doubling (WGD), which was associated with aggressive clinical course, suggesting WGD is a hallmark of disease progression. Corroborating this hypothesis were increased TERT expression, decreased telomere length, and activation of cell-cycle programs. Integrated subtype analysis identified three ACC subtypes with distinct clinical outcome and molecular alterations which could be captured by a 68-CpG probe DNA-methylation signature, proposing a strategy for clinical stratification of patients based on molecular markers. PMID:27165744

  15. Genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Zika virus circulating in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Han, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-09-01

    The rapid spread and potential link with birth defects have made Zika virus (ZIKV) a global public health problem. The virus was discovered 70years ago, yet the knowledge about its genomic structure and the genetic variations associated with current ZIKV explosive epidemics remains not fully understood. In this review, the genome organization, especially conserved terminal structures of ZIKV genome were characterized and compared with other mosquito-borne flaviviruses. It is suggested that major viral proteins of ZIKV share high structural and functional similarity with other known flaviviruses as shown by sequence comparison and prediction of functional motifs in viral proteins. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all ZIKV strains circulating in the America form a unique clade within the Asian lineage. Furthermore, we identified a series of conserved amino acid residues that differentiate the Asian strains including the current circulating American strains from the ancient African strains. Overall, our findings provide an overview of ZIKV genome characterization and evolutionary dynamics in the Americas and point out critical clues for future virological and epidemiological studies. PMID:27156653

  16. Rapid characterizing of ferromagnetic materials using spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaolong Wang, Wei; Wang, Yutian; Zhou, Hengan; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Gao, Cunxu; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-12-29

    Spin rectification is a powerful tool for dc electric detections of spin dynamics and electromagnetic waves. Technically, elaborately designed on-chip microwave devices are needed in order to realize that effect. In this letter, we propose a rapid characterizing approach based on spin rectification. By directly sending dynamic current into ferromagnetic films with stripe shape, resonant dc voltages can be detected along the longitudinal or transversal directions. As an example, Fe (010) films with precise crystalline structure and magnetic parameters were used to testify the reliability of such method. We investigated not only the dynamic parameters and the precise anisotropy constants of the Fe crystals but also the principle of spin rectification in this method.

  17. Genomic signatures of rapid adaptive evolution in the bluespotted cornetfish, a Mediterranean Lessepsian invader.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Giacomo; Azzurro, Ernesto; Golani, Daniel; Miller, Michael Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Biological invasions are increasingly creating ecological and economical problems both on land and in aquatic environments. For over a century, the Mediterranean Sea has steadily been invaded by Indian Ocean/Red Sea species (called Lessepsian invaders) via the Suez Canal, with a current estimate of ~450 species. The bluespotted cornetfish, Fistularia commersonii, considered a 'Lessepsian sprinter', entered the Mediterranean in 2000 and by 2007 had spread through the entire basin from Israel to Spain. The situation is unique and interesting both because of its unprecedented rapidity and by the fact that it took this species c. 130 years to immigrate into the Mediterranean. Using genome scans, with restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, we evaluated neutral and selected genomic regions for Mediterranean vs. Red Sea cornetfish individuals. We found that few fixed neutral changes were detectable among populations. However, almost half of the genes associated with the 47 outlier loci (potentially under selection) were related to disease resistance and osmoregulation. Due to the short time elapsed from the beginning of the invasion to our sampling, we interpret these changes as signatures of rapid adaptation that may be explained by several mechanisms including preadaptation and strong local selection. Such genomic regions are therefore good candidates to further study their role in invasion success. PMID:27162055

  18. Rapid Characterization of Vegetation Structure with a Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Azzari, George; Goulden, Michael L.; Rusu, Radu B.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of vegetation structure and biomass in controlling land-atmosphere exchange is widely recognized, but measurements of canopy structure are challenging, time consuming, and often rely on destructive methods. The Microsoft Kinect is an infrared sensor designed for video gaming that outputs synchronized color and depth images and that has the potential to allow rapid characterization of vegetation structure. We compared depth images from a Kinect sensor with manual measurements of plant structure and size for two species growing in a California grassland. The depth images agreed well with the horizontal and vertical measurements of plant size made manually. Similarly, the plant volumes calculated with a three-dimensional convex hulls approach was well related to plant biomass. The Kinect showed some limitations for ecological observation associated with a short measurement range and daytime light contamination. Nonetheless, the Kinect's light weight, fast acquisition time, low power requirement, and cost make it a promising tool for rapid field surveys of canopy structure, especially in small-statured vegetation. PMID:23435053

  19. Rapid characterization of vegetation structure with a Microsoft Kinect sensor.

    PubMed

    Azzari, George; Goulden, Michael L; Rusu, Radu B

    2013-01-01

    The importance of vegetation structure and biomass in controlling land-atmosphere exchange is widely recognized, but measurements of canopy structure are challenging, time consuming, and often rely on destructive methods. The Microsoft Kinect is an infrared sensor designed for video gaming that outputs synchronized color and depth images and that has the potential to allow rapid characterization of vegetation structure. We compared depth images from a Kinect sensor with manual measurements of plant structure and size for two species growing in a California grassland. The depth images agreed well with the horizontal and vertical measurements of plant size made manually. Similarly, the plant volumes calculated with a three-dimensional convex hulls approach was well related to plant biomass. The Kinect showed some limitations for ecological observation associated with a short measurement range and daytime light contamination. Nonetheless, the Kinect's light weight, fast acquisition time, low power requirement, and cost make it a promising tool for rapid field surveys of canopy structure, especially in small-statured vegetation. PMID:23435053

  20. Sequenced genomes and rapidly emerging technologies pave the way for conifer evolutionary developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Uddenberg, Daniel; Akhter, Shirin; Ramachandran, Prashanth; Sundström, Jens F.; Carlsbecker, Annelie

    2015-01-01

    Conifers, Ginkgo, cycads and gnetophytes comprise the four groups of extant gymnosperms holding a unique position of sharing common ancestry with the angiosperms. Comparative studies of gymnosperms and angiosperms are the key to a better understanding of ancient seed plant morphologies, how they have shifted over evolution to shape modern day species, and how the genes governing these morphologies have evolved. However, conifers and other gymnosperms have been notoriously difficult to study due to their long generation times, inaccessibility to genetic experimentation and unavailable genome sequences. Now, with three draft genomes from spruces and pines, rapid advances in next generation sequencing methods for genome wide expression analyses, and enhanced methods for genetic transformation, we are much better equipped to address a number of key evolutionary questions relating to seed plant evolution. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in conifer developmental biology relevant to evo-devo questions. We discuss how genome sequence data and novel techniques might allow us to explore genetic variation and naturally occurring conifer mutants, approaches to reduce long generation times to allow for genetic studies in conifers, and other potential upcoming research avenues utilizing current and emergent techniques. Results from developmental studies of conifers and other gymnosperms in comparison to those in angiosperms will provide information to trace core molecular developmental control tool kits of ancestral seed plants, but foremost they will greatly improve our understanding of the biology of conifers and other gymnosperms in their own right. PMID:26579190

  1. Genomic allergen rapid detection in-house validation--a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Rydnert, Frida; Kühnl, Jochen; Schepky, Andreas; Borrebaeck, Carl; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Chemical sensitization is an adverse immunologic response to chemical substances, inducing hypersensitivity in exposed individuals. Identifying chemical sensitizers is of great importance for chemical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries, in order to prevent the use of sensitizers in consumer products. Historically, chemical sensitizers have been assessed mainly by in vivo methods, however, recently enforced European legislations urge and promote the development of animal-free test methods able to predict chemical sensitizers. Recently, we presented a predictive biomarker signature in the myeloid cell line MUTZ-3, for assessment of skin sensitizers. The identified genomic biomarkers were found to be involved in immunologically relevant pathways, induced by recognition of foreign substances and regulating dendritic cell maturation and cytoprotective mechanisms. We have developed the usage of this biomarker signature into a novel in vitro assay for assessment of chemical sensitizers, called Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD). The assay is based on chemical stimulation of MUTZ-3 cultures, using the compounds to be assayed as stimulatory agents. The readout of the assay is a transcriptional quantification of the genomic predictors, collectively termed the GARD Prediction Signature (GPS), using a complete genome expression array. Compounds are predicted as either sensitizers or nonsensitizers by a Support Vector Machine model. In this report, we provide a proof of concept for the functionality of the GARD assay by describing the classification of 26 blinded and 11 nonblinded chemicals as sensitizers or nonsensitizers. Based on these classifications, the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the assay were estimated to 89, 89, and 88%, respectively. PMID:24675087

  2. Rapid geo-acoustic characterization from a seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaney, Kevin D.; Sternlicht, Daniel; Teranishi, Arthur; Castille, Brett; Hamilton, Michael

    2002-05-01

    A recent transmission loss experiment was conducted in Long Beach Harbor for the THUMS Long Beach Company. The objective of the experiment was to measure the range at which the received level was 160 dB for compliance with Marine Mammal regulations. This short experiment provided the opportunity to test the rapid geo-acoustic characterization (RGC) algorithm and perform real-time geo-acoustic inversions from a seismic source. The airgun source transmitted pulses every 20 s corresponding to every 45 m. The water depth was 10-15 m and the water was assumed to be iso-velocity. The data quality was excellent, providing clear striation patterns in the broadband frequency display. The RGC algorithm matches the observed time-spread, striation slope, and TL slope to precomputed values using a normal mode algorithm and parametric geo-acoustic profiles based on Hamilton and Bachman's model. Precomputation of the acoustic observables, combined with real-time signal processing permits real time geo-acoustic characterization.

  3. Characterization of the flamenco region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, V; Prud'homme, N; Kim, A; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    2001-01-01

    The flamenco gene, located at 20A1-3 in the beta-heterochromatin of the Drosophila X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. As a first step to characterize this gene, approximately 100 kb of genomic DNA flanking a P-element-induced mutation of flamenco was isolated. This DNA is located in a sequencing gap of the Celera Genomics project, i.e., one of those parts of the genome in which the "shotgun" sequence could not be assembled, probably because it contains long stretches of repetitive DNA, especially on the proximal side of the P insertion point. Deficiency mapping indicated that sequences required for the normal flamenco function are located >130 kb proximal to the insertion site. The distal part of the cloned DNA does, nevertheless, contain several unique sequences, including at least four different transcription units. Dip1, the closest one to the P-element insertion point, might be a good candidate for a gypsy regulator, since it putatively encodes a nuclear protein containing two double-stranded RNA-binding domains. However, transgenes containing dip1 genomic DNA were not able to rescue flamenco mutant flies. The possible nature of the missing flamenco sequences is discussed. PMID:11404334

  4. Characterization of the flamenco region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed

    Robert, V; Prud'homme, N; Kim, A; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    2001-06-01

    The flamenco gene, located at 20A1-3 in the beta-heterochromatin of the Drosophila X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. As a first step to characterize this gene, approximately 100 kb of genomic DNA flanking a P-element-induced mutation of flamenco was isolated. This DNA is located in a sequencing gap of the Celera Genomics project, i.e., one of those parts of the genome in which the "shotgun" sequence could not be assembled, probably because it contains long stretches of repetitive DNA, especially on the proximal side of the P insertion point. Deficiency mapping indicated that sequences required for the normal flamenco function are located >130 kb proximal to the insertion site. The distal part of the cloned DNA does, nevertheless, contain several unique sequences, including at least four different transcription units. Dip1, the closest one to the P-element insertion point, might be a good candidate for a gypsy regulator, since it putatively encodes a nuclear protein containing two double-stranded RNA-binding domains. However, transgenes containing dip1 genomic DNA were not able to rescue flamenco mutant flies. The possible nature of the missing flamenco sequences is discussed. PMID:11404334

  5. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  6. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  7. Rapid Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates Directly from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amanda C.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Holdstock, Jolyon; Houniet, Darren T.; Chan, Jacqueline Z. M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Broda, Agnieszka; Stone, Madeline J.; Christiansen, Mette T.; Williams, Rachel; McAndrew, Michael B.; Tutill, Helena; Brown, Julianne; Melzer, Mark; Rosmarin, Caryn; McHugh, Timothy D.; Shorten, Robert J.; Drobniewski, Francis; Speight, Graham; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The rapid identification of antimicrobial resistance is essential for effective treatment of highly resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Whole-genome sequencing provides comprehensive data on resistance mutations and strain typing for monitoring transmission, but unlike for conventional molecular tests, this has previously been achievable only from cultures of M. tuberculosis. Here we describe a method utilizing biotinylated RNA baits designed specifically for M. tuberculosis DNA to capture full M. tuberculosis genomes directly from infected sputum samples, allowing whole-genome sequencing without the requirement of culture. This was carried out on 24 smear-positive sputum samples, collected from the United Kingdom and Lithuania where a matched culture sample was available, and 2 samples that had failed to grow in culture. M. tuberculosis sequencing data were obtained directly from all 24 smear-positive culture-positive sputa, of which 20 were of high quality (>20× depth and >90% of the genome covered). Results were compared with those of conventional molecular and culture-based methods, and high levels of concordance between phenotypical resistance and predicted resistance based on genotype were observed. High-quality sequence data were obtained from one smear-positive culture-negative case. This study demonstrated for the first time the successful and accurate sequencing of M. tuberculosis genomes directly from uncultured sputa. Identification of known resistance mutations within a week of sample receipt offers the prospect for personalized rather than empirical treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis, including the use of antimicrobial-sparing regimens, leading to improved outcomes. PMID:25972414

  8. Genomic characterization of pseudorabies virus strains isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, E; Moreno, A; Lelli, D; Cinotti, S; Alborali, G L; Nigrelli, A; Luppi, A; Bresaola, M; Catella, A; Cordioli, P

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we undertook the genomic characterization of 54 pseudorabies virus (PRV) strains isolated in Italy during 1984-2010. The characterization was based on partial sequencing of the UL44 (gC) and US8 (gE) genes; 44 strains (38 for gene gE and 36 for gC) were isolated on pig farms; 9 originated from dogs and 1 from cattle. These porcine PRV strains, which were closely related to those isolated in Europe and America in the last 20 years, and the bovine strain bovine/It/2441/1992 belong to cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Six porcine strains that do not belong to cluster B are related in both gE and gC phylogenetic trees to the 'old' porcine PRV strains isolated in the 1970s and 1980s. In the last two decades, the presence of these strains in domestic pig populations has been reduced drastically, whereas they are prevalent in wild boar. The two remaining strains have an interesting genomic profile, characterized by the gC gene being closely related to the old porcine PRV strains, and the gE gene being similar to that of recently isolated strains. Three strains originating from working dogs on pig farms are located in cluster B in both phylogenetic trees. Five strains isolated from hunting dogs have a high degree of correlation with PRV strains circulating in wild boar. The last isolate has a gC gene similar to that in the two porcine strains mentioned previously, and the gE gene is correlated with the strains isolated from hunting dogs. These results provide interesting insight into the genomic characterization of PRV strains and reveal a clear differentiation between the strains isolated from hunting dogs that are related to the wild boar strains and those originating from domestic pigs. PMID:23331342

  9. Next Generation Sequencing to Characterize Mitochondrial Genomic DNA Heteroplasmy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    This protocol is to describe the methodology to characterize mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy with parallel sequencing. Mitochondria play a very important role in important cellular functions. Each eukaryotic cell contains hundreds of mitochondria with hundreds of mitochondria genomes. The mutant mtDNA and the wild type may co-exist as heteroplasmy, and cause human disease. The purpose of this methodology is to simultaneously determine mtDNA sequence and to quantify the heteroplasmy level. The protocol includes two-fragment mitochondria genome DNA PCR amplification. The PCR product is then mixed at an equimolar ratio. The samples will be barcoded and sequenced with high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology. We found that this technology is highly sensitive, specific, and accurate in determining mtDNA mutations and the degree of heteroplasmic level. PMID:21975941

  10. Genomic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Brazilian Yellow Fever Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Martins, Livia C.; Sousa, Edivaldo C.; de Lima, Clayton P. S.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; Savji, Nazir; Desai, Aaloki; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Carvalho, Valeria L.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    Globally, yellow fever virus infects nearly 200,000 people, leading to 30,000 deaths annually. Although the virus is endemic to Latin America, only a single genome from this region has been sequenced. Here, we report 12 Brazilian yellow fever virus complete genomes, their genetic traits, phylogenetic characterization, and phylogeographic dynamics. Variable 3′ noncoding region (3′NCR) patterns and specific mutations throughout the open reading frame altered predicted secondary structures. Our findings suggest that whereas the introduction of yellow fever virus in Brazil led to genotype I-predominant dispersal throughout South and Central Americas, genotype II remained confined to Bolivia, Peru, and the western Brazilian Amazon. PMID:23015713

  11. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures.

    PubMed

    Thomson, John P; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; "DIP-SC-seq") on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets. PMID:25985418

  12. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, John P.; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K.; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; “DIP-SC-seq”) on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets. PMID:25985418

  13. Genomic Analysis of the Emergence and Rapid Global Dissemination of the Clonal Group 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Driebe, Elizabeth M.; MacCannell, Duncan R.; Roe, Chandler; Lemmer, Darrin; de Man, Tom; Rasheed, J. Kamile; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul; Limbago, Brandi M.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the KPC carbapenemase have rapidly spread throughout the world, causing severe healthcare-associated infections with limited antimicrobial treatment options. Dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is largely attributed to expansion of a single dominant strain, ST258. In this study, we explore phylogenetic relationships and evolution within ST258 and its clonal group, CG258, using whole genome sequence analysis of 167 isolates from 20 countries collected over 17 years. Our results show a common ST258 ancestor emerged from its diverse parental clonal group around 1995 and likely acquired blaKPC prior to dissemination. Over the past two decades, ST258 has remained highly clonal despite diversity in accessory elements and divergence in the capsule polysaccharide synthesis locus. Apart from the large recombination event that gave rise to ST258, few mutations set it apart from its clonal group. However, one mutation occurs in a global transcription regulator. Characterization of outer membrane protein sequences revealed a profile in ST258 that includes a truncated OmpK35 and modified OmpK37. Our work illuminates potential genomic contributors to the pathogenic success of ST258, helps us better understand the global dissemination of this strain, and identifies genetic markers unique to ST258. PMID:26196384

  14. Rapid Identification of Potential Drugs for Diabetic Nephropathy Using Whole-Genome Expression Profiles of Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jingsong; Jiang, Song; Qiu, Dandan; Le, Weibo; Wang, Xiao; Lu, Yinhui; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate potential drugs for diabetic nephropathy (DN) using whole-genome expression profiles and the Connectivity Map (CMAP). Methodology. Eighteen Chinese Han DN patients and six normal controls were included in this study. Whole-genome expression profiles of microdissected glomeruli were measured using the Affymetrix human U133 plus 2.0 chip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between late stage and early stage DN samples and the CMAP database were used to identify potential drugs for DN using bioinformatics methods. Results. (1) A total of 1065 DEGs (FDR < 0.05 and fold change > 1.5) were found in late stage DN patients compared with early stage DN patients. (2) Piperlongumine, 15d-PGJ2 (15-delta prostaglandin J2), vorinostat, and trichostatin A were predicted to be the most promising potential drugs for DN, acting as NF-κB inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), PI3K pathway inhibitors, or PPARγ agonists, respectively. Conclusion. Using whole-genome expression profiles and the CMAP database, we rapidly predicted potential DN drugs, and therapeutic potential was confirmed by previously published studies. Animal experiments and clinical trials are needed to confirm both the safety and efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of DN. PMID:27069916

  15. Rapid Evolution of Genomic Imprinting in Two Species of the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Hatorangan, Marcelinus R; Laenen, Benjamin; Steige, Kim A; Slotte, Tanja; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon occurring in mammals and flowering plants that causes genes to adopt a parent-of-origin-specific mode of expression. While the imprinting status of genes is well conserved in mammals, clear estimates for the degree of conservation were lacking in plants. We therefore analyzed the genome-wide imprinting status of Capsella rubella, which shared a common recent ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana ∼10 to 14 million years ago. However, only ∼14% of maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and ∼29% of paternally expressed genes (PEGs) in C. rubella were commonly imprinted in both species, revealing that genomic imprinting is a rapidly evolving phenomenon in plants. Nevertheless, conserved PEGs exhibited signs of selection, suggesting that a subset of imprinted genes play an important functional role and are therefore maintained in plants. Like in Arabidopsis, PEGs in C. rubella are frequently associated with the presence of transposable elements that preferentially belong to helitron and MuDR families. Our data further reveal that MEGs and PEGs differ in their targeting by 24-nucleotide small RNAs and asymmetric DNA methylation, suggesting different mechanisms establishing DNA methylation at MEGs and PEGs. PMID:27465027

  16. Genome Scale Evolution of Myxoma Virus Reveals Host-Pathogen Adaptation and Rapid Geographic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Peter J.; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; DePasse, Jay V.; Cattadori, Isabella M.; Twaddle, Alan C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Tscharke, David C.; Read, Andrew F.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary interplay between myxoma virus (MYXV) and the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) following release of the virus in Australia in 1950 as a biological control is a classic example of host-pathogen coevolution. We present a detailed genomic and phylogeographic analysis of 30 strains of MYXV, including the Australian progenitor strain Standard Laboratory Strain (SLS), 24 Australian viruses isolated from 1951 to 1999, and three isolates from the early radiation in Britain from 1954 and 1955. We show that in Australia MYXV has spread rapidly on a spatial scale, with multiple lineages cocirculating within individual localities, and that both highly virulent and attenuated viruses were still present in the field through the 1990s. In addition, the detection of closely related virus lineages at sites 1,000 km apart suggests that MYXV moves freely in geographic space, with mosquitoes, fleas, and rabbit migration all providing means of transport. Strikingly, despite multiple introductions, all modern viruses appear to be ultimately derived from the original introductions of SLS. The rapidity of MYXV evolution was also apparent at the genomic scale, with gene duplications documented in a number of viruses. Duplication of potential virulence genes may be important in increasing the expression of virulence proteins and provides the basis for the evolution of novel functions. Mutations leading to loss of open reading frames were surprisingly frequent and in some cases may explain attenuation, but no common mutations that correlated with virulence or attenuation were identified. PMID:24067966

  17. Evaluating and Characterizing Ancient Whole-Genome Duplications in Plants with Gene Count Data.

    PubMed

    Tiley, George P; Ané, Cécile; Burleigh, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have helped shape the genomes of land plants, and recent evidence suggests that the genomes of all angiosperms have experienced at least two ancient WGDs. In plants, WGDs often are followed by rapid fractionation, in which many homeologous gene copies are lost. Thus, it can be extremely difficult to identify, let alone characterize, ancient WGDs. In this study, we use a new maximum likelihood estimator to test for evidence of ancient WGDs in land plants and estimate the fraction of new genes copies that are retained following a WGD using gene count data, the number of gene copies in gene families. We identified evidence of many putative ancient WGDs in land plants and found that the genome fractionation rates vary tremendously among ancient WGDs. Analyses of WGDs within Brassicales also indicate that background gene duplication and loss rates vary across land plants, and different gene families have different probabilities of being retained following a WGD. Although our analyses are largely robust to errors in duplication and loss rates and the choice of priors, simulations indicate that this method can have trouble detecting multiple WGDs that occur on the same branch, especially when the gene retention rates for ancient WGDs are very low. They also suggest that we should carefully evaluate evidence for some ancient plant WGD hypotheses. PMID:26988251

  18. Evaluating and Characterizing Ancient Whole-Genome Duplications in Plants with Gene Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Tiley, George P.; Ané, Cécile; Burleigh, J. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have helped shape the genomes of land plants, and recent evidence suggests that the genomes of all angiosperms have experienced at least two ancient WGDs. In plants, WGDs often are followed by rapid fractionation, in which many homeologous gene copies are lost. Thus, it can be extremely difficult to identify, let alone characterize, ancient WGDs. In this study, we use a new maximum likelihood estimator to test for evidence of ancient WGDs in land plants and estimate the fraction of new genes copies that are retained following a WGD using gene count data, the number of gene copies in gene families. We identified evidence of many putative ancient WGDs in land plants and found that the genome fractionation rates vary tremendously among ancient WGDs. Analyses of WGDs within Brassicales also indicate that background gene duplication and loss rates vary across land plants, and different gene families have different probabilities of being retained following a WGD. Although our analyses are largely robust to errors in duplication and loss rates and the choice of priors, simulations indicate that this method can have trouble detecting multiple WGDs that occur on the same branch, especially when the gene retention rates for ancient WGDs are very low. They also suggest that we should carefully evaluate evidence for some ancient plant WGD hypotheses. PMID:26988251

  19. A rapid classification protocol for the CATH Domain Database to support structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Frances M. G.; Martin, Nigel; Bray, James E.; Buchan, Daniel W. A.; Harrison, Andrew P.; Lee, David; Reeves, Gabrielle A.; Shepherd, Adrian J.; Sillitoe, Ian; Todd, Annabel E.; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to support the structural genomic initiatives, both by rapidly classifying newly determined structures and by suggesting suitable targets for structure determination, we have recently developed several new protocols for classifying structures in the CATH domain database (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath). These aim to increase the speed of classification of new structures using fast algorithms for structure comparison (GRATH) and to improve the sensitivity in recognising distant structural relatives by incorporating sequence information from relatives in the genomes (DomainFinder). In order to ensure the integrity of the database given the expected increase in data, the CATH Protein Family Database (CATH-PFDB), which currently includes 25 320 structural domains and a further 160 000 sequence relatives has now been installed in a relational ORACLE database. This was essential for developing more rigorous validation procedures and for allowing efficient querying of the database, particularly for genome analysis. The associated Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies [Bray,J.E., Todd,A.E., Pearl,F.M.G., Thornton,J.M. and Orengo,C.A. (2000) Protein Eng., 13, 153–165], which provides multiple structural alignments and functional information to assist in assigning new relatives, has also been expanded recently and now includes information for 903 homo­logous superfamilies. In order to improve coverage of known structures, preliminary classification levels are now provided for new structures at interim stages in the classification protocol. Since a large proportion of new structures can be rapidly classified using profile-based sequence analysis [e.g. PSI-BLAST: Altschul,S.F., Madden,T.L., Schaffer,A.A., Zhang,J., Zhang,Z., Miller,W. and Lipman,D.J. (1997) Nucleic Acids Res., 25, 3389–3402], this provides preliminary classification for easily recognisable homologues, which in the latest release of CATH (version 1.7) represented nearly three-quarters of

  20. A rapid classification protocol for the CATH Domain Database to support structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Pearl, F M; Martin, N; Bray, J E; Buchan, D W; Harrison, A P; Lee, D; Reeves, G A; Shepherd, A J; Sillitoe, I; Todd, A E; Thornton, J M; Orengo, C A

    2001-01-01

    In order to support the structural genomic initiatives, both by rapidly classifying newly determined structures and by suggesting suitable targets for structure determination, we have recently developed several new protocols for classifying structures in the CATH domain database (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath). These aim to increase the speed of classification of new structures using fast algorithms for structure comparison (GRATH) and to improve the sensitivity in recognising distant structural relatives by incorporating sequence information from relatives in the genomes (DomainFinder). In order to ensure the integrity of the database given the expected increase in data, the CATH Protein Family Database (CATH-PFDB), which currently includes 25,320 structural domains and a further 160,000 sequence relatives has now been installed in a relational ORACLE database. This was essential for developing more rigorous validation procedures and for allowing efficient querying of the database, particularly for genome analysis. The associated Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies [Bray,J.E., Todd,A.E., Pearl,F.M.G., Thornton,J.M. and Orengo,C.A. (2000) Protein Eng., 13, 153-165], which provides multiple structural alignments and functional information to assist in assigning new relatives, has also been expanded recently and now includes information for 903 homologous superfamilies. In order to improve coverage of known structures, preliminary classification levels are now provided for new structures at interim stages in the classification protocol. Since a large proportion of new structures can be rapidly classified using profile-based sequence analysis [e.g. PSI-BLAST: Altschul,S.F., Madden,T.L., Schaffer,A.A., Zhang,J., Zhang,Z., Miller,W. and Lipman,D.J. (1997) Nucleic Acids Res., 25, 3389-3402], this provides preliminary classification for easily recognisable homologues, which in the latest release of CATH (version 1.7) represented nearly three-quarters of the non

  1. Genomic Sequencing and Characterization of Cynomolgus Macaque Cytomegalovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Dzamba, Misko; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Pilon, Richard; Fournier, Jocelyn; Sandstrom, Paul; Brudno, Michael; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients or people living with HIV/AIDS, and congenital CMV is the leading viral cause of developmental disabilities in infants. Due to the highly species-specific nature of CMV, animal models that closely recapitulate human CMV (HCMV) are of growing importance for vaccine development. Here we present the genomic sequence of a novel nonhuman primate CMV from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis; CyCMV). CyCMV (Ottawa strain) was isolated from the urine of a healthy, captive-bred, 4-year-old cynomolgus macaque of Philippine origin, and the viral genome was sequenced using next-generation Illumina sequencing to an average of 516-fold coverage. The CyCMV genome is 218,041 bp in length, with 49.5% G+C content and 84% protein-coding density. We have identified 262 putative open reading frames (ORFs) with an average coding length of 789 bp. The genomic organization of CyCMV is largely colinear with that of rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV). Of the 262 CyCMV ORFs, 137 are homologous to HCMV genes, 243 are homologous to RhCMV 68.1, and 200 are homologous to RhCMV 180.92. CyCMV encodes four ORFs that are not present in RhCMV strain 68.1 or 180.92 but have homologies with HCMV (UL30, UL74A, UL126, and UL146). Similar to HCMV, CyCMV does not produce the RhCMV-specific viral homologue of cyclooxygenase-2. This newly characterized CMV may provide a novel model in which to study CMV biology and HCMV vaccine development. PMID:21994460

  2. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  3. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trung D; Cao, Hieu X; Jovtchev, Gabriele; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, Miloslava; Vu, Giang T H; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, Ingo; Fuchs, Joerg

    2015-12-01

    Linear chromosomes of eukaryotic organisms invariably possess centromeres and telomeres to ensure proper chromosome segregation during nuclear divisions and to protect the chromosome ends from deterioration and fusion, respectively. While centromeric sequences may differ between species, with arrays of tandemly repeated sequences and retrotransposons being the most abundant sequence types in plant centromeres, telomeric sequences are usually highly conserved among plants and other organisms. The genome size of the carnivorous genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae) is highly variable. Here we study evolutionary sequence plasticity of these chromosomal domains at an intrageneric level. We show that Genlisea nigrocaulis (1C = 86 Mbp; 2n = 40) and G. hispidula (1C = 1550 Mbp; 2n = 40) differ as to their DNA composition at centromeres and telomeres. G. nigrocaulis and its close relative G. pygmaea revealed mainly 161 bp tandem repeats, while G. hispidula and its close relative G. subglabra displayed a combination of four retroelements at centromeric positions. G. nigrocaulis and G. pygmaea chromosome ends are characterized by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric repeats (TTTAGGG); G. hispidula and G. subglabra instead revealed two intermingled sequence variants (TTCAGG and TTTCAGG). These differences in centromeric and, surprisingly, also in telomeric DNA sequences, uncovered between groups with on average a > 9-fold genome size difference, emphasize the fast genome evolution within this genus. Such intrageneric evolutionary alteration of telomeric repeats with cytosine in the guanine-rich strand, not yet known for plants, might impact the epigenetic telomere chromatin modification. PMID:26485466

  4. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus.

    PubMed

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1(T), LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  5. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1T, LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  6. Rapid detection, characterization, and enrumeration of food-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been much research activity on the development of methodologies that are rapid, accurate, and ultrasensitive for detecting pathogenic microorganisms in food. Rapid methods include immunological systems such as the lateral flow assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays...

  7. Genome-Wide Tuning of Protein Expression Levels to Rapidly Engineer Microbial Traits.

    PubMed

    Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Weiss, Sophie J; Garst, Andrew D; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The reliable engineering of biological systems requires quantitative mapping of predictable and context-independent expression over a broad range of protein expression levels. However, current techniques for modifying expression levels are cumbersome and are not amenable to high-throughput approaches. Here we present major improvements to current techniques through the design and construction of E. coli genome-wide libraries using synthetic DNA cassettes that can tune expression over a ∼10(4) range. The cassettes also contain molecular barcodes that are optimized for next-generation sequencing, enabling rapid and quantitative tracking of alleles that have the highest fitness advantage. We show these libraries can be used to determine which genes and expression levels confer greater fitness to E. coli under different growth conditions. PMID:26478262

  8. Comparative genomic characterization of citrus-associated Xylella fastidiosa strains

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Vivian S; Shida, Cláudio S; Rodrigues, Fabiana B; Ribeiro, Diógenes CD; de Souza, Alessandra A; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Machado, Marcos A; Nunes, Luiz R; de Oliveira, Regina Costa

    2007-01-01

    Background The xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) in vineyards and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) in orange trees. Both of these economically-devastating diseases are caused by distinct strains of this complex group of microorganisms, which has motivated researchers to conduct extensive genomic sequencing projects with Xf strains. This sequence information, along with other molecular tools, have been used to estimate the evolutionary history of the group and provide clues to understand the capacity of Xf to infect different hosts, causing a variety of symptoms. Nonetheless, although significant amounts of information have been generated from Xf strains, a large proportion of these efforts has concentrated on the study of North American strains, limiting our understanding about the genomic composition of South American strains – which is particularly important for CVC-associated strains. Results This paper describes the first genome-wide comparison among South American Xf strains, involving 6 distinct citrus-associated bacteria. Comparative analyses performed through a microarray-based approach allowed identification and characterization of large mobile genetic elements that seem to be exclusive to South American strains. Moreover, a large-scale sequencing effort, based on Suppressive Subtraction Hybridization (SSH), identified 290 new ORFs, distributed in 135 Groups of Orthologous Elements, throughout the genomes of these bacteria. Conclusion Results from microarray-based comparisons provide further evidence concerning activity of horizontally transferred elements, reinforcing their importance as major mediators in the evolution of Xf. Moreover, the microarray-based genomic profiles showed similarity between Xf strains 9a5c and Fb7, which is unexpected, given the geographical and chronological differences associated with the isolation of these microorganisms. The newly identified ORFs, obtained by

  9. Rapid phylogenetic analysis of large samples of recombinant bacterial whole genome sequences using Gubbins.

    PubMed

    Croucher, Nicholas J; Page, Andrew J; Connor, Thomas R; Delaney, Aidan J; Keane, Jacqueline A; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R

    2015-02-18

    The emergence of new sequencing technologies has facilitated the use of bacterial whole genome alignments for evolutionary studies and outbreak analyses. These datasets, of increasing size, often include examples of multiple different mechanisms of horizontal sequence transfer resulting in substantial alterations to prokaryotic chromosomes. The impact of these processes demands rapid and flexible approaches able to account for recombination when reconstructing isolates' recent diversification. Gubbins is an iterative algorithm that uses spatial scanning statistics to identify loci containing elevated densities of base substitutions suggestive of horizontal sequence transfer while concurrently constructing a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on the putative point mutations outside these regions of high sequence diversity. Simulations demonstrate the algorithm generates highly accurate reconstructions under realistically parameterized models of bacterial evolution, and achieves convergence in only a few hours on alignments of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences. Gubbins is appropriate for reconstructing the recent evolutionary history of a variety of haploid genotype alignments, as it makes no assumptions about the underlying mechanism of recombination. The software is freely available for download at github.com/sanger-pathogens/Gubbins, implemented in Python and C and supported on Linux and Mac OS X. PMID:25414349

  10. Rapid phylogenetic analysis of large samples of recombinant bacterial whole genome sequences using Gubbins

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Page, Andrew J.; Connor, Thomas R.; Delaney, Aidan J.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of new sequencing technologies has facilitated the use of bacterial whole genome alignments for evolutionary studies and outbreak analyses. These datasets, of increasing size, often include examples of multiple different mechanisms of horizontal sequence transfer resulting in substantial alterations to prokaryotic chromosomes. The impact of these processes demands rapid and flexible approaches able to account for recombination when reconstructing isolates’ recent diversification. Gubbins is an iterative algorithm that uses spatial scanning statistics to identify loci containing elevated densities of base substitutions suggestive of horizontal sequence transfer while concurrently constructing a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on the putative point mutations outside these regions of high sequence diversity. Simulations demonstrate the algorithm generates highly accurate reconstructions under realistically parameterized models of bacterial evolution, and achieves convergence in only a few hours on alignments of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences. Gubbins is appropriate for reconstructing the recent evolutionary history of a variety of haploid genotype alignments, as it makes no assumptions about the underlying mechanism of recombination. The software is freely available for download at github.com/sanger-pathogens/Gubbins, implemented in Python and C and supported on Linux and Mac OS X. PMID:25414349

  11. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Optical restriction genome mapping is a technology in which a genome is linearized on a surface and digested with specific restriction enzymes, giving an arrangement of the genome with gaps whose order and size are unique for a given organism. Current applications of this technology include assisting with the correct scaffolding and ordering of genomes in conjunction with whole-genome sequencing, observation of genetic drift and evolution using comparative genomics and epidemiological monitoring of the spread of infections. Here, we investigated the suitability of genome mapping for use in clinical labs as a potential diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods Using whole genome mapping, we investigated the basic performance of the technology for identifying two bacteria of interest for food-safety (Lactobacilli spp. and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli). We further evaluated the performance for identifying multiple organisms from both simple and complex mixtures. Results We were able to successfully generate optical restriction maps of four Lactobacillus species as well as a strain of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli from within a mixed solution, each distinguished using a common compatible restriction enzyme. Finally, we demonstrated that optical restriction maps were successfully obtained and the correct organism identified within a clinical matrix. Conclusion With additional development, whole genome mapping may be a useful clinical tool for rapid invitro diagnostics. PMID:26435946

  12. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

  13. GE-03GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF SURVIVAL OUTLIERS IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Berens, Michael; Armstrong, Brock; Peng, Sen; Ross, Julianna; Salhia, Bodour; Byron, Sara; Virk, Selene; Dhruv, Harshil; Tran, Nhan; Sloan, Andrew; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Despite the general poor prognosis for patients with GBM, a proportion survives well beyond the median survival of 12-14 months following diagnosis. To elucidate molecular features associated with disproportionately protracted survival, we conducted deep genomic comparative analysis of a cohort of patients receiving standard therapy (surgery plus concurrent radiation and temozolomide) wherein "GBM outliers" were identified: patients who responded (long-term survivor, LTS) versus those who failed rapidly (short-term survivor, STS). The datasets enabled interrogation for signatures indicative of tumor vulnerability. Whole genomic, epigenetic and transcriptomic analyses of 18 patients, including 8 LTS with an average 30 months overall survival (OS) and 10 STS with an average of 7 months OS were performed to capture single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels, translocations, intra-chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, along with DNA methylation and mRNA expression. LTS and STS cases showed equal proportion of 7p11.2 (EGFR) amplification and 9p21.3 (CDKN2A) deletion. However, LTS GBM showed frequent chromosomal gains in 4q12 (PDGFRA and KIT) and 12q14.1 (CDK4) and deletion in 19q13.33 (BAX, BCAT2 and CD33), whereas, STS GBM showed frequent deletion in 9p11.2 (FOXD4L2 and AQP7P3) and 22q11.21 (HIC2). In addition, LTS GBM showed a 2-fold increased chromosomal instability as compared to STS GBM. By gene expression analysis, supervised clustering using the CIN70 chromosomal instability signature showed a decreased expression of these markers in LTS GBM, corroborating the genomic analysis. Finally, integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed in STS GBM hypermethylation and downregulation of EPHA3, MEG, and PPP1R9A, linked to defective cell migration and adhesion. In contrast, LTS GBM showed hypomethylation and an increased gene expression of KIT. We posit that genomic instability predicts vulnerability of GBM to standard therapy and coupled with

  14. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways.

    PubMed

    2008-10-23

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large-scale multi-dimensional analysis of these molecular characteristics in human cancer and to provide the data rapidly to the research community. Here we report the interim integrative analysis of DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation aberrations in 206 glioblastomas--the most common type of adult brain cancer--and nucleotide sequence aberrations in 91 of the 206 glioblastomas. This analysis provides new insights into the roles of ERBB2, NF1 and TP53, uncovers frequent mutations of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase regulatory subunit gene PIK3R1, and provides a network view of the pathways altered in the development of glioblastoma. Furthermore, integration of mutation, DNA methylation and clinical treatment data reveals a link between MGMT promoter methylation and a hypermutator phenotype consequent to mismatch repair deficiency in treated glioblastomas, an observation with potential clinical implications. Together, these findings establish the feasibility and power of TCGA, demonstrating that it can rapidly expand knowledge of the molecular basis of cancer. PMID:18772890

  15. Genomic Characterization of the Genus Nairovirus (Family Bunyaviridae)

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jens H.; Wiley, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Sergio E.; Bào, Yīmíng; Prieto, Karla; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Guzman, Hilda; Savji, Nazir; Ladner, Jason T.; Tesh, Robert B.; Wada, Jiro; Jahrling, Peter B.; Bente, Dennis A.; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Nairovirus, one of five bunyaviral genera, includes seven species. Genomic sequence information is limited for members of the Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, Qalyub, Sakhalin, and Thiafora nairovirus species. We used next-generation sequencing and historical virus-culture samples to determine 14 complete and nine coding-complete nairoviral genome sequences to further characterize these species. Previously unsequenced viruses include Abu Mina, Clo Mor, Great Saltee, Hughes, Raza, Sakhalin, Soldado, and Tillamook viruses. In addition, we present genomic sequence information on additional isolates of previously sequenced Avalon, Dugbe, Sapphire II, and Zirqa viruses. Finally, we identify Tunis virus, previously thought to be a phlebovirus, as an isolate of Abu Hammad virus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the need for reassignment of Sapphire II virus to Dera Ghazi Khan nairovirus and reassignment of Hazara, Tofla, and Nairobi sheep disease viruses to novel species. We also propose new species for the Kasokero group (Kasokero, Leopards Hill, Yogue viruses), the Ketarah group (Gossas, Issyk-kul, Keterah/soft tick viruses) and the Burana group (Wēnzhōu tick virus, Huángpí tick virus 1, Tǎchéng tick virus 1). Our analyses emphasize the sister relationship of nairoviruses and arenaviruses, and indicate that several nairo-like viruses (Shāyáng spider virus 1, Xīnzhōu spider virus, Sānxiá water strider virus 1, South Bay virus, Wǔhàn millipede virus 2) require establishment of novel genera in a larger nairovirus-arenavirus supergroup. PMID:27294949

  16. Genomic Characterization of the Genus Nairovirus (Family Bunyaviridae).

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jens H; Wiley, Michael R; Rodriguez, Sergio E; Bào, Yīmíng; Prieto, Karla; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Guzman, Hilda; Savji, Nazir; Ladner, Jason T; Tesh, Robert B; Wada, Jiro; Jahrling, Peter B; Bente, Dennis A; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Nairovirus, one of five bunyaviral genera, includes seven species. Genomic sequence information is limited for members of the Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, Qalyub, Sakhalin, and Thiafora nairovirus species. We used next-generation sequencing and historical virus-culture samples to determine 14 complete and nine coding-complete nairoviral genome sequences to further characterize these species. Previously unsequenced viruses include Abu Mina, Clo Mor, Great Saltee, Hughes, Raza, Sakhalin, Soldado, and Tillamook viruses. In addition, we present genomic sequence information on additional isolates of previously sequenced Avalon, Dugbe, Sapphire II, and Zirqa viruses. Finally, we identify Tunis virus, previously thought to be a phlebovirus, as an isolate of Abu Hammad virus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the need for reassignment of Sapphire II virus to Dera Ghazi Khan nairovirus and reassignment of Hazara, Tofla, and Nairobi sheep disease viruses to novel species. We also propose new species for the Kasokero group (Kasokero, Leopards Hill, Yogue viruses), the Ketarah group (Gossas, Issyk-kul, Keterah/soft tick viruses) and the Burana group (Wēnzhōu tick virus, Huángpí tick virus 1, Tǎchéng tick virus 1). Our analyses emphasize the sister relationship of nairoviruses and arenaviruses, and indicate that several nairo-like viruses (Shāyáng spider virus 1, Xīnzhōu spider virus, Sānxiá water strider virus 1, South Bay virus, Wǔhàn millipede virus 2) require establishment of novel genera in a larger nairovirus-arenavirus supergroup. PMID:27294949

  17. Isolation and characterization of hypervariable sequences from tsetse fly genome.

    PubMed

    Blanchetot, A; Gooding, R H

    1994-10-01

    A Glossina brevipalpis Newstead genomic library, constructed using a Charomid 9-36 vector, was used to isolate putative clones that hybridize to polymorphic regions of the tsetse genome. Five types of probes, that reveal individual DNA polymorphic in humans and higher animal species, were used to screen 300 tsetse Charomid clones; 15% of the clones hybridized with at least one probe. Twenty four recombinants were further characterized by Southern blotting hybridization using DNA isolated from individual tsetse fly from Glossina morsitans centralis Machado. Two classes of DNA profiles were obtained upon hybridization with the recombinant inserts. The first, termed the "multilocus profile" displayed a complex DNA pattern of multiple components whilst the second, referred to as the "single locus profile" revealed one or two bands in each individual. Of the 24 recombinant inserts tested, 13 were multilocus probes and the remainder were single locus probes, each of which hybridized to a single location when G. m. centralis DNA had been cleaved with EcoRI. These single locus probes revealed a low level of genetic variability among individual flies from an inbred colony. The hybridization profiles using multilocus and single locus probes were also obtained on DNA from individual Glossina palpalis palpalis Robineau-Desvoidy and Glossina palpalis gambienis Vanderplank and some of the G. brevipalpis recombinant clones also detected multilocus profiles in honey bees and man. PMID:7951269

  18. The Salmonella In Silico Typing Resource (SISTR): An Open Web-Accessible Tool for Rapidly Typing and Subtyping Draft Salmonella Genome Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Catherine E; Kruczkiewicz, Peter; Laing, Chad R; Lingohr, Erika J; Gannon, Victor P J; Nash, John H E; Taboada, Eduardo N

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 100 years serotyping has been the gold standard for the identification of Salmonella serovars. Despite the increasing adoption of DNA-based subtyping approaches, serotype information remains a cornerstone in food safety and public health activities aimed at reducing the burden of salmonellosis. At the same time, recent advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) promise to revolutionize our ability to perform advanced pathogen characterization in support of improved source attribution and outbreak analysis. We present the Salmonella In Silico Typing Resource (SISTR), a bioinformatics platform for rapidly performing simultaneous in silico analyses for several leading subtyping methods on draft Salmonella genome assemblies. In addition to performing serovar prediction by genoserotyping, this resource integrates sequence-based typing analyses for: Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), ribosomal MLST (rMLST), and core genome MLST (cgMLST). We show how phylogenetic context from cgMLST analysis can supplement the genoserotyping analysis and increase the accuracy of in silico serovar prediction to over 94.6% on a dataset comprised of 4,188 finished genomes and WGS draft assemblies. In addition to allowing analysis of user-uploaded whole-genome assemblies, the SISTR platform incorporates a database comprising over 4,000 publicly available genomes, allowing users to place their isolates in a broader phylogenetic and epidemiological context. The resource incorporates several metadata driven visualizations to examine the phylogenetic, geospatial and temporal distribution of genome-sequenced isolates. As sequencing of Salmonella isolates at public health laboratories around the world becomes increasingly common, rapid in silico analysis of minimally processed draft genome assemblies provides a powerful approach for molecular epidemiology in support of public health investigations. Moreover, this type of integrated analysis using multiple sequence-based methods of sub

  19. The Salmonella In Silico Typing Resource (SISTR): An Open Web-Accessible Tool for Rapidly Typing and Subtyping Draft Salmonella Genome Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Chad R.; Lingohr, Erika J.; Gannon, Victor P. J.; Nash, John H. E.; Taboada, Eduardo N.

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 100 years serotyping has been the gold standard for the identification of Salmonella serovars. Despite the increasing adoption of DNA-based subtyping approaches, serotype information remains a cornerstone in food safety and public health activities aimed at reducing the burden of salmonellosis. At the same time, recent advances in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) promise to revolutionize our ability to perform advanced pathogen characterization in support of improved source attribution and outbreak analysis. We present the Salmonella In Silico Typing Resource (SISTR), a bioinformatics platform for rapidly performing simultaneous in silico analyses for several leading subtyping methods on draft Salmonella genome assemblies. In addition to performing serovar prediction by genoserotyping, this resource integrates sequence-based typing analyses for: Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), ribosomal MLST (rMLST), and core genome MLST (cgMLST). We show how phylogenetic context from cgMLST analysis can supplement the genoserotyping analysis and increase the accuracy of in silico serovar prediction to over 94.6% on a dataset comprised of 4,188 finished genomes and WGS draft assemblies. In addition to allowing analysis of user-uploaded whole-genome assemblies, the SISTR platform incorporates a database comprising over 4,000 publicly available genomes, allowing users to place their isolates in a broader phylogenetic and epidemiological context. The resource incorporates several metadata driven visualizations to examine the phylogenetic, geospatial and temporal distribution of genome-sequenced isolates. As sequencing of Salmonella isolates at public health laboratories around the world becomes increasingly common, rapid in silico analysis of minimally processed draft genome assemblies provides a powerful approach for molecular epidemiology in support of public health investigations. Moreover, this type of integrated analysis using multiple sequence-based methods of sub

  20. GE-20GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF BREAST CANCER BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Michelhaugh, Sharon; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of central nervous system metastasis from primary breast cancer has steadily increased with introduction of more effective molecular-targeted therapies resulting in improved long-term survival. Current standard-of-care treatment modalities for CNS metastases include microsurgical resection, whole-brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery, either alone or in combination. There are currently no FDA-approved drugs with an indication for breast cancer brain metastases. Clearly, there is a dire need to identify biomarkers permitting earlier and accurate diagnosis of CNS metastases, development of prevention strategies in high-risk individuals, and establishing more effective treatment options such as targeted systemic and intrathecal therapies. METHODS: Extracted DNA from metastatic brain tumors (MBTs) and matched tissues from primary breast tumors was quantified and array comparative genomic hybridizations (aCGH) were performed with Agilent SurePrint arrays (G3 ISCA CGH + SNP 180K) using a commercially-available, genetically-normal female DNA standard. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using Agilent CytoGenomics Edition 2.5.8.1. Data were filtered against the Cancer Gene Census (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) to identify genes with well-characterized roles in cancer. RESULTS: From genomic copy number data analysis tailored to uncover the most frequent gene aberrations in breast cancer MBTs, we identified that MYC oncogene amplification was among the most common. Pathway analysis of the analyzed gene set of recurring gene aberrations identified the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency pathway as being over-represented. The genes in this pathway showing copy number gain include NTRK1, PIK3CA and SOX2. Direct comparisons of MBTs with their matched primary tumor (n = 4) revealed a range of examples for highly similar and divergent patterns of gene aberrations. In one case ERBB2 was confirmed to be in the MBT, and not in the

  1. Genomic Characterization of Prenatally Detected Chromosomal Structural Abnormalities Using Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peining; Pomianowski, Pawel; DiMaio, Miriam S.; Florio, Joanne R.; Rossi, Michael R.; Xiang, Bixia; Xu, Fang; Yang, Hui; Geng, Qian; Xie, Jiansheng; Mahoney, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chromosomal structural abnormalities using conventional cytogenetic methods poses a challenge for prenatal genetic counseling due to unpredictable clinical outcomes and risk of recurrence. Of the 1,726 prenatal cases in a 3-year period, we performed oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis on 11 cases detected with various structural chromosomal abnormalities. In nine cases, genomic aberrations and gene contents involving a 3p distal deletion, a marker chromosome from chromosome 4, a derivative chromosome 5 from a 5p/7q translocation, a de novo distal 6q deletion, a recombinant chromosome 8 comprised of an 8p duplication and an 8q deletion, an extra derivative chromosome 9 from an 8p/9q translocation, mosaicism for chromosome 12q with added material of initially unknown origin, an unbalanced 13q/15q rearrangement, and a distal 18q duplication and deletion were delineated. An absence of pathogenic copy number changes was noted in one case with a de novo 11q/14q translocation and in another with a familial insertion of 21q into a 19q. Genomic characterization of the structural abnormalities aided in the prediction of clinical outcomes. These results demonstrated the value of aCGH analysis in prenatal cases with subtle or complex chromosomal rearrangements. Furthermore, a retrospective analysis of clinical indications of our prenatal cases showed that approximately 20% of them had abnormal ultrasound findings and should be considered as high risk pregnancies for a combined chromosome and aCGH analysis. PMID:21671377

  2. Rapid evolution and complex structural organization in genomic regions harboring multiple prolamin genes in the polyploid wheat genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes encoding wheat prolamins belong to complicated multi-gene families in the wheat genome. To understand the structural complexity of storage protein loci, we sequenced and analyzed orthologous regions containing both gliadin and LMW-glutenin genes from the A and B genomes of a tetraploid wheat ...

  3. Design of Genomic Signatures of Pathogen Identification & Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, T; Gardner, S; Allen, J; Vitalis, E; Jaing, C

    2010-02-09

    This chapter will address some of the many issues associated with the identification of signatures based on genomic DNA/RNA, which can be used to identify and characterize pathogens for biodefense and microbial forensic goals. For the purposes of this chapter, we define a signature as one or more strings of contiguous genomic DNA or RNA bases that are sufficient to identify a pathogenic target of interest at the desired resolution and which could be instantiated with particular detection chemistry on a particular platform. The target may be a whole organism, an individual functional mechanism (e.g., a toxin gene), or simply a nucleic acid indicative of the organism. The desired resolution will vary with each program's goals but could easily range from family to genus to species to strain to isolate. The resolution may not be taxonomically based but rather pan-mechanistic in nature: detecting virulence or antibiotic-resistance genes shared by multiple microbes. Entire industries exist around different detection chemistries and instrument platforms for identification of pathogens, and we will only briefly mention a few of the techniques that we have used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to support our biosecurity-related work since 2000. Most nucleic acid based detection chemistries involve the ability to isolate and amplify the signature target region(s), combined with a technique to detect the amplification. Genomic signature based identification techniques have the advantage of being precise, highly sensitive and relatively fast in comparison to biochemical typing methods and protein signatures. Classical biochemical typing methods were developed long before knowledge of DNA and resulted in dozens of tests (Gram's stain, differential growth characteristics media, etc.) that could be used to roughly characterize the major known pathogens (of course some are uncultivable). These tests could take many days to complete and precise resolution of species

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar-Figueras, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  6. Genomic Characterization of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase Gene in Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Karthikeyan; Vitali, Fabio; Tolaini, Valentina; Galeffi, Patrizia; Cantale, Cristina; Vikram, Prashant; Singh, Sukhwinder; De Rossi, Patrizia; Nobili, Chiara; Procacci, Silvia; Del Fiore, Antonella; Antonini, Alessandro; Presenti, Ombretta; Brunori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL) gene which plays a key role in bio-synthesis of medicinally important compounds, Rutin/quercetin was sequence characterized for its efficient genomics application. These compounds possessing anti-diabetic and anti-cancer properties and are predominantly produced by Fagopyrum spp. In the present study, PAL gene was sequenced from three Fagopyrum spp. (F. tataricum, F. esculentum and F. dibotrys) and showed the presence of three SNPs and four insertion/deletions at intra and inter specific level. Among them, the potential SNP (position 949th bp G>C) with Parsimony Informative Site was selected and successfully utilised to individuate the zygosity/allelic variation of 16 F. tataricum varieties. Insertion mutations were identified in coding region, which resulted the change of a stretch of 39 amino acids on the putative protein. Our Study revealed that autogamous species (F. tataricum) has lower frequency of observed SNPs as compared to allogamous species (F. dibotrys and F. esculentum). The identified SNPs in F. tataricum didn’t result to amino acid change, while in other two species it caused both conservative and non-conservative variations. Consistent pattern of SNPs across the species revealed their phylogenetic importance. We found two groups of F. tataricum and one of them was closely related with F. dibotrys. Sequence characterization information of PAL gene reported in present investigation can be utilized in genetic improvement of buckwheat in reference to its medicinal value. PMID:26990297

  7. Genomic Characterization of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase Gene in Buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Karthikeyan; Vitali, Fabio; Tolaini, Valentina; Galeffi, Patrizia; Cantale, Cristina; Vikram, Prashant; Singh, Sukhwinder; De Rossi, Patrizia; Nobili, Chiara; Procacci, Silvia; Del Fiore, Antonella; Antonini, Alessandro; Presenti, Ombretta; Brunori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL) gene which plays a key role in bio-synthesis of medicinally important compounds, Rutin/quercetin was sequence characterized for its efficient genomics application. These compounds possessing anti-diabetic and anti-cancer properties and are predominantly produced by Fagopyrum spp. In the present study, PAL gene was sequenced from three Fagopyrum spp. (F. tataricum, F. esculentum and F. dibotrys) and showed the presence of three SNPs and four insertion/deletions at intra and inter specific level. Among them, the potential SNP (position 949th bp G>C) with Parsimony Informative Site was selected and successfully utilised to individuate the zygosity/allelic variation of 16 F. tataricum varieties. Insertion mutations were identified in coding region, which resulted the change of a stretch of 39 amino acids on the putative protein. Our Study revealed that autogamous species (F. tataricum) has lower frequency of observed SNPs as compared to allogamous species (F. dibotrys and F. esculentum). The identified SNPs in F. tataricum didn't result to amino acid change, while in other two species it caused both conservative and non-conservative variations. Consistent pattern of SNPs across the species revealed their phylogenetic importance. We found two groups of F. tataricum and one of them was closely related with F. dibotrys. Sequence characterization information of PAL gene reported in present investigation can be utilized in genetic improvement of buckwheat in reference to its medicinal value. PMID:26990297

  8. Rapid, comprehensive, and affordable mycobacterial diagnosis with whole-genome sequencing: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Louise J; del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Votintseva, Antonina A; Walker, Timothy M; Cole, Kevin; Davies, Jim; Fermont, Jilles M; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah M; Kohl, Thomas A; Kong, Clare; Lemaitre, Nadine; Niemann, Stefan; Paul, John; Rogers, Thomas R; Roycroft, Emma; Smith, E Grace; Supply, Philip; Tang, Patrick; Wilcox, Mark H; Wordsworth, Sarah; Wyllie, David; Xu, Li; Crook, Derrick W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Slow and cumbersome laboratory diagnostics for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) risk delayed treatment and poor patient outcomes. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) could potentially provide a rapid and comprehensive diagnostic solution. In this prospective study, we compare real-time WGS with routine MTBC diagnostic workflows. Methods We compared sequencing mycobacteria from all newly positive liquid cultures with routine laboratory diagnostic workflows across eight laboratories in Europe and North America for diagnostic accuracy, processing times, and cost between Sept 6, 2013, and April 14, 2014. We sequenced specimens once using local Illumina MiSeq platforms and processed data centrally using a semi-automated bioinformatics pipeline. We identified species or complex using gene presence or absence, predicted drug susceptibilities from resistance-conferring mutations identified from reference-mapped MTBC genomes, and calculated genetic distance to previously sequenced UK MTBC isolates to detect outbreaks. WGS data processing and analysis was done by staff masked to routine reference laboratory and clinical results. We also did a microcosting analysis to assess the financial viability of WGS-based diagnostics. Findings Compared with routine results, WGS predicted species with 93% (95% CI 90–96; 322 of 345 specimens; 356 mycobacteria specimens submitted) accuracy and drug susceptibility also with 93% (91–95; 628 of 672 specimens; 168 MTBC specimens identified) accuracy, with one sequencing attempt. WGS linked 15 (16% [95% CI 10–26]) of 91 UK patients to an outbreak. WGS diagnosed a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis before routine diagnosis was completed and discovered a new multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cluster. Full WGS diagnostics could be generated in a median of 9 days (IQR 6–10), a median of 21 days (IQR 14–32) faster than final reference laboratory reports were produced (median of 31 days [IQR 21–44]), at a cost

  9. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers with the potential to i

  10. Genome-wide mining, characterization, and development of microsatellite markers in Marsupenaeus japonicus by genome survey sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Kong, Jie; Hu, Longyang; Mao, Yong; Zhong, Shengping

    2015-12-01

    The kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, is one of the most cultivated and consumed species of shrimp. However, very few molecular genetic/genomic resources are publically available for it. Thus, the characterization and distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) remains ambiguous and the use of SSR markers in genomic studies and marker-assisted selection is limited. The goal of this study is to characterize and develop genome-wide SSR markers in M. japonicus by genome survey sequencing for application in comparative genomics and breeding. A total of 326 945 perfect SSRs were identifi ed, among which dinucleotide repeats were the most frequent class (44.08%), followed by mononucleotides (29.67%), trinucleotides (18.96%), tetranucleotides (5.66%), hexanucleotides (1.07%), and pentanucleotides (0.56%). In total, 151 541 SSR loci primers were successfully designed. A subset of 30 SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested in 42 individuals from a wild population, of which 27 loci (90.0%) were successfully amplifi ed with specifi c products and 24 (80.0%) were polymorphic. For the amplifi ed polymorphic loci, the alleles ranged from 5 to 17 (with an average of 9.63), and the average PIC value was 0.796. A total of 58 256 SSR-containing sequences had signifi cant Gene Ontology annotation; these are good functional molecular marker candidates for association studies and comparative genomic analysis. The newly identifi ed SSRs signifi cantly contribute to the M. japonicus genomic resources and will facilitate a number of genetic and genomic studies, including high density linkage mapping, genome-wide association analysis, marker-aided selection, comparative genomics analysis, population genetics, and evolution.

  11. Rapid detection, characterization, and enumeration of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hoorfar, J

    2011-11-01

    As food safety management further develops, microbiological testing will continue to play an important role in assessing whether Food Safety Objectives are achieved. However, traditional microbiological culture-based methods are limited, particularly in their ability to provide timely data. The present review discusses the reasons for the increasing interest in rapid methods, current developments in the field, the research needs, and the future trends. The advent of biotechnology has introduced new technologies that led to the emergence of rapid diagnostic methods and altered food testing practices. Rapid methods are comprised of many different detection technologies, including specialized enzyme substrates, antibodies and DNA, ranging from simple differential plating media to the use of sophisticated instruments. The use of non-invasive sampling techniques for live animals especially came into focus with the 1990s outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy that was linked to the human outbreak of Creutzfeldt Jakob's Disease. Serology is still an important tool in preventing foodborne pathogens to enter the human food supply through meat and milk from animals. One of the primary uses of rapid methods is for fast screening of large number of samples, where most of them are expected to be test-negative, leading to faster product release for sale. This has been the main strength of rapid methods such as real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Enrichment PCR, where a primary culture broth is tested in PCR, is the most common approach in rapid testing. Recent reports show that it is possible both to enrich a sample and enumerate by pathogen-specific real-time PCR, if the enrichment time is short. This can be especially useful in situations where food producers ask for the level of pathogen in a contaminated product. Another key issue is automation, where the key drivers are miniaturization and multiple testing, which mean that not only one instrument is flexible

  12. An empirical strategy for characterizing bacterial proteomes across species in the absence of genomic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Turse, Joshua E.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Callister, Stephen J.

    2010-11-12

    Current methods in proteomics are dependent on the availability of sequenced genomes to identify proteins. However, genomic sequences are not always available for bacteria or microbial communities, even with high throughput sequencing technology becoming more readily available. Nevertheless, the homology that exists between related bacteria makes possible the extraction of meaningful biological information from an organism’s, or community’s proteome using the genomic sequence of a near neighbor. Here, a cross-organism search strategy was used to look at the amount of proteomics information obtainable with relative genetic distance from a near neighbor organism and to identify proteins in the proteome of minimally characterized environmental isolates. We conclude that closely related organisms with sequenced genomes, can be used to characterize proteomes of organisms with unsequenced genomes. In general, a cross-organism search strategy demonstrates the first step to use of sequences genomes to evaluate the proteomes of environmental bacteria and microbial communities that have no sequenced genome

  13. Mitochondrial genomes suggest rapid evolution of dwarf California Channel Islands foxes (Urocyon littoralis).

    PubMed

    Hofman, Courtney A; Rick, Torben C; Hawkins, Melissa T R; Funk, W Chris; Ralls, Katherine; Boser, Christina L; Collins, Paul W; Coonan, Tim; King, Julie L; Morrison, Scott A; Newsome, Seth D; Sillett, T Scott; Fleischer, Robert C; Maldonado, Jesus E

    2015-01-01

    Island endemics are typically differentiated from their mainland progenitors in behavior, morphology, and genetics, often resulting from long-term evolutionary change. To examine mechanisms for the origins of island endemism, we present a phylogeographic analysis of whole mitochondrial genomes from the endangered island fox (Urocyon littoralis), endemic to California's Channel Islands, and mainland gray foxes (U. cinereoargenteus). Previous genetic studies suggested that foxes first appeared on the islands >16,000 years ago, before human arrival (~13,000 cal BP), while archaeological and paleontological data supported a colonization >7000 cal BP. Our results are consistent with initial fox colonization of the northern islands probably by rafting or human introduction ~9200-7100 years ago, followed quickly by human translocation of foxes from the northern to southern Channel Islands. Mitogenomes indicate that island foxes are monophyletic and most closely related to gray foxes from northern California that likely experienced a Holocene climate-induced range shift. Our data document rapid morphological evolution of island foxes (in ~2000 years or less). Despite evidence for bottlenecks, island foxes have generated and maintained multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. This study highlights the intertwined evolutionary history of island foxes and humans, and illustrates a new approach for investigating the evolutionary histories of other island endemics. PMID:25714775

  14. Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest Rapid Evolution of Dwarf California Channel Islands Foxes (Urocyon littoralis)

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Courtney A.; Rick, Torben C.; Hawkins, Melissa T. R.; Funk, W. Chris; Ralls, Katherine; Boser, Christina L.; Collins, Paul W.; Coonan, Tim; King, Julie L.; Morrison, Scott A.; Newsome, Seth D.; Sillett, T. Scott; Fleischer, Robert C.; Maldonado, Jesus E.

    2015-01-01

    Island endemics are typically differentiated from their mainland progenitors in behavior, morphology, and genetics, often resulting from long-term evolutionary change. To examine mechanisms for the origins of island endemism, we present a phylogeographic analysis of whole mitochondrial genomes from the endangered island fox (Urocyon littoralis), endemic to California’s Channel Islands, and mainland gray foxes (U. cinereoargenteus). Previous genetic studies suggested that foxes first appeared on the islands >16,000 years ago, before human arrival (~13,000 cal BP), while archaeological and paleontological data supported a colonization >7000 cal BP. Our results are consistent with initial fox colonization of the northern islands probably by rafting or human introduction ~9200–7100 years ago, followed quickly by human translocation of foxes from the northern to southern Channel Islands. Mitogenomes indicate that island foxes are monophyletic and most closely related to gray foxes from northern California that likely experienced a Holocene climate-induced range shift. Our data document rapid morphological evolution of island foxes (in ~2000 years or less). Despite evidence for bottlenecks, island foxes have generated and maintained multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. This study highlights the intertwined evolutionary history of island foxes and humans, and illustrates a new approach for investigating the evolutionary histories of other island endemics. PMID:25714775

  15. Genomic Evidence of Rapid and Stable Adaptive Oscillations over Seasonal Time Scales in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; O'Brien, Katherine R.; Schmidt, Paul S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    In many species, genomic data have revealed pervasive adaptive evolution indicated by the fixation of beneficial alleles. However, when selection pressures are highly variable along a species' range or through time adaptive alleles may persist at intermediate frequencies for long periods. So called “balanced polymorphisms” have long been understood to be an important component of standing genetic variation, yet direct evidence of the strength of balancing selection and the stability and prevalence of balanced polymorphisms has remained elusive. We hypothesized that environmental fluctuations among seasons in a North American orchard would impose temporally variable selection on Drosophila melanogaster that would drive repeatable adaptive oscillations at balanced polymorphisms. We identified hundreds of polymorphisms whose frequency oscillates among seasons and argue that these loci are subject to strong, temporally variable selection. We show that these polymorphisms respond to acute and persistent changes in climate and are associated in predictable ways with seasonally variable phenotypes. In addition, our results suggest that adaptively oscillating polymorphisms are likely millions of years old, with some possibly predating the divergence between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model of balancing selection wherein rapid temporal fluctuations in climate over generational time promotes adaptive genetic diversity at loci underlying polygenic variation in fitness related phenotypes. PMID:25375361

  16. Meiotic Parthenogenesis in a Root-Knot Nematode Results in Rapid Genomic Homozygosity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingli L.; Thomas, Varghese P.; Williamson, Valerie M.

    2007-01-01

    Many isolates of the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne hapla reproduce by facultative meiotic parthenogenesis. Sexual crosses can occur, but, in the absence of males, the diploid state appears to be restored by reuniting sister chromosomes of a single meiosis. We have crossed inbred strains of M. hapla that differ in DNA markers and produced hybrids and F2 lines. Here we show that heterozygous M. hapla females, upon parthenogenetic reproduction, produce progeny that segregate 1:1 for the presence or absence of dominant DNA markers, as would be expected if sister chromosomes are rejoined, rather than the 3:1 ratio typical of a Mendelian cross. Codominant markers also segregate 1:1 and heterozygotes are present at low frequency (<3%). Segregation patterns and recombinant analysis indicate that a homozygous condition is prevalent for markers flanking recombination events, suggesting that recombination occurs preferentially as four-strand exchanges at similar locations between both pairs of non-sister chromatids. With this mechanism, meiotic parthenogenesis would be expected to result in rapid genomic homozygosity. This type of high negative crossover interference coupled with positive chromatid interference has not been observed in fungal or other animal systems in which it is possible to examine the sister products of a single meiosis and may indicate that meiotic recombination in this nematode has novel features. PMID:17483427

  17. Genome skimming: A rapid approach to gaining diverse biological insights into multicellular pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New genome sequence information can now be generated very quickly and cheaply for virtually any organism. The dive into genomics is increasingly tempting to scientists studying plant pathogens and other eukaryotic species without reference genomes. The ease of data collection, however, is tempered ...

  18. Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine Sequencing for Genomic Typing of Neisseria meningitidis for Rapid Determination of Multiple Layers of Typing Information

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Claus, Heike; Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes invasive meningococcal disease in infants, toddlers, and adolescents worldwide. DNA sequence-based typing, including multilocus sequence typing, analysis of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance, and sequence typing of vaccine antigens, has become the standard for molecular epidemiology of the organism. However, PCR of multiple targets and consecutive Sanger sequencing provide logistic constraints to reference laboratories. Taking advantage of the recent development of benchtop next-generation sequencers (NGSs) and of BIGSdb, a database accommodating and analyzing genome sequence data, we therefore explored the feasibility and accuracy of Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing for genomic typing of meningococci. Three strains from a previous meningococcus serogroup B community outbreak were selected to compare conventional typing results with data generated by semiconductor chip-based sequencing. In addition, sequencing of the meningococcal type strain MC58 provided information about the general performance of the technology. The PGM technology generated sequence information for all target genes addressed. The results were 100% concordant with conventional typing results, with no further editing being necessary. In addition, the amount of typing information, i.e., nucleotides and target genes analyzed, could be substantially increased by the combined use of genome sequencing and BIGSdb compared to conventional methods. In the near future, affordable and fast benchtop NGS machines like the PGM might enable reference laboratories to switch to genomic typing on a routine basis. This will reduce workloads and rapidly provide information for laboratory surveillance, outbreak investigation, assessment of vaccine preventability, and antibiotic resistance gene monitoring. PMID:22461678

  19. Construction and characterization of a valve for rapid gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedo, M.; Rossi, J. O.; Aso, Y.; Mangueira, L. S.; Pereira, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic valve for fast gas injection was built and characterized. This type of gas injection valve is routinely applied to various plasma experiments: in magnetic confinement devices as TOKAMAK, FRP, and Compact Toroids as well as intense ion beam and neutral particle generators. The valve is capable of injecting gas pulses with up to 80 m Torr peak pressure, rising time less than 400 microsec and duration time of 40 ms, in the present experimental set-up. It is easy to build and its components can be totally acquired in the country.

  20. Rapid morphological characterization of isolated mitochondria using Brownian motion†

    PubMed Central

    Palanisami, Akilan; Fang, Jie; Lowder, Thomas W.; Kunz, Hawley; Miller, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology has been associated with numerous pathologies including cancer, diabetes, obesity and heart disease. However, the connection is poorly understood—in part due to the difficulty of characterizing the morphology. This impedes the use of morphology as a tool for disease detection/monitoring. Here, we use the Brownian motion of isolated mitochondria to characterize their size and shape in a high throughput fashion. By using treadmill exercise training, mitochondria from heart and gastrocnemius of Balb/c mice were modulated in size and used to investigate the protocol. Consistent with previous reports, the heart mitochondria of untrained mice increased 5% in diameter immediately after a single bout of moderate exercise (1.091 ± 0.004 μm) as compared to completely sedentary controls (1.040 ± 0.022 μm). In addition, no change was observed in the size of gastrocnemius mitochondria (1.025 ± 0.018 μm), which was also in agreement with previous studies. The method was also successfully applied to smaller Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria. PMID:26435755

  1. Reverse transcription genome exponential amplification reaction assay for rapid and universal detection of human rhinoviruses.

    PubMed

    Guan, Li; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Zhou, Hang-Yu; Nie, Kai; Li, Xin-Na; Zhang, Dan; Song, Juan; Qian, Yuan; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have long been recognized as the cause of more than one-half of acute viral upper respiratory illnesses, and they are associated with more-serious diseases in children, such as asthma, acute otitis media and pneumonia. A rapid and universal test for of HRV infection is in high demand. In this study, a reverse transcription genome exponential amplification reaction (RT-GEAR) assay targeting the HRV 5' untranslated region (UTR) was developed for pan-HRV detection. The reaction was performed in a single tube in one step at 65 °C for 60 min using a real-time fluorometer (Genie(®)II; Optigene). The RT-GEAR assay showed no cross-reactivity with common human enteroviruses, including HEV71, CVA16, CVA6, CVA10, CVA24, CVB5, Echo30, and PV1-3 or with other common respiratory viruses including FluA H3, FluB, PIV1-4, ADV3, RSVA, RSVB and HMPV. With in vitro-transcribed RNA containing the amplified regions of HRV-A60, HRV-B06 and HRV-C07 as templates, the sensitivity of the RT-GEAR assay was 5, 50 and 5 copies/reaction, respectively. Experiments to evaluate the clinical performance of the RT-GEAR assay were also carried out with a panel of 143 previously verified samples, and the results were compared with those obtained using a published semi-nested PCR assay followed by sequencing. The tested panel comprised 91 HRV-negative samples and 52 HRV-positive samples (18 HRV-A-positive samples, 3 HRV-B-positive samples and 31 HRV-C-positive samples). The sensitivity and specificity of the pan-HRVs RT-GEAR assay was 98.08 % and 100 %, respectively. The kappa correlation between the two methods was 0.985. The RT-GEAR assay based on a portable Genie(®)II fluorometer is a sensitive, specific and rapid assay for the universal detection of HRV infection. PMID:27132014

  2. Rapid coastal spread of First Americans: Novel insights from South America's Southern Cone mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Martin; Perego, Ugo A.; Huber, Gabriela; Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander W.; Zimmermann, Bettina; Olivieri, Anna; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Lancioni, Hovirag; Angerhofer, Norman; Bobillo, Maria Cecilia; Corach, Daniel; Woodward, Scott R.; Salas, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely agreed that the Native American founders originated from a Beringian source population ∼15–18 thousand years ago (kya) and rapidly populated all of the New World, probably mainly following the Pacific coastal route. However, details about the migration into the Americas and the routes pursued on the continent still remain unresolved, despite numerous genetic, archaeological, and linguistic investigations. To examine the pioneering peopling phase of the South American continent, we screened literature and mtDNA databases and identified two novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) clades, here named D1g and D1j, within the pan-American haplogroup D1. They both show overall rare occurrences but local high frequencies, and are essentially restricted to populations from the Southern Cone of South America (Chile and Argentina). We selected and completely sequenced 43 D1g and D1j mtDNA genomes applying highest quality standards. Molecular and phylogeographic analyses revealed extensive variation within each of the two clades and possibly distinct dispersal patterns. Their age estimates agree with the dating of the earliest archaeological sites in South America and indicate that the Paleo-Indian spread along the entire longitude of the American double continent might have taken even <2000 yr. This study confirms that major sampling and sequencing efforts are mandatory for uncovering all of the most basal variation in the Native American mtDNA haplogroups and for clarification of Paleo-Indian migrations, by targeting, if possible, both the general mixed population of national states and autochthonous Native American groups, especially in South America. PMID:22333566

  3. Rapid coastal spread of First Americans: novel insights from South America's Southern Cone mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Perego, Ugo A; Huber, Gabriela; Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander W; Zimmermann, Bettina; Olivieri, Anna; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Lancioni, Hovirag; Angerhofer, Norman; Bobillo, Maria Cecilia; Corach, Daniel; Woodward, Scott R; Salas, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Parson, Walther

    2012-05-01

    It is now widely agreed that the Native American founders originated from a Beringian source population ~15-18 thousand years ago (kya) and rapidly populated all of the New World, probably mainly following the Pacific coastal route. However, details about the migration into the Americas and the routes pursued on the continent still remain unresolved, despite numerous genetic, archaeological, and linguistic investigations. To examine the pioneering peopling phase of the South American continent, we screened literature and mtDNA databases and identified two novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) clades, here named D1g and D1j, within the pan-American haplogroup D1. They both show overall rare occurrences but local high frequencies, and are essentially restricted to populations from the Southern Cone of South America (Chile and Argentina). We selected and completely sequenced 43 D1g and D1j mtDNA genomes applying highest quality standards. Molecular and phylogeographic analyses revealed extensive variation within each of the two clades and possibly distinct dispersal patterns. Their age estimates agree with the dating of the earliest archaeological sites in South America and indicate that the Paleo-Indian spread along the entire longitude of the American double continent might have taken even <2000 yr. This study confirms that major sampling and sequencing efforts are mandatory for uncovering all of the most basal variation in the Native American mtDNA haplogroups and for clarification of Paleo-Indian migrations, by targeting, if possible, both the general mixed population of national states and autochthonous Native American groups, especially in South America. PMID:22333566

  4. Genome-Based Selection and Characterization of Fusarium circinatum-Specific Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Maphosa, Mkhululi N.; Steenkamp, Emma T.; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium circinatum is an important pathogen of pine trees and its management in the commercial forestry environment relies largely on early detection, particularly in seedling nurseries. The fact that the entire genome of this pathogen is available opens new avenues for the development of diagnostic tools for this fungus. In this study we identified open reading frames (ORFs) unique to F. circinatum and determined that they were specific to the pathogen. The ORF identification process involved bioinformatics-based screening of all the putative F. circinatum ORFs against public databases. This was followed by functional characterization of ORFs found to be unique to F. circinatum. We used PCR- and hybridization-based approaches to confirm the presence of selected unique genes in different strains of F. circinatum and their absence from other Fusarium species for which genome sequence data are not yet available. These included species that are closely related to F. circinatum as well as those that are commonly encountered in the forestry environment. Thirty-six ORFs were identified as potentially unique to F. circinatum. Nineteen of these encode proteins with known domains while the other 17 encode proteins of unknown function. The results of our PCR analyses and hybridization assays showed that three of the selected genes were present in all of the strains of F. circinatum tested and absent from the other Fusarium species screened. These data thus indicate that the selected genes are common and unique to F. circinatum. These genes thus could be good candidates for use in rapid, in-the-field diagnostic assays specific to F. circinatum. Our study further demonstrates how genome sequence information can be mined for the identification of new diagnostic markers for the detection of plant pathogens. PMID:26888868

  5. Genome-Based Selection and Characterization of Fusarium circinatum-Specific Sequences.

    PubMed

    Maphosa, Mkhululi N; Steenkamp, Emma T; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2016-03-01

    Fusarium circinatum is an important pathogen of pine trees and its management in the commercial forestry environment relies largely on early detection, particularly in seedling nurseries. The fact that the entire genome of this pathogen is available opens new avenues for the development of diagnostic tools for this fungus. In this study we identified open reading frames (ORFs) unique to F. circinatum and determined that they were specific to the pathogen. The ORF identification process involved bioinformatics-based screening of all the putative F. circinatum ORFs against public databases. This was followed by functional characterization of ORFs found to be unique to F. circinatum. We used PCR- and hybridization-based approaches to confirm the presence of selected unique genes in different strains of F. circinatum and their absence from other Fusarium species for which genome sequence data are not yet available. These included species that are closely related to F. circinatum as well as those that are commonly encountered in the forestry environment. Thirty-six ORFs were identified as potentially unique to F. circinatum. Nineteen of these encode proteins with known domains while the other 17 encode proteins of unknown function. The results of our PCR analyses and hybridization assays showed that three of the selected genes were present in all of the strains of F. circinatum tested and absent from the other Fusarium species screened. These data thus indicate that the selected genes are common and unique to F. circinatum. These genes thus could be good candidates for use in rapid, in-the-field diagnostic assays specific to F. circinatum. Our study further demonstrates how genome sequence information can be mined for the identification of new diagnostic markers for the detection of plant pathogens. PMID:26888868

  6. Molecular Diagnosis of Long-QT syndrome at 10 Days of Life by Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Priest, James R.; Ceresnak, Scott R.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Malloy-Walton, Lindsey E.; Dunn, Kyla; Grove, Megan E.; Perez, Marco V.; Maeda, Katsuhide; Dubin, Anne M.; Ashley, Euan A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The advent of clinical next generation sequencing is rapidly changing the landscape of rare disease medicine. Molecular diagnosis of long QT syndrome (LQTS) can impact clinical management, including risk stratification and selection of pharmacotherapy based on the type of ion channel affected, but results from current gene panel testing requires 4 to 16 weeks before return to clinicians. Objective A term female infant presented with 2:1 atrioventricular block and ventricular arrhythmias consistent with perinatal LQTS, requiring aggressive treatment including epicardial pacemaker, and cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and sympathectomy on day of life two. We sought to provide a rapid molecular diagnosis for optimization of treatment strategies. Methods We performed CLIA-certified rapid whole genome sequencing (WGS) with a speed-optimized bioinformatics platform to achieve molecular diagnosis at 10 days of life. Results We detected a known pathogenic variant in KCNH2 that was demonstrated to be paternally inherited by followup genotyping. The unbiased assessment of the entire catalog of human genes provided by whole genome sequencing revealed a maternally inherited variant of unknown significance in a novel gene. Conclusions Rapid clinical WGS provides faster and more comprehensive diagnostic information by 10 days of life than standard gene-panel testing. In selected clinical scenarios such as perinatal LQTS, rapid WGS may be able to provide more timely and clinically actionable information than a standard commercial test. PMID:24973560

  7. Rapid identification of thousands of copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) microsatellite loci from modest amounts of 454 shotgun genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Poole, Alexander W; Gu, Wanjun; Jason de Koning, A P; Daza, Juan M; Smith, Eric N; Pollock, David D

    2010-03-01

    Optimal integration of next-generation sequencing into mainstream research requires re-evaluation of how problems can be reasonably overcome and what questions can be asked. One potential application is the rapid acquisition of genomic information to identify microsatellite loci for evolutionary, population genetic and chromosome linkage mapping research on non-model and not previously sequenced organisms. Here, we report on results using high-throughput sequencing to obtain a large number of microsatellite loci from the venomous snake Agkistrodon contortrix, the copperhead. We used the 454 Genome Sequencer FLX next-generation sequencing platform to sample randomly ∼27 Mbp (128 773 reads) of the copperhead genome, thus sampling about 2% of the genome of this species. We identified microsatellite loci in 11.3% of all reads obtained, with 14 612 microsatellite loci identified in total, 4564 of which had flanking sequences suitable for polymerase chain reaction primer design. The random sequencing-based approach to identify microsatellites was rapid, cost-effective and identified thousands of useful microsatellite loci in a previously unstudied species. PMID:21565030

  8. Faceted Surface Grain Morphology of Rapidly Solidified Alumina: Characterization and Potential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harimkar, Sandip; Kenik, Edward A; Shim, Sanghoon; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2009-01-01

    This communication reports on the characterization of novel surface microstructure formed in rapidly solidified porous alumina ceramic. Advanced characterization techniques such as Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) are used to understand the crystallographic and morphological aspects of the resultant microstructure. Potential applications of laser surface modified alumina ceramics are presented.

  9. Rapid genome-wide evolution in Brassica rapa populations following drought revealed by sequencing of ancestral and descendant gene pools.

    PubMed

    Franks, Steven J; Kane, Nolan C; O'Hara, Niamh B; Tittes, Silas; Rest, Joshua S

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that evolution can occur rapidly in response to selection. Recent advances in sequencing suggest the possibility of documenting genetic changes as they occur in populations, thus uncovering the genetic basis of evolution, particularly if samples are available from both before and after selection. Here, we had a unique opportunity to directly assess genetic changes in natural populations following an evolutionary response to a fluctuation in climate. We analysed genome-wide differences between ancestors and descendants of natural populations of Brassica rapa plants from two locations that rapidly evolved changes in multiple phenotypic traits, including flowering time, following a multiyear late-season drought in California. These ancestor-descendant comparisons revealed evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in many genes. Some genes showing evolutionary shifts have functions related to drought stress and flowering time, consistent with an adaptive response to selection. Loci differentiated between ancestors and descendants (FST outliers) were generally different from those showing signatures of selection based on site frequency spectrum analysis (Tajima's D), indicating that the loci that evolved in response to the recent drought and those under historical selection were generally distinct. Very few genes showed similar evolutionary responses between two geographically distinct populations, suggesting independent genetic trajectories of evolution yielding parallel phenotypic changes. The results show that selection can result in rapid genome-wide evolutionary shifts in allele frequencies in natural populations, and highlight the usefulness of combining resurrection experiments in natural populations with genomics for studying the genetic basis of adaptive evolution. PMID:27072809

  10. BAC-pool 454-sequencing: A rapid and efficient approach to sequence complex tetraploid cotton genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New and emerging next generation sequencing technologies have been promising in reducing sequencing costs, but not significantly for complex polyploid plant genomes such as cotton. Large and highly repetitive genome of G. hirsutum (~2.5GB) is less amenable and cost-intensive with traditional BAC-by...

  11. Rapid development of PCR-based genome-specific repetitive DNA junction markers in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (AABBDD, C=17,000Mb), repeat DNA accounts for ~ 90% of the genome of which transposable elements (TEs) constitute 60-80 %. Despite the dynamic evolution of TEs, our previous study indicated that the majority of TEs between the homologous wheat genomes are co...

  12. Eco-genomic analysis of the poleward range expansion of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi shows rapid adaptation and genomic admixture.

    PubMed

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Rödder, Dennis; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-12-01

    Poleward range expansions are commonly attributed to global change, but could alternatively be driven by rapid evolutionary adaptation. A well-documented example of a range expansion during the past decades is provided by the European wasp spider Argiope bruennichi. Using ecological niche modeling, thermal tolerance experiments and a genome-wide analysis of gene expression divergence, we show that invasive populations have adapted to novel climatic conditions in the course of their expansion. Their climatic niche shift is mirrored in an increased cold tolerance and a population-specific and functionally differentiated gene expression response. We generated an Argiope reference genome sequence and used population genome resequencing to assess genomic changes associated with the new climatic adaptations. We find clear genetic differentiation and a significant admixture with alleles from East Asian populations in the invasive Northern European populations. Population genetic modeling suggests that at least some of these introgressing alleles have contributed to the new adaptations during the expansion. Our results thus confirm the notion that range expansions are not a simple consequence of climate change, but are accompanied by fast genetic changes and adaptations that may be fuelled through admixture between long separated lineages. PMID:26183328

  13. [Rapid improvement of lipase production in Penicillium expansum by genome shuffling].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Shi, Bi-Hong; Shi, Qiao-Qin; He, Yun-Xia; Wang, Ming-Zi

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, the genome shuffling was used to improve lipase production of Penicillium expansum. A lipase producing mutant strain-Penicillium expansum FS8486 and a wild type of Aspergillus Tamarii FS-132 isolated from soil of a volcano in Xinjiang were used as the parental strains. After two rounds of genome shuffling, several elite daughter strains were screened. The lipase activity in one of the daughter strains was increased 317% over the starting strain FS8486. Comparisons of the morphology, RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) polymorphism and the fatty acid compositions between the daughter and the parental strains suggested that the filial generation were generated by genome shuffling. In this study, the genome shuffling used successfully first time in eukaryotic microorganism and increases the production of the desired metabolite in short time, the study will be useful to spread the genome shuffling in eukaryotic microbial breeding. PMID:17822042

  14. Preliminary Genomic Characterization of Ten Hardwood Tree Species from Multiplexed Low Coverage Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Staton, Margaret; Best, Teodora; Khodwekar, Sudhir; Owusu, Sandra; Xu, Tao; Xu, Yi; Jennings, Tara; Cronn, Richard; Arumuganathan, A. Kathiravetpilla; Coggeshall, Mark; Gailing, Oliver; Liang, Haiying; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Schlarbaum, Scott; Carlson, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Forest health issues are on the rise in the United States, resulting from introduction of alien pests and diseases, coupled with abiotic stresses related to climate change. Increasingly, forest scientists are finding genetic/genomic resources valuable in addressing forest health issues. For a set of ten ecologically and economically important native hardwood tree species representing a broad phylogenetic spectrum, we used low coverage whole genome sequencing from multiplex Illumina paired ends to economically profile their genomic content. For six species, the genome content was further analyzed by flow cytometry in order to determine the nuclear genome size. Sequencing yielded a depth of 0.8X to 7.5X, from which in silico analysis yielded preliminary estimates of gene and repetitive sequence content in the genome for each species. Thousands of genomic SSRs were identified, with a clear predisposition toward dinucleotide repeats and AT-rich repeat motifs. Flanking primers were designed for SSR loci for all ten species, ranging from 891 loci in sugar maple to 18,167 in redbay. In summary, we have demonstrated that useful preliminary genome information including repeat content, gene content and useful SSR markers can be obtained at low cost and time input from a single lane of Illumina multiplex sequence. PMID:26698853

  15. Rapid evolutionary change of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) plastome, and the genomic diversification of legume chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xianwu; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; González, Víctor; Bustos, Patricia; Luís Fernández-Vázquez, José; Santamaría, Rosa Isela; Arellano, Jesús; Cevallos, Miguel A; Dávila, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Background Fabaceae (legumes) is one of the largest families of flowering plants, and some members are important crops. In contrast to what we know about their great diversity or economic importance, our knowledge at the genomic level of chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs or plastomes) for these crops is limited. Results We sequenced the complete genome of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Negro Jamapa) chloroplast. The plastome of P. vulgaris is a 150,285 bp circular molecule. It has gene content similar to that of other legume plastomes, but contains two pseudogenes, rpl33 and rps16. A distinct inversion occurred at the junction points of trnH-GUG/rpl14 and rps19/rps8, as in adzuki bean [1]. These two pseudogenes and the inversion were confirmed in 10 varieties representing the two domestication centers of the bean. Genomic comparative analysis indicated that inversions generally occur in legume plastomes and the magnitude and localization of insertions/deletions (indels) also vary. The analysis of repeat sequences demonstrated that patterns and sequences of tandem repeats had an important impact on sequence diversification between legume plastomes and tandem repeats did not belong to dispersed repeats. Interestingly, P. vulgaris plastome had higher evolutionary rates of change on both genomic and gene levels than G. max, which could be the consequence of pressure from both mutation and natural selection. Conclusion Legume chloroplast genomes are widely diversified in gene content, gene order, indel structure, abundance and localization of repetitive sequences, intracellular sequence exchange and evolutionary rates. The P. vulgaris plastome is a rapidly evolving genome. PMID:17623083

  16. Rapid evolution of the compact and unusual mitochondrial genome in the ctenophore, Pleurobrachia bachei.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Andrea B; Citarella, Mathew R; Kocot, Kevin M; Bobkova, Yelena V; Halanych, Kenneth M; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-04-01

    Ctenophores are one of the most basally branching lineages of metazoans with the largest mitochondrial organelles in the animal kingdom. We sequenced the mitochondrial (mtDNA) genome from the Pacific cidipid ctenophore, Pleurobrachia bachei. The circular mitochondrial genome is 11,016 nts, with only 12 genes, and one of the smallest metazoan mtDNA genomes recorded. The protein coding genes are intronless cox1-3, cob, nad1, 3, 4, 4L and 5. The nad2 and 6 genes are represented as short fragments whereas the atp6 gene was found in the nuclear genome. Only the large ribosomal RNA subunit and two tRNAs were present with possibly the small subunit unidentifiable due to extensive fragmentation. The observed unique features of this mitochondrial genome suggest that nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have evolved at very different rates. This reduced mtDNA genome sharply contrasts with the very large sizes of mtDNA found in other basal metazoans including Porifera (sponges), and Placozoa (Trichoplax). PMID:22201557

  17. Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses related to disease outbreak.

    SciTech Connect

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Edwards, Thayne L.; Anderson, John Moses; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Branch, Darren W.; Wheeler, David Roger; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Ebel, Gregory D.; Prasad, Abhishek N.; Brozik, James A.; Rudolph, Angela R.; Wong, Lillian P.

    2013-09-01

    Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose growing threats to our national security. Both natural disease outbreak and outbreaks due to a bioterrorist attack are a challenge to detect, taking days after the outbreak to identify since most outbreaks are only recognized through reportable diseases by health departments and reports of unusual diseases by clinicians. In recent decades, arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) have emerged as some of the most significant threats to human health. They emerge, often unexpectedly, from cryptic transmission foci causing localized outbreaks that can rapidly spread to multiple continents due to increased human travel and trade. Currently, diagnosis of acute infections requires amplification of viral nucleic acids, which can be costly, highly specific, technically challenging and time consuming. No diagnostic devices suitable for use at the bedside or in an outbreak setting currently exist. The original goals of this project were to 1) develop two highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays for detecting RNA from a wide range of arboviruses; one based on an electrochemical approach and the other a fluorescent based assay and 2) develop prototype microfluidic diagnostic platforms for preclinical and field testing that utilize the assays developed in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were developed for DNA-RNA hybridization detection and were implemented in microfluidic diagnostic sensing platforms that were developed in this project.

  18. Analyses of Charophyte Chloroplast Genomes Help Characterize the Ancestral Chloroplast Genome of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Civáň, Peter; Foster, Peter G.; Embley, Martin T.; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  19. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  20. Genome-culture coevolution promotes rapid divergence of killer whale ecotypes

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Andrew D.; Vijay, Nagarjun; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Baird, Robin W.; Durban, John W.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hanson, M. Bradley; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S.; Martin, Michael D.; Robertson, Kelly M.; Sousa, Vitor C.; Vieira, Filipe G.; Vinař, Tomáš; Wade, Paul; Worley, Kim C.; Excoffier, Laurent; Morin, Phillip A.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wolf, Jochen B.W.

    2016-01-01

    Analysing population genomic data from killer whale ecotypes, which we estimate have globally radiated within less than 250,000 years, we show that genetic structuring including the segregation of potentially functional alleles is associated with socially inherited ecological niche. Reconstruction of ancestral demographic history revealed bottlenecks during founder events, likely promoting ecological divergence and genetic drift resulting in a wide range of genome-wide differentiation between pairs of allopatric and sympatric ecotypes. Functional enrichment analyses provided evidence for regional genomic divergence associated with habitat, dietary preferences and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Our findings are consistent with expansion of small founder groups into novel niches by an initial plastic behavioural response, perpetuated by social learning imposing an altered natural selection regime. The study constitutes an important step towards an understanding of the complex interaction between demographic history, culture, ecological adaptation and evolution at the genomic level. PMID:27243207

  1. Genomic evidence of rapid, global-scale gene flow in a Sulfolobus species.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis

    2012-08-01

    Local populations of Sulfolobus islandicus diverge genetically with geographical separation, and this has been attributed to restricted transfer of propagules imposed by the unfavorable spatial distribution of acidic geothermal habitat. We tested the generality of genetic divergence with distance in Sulfolobus species by analyzing genomes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius drawn from three populations separated by more than 8000 km. In sharp contrast to S. islandicus, the geographically diverse S. acidocaldarius genomes proved to be nearly identical. We could not link the difference in genome conservation between the two species to a corresponding difference in genome stability or ecological factors affecting propagule dispersal. The results provide the first evidence that genetic isolation of local populations does not result primarily from properties intrinsic to Sulfolobus and the severe discontinuity of its geothermal habitat, but varies with species, and thus may reflect biotic interactions that act after propagule dispersal. PMID:22418622

  2. Genome-culture coevolution promotes rapid divergence of killer whale ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Vijay, Nagarjun; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Baird, Robin W; Durban, John W; Fumagalli, Matteo; Gibbs, Richard A; Hanson, M Bradley; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Martin, Michael D; Robertson, Kelly M; Sousa, Vitor C; Vieira, Filipe G; Vinař, Tomáš; Wade, Paul; Worley, Kim C; Excoffier, Laurent; Morin, Phillip A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-01-01

    Analysing population genomic data from killer whale ecotypes, which we estimate have globally radiated within less than 250,000 years, we show that genetic structuring including the segregation of potentially functional alleles is associated with socially inherited ecological niche. Reconstruction of ancestral demographic history revealed bottlenecks during founder events, likely promoting ecological divergence and genetic drift resulting in a wide range of genome-wide differentiation between pairs of allopatric and sympatric ecotypes. Functional enrichment analyses provided evidence for regional genomic divergence associated with habitat, dietary preferences and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Our findings are consistent with expansion of small founder groups into novel niches by an initial plastic behavioural response, perpetuated by social learning imposing an altered natural selection regime. The study constitutes an important step towards an understanding of the complex interaction between demographic history, culture, ecological adaptation and evolution at the genomic level. PMID:27243207

  3. Genome-wide congealing and rapid transitions across the speciation continuum during speciation with gene flow.

    PubMed

    Feder, Jeffrey L; Nosil, Patrik; Wacholder, Aaron C; Egan, Scott P; Berlocher, Stewart H; Flaxman, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of speciation is often based on considering a relatively small number of genes, sometimes in isolation of one another. Here, we describe a possible emergent genome process involving the aggregate effect of many genes contributing to the evolution of reproductive isolation across the speciation continuum. When a threshold number of divergently selected mutations of modest to low fitness effects accumulate between populations diverging with gene flow, nonlinear transitions can occur in which levels of adaptive differentiation, linkage disequilibrium, and reproductive isolation dramatically increase. In effect, the genomes of the populations start to "congeal" into distinct entities representing different species. At this stage, reproductive isolation changes from being a characteristic of specific, divergently selected genes to a property of the genome. We examine conditions conducive to such genome-wide congealing (GWC), describe how to empirically test for GWC, and highlight a putative empirical example involving Rhagoletis fruit flies. We conclude with cautious optimism that the models and concepts discussed here, once extended to large numbers of neutral markers, may provide a framework for integrating information from genome scans, selection experiments, quantitative trait loci mapping, association studies, and natural history to develop a deeper understanding of the genomics of speciation. PMID:25149256

  4. Genomic Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates Selected for Medical Countermeasures Testing: Comparative Genomics Associated with Differential Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Allender, Christopher J.; Colman, Rebecca E.; Califf, Katy J.; Schupp, James M.; Currie, Bart J.; Van Zandt, Kristopher E.; Gelhaus, H. Carl; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and a potential bioterrorism agent. In the development of medical countermeasures against B. pseudomallei infection, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) animal Rule recommends using well-characterized strains in animal challenge studies. In this study, whole genome sequence data were generated for 6 B. pseudomallei isolates previously identified as candidates for animal challenge studies; an additional 5 isolates were sequenced that were associated with human inhalational melioidosis. A core genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phylogeny inferred from a concatenated SNP alignment from the 11 isolates sequenced in this study and a diverse global collection of isolates demonstrated the diversity of the proposed Animal Rule isolates. To understand the genomic composition of each isolate, a large-scale blast score ratio (LS-BSR) analysis was performed on the entire pan-genome; this demonstrated the variable composition of genes across the panel and also helped to identify genes unique to individual isolates. In addition, a set of ~550 genes associated with pathogenesis in B. pseudomallei were screened against the 11 sequenced genomes with LS-BSR. Differential gene distribution for 54 virulence-associated genes was observed between genomes and three of these genes were correlated with differential virulence observed in animal challenge studies using BALB/c mice. Differentially conserved genes and SNPs associated with disease severity were identified and could be the basis for future studies investigating the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei. Overall, the genetic characterization of the 11 proposed Animal Rule isolates provides context for future studies involving B. pseudomallei pathogenesis, differential virulence, and efficacy to therapeutics. PMID:25803742

  5. Characterizing genomic alterations in cancer by complementary functional associations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Systematic efforts to sequence the cancer genome have identified large numbers of mutations and copy number alterations in human cancers. However, elucidating the functional consequences of these variants, and their interactions to drive or maintain oncogenic states, remains a challenge in cancer research. We developed REVEALER, a computational method that identifies combinations of mutually exclusive genomic alterations correlated with functional phenotypes, such as the activation or gene dependency of oncogenic pathways or sensitivity to a drug treatment.

  6. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science.

    PubMed

    Ma, Alvin C; McNulty, Melissa S; Poshusta, Tanya L; Campbell, Jarryd M; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P; Lee, Han B; Urban, Mark D; Bullard, Cassandra E; Blackburn, Patrick R; Man, Toni K; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications. PMID:26854857

  7. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alvin C.; McNulty, Melissa S.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Campbell, Jarryd M.; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P.; Lee, Han B.; Urban, Mark D.; Bullard, Cassandra E.; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Man, Toni K.; Clark, Karl J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications. PMID:26854857

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  9. Characterization of evolutionary rates and constraints in three mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Gregory M.; Brudno, Michael; Stone, Eric A.; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

    2004-02-15

    We present an analysis of rates and patterns of microevolutionary phenomena that have shaped the human, mouse, and rat genomes since their last common ancestor. We find evidence for a shift in the mutational spectrum between the mouse and rat lineages, with the net effect being a relative increase in GC content in the rat genome. Our estimate for the neutral point substitution rate separating the two rodents is 0.196 substitutions per site, and 0.65 substitutions per site for the tree relating all three mammals. Small insertions and deletions of 1-10 bp in length (''microindels'') occur at approximately 5 percent of the point substitution rate. Inferred regional correlations in evolutionary rates between lineages and between types of sites support the idea that rates of evolution are influenced by local genomic or cell biological context. No substantial correlations between rates of point substitutions and rates of microindels are found, however, implying that the influences that affect these processes are distinct. Finally, we have identified those regions in the human genome that are evolving slowly, which are likely to include functional elements important to human biology. At least 5 percent of the human genome is under substantial constraint, most of which is noncoding.

  10. Genome sequence and characterization of the Tsukamurella bacteriophage TPA2.

    PubMed

    Petrovski, Steve; Seviour, Robert J; Tillett, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    The formation of stable foam in activated sludge plants is a global problem for which control is difficult. These foams are often stabilized by hydrophobic mycolic acid-synthesizing Actinobacteria, among which are Tsukamurella spp. This paper describes the isolation from activated sludge of the novel double-stranded DNA phage TPA2. This polyvalent Siphoviridae family phage is lytic for most Tsukamurella species. Whole-genome sequencing reveals that the TPA2 genome is circularly permuted (61,440 bp) and that 70% of its sequence is novel. We have identified 78 putative open reading frames, 95 pairs of inverted repeats, and 6 palindromes. The TPA2 genome has a modular gene structure that shares some similarity to those of Mycobacterium phages. A number of the genes display a mosaic architecture, suggesting that the TPA2 genome has evolved at least in part from genetic recombination events. The genome sequence reveals many novel genes that should inform any future discussion on Tsukamurella phage evolution. PMID:21183635

  11. Cytogenetic characterization and genome size of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Guilherme; Cardoso, Luísa; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Duarte, Patrícia; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Catharanthus roseus is a highly valuable medicinal plant producing several terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) with pharmaceutical applications, including the anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine. Due to the interest in its TIAs, C. roseus is one of the most extensively studied medicinal plants and has become a model species for the study of plant secondary metabolism. However, very little is known about the cytogenetics and genome size of this species, in spite of their importance for breeding programmes, TIA genetics and emerging genomic research. Therefore, the present paper provides a karyotype description and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data for C. roseus, as well as a rigorous characterization of its genome size. Methodology The organization of C. roseus chromosomes was characterized using several DNA/chromatin staining techniques and FISH of rDNA. Genome size was investigated by flow cytometry using an optimized methodology. Principal results The C. roseus full chromosome complement of 2n = 16 includes two metacentric, four subtelocentric and two telocentric chromosome pairs, with the presence of a single nucleolus organizer region in chromosome 6. An easy and reliable flow cytometry protocol for nuclear genome analysis of C. roseus was optimized, and the C-value of this species was estimated to be 1C = 0.76 pg, corresponding to 738 Mbp. Conclusions The organization and size of the C. roseus genome were characterized, providing an important basis for future studies of this important medicinal species, including further cytogenetic mapping, genomics, TIA genetics and breeding programmes. PMID:22479673

  12. Three-Enzyme Cascade Bioreactor for Rapid Digestion of Genomic DNA into Single Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junfa; Xu, Tian; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Hailin

    2016-08-01

    Structure-based DNA modification analysis provides accurate and important information on genomic DNA changes from epigenetic modifications to various DNA lesions. However, genomic DNA strands are often required to be efficiently digested into single nucleosides. It is an arduous task because of the involvement of multiple enzymes with different catalytic acitivities. Here we constructed a three-enzyme cascade capillary monolithic bioreactor that consists of immobilized deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I), snake venom phosphodiesterase (SVP), and alkaline phosphatase (ALPase). By the use of this cascade capillary bioreactor, genomic DNA can be efficiently digested into single nucleosides with an increasing rate of ∼20 folds. The improvement is mainly attributed to dramatically increase enzymatic capacity and activity. With a designed macro-porous structure, genomic DNA of 5-30 Kb (∼1.6-10 million Daltons) can be directly passed through the bioreactor simply by hand pushing or a low-pressure microinjection pump. By coupling with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we further developed a sensitive assay for detection of an oxidative stress biomarker 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in DNA. The proposed three-enzyme cascade bioreactor is also potentially applicable for fast identification and quantitative detection of other lesions and modifications in genomic DNA. PMID:27416319

  13. Segtor: Rapid Annotation of Genomic Coordinates and Single Nucleotide Variations Using Segment Trees

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Gabriel; Neves, Pedro; Folador, Edson Luiz; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Passetti, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Various research projects often involve determining the relative position of genomic coordinates, intervals, single nucleotide variations (SNVs), insertions, deletions and translocations with respect to genes and their potential impact on protein translation. Due to the tremendous increase in throughput brought by the use of next-generation sequencing, investigators are routinely faced with the need to annotate very large datasets. We present Segtor, a tool to annotate large sets of genomic coordinates, intervals, SNVs, indels and translocations. Our tool uses segment trees built using the start and end coordinates of the genomic features the user wishes to use instead of storing them in a database management system. The software also produces annotation statistics to allow users to visualize how many coordinates were found within various portions of genes. Our system currently can be made to work with any species available on the UCSC Genome Browser. Segtor is a suitable tool for groups, especially those with limited access to programmers or with interest to analyze large amounts of individual genomes, who wish to determine the relative position of very large sets of mapped reads and subsequently annotate observed mutations between the reads and the reference. Segtor (http://lbbc.inca.gov.br/segtor/) is an open-source tool that can be freely downloaded for non-profit use. We also provide a web interface for testing purposes. PMID:22069465

  14. Characterizing the citrus variety Carrizo genome through 454 shotgun sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus production is of global importance both in economic impact and significance to nutrition. The number of natural citrus species appears extremely limited. The genome size is small (haploid approximately 367 Mb), arranged on 18 chromosomes. The citrus variety Carrizo, generated by a ‘Washingt...

  15. Characterization of reniform nematode genome through shotgun sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode (RN), a major agricultural pest particularly on cotton in the United States(U.S.), is among the major plant parasitic nematodes for which limited genomic information exists. In this study, over 380 Mb of sequence data were generated from four pooled adult female RN and assembl...

  16. Characterizing the walnut genome through analyses of BAC end sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) is an economically important tree for its nut crop and timber. To gain insight into the structure and evolution of the walnut genome, we constructed two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries, containing a total of 129,024 clones, from in vitro-grown shoots...

  17. Rapid prototyping of microbial cell factories via genome-scale engineering.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-11-15

    Advances in reading, writing and editing genetic materials have greatly expanded our ability to reprogram biological systems at the resolution of a single nucleotide and on the scale of a whole genome. Such capacity has greatly accelerated the cycles of design, build and test to engineer microbes for efficient synthesis of fuels, chemicals and drugs. In this review, we summarize the emerging technologies that have been applied, or are potentially useful for genome-scale engineering in microbial systems. We will focus on the development of high-throughput methodologies, which may accelerate the prototyping of microbial cell factories. PMID:25450192

  18. Rapid and Easy In Silico Serotyping of Escherichia coli Isolates by Use of Whole-Genome Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Joensen, Katrine G; Tetzschner, Anna M M; Iguchi, Atsushi; Aarestrup, Frank M; Scheutz, Flemming

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and rapid typing of pathogens is essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. Conventional serotyping of Escherichia coli is a delicate, laborious, time-consuming, and expensive procedure. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has vast potential in routine typing and surveillance. The aim of this study was to establish a valid and publicly available tool for WGS-based in silico serotyping of E. coli applicable for routine typing and surveillance. A FASTA database of specific O-antigen processing system genes for O typing and flagellin genes for H typing was created as a component of the publicly available Web tools hosted by the Center for Genomic Epidemiology (CGE) (www.genomicepidemiology.org). All E. coli isolates available with WGS data and conventional serotype information were subjected to WGS-based serotyping employing this specific SerotypeFinder CGE tool. SerotypeFinder was evaluated on 682 E. coli genomes, 108 of which were sequenced for this study, where both the whole genome and the serotype were available. In total, 601 and 509 isolates were included for O and H typing, respectively. The O-antigen genes wzx, wzy, wzm, and wzt and the flagellin genes fliC, flkA, fllA, flmA, and flnA were detected in 569 and 508 genome sequences, respectively. SerotypeFinder for WGS-based O and H typing predicted 560 of 569 O types and 504 of 508 H types, consistent with conventional serotyping. In combination with other available WGS typing tools, E. coli serotyping can be performed solely from WGS data, providing faster and cheaper typing than current routine procedures and making WGS typing a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. PMID:25972421

  19. Rapid and Easy In Silico Serotyping of Escherichia coli Isolates by Use of Whole-Genome Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Joensen, Katrine G.; Tetzschner, Anna M. M.; Iguchi, Atsushi; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and rapid typing of pathogens is essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. Conventional serotyping of Escherichia coli is a delicate, laborious, time-consuming, and expensive procedure. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has vast potential in routine typing and surveillance. The aim of this study was to establish a valid and publicly available tool for WGS-based in silico serotyping of E. coli applicable for routine typing and surveillance. A FASTA database of specific O-antigen processing system genes for O typing and flagellin genes for H typing was created as a component of the publicly available Web tools hosted by the Center for Genomic Epidemiology (CGE) (www.genomicepidemiology.org). All E. coli isolates available with WGS data and conventional serotype information were subjected to WGS-based serotyping employing this specific SerotypeFinder CGE tool. SerotypeFinder was evaluated on 682 E. coli genomes, 108 of which were sequenced for this study, where both the whole genome and the serotype were available. In total, 601 and 509 isolates were included for O and H typing, respectively. The O-antigen genes wzx, wzy, wzm, and wzt and the flagellin genes fliC, flkA, fllA, flmA, and flnA were detected in 569 and 508 genome sequences, respectively. SerotypeFinder for WGS-based O and H typing predicted 560 of 569 O types and 504 of 508 H types, consistent with conventional serotyping. In combination with other available WGS typing tools, E. coli serotyping can be performed solely from WGS data, providing faster and cheaper typing than current routine procedures and making WGS typing a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. PMID:25972421

  20. Using genomic prediction to characterize environments and optimize prediction accuracy in applied breeding data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation and empirical studies of genomic selection (GS) show accuracies sufficient to generate rapid annual genetic gains. It also shifts the focus from the evaluation of lines to the evaluation of alleles. Consequently, new methods should be developed to optimize the use of large historic multi-...

  1. Rapid genome resequencing of an atoxigenic strain of Aspergillus carbonarius

    SciTech Connect

    Cabañes, F. Javier; Sanseverino, Walter; Castellá, Gemma; Bragulat, M. Rosa; Cigliano, Riccardo Aiese; Sánchez, Armand

    2015-03-13

    In microorganisms, Ion Torrent sequencing technology has been proved to be useful in whole-genome sequencing of bacterial genomes (5 Mbp). In our study, for the first time we used this technology to perform a resequencing approach in a whole fungal genome (36 Mbp), a non-ochratoxin A producing strain of Aspergillus carbonarius. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent nephrotoxin which is found mainly in cereals and their products, but it also occurs in a variety of common foods and beverages. Due to the fact that this strain does not produce OTA, we focused some of the bioinformatics analyses in genes involved in OTA biosynthesis, using a reference genome of an OTA producing strain of the same species. This study revealed that in the atoxigenic strain there is a high accumulation of nonsense and missense mutations in several genes. Importantly, a two fold increase in gene mutation ratio was observed in PKS and NRPS encoding genes which are suggested to be involved in OTA biosynthesis.

  2. Next generation sequencing provides rapid access to the genome of wheat stripe rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The wheat stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, PST) is responsible for significant yield losses in wheat production worldwide. In spite of its economic importance, the PST genomic sequence is not currently available. Fortunately Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has ra...

  3. Rapid, Enhanced IV Characterization of Multi-Junction PV Devices under One Sun at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Tom; France, Ryan; Steiner, Myles

    2015-06-14

    Multi-junction technology is rapidly advancing, which puts increasing demands on IV characterization resources. We report on a tool and procedure for fast turn-around of IV data under the reference conditions, but also under controlled variations from the reference conditions. This enhanced data set can improve further iterations of device optimization.

  4. Rapid, Enhanced IV Characterization of Multi-Junction PV Devices under One Sun at NREL: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Tom; France, Ryan; Steiner, Myles

    2015-09-15

    Multi-junction technology is rapidly advancing, which puts increasing demands on IV characterization resources. We report on a tool and procedure for fast turn-around of IV data under the reference conditions, but also under controlled variations from the reference conditions. This enhanced data set can improve further iterations of device optimization.

  5. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis in Sicily: genome macrorestriction analysis and rapid PCR-ribotyping.

    PubMed

    Agodi, A; Sciacca, A; Campanile, F; Messina, C; Barchitta, M; Sciacca, S; Stefani, S

    2000-07-01

    This study addresses the epidemiologic relatedness of a collection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients attending the Pediatric Clinic, Catania, Sicily. Genome macrorestriction analysis after pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to characterise all strains. Furthermore, a rapid typing procedure, developed in this study, based on polymerase chain reaction amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms (PCR-ribotyping), straight from bacterial cultures, was used. On the basis of macrorestriction analysis after PFGE, persistence of infection was shown in all patients; two cross-transmission episodes were identified in the nosocomial as well as in the familiar environment. PCR-ribotyping proved to be useful for a DNA-based identification test, suitable for screening purposes. The rapid amplification protocol here tested is proposed to evaluate the discriminatory power of other specific target sequences in PCR-based typing assays, for epidemiologic purposes. PMID:10939047

  7. Final progress report, Construction of a genome-wide highly characterized clone resource for genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Nierman, William C.

    2000-02-14

    At TIGR, the human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) end sequencing and trimming were with an overall sequencing success rate of 65%. CalTech human BAC libraries A, B, C and D as well as Roswell Park Cancer Institute's library RPCI-11 were used. To date, we have generated >300,000 end sequences from >186,000 human BAC clones with an average read length {approx}460 bp for a total of 141 Mb covering {approx}4.7% of the genome. Over sixty percent of the clones have BAC end sequences (BESs) from both ends representing over five-fold coverage of the genome by the paired-end clones. The average phred Q20 length is {approx}400 bp. This high accuracy makes our BESs match the human finished sequences with an average identity of 99% and a match length of 450 bp, and a frequency of one match per 12.8 kb contig sequence. Our sample tracking has ensured a clone tracking accuracy of >90%, which gives researchers a high confidence in (1) retrieving the right clone from the BA C libraries based on the sequence matches; and (2) building a minimum tiling path of sequence-ready clones across the genome and genome assembly scaffolds.

  8. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Isaac B.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  9. Contributing to Tumor Molecular Characterization Projects with a Global Impact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    My name is Nicholas Griner and I am the Scientific Program Manager for the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative (CGCI) in the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG). Until recently, I spent most of my scientific career working in a cancer research laboratory. In my postdoctoral training, my research focused on identifying novel pathways that contribute to both prostate and breast cancers and studying proteins within these pathways that may be targeted with cancer drugs.

  10. Transcriptome-guided characterization of genomic rearrangements in a breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Caballero, Otavia L.; Levy, Samuel; Stevenson, Brian J.; Iseli, Christian; de Souza, Sandro J.; Galante, Pedro A.; Busam, Dana; Leversha, Margaret A.; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Venter, J. Craig; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    We have identified new genomic alterations in the breast cancer cell line HCC1954, using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. With 120 Mb of cDNA sequences, we were able to identify genomic rearrangement events leading to fusions or truncations of genes including MRE11 and NSD1, genes already implicated in oncogenesis, and 7 rearrangements involving other additional genes. This approach demonstrates that high-throughput transcriptome sequencing is an effective strategy for the characterization of genomic rearrangements in cancers. PMID:19181860

  11. Characterization of a minimal screening set of 172 microsatellite markers for genome-wide screens of the canine genome.

    PubMed

    Richman, M; Mellersh, C S; André, C; Galibert, F; Ostrander, E A

    2001-01-30

    We have characterized a subset of 172 microsatellite markers from the canine map, termed 'Minimal Screening Set 1' (Canine MSS-1), which we propose be used for initial genome-wide genetic linkage studies. Three hierarchical criteria were used to select markers from the current meiotic linkage and radiation hybrid maps for MSS-1. Markers were selected that (1) provided as complete coverage as possible of the canine genome, (2) were highly informative, and (3) have been ordered in linkage groups with a high degree of statistical support. This resulting screening set spans all reported meiotic linkage and RH groups, leaving only 10 known gaps > or = 20 cM. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) value of markers tested is 0.74. Coverage estimates suggest 42% of the genome is within 5 cM of at least one marker in the minimal screening set, 77% of the genome is within 10 cM. This minimal mapping set therefore provides an efficient and cost effective way to begin screening pedigrees of interest for genetic linkage. PMID:11179770

  12. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Killian, J Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R; Strong, Louise C; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E; Robison, Leslie L; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25764003

  13. A New Method for Rapid Screening of End-Point PCR Products: Application to Single Genome Amplified HIV and SIV Envelope Amplicons.

    PubMed

    Houzet, Laurent; Deleage, Claire; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Merlande, Laetitia; Mahe, Dominique; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    PCR is the most widely applied technique for large scale screening of bacterial clones, mouse genotypes, virus genomes etc. A drawback of large PCR screening is that amplicon analysis is usually performed using gel electrophoresis, a step that is very labor intensive, tedious and chemical waste generating. Single genome amplification (SGA) is used to characterize the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of virus populations within infected hosts. SGA is based on the isolation of single template molecule using limiting dilution followed by nested PCR amplification and requires the analysis of hundreds of reactions per sample, making large scale SGA studies very challenging. Here we present a novel approach entitled Long Amplicon Melt Profiling (LAMP) based on the analysis of the melting profile of the PCR reactions using SYBR Green and/or EvaGreen fluorescent dyes. The LAMP method represents an attractive alternative to gel electrophoresis and enables the quick discrimination of positive reactions. We validate LAMP for SIV and HIV env-SGA, in 96- and 384-well plate formats. Because the melt profiling allows the screening of several thousands of PCR reactions in a cost-effective, rapid and robust way, we believe it will greatly facilitate any large scale PCR screening. PMID:26053379

  14. Rapid detection of specific genes from human genomic DNA using the microbead-quantum dot complexes in microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Ha; Kim, Jong Sung

    2013-08-01

    In the clinic, it is important to prepare for single stranded DNA from genomic DNA to detect the target gene. In this study, we have investigated the detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) obtained by ultrasonication of human genomic DNA via fluorescence quenching on microfluidic chip with pillars at the channel to entrap the microbead-QD complexes (MQCs). The QDs with carboxyl group bind to microbeads with amine group by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The thiolated probe DNA conjugates strongly with the metal ions on the surface of QDs. The MQCs were packed into a chamber on the channel blocked by pillars. ssDNA and TOTO-3 (intercalating dye) were introduced into the microchannel. After hybridization of probe DNA and target DNA, fluorescence quenching was observed at the surface of the MQDs by FRET between QD and TOTO-3. This experiment shows the possibility of rapid detection of genomic DNA from clinical samples via microbead-QD complexs on microfluidic chip. PMID:23882750

  15. Population genomics reveal recent speciation and rapid evolutionary adaptation in polar bears.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D; Fumagalli, Matteo; Li, Bo; Harris, Kelley; Xiong, Zijun; Zhou, Long; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Somel, Mehmet; Babbitt, Courtney; Wray, Greg; Li, Jianwen; He, Weiming; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Wenjing; Xiang, Xueyan; Morgan, Claire C; Doherty, Aoife; O'Connell, Mary J; McInerney, James O; Born, Erik W; Dalén, Love; Dietz, Rune; Orlando, Ludovic; Sonne, Christian; Zhang, Guojie; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Wang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyper-lipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479-343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardiovascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans. PMID:24813606

  16. POPULATION GENOMICS REVEAL RECENT SPECIATION AND RAPID EVOLUTIONARY ADAPTATION IN POLAR BEARS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiping; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Li, Bo; Harris, Kelley; Xiong, Zijun; Zhou, Long; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Somel, Mehmet; Babbitt, Courtney; Wray, Greg; Li, Jianwen; He, Weiming; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Wenjing; Xiang, Xueyan; Morgan, Claire C.; Doherty, Aoife; O’Connell, Mary J.; McInerney, James O.; Born, Erik W.; Dalén, Love; Dietz, Rune; Orlando, Ludovic; Sonne, Christian; Zhang, Guojie; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyperlipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479–343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardio-vascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans. PMID:24813606

  17. Alignment-free comparison of genome sequences by a new numerical characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guohua; Zhou, Houqing; Li, Yongfan; Xu, Lixin

    2011-07-21

    In order to compare different genome sequences, an alignment-free method has proposed. First, we presented a new graphical representation of DNA sequences without degeneracy, which is conducive to intuitive comparison of sequences. Then, a new numerical characterization based on the representation was introduced to quantitatively depict the intrinsic nature of genome sequences, and considered as a 10-dimensional vector in the mathematical space. Alignment-free comparison of sequences was performed by computing the distances between vectors of the corresponding numerical characterizations, which define the evolutionary relationship. Two data sets of DNA sequences were constructed to assess the performance on sequence comparison. The results illustrate well validity of the method. The new numerical characterization provides a powerful tool for genome comparison. PMID:21536050

  18. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences increases phylogenetic resolution of bears (Ursidae), a mammalian family that experienced rapid speciation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Li, Yi-Wei; Ryder, Oliver A; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the small number of ursid species, bear phylogeny has long been a focus of study due to their conservation value, as all bear genera have been classified as endangered at either the species or subspecies level. The Ursidae family represents a typical example of rapid evolutionary radiation. Previous analyses with a single mitochondrial (mt) gene or a small number of mt genes either provide weak support or a large unresolved polytomy for ursids. We revisit the contentious relationships within Ursidae by analyzing complete mt genome sequences and evaluating the performance of both entire mt genomes and constituent mtDNA genes in recovering a phylogeny of extremely recent speciation events. Results This mitochondrial genome-based phylogeny provides strong evidence that the spectacled bear diverged first, while within the genus Ursus, the sloth bear is the sister taxon of all the other five ursines. The latter group is divided into the brown bear/polar bear and the two black bears/sun bear assemblages. These findings resolve the previous conflicts between trees using partial mt genes. The ability of different categories of mt protein coding genes to recover the correct phylogeny is concordant with previous analyses for taxa with deep divergence times. This study provides a robust Ursidae phylogenetic framework for future validation by additional independent evidence, and also has significant implications for assisting in the resolution of other similarly difficult phylogenetic investigations. Conclusion Identification of base composition bias and utilization of the combined data of whole mitochondrial genome sequences has allowed recovery of a strongly supported phylogeny that is upheld when using multiple alternative outgroups for the Ursidae, a mammalian family that underwent a rapid radiation since the mid- to late Pliocene. It remains to be seen if the reliability of mt genome analysis will hold up in studies of other difficult phylogenetic

  19. Mitochondrial genome of the Torpedo scad Megalaspis cordyla (Perciformes: Carangidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Li, Yufang; Chen, Zuozhi

    2016-05-01

    This study presented the complete mitochondrial genome of the Torpedo scad Megalaspis cordyla, the only member of its genus, as well as its phylogenetic position in Carangidae. The genome is 16,566 bp containing the usual 2 rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region. Gene organization is similar to that observed in most other vertebrates. Gene overlapping and separating were also observed in M. cordyla mitogenome. The overall base compositions of mitogenome was 28.83% A, 25.81% T, 15.93% G, and 29.43% C. Phylogenetic analyses using the concatenated sequence of the protein-coding genes of the reported Carangidae mitogenome showed similar results in the neighbour-joining and Bayesian inference trees. Three clades were formed as Subfamilies Caranginae, Seriolinae and Trachinotinae in Carangidae. M. cordyla was most closely related to the species in genus Caranx. PMID:25319290

  20. Improved method for rapid and efficient determination of genome replication and protein expression of clinical hepatitis B virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanli; Zhang, Jiming; Garcia, Tamako; Ito, Kiyoaki; Gutelius, Danielle; Li, Jisu; Wands, Jack; Tong, Shuping

    2011-04-01

    Different hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and variants are associated with different clinical outcomes and/or response to antiviral therapy, yet the comparison of the in vitro replication capacity of a large number of clinical isolates remains technically challenging and time-consuming. Although the full-length HBV genome can be amplified from high-titer blood samples by PCR using High Fidelity(plus) DNA polymerase and primers targeting the conserved precore region, the HBV clones thus generated are replication deficient due to the inability to generate the terminally redundant pregenomic RNA essential for genome replication. The transfection experiment is further complicated by PCR errors and the presence of viral quasispecies. A previous study found that the precise removal of non-HBV sequence by SapI digestion led to HBV replication in transfected cells, possibly due to low-level genome circularization by a cellular enzyme. We released HBV genome from the cloning vector using BspQI, an inexpensive isoschizomer of SapI, and increased the efficiency of genome replication by an extra step of in vitro DNA ligation. The uncut plasmid DNA can be used for transfection if the sole purpose is to study envelope protein expression. We found significant PCR errors associated with the High Fidelity(plus) DNA polymerase, which could be greatly diminished using Phusion DNA polymerase or masked by the use of a clone pool. The reduced PCR error and modified enzymatic steps prior to transfection should facilitate a more widespread functional characterization of clinical HBV isolates, while the clone pool approach is useful for samples with significant sequence heterogeneity. PMID:21289153

  1. Improved Method for Rapid and Efficient Determination of Genome Replication and Protein Expression of Clinical Hepatitis B Virus Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanli; Zhang, Jiming; Garcia, Tamako; Ito, Kiyoaki; Gutelius, Danielle; Li, Jisu; Wands, Jack; Tong, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Different hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and variants are associated with different clinical outcomes and/or response to antiviral therapy, yet the comparison of the in vitro replication capacity of a large number of clinical isolates remains technically challenging and time-consuming. Although the full-length HBV genome can be amplified from high-titer blood samples by PCR using High Fidelityplus DNA polymerase and primers targeting the conserved precore region, the HBV clones thus generated are replication deficient due to the inability to generate the terminally redundant pregenomic RNA essential for genome replication. The transfection experiment is further complicated by PCR errors and the presence of viral quasispecies. A previous study found that the precise removal of non-HBV sequence by SapI digestion led to HBV replication in transfected cells, possibly due to low-level genome circularization by a cellular enzyme. We released HBV genome from the cloning vector using BspQI, an inexpensive isoschizomer of SapI, and increased the efficiency of genome replication by an extra step of in vitro DNA ligation. The uncut plasmid DNA can be used for transfection if the sole purpose is to study envelope protein expression. We found significant PCR errors associated with the High Fidelityplus DNA polymerase, which could be greatly diminished using Phusion DNA polymerase or masked by the use of a clone pool. The reduced PCR error and modified enzymatic steps prior to transfection should facilitate a more widespread functional characterization of clinical HBV isolates, while the clone pool approach is useful for samples with significant sequence heterogeneity. PMID:21289153

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of rabbit pinworm Passalurus ambiguus: genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Li, Sheng; Zou, Feng-Cai; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Passalurus ambiguus (Nematda: Oxyuridae) is a common pinworm which parasitizes in the caecum and colon of rabbits. Despite its significance as a pathogen, the epidemiology, genetics, systematics, and biology of this pinworm remain poorly understood. In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of P. ambiguus. The circular mt genome is 14,023 bp in size and encodes of 36 genes, including 12 protein-coding, two ribosomal RNA, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The mt gene order of P. ambiguus is the same as that of Wellcomia siamensis, but distinct from that of Enterobius vermicularis. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes by Bayesian inference (BI) showed that P. ambiguus was more closely related to W. siamensis than to E. vermicularis. This mt genome provides novel genetic markers for studying the molecular epidemiology, population genetics, systematics of pinworm of animals and humans, and should have implications for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of passaluriasis in rabbits and other animals. PMID:26472717

  3. Characterization of Three Mycobacterium spp. with Potential Use in Bioremediation by Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B.M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the genome sequences of the type strains of the polychlorophenol-degrading Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum (DSM43826), the degrader of chlorinated aliphatics Mycobacterium chubuense (DSM44219) and Mycobacterium obuense (DSM44075) that has been tested for use in cancer immunotherapy. The genome sizes of M. chlorophenolicum, M. chubuense, and M. obuense are 6.93, 5.95, and 5.58 Mb with GC-contents of 68.4%, 69.2%, and 67.9%, respectively. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 3,254 genes are common and we predicted approximately 250 genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer from different sources including proteobacteria. The data also showed that the biodegrading Mycobacterium spp. NBB4, also referred to as M. chubuense NBB4, is distantly related to the M. chubuense type strain and should be considered as a separate species, we suggest it to be named Mycobacterium ethylenense NBB4. Among different categories we identified genes with potential roles in: biodegradation of aromatic compounds and copper homeostasis. These are the first nonpathogenic Mycobacterium spp. found harboring genes involved in copper homeostasis. These findings would therefore provide insight into the role of this group of Mycobacterium spp. in bioremediation as well as the evolution of copper homeostasis within the Mycobacterium genus. PMID:26079817

  4. Genome Characterization of the Oleaginous Fungus Mortierella alpina

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yun; Ren, Yan; Gu, Zhennan; Chen, Haiqin; Wang, Hongchao; Thomas, Michael J.; Zhang, Baixi; Berquin, Isabelle M.; Li, Yang; Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Huanxin; Song, Yuanda; Liu, Xiang; Norris, James S.; Wang, Suriguga; Du, Peng; Shen, Junguo; Wang, Na; Yang, Yanlin; Wang, Wei; Feng, Lu; Ratledge, Colin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.

    2011-01-01

    Mortierella alpina is an oleaginous fungus which can produce lipids accounting for up to 50% of its dry weight in the form of triacylglycerols. It is used commercially for the production of arachidonic acid. Using a combination of high throughput sequencing and lipid profiling, we have assembled the M. alpina genome, mapped its lipogenesis pathway and determined its major lipid species. The 38.38 Mb M. alpina genome shows a high degree of gene duplications. Approximately 50% of its 12,796 gene models, and 60% of genes in the predicted lipogenesis pathway, belong to multigene families. Notably, M. alpina has 18 lipase genes, of which 11 contain the class 2 lipase domain and may share a similar function. M. alpina's fatty acid synthase is a single polypeptide containing all of the catalytic domains required for fatty acid synthesis from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, whereas in many fungi this enzyme is comprised of two polypeptides. Major lipids were profiled to confirm the products predicted in the lipogenesis pathway. M. alpina produces a complex mixture of glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. In contrast, only two major sterol lipids, desmosterol and 24(28)-methylene-cholesterol, were detected. Phylogenetic analysis based on genes involved in lipid metabolism suggests that oleaginous fungi may have acquired their lipogenic capacity during evolution after the divergence of Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Mucoromycota. Our study provides the first draft genome and comprehensive lipid profile for M. alpina, and lays the foundation for possible genetic engineering of M. alpina to produce higher levels and diverse contents of dietary lipids. PMID:22174787

  5. Complete genome assemblies and methylome characterization in infectious diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the genetic basis of infectious diseases is a critical component to effective treatments. Because of the rapid evolution of bacterial strains and frequent horizontal transfer of DNA between them, resequencing of new isolates against known reference strains often provides an incomplete ...

  6. Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry—What Can Be Learned and How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine C.

    2013-08-01

    Strategies for the rapid and reliable analysis of microorganisms have been sought to meet national needs in defense, homeland security, space exploration, food and water safety, and clinical diagnosis. Mass spectrometry has long been a candidate technique because it is extremely rapid and can provide highly specific information. It has excellent sensitivity. Molecular and fragment ion masses provide detailed fingerprints, which can also be interpreted. Mass spectrometry is also a broad band method—everything has a mass—and it is automatable. Mass spectrometry is a physiochemical method that is orthogonal and complementary to biochemical and morphological methods used to characterize microorganisms.

  7. Rapid characterization of microorganisms by mass spectrometry - What can be learned and how?

    PubMed Central

    Fenselau, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for the rapid and reliable analysis of microorganisms have been sought to meet national needs in defense, homeland security, space exploration, food and water safety, and clinical diagnosis. Mass spectrometry has long been a candidate technique because it is extremely rapid and can provide highly specific information. It has excellent sensitivity. Molecular and fragment ion masses provide detailed fingerprints, which can also be interpreted. Mass spectrometry is also a broad band method—everything has a mass—and it is automatable. Mass spectrometry is a physiochemical method that is orthogonal and complementary to biochemical and morphological methods used to characterize microorganisms. PMID:23722726

  8. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    2015-01-29

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. Here we show that human-papillomavirus-associated tumours are dominated by helical domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss-of-function TP53 mutations and CDKN2A inactivation with frequent copy number alterations including amplification of 3q26/28 and 11q13/22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumours with favourable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent copy number alterations in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and TP53. Other distinct subgroups contained loss-of-function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, WNT pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumours. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in most HNSCCs. PMID:25631445

  9. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Hooper, Sean; Lykidis, A; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  10. Characterization of genome-reduced fission yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mayumi; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tohda, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome is one of the smallest among the free-living eukaryotes. We further reduced the S. pombe gene number by large-scale gene deletion to identify a minimal gene set required for growth under laboratory conditions. The genome-reduced strain has four deletion regions: 168.4 kb in the left arm of chromosome I, 155.4 kb in the right arm of chromosome I, 211.7 kb in the left arm of chromosome II and 121.6 kb in the right arm of chromosome II. The deletions corresponded to a loss of 223 genes of the original ∼5100. The quadruple-deletion strain, with a total deletion size of 657.3 kb, showed a decreased ability to uptake glucose and some amino acids in comparison with the parental strain. The strain also showed increased gene expression of the mating pheromone M-factor precursor and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate -specific glutamate dehydrogenase. There was also a 2.7-fold increase in the concentration of cellular adenosine triphosphate, and levels of the heterologous proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein and secreted human growth hormone were increased by 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively. The transcriptome data from this study have been submitted to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) under the accession number GSE38620 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?token=vjkxjewuywgcovc&acc=GSE38620). PMID:23563150

  11. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  12. Comprehensive genomic characterization of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas profiled 279 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) to provide a comprehensive landscape of somatic genomic alterations. We find that human papillomavirus-associated (HPV) tumors are dominated by helicase domain mutations of the oncogene PIK3CA, novel alterations involving loss of TRAF3, and amplification of the cell cycle gene E2F1. Smoking-related HNSCCs demonstrate near universal loss of TP53 mutations and CDKN2A with frequent copy number alterations including a novel amplification of 11q22. A subgroup of oral cavity tumors with favorable clinical outcomes displayed infrequent CNAs in conjunction with activating mutations of HRAS or PIK3CA, coupled with inactivating mutations of CASP8, NOTCH1 and wild-type TP53. Other distinct subgroups harbored novel loss of function alterations of the chromatin modifier NSD1, Wnt pathway genes AJUBA and FAT1, and activation of oxidative stress factor NFE2L2, mainly in laryngeal tumors. Therapeutic candidate alterations were identified in the majority of HNSCC's. PMID:25631445

  13. Comparative Genomics and stx Phage Characterization of LEE-Negative Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Steyert, Susan R.; Sahl, Jason W.; Fraser, Claire M.; Teel, Louise D.; Scheutz, Flemming; Rasko, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Infection by Escherichia coli and Shigella species are among the leading causes of death due to diarrheal disease in the world. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) that do not encode the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE-negative STEC) often possess Shiga toxin gene variants and have been isolated from humans and a variety of animal sources. In this study, we compare the genomes of nine LEE-negative STEC harboring various stx alleles with four complete reference LEE-positive STEC isolates. Compared to a representative collection of prototype E. coli and Shigella isolates representing each of the pathotypes, the whole genome phylogeny demonstrated that these isolates are diverse. Whole genome comparative analysis of the 13 genomes revealed that in addition to the absence of the LEE pathogenicity island, phage-encoded genes including non-LEE encoded effectors, were absent from all nine LEE-negative STEC genomes. Several plasmid-encoded virulence factors reportedly identified in LEE-negative STEC isolates were identified in only a subset of the nine LEE-negative isolates further confirming the diversity of this group. In combination with whole genome analysis, we characterized the lambdoid phages harboring the various stx alleles and determined their genomic insertion sites. Although the integrase gene sequence corresponded with genomic location, it was not correlated with stx variant, further highlighting the mosaic nature of these phages. The transcription of these phages in different genomic backgrounds was examined. Expression of the Shiga toxin genes, stx1 and/or stx2, as well as the Q genes, were examined with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays. A wide range of basal and induced toxin induction was observed. Overall, this is a first significant foray into the genome space of this unexplored group of emerging and divergent pathogens. PMID:23162798

  14. Biophysical and Ultrastructural Characterization of Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Uncoating and Genome Release

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Eric D.; Rahman, K. Shefaet; Bower, Brian D.; Dismuke, David J.; Falvo, Michael R.; Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    We describe biophysical and ultrastructural differences in genome release from adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsids packaging wild-type DNA, recombinant single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), or dimeric, self-complementary DNA (scDNA) genomes. Atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that AAV particles release packaged genomes and undergo marked changes in capsid morphology upon heating in physiological buffer (pH 7.2). When different AAV capsids packaging ss/scDNA varying in length from 72 to 123% of wild-type DNA (3.4 to 5.8 kb) were incrementally heated, the proportion of uncoated AAV capsids decreased with genome length as observed by EM. Genome release was further characterized by a fluorimetric assay, which demonstrated that acidic pH and high osmotic pressure suppress genome release from AAV particles. In addition, fluorimetric analysis corroborated an inverse correlation between packaged genome length and the temperature needed to induce uncoating. Surprisingly, scAAV vectors required significantly higher temperatures to uncoat than their ssDNA-packaging counterparts. However, externalization of VP1 N termini appears to be unaffected by packaged genome length or self-complementarity. Further analysis by tungsten-shadowing EM revealed striking differences in the morphologies of ssDNA and scDNA genomes upon release from intact capsids. Computational modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the unusual thermal stability of scAAV vectors might arise from partial base pairing and optimal organization of packaged scDNA. Our work further defines the biophysical mechanisms underlying adeno-associated virus uncoating and genome release. PMID:23269804

  15. Rapid extraction of genomic DNA from saliva for HLA typing on microarray based on magnetic nanobeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Bingbin; Gao, Huafang; Zhang, Huan; Fei, Weiyang

    2004-09-01

    A series of simplified protocols are developed for extracting genomic DNA from saliva by using the magnetic nanobeads as absorbents. In these protocols, both the enrichment of the target cells and the adsorption of DNA can be achieved simultaneously by our functionally modified magnetic beads in one step, and the DNA-nanobeads complex can be used as PCR templates. HLA typing based on an oligonucleotide array was conducted by hybridization with the PCR products. The result shows that the protocols are robust and sensitive.

  16. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) for rapid prenatal diagnosis of cytogenetic abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have shown in a prospective validation study that an array CGH test was highly accurate for rapid detection of chromosomal aneuploidies and deletions or duplications on fetal DNA samples in a clinical prenatal diagnostic setting. Here we present our updated "post-validation phase" experience with...

  17. Expedited Site Characterization: A rapid, cost-effective process for preremedial site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Walker, J.L.; Jennings, T.V.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Hastings, B.; Meyer, W.T.; Rose, C.M.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1993-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a unique, cost- and time-effective, technically innovative process for preremedial site characterization, referred to as Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). The cost of the ESC field sampling process ranges from 1/10 to 1/5 of the cost of traditional site characterization. The time required for this ESC field activity is approximately 1/30 of that for current methods. Argonne`s preremedial site investigations based on this approach have been accepted by the appropriate regulatory agencies. The ESC process is flexible and neither site nor contaminant dependent. The process has been successfully tested and applied in site investigations of multiple contaminated landfills in New Mexico (for the US Department of the Interior`s Bureau of Land Management [BLM]) and at former grain storage facilities in Nebraska and Kansas, contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (for the Department of Agriculture`s Commodity Credit Corporation [CCC/USDA]). A working demonstration of this process was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development as a model of the methodology needed to accelerate site characterizations at DOE facilities. This report describes the application of the process in New Mexico, Nebraska and Kansas.

  18. Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Active Human Alu Subfamilies Based on the 1000 Genomes Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Hotard, Ashley B.; Ranck, Megan C.; Fontenot, Catherine C.; Storer, Jessica; Stewart, Chip; Marth, Gabor T.; Batzer, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the 1000 Genomes Consortium is to characterize human genome structural variation (SV), including forms of copy number variations such as deletions, duplications, and insertions. Mobile element insertions, particularly Alu elements, are major contributors to genomic SV among humans. During the pilot phase of the project we experimentally validated 645 (611 intergenic and 34 exon targeted) polymorphic “young” Alu insertion events, absent from the human reference genome. Here, we report high resolution sequencing of 343 (322 unique) recent Alu insertion events, along with their respective target site duplications, precise genomic breakpoint coordinates, subfamily assignment, percent divergence, and estimated A-rich tail lengths. All the sequenced Alu loci were derived from the AluY lineage with no evidence of retrotransposition activity involving older Alu families (e.g., AluJ and AluS). AluYa5 is currently the most active Alu subfamily in the human lineage, followed by AluYb8, and many others including three newly identified subfamilies we have termed AluYb7a3, AluYb8b1, and AluYa4a1. This report provides the structural details of 322 unique Alu variants from individual human genomes collectively adding about 100 kb of genomic variation. Many Alu subfamilies are currently active in human populations, including a surprising level of AluY retrotransposition. Human Alu subfamilies exhibit continuous evolution with potential drivers sprouting new Alu lineages. PMID:26319576

  19. Genomics-informed isolation and characterization of a symbiotic Nanoarchaeota system from a terrestrial geothermal environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurch, Louie; Giannone, Richard J.; Belisle, Bernard S.; Swift, Carolyn; Utturkar, Sagar; Hettich, Robert L.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Podar, Mircea

    2016-07-05

    Biological features can be inferred, based on genomic data, for many microbial lineages that remain uncultured. However, cultivation is important for characterizing an organism’s physiology and testing its genome-encoded potential. Here we use single-cell genomics to infer cultivation conditions for the isolation of an ectosymbiotic Nanoarchaeota (‘Nanopusillus acidilobi’) and its host (Acidilobus, a crenarchaeote) from a terrestrial geothermal environment. The cells of ‘Nanopusillus’ are among the smallest known cellular organisms (100–300 nm). They appear to have a complete genetic information processing machinery, but lack almost all primary biosynthetic functions as well as respiration and ATP synthesis. Lastly, genomic and proteomicmore » comparison with its distant relative, the marine Nanoarchaeum equitans illustrate an ancient, common evolutionary history of adaptation of the Nanoarchaeota to ectosymbiosis, so far unique among the Archaea.« less

  20. Genomics-informed isolation and characterization of a symbiotic Nanoarchaeota system from a terrestrial geothermal environment

    PubMed Central

    Wurch, Louie; Giannone, Richard J.; Belisle, Bernard S.; Swift, Carolyn; Utturkar, Sagar; Hettich, Robert L.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Podar, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Biological features can be inferred, based on genomic data, for many microbial lineages that remain uncultured. However, cultivation is important for characterizing an organism's physiology and testing its genome-encoded potential. Here we use single-cell genomics to infer cultivation conditions for the isolation of an ectosymbiotic Nanoarchaeota (‘Nanopusillus acidilobi') and its host (Acidilobus, a crenarchaeote) from a terrestrial geothermal environment. The cells of ‘Nanopusillus' are among the smallest known cellular organisms (100–300 nm). They appear to have a complete genetic information processing machinery, but lack almost all primary biosynthetic functions as well as respiration and ATP synthesis. Genomic and proteomic comparison with its distant relative, the marine Nanoarchaeum equitans illustrate an ancient, common evolutionary history of adaptation of the Nanoarchaeota to ectosymbiosis, so far unique among the Archaea. PMID:27378076

  1. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Sarwar; Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Jakka, Padmaja; NarasimhaRao, Veera; Bhargavi, Bindu; Gupta, Vivek Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis. PMID:27525259

  2. Genomics-informed isolation and characterization of a symbiotic Nanoarchaeota system from a terrestrial geothermal environment.

    PubMed

    Wurch, Louie; Giannone, Richard J; Belisle, Bernard S; Swift, Carolyn; Utturkar, Sagar; Hettich, Robert L; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Podar, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Biological features can be inferred, based on genomic data, for many microbial lineages that remain uncultured. However, cultivation is important for characterizing an organism's physiology and testing its genome-encoded potential. Here we use single-cell genomics to infer cultivation conditions for the isolation of an ectosymbiotic Nanoarchaeota ('Nanopusillus acidilobi') and its host (Acidilobus, a crenarchaeote) from a terrestrial geothermal environment. The cells of 'Nanopusillus' are among the smallest known cellular organisms (100-300 nm). They appear to have a complete genetic information processing machinery, but lack almost all primary biosynthetic functions as well as respiration and ATP synthesis. Genomic and proteomic comparison with its distant relative, the marine Nanoarchaeum equitans illustrate an ancient, common evolutionary history of adaptation of the Nanoarchaeota to ectosymbiosis, so far unique among the Archaea. PMID:27378076

  3. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Azam, Sarwar; Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Jakka, Padmaja; NarasimhaRao, Veera; Bhargavi, Bindu; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Radhakrishnan, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis. PMID:27525259

  4. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/. PMID:26394708

  5. Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of Amolops tuberodepressus (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaohua; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao

    2016-07-01

    Amolops tuberodepressus is a vulnerable torrent frog, and only know distributed in the Wuliang Mountain in southwestern China. In the present study, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of A. tuberodepressus was determined. The genome was 18 348 bp in length, and it contained 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs), one partial control region and one light strand replication origin. The gene rearrangement was observed within the WANCY tRNA gene cluster region, which similar to other Amolops species. In this paper, we utilized 13 protein-coding genes of A. tuberodepressus and other 10 closely ranid species to construct the species phylogenetic tree to verify the A. tuberodepressus was accuracy. PMID:26153745

  6. Whole-genome characterization of chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Patch, Ann-Marie; Christie, Elizabeth L; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Garsed, Dale W; George, Joshy; Fereday, Sian; Nones, Katia; Cowin, Prue; Alsop, Kathryn; Bailey, Peter J; Kassahn, Karin S; Newell, Felicity; Quinn, Michael C J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Quek, Kelly; Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte; Curry, Ed; Leong, Huei San; Hamilton, Anne; Mileshkin, Linda; Au-Yeung, George; Kennedy, Catherine; Hung, Jillian; Chiew, Yoke-Eng; Harnett, Paul; Friedlander, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Pyman, Jan; Cordner, Stephen; O'Brien, Patricia; Leditschke, Jodie; Young, Greg; Strachan, Kate; Waring, Paul; Azar, Walid; Mitchell, Chris; Traficante, Nadia; Hendley, Joy; Thorne, Heather; Shackleton, Mark; Miller, David K; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Tothill, Richard W; Holloway, Timothy P; Semple, Timothy; Harliwong, Ivon; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Idrisoglu, Senel; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Poudel, Barsha; Holmes, Oliver; Anderson, Matthew; Leonard, Conrad; Lonie, Andrew; Hall, Nathan; Wood, Scott; Taylor, Darrin F; Xu, Qinying; Fink, J Lynn; Waddell, Nick; Drapkin, Ronny; Stronach, Euan; Gabra, Hani; Brown, Robert; Jewell, Andrea; Nagaraj, Shivashankar H; Markham, Emma; Wilson, Peter J; Ellul, Jason; McNally, Orla; Doyle, Maria A; Vedururu, Ravikiran; Stewart, Collin; Lengyel, Ernst; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; deFazio, Anna; Grimmond, Sean M; Bowtell, David D L

    2015-05-28

    Patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) have experienced little improvement in overall survival, and standard treatment has not advanced beyond platinum-based combination chemotherapy, during the past 30 years. To understand the drivers of clinical phenotypes better, here we use whole-genome sequencing of tumour and germline DNA samples from 92 patients with primary refractory, resistant, sensitive and matched acquired resistant disease. We show that gene breakage commonly inactivates the tumour suppressors RB1, NF1, RAD51B and PTEN in HGSC, and contributes to acquired chemotherapy resistance. CCNE1 amplification was common in primary resistant and refractory disease. We observed several molecular events associated with acquired resistance, including multiple independent reversions of germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in individual patients, loss of BRCA1 promoter methylation, an alteration in molecular subtype, and recurrent promoter fusion associated with overexpression of the drug efflux pump MDR1. PMID:26017449

  7. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  8. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration of B2 may provide the

  9. Complete genomic characterization of potato mop-topvirus isolate from the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato mop-top virus (PMTV; family Virgaviridae)was reported recently in the Pacific Northwestern USA. To better understand the genetic diversity of thisvirus, the complete genome of an isolate from WashingtonState (WA), USA, was characterized. Sequence comparisons of the WA isolate with other known...

  10. Identification and characterization of the genomic termini and cleavage/packaging signals of gallid herpesvirus 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpesvirus replication within infected host cells results in concatameric head-to-tail genomes which are cleaved at specific sites and packaged into the viral capsid by a complex of proteins. The sites of cleavage have been characterized for a number of herpesviruses and conserved signaling sequenc...

  11. Rapid and Inexpensive Screening of Genomic Copy Number Variations Using a Novel Quantitative Fluorescent PCR Method

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joan C.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Pena, Heloísa B.; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2013-01-01

    Detection of human microdeletion and microduplication syndromes poses significant burden on public healthcare systems in developing countries. With genome-wide diagnostic assays frequently inaccessible, targeted low-cost PCR-based approaches are preferred. However, their reproducibility depends on equally efficient amplification using a number of target and control primers. To address this, the recently described technique called Microdeletion/Microduplication Quantitative Fluorescent PCR (MQF-PCR) was shown to reliably detect four human syndromes by quantifying DNA amplification in an internally controlled PCR reaction. Here, we confirm its utility in the detection of eight human microdeletion syndromes, including the more common WAGR, Smith-Magenis, and Potocki-Lupski syndromes with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We present selection, design, and performance evaluation of detection primers using variety of approaches. We conclude that MQF-PCR is an easily adaptable method for detection of human pathological chromosomal aberrations. PMID:24288428

  12. Rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Axelrod, Tim; Butler, Nat; Jedicke, Robert; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Pichardo, Barbara; Reyes, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    Small NEOs are, as a whole, poorly characterized, and we know nothing about the physical properties of the majority of all NEOs. The rate of NEO discoveries is increasing each year, and projects to determine the physical properties of NEOs are lagging behind. NEOs are faint, and generally even fainter by the time that follow-up characterizations can be made days or weeks later. There is a need for a high-throughput, high-efficiency physical characterization strategy in which hundreds of faint NEOs can be characterized each year. Broadband photometry in the near-infrared is sufficiently diagnostic to assign taxonomic types, and hence constrain both the individual and ensemble properties of NEOs. We will present results from our recently initiated program of rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of NEOs. We are using UKIRT (on Mauna Kea) and the RATIR instrument on the 1.5m telescope at the San Pedro Martir Observatory (Mexico) to allow us to make observations most nights of the year in robotic/queue mode. This technique is powerful and fast. We have written automated software that allows us to observe NEOs very soon after discovery. Our targets are NEOs that are generally too faint for other characterization techniques. We are on pace to characterize hundreds of NEOs per year.

  13. Integrated genomic characterization of IDH1-mutant glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hanwen; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Li, Jie; Coşkun, Süleyman; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Özduman, Koray; Omay, S Bülent; Sorensen, Eric A; Turcan, Şevin; Bakırcığlu, Mehmet; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Murray, Phillip B; Clark, Victoria E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Knight, James; Sencar, Leman; Altınok, Selin; Kaulen, Leon D; Gülez, Burcu; Timmer, Marco; Schramm, Johannes; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Henegariu, Octavian; Moliterno, Jennifer; Louvi, Angeliki; Chan, Timothy A; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Pamir, M Necmettin; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Bilguvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas represent approximately 30% of all central nervous system tumors and 80% of malignant brain tumors1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the malignant progression of low-grade gliomas with mutations in IDH1 (encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1), we studied paired tumor samples from 41 patients, comparing higher-grade, progressed samples to their lower-grade counterparts. Integrated genomic analyses, including whole-exome sequencing and copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, demonstrated nonlinear clonal expansion of the original tumors and identified oncogenic pathways driving progression. These include activation of the MYC and RTK-RAS-PI3K pathways and upregulation of the FOXM1- and E2F2-mediated cell cycle transitions, as well as epigenetic silencing of developmental transcription factor genes bound by Polycomb repressive complex 2 in human embryonic stem cells. Our results not only provide mechanistic insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving glioma progression but also identify inhibition of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26618343

  14. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  15. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W; Krupczak, Kevin M; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2015-11-27

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated with an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Last, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  16. Large number of replacement polymorphisms in rapidly evolving genes of Drosophila. Implications for genome-wide surveys of DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K J; Nigro, L; Aquadro, C F; Tautz, D

    1999-01-01

    We present a survey of nucleotide polymorphism of three novel, rapidly evolving genes in populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Levels of silent polymorphism are comparable to other loci, but the number of replacement polymorphisms is higher than that in most other genes surveyed in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Tests of neutrality fail to reject neutral evolution with one exception. This concerns a gene located in a region of high recombination rate in D. simulans and in a region of low recombination rate in D. melanogaster, due to an inversion. In the latter case it shows a very low number of polymorphisms, presumably due to selective sweeps in the region. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism suggest that most substitutions are neutral or nearly neutral and that weak (positive and purifying) selection plays a significant role in the evolution of these genes. At all three loci, purifying selection of slightly deleterious replacement mutations appears to be more efficient in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster, presumably due to different effective population sizes. Our analysis suggests that current knowledge about genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism is far from complete with respect to the types and range of nucleotide substitutions and that further analysis of differences between local populations will be required to understand the forces more completely. We note that rapidly diverging and nearly neutrally evolving genes cannot be expected only in the genome of Drosophila, but are likely to occur in large numbers also in other organisms and that their function and evolution are little understood so far. PMID:10581279

  17. antiSMASH: rapid identification, annotation and analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters in bacterial and fungal genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Medema, Marnix H.; Blin, Kai; Cimermancic, Peter; de Jager, Victor; Zakrzewski, Piotr; Fischbach, Michael A.; Weber, Tilmann; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal secondary metabolism is a rich source of novel bioactive compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications as antibiotics, anti-tumor drugs or cholesterol-lowering drugs. To find new drug candidates, microbiologists are increasingly relying on sequencing genomes of a wide variety of microbes. However, rapidly and reliably pinpointing all the potential gene clusters for secondary metabolites in dozens of newly sequenced genomes has been extremely challenging, due to their biochemical heterogeneity, the presence of unknown enzymes and the dispersed nature of the necessary specialized bioinformatics tools and resources. Here, we present antiSMASH (antibiotics & Secondary Metabolite Analysis Shell), the first comprehensive pipeline capable of identifying biosynthetic loci covering the whole range of known secondary metabolite compound classes (polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenes, aminoglycosides, aminocoumarins, indolocarbazoles, lantibiotics, bacteriocins, nucleosides, beta-lactams, butyrolactones, siderophores, melanins and others). It aligns the identified regions at the gene cluster level to their nearest relatives from a database containing all other known gene clusters, and integrates or cross-links all previously available secondary-metabolite specific gene analysis methods in one interactive view. antiSMASH is available at http://antismash.secondarymetabolites.org. PMID:21672958

  18. Sequence elimination and cytosine methylation are rapid and reproducible responses of the genome to wide hybridization and allopolyploidy in wheat.

    PubMed

    Shaked, H; Kashkush, K; Ozkan, H; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    2001-08-01

    Interspecific or intergeneric hybridization, followed by chromosome doubling, can lead to the formation of new allopolyploid species. Recent studies indicate that allopolyploid formation is associated with genetic and epigenetic changes, although little is known about the type of changes that occur, how rapidly they occur, and the type of sequences involved. To address these matters, we have surveyed F1 hybrids between diploid species from the wheat (Aegilops and Triticum) group and their derived allotetraploids by screening a large number of loci using amplified fragment length polymorphism and DNA gel blot analysis and by assaying the extent of cytosine methylation. We found that sequence elimination is one of the major and immediate responses of the wheat genome to wide hybridization or allopolyploidy, that it affects a large fraction of the genome, and that it is reproducible. In one cross between AE: sharonensis x AE: umbellulata, 14% of the loci from AE: sharonensis were eliminated compared with only 0.5% from AE: umbellulata, with most changes occurring in the F1 hybrid. In contrast, crosses between AE: longissima x T. urartu showed that sequence elimination was more frequent after chromosome doubling. Alterations in cytosine methylation occurred in approximately 13% of the loci, either in the F1 hybrid or in the allopolyploid. For eight of nine bands that were isolated, the sequences that underwent elimination corresponded to low-copy DNA, whereas alterations in methylation patterns affected both repetitive DNA sequences, such as retrotransposons, and low-copy DNA in approximately equal proportions. PMID:11487690

  19. Rapid Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations under Intergeneric Genomic Shock in Newly Synthesized Chrysanthemum morifolium × Leucanthemum paludosum Hybrids (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibin; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Qi, Xiangyu; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Teng, Nianjun; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The Asteraceae family is at the forefront of the evolution due to frequent hybridization. Hybridization is associated with the induction of widespread genetic and epigenetic changes and has played an important role in the evolution of many plant taxa. We attempted the intergeneric cross Chrysanthemum morifolium × Leucanthemum paludosum. To obtain the success in cross, we have to turn to ovule rescue. DNA profiling of the amphihaploid and amphidiploid was investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-related amplified polymorphism, start codon targeted polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP). Hybridization induced rapid changes at the genetic and the epigenetic levels. The genetic changes mainly involved loss of parental fragments and gaining of novel fragments, and some eliminated sequences possibly from the noncoding region of L. paludosum. The MSAP analysis indicated that the level of DNA methylation was lower in the amphiploid (∼45%) than in the parental lines (51.5–50.6%), whereas it increased after amphidiploid formation. Events associated with intergeneric genomic shock were a feature of C. morifolium × L. paludosum hybrid, given that the genetic relationship between the parental species is relatively distant. Our results provide genetic and epigenetic evidence for understanding genomic shock in wide crosses between species in Asteraceae and suggest a need to expand our current evolutionary framework to encompass a genetic/epigenetic dimension when seeking to understand wide crosses. PMID:24407856

  20. Integrated Genomic Characterization Reveals Novel, Therapeutically Relevant Drug Targets in FGFR and EGFR Pathways in Sporadic Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S.; Fonseca, Rafael; Bryce, Alan H.; McCullough, Ann E.; Barrett, Michael T.; Hunt, Katherine; Patel, Maitray D.; Young, Scott W.; Collins, Joseph M.; Silva, Alvin C.; Condjella, Rachel M.; Block, Matthew; McWilliams, Robert R.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Klee, Eric W.; Bible, Keith C.; Harris, Pamela; Oliver, Gavin R.; Bhavsar, Jaysheel D.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Schahl, Kimberly; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Barr Fritcher, Emily G.; Baker, Angela; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Izatt, Tyler; Christoforides, Alexis; Cherni, Irene; Nasser, Sara; Reiman, Rebecca; Phillips, Lori; McDonald, Jackie; Adkins, Jonathan; Mastrian, Stephen D.; Placek, Pamela; Watanabe, Aprill T.; LoBello, Janine; Han, Haiyong; Von Hoff, Daniel; Craig, David W.; Stewart, A. Keith; Carpten, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma continues to harbor a difficult prognosis and therapeutic options have been limited. During the course of a clinical trial of whole genomic sequencing seeking druggable targets, we examined six patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Integrated genome-wide and whole transcriptome sequence analyses were performed on tumors from six patients with advanced, sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (SIC) to identify potential therapeutically actionable events. Among the somatic events captured in our analysis, we uncovered two novel therapeutically relevant genomic contexts that when acted upon, resulted in preliminary evidence of anti-tumor activity. Genome-wide structural analysis of sequence data revealed recurrent translocation events involving the FGFR2 locus in three of six assessed patients. These observations and supporting evidence triggered the use of FGFR inhibitors in these patients. In one example, preliminary anti-tumor activity of pazopanib (in vitro FGFR2 IC50≈350 nM) was noted in a patient with an FGFR2-TACC3 fusion. After progression on pazopanib, the same patient also had stable disease on ponatinib, a pan-FGFR inhibitor (in vitro, FGFR2 IC50≈8 nM). In an independent non-FGFR2 translocation patient, exome and transcriptome analysis revealed an allele specific somatic nonsense mutation (E384X) in ERRFI1, a direct negative regulator of EGFR activation. Rapid and robust disease regression was noted in this ERRFI1 inactivated tumor when treated with erlotinib, an EGFR kinase inhibitor. FGFR2 fusions and ERRFI mutations may represent novel targets in sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and trials should be characterized in larger cohorts of patients with these aberrations. PMID:24550739

  1. A rapid method to characterize seabed habitats and associated macro-organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, T.J.; Cochrane, G.R.; Roberts, D.A.; Chezar, H.; Hatcher, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a method for rapidly collecting, processing, and interrogating real-time abiotic and biotic seabed data to determine seabed habitat classifications. This is done from data collected over a large area of an acoustically derived seabed map, along multidirectional transects, using a towed small camera-sled. The seabed, within the newly designated Point Harris Marine Reserve on the northern coast of San Miguel Island, California, was acoustically imaged using sidescan sonar then ground-truthed using a towed small camera-sled. Seabed characterizations were made from video observations, and were logged to a laptop computer (PC) in real time. To ground-truth the acoustic mosaic, and to characterize abiotic and biotic aspects of the seabed, a three-tiered characterization scheme was employed that described the substratum type, physical structure (i.e., bedform or vertical relief), and the occurrence of benthic macrofauna and flora. A crucial advantage of the method described here, is that preliminary seabed characterizations can be interrogated and mapped over the sidescan mosaic and other seabed information within hours of data collection. This ability to rapidly process seabed data is invaluable to scientists and managers, particularly in modifying concurrent or planning subsequent surveys.

  2. Rapid characterization of titanium microstructural features for specific modelling of mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, T.; Tiley, J.; Tanner, A.; Williams, R.; Rollins, B.; Lee, E.; Kar, S.; Banerjee, R.; Fraser, H. L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical properties of α/β Ti alloys are closely related to their microstructure. The complexity of the microstructural features involved makes it rather difficult to develop models for predicting properties of these alloys. Advances in stereology and microscopy permit rapid characterization of various features in Ti alloys including Widmanstätten α-laths, grain sizes, grain shapes, colony structures and volume fractions of different phases. This research documents the stereology procedures for characterizing microstructural features in Ti alloys, including the use of three-dimensional serial sectioning and reconstruction procedures for developing through material measurements. The resulting data indicate the powerful characterization processes now available, and the ability to rapidly assess microstructural features in Ti alloys. The processes were tested using Ti-62222 by serial sectioning the sample and conducting automated stereology protocols to determine features. In addition, three-dimensional reconstruction was completed on a Ti-6242 sample to evaluate lath interactions within the alloy. Results indicate the tremendous potential for characterizing microstructures using advanced techniques.

  3. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers from the sika deer (Cervus nippon) genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Niu, W P; Yu, H; Yang, R J; Yan, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, M J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers are widely and evenly distributed, and are highly polymorphic. Rapid and convenient detection through automated analysis means that microsatellite markers are widely used in the construction of plant and animal genetic maps, in quantitative trait loci localization, marker-assisted selection, identification of genetic relationships, and genetic diversity and phylogenetic tree construction. However, few microsatellite markers remain to be isolated. We used streptavidin magnetic beads to affinity-capture and construct a (CA)n microsatellite DNA-enriched library from sika deer. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers. Clear bands were selected, which were amplified using non-specific primers following PCR amplification to screen polymorphisms in a group of 65 unrelated sika deer. The positive clone rate reached 82.9% by constructing the enriched library, and we then selected positive clones for sequencing. There were 395 sequences with CA repeats, and the CA repeat number was 4-105. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers, of which 297 pairs were designed. We next selected clear bands and used non-specific primers to amplify following PCR amplification. In total, 245 pairs of primers were screened. We then selected 50 pairs of primers to randomly screen for polymorphisms. We detected 47 polymorphic and 3 monomorphic loci in 65 unrelated sika deer. These newly isolated and characterized microsatellite loci can be used to construct genetic maps and for lineage testing in deer. In addition, they can be used for comparative genomics between Cervidae species. PMID:26436393

  4. Genome-Wide Mining, Characterization, and Development of Microsatellite Markers in Gossypium Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Fang, Lei; Chen, Jiedan; Hu, Yan; Si, Zhanfeng; Wang, Sen; Chang, Lijing; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Although much research has been conducted to characterize microsatellites and develop markers, the distribution of microsatellites remains ambiguous and the use of microsatellite markers in genomic studies and marker-assisted selection is limited. To identify microsatellites for cotton research, we mined 100,290, 83,160, and 56,937 microsatellites with frequencies of 41.2, 49.1, and 74.8 microsatellites per Mb in the recently sequenced Gossypium species: G. hirsutum, G. arboreum, and G. raimondii, respectively. The distributions of microsatellites in their genomes were non-random and were positively and negatively correlated with genes and transposable elements, respectively. Of the 77,996 developed microsatellite markers, 65,498 were physically anchored to the 26 chromosomes of G. hirsutum with an average marker density of 34 markers per Mb. We confirmed 67,880 (87%) universal and 7,705 (9.9%) new genic microsatellite markers. The polymorphism was estimated in above three species by in silico PCR and validated with 505 markers in G. hirsutum. We further predicted 8,825 polymorphic microsatellite markers within G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124. In our study, genome-wide mining and characterization of microsatellites, and marker development were very useful for the saturation of the allotetraploid genetic linkage map, genome evolution studies and comparative genome mapping. PMID:26030481

  5. Genome-wide characterization and expression analysis of genetic variants in sweet orange.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wen-Biao; Huang, Ding; Xing, Feng; Hu, Yibo; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2013-09-01

    Heterozyosity is an important feature of many plant genomes, and is related to heterosis. Sweet orange, a highly heterozygous species, is thought to have originated from an inter-species hybrid between pummelo and mandarin. To investigate the heterozygosity of the sweet orange genome and examine how this heterozygosity affects gene expression, we characterized the genome of Valencia orange for single nucleotide variations (SNVs), small insertions and deletions (InDels) and structural variations (SVs), and determined their functional effects on protein-coding genes and non-coding sequences. Almost half of the genes containing large-effect SNVs and InDels were expressed in a tissue-specific manner. We identified 3542 large SVs (>50 bp), including deletions, insertions and inversions. Most of the 296 genes located in large-deletion regions showed low expression levels. RNA-Seq reads and DNA sequencing reads revealed that the alleles of 1062 genes were differentially expressed. In addition, we detected approximately 42 Mb of contigs that were not found in the reference genome of a haploid sweet orange by de novo assembly of unmapped reads, and annotated 134 protein-coding genes within these contigs. We discuss how this heterozygosity affects the quality of genome assembly. This study advances our understanding of the genome architecture of sweet orange, and provides a global view of gene expression at heterozygous loci. PMID:23738603

  6. Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Likun; You, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Yanliang; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Zixia; Chen, Baohua; Zhao, Yunfeng; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Ke, Caihuan; Xu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33%. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor. PMID:26438131

  7. Genome-wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Until very recently, cucumber genetic and genomic resources, especially molecular markers, have been very limited, impeding progress of cucumber breeding efforts. Microsatellites are short tandemly repeated DNA sequences, which are frequently favored as genetic markers due to their high level of polymorphism and codominant inheritance. Data from previously characterized genomes has shown that these repeats vary in frequency, motif sequence, and genomic location across taxa. During the last year, the genomes of two cucumber genotypes were sequenced including the Chinese fresh market type inbred line '9930' and the North American pickling type inbred line 'Gy14'. These sequences provide a powerful tool for developing markers in a large scale. In this study, we surveyed and characterized the distribution and frequency of perfect microsatellites in 203 Mbp assembled Gy14 DNA sequences, representing 55% of its nuclear genome, and in cucumber EST sequences. Similar analyses were performed in genomic and EST data from seven other plant species, and the results were compared with those of cucumber. Results A total of 112,073 perfect repeats were detected in the Gy14 cucumber genome sequence, accounting for 0.9% of the assembled Gy14 genome, with an overall density of 551.9 SSRs/Mbp. While tetranucleotides were the most frequent microsatellites in genomic DNA sequence, dinucleotide repeats, which had more repeat units than any other SSR type, had the highest cumulative sequence length. Coding regions (ESTs) of the cucumber genome had fewer microsatellites compared to its genomic sequence, with trinucleotides predominating in EST sequences. AAG was the most frequent repeat in cucumber ESTs. Overall, AT-rich motifs prevailed in both genomic and EST data. Compared to the other species examined, cucumber genomic sequence had the highest density of SSRs (although comparable to the density of poplar

  8. PRIMUS: Rapid Reconstruction of Pedigrees from Genome-wide Estimates of Identity by Descent

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Jeffrey; Qiao, Dandi; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Below, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and correctly utilizing relatedness among samples is essential for genetic analysis; however, managing sample records and pedigrees can often be error prone and incomplete. Data sets ascertained by random sampling often harbor cryptic relatedness that can be leveraged in genetic analyses for maximizing power. We have developed a method that uses genome-wide estimates of pairwise identity by descent to identify families and quickly reconstruct and score all possible pedigrees that fit the genetic data by using up to third-degree relatives, and we have included it in the software package PRIMUS (Pedigree Reconstruction and Identification of the Maximally Unrelated Set). Here, we validate its performance on simulated, clinical, and HapMap pedigrees. Among these samples, we demonstrate that PRIMUS can verify reported pedigree structures and identify cryptic relationships. Finally, we show that PRIMUS reconstructed pedigrees, all of which were previously unknown, for 203 families from a cohort collected in Starr County, TX (1,890 samples). PMID:25439724

  9. PRIMUS: rapid reconstruction of pedigrees from genome-wide estimates of identity by descent.

    PubMed

    Staples, Jeffrey; Qiao, Dandi; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Nickerson, Deborah A; Below, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    Understanding and correctly utilizing relatedness among samples is essential for genetic analysis; however, managing sample records and pedigrees can often be error prone and incomplete. Data sets ascertained by random sampling often harbor cryptic relatedness that can be leveraged in genetic analyses for maximizing power. We have developed a method that uses genome-wide estimates of pairwise identity by descent to identify families and quickly reconstruct and score all possible pedigrees that fit the genetic data by using up to third-degree relatives, and we have included it in the software package PRIMUS (Pedigree Reconstruction and Identification of the Maximally Unrelated Set). Here, we validate its performance on simulated, clinical, and HapMap pedigrees. Among these samples, we demonstrate that PRIMUS can verify reported pedigree structures and identify cryptic relationships. Finally, we show that PRIMUS reconstructed pedigrees, all of which were previously unknown, for 203 families from a cohort collected in Starr County, TX (1,890 samples). PMID:25439724

  10. Chromosomal locus rearrangements are a rapid response to formation of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica genome

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Olga; Neves, Nuno; Silva, Manuela; Lewis, Michelle S.; Madlung, Andreas; Comai, Luca; Viegas, Wanda; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2004-01-01

    Allopolyploidy is a significant evolutionary process, resulting in new species with diploid or greater chromosome complements derived from two or more progenitor species. We examined the chromosomal consequences of genomic merger in Arabidopsis suecica, the allotetraploid hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromere, nucleolus organizer region (NOR), and 5S rRNA gene probes reveals the expected numbers of progenitor chromosomes in natural A. suecica, but one pair of A. thaliana NORs and one pair of A. arenosa-derived 5S gene loci are missing. Similarly, in newly formed synthetic A. suecica-like allotetraploids, pairs of A. thaliana NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed to A. arenosa chromosomes, with genotypic differences apparent between F3 siblings of the same F2 parent and between independent lines. Likewise, pairs of A. arenosa 5S genes are lost and novel linkages between 5S loci and NORs arise in synthetic allotetraploids. By contrast, the expected numbers of A. arenosa-derived NORs and A. thaliana-derived 5S loci are found in both natural and synthetic A. suecica. Collectively, these observations suggest that some, but not all, loci are unstable in newly formed A. suecica allotetraploids and can participate in a variety of alternative rearrangements, some of which resemble chromosomal changes found in nature. PMID:15604143

  11. Chromosomal locus rearrangements are a rapid response to formation of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica genome.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Olga; Neves, Nuno; Silva, Manuela; Lewis, Michelle S; Madlung, Andreas; Comai, Luca; Viegas, Wanda; Pikaard, Craig S

    2004-12-28

    Allopolyploidy is a significant evolutionary process, resulting in new species with diploid or greater chromosome complements derived from two or more progenitor species. We examined the chromosomal consequences of genomic merger in Arabidopsis suecica, the allotetraploid hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromere, nucleolus organizer region (NOR), and 5S rRNA gene probes reveals the expected numbers of progenitor chromosomes in natural A. suecica, but one pair of A. thaliana NORs and one pair of A. arenosa-derived 5S gene loci are missing. Similarly, in newly formed synthetic A. suecica-like allotetraploids, pairs of A. thaliana NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed to A. arenosa chromosomes, with genotypic differences apparent between F(3) siblings of the same F(2) parent and between independent lines. Likewise, pairs of A. arenosa 5S genes are lost and novel linkages between 5S loci and NORs arise in synthetic allotetraploids. By contrast, the expected numbers of A. arenosa-derived NORs and A. thaliana-derived 5S loci are found in both natural and synthetic A. suecica. Collectively, these observations suggest that some, but not all, loci are unstable in newly formed A. suecica allotetraploids and can participate in a variety of alternative rearrangements, some of which resemble chromosomal changes found in nature. PMID:15604143

  12. Rapid evolution of a recently retroposed transcription factor YY2 in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, C; Lu, X; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2005-11-11

    YY2 was originally identified due to its unusual similarity to the evolutionarily well conserved, zinc-finger gene YY1. In this study, we have determined the evolutionary origin and conservation of YY2 using comparative genomic approaches. Our results indicate that YY2 is a retroposed copy of YY1 that has been inserted into another gene locus named Mbtps2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2). This retroposition is estimated to have occurred after the divergence of placental mammals from other vertebrates based on the detection of YY2 only in the placental mammals. The N-terminal and C-terminal regions of YY2 have evolved under different selection pressures. The N-terminal region has evolved at a very fast pace with very limited functional constraints whereas the DNA-binding, C-terminal region still maintains very similar sequence structure as YY1 and is also well conserved among placental mammals. In situ hybridizations using different adult mouse tissues indicate that mouse YY2 is expressed at relatively low levels in Purkinje and granular cells of cerebellum, and neuronal cells of cerebrum, but at very high levels in testis. The expression levels of YY2 is much lower than YY1, but the overall spatial expression patterns are similar to those of Mbtps2, suggesting a possible shared transcriptional control between YY2 and Mbtps2. Taken together, the formation and evolution of YY2 represent a very unusual case where a transcription factor was first retroposed into another gene locus encoding a protease and survived with different selection schemes and expression patterns.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium

    PubMed Central

    Pajuelo, Mónica J.; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. Methods For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. Results The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. Conclusions/Significance The availability of draft

  14. Rapid, simple and efficient method for detection of viral genomes on raspberries.

    PubMed

    Perrin, A; Loutreul, J; Boudaud, N; Bertrand, I; Gantzer, C

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, foodborne viruses, especially human noroviruses (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), have been increasingly reported as the causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. Soft red fruits, especially raspberries, have a high incidence among the types of food concerned. Due to low infectious doses and low concentrations of enteric viruses in food samples, it is necessary to have an efficient and rapid detection method to implement prevention measures. A standard method for virus detection and quantification in food, including raspberries (XP CEN ISO/TS 15216-1 and -2, 2013) is currently available. This method proposes a consensus detection approach by RT-real time PCR (RT-qPCR) but also a virus extraction procedure based on the elution-concentration principle. In this study, an alternative method of extraction in which RNAs are directly extracted from food matrices (based on direct RNA extraction) has been optimized. First, each step was improved to make it a highly rapid, specific and simple method. Second, the standard virus concentration method was compared with the optimized direct RNA extraction one. Human enteric viral surrogates, Murine Norovirus (MNV) and F-specific RNA bacteriophage GA, were selected according to their adhesion properties and resistance to pH close to our main targets (NoV and HAV). Raspberries were artificially contaminated using two different techniques (immersion and spotting) in order to define a recovery rate and the amounts of virus recovered. Results showed that the direct RNA extraction method revealed significantly higher viral extraction efficiency (46.2%) than the elution-concentration method (20.3%), with similar proportions of inhibitors for both. In the same way with inoculation by spotting, the best recovery rate of GA phage (39.7% against 0.7%) and MNV (42.8% against 0.5%) was observed by direct RNA extraction. For the lowest concentrations of phage and virus in the immersion bath, only the direct RNA extraction method

  15. The Swedish new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis: genome sequence, morphology, cell tropism and phenotypic characterization

    PubMed Central

    Unemo, Magnus; Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Skilton, Rachel J.; Barlow, David; Goulding, David; Persson, Kenneth; Harris, Simon R.; Kelly, Anne; Bjartling, Carina; Fredlund, Hans; Olcén, Per; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Clarke, Ian N.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. In 2006, a new variant of C. trachomatis (nvCT), carrying a 377 bp deletion within the plasmid, was reported in Sweden. This deletion included the targets used by the commercial diagnostic systems from Roche and Abbott. The nvCT is clonal (serovar/genovar E) and it spread rapidly in Sweden, undiagnosed by these systems. The degree of spread may also indicate an increased biological fitness of nvCT. The aims of this study were to describe the genome of nvCT, to compare the nvCT genome to all available C. trachomatis genome sequences and to investigate the biological properties of nvCT. An early nvCT isolate (Sweden2) was analysed by genome sequencing, growth kinetics, microscopy, cell tropism assay and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. It was compared with relevant C. trachomatis isolates, including a similar serovar E C. trachomatis wild-type strain that circulated in Sweden prior to the initially undetected expansion of nvCT. The nvCT genome does not contain any major genetic polymorphisms – the genes for central metabolism, development cycle and virulence are conserved – or phenotypic characteristics that indicate any altered biological fitness. This is supported by the observations that the nvCT and wild-type C. trachomatis infections are very similar in terms of epidemiological distribution, and that differences in clinical signs are only described, in one study, in women. In conclusion, the nvCT does not appear to have any altered biological fitness. Therefore, the rapid transmission of nvCT in Sweden was due to the strong diagnostic selective advantage and its introduction into a high-frequency transmitting population. PMID:20093289

  16. In human T cells mifepristone antagonizes glucocorticoid non-genomic rapid responses in terms of Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 activity, but not ezrin/radixin/moesin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Eileen Jea; Hsu, Ching-Hui; Chang, Vincent Han-Jhih; Lin, Enoch Pin-Yi; Kuo, Trista Pin-Tsun; Chien, Chau-Heng; Lin, Hsiao-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and progesterone have been employed as immunosuppressive agents during pregnancy for many years. Intracellular acidification by GCs is due to a rapid non-genomic inhibition of membrane Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 (NHE1) activity and is followed by immunosuppression of PHA-stimulated proliferation. NHE1 is tethered to the cortical actin cytoskeleton through ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins within lipid rafts; these regulate cell shape, migration and resistance to apoptosis. We explored whether mifepristone (RU486), an antagonist of GCs in T cells, is able to completely block rapid non-genomic responses, namely NHE1 activity and the phosphorylation C-terminal residues of ERM proteins at threonine (cp-ERM). GCs stimulate a rapid non-genomic cp-ERM response in cells within 5min. RU486 antagonized the GC-induced rapid decrease in NHE1 activity, and arrested PHA-stimulated T cells at G0/G1 phase but had no effect on the rapid increase in cp-ERM, which persisted for 24h. However, the cp-ERM response was blocked by staurosporine in both resting and GC stimulated cells. The results of RU486 antagonized the GC induced rapid decrease in NHE1 ion transport activity, but not the increase cp-ERM. This suggests that RU486 in T cells exerts its antagonistic effects at NHE1 containing plasma membrane sites and not where cp-ERM links lipid rafts to cortical cytoskeletons. PMID:26773750

  17. Genomic characterization of novel circular ssDNA viruses from insectivorous bats in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Varela, Ana Paula Muterle; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Delwart, Eric; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Circoviruses are highly prevalent porcine and avian pathogens. In recent years, novel circular ssDNA genomes have recently been detected in a variety of fecal and environmental samples using deep sequencing approaches. In this study the identification of genomes of novel circoviruses and cycloviruses in feces of insectivorous bats is reported. Pan-reactive primers were used targeting the conserved rep region of circoviruses and cycloviruses to screen DNA bat fecal samples. Using this approach, partial rep sequences were detected which formed five phylogenetic groups distributed among the Circovirus and the recently proposed Cyclovirus genera of the Circoviridae. Further analysis using inverse PCR and Sanger sequencing led to the characterization of four new putative members of the family Circoviridae with genome size ranging from 1,608 to 1,790 nt, two inversely arranged ORFs, and canonical nonamer sequences atop a stem loop. PMID:25688970

  18. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Formica selysi (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Formicinae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sen; Li, Xin; Cai, Lei-Gang; Qian, Zeng-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Formica selysi has been assembled from Illumina sequencing data with an average coverage of 2733X. The circular genome was 16,752 bp in length, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and one D-loop region. All PCGs initiated with ATN codons and terminated with the TAA codon. The nucleotide composition was highly asymmetric (40.33% A, 11.07% C, 5.66% G and 42.94% T) with an overall GC content of 16.73%. Unlike those of most other insects, the mitochondrial genome of F. selysi was characterized by an obviously high proportion of intergenic spacers. These data would contribute to the evolutionary studies of this and related ant taxa. PMID:25703846

  19. Genomic Characterization of Novel Circular ssDNA Viruses from Insectivorous Bats in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Varela, Ana Paula Muterle; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Delwart, Eric; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Circoviruses are highly prevalent porcine and avian pathogens. In recent years, novel circular ssDNA genomes have recently been detected in a variety of fecal and environmental samples using deep sequencing approaches. In this study the identification of genomes of novel circoviruses and cycloviruses in feces of insectivorous bats is reported. Pan-reactive primers were used targeting the conserved rep region of circoviruses and cycloviruses to screen DNA bat fecal samples. Using this approach, partial rep sequences were detected which formed five phylogenetic groups distributed among the Circovirus and the recently proposed Cyclovirus genera of the Circoviridae. Further analysis using inverse PCR and Sanger sequencing led to the characterization of four new putative members of the family Circoviridae with genome size ranging from 1,608 to 1,790 nt, two inversely arranged ORFs, and canonical nonamer sequences atop a stem loop. PMID:25688970

  20. Rapid antibiotic-resistance predictions from genome sequence data for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Phelim; Gordon, N Claire; Walker, Timothy M; Dunn, Laura; Heys, Simon; Huang, Bill; Earle, Sarah; Pankhurst, Louise J; Anson, Luke; de Cesare, Mariateresa; Piazza, Paolo; Votintseva, Antonina A; Golubchik, Tanya; Wilson, Daniel J; Wyllie, David H; Diel, Roland; Niemann, Stefan; Feuerriegel, Silke; Kohl, Thomas A; Ismail, Nazir; Omar, Shaheed V; Smith, E Grace; Buck, David; McVean, Gil; Walker, A Sarah; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W; Iqbal, Zamin

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to an urgent need for rapid detection of drug resistance in clinical samples, and improvements in global surveillance. Here we show how de Bruijn graph representation of bacterial diversity can be used to identify species and resistance profiles of clinical isolates. We implement this method for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a software package ('Mykrobe predictor') that takes raw sequence data as input, and generates a clinician-friendly report within 3 minutes on a laptop. For S. aureus, the error rates of our method are comparable to gold-standard phenotypic methods, with sensitivity/specificity of 99.1%/99.6% across 12 antibiotics (using an independent validation set, n=470). For M. tuberculosis, our method predicts resistance with sensitivity/specificity of 82.6%/98.5% (independent validation set, n=1,609); sensitivity is lower here, probably because of limited understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. We give evidence that minor alleles improve detection of extremely drug-resistant strains, and demonstrate feasibility of the use of emerging single-molecule nanopore sequencing techniques for these purposes. PMID:26686880

  1. Rapid antibiotic-resistance predictions from genome sequence data for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Phelim; Gordon, N. Claire; Walker, Timothy M.; Dunn, Laura; Heys, Simon; Huang, Bill; Earle, Sarah; Pankhurst, Louise J.; Anson, Luke; de Cesare, Mariateresa; Piazza, Paolo; Votintseva, Antonina A.; Golubchik, Tanya; Wilson, Daniel J.; Wyllie, David H.; Diel, Roland; Niemann, Stefan; Feuerriegel, Silke; Kohl, Thomas A.; Ismail, Nazir; Omar, Shaheed V.; Smith, E. Grace; Buck, David; McVean, Gil; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.; Iqbal, Zamin

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to an urgent need for rapid detection of drug resistance in clinical samples, and improvements in global surveillance. Here we show how de Bruijn graph representation of bacterial diversity can be used to identify species and resistance profiles of clinical isolates. We implement this method for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a software package (‘Mykrobe predictor') that takes raw sequence data as input, and generates a clinician-friendly report within 3 minutes on a laptop. For S. aureus, the error rates of our method are comparable to gold-standard phenotypic methods, with sensitivity/specificity of 99.1%/99.6% across 12 antibiotics (using an independent validation set, n=470). For M. tuberculosis, our method predicts resistance with sensitivity/specificity of 82.6%/98.5% (independent validation set, n=1,609); sensitivity is lower here, probably because of limited understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. We give evidence that minor alleles improve detection of extremely drug-resistant strains, and demonstrate feasibility of the use of emerging single-molecule nanopore sequencing techniques for these purposes. PMID:26686880

  2. Genomic Characterization of the Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Khincha, Payal P.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2013-01-01

    The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are a set of clinically related yet heterogeneous disorders in which at least one hematopoietic cell lineage is significantly reduced. Many of the IBMFS have notably increased cancer risks as well as other physical findings. Highly penetrant germline mutations in key pathways, such as DNA repair, telomere biology, or ribosomal biogenesis are causative of Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), respectively. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) generally refers to high-throughput, large-scale sequencing technologies and is being used more frequently to understand disease etiology. In the IBMFS, NGS has facilitated the discovery of germline mutations that cause thombocytopenia absent radii syndrome, a subset of DC and DBA, and other uncharacterized, but related, disorders. Panels of large numbers of genes are being used to molecularly characterize patients with IBMFS, such as FA and DBA. NGS is also accelerating the discovery of the genetic etiology of previously unclassified IBMFS. In this review, we will highlight recent studies that have employed NGS to ascertain the genetic etiology of IBMFS, namely FA, DC, DBA and TAR and discuss the translational utility of these findings. PMID:24246701

  3. Genomic DNA characterization of pork spleen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Orrego Cardozo, M.; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the study of Raman signal enhancement due to interaction between ZnO rods and pork spleen DNA is reported. ZnO microstructures were synthesized by the Sol-Gel method and afterward combined with porcine spleen DNA extracted in the previous stages, following standardized cell lysis, deproteinization, and precipitation processes. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of structures of ZnO and ZnO-DNA complex, and the results show the respective bands of ZnO wurtzite hexagonal phase for modes E2 (M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO), and 2LO. Due to the SERS effect in the spectral range from 200 to 1800 cm,-1 Raman bands caused by vibrations of the deoxyribose C-O-C binding were also observed, producing deformation of the ring as shown in the 559 cm-1 peak. The broad band at 782 cm-1, together with the complex vibration of the string 5'-COPO-C3', is over a wide band of thymine (790 cm-1) or cytosine (780 cm-1). A prominent band near 1098 cm-1 assigned to symmetric stretching vibration phosphodioxy group (PO2-) DNA backbone is most favoured in intensity by the addition of ZnO particles originated by the SERS effect. This effect suggests a possible mechanism for enhancing the Raman signal due to the electromagnetic interaction between a DNA molecule and the flat surface of the ZnO rod.

  4. Characterization of active miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements in the peanut genome.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kiyoshima, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Sigeru; Sasamoto, Sigemi; Watanabe, Akiko; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Isobe, Sachiko

    2012-05-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), some of which are known as active nonautonomous DNA transposons, are found in the genomes of plants and animals. In peanut (Arachis hypogaea), Ah-MITE1 has been identified in a gene for fatty-acid desaturase, and possessed excision activity. However, the AhMITE1 distribution and frequency of excision have not been determined for the peanut genome. In order to characterize AhMITE1s, their genomic diversity and transposition ability was investigated. Southern blot analysis indicated high AhMITE1 copy number in the genomes of A. hypogaea, A. magna and A. monticola, but not in A. duranensis. A total of 504 AhMITE1s were identified from the MITE-enriched genomic libraries of A. hypogaea. The representative AhMITE1s exhibited a mean length of 205.5 bp and a GC content of 30.1%, with AT-rich, 9 bp target site duplications and 25 bp terminal inverted repeats. PCR analyses were performed using primer pairs designed against both flanking sequences of each AhMITE1. These analyses detected polymorphisms at 169 out of 411 insertional loci in the four peanut lines. In subsequent analyses of 60 gamma-irradiated mutant lines, four Ah-MITE1 excisions showed footprint mutations at the 109 loci tested. This study characterizes AhMITE1s in peanut and discusses their use as DNA markers and mutagens for the genetics, genomics and breeding of peanut and its relatives. PMID:22294450

  5. Characterization of the Genome, Proteome, and Structure of Yersiniophage ϕR1-37

    PubMed Central

    Hyytiäinen, Heidi J.; Happonen, Lotta J.; Kiljunen, Saija; Datta, Neeta; Mattinen, Laura; Williamson, Kirsty; Kristo, Paula; Szeliga, Magdalena; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Ahola-Iivarinen, Elina; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage vB_YecM-ϕR1-37 (ϕR1-37) is a lytic yersiniophage that can propagate naturally in different Yersinia species carrying the correct lipopolysaccharide receptor. This large-tailed phage has deoxyuridine (dU) instead of thymidine in its DNA. In this study, we determined the genomic sequence of phage ϕR1-37, mapped parts of the phage transcriptome, characterized the phage particle proteome, and characterized the virion structure by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction. The 262,391-bp genome of ϕR1-37 is one of the largest sequenced phage genomes, and it contains 367 putative open reading frames (ORFs) and 5 tRNA genes. Mass-spectrometric analysis identified 69 phage particle structural proteins with the genes scattered throughout the genome. A total of 269 of the ORFs (73%) lack homologues in sequence databases. Based on terminator and promoter sequences identified from the intergenic regions, the phage genome was predicted to consist of 40 to 60 transcriptional units. Image reconstruction revealed that the ϕR1-37 capsid consists of hexameric capsomers arranged on a T=27 lattice similar to the bacteriophage ϕKZ. The tail of ϕR1-37 has a contractile sheath. We conclude that phage ϕR1-37 is a representative of a novel phage type that carries the dU-containing genome in a ϕKZ-like head. PMID:22973030

  6. Rapid, Multiplexed Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Isolates Using Suspension Array Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carter, John M.; Lin, Andrew; Clotilde, Laurie; Lesho, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods have emerged as the most reliable techniques to detect and characterize pathogenic Escherichia coli. These molecular techniques include conventional single analyte and multiplex PCR, PCR followed by microarray detection, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole genome sequencing. The choice of methods used depends upon the specific needs of the particular study. One versatile method involves detecting serogroup-specific markers by hybridization or binding to encoded microbeads in a suspension array. This molecular serotyping method has been developed and adopted for investigating E. coli outbreaks. The major advantages of this technique are the ability to simultaneously serotype E. coli and detect the presence of virulence and pathogenicity markers. Here, we describe the development of a family of multiplex molecular serotyping methods for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, compare their performance to traditional serotyping methods, and discuss the cost-benefit balance of these methods in the context of various food safety objectives. PMID:27242670

  7. Rapid, Multiplexed Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Isolates Using Suspension Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Carter, John M; Lin, Andrew; Clotilde, Laurie; Lesho, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods have emerged as the most reliable techniques to detect and characterize pathogenic Escherichia coli. These molecular techniques include conventional single analyte and multiplex PCR, PCR followed by microarray detection, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole genome sequencing. The choice of methods used depends upon the specific needs of the particular study. One versatile method involves detecting serogroup-specific markers by hybridization or binding to encoded microbeads in a suspension array. This molecular serotyping method has been developed and adopted for investigating E. coli outbreaks. The major advantages of this technique are the ability to simultaneously serotype E. coli and detect the presence of virulence and pathogenicity markers. Here, we describe the development of a family of multiplex molecular serotyping methods for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, compare their performance to traditional serotyping methods, and discuss the cost-benefit balance of these methods in the context of various food safety objectives. PMID:27242670

  8. Mapping of Betapapillomavirus Human Papillomavirus 5 Transcription and Characterization of Viral-Genome Replication Function

    PubMed Central

    Sankovski, Eve; Männik, Andres; Geimanen, Jelizaveta; Ustav, Ene

    2014-01-01

    Betapapillomavirus replication and transcription have not been studied in detail because of a lack of suitable cellular systems supporting human papillomavirus (HPV) genome replication. We have recently shown that the human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS provides a useful environment for the genome replication of many different HPVs, including the betapapillomaviruses HPV5 and HPV8. Using mutational analysis and complementation assay, we demonstrated herein that the viral early proteins E1 and E2 are viral transfactors that are necessary and sufficient for HPV5 genome replication. We also identified four HPV5 early promoter regions with transcription start sites (TSSs) at nucleotides (nt) 184/191, 460, 840, and 1254, respectively, and the HPV late promoter with a TSS at nt 7640. In addition, we mapped the HPV5 early polyadenylation cleavage sites via 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3′RACE) to nt 4457 and 4475. In total, 14 different viral mRNA species, originating from the HPV5 genome, were mapped in U2OS cells during transient and stable replication. The main splicing donor and acceptor sites identified herein are consistent with the data previously obtained in HPV5-positive skin lesions. In addition, we identified novel E8 open reading frame (ORF)-containing transcripts (E8^E1C and E8^E2C) expressed from the HPV5 genome. Similar to several other papillomaviruses, the product of the E8^E2C mRNA acts as a repressor of viral genome replication. PMID:24198410

  9. Genome sequence of E. coli O104:H4 leads to rapid development of a targeted antimicrobial agent against this emerging pathogen.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent widespread outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Germany demonstrates the dynamic nature of emerging and re-emerging food-borne pathogens, particularly STECs and related pathogenic E. coli. Rapid genomic sequencing and public availability of these data from the German outbreak strain allo...

  10. Genomic characterization of novel marine vesiviruses from Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) from Alaska.

    PubMed

    McClenahan, Shasta D; Burek, Kathy A; Beckmen, Kimberlee B; Knowles, Nick J; Neill, John D; Romero, Carlos H

    2008-12-01

    Marine vesiviruses were isolated in cell culture from oral and rectal swabs and vesicular fluid from Alaskan Steller sea lions (SSL; Eumetopias jubatus). Further characterization by RT-PCR, complete genomic sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that these viruses are most closely related to the marine vesiviruses, but are distinct viruses and represent two novel genotypes. The complete genome of these two SSL isolates was sequenced after cloning their viral cDNA. The genomes were found to be 8302 and 8305 nucleotides in length, organized in three open reading frames and contained 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of 19 and 180 nucleotides, respectively. The complete genomes of both SSL viruses were most closely related to each other and shared 83.0% nucleotide identity. Using the very limited number of complete genomic vesivirus sequences available in the NCBI database, these novel SSL vesiviruses seem most closely related to vesicular exanthema of swine virus-A48 and least related to rabbit vesivirus and walrus calicivirus. Specific antiserum against some evolutionary closer marine vesiviruses did not neutralize these isolates supporting the novel nature of these SSL viruses. PMID:18765261

  11. Characterization and genomic analysis of two Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages isolated from poultry/livestock farms

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Yun, Jiae; Lim, Jeong-A; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyu-Seok; Chang, Yoonjee; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens, causing various diseases in humans and animals. As methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent, controlling this pathogen with standard antibiotic treatment has become challenging. Bacteriophages (phages) have attracted interest as alternative antibacterial agents to control MRSA. In this study, we isolated six S. aureus phages from soils of poultry/livestock farms. Based on the results of host range determination with 150 S. aureus strains and restriction enzyme treatment of phage DNA, two phages, designated SP5 and SP6, were selected for further characterization and genome sequencing. Both SP5 and SP6 were classified as members of the family Siphoviridae. The genome of SP5 comprises 43 305 bp and contains 63 ORFs, while the SP6 genome comprises 42 902 bp and contains 61 ORFs. Although they have different host spectra, the phage genomes exhibit high nucleotide similarity to each other. Adsorption assay results suggested that the host range determinants of the two phages are involved in both adsorption and infection. Comparative genomic analyses of the two phages provided evidence that the lysogenic/lytic control module and tail proteins may be important for host specificity. PMID:23973965

  12. Characterization of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Integration in the Horse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; He, Xi-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 has a unique integration profile in the human genome relative to murine and avian retroviruses. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is another well-studied lentivirus that can also be used as a promising retro-transfection vector, but its integration into its native host has not been characterized. In this study, we mapped 477 integration sites of the EIAV strain EIAVFDDV13 in fetal equine dermal (FED) cells during in vitro infection. Published integration sites of EIAV and HIV-1 in the human genome were also analyzed as references. Our results demonstrated that EIAVFDDV13 tended to integrate into genes and AT-rich regions, and it avoided integrating into transcription start sites (TSS), which is consistent with EIAV and HIV-1 integration in the human genome. Notably, the integration of EIAVFDDV13 favored long interspersed elements (LINEs) and DNA transposons in the horse genome, whereas the integration of HIV-1 favored short interspersed elements (SINEs) in the human genome. The chromosomal environment near LINEs or DNA transposons potentially influences viral transcription and may be related to the unique EIAV latency states in equids. The data on EIAV integration in its natural host will facilitate studies on lentiviral infection and lentivirus-based therapeutic vectors. PMID:26102582

  13. Full-length genomic characterizations of two canine parvoviruses prevalent in Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Shi-Chong; Guo, Hui-Chen; Sun, Shi-Qi; Shu, Long; Wei, Yan-Quan; Sun, De-Hui; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Peng, Guang-Neng; Liu, Xiang-Tao

    2015-05-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) can cause acute hemorrhagic diarrhea and fatal myocarditis in young dogs. Currently, most studies have focused on the evolution of the VP2 gene, whereas the full-length genome of CPV has been rarely reported. In this study, the whole genomes of CPV-LZ1 and CPV-LZ2 strains prevalent in Northwest China were determined and analyzed in comparison with those of the reference CPVs. The genome sequences of both LZ strains consisted of 5053 nucleotides. CPV-LZ1 and CPV-LZ2 strains were designated as new CPV-2a and CPV-2b, respectively. Sequence alignment analysis results revealed that these two new strains underwent specific unique variations during the process of local adaption. The left non-translated regions of these strains formed a Y-shaped hairpin structure, whereas the right non-translated regions lacked the reiteration of DNA sequence. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 33 whole coding regions of CPVs showed a strong spatial clustering, and these two strains belonged to the Chinese strain cluster lineage. This study provides a method to obtain the full-length genome of CPV. The isolation and characterization of these viruses adds incrementally to the knowledge of the full-length genome of CPV. The results from this study also provide insight into the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of the CPV field isolates from Northwest China and can be useful in preventing and controlling CPV infection in this region. PMID:25690604

  14. Characterization and genomic analysis of two Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages isolated from poultry/livestock farms.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Yun, Jiae; Lim, Jeong-A; Roh, Eunjung; Jung, Kyu-Seok; Chang, Yoonjee; Ryu, Sangryeol; Heu, Sunggi

    2013-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens, causing various diseases in humans and animals. As methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent, controlling this pathogen with standard antibiotic treatment has become challenging. Bacteriophages (phages) have attracted interest as alternative antibacterial agents to control MRSA. In this study, we isolated six S. aureus phages from soils of poultry/livestock farms. Based on the results of host range determination with 150 S. aureus strains and restriction enzyme treatment of phage DNA, two phages, designated SP5 and SP6, were selected for further characterization and genome sequencing. Both SP5 and SP6 were classified as members of the family Siphoviridae. The genome of SP5 comprises 43 305 bp and contains 63 ORFs, while the SP6 genome comprises 42 902 bp and contains 61 ORFs. Although they have different host spectra, the phage genomes exhibit high nucleotide similarity to each other. Adsorption assay results suggested that the host range determinants of the two phages are involved in both adsorption and infection. Comparative genomic analyses of the two phages provided evidence that the lysogenic/lytic control module and tail proteins may be important for host specificity. PMID:23973965

  15. An Integrated Genomic Approach for Rapid Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Agro-Morphological Traits in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Maneesha S.; Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Kujur, Alice; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2014-01-01

    The identification and fine mapping of robust quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/genes governing important agro-morphological traits in chickpea still lacks systematic efforts at a genome-wide scale involving wild Cicer accessions. In this context, an 834 simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism marker-based high-density genetic linkage map between cultivated and wild parental accessions (Cicer arietinum desi cv. ICC 4958 and Cicer reticulatum wild cv. ICC 17160) was constructed. This inter-specific genetic map comprising eight linkage groups spanned a map length of 949.4 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 1.14 cM. Eleven novel major genomic regions harbouring 15 robust QTLs (15.6–39.8% R2 at 4.2–15.7 logarithm of odds) associated with four agro-morphological traits (100-seed weight, pod and branch number/plant and plant hairiness) were identified and mapped on chickpea chromosomes. Most of these QTLs showed positive additive gene effects with effective allelic contribution from ICC 4958, particularly for increasing seed weight (SW) and pod and branch number. One robust SW-influencing major QTL region (qSW4.2) has been narrowed down by combining QTL mapping with high-resolution QTL region-specific association analysis, differential expression profiling and gene haplotype-based association/LD mapping. This enabled to delineate a strong SW-regulating ABI3VP1 transcription factor (TF) gene at trait-specific QTL interval and consequently identified favourable natural allelic variants and superior high seed weight-specific haplotypes in the upstream regulatory region of this gene showing increased transcript expression during seed development. The genes (TFs) harbouring diverse trait-regulating QTLs, once validated and fine-mapped by our developed rapid integrated genomic approach and through gene/QTL map-based cloning, can be utilized as potential candidates for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of chickpea. PMID:25335477

  16. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Lane, Todd [SNL

    2013-02-11

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd

    2012-06-01

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Method for Genotyping Genome-Edited Animals: A Heteroduplex Mobility Assay Using Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Vanessa; Brusselle, Lucas; Heslan, Jean-Marie; Remy, Séverine; Ménoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; NGuyen, Tuan Huy; Anegon, Ignacio; Tesson, Laurent

    2016-05-20

    The recent emergence and application of engineered endonucleases have led to the development of genome editing tools capable of rapidly implementing various targeted genome editions in a wide range of species. Moreover, these novel tools have become easier to use and have resulted in a great increase of applications. Whilst gene knockout (KO) or knockin (KI) animal models are relatively easy to achieve, there is a bottleneck in the detection and analysis of these mutations. Although several methods exist to detect these targeted mutations, we developed a heteroduplex mobility assay on an automated microfluidic capillary electrophoresis system named HMA-CE in order to accelerate the genotyping process. The HMA-CE method uses a simple PCR amplification of genomic DNA (gDNA) followed by an automated capillary electrophoresis step which reveals a heteroduplexes (HD) signature for each mutation. This allows efficient discrimination of wild-type and genome-edited animals down to the single base pair level. PMID:27209567

  19. Rapidly-Deposited Polydopamine Coating via High Temperature and Vigorous Stirring: Formation, Characterization and Biofunctional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Deng, Yi; Lyu, Beier; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Hai; Ma, Hongwei; Lyu, Yalin; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) coating provides a promising approach for immobilization of biomolecules onto almost all kinds of solid substrates. However, the deposition kinetics of PDA coating as a function of temperature and reaction method is not well elucidated. Since dopamine self-polymerization usually takes a long time, therefore, rapid-formation of PDA film becomes imperative for surface modification of biomaterials and medical devices. In the present study, a practical method for preparation of rapidly-deposited PDA coating was developed using a uniquely designed device, and the kinetics of dopamine self-polymerization was investigated by QCM sensor system. It was found that high temperature and vigorous stirring could dramatically speed up the formation of PDA film on QCM chip surface. Surface characterization, BSA binding study, cell viability assay and antibacterial test demonstrates that the polydopamine coating after polymerization for 30 min by our approach exhibits similar properties to those of 24 h counterpart. The method has a great potential for rapid-deposition of polydopamine films to modify biomaterial surfaces. PMID:25415328

  20. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  1. Rapid fixation of non-native alleles revealed by genome-wide SNP analysis of hybrid tiger salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Johnson, Jarrett R; Kump, D Kevin; Shaffer, H Bradley; Smith, Jeramiah J; Voss, S Randal

    2009-01-01

    Background Hybrid zones represent valuable opportunities to observe evolution in systems that are unusually dynamic and where the potential for the origin of novelty and rapid adaptation co-occur with the potential for dysfunction. Recently initiated hybrid zones are particularly exciting evolutionary experiments because ongoing natural selection on novel genetic combinations can be studied in ecological time. Moreover, when hybrid zones involve native and introduced species, complex genetic patterns present important challenges for conservation policy. To assess variation of admixture dynamics, we scored a large panel of markers in five wild hybrid populations formed when Barred Tiger Salamanders were introduced into the range of California Tiger Salamanders. Results At three of 64 markers, introduced alleles have largely displaced native alleles within the hybrid populations. Another marker (GNAT1) showed consistent heterozygote deficits in the wild, and this marker was associated with embryonic mortality in laboratory F2's. Other deviations from equilibrium expectations were idiosyncratic among breeding ponds, consistent with highly stochastic demographic effects. Conclusion While most markers retain native and introduced alleles in expected proportions, strong selection appears to be eliminating native alleles at a smaller set of loci. Such rapid fixation of alleles is detectable only in recently formed hybrid zones, though it might be representative of dynamics that frequently occur in nature. These results underscore the variable and mosaic nature of hybrid genomes and illustrate the potency of recombination and selection in promoting variable, and often unpredictable genetic outcomes. Introgression of a few, strongly selected introduced alleles should not necessarily affect the conservation status of California Tiger Salamanders, but suggests that genetically pure populations of this endangered species will be difficult to maintain. PMID:19630983

  2. Genome differentiation in a species pair of coregonine fishes: an extremely rapid speciation driven by stress-activated retrotransposons mediating extensive ribosomal DNA multiplications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sympatric species pairs are particularly common in freshwater fishes associated with postglacial lakes in northern temperate environments. The nature of divergences between co-occurring sympatric species, factors contributing to reproductive isolation and modes of genome evolution is a much debated topic in evolutionary biology addressed by various experimental tools. To the best of our knowledge, nobody approached this field using molecular cytogenetics. We examined chromosomes and genomes of one postglacial species pair, sympatric European winter-spawning Coregonus albula and the local endemic dwarf-sized spring-spawning C. fontanae, both originating in Lake Stechlin. We have employed molecular cytogenetic tools to identify the genomic differences between the two species of the sympatric pair on the sub-chromosomal level of resolution. Results Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments consistently revealed a distinct variation in the copy number of loci of the major ribosomal DNA (the 45S unit) between C. albula and C. fontanae genomes. In C. fontanae, up to 40 chromosomes were identified to bear a part of the major ribosomal DNA, while in C. albula only 8–10 chromosomes possessed these genes. To determine mechanisms how such extensive genome alternation might have arisen, a PCR screening for retrotransposons from genomic DNA of both species was performed. The amplified retrotransposon Rex1 was used as a probe for FISH mapping onto chromosomes of both species. These experiments showed a clear co-localization of the ribosomal DNA and the retrotransposon Rex1 in a pericentromeric region of one or two acrocentric chromosomes in both species. Conclusion We demonstrated genomic consequences of a rapid ecological speciation on the level undetectable by neither sequence nor karyotype analysis. We provide indirect evidence that ribosomal DNA probably utilized the spreading mechanism of retrotransposons subsequently affecting recombination rates

  3. CODEHOP-mediated PCR – A powerful technique for the identification and characterization of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Timothy M

    2005-01-01

    Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) PCR primers derived from amino acid sequence motifs which are highly conserved between members of a protein family have proven to be highly effective in the identification and characterization of distantly related family members. Here, the use of the CODEHOP strategy to identify novel viruses and obtain sequence information for phylogenetic characterization, gene structure determination and genome analysis is reviewed. While this review describes techniques for the identification of members of the herpesvirus family of DNA viruses, the same methodology and approach is applicable to other virus families. PMID:15769292

  4. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population with High Frequency of Genomic Islands

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Delgado-Sapién, Gabriela; Sandner-Miranda, Luisa; Méndez, José L.; González-Valencia, Gerardo; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Various genomic islands, PAPI-1, PAPI-2, PAGI-1, PAGI-2, PAGI-3, and PAGI-4, and the element pKLC102 have been characterized in different P. aeruginosa strains from diverse habitats and geographical locations. Chromosomal DNA macroarray of 100 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 85 unrelated patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit was created to assess the occurrence of these genomic islands (GEIs). The macroarray was then hybridized with labeled probes derived from each genomic island. In addition, PFGE patterns with SpeI, frequency of virulence genes, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of the strains were studied. Our results showed that almost all P. aeruginosa strains presented up to eight virulence genes. By SpeI macrorestriction fragment analysis we were able to identify 49 restriction patterns; 35 patterns correspond to single strains and the remaining 14 to strains subgroup (a–n). Most of the strains showed variation in number or composition of GEIs and a specific antimicrobial pattern indicating that each strain was an unrelated isolate. In terms of the number of genomic islands per strain, 7 GEIs were found in 34% of the strains, 6 in 18%, 5 in 12%, 4 in 14%, 3 in 10%, 2 in 7%, and 1 in 4%; only one isolate did not present any GEI. The genomic islands PAPI-1 and PAPI-2 and the element pKLC102 were the most frequently detected. The analysis of the location of each GEI in the chromosome of two strains show that the islands PAGI-3, PAPI-1, PAPI-2 and pKLC102 are present in the insertion site previously reported, but that PAGI-2 and PAGI-4 are inserted in another chromosome place in a site not characterized yet. In conclusion our data show that P. aeruginosa strains exhibited an epidemic population structure with horizontal transfer of DNA resulting in a high frequency of GEIs. PMID:22662157

  5. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population with high frequency of genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Delgado-Sapién, Gabriela; Sandner-Miranda, Luisa; Méndez, José L; González-Valencia, Gerardo; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Various genomic islands, PAPI-1, PAPI-2, PAGI-1, PAGI-2, PAGI-3, and PAGI-4, and the element pKLC102 have been characterized in different P. aeruginosa strains from diverse habitats and geographical locations. Chromosomal DNA macroarray of 100 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 85 unrelated patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit was created to assess the occurrence of these genomic islands (GEIs). The macroarray was then hybridized with labeled probes derived from each genomic island. In addition, PFGE patterns with SpeI, frequency of virulence genes, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of the strains were studied. Our results showed that almost all P. aeruginosa strains presented up to eight virulence genes. By SpeI macrorestriction fragment analysis we were able to identify 49 restriction patterns; 35 patterns correspond to single strains and the remaining 14 to strains subgroup (a-n). Most of the strains showed variation in number or composition of GEIs and a specific antimicrobial pattern indicating that each strain was an unrelated isolate. In terms of the number of genomic islands per strain, 7 GEIs were found in 34% of the strains, 6 in 18%, 5 in 12%, 4 in 14%, 3 in 10%, 2 in 7%, and 1 in 4%; only one isolate did not present any GEI. The genomic islands PAPI-1 and PAPI-2 and the element pKLC102 were the most frequently detected. The analysis of the location of each GEI in the chromosome of two strains show that the islands PAGI-3, PAPI-1, PAPI-2 and pKLC102 are present in the insertion site previously reported, but that PAGI-2 and PAGI-4 are inserted in another chromosome place in a site not characterized yet. In conclusion our data show that P. aeruginosa strains exhibited an epidemic population structure with horizontal transfer of DNA resulting in a high frequency of GEIs. PMID:22662157

  6. Rapid Detection of the Marek's Disease Viral Genome in Chicken Feathers by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Subasty; Gopal, Dhinakar Raj; Devarajan, Jeyanthi; Kathaperumal, Kumanan

    2012-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of serotype 1 Marek's disease virus (MDV) was developed. The method used a set of three pairs of primers to amplify the MEQ gene for detecting serotype 1 MDV. The MDV LAMP method did not cross-react with serotype 2 and serotype 3, nor did the LAMP primers have binding sites for the common avian DNA viruses (reticuloendotheliosis virus, chicken anemia virus, subgroup J of the avian leukosis virus). Additionally, the assay could detect up to 10 copies of the MEQ gene in the MD viral genome, and it had 10 times higher sensitivity than the traditional PCR methods. The LAMP master mix was stable for 90 days at −20°C. Furthermore, the efficiency of LAMP for detection of serotype 1 MDV in clinical samples was comparable to those of PCR and viral isolation. The LAMP procedure is simple and does not rely on any special equipment. The detection of serotype 1 MDV by LAMP will be useful for detecting and controlling oncogenic Marek's disease. PMID:22170920

  7. Enhancing genome investigations in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus via BAC library construction and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) is a major species in the Culex pipiens complex and an important vector for several human pathogens including West Nile virus and parasitic filarial nematodes causing lymphatic filariasis. It is common throughout tropical and subtropical regions and is among the most geographically widespread mosquito species. Although the complete genome sequence is now available, additional genomic tools are needed to improve the sequence assembly. Findings We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using the pIndigoBAC536 vector and HindIII partially digested DNA isolated from Cx. quinquefasciatus pupae, Johannesburg strain (NDJ). Insert size was estimated by NotI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of 82 randomly selected clones. To estimate genome coverage, each 384-well plate was pooled for screening with 29 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and five gene markers. The NDJ library consists of 55,296 clones arrayed in 144 384-well microplates. Fragment insert size ranged from 50 to 190 kb in length (mean = 106 kb). Based on a mean insert size of 106 kb and a genome size of 579 Mbp, the BAC library provides ~10.1-fold coverage of the Cx. quinquefasciatus genome. PCR screening of BAC DNA plate pools for SSR loci from the genetic linkage map and for four genes associated with reproductive diapause in Culex pipiens resulted in a mean of 9.0 positive plate pools per locus. Conclusion The NDJ library represents an excellent resource for genome assembly enhancement and characterization in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes. PMID:21914202

  8. Genome Wide Characterization of Short Tandem Repeat Markers in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Xu, Qiang; Mayer, Christoph; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-01-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ≈347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly distributed in the genome and most of the SSRs (62.02%) are located in the intergenic regions. We found that AT-rich SSRs are more frequent than GC-rich SSRs. A total number of 21,248 SSR primers were successfully developed, which represents 89 SSR markers per Mb of the genome. A subset of 950 developed SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested by wet lab experiments on a set of 16 citrus accessions. In total we identified 534 (56.21%) polymorphic SSR markers that will be useful in citrus improvement. The number of amplified alleles ranges from 2 to 12 with an average of 4 alleles per marker and an average PIC value of 0.75. The newly developed sweet orange primer sequences, their in silico PCR products, exact position in the genome assembly and putative function are made publicly available. We present the largest number of SSR markers ever developed for a citrus species. Almost two thirds of the markers are transferable to 16 citrus relatives and may be used for constructing a high density linkage map. In addition, they are valuable for marker-assisted selection studies, population structure analyses and comparative genomic studies of C. sinensis with other citrus related species. Altogether, these markers provide a significant contribution to the citrus research community. PMID:25148383

  9. Insights into the Loblolly Pine Genome: Characterization of BAC and Fosmid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, William M.; Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Koriabine, Maxim; Holtz-Morris, Ann; deJong, Pieter; Crepeau, Marc; Langley, Charles H.; Puiu, Daniela; Salzberg, Steven L.; Neale, David B.; Stevens, Kristian A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their prevalence and importance, the genome sequences of loblolly pine, Norway spruce, and white spruce, three ecologically and economically important conifer species, are just becoming available to the research community. Following the completion of these large assemblies, annotation efforts will be undertaken to characterize the reference sequences. Accurate annotation of these ancient genomes would be aided by a comprehensive repeat library; however, few studies have generated enough sequence to fully evaluate and catalog their non-genic content. In this paper, two sets of loblolly pine genomic sequence, 103 previously assembled BACs and 90,954 newly sequenced and assembled fosmid scaffolds, were analyzed. Together, this sequence represents 280 Mbp (roughly 1% of the loblolly pine genome) and one of the most comprehensive studies of repetitive elements and genes in a gymnosperm species. A combination of homology and de novo methodologies were applied to identify both conserved and novel repeats. Similarity analysis estimated a repetitive content of 27% that included both full and partial elements. When combined with the de novo investigation, the estimate increased to almost 86%. Over 60% of the repetitive sequence consists of full or partial LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons. Through de novo approaches, 6,270 novel, full-length transposable element families and 9,415 sub-families were identified. Among those 6,270 families, 82% were annotated as single-copy. Several of the novel, high-copy families are described here, with the largest, PtPiedmont, comprising 133 full-length copies. In addition to repeats, analysis of the coding region reported 23 full-length eukaryotic orthologous proteins (KOGS) and another 29 novel or orthologous genes. These discoveries, along with other genomic resources, will be used to annotate conifer genomes and address long-standing questions about gymnosperm evolution. PMID:24023741

  10. Insights into the loblolly pine genome: characterization of BAC and fosmid sequences.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Jill L; Lin, Brian Y; Zieve, Jacob J; Dougherty, William M; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Koriabine, Maxim; Holtz-Morris, Ann; deJong, Pieter; Crepeau, Marc; Langley, Charles H; Puiu, Daniela; Salzberg, Steven L; Neale, David B; Stevens, Kristian A

    2013-01-01

    Despite their prevalence and importance, the genome sequences of loblolly pine, Norway spruce, and white spruce, three ecologically and economically important conifer species, are just becoming available to the research community. Following the completion of these large assemblies, annotation efforts will be undertaken to characterize the reference sequences. Accurate annotation of these ancient genomes would be aided by a comprehensive repeat library; however, few studies have generated enough sequence to fully evaluate and catalog their non-genic content. In this paper, two sets of loblolly pine genomic sequence, 103 previously assembled BACs and 90,954 newly sequenced and assembled fosmid scaffolds, were analyzed. Together, this sequence represents 280 Mbp (roughly 1% of the loblolly pine genome) and one of the most comprehensive studies of repetitive elements and genes in a gymnosperm species. A combination of homology and de novo methodologies were applied to identify both conserved and novel repeats. Similarity analysis estimated a repetitive content of 27% that included both full and partial elements. When combined with the de novo investigation, the estimate increased to almost 86%. Over 60% of the repetitive sequence consists of full or partial LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons. Through de novo approaches, 6,270 novel, full-length transposable element families and 9,415 sub-families were identified. Among those 6,270 families, 82% were annotated as single-copy. Several of the novel, high-copy families are described here, with the largest, PtPiedmont, comprising 133 full-length copies. In addition to repeats, analysis of the coding region reported 23 full-length eukaryotic orthologous proteins (KOGS) and another 29 novel or orthologous genes. These discoveries, along with other genomic resources, will be used to annotate conifer genomes and address long-standing questions about gymnosperm evolution. PMID:24023741

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E: The First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. PMID:27034495

  12. Bioinformatic tools for using whole genome sequencing as a rapid high resolution diagnostic typing tool when tracing bioterror organisms in the food and feed chain.

    PubMed

    Segerman, Bo; De Medici, Dario; Ehling Schulz, Monika; Fach, Patrick; Fenicia, Lucia; Fricker, Martina; Wielinga, Peter; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Knutsson, Rickard

    2011-03-01

    The rapid technological development in the field of parallel sequencing offers new opportunities when tracing and tracking microorganisms in the food and feed chain. If a bioterror organism is deliberately spread it is of crucial importance to get as much information as possible regarding the strain as fast as possible to aid the decision process and select suitable controls, tracing and tracking tools. A lot of efforts have been made to sequence multiple strains of potential bioterror organisms so there is a relatively large set of reference genomes available. This study is focused on how to use parallel sequencing for rapid phylogenomic analysis and screen for genetic modifications. A bioinformatic methodology has been developed to rapidly analyze sequence data with minimal post-processing. Instead of assembling the genome, defining genes, defining orthologous relations and calculating distances, the present method can achieve a similar high resolution directly from the raw sequence data. The method defines orthologous sequence reads instead of orthologous genes and the average similarity of the core genome (ASC) is calculated. The sequence reads from the core and from the non-conserved genomic regions can also be separated for further analysis. Finally, the comparison algorithm is used to visualize the phylogenomic diversity of the bacterial bioterror organisms Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum using heat plot diagrams. PMID:20826036

  13. Use of Alignment-Free Phylogenetics for Rapid Genome Sequence-Based Typing of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Markers and Antibiotic Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kusters, Johannes G.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is becoming a leading technology in the typing and epidemiology of microbial pathogens, but the increase in genomic information necessitates significant investment in bioinformatic resources and expertise, and currently used methodologies struggle with genetically heterogeneous bacteria such as the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Here we demonstrate that the alignment-free analysis method feature frequency profiling (FFP) can be used to rapidly construct phylogenetic trees of draft bacterial genome sequences on a standard desktop computer and that coupling with in silico genotyping methods gives useful information for comparative and clinical genomic and molecular epidemiology applications. FFP-based phylogenetic trees of seven gastric Helicobacter species matched those obtained by analysis of 16S rRNA genes and ribosomal proteins, and FFP- and core genome single nucleotide polymorphism-based analysis of 63 H. pylori genomes again showed comparable phylogenetic clustering, consistent with genomotypes assigned by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Analysis of 377 H. pylori genomes highlighted the conservation of genomotypes and linkage with phylogeographic characteristics and predicted the presence of an incomplete or nonfunctional cag pathogenicity island in 18/276 genomes. In silico analysis of antibiotic susceptibility markers suggests that most H. pylori hspAmerind and hspEAsia isolates are predicted to carry the T2812C mutation potentially conferring low-level clarithromycin resistance, while levels of metronidazole resistance were similar in all multilocus sequence types. In conclusion, the use of FFP phylogenetic clustering and in silico genotyping allows determination of genome evolution and phylogeographic clustering and can contribute to clinical microbiology by genomotyping for outbreak management and the prediction of pathogenic potential and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:26135867

  14. Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging for Rapid III-V Heteroepitaxial Characterization.

    PubMed

    Deitz, Julia I; Carnevale, Santino D; Ringel, Steven A; McComb, David W; Grassman, Tyler J

    2015-01-01

    Misfit dislocations in heteroepitaxial layers of GaP grown on Si(001) substrates are characterized through use of electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). ECCI allows for imaging of defects and crystallographic features under specific diffraction conditions, similar to that possible via plan-view transmission electron microscopy (PV-TEM). A particular advantage of the ECCI technique is that it requires little to no sample preparation, and indeed can use large area, as-produced samples, making it a considerably higher throughput characterization method than TEM. Similar to TEM, different diffraction conditions can be obtained with ECCI by tilting and rotating the sample in the SEM. This capability enables the selective imaging of specific defects, such as misfit dislocations at the GaP/Si interface, with high contrast levels, which are determined by the standard invisibility criteria. An example application of this technique is described wherein ECCI imaging is used to determine the critical thickness for dislocation nucleation for GaP-on-Si by imaging a range of samples with various GaP epilayer thicknesses. Examples of ECCI micrographs of additional defect types, including threading dislocations and a stacking fault, are provided as demonstration of its broad, TEM-like applicability. Ultimately, the combination of TEM-like capabilities - high spatial resolution and richness of microstructural data - with the convenience and speed of SEM, position ECCI as a powerful tool for the rapid characterization of crystalline materials. PMID:26274560

  15. Rapid genome mapping in nano channel array for highly complete and accurate de novo sequence assembly of the complex Aegilops tauschii genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled high-throughput and low-cost generation of sequence data; however, de novo genome assembly remains a great challenge, particularly for large genomes. NGS short reads are often insufficient to create large contigs that span repeat sequences...

  16. Discovery and characterization of chromatin states for systematic annotation of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-01-01

    A plethora of epigenetic modifications have been described in the human genome and shown to play diverse roles in gene regulation, cellular differentiation, and the onset of disease. While some modifications have been linked with activity levels of different functional elements, their combinatorial patterns remain unresolved, and their potential for systematic de novo genome annotation remains untapped. In this paper, we systematically discover and characterize recurrent spatially-coherent and biologically-meaningful chromatin mark combinations, or chromatin states, in human T-cells. We describe 51 distinct chromatin states, including promoter-associated, transcription-associated, active intergenic, large-scale repressed and repeat-associated states. Each chromatin state shows specific functional, experimental, conservation, annotation, and sequence-motif enrichments, revealing their distinct candidate biological roles. Overall, our work provides a complementary functional annotation of the human genome revealing the genome-wide locations of diverse classes of epigenetic functions, including previously-unsuspected chromatin states enriched in transcription end sites, distinct repeat families, and disease-SNP-associated states. PMID:20657582

  17. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of Rhizobium gallicum phage vB_RglS_P106B.

    PubMed

    Halmillawewa, Anupama P; Restrepo-Córdoba, Marcela; Yost, Christopher K; Hynes, Michael F

    2015-03-01

    The phage P106B (vB_RglS_P106B) is a Siphoviridae phage with a narrow spectrum of infectivity, which has been isolated from soils with a history of pea cultivation. The trapping host of P106B is an indigenous strain of Rhizobium gallicum (SO14B-4) isolated from soils associated with Vicia cracca. Phenotypic characterization of the phage revealed that P106B has an approximate burst size of 21 p.f.u. per infected cell with 60 min and 100 min eclipse and latent periods, respectively. Phage P106B was unable to transduce under the conditions tested. The genome of P106B is 56 024 bp in length with a mean DNA G+C content of 47.9 %. The complete genome sequence contains 95 putative ORFs and a single tRNA gene coding for leucine with the anticodon TTA. Putative functions could only be assigned to 22 of the predicted ORFs while a significant number of ORFs (47) shared no sequence similarities to previously characterized proteins. The remaining 26 putative protein-coding genes exhibited a sequence resemblance to other hypothetical proteins. No lysogeny-related genes were found in the P106B genome. PMID:25627439

  18. A new fiber-optic sensor technology for rapid and inexpensive characterization of soil contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Milanovich, F.P.; Brown, S.B.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Rossabi, J.

    1993-04-01

    The extent and complexity of worldwide environmental contamination are great enough that remediation will be extremely costly and lengthy. There is an urgent need for characterization techniques that are rapid, inexpensive, and simple and that do not generate waste. Towards this end LLNL is developing a fiber-optic chemical sensor technology for use in groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring. We use a colorimetric detection technique, based on an irreversible chemical reaction between a specific reagent and the target compound. The accuracy and sensitivity of the sensor (<5 ppb by weight in water, determined by comparison with gas chromatographic standard measurements) are sufficient for environmental monitoring of at least trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform.

  19. Rapid molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and assessment of populations of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Danielle; Hannett, George E; Bopp, Dianna J; Dumyati, Ghinwa K; Halse, Tanya A; Dumas, Nellie B; Musser, Kimberlee A

    2009-07-01

    Our laboratory has developed testing methods that use real-time PCR and pyrosequencing analysis to enable the rapid identification of potential hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains. We describe a real-time PCR assay that detects four C. difficile genes encoding toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and the binary toxin genes (cdtA and cdtB), as well as a pyrosequencing assay that detects common deletions in the tcdC gene in less than 4 h. A subset of historical and recent C. difficile isolates (n = 31) was also analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the circulating North American pulsed-field (NAP) types that have been isolated in New York State. Thirteen different NAP types were found among the 31 isolates tested, 13 of which were NAP type 1 strains. To further assess the best approach to utilizing our conventional and molecular methods, we studied the populations of C. difficile in patient stool specimens (n = 23). Our results indicated that 13% of individual stool specimens had heterogeneous populations of C. difficile when we compared the molecular characterization results for multiple bacterial isolates (n = 10). Direct molecular analysis of stool specimens gave results that correlated well with the results obtained with cultured stool specimens; the direct molecular analysis was rapid, informative, and less costly than the testing of multiple patient stool isolates. PMID:19403775

  20. Single Cell Analysis of Complex Thymus Stromal Cell Populations: Rapid Thymic Epithelia Preparation Characterizes Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Mella, Heather; Lucas, Philip J.; Williams, Joy A.; Telford, William; Gress, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and dendritic cells are essential for the maintenance of thymopoiesis. Because these stromal elements define the progenitor niche, provide critical survival signals and growth factors, and direct positive and negative selection, detailed study of these populations is necessary to understand important elements for thymic renewal after cytotoxic injury. Study of TEC is currently hindered by lengthy enzymatic separation techniques with decreased viability. We present a new rapid separation technique that yields consistent viable TEC numbers in a quarter of the prior preparation time. Using this new procedure, we identify changes in stroma populations following total body irradiation (TBI). By flow cytometry, we show that TBI significantly depletes UEA+ medullary TEC, while sparing Ly51+ CD45− cells. Further characterization of the Ly51+ subset reveals enrichment of fibroblasts (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII−), while cortical TECs (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII+) were markedly reduced. Dendritic cells (CD11lc+ CD45+) were also decreased following TBI. These data suggest that cytotoxic preparative regimens may impair thymic renewal by reducing critical populations of cortical and medullary TEC, and that such thymic damage can be assessed by this new rapid separation technique, thereby providing a means of assessing optimal conditioning pretransplantfor enhancing thymic-dependent immune reconstitution posttranspiant. PMID:19750208

  1. Roughness gradients on zirconia for rapid screening of cell-surface interactions: Fabrication, characterization and application.

    PubMed

    Flamant, Quentin; Stanciuc, Ana-Maria; Pavailler, Hugo; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Alini, Mauro; Peroglio, Marianna; Anglada, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Roughness is one of the key parameters for successful osseointegration of dental implants. The understanding of how roughness affects cell response is thus crucial to improve implant performance. Surface gradients, which allow rapid and systematic investigations of cell-surface interactions, have the potential to facilitate this task. In this study, a novel method aiming to produce roughness gradients at the surface of zirconia using hydrofluoric acid etching was implemented. The topography was exhaustively characterized at the microscale and nanoscale by white light interferometry and atomic force microscopy, including the analysis of amplitude, spatial, hybrid, functional, and fractal parameters. A rapid screening of the influence of roughness on human mesenchymal stem cell morphology was conducted and potential correlations between roughness parameters and cell morphology were investigated. The roughness gradient induced significant changes in cell area (p < 0.001), aspect ratio (p = 0.01), and solidity (p = 0.026). Nanoroughness parameters were linearly correlated to cell solidity (p < 0.005), while microroughness parameters appeared nonlinearly correlated to cell area, highlighting the importance of multiscale optimization of implant topography to induce the desired cell response. The gradient method proposed here drastically reduces the efforts and resources necessary to study cell-surface interactions and provides results directly transferable to industry. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2502-2514, 2016. PMID:27227541

  2. Solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Benfu; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yiwen; Tao, Yu; Liu, Jiantao

    2012-11-15

    The solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy prepared by plasma rotating electrode process was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the solidification microstructure changes from dendrites to cellular and microcrystal structures with decreasing powder size. The elements of Co, Cr, W and Ni are enriched in the dendrites, while Mo, Nb and Ti are higher in the interdendritic regions. The relationships between powder size with the average solid-liquid interface moving rate, the average interface temperature gradient and the average cooling rate are established. Microsegregation is increased with larger powder size. The geometric integrity of MC Prime type carbides in the powders changes from regular to diverse with decreasing powder size. The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the thermal parameters and non-equilibrium solute partition coefficients during rapid solidification. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relations of solidification thermal parameters with powder size are established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation of non-equilibrium solute partition with powder size is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification microstructure is related to thermal parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The segregation behavior is linked to non-equilibrium partition coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the above combined factors.

  3. Construction and characterization of an eightfold redundant dog genomic bacterial artificial chromosome library.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Mignot, E; Faraco, J; Kadotani, H; Cantanese, J; Zhao, B; Lin, X; Hinton, L; Ostrander, E A; Patterson, D F; de Jong, P J

    1999-05-15

    A large insert canine genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was built from a Doberman pinscher. Approximately 166,000 clones were gridded on nine high-density hybridization filters. Insert analysis of randomly selected clones indicated a mean insert size of 155 kb and predicted 8.1 coverage of the canine genome. Two percent of the clones were nonrecombinant. Chromosomal fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of 60 BAC clones indicated no chimerism. The library was hybridized with dog PCR products representing eight genes (ADA, TNFA, GCA, MYB, HOXA, GUSB, THY1, and TOP1). The resulting positive clones were characterized and shown to be compatible with an eightfold redundant library. PMID:10331940

  4. Isolation and Genome Characterization of the Virulent Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriophage SA97

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoonjee; Shin, Hakdong; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Park, Chul Jong; Paik, Soon-Young; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-01-01

    A novel bacteriophage that infects S. aureus, SA97, was isolated and characterized. The phage SA97 belongs to the Siphoviridae family, and the cell wall teichoic acid (WTA) was found to be a host receptor of the phage SA97. Genome analysis revealed that SA97 contains 40,592 bp of DNA encoding 54 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and none of these genes were related to virulence or drug resistance. Although a few genes associated with lysogen formation were detected in the phage SA97 genome, the phage SA97 produced neither lysogen nor transductant in S. aureus. These results suggest that the phage SA97 may be a promising candidate for controlling S. aureus. PMID:26437428

  5. Characterization and comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting members of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group phages infecting B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis (Bt) have been studied at the molecular level and, recently, at the genomic level to control the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and to prevent phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. A comparative phylogenetic analysis has revealed three different major phage groups with different morphologies (Myoviridae for group I, Siphoviridae for group II, and Tectiviridae for group III), genome size (group I > group II > group III), and lifestyle (virulent for group I and temperate for group II and III). A subsequent phage genome comparison using a dot plot analysis showed that phages in each group are highly homologous, substantiating the grouping of B. cereus phages. Endolysin is a host lysis protein that contains two conserved domains: a cell-wall-binding domain (CBD) and an enzymatic activity domain (EAD). In B. cereus sensu lato phage group I, four different endolysin groups have been detected, according to combinations of two types of CBD and four types of EAD. Group I phages have two copies of tail lysins and one copy of endolysin, but the functions of the tail lysins are still unknown. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group II, the B. anthracis phages have been studied and applied for typing and rapid detection of pathogenic host strains. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group III, the B. thuringiensis phages Bam35 and GIL01 have been studied to understand phage entry and lytic switch regulation mechanisms. In this review, we suggest that further study of the B. cereus group phages would be useful for various phage applications, such as biocontrol, typing, and rapid detection of the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and for the prevention of phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. PMID:24264384

  6. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

  7. Characterizing protein interactions employing a genome-wide siRNA cellular phenotyping screen.

    PubMed

    Suratanee, Apichat; Schaefer, Martin H; Betts, Matthew J; Soons, Zita; Mannsperger, Heiko; Harder, Nathalie; Oswald, Marcus; Gipp, Markus; Ramminger, Ellen; Marcus, Guillermo; Männer, Reinhard; Rohr, Karl; Wanker, Erich; Russell, Robert B; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Characterizing the activating and inhibiting effect of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is fundamental to gain insight into the complex signaling system of a human cell. A plethora of methods has been suggested to infer PPI from data on a large scale, but none of them is able to characterize the effect of this interaction. Here, we present a novel computational development that employs mitotic phenotypes of a genome-wide RNAi knockdown screen and enables identifying the activating and inhibiting effects of PPIs. Exemplarily, we applied our technique to a knockdown screen of HeLa cells cultivated at standard conditions. Using a machine learning approach, we obtained high accuracy (82% AUC of the receiver operating characteristics) by cross-validation using 6,870 known activating and inhibiting PPIs as gold standard. We predicted de novo unknown activating and inhibiting effects for 1,954 PPIs in HeLa cells covering the ten major signaling pathways of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and made these predictions publicly available in a database. We finally demonstrate that the predicted effects can be used to cluster knockdown genes of similar biological processes in coherent subgroups. The characterization of the activating or inhibiting effect of individual PPIs opens up new perspectives for the interpretation of large datasets of PPIs and thus considerably increases the value of PPIs as an integrated resource for studying the detailed function of signaling pathways of the cellular system of interest. PMID:25255318

  8. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    PubMed

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data. PMID:23928422

  9. Variability among the Most Rapidly Evolving Plastid Genomic Regions is Lineage-Specific: Implications of Pairwise Genome Comparisons in Pyrus (Rosaceae) and Other Angiosperms for Marker Choice

    PubMed Central

    Ter-Voskanyan, Hasmik; Allgaier, Martin; Borsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plastid genomes exhibit different levels of variability in their sequences, depending on the respective kinds of genomic regions. Genes are usually more conserved while noncoding introns and spacers evolve at a faster pace. While a set of about thirty maximum variable noncoding genomic regions has been suggested to provide universally promising phylogenetic markers throughout angiosperms, applications often require several regions to be sequenced for many individuals. Our project aims to illuminate evolutionary relationships and species-limits in the genus Pyrus (Rosaceae)—a typical case with very low genetic distances between taxa. In this study, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Pyrus spinosa and aligned it to the already available P. pyrifolia sequence. The overall p-distance of the two Pyrus genomes was 0.00145. The intergenic spacers between ndhC–trnV, trnR–atpA, ndhF–rpl32, psbM–trnD, and trnQ–rps16 were the most variable regions, also comprising the highest total numbers of substitutions, indels and inversions (potentially informative characters). Our comparative analysis of further plastid genome pairs with similar low p-distances from Oenothera (representing another rosid), Olea (asterids) and Cymbidium (monocots) showed in each case a different ranking of genomic regions in terms of variability and potentially informative characters. Only two intergenic spacers (ndhF–rpl32 and trnK–rps16) were consistently found among the 30 top-ranked regions. We have mapped the occurrence of substitutions and microstructural mutations in the four genome pairs. High AT content in specific sequence elements seems to foster frequent mutations. We conclude that the variability among the fastest evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific and thus cannot be precisely predicted across angiosperms. The often lineage-specific occurrence of stem-loop elements in the sequences of introns and spacers also governs lineage-specific mutations

  10. Genomic Characterization of DArT Markers Based on High-Density Linkage Analysis and Physical Mapping to the Eucalyptus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Petroli, César D.; Sansaloni, Carolina P.; Carling, Jason; Steane, Dorothy A.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Myburg, Alexander A.; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Pappas, Georgios Joannis; Kilian, Andrzej; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2012-01-01

    genome is yet available to allow such detailed characterization. PMID:22984541

  11. Characterization of Apparently Balanced Chromosomal Rearrangements from the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Anne W.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Bosco, Amy F.; Brown, Kerry K.; Bruns, Gail A.P.; Donovan, Diana J.; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G.; Ferguson, Heather L.; Gusella, James F.; Harris, David J.; Herrick, Steven R.; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T.; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H.; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Moore, Steven D.P.; Peters, Roxanna E.; Quade, Bradley J.; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation. PMID:18319076

  12. Genomic sequencing and characterization of a Chinese isolate of Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L Q; Lin, Y Q; Ding, X Y; Ren, M; Tao, J; Wang, J Y; Zhang, G P; Zhu, G Q

    2009-01-01

    The complete genomic sequencing and characterization of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolate XJ-04 originated from cattle in China was described. The genomic RNA of the isolate was 12,284 nt long and contained short 5'- untranslated region (UTR), 3'-non-coding regions (NCR), and one open reading frame (ORF) encoding a large polyprotein of 3,895 amino acids with 20 potential N-glycosylation sites. The identity of the isolate XJ-04 with reference strains NADL (BVDV-1) and 890 (BVDV-2) in autoprotease (N(pro)) gene and structural genes (C, E(rns), E1, E2) was analyzed. The percentage of nt and aa identity in analyzed genes indicated that the isolate XJ-04 was closer to the reference strain 890 (BVDV-2) than to NADL (BVDV-1). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate belonged to BVDV-2a subtype. Furthermore, comparison analysis indicated that the isolate XJ-04 did not contain any genomic insertions that can be directly related to the cytopathic phenotype. PMID:19941402

  13. GeneSV - an Approach to Help Characterize Possible Variations in Genomic and Protein Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zemla, Adam; Kostova, Tanya; Gorchakov, Rodion; Volkova, Evgeniya; Beasley, David W C; Cardosa, Jane; Weaver, Scott C; Vasilakis, Nikos; Naraghi-Arani, Pejman

    2014-01-01

    A computational approach for identification and assessment of genomic sequence variability (GeneSV) is described. For a given nucleotide sequence, GeneSV collects information about the permissible nucleotide variability (changes that potentially preserve function) observed in corresponding regions in genomic sequences, and combines it with conservation/variability results from protein sequence and structure-based analyses of evaluated protein coding regions. GeneSV was used to predict effects (functional vs. non-functional) of 37 amino acid substitutions on the NS5 polymerase (RdRp) of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2), 36 of which are not observed in any publicly available DENV-2 sequence. 32 novel mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the RdRp were generated using a DENV-2 reverse genetics system. In 81% (26 of 32) of predictions tested, GeneSV correctly predicted viability of introduced mutations. In 4 of 5 (80%) mutants with double amino acid substitutions proximal in structure to one another GeneSV was also correct in its predictions. Predictive capabilities of the developed system were illustrated on dengue RNA virus, but described in the manuscript a general approach to characterize real or theoretically possible variations in genomic and protein sequences can be applied to any organism. PMID:24453480

  14. Characterization of active ribosomal RNA harboring MITEs insertion in microsporidian Nosema bombycis genome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Handeng; Pan, Guoqing; Dang, Xiaoqun; Li, Tian; Zhou, Zeyang

    2013-03-01

    Microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular parasites of medical and agricultural importance, which can infect almost all animals, including human beings. Using the genome data of Nosema bombycis, four families of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) in ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were characterized in the microsporidian N. bombycis and were named LSUME1, ITSME1, SSUME1, and SSUME2, respectively. The genome-wide investigation of these MITEs shows that these MITEs families distribute randomly in N. bombycis genome. All insertion sequences have conserved characteristics of MITEs, the direct repeat sequence and terminal inverted-repeat sequence at both ends of each MITEs sequence. Additionally, using the CLC RNA Workbench Software, secondary structures of rRNA containing MITEs sequence have been predicted and were located in variable region or expansion segment. Furthermore, using two different probes, one is prepared by MITE sequence only (short probe) and the other is prepared by MITE sequence flanking partial rDNA sequence (long probe); northern blotting and dot blotting have been performed to detect the transcriptional and functional activity of the rDNA containing MITEs insertion. Fortunately, we found that the rDNA, which harbors the MITE, not only can be transcripted but also can form a complete ribosome. This is an interesting thing that one gene can keep active even when it has been inserted with another sequence. But the biological and structural significance of this observation is not readily apparent. PMID:23254587

  15. GeneSV – an Approach to Help Characterize Possible Variations in Genomic and Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zemla, Adam; Kostova, Tanya; Gorchakov, Rodion; Volkova, Evgeniya; Beasley, David W. C.; Cardosa, Jane; Weaver, Scott C.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Naraghi-Arani, Pejman

    2014-01-01

    A computational approach for identification and assessment of genomic sequence variability (GeneSV) is described. For a given nucleotide sequence, GeneSV collects information about the permissible nucleotide variability (changes that potentially preserve function) observed in corresponding regions in genomic sequences, and combines it with conservation/variability results from protein sequence and structure-based analyses of evaluated protein coding regions. GeneSV was used to predict effects (functional vs. non-functional) of 37 amino acid substitutions on the NS5 polymerase (RdRp) of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2), 36 of which are not observed in any publicly available DENV-2 sequence. 32 novel mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the RdRp were generated using a DENV-2 reverse genetics system. In 81% (26 of 32) of predictions tested, GeneSV correctly predicted viability of introduced mutations. In 4 of 5 (80%) mutants with double amino acid substitutions proximal in structure to one another GeneSV was also correct in its predictions. Predictive capabilities of the developed system were illustrated on dengue RNA virus, but described in the manuscript a general approach to characterize real or theoretically possible variations in genomic and protein sequences can be applied to any organism. PMID:24453480

  16. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin gene family in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Huayu; Li, Lichao; Lou, Yongfeng; Zhao, Hansheng; Gao, Zhimin

    2016-05-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are known to play a major role in maintaining water and hydraulic conductivity balance in the plant system. Numerous studies have showed AQPs execute multi-function throughout plant growth and development, including water transport, nitrogen, carbon, and micronutrient acquisition etc. However, little information on AQPs is known in bamboo. In this study, we present the first genome-wide identification and characterization of AQP genes in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) using bioinformatics. In total, 26 AQP genes were identified by homologous analysis, which were divided into four groups (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, and SIPs) based on the phylogenetic analysis. All the genes were located on 26 different scaffolds respectively on basis of the gene mapped to bamboo genome. Evolutionary analysis indicated that Ph. edulis was more close to Oryza sativa than Zea mays in the genetic relationship. Besides, qRT-PCR was used to analyze gene expression profiles, which revealed that AQP genes were expressed constitutively in all the detected tissues, and were all responsive to the environmental cues such as drought, water, and NaCl stresses. This data suggested that AQPs may play fundamental roles in maintaining normal growth and development of bamboo, which would contribute to better understanding for the complex regulation mechanism involved in the fast-growing process of bamboo. Furthermore, the result could provide valuable information for further research on bamboo functional genomics. PMID:26993482

  17. Development and characterization of genomics resources for leafy spurge: A model perennial weed for functional genomics studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High throughput genomics approaches to study weed biology have so far been limited to a small number of research groups within the weed science community. In most cases, these groups have relied on heterologous approaches, since resources needed for functional genomics studies within desired species...

  18. Hydrodynamic trapping for rapid assembly and in situ electrical characterization of droplet interface bilayer arrays.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mary-Anne; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Collier, C Patrick; Retterer, Scott T; Sarles, Stephen A

    2016-09-21

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a modular technique for assembling planar lipid membranes between water droplets in oil. The DIB method thus provides a unique capability for developing digital, droplet-based membrane platforms for rapid membrane characterization, drug screening and ion channel recordings. This paper demonstrates a new, low-volume microfluidic system that automates droplet generation, sorting, and sequential trapping in designated locations to enable the rapid assembly of arrays of DIBs. The channel layout of the device is guided by an equivalent circuit model, which predicts that a serial arrangement of hydrodynamic DIB traps enables sequential droplet placement and minimizes the hydrodynamic pressure developed across filled traps to prevent squeeze-through of trapped droplets. Furthermore, the incorporation of thin-film electrodes fabricated via evaporation metal deposition onto the glass substrate beneath the channels allows for the first time in situ, simultaneous electrical interrogation of multiple DIBs within a sealed device. Combining electrical measurements with imaging enables measurements of membrane capacitance and resistance and bilayer area, and our data show that DIBs formed in different trap locations within the device exhibit similar sizes and transport properties. Simultaneous, single channel recordings of ion channel gating in multiple membranes are obtained when alamethicin peptides are incorporated into the captured droplets, qualifying the thin-film electrodes as a means for measuring stimuli-responsive functions of membrane-bound biomolecules. This novel microfluidic-electrophysiology platform provides a reproducible, high throughput method for performing electrical measurements to study transmembrane proteins and biomembranes in low-volume, droplet-based membranes. PMID:27513561

  19. Rapid characterization of the biomechanical properties of drug-treated cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Chu, Henry K.; Zhang, Yang; Bai, Guohua; Wang, Kaiqun; Tan, Qiulin; Sun, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cell mechanics is closely related to many cell functions. Recent studies have suggested that the deformability of cells can be an effective biomarker to indicate the onset and progression of diseases. In this paper, a microfluidic chip is designed for rapid characterization of the mechanics of drug-treated cells through stretching with dielectrophoresis (DEP) force. This chip was fabricated using PDMS and micro-electrodes were integrated and patterned on the ITO layer of the chip. Leukemia NB4 cells were considered and the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) drug on NB4 cells were examined via the microfluidic chip. To induce a DEP force onto the cell, a relatively weak ac voltage was utilized to immobilize a cell at one side of the electrodes. The applied voltage was then increased to 3.5 V pp and the cell started to be stretched along the applied electric field lines. The elongation of the cell was observed using an optical microscope and the results showed that both types of cells were deformed by the induced DEP force. The strain of the NB4 cell without the drug treatment was recorded to be about 0.08 (time t = 180 s) and the drug-treated NB4 cell was about 0.21 (time t = 180 s), indicating a decrease in the stiffness after drug treatment. The elastic modulus of the cell was also evaluated and the modulus changed from 140 Pa to 41 Pa after drug treatment. This microfluidic chip can provide a simple and rapid platform for measuring the change in the biomechanical properties of cells and can potentially be used as the tool to determine the biomechanical effects of different drug treatments for drug discovery and development applications.

  20. A rapid solvothermal synthesis of cerium oxide hollow spheres and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kempaiah Devaraju, Murukanahally; Liu, Xiangwen; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2012-10-15

    An easy and size controlled solvothermal synthesis of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres is still a challenge in the area of materials synthesis. Here, CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres have been synthesized using PVA500 as a surfactant via solvothermal reaction followed by calcinations. The size of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres could be controlled from 500 to 150 nm by changing the amounts of Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and PVA500. The possible growth mechanism of CeO{sub 2} hollow sphere was explained. The CO oxidation catalytic activity of the CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres were superior to that of the commercial CeO{sub 2} powder due to the high specific surface area and small crystallite size. - Graphical abstract: A rapid and easy way to prepare CeO{sub 2} hollow sphere with 150-500 nm in diameter was successfully achieved by solvothermal reaction. The prepared particles showed hollowness due to Ostwald ripening process. An improved catalytic activity was observed and discussed. Highlights: A rapid synthesis of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres with diameter size from 15 to 500 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cheap surfactant was used to prepare hollow spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of temperature and surfactant ratio were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematic characterization by XRD, FESEM, TEM, TG, FTIR and UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO oxidation analysis results showed better catalytic activity.

  1. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading: application of reliability analysis in structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasov, Artem; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Brunham, Robert C; Jones, Steven JM

    2004-01-01

    Background We establish that the occurrence of protein folds among genomes can be accurately described with a Weibull function. Systems which exhibit Weibull character can be interpreted with reliability theory commonly used in engineering analysis. For instance, Weibull distributions are widely used in reliability, maintainability and safety work to model time-to-failure of mechanical devices, mechanisms, building constructions and equipment. Results We have found that the Weibull function describes protein fold distribution within and among genomes more accurately than conventional power functions which have been used in a number of structural genomic studies reported to date. It has also been found that the Weibull reliability parameter β for protein fold distributions varies between genomes and may reflect differences in rates of gene duplication in evolutionary history of organisms. Conclusions The results of this work demonstrate that reliability analysis can provide useful insights and testable predictions in the fields of comparative and structural genomics. PMID:15274750

  2. Genomic characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from a high-risk population in China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Ng, David; Clifford, Robert; Yang, Howard H; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Wang, Quan-Hong; Han, Xiao-You; Giffen, Carol; Goldstein, Alisa M; Taylor, Philip R; Lee, Maxwell P

    2009-01-01

    Genomic instability plays an important role in most human cancers. To characterize genomic instability in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we examined loss of heterozygosity (LOH), copy number (CN) loss, CN gain, and gene expression using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K (n=30 cases) and Human U133A (n=17 cases) arrays in ESCC cases from a high-risk region of China. We found that genomic instability measures varied widely among cases and separated them into two groups: a high-frequency instability group (two-thirds of all cases with one or more instability category ≥ 10%) and a low-frequency instability group (one-third of cases with instability < 10%). Genomic instability also varied widely across chromosomal arms, with the highest frequency of LOH on 9p (33% of informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)), CN loss on 3p (33%), and CN gain on 3q (48%). Twenty-two LOH regions were identified: four on 9p, seven on 9q, four on 13q, two on 17p, and five on 17q. Three CN loss regions – 3p12.3, 4p15.1, and 9p21.3 – were detected. Twelve CN gain regions were found, including six on 3q, one on 7q, four on 8q, and one on 11q. One of the most gene-rich of these CN gain regions was 11q13.1-13.4, where 26 genes also had RNA expression data available. CN gain was significantly correlated with increased RNA expression in over 80% of these genes. Our findings demonstrate the potential utility of combining CN analysis and gene expression data to identify genes involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19584285

  3. Genomic characterization of viral integration sites in HPV-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Bodelon, Clara; Untereiner, Michael E; Machiela, Mitchell J; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Persistent infection with carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) causes the majority of anogenital cancers and a subset of head and neck cancers. The HPV genome is frequently found integrated into the host genome of invasive cancers. The mechanisms of how it may promote disease progression are not well understood. Thoroughly characterizing integration events can provide insights into HPV carcinogenesis. Individual studies have reported limited number of integration sites in cell lines and human samples. We performed a systematic review of published integration sites in HPV-related cancers and conducted a pooled analysis to formally test for integration hotspots and genomic features enriched in integration events using data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). Over 1,500 integration sites were reported in the literature, of which 90.8% (N = 1,407) were in human tissues. We found 10 cytobands enriched for integration events, three previously reported ones (3q28, 8q24.21 and 13q22.1) and seven additional ones (2q22.3, 3p14.2, 8q24.22, 14q24.1, 17p11.1, 17q23.1 and 17q23.2). Cervical infections with HPV18 were more likely to have breakpoints in 8q24.21 (p = 7.68 × 10(-4) ) than those with HPV16. Overall, integration sites were more likely to be in gene regions than expected by chance (p = 6.93 × 10(-9) ). They were also significantly closer to CpG regions, fragile sites, transcriptionally active regions and enhancers. Few integration events occurred within 50 Kb of known cervical cancer driver genes. This suggests that HPV integrates in accessible regions of the genome, preferentially genes and enhancers, which may affect the expression of target genes. PMID:27343048

  4. Genomic characterization of sex-identification markers in Sebastes carnatus and Sebastes chrysomelas rockfishes.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Benjamin L S; Buonaccorsi, Vincent P

    2016-05-01

    Fish have evolved a variety of sex-determining (SD) systems including male heterogamy (XY), female heterogamy (ZW) and environmental SD. Little is known about SD mechanisms of Sebastes rockfishes, a highly speciose genus of importance to evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we characterize the sex determination system in the sympatrically distributed sister species Sebastes chrysomelas and Sebastes carnatus. To identify sex-specific genotypic markers, double digest restriction site - associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq) of genomic DNA from 40 sexed individuals of both species was performed. Loci were filtered for presence in all of the individuals of one sex, absence in the other sex and no heterozygosity. Of the 74 965 loci present in all males, 33 male-specific loci met the criteria in at least one species and 17 in both. Conversely, no female-specific loci were detected, together providing evidence of an XY sex determination system in both species. When aligned to a draft reference genome from Sebastes aleutianus, 26 sex-specific loci were interspersed among 1168 loci that were identical between sexes. The nascent Y chromosome averaged 5% divergence from the X chromosome and mapped to reference Sebastes genome scaffolds totalling 6.9Mbp in length. These scaffolds aligned to a single chromosome in three model fish genomes. Read coverage differences were also detected between sex-specific and autosomal loci. A PCR-RFLP assay validated the bioinformatic results and correctly identified sex of five additional individuals of known sex. A sex-determining gene in other teleosts gonadal soma-derived factor (gsdf) was present in the model fish chromosomes that spanned our sex-specific markers. PMID:26923740

  5. Implementation of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) for Identification and Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Rebecca L.; Pouseele, Hannes; Chen, Jessica C.; Strockbine, Nancy A.; Carleton, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important foodborne pathogen capable of causing severe disease in humans. Rapid and accurate identification and characterization techniques are essential during outbreak investigations. Current methods for characterization of STEC are expensive and time-consuming. With the advent of rapid and cheap whole genome sequencing (WGS) benchtop sequencers, the potential exists to replace traditional workflows with WGS. The aim of this study was to validate tools to do reference identification and characterization from WGS for STEC in a single workflow within an easy to use commercially available software platform. Publically available serotype, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance databases were downloaded from the Center for Genomic Epidemiology (CGE) (www.genomicepidemiology.org) and integrated into a genotyping plug-in with in silico PCR tools to confirm some of the virulence genes detected from WGS data. Additionally, down sampling experiments on the WGS sequence data were performed to determine a threshold for sequence coverage needed to accurately predict serotype and virulence genes using the established workflow. The serotype database was tested on a total of 228 genomes and correctly predicted from WGS for 96.1% of O serogroups and 96.5% of H serogroups identified by conventional testing techniques. A total of 59 genomes were evaluated to determine the threshold of coverage to detect the different WGS targets, 40 were evaluated for serotype and virulence gene detection and 19 for the stx gene subtypes. For serotype, 95% of the O and 100% of the H serogroups were detected at > 40x and ≥ 30x coverage, respectively. For virulence targets and stx gene subtypes, nearly all genes were detected at > 40x, though some targets were 100% detectable from genomes with coverage ≥20x. The resistance detection tool was 97% concordant with phenotypic testing results. With isolates sequenced to > 40x coverage, the different

  6. Physiological and genomic characterization of Arcobacter anaerophilus IR-1 reveals new metabolic features in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Roalkvam, Irene; Drønen, Karine; Stokke, Runar; Daae, Frida L.; Dahle, Håkon; Steen, Ida H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we characterized and sequenced the genome of Arcobacter anaerophilus strain IR-1 isolated from enrichment cultures used in nitrate-amended corrosion experiments. A. anaerophilus IR-1 could grow lithoautotrophically on hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide and lithoheterothrophically on thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. In addition, the strain grew organoheterotrophically on yeast extract, peptone, and various organic acids. We show for the first time that Arcobacter could grow on the complex organic substrate tryptone and oxidize acetate with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor. Electron acceptors utilized by most Epsilonproteobacteria, such as oxygen, nitrate, and sulfur, were also used by A. anaerophilus IR-1. Strain IR-1 was also uniquely able to use iron citrate as electron acceptor. Comparative genomics of the Arcobacter strains A. butzleri RM4018, A. nitrofigilis CI and A. anaerophilus IR-1 revealed that the free-living strains had a wider metabolic range and more genes in common compared to the pathogen strain. The presence of genes for NAD+-reducing hydrogenase (hox) and dissimilatory iron reduction (fre) were unique for A. anaerophilus IR-1 among Epsilonproteobacteria. Finally, the new strain had an incomplete denitrification pathway where the end product was nitrite, which is different from other Arcobacter strains where the end product is ammonia. Altogether, our study shows that traditional characterization in combination with a modern genomics approach can expand our knowledge on free-living Arcobacter, and that this complementary approach could also provide invaluable knowledge about the physiology and metabolic pathways in other Epsilonproteobacteria from various environments. PMID:26441916

  7. Genome-Wide Characterization of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Patients Using Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Demeure, Michael J.; Weiss, Glen J.; Izatt, Tyler; Sinari, Shripad; Christoforides, Alexis; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Barrett, Michael; Phillips, Lori; Benson, Hollie; Tembe, Waibhav; Braggio, Esteban; Kiefer, Jeffrey A.; Legendre, Christophe; Posner, Richard; Hostetter, Galen H.; Baker, Angela; Egan, Jan B.; Han, Haiyong; Lake, Douglas; Stites, Edward C.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith; Von Hoff, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is among the most lethal malignancies. While research has implicated multiple genes in disease pathogenesis, identification of therapeutic leads has been difficult and the majority of currently available therapies provide only marginal benefit. To address this issue, our goal was to genomically characterize individual PAC patients to understand the range of aberrations that are occurring in each tumor. Because our understanding of PAC tumorigenesis is limited, evaluation of separate cases may reveal aberrations, that are less common but may provide relevant information on the disease, or that may represent viable therapeutic targets for the patient. We used next generation sequencing to assess global somatic events across 3 PAC patients to characterize each patient and to identify potential targets. This study is the first to report whole genome sequencing (WGS) findings in paired tumor/normal samples collected from 3 separate PAC patients. We generated on average 132 billion mappable bases across all patients using WGS, and identified 142 somatic coding events including point mutations, insertion/deletions, and chromosomal copy number variants. We did not identify any significant somatic translocation events. We also performed RNA sequencing on 2 of these patients' tumors for which tumor RNA was available to evaluate expression changes that may be associated with somatic events, and generated over 100 million mapped reads for each patient. We further performed pathway analysis of all sequencing data to identify processes that may be the most heavily impacted from somatic and expression alterations. As expected, the KRAS signaling pathway was the most heavily impacted pathway (P<0.05), along with tumor-stroma interactions and tumor suppressive pathways. While sequencing of more patients is needed, the high resolution genomic and transcriptomic information we have acquired here provides valuable information on the molecular

  8. Genome-wide characterization of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Winnie S; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Borad, Mitesh J; Demeure, Michael J; Weiss, Glen J; Izatt, Tyler; Sinari, Shripad; Christoforides, Alexis; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Barrett, Michael; Phillips, Lori; Benson, Hollie; Tembe, Waibhav; Braggio, Esteban; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Legendre, Christophe; Posner, Richard; Hostetter, Galen H; Baker, Angela; Egan, Jan B; Han, Haiyong; Lake, Douglas; Stites, Edward C; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A Keith; Von Hoff, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is among the most lethal malignancies. While research has implicated multiple genes in disease pathogenesis, identification of therapeutic leads has been difficult and the majority of currently available therapies provide only marginal benefit. To address this issue, our goal was to genomically characterize individual PAC patients to understand the range of aberrations that are occurring in each tumor. Because our understanding of PAC tumorigenesis is limited, evaluation of separate cases may reveal aberrations, that are less common but may provide relevant information on the disease, or that may represent viable therapeutic targets for the patient. We used next generation sequencing to assess global somatic events across 3 PAC patients to characterize each patient and to identify potential targets. This study is the first to report whole genome sequencing (WGS) findings in paired tumor/normal samples collected from 3 separate PAC patients. We generated on average 132 billion mappable bases across all patients using WGS, and identified 142 somatic coding events including point mutations, insertion/deletions, and chromosomal copy number variants. We did not identify any significant somatic translocation events. We also performed RNA sequencing on 2 of these patients' tumors for which tumor RNA was available to evaluate expression changes that may be associated with somatic events, and generated over 100 million mapped reads for each patient. We further performed pathway analysis of all sequencing data to identify processes that may be the most heavily impacted from somatic and expression alterations. As expected, the KRAS signaling pathway was the most heavily impacted pathway (P<0.05), along with tumor-stroma interactions and tumor suppressive pathways. While sequencing of more patients is needed, the high resolution genomic and transcriptomic information we have acquired here provides valuable information on the molecular

  9. Global genomic analysis reveals rapid control of a robust innate response in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Bosinger, Steven E.; Li, Qingsheng; Gordon, Shari N.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Duan, Lijie; Xu, Luoling; Francella, Nicholas; Sidahmed, Abubaker; Smith, Anthony J.; Cramer, Elizabeth M.; Zeng, Ming; Masopust, David; Carlis, John V.; Ran, Longsi; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Paiardini, Mirko; Isett, R. Benjamin; Baldwin, Don A.; Else, James G.; Staprans, Silvija I.; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T.; Kelvin, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Natural SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SMs) is nonprogressive despite chronic virus replication. Strikingly, it is characterized by low levels of immune activation, while pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RMs) is associated with chronic immune activation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this intriguing phenotype, we used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to longitudinally assess host gene expression in SIV-infected SMs and RMs. We found that acute SIV infection of SMs was consistently associated with a robust innate immune response, including widespread upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in blood and lymph nodes. While SMs exhibited a rapid resolution of ISG expression and immune activation, both responses were observed chronically in RMs. Systems biology analysis indicated that expression of the lymphocyte inhibitory receptor LAG3, a marker of T cell exhaustion, correlated with immune activation in SIV-infected RMs but not SMs. Our findings suggest that active immune regulatory mechanisms, rather than intrinsically attenuated innate immune responses, underlie the low levels of immune activation characteristic of SMs chronically infected with SIV. PMID:19959874

  10. BlastKOALA and GhostKOALA: KEGG Tools for Functional Characterization of Genome and Metagenome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kanehisa, Minoru; Sato, Yoko; Morishima, Kanae

    2016-02-22

    BlastKOALA and GhostKOALA are automatic annotation servers for genome and metagenome sequences, which perform KO (KEGG Orthology) assignments to characterize individual gene functions and reconstruct KEGG pathways, BRITE hierarchies and KEGG modules to infer high-level functions of the organism or the ecosystem. Both servers are made freely available at the KEGG Web site (http://www.kegg.jp/blastkoala/). In BlastKOALA, the KO assignment is performed by a modified version of the internally used KOALA algorithm after the BLAST search against a non-redundant dataset of pangenome sequences at the species, genus or family level, which is generated from the KEGG GENES database by retaining the KO content of each taxonomic category. In GhostKOALA, which utilizes more rapid GHOSTX for database search and is suitable for metagenome annotation, the pangenome dataset is supplemented with Cd-hit clusters including those for viral genes. The result files may be downloaded and manipulated for further KEGG Mapper analysis, such as comparative pathway analysis using multiple BlastKOALA results. PMID:26585406

  11. Collision Induced Unfolding of Intact Antibodies: Rapid Characterization of Disulfide Bonding Patterns, Glycosylation, and Structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuwei; Han, Linjie; Buckner, Adam C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-11-17

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are among the fastest growing class of therapeutics due to their high specificity and low incidence of side effects. Unlike most drugs, mAbs are complex macromolecules (∼150 kDa), leading to a host of quality control and characterization challenges inherent in their development. Recently, we introduced a new approach for the analysis of the intact proteins based on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Our protocol involves the collision induced unfolding (CIU) of intact antibodies, where collisional heating in the gas-phase is used to generate unfolded antibody forms, which are subsequently separated by IM and then analyzed by MS. Collisional energy is added to the antibody ions in a stepwise fashion, and "fingerprint plots" are created that track the amount of unfolding undergone as a function of the energy imparted to the ions prior to IM separation. In this report, we have used these fingerprints to rapidly distinguish between antibody isoforms, possessing different numbers and/or patterns of disulfide bonding and general levels of glycosylation. In addition, we validate our CIU protocols through control experiments and systematic statistical evaluations of CIU reproducibility. We conclude by projecting the impact of our approach for antibody-related drug discovery and development applications. PMID:26471104

  12. Rapid discovery and functional characterization of terpene synthases from four endophytic xylariaceae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Weihua; Tran, William; Taatjes, Craig A.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Lee, Taek Soon; Gladden, John M.; Hamberger, Bjorn

    2016-02-17

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous plant endosymbionts that establish complex and poorly understood relationships with their host organisms. Many endophytic fungi are known to produce a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with potential energy applications, which have been described as "mycodiesel". Many of these mycodiesel hydrocarbons are terpenes, a chemically diverse class of compounds produced by many plants, fungi, and bacteria. Due to their high energy densities, terpenes, such as pinene and bisabolene, are actively being investigated as potential "drop-in" biofuels for replacing diesel and aviation fuel. In this study, we rapidly discovered and characterized 26 terpene synthases (TPSs)more » derived from four endophytic fungi known to produce mycodiesel hydrocarbons. The TPS genes were expressed in an E. coli strain harboring a heterologous mevalonate pathway designed to enhance terpene production, and their product profiles were determined using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) and GC-MS. Lastly, out of the 26 TPS’s profiled, 12 TPS’s were functional, with the majority of them exhibiting both monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase activity.« less

  13. Preparation and characterization of guluronic acid oligosaccharides degraded by a rapid microwave irradiation method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Li, Chunxia; Zhao, Xia; Li, Guangsheng; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi

    2013-05-24

    Guluronic acid oligosaccharides (GOS) with degree of polymerization (DP) ranging from 1 to 10 were prepared by a rapid microwave degradation method. Polyguluronic acid, fractionated from alginate hydrolysate, was dissolved in dilute ammonia water at a concentration of 20 mg/mL (pH 5) and then hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation (1600 W) at 130°C for 15 min to produce GOS mixture. The GOS mixture was separated by a Bio-Gel P6 column and ten fractions were obtained. Each GOS fraction was further characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and 2D NMR spectroscopy techniques. The data showed that the GOS fractions were saturated oligoguluronates with general molecular formula C(6n)H(8n+2)O(6n+1) (n=1-10). This microwave degradation method was not only convenient, less time consuming, and environment-friendly, but also produced GOS with high yield (71%) and eliminating a desalting procedure compared to conventional acid hydrolysis method. PMID:23584235

  14. Rapid Discovery and Functional Characterization of Terpene Synthases from Four Endophytic Xylariaceae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weihua; Tran, William; Taatjes, Craig A.; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Lee, Taek Soon; Gladden, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous plant endosymbionts that establish complex and poorly understood relationships with their host organisms. Many endophytic fungi are known to produce a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with potential energy applications, which have been described as "mycodiesel". Many of these mycodiesel hydrocarbons are terpenes, a chemically diverse class of compounds produced by many plants, fungi, and bacteria. Due to their high energy densities, terpenes, such as pinene and bisabolene, are actively being investigated as potential "drop-in" biofuels for replacing diesel and aviation fuel. In this study, we rapidly discovered and characterized 26 terpene synthases (TPSs) derived from four endophytic fungi known to produce mycodiesel hydrocarbons. The TPS genes were expressed in an E. coli strain harboring a heterologous mevalonate pathway designed to enhance terpene production, and their product profiles were determined using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) and GC-MS. Out of the 26 TPS’s profiled, 12 TPS’s were functional, with the majority of them exhibiting both monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase activity. PMID:26885833

  15. Rapid Discovery and Functional Characterization of Terpene Synthases from Four Endophytic Xylariaceae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weihua; Tran, William; Taatjes, Craig A; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Lee, Taek Soon; Gladden, John M

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous plant endosymbionts that establish complex and poorly understood relationships with their host organisms. Many endophytic fungi are known to produce a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with potential energy applications, which have been described as "mycodiesel". Many of these mycodiesel hydrocarbons are terpenes, a chemically diverse class of compounds produced by many plants, fungi, and bacteria. Due to their high energy densities, terpenes, such as pinene and bisabolene, are actively being investigated as potential "drop-in" biofuels for replacing diesel and aviation fuel. In this study, we rapidly discovered and characterized 26 terpene synthases (TPSs) derived from four endophytic fungi known to produce mycodiesel hydrocarbons. The TPS genes were expressed in an E. coli strain harboring a heterologous mevalonate pathway designed to enhance terpene production, and their product profiles were determined using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) and GC-MS. Out of the 26 TPS's profiled, 12 TPS's were functional, with the majority of them exhibiting both monoterpene and sesquiterpene synthase activity. PMID:26885833

  16. Characterization of Rapidly Solidified Al-27 Si Hypereutectic Alloy: Effect of Solidification Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhiyong; Wang, Richu; Zhang, Chun; Peng, Chaoqun; Xie, Lichuan; Wang, Linqian

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-27wt.%Si hypereutectic alloy was fabricated by gas atomization, and its characterization as a function of particle size was investigated. A relationship between the particle size and solidification condition was established to understand the microstructural characteristics. While the irregular primary Si phase transformed to quasi-spherical shape, and its size decreased gradually with the particle size, the primary Si morphology similar to that in ingot metallurgy sample was found from the deep-etched images. In the fine powder, the eutectic Si phase formed a network structure densely distributed in the matrix, while a tangled dendritic formed at the surface. From the distribution of the Si phase, it is suggested that the microstructure inhomogeneity increased as the particle size decreases. The structural distortion of the Al matrix was observed from x-ray diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry curves. From the calculated results, an undercooling of 33 K (or interface velocity of 8 mm/s) was sufficient to suppress the primary Si to less than 2 μm in the present composition. The microhardness increased significantly while the particle size decreases. The microstructure and properties of the bulk material consolidated by hot pressing of the powders obtained were also conducted.

  17. First Results from the Rapid-response Spectrophotometric Characterization of Near-Earth Objects using UKIRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Borth, D.; Jedicke, R.; Butler, N.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Pichardo, B.; Petersen, E.; Axelrod, T.; Moskovitz, N.

    2016-04-01

    Using the Wide Field Camera for the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), we measure the near-infrared colors of near-Earth objects (NEOs) in order to put constraints on their taxonomic classifications. The rapid-response character of our observations allows us to observe NEOs when they are close to the Earth and bright. Here we present near-infrared color measurements of 86 NEOs, most of which were observed within a few days of their discovery, allowing us to characterize NEOs with diameters of only a few meters. Using machine-learning methods, we compare our measurements to existing asteroid spectral data and provide probabilistic taxonomic classifications for our targets. Our observations allow us to distinguish between S-complex, C/X-complex, D-type, and V-type asteroids. Our results suggest that the fraction of S-complex asteroids in the whole NEO population is lower than the fraction of ordinary chondrites in the meteorite fall statistics. Future data obtained with UKIRT will be used to investigate the significance of this discrepancy.

  18. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Miki; Ganmyo, Yuto; Miura, Osamu; Ohyama, Takashi; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs). This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS), which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31) that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending) nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production. PMID:27078685

  19. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Ohyama, Takashi; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs). This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS), which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31) that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending) nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production. PMID:27078685

  20. Characterizing neutral genomic diversity and selection signatures in indigenous populations of Moroccan goats (Capra hircus) using WGS data.

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Badr; Alberto, Florian J; Streeter, Ian; Boyer, Frédéric; Coissac, Eric; Stucki, Sylvie; BenBati, Mohammed; Ibnelbachyr, Mustapha; Chentouf, Mouad; Bechchari, Abdelmajid; Leempoel, Kevin; Alberti, Adriana; Engelen, Stefan; Chikhi, Abdelkader; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Joost, Stéphane; Taberlet, Pierre; Pompanon, François

    2015-01-01

    Since the time of their domestication, goats (Capra hircus) have evolved in a large variety of locally adapted populations in response to different human and environmental pressures. In the present era, many indigenous populations are threatened with extinction due to their substitution by cosmopolitan breeds, while they might represent highly valuable genomic resources. It is thus crucial to characterize the neutral and adaptive genetic diversity of indigenous populations. A fine characterization of whole genome variation in farm animals is now possible by using new sequencing technologies. We sequenced the complete genome at 12× coverage of 44 goats geographically representative of the three phenotypically distinct indigenous populations in Morocco. The study of mitochondrial genomes showed a high diversity exclusively restricted to the haplogroup A. The 44 nuclear genomes showed a very high diversity (24 million variants) associated with low linkage disequilibrium. The overall genetic diversity was weakly structured according to geography and phenotypes. When looking for signals of positive selection in each population we identified many candidate genes, several of which gave insights into the metabolic pathways or biological processes involved in the adaptation to local conditions (e.g., panting in warm/desert conditions). This study highlights the interest of WGS data to characterize livestock genomic diversity. It illustrates the valuable genetic richness present in indigenous populations that have to be sustainably managed and may represent valuable genetic resources for the long-term preservation of the species. PMID:25904931

  1. Characterizing neutral genomic diversity and selection signatures in indigenous populations of Moroccan goats (Capra hircus) using WGS data

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, Badr; Alberto, Florian J.; Streeter, Ian; Boyer, Frédéric; Coissac, Eric; Stucki, Sylvie; BenBati, Mohammed; Ibnelbachyr, Mustapha; Chentouf, Mouad; Bechchari, Abdelmajid; Leempoel, Kevin; Alberti, Adriana; Engelen, Stefan; Chikhi, Abdelkader; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Joost, Stéphane; Taberlet, Pierre; Pompanon, François

    2015-01-01

    Since the time of their domestication, goats (Capra hircus) have evolved in a large variety of locally adapted populations in response to different human and environmental pressures. In the present era, many indigenous populations are threatened with extinction due to their substitution by cosmopolitan breeds, while they might represent highly valuable genomic resources. It is thus crucial to characterize the neutral and adaptive genetic diversity of indigenous populations. A fine characterization of whole genome variation in farm animals is now possible by using new sequencing technologies. We sequenced the complete genome at 12× coverage of 44 goats geographically representative of the three phenotypically distinct indigenous populations in Morocco. The study of mitochondrial genomes showed a high diversity exclusively restricted to the haplogroup A. The 44 nuclear genomes showed a very high diversity (24 million variants) associated with low linkage disequilibrium. The overall genetic diversity was weakly structured according to geography and phenotypes. When looking for signals of positive selection in each population we identified many candidate genes, several of which gave insights into the metabolic pathways or biological processes involved in the adaptation to local conditions (e.g., panting in warm/desert conditions). This study highlights the interest of WGS data to characterize livestock genomic diversity. It illustrates the valuable genetic richness present in indigenous populations that have to be sustainably managed and may represent valuable genetic resources for the long-term preservation of the species. PMID:25904931

  2. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with regard to definition of pathogenic strains. Results To better understand genome evolution and evolution of virulence characteristics in Listeria, we used a next generation sequencing approach to generate draft genomes for seven strains representing Listeria species or clades for which genome sequences were not available. Comparative analyses of these draft genomes and six publicly available genomes, which together represent the main Listeria species, showed evidence for (i) a pangenome with 2,032 core and 2,918 accessory genes identified to date, (ii) a critical role of gene loss events in transition of Listeria species from facultative pathogen to saprotroph, even though a consistent pattern of gene loss seemed to be absent, and a number of isolates representing non-pathogenic species still carried some virulence associated genes, and (iii) divergence of modern pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species and strains, most likely circa 47 million years ago, from a pathogenic common ancestor that contained key virulence genes. Conclusions Genome evolution in Listeria involved limited gene loss and acquisition as supported by (i) a relatively high coverage of the predicted pan-genome by the observed pan-genome, (ii) conserved genome size (between 2.8 and 3.2 Mb), and (iii) a highly syntenic genome. Limited gene loss in Listeria did include loss of virulence associated genes, likely associated with multiple transitions to a saprotrophic lifestyle. The genus Listeria thus provides

  3. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python)

    PubMed Central

    Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value. PMID:27200191

  4. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python).

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value. PMID:27200191

  5. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  6. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  7. Use of 3' untranslated sequences of human cDNAs for rapid chromosome assignment and conversion to STSs: implications for an expression map of the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, A S; Khan, A S; Hopkins, J A; Sikela, J M

    1991-01-01

    A general mapping strategy is described in which the 3'untranslated regions of human cDNAs are used to design PCR primers which will selectively amplify human genomic sequences in a rodent background. When applied to panels of human x hamster somatic cell hybrid DNAs, this approach provides a PCR-based method for rapidly assigning genes to specific chromosomes and chromosomal regions. In addition, it follows from the virtual absence of introns in the 3'untranslated region of vertebrate genes that within this region the cDNA sequences almost always will be identical to those of the genomic DNA and can therefore be used to automatically generate gene-specific sequence-tagged sites (STSs). We have applied this strategy to six human cDNAs and demonstrate that 1) the primers selectively amplify human genomic DNA and 2) the PCR product is of the size predicted from the cDNA. To test this approach further we have utilized it to confirm the known chromosomal location of the retinoblastoma gene. Lastly, we describe how this strategy can readily be applied to unknown human cDNAs, and thereby be integrated into efforts to generate a human STS expression map of the genome. A strategy for production of such a map, using human brain cDNAs as a model, is described. Images PMID:2030965

  8. Rapid and accurate species and genomic species identification and exhaustive population diversity assessment of Agrobacterium spp. using recA-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Shams, M; Vial, L; Chapulliot, D; Nesme, X; Lavire, C

    2013-07-01

    Agrobacteria are common soil bacteria that interact with plants as commensals, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or alternatively as pathogens. Indigenous agrobacterial populations are composites, generally with several species and/or genomic species and several strains per species. We thus developed a recA-based PCR approach to accurately identify and specifically detect agrobacteria at various taxonomic levels. Specific primers were designed for all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium presently known, including 11 genomic species of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens complex (G1-G9, G13 and G14, among which only G2, G4, G8 and G14 still received a Latin epithet: pusense, radiobacter, fabrum and nepotum, respectively), A. larrymoorei, A. rubi, R. skierniewicense, A. sp. 1650, and A. vitis, and for the close relative Allorhizobium undicola. Specific primers were also designed for superior taxa, Agrobacterium spp. and Rhizobiaceace. Primer specificities were assessed with target and non-target pure culture DNAs as well as with DNAs extracted from composite agrobacterial communities. In addition, we showed that the amplicon cloning-sequencing approach used with Agrobacterium-specific or Rhizobiaceae-specific primers is a way to assess the agrobacterial diversity of an indigenous agrobacterial population. Hence, the agrobacterium-specific primers designed in the present study enabled the first accurate and rapid identification of all species and/or genomic species of Agrobacterium, as well as their direct detection in environmental samples. PMID:23578959

  9. Rapid characterization of earthquake disasters using real-time sensors and imagery differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Recent major disasters have resulted from diverse earthquakes and related phenomena, hence a daunting array of observational challenges was encountered in the past few years. Rapid characterization of damage to provide situational awareness, and to inform disaster management decisions, has repeatedly proven important after recent events. The 2004 M9.0 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake caused entire islands to be elevated by more than two meters. As a result, corals and other biota were bleached in the sun, which made the uplift apparent in satellite imagery. In the 2010 M8.8 Chile earthquake, similar uplift occurred, and in both cases imagery taken before and afterwards revealed coherent long-wavelength patterns of coastal uplift and submergence. In the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake, widespread coastal subsidence occurred, as documented by data from the dense GPS network operated by GSI. These observed patterns indicate along-strike and down-dip maximum co-seismic slip areas on the plate interface. Along with these coastal vertical deformations, all three of these megathrust events also were accompanied by long-wavelength (hundreds of km's) horizontal deformations, also up to several meters. As the upper plate wedges of these subduction zones displaced elastically and rapidly towards the trenches, tsunamigenic strain was released co-seismically. GPS and differential imagery methods (e.g., InSAR and electro-optical) were also used to map the detailed patterns of these large crustal deformations, allowing estimation of slip on the plate interface by many investigators. The down-dip and along-strike slip variations are of interest because the slip pattern strongly influences tsunamigenesis. From these models of spatial and temporal slip on the plate interface, the process of tsunami and strong ground motion generation may then also be better understood and related to observed patterns of shaking and inundation, and to observed damage. If such modeling could be done even

  10. Full-genome identification and characterization of NBS-encoding disease resistance genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Bouktila, Dhia; Khalfallah, Yosra; Habachi-Houimli, Yosra; Mezghani-Khemakhem, Maha; Makni, Mohamed; Makni, Hanem

    2015-02-01

    Host resistance is the most economical, effective and ecologically sustainable method of controlling diseases in crop plants. In bread wheat, despite the high number of resistance loci that have been cataloged to date, only few have been cloned, underlying the need for genomics-guided investigations capable of providing a prompt and acute knowledge on the identity of effective resistance genes that can be used in breeding programs. Proteins with a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) encoded by the major plant disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in the responses of plants to various pathogens. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes within the whole wheat genome was performed, and the genome scale characterization of this gene family was established. From the recently published wheat genome sequence, we used a data mining and automatic prediction pipeline to identify 580 complete ORF candidate NBS-encoding genes and 1,099 partial-ORF ones. Among complete gene models, 464 were longer than 200 aa, among them 436 had less than 70 % of sequence identity to each other. This gene models set was deeply characterized. (1) First, we have analyzed domain architecture and identified, in addition to typical domain combinations, the presence of particular domains like signal peptides, zinc fingers, kinases, heavy-metal-associated and WRKY DNA-binding domains. (2) Functional and expression annotation via homology searches in protein and transcript databases, based on sufficient criteria, enabled identifying similar proteins for 60 % of the studied gene models and expression evidence for 13 % of them. (3) Shared orthologous groups were defined using NBS-domain proteins of rice and Brachypodium distachyon. (4) Finally, alignment of the 436 NBS-containing gene models to the full set of scaffolds from the IWGSC's wheat chromosome survey sequence enabled high-stringence anchoring to chromosome arms. The distribution of the R genes was found balanced

  11. Formation and Characterization of Beclomethasone Dipropionate Nanoparticles Using Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solution

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Mohsen; Vatanara, Alireza; Zarghami, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Particle size of Beclometasone Dipropionate (BDP) was reduced by the rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) process, using CO2 as supercritical solvent. Also, the effect of RESS parameters such as extraction pressure, pre-expansion temperature, and weight fraction of co-solvent on the size and distribution of BDP particles were investigated. Methods: The effects of extraction pressure (200-260 bar), pre-expansion temperature (70-110 °C) and weight fraction of menthol as a co-solvent on mean particle size (MPS) of BDP were investigated by design of experiment (DOE). Particles were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). Results: The average sizes of precipitated BDP were between 64.1 and 294 nm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that extraction pressure was the most significant parameter and a higher extraction pressure caused production of smaller particles. Also, it was found that higher temperature and weight fraction of co-solvent increased the MPS. The interaction effects of extraction pressure-pre-expansion temperature and pre-expansion temperature-co-solvent ratio were significant through the analysis of variance. It was observed that the MPS of precipitated particles was mostly influenced by pressure. Conclusion: The smallest MPS of BDP obtained from the RESS process was 65 nm that revealed a significant size reduction from its original MPS of 9 μm. Moreover, a slight change was observed for precipitated particles of BDP into spherical form while the original particles were irregular in shape. RESS process showed as a promising method for production of BDP nanoparticles that may results in improvement of drug’s physicochemical properties. PMID:26504756

  12. Applying polarity rapid assessment method and ultrafiltration to characterize NDMA precursors in wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Leavey, Shannon; Krasner, Stuart W; Mel Suffet, I H

    2014-06-15

    Certain nitrosamines in water are disinfection byproducts that are probable human carcinogens. Nitrosamines have diverse and complex precursors that include effluent organic matter, some anthropogenic chemicals, and natural (likely non-humic) substances. An easy and selective tool was first developed to characterize nitrosamine precursors in treated wastewaters, including different process effluents. This tool takes advantages of the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) and ultrafiltration (UF) (molecular weight distribution) to locate the fractions with the strongest contributions to the nitrosamine precursor pool in the effluent organic matter. Strong cation exchange (SCX) and C18 solid-phase extraction cartridges were used for their high selectivity for nitrosamine precursors. The details of PRAM operation, such as cartridge clean-up, capacity, pH influence, and quality control were included in this paper, as well as the main parameters of UF operation. Preliminary testing of the PRAM/UF method with effluents from one wastewater treatment plant gave very informative results. SCX retained 45-90% of the N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential (FP)-a measure of the precursors-in secondary and tertiary wastewater effluents. These results are consistent with NDMA precursors likely having a positively charged amine group. C18 adsorbed 30-45% of the NDMAFP, which indicates that a substantial portion of these precursors were non-polar. The small molecular weight (MW) (<1 kDa) and large MW (>10 kDa) fractions obtained from UF were the primary contributors to NDMAFP. The combination of PRAM and UF brings important information on the characteristics of nitrosamine precursors in water with easy operation. PMID:24709532

  13. Context based computational analysis and characterization of ARS consensus sequences (ACS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod Kumar; Krishnamachari, Annangarachari

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide experimental studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that autonomous replicating sequence (ARS) requires an essential consensus sequence (ACS) for replication activity. Computational studies identified thousands of ACS like patterns in the genome. However, only a few hundreds of these sites act as replicating sites and the rest are considered as dormant or evolving sites. In a bid to understand the sequence makeup of replication sites, a content and context-based analysis was performed on a set of replicating ACS sequences that binds to origin-recognition complex (ORC) denoted as ORC-ACS and non-replicating ACS sequences (nrACS), that are not bound by ORC. In this study, DNA properties such as base composition, correlation, sequence dependent thermodynamic and DNA structural profiles, and their positions have been considered for characterizing ORC-ACS and nrACS. Analysis reveals that ORC-ACS depict marked differences in nucleotide composition and context features in its vicinity compared to nrACS. Interestingly, an A-rich motif was also discovered in ORC-ACS sequences within its nucleosome-free region. Profound changes in the conformational features, such as DNA helical twist, inclination angle and stacking energy between ORC-ACS and nrACS were observed. Distribution of ACS motifs in the non-coding segments points to the locations of ORC-ACS which are found far away from the adjacent gene start position compared to nrACS thereby enabling an accessible environment for ORC-proteins. Our attempt is novel in considering the contextual view of ACS and its flanking region along with nucleosome positioning in the S. cerevisiae genome and may be useful for any computational prediction scheme. PMID:27508123

  14. Genome characterization and population genetic structure of the zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus canis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptococcus canis is an important opportunistic pathogen of dogs and cats that can also infect a wide range of additional mammals including cows where it can cause mastitis. It is also an emerging human pathogen. Results Here we provide characterization of the first genome sequence for this species, strain FSL S3-227 (milk isolate from a cow with an intra-mammary infection). A diverse array of putative virulence factors was encoded by the S. canis FSL S3-227 genome. Approximately 75% of these gene sequences were homologous to known Streptococcal virulence factors involved in invasion, evasion, and colonization. Present in the genome are multiple potentially mobile genetic elements (MGEs) [plasmid, phage, integrative conjugative element (ICE)] and comparison to other species provided convincing evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) between S. canis and two additional bovine mastitis causing pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae), with this transfer possibly contributing to host adaptation. Population structure among isolates obtained from Europe and USA [bovine = 56, canine = 26, and feline = 1] was explored. Ribotyping of all isolates and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of a subset of the isolates (n = 45) detected significant differentiation between bovine and canine isolates (Fisher exact test: P = 0.0000 [ribotypes], P = 0.0030 [sequence types]), suggesting possible host adaptation of some genotypes. Concurrently, the ancestral clonal complex (54% of isolates) occurred in many tissue types, all hosts, and all geographic locations suggesting the possibility of a wide and diverse niche. Conclusion This study provides evidence highlighting the importance of LGT in the evolution of the bacteria S. canis, specifically, its possible role in host adaptation and acquisition of virulence factors. Furthermore, recent LGT detected between S. canis and human bacteria (Streptococcus

  15. Complete genome sequence and characterization of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli field isolate ACN001.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangru; Wei, Liuya; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Ruixuan; Liu, Canying; Bi, Dingren; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli is an important etiological agent of avian colibacillosis, which manifests as respiratory, hematogenous, meningitic, and enteric infections in poultry. It is also a potential zoonotic threat to human health. The diverse genomes of APEC strains largely hinder disease prevention and control measures. In the current study, pyrosequencing was used to analyze and characterize APEC strain ACN001 (= CCTCC 2015182(T) = DSMZ 29979(T)), which was isolated from the liver of a diseased chicken in China in 2010. Strain ACN001 belongs to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli phylogenetic group B1, and was highly virulent in chicken and mouse models. Whole genome analysis showed that it consists of six different plasmids along with a circular chromosome of 4,936,576 bp, comprising 4,794 protein-coding genes, 108 RNA genes, and 51 pseudogenes, with an average G + C content of 50.56 %. As well as 237 coding sequences, we identified 39 insertion sequences, 12 predicated genomic islands, 8 prophage-related sequences, and 2 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats regions on the chromosome, suggesting the possible occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in this strain. In addition, most of the virulence and antibiotic resistance genes were located on the plasmids, which would assist in the distribution of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance elements among E. coli populations. Together, the information provided here on APEC isolate ACN001 will assist in future study of APEC strains, and aid in the development of control measures. PMID:26823959

  16. Characterization of Genomic Island 3 and Genetic Variability of Chilean Field Strains of Brucella abortus▿

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, Sandra; Salgado, Paulina; Valenzuela, Patricio; Vidal, Roberto; Oñate, Angel A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the capabilities developed by bacteria is the ability to gain large fragments of DNA from other bacteria or to lose portions of their own genomes. Among these exchangeable fragments are the genomic islands (GIs). Nine GIs have been identified in Brucella, and genomic island 3 (GI-3) is shared by two pathogenic species, B. melitensis and B. abortus. GI-3 encodes mostly unknown proteins. One of the aims of this study was to perform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on field isolates of B. abortus from Chile to determine whether these isolates are clonally related. Furthermore, we focused on the characterization of GI-3, studying its organization and the genetic conservation of the GI-3 sequence using techniques such as tiling-path PCR (TP-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR). Our results, after PFGE was performed on 69 field isolates of B. abortus from Chile, showed that the strains were genetically homogeneous. To increase the power of genetic discrimination among these strains, we used multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis with 16 loci (MLVA-16). The results obtained by MLVA-16 showed that the strains of B. abortus were genetically heterogeneous and that most of them clustered according to their geographic origin. Of the genetic loci studied, panel 2B was the one describing the highest diversity in the analysis, as well as locus Bruce19 in panel 2A. In relation to the study of GI-3, our experimental analysis by TP-PCR identified and confirmed that GI-3 is present in all wild strains of B. abortus, demonstrating the high stability of gene cluster GI-3 in Chilean field strains. PMID:21543580

  17. Transposable element junctions in marker development and genomic characterization of barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley is a model plant in genomic studies of Triticeae species. A complete barley genome sequence will facilitate not only barley breeding programs, but also those for related species. However, the large genome size and high repetitive sequence content complicate the barley genome assembly. The ma...

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese spiny lobster Panulirus stimpsoni (Crustacea: Decapoda): genome characterization and phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2011-01-01

    The genetics and molecular biology of the commercially important Chinese spiny lobster, Panulirus stimpsoni are little known. Here, we present the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. stimpsoni, determined by the long polymerase chain reaction and primer walking sequencing method. The entire genome is 15,677 bp in length, encoding the standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The overall A+T content of the genome is 65.6%, lower than most malacostracan species. The gene order is consistent with the pancrustacean ground pattern. Several conserved elements were identified from P. stimpsoni control region, viz. one [TA(A)]n-block, two GA-blocks and three hairpin structures. However, the position of [TA(A)]n-block and number of hairpin structure are different from those in the congeneric P. japonicus and other decapods. Phylogenetic analyses using the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 13 protein-coding genes do not support the monophyly of suborder Pleocyemata, which is in contrast to most morphological and molecular results. However, the position of Palinura and Astacidea is unstable, as represented by the basal or sister branches to other Reptantia species. P. stimpsoni, as the second species of Palinura with complete mitochondrial genome available, will provide important information on both genomics and conservation biology of the group. PMID:20352347

  19. Preliminary Characterization of Mitochondrial Genome of Melipona scutellaris, a Brazilian Stingless Bee

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Manuella Souza; Rodovalho, Vinícius de Rezende; Bonetti, Ana Maria; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Cuadros-Orellana, Sara; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos; Rodrigues dos Santos, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Bees are manufacturers of relevant economical products and have a pollinator role fundamental to ecosystems. Traditionally, studies focused on the genus Melipona have been mostly based on behavioral, and social organization and ecological aspects. Only recently the evolutionary history of this genus has been assessed using molecular markers, including mitochondrial genes. Even though these studies have shed light on the evolutionary history of the Melipona genus, a more accurate picture may emerge when full nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of Melipona species become available. Here we present the assembly, annotation, and characterization of a draft mitochondrial genome of the Brazilian stingless bee Melipona scutellaris using Melipona bicolor as a reference organism. Using Illumina MiSeq data, we achieved the annotation of all protein coding genes, as well as the genes for the two ribosomal subunits (16S and 12S) and transfer RNA genes as well. Using the COI sequence as a DNA barcode, we found that M. cramptoni is the closest species to M. scutellaris. PMID:25019088

  20. Deep Subsurface Life from North Pond: Enrichment, Isolation, Characterization and Genomes of Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joseph A.; León-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic water-column west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. The cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface. PMID:27242705

  1. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sedimentmore » column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.« less

  2. Characterization, correction and de novo assembly of an Oxford Nanopore genomic dataset from Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Stéphane; Mudge, Joann; Cameron, Connor; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Anand, Ajith; Fengler, Kevin; Hayes, Kevin; Llaca, Victor; Jones, Todd J.; May, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The MinION is a portable single-molecule DNA sequencing instrument that was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies in 2014, producing long sequencing reads by measuring changes in ionic flow when single-stranded DNA molecules translocate through the pores. While MinION long reads have an error rate substantially higher than the ones produced by short-read sequencing technologies, they can generate de novo assemblies of microbial genomes, after an initial correction step that includes alignment of Illumina sequencing data or detection of overlaps between Oxford Nanopore reads to improve accuracy. In this study, MinION reads were generated from the multi-chromosome genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Errors in the consensus two-directional (sense and antisense) “2D” sequences were first characterized by way of comparison with an internal reference assembly. Both Illumina-based correction and self-correction were performed and the resulting corrected reads assembled into high-quality hybrid and non-hybrid assemblies. Corrected read datasets and assemblies were subsequently compared. The results shown here indicate that both hybrid and non-hybrid methods can be used to assemble Oxford Nanopore reads into informative multi-chromosome assemblies, each with slightly different outcomes in terms of contiguity and accuracy. PMID:27350167

  3. Characterization and comparative analysis of a simian foamy virus complete genome isolated from Brazilian capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Lian L; Muniz, Cláudia P; Siqueira, Juliana D; Curty, Gislaine; Schrago, Carlos G; Augusto, Anderson; Fedullo, Luiz; Soares, Marcelo A; Santos, André F

    2015-10-01

    Foamy viruses infect a wide range of placental mammals, including primates. However, despite of great diversity of New World primates, only three strains of neotropical simian foamy viruses (SFV) have been described. Only after 40 years since serological characterization, the complete sequence of an SFVcap strain infecting a family of six capuchin monkeys (Sapajus xanthosternos) was obtained. Co-culture of primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells with Cf2Th canine cells was established and monitored for the appearance of cytopathic effects, PCR amplification of integrated SFV proviral genome and viral reverse transcriptase activity. The novel SFVcap was fully sequenced through a next-generation sequencing protocol. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome grouped SFVcap and SFVmar, both infecting primate species of the Cebidae family with a genetic similarity of approximately 85%. Similar ORF sizes were observed among SFV from neotropical primates, and env and pol genes were the most conserved. Neotropical SFV presented the smallest LTRs among exogenous mammalians. The novel SFVcap strain provides a valuable research tool for the FV community. PMID:26047587

  4. Genome-wide characterization of the ankyrin repeats gene family under salt stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayong; Wan, Qun; He, Xiaolan; Ning, Lihua; Huang, Yihong; Xu, Zhaolong; Liu, Jia; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-10-15

    Ankyrin repeats (ANK) gene family are common in diverse organisms and play important roles in cell growth, development and response to environmental stresses. Recently, genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of the ANK gene family have been carried out in Arabidopsis, rice and maize. However, little is known about the ANK genes in the whole soybean genome. In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of 162ANK genes in soybean (GmANK). Then, comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of GmANK genes family were performed including gene locus, phylogenetic, domain composition analysis, chromosomal localization and expression profiling. Domain composition analyses showed that GmANK proteins formed eleven subfamilies in soybean. In sicilo expression analysis of these GmANK genes demonstrated that GmANK genes show a diverse/various expression pattern, suggesting that functional diversification of GmANK genes family. Based on digital gene expression profile (DGEP) data between cultivated soybean and wild type under salt treatment, some GmANKs related to salt/drought response were investigated. Moreover, the expression pattern and subcellular localization of GmANK6 were performed. The results will provide important clues to explore ANK genes expression and function in future studies in soybean. PMID:27335162

  5. Structural characterization of virion proteins and genomic RNA of human parainfluenza virus 3.

    PubMed Central

    Storey, D G; Dimock, K; Kang, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The virion proteins and genomic RNA of human parainfluenza virus 3 have been characterized. The virion contains seven major and two minor proteins. Three proteins of 195 X 10(3) molecular weight (195K), 87K, and 67K are associated with the nucleocapsid of the virion and have been designated L, P, and NP, respectively. Three proteins can be labeled with [14C]glucosamine and have molecular weights of 69K, 60K, and 46K. We have designated these proteins as HN, F0, and F1, respectively. HN protein has interchain disulfide bonds, but does not participate in disulfide bonding to form homomultimeric forms. F1 appears to be derived from a complex, F1,2, that has an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of F0 under nonreducing conditions. A protein of 35K is associated with the envelope components of the virion and aggregates under low-salt conditions; this protein has been designated M. The genome of human parainfluenza virus 3 is a linear RNA molecule with a molecular weight of approximately 4.6 X 10(6). Images PMID:6092708

  6. Principal Component Analysis Characterizes Shared Pathogenetics from Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Diana; Keinan, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have recently revealed many genetic associations that are shared between different diseases. We propose a method, disPCA, for genome-wide characterization of shared and distinct risk factors between and within disease classes. It flips the conventional GWAS paradigm by analyzing the diseases themselves, across GWAS datasets, to explore their “shared pathogenetics”. The method applies principal component analysis (PCA) to gene-level significance scores across all genes and across GWASs, thereby revealing shared pathogenetics between diseases in an unsupervised fashion. Importantly, it adjusts for potential sources of heterogeneity present between GWAS which can confound investigation of shared disease etiology. We applied disPCA to 31 GWASs, including autoimmune diseases, cancers, psychiatric disorders, and neurological disorders. The leading principal components separate these disease classes, as well as inflammatory bowel diseases from other autoimmune diseases. Generally, distinct diseases from the same class tend to be less separated, which is in line with their increased shared etiology. Enrichment analysis of genes contributing to leading principal components revealed pathways that are implicated in the immune system, while also pointing to pathways that have yet to be explored before in this context. Our results point to the potential of disPCA in going beyond epidemiological findings of the co-occurrence of distinct diseases, to highlighting novel genes and pathways that unsupervised learning suggest to be key players in the variability across diseases. PMID:25211452

  7. Deep Subsurface Life from North Pond: Enrichment, Isolation, Characterization and Genomes of Heterotrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joseph A; León-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F

    2016-01-01

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic water-column west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sediment column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. The cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface. PMID:27242705

  8. Ovarian Cancers Harboring Inactivating Mutations in CDK12 Display a Distinct Genomic Instability Pattern Characterized by Large Tandem Duplications.

    PubMed

    Popova, Tatiana; Manié, Elodie; Boeva, Valentina; Battistella, Aude; Goundiam, Oumou; Smith, Nicholas K; Mueller, Christopher R; Raynal, Virginie; Mariani, Odette; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-04-01

    CDK12 is a recurrently mutated gene in serous ovarian carcinoma, whose downregulation is associated with impaired expression of DNA damage repair genes and subsequent hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and PARP1/2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the genomic landscape associated with CDK12 inactivation in patients with serous ovarian carcinoma. We show that CDK12 loss was consistently associated with a particular genomic instability pattern characterized by hundreds of tandem duplications of up to 10 megabases (Mb) in size. Tandem duplications were characterized by a bimodal (∼0.3 and ∼3 Mb) size distribution and overlapping microhomology at the breakpoints. This genomic instability, denoted as the CDK12 TD-plus phenotype, is remarkably distinct from other alteration patterns described in breast and ovarian cancers. The CDK12 TD-plus phenotype was associated with a greater than 10% gain in genomic content and occurred at a 3% to 4% rate in The Cancer Genome Atlas-derived and in-house cohorts of patients with serous ovarian carcinoma. Moreover, CDK12-inactivating mutations together with the TD-plus phenotype were also observed in prostate cancers. Our finding provides new insight toward deciphering the function of CDK12 in genome maintenance and oncogenesis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1882-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26787835

  9. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jordan A.; Merrill, Bryan D.; Crockett, Justin T.; Esplin, Kyle P.; Evans, Marlee R.; Heaton, Karli E.; Hilton, Jared A.; Hyde, Jonathan R.; McBride, Morgan S.; Schouten, Jordan T.; Simister, Austin R.; Thurgood, Trever L.; Ward, Andrew T.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Hope, Sandra; Grose, Julianne H.

    2016-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium that causes a secondary infection in beehives following European Foulbrood disease. To better understand the contributions of Brevibacillus bacteriophages to the evolution of their hosts, five novel phages (Jenst, Osiris, Powder, SecTim467, and Sundance) were isolated and characterized. When compared with the five Brevibacillus phages currently in NCBI, these phages were assigned to clusters based on whole genome and proteome synteny. Powder and Osiris, both myoviruses, were assigned to the previously described Jimmer-like cluster. SecTim467 and Jenst, both siphoviruses, formed a novel phage cluster. Sundance, a siphovirus, was assigned as a singleton phage along with the previously isolated singleton, Emery. In addition to characterizing the basic relationships between these phages, several genomic features were observed. A motif repeated throughout phages Jenst and SecTim467 was frequently upstream of genes predicted to function in DNA replication, nucleotide metabolism, and transcription, suggesting transcriptional co-regulation. In addition, paralogous gene pairs that encode a putative transcriptional regulator were identified in four Brevibacillus phages. These paralogs likely evolved to bind different DNA sequences due to variation at amino acid residues predicted to bind specific nucleotides. Finally, a putative transposable element was identified in SecTim467 and Sundance that carries genes homologous to those found in Brevibacillus chromosomes. Remnants of this transposable element were also identified in phage Jenst. These discoveries provide a greater understanding of the diversity of phages, their behavior, and their evolutionary relationships to one another and to their host. In addition, they provide a foundation with which further Brevibacillus phages can be compared. PMID:27304881

  10. Characterization of a Single Genomic Locus Encoding the Clustered Protocadherin Receptor Diversity in Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Etlioglu, Hakki E.; Sun, Wei; Huang, Zengjin; Chen, Wei; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Clustered protocadherins (cPcdhs) constitute the largest subgroup of the cadherin superfamily, and in mammals are grouped into clusters of α-, β-, and γ-types. Tens of tandemly arranged paralogous Pcdh genes of the Pcdh clusters generate a substantial diversity of receptor isoforms. cPcdhs are known to have important roles in neuronal development, and genetic alterations of cPcdhs have been found to be associated with several neurological diseases. Here, we present a first characterization of cPcdhs in Xenopus tropicalis. We determined and annotated all cPcdh isoforms, revealing that they are present in a single chromosomal locus. We validated a total of 96 isoforms, which we show are organized in three distinct clusters. The X. tropicalis cPcdh locus is composed of one α- and two distinct γ-Pcdh clusters (pcdh-γ1 and pcdh-γ2). Bioinformatics analyses assisted by genomic BAC clone sequencing showed that the X. tropicalis α- and γ-Pcdhs are conserved at the cluster level, but, unlike mammals, X. tropicalis does not contain a β-Pcdh cluster. In contrast, the number of γ-Pcdh isoforms has expanded, possibly due to lineage-specific gene duplications. Interestingly, the number of X. tropicalis α-Pcdhs is identical between X. tropicalis and mouse. Moreover, we find highly conserved as well as novel promoter elements potentially involved in regulating the cluster-specific expression of cPcdh isoforms. This study provides important information for the understanding of the evolutionary history of cPcdh genes and future mechanistic studies. It provides an annotated X. tropicalis cPcdh genomic map and a first molecular characterization essential for functional and comparative studies. PMID:27261006

  11. Characterization of a Single Genomic Locus Encoding the Clustered Protocadherin Receptor Diversity in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Etlioglu, Hakki E; Sun, Wei; Huang, Zengjin; Chen, Wei; Schmucker, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Clustered protocadherins (cPcdhs) constitute the largest subgroup of the cadherin superfamily, and in mammals are grouped into clusters of α-, β-, and γ-types. Tens of tandemly arranged paralogous Pcdh genes of the Pcdh clusters generate a substantial diversity of receptor isoforms. cPcdhs are known to have important roles in neuronal development, and genetic alterations of cPcdhs have been found to be associated with several neurological diseases. Here, we present a first characterization of cPcdhs in Xenopus tropicalis We determined and annotated all cPcdh isoforms, revealing that they are present in a single chromosomal locus. We validated a total of 96 isoforms, which we show are organized in three distinct clusters. The X. tropicalis cPcdh locus is composed of one α- and two distinct γ-Pcdh clusters (pcdh-γ1 and pcdh-γ2). Bioinformatics analyses assisted by genomic BAC clone sequencing showed that the X. tropicalis α- and γ-Pcdhs are conserved at the cluster level, but, unlike mammals, X. tropicalis does not contain a β-Pcdh cluster. In contrast, the number of γ-Pcdh isoforms has expanded, possibly due to lineage-specific gene duplications. Interestingly, the number of X. tropicalis α-Pcdhs is identical between X. tropicalis and mouse. Moreover, we find highly conserved as well as novel promoter elements potentially involved in regulating the cluster-specific expression of cPcdh isoforms. This study provides important information for the understanding of the evolutionary history of cPcdh genes and future mechanistic studies. It provides an annotated X. tropicalis cPcdh genomic map and a first molecular characterization essential for functional and comparative studies. PMID:27261006

  12. Characterization of genome-wide microsatellites of Saccharina japonica based on a preliminary assembly of Illumina sequencing reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linan; Peng, Jie; Li, Xiaojie; Cui, Cuiju; Sun, Juan; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-06-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) function widely and locate dependently in genome. However, their characteristics are often ignored due to the lack of genomic sequences of most species. Kelp ( Saccharina japonica), a brown macroalga, is extensively cultured in China. In this study, the genome of S. japonica was surveyed using an Illumina sequencing platform, and its microsatellites were characterized. The preliminarily assembled genome was 469.4 Mb in size, with a scaffold N50 of 20529 bp. Among the 128370 identified microsatellites, 90671, 25726 and 11973 were found in intergenic regions, introns and exons, averaging 339.3, 178.8 and 205.4 microsatellites per Mb, respectively. These microsatellites distributed unevenly in S. japonica genome. Mononucleotide motifs were the most abundant in the genome, while trinucleotide ones were the most prevalent in exons. The microsatellite abundance decreased significantly with the increase of motif repeat numbers, and the microsatellites with a small number of repeats accounted for a higher proportion of the exons than those of the intergenic regions and introns. C/G-rich motifs were more common in exons than in intergenic regions and introns. These characteristics of microsatellites in S. japonica genome may associate with their functions, and ultimately their adaptation and evolution. Among the 120140 pairs of designed microsatellite primers, approximately 75% were predicted to be able to amplify S. japonica DNA. These microsatellite markers will be extremely useful for the genetic breeding and population evolution studies of kelp.

  13. Characterization of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and engaging teaching strategies described in two curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alexandra P.

    Cancer arises through an accumulation of mutations in the genome. In cancer cells, mutations are frequently caused by DNA rearrangements, which include chromosomal breakages, deletions, insertions, and translocations. Such events contribute to genomic instability, a known hallmark of cancer. To study cycles of chromosomal instability, we are using baker's yeast as a model organism. In yeast, a ChrVII system was previously developed (Admire et al., 2006), in which a disomic yeast strain was used to identify regions of instability on ChrVII. Using this system, a fragile site on the left arm of ChrVII (Admire et al., 2006) was identified and characterized. This study led to insight into mechanisms involved in chromosomal rearrangements and mutations that arise from them as well as to an understanding of mechanisms involved in genomic instability. To further our understanding of genomic instability, I devised a strategy to study instability on a different chromosome (ChrV) (Figure 3), so that we could determine whether lessons learned from the ChrVII system are applicable to other chromosomes, and/or whether other mechanisms of instability could be identified. A suitable strain was generated and analyzed, and our findings suggest that frequencies of instability on the right arm of ChrV are similar to those found in ChrVII. The results from the work in ChrV described in this paper support the idea that the instability found on ChrVII is not an isolated occurrence. My research was supported by an NSF GK-12 grant. The aim of this grant is to improve science education in middle schools, and as part of my participation in this program, I studied and practiced effective science communication methodologies. In attempts to explain my research to middle school students, I collaborated with others to develop methods for explaining genetics and the most important techniques I used in my research. While developing these methods, I learned more about what motivates people to learn

  14. Characterization of genome-wide SNPs for the water flea Daphnia pulicaria generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Joaquín; Chaturvedi, Anurag; De Meester, Luc; Weider, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    The keystone aquatic herbivore Daphnia has been studied for more than 150 years in the context of evolution, ecology and ecotoxicology. Although it is rapidly becoming an emergent model for environmental and population genomics, there have been limited genome-wide level studies in natural populations. We report a unique resource of novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP) markers for Daphnia pulicaria using the reduction in genomic complexity with the restriction enzymes approach, genotyping-by-sequencing. Using the genome of D. pulex as a reference, SNPs were scored for 53 clones from five natural populations that varied in lake trophic status. Our analyses resulted in 32,313 highly confident and bi-allelic SNP markers. 1,364 outlier SNPs were mapped on the annotated D. pulex genome, which identified 2,335 genes, including 565 within functional genes. Out of 885 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups that we found from outlier SNPs, 294 were involved in three metabolic and four regulatory pathways. Bayesian-clustering analyses showed two distinct population clusters representing the possible combined effects of geography and lake trophic status. Our results provide an invaluable tool for future population genomics surveys in Daphnia targeting informative regions related to physiological processes that can be linked to the ecology of this emerging eco-responsive taxon. PMID:27346179

  15. Characterization of genome-wide SNPs for the water flea Daphnia pulicaria generated by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Joaquín; Chaturvedi, Anurag; De Meester, Luc; Weider, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    The keystone aquatic herbivore Daphnia has been studied for more than 150 years in the context of evolution, ecology and ecotoxicology. Although it is rapidly becoming an emergent model for environmental and population genomics, there have been limited genome-wide level studies in natural populations. We report a unique resource of novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphic (SNP) markers for Daphnia pulicaria using the reduction in genomic complexity with the restriction enzymes approach, genotyping-by-sequencing. Using the genome of D. pulex as a reference, SNPs were scored for 53 clones from five natural populations that varied in lake trophic status. Our analyses resulted in 32,313 highly confident and bi-allelic SNP markers. 1,364 outlier SNPs were mapped on the annotated D. pulex genome, which identified 2,335 genes, including 565 within functional genes. Out of 885 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups that we found from outlier SNPs, 294 were involved in three metabolic and four regulatory pathways. Bayesian-clustering analyses showed two distinct population clusters representing the possible combined effects of geography and lake trophic status. Our results provide an invaluable tool for future population genomics surveys in Daphnia targeting informative regions related to physiological processes that can be linked to the ecology of this emerging eco-responsive taxon. PMID:27346179

  16. Characterization of genome-wide binding of NF-κB in TNFα-stimulated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yujun; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Jinke

    2013-09-10

    This study characterized the genome-wide binding of NF-κB RelA with ChIP-Seq and explored its effects on the gene transcription with DNA microarray. It was found that NF-κB showed several significant binding characteristics, including the inter- and intra-chromosomal differential high-fold enrichment binding, the dominant intronic binding to vast majority of target genes through multiple ChIP-seq peaks and κB sites, extensively binding to large number of genes in the human genome, and binding its target genes more broadly through noncanonical κB sites than canonical κB sites. These in vivo genome-wide binding characteristics exerted effects on the transcription of its direct target genes in genome, reflecting some important traits of this protein which acts as a stimulatory transcription factor involving in many biological processes and responding to various internal and external stimuli. PMID:23688556

  17. Genomic interspecies microarray hybridization: rapid discovery of three thousand genes in the maize endophyte, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, by microarray hybridization with Escherichia coli K-12 open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Glasner, J D; Blattner, F R; Triplett, E W

    2001-04-01

    In an effort to efficiently discover genes in the diazotrophic endophyte of maize, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, DNA from strain 342 was hybridized to a microarray containing 96% (n = 4,098) of the annotated open reading frames from Escherichia coli K-12. Using a criterion of 55% identity or greater, 3,000 (70%) of the E. coli K-12 open reading frames were also found to be present in strain 342. Approximately 24% (n = 1,030) of the E. coli K-12 open reading frames are absent in strain 342. For 1.6% (n = 68) of the open reading frames, the signal was too low to make a determination regarding the presence or absence of the gene. Genes with high identity between the two organisms are those involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, cofactor synthesis, cell division, DNA replication, transcription, translation, transport, and regulatory proteins. Functions that were less highly conserved included carbon compound metabolism, membrane proteins, structural proteins, putative transport proteins, cell processes such as adaptation and protection, and central intermediary metabolism. Open reading frames of E. coli K-12 with little or no identity in strain 342 included putative regulatory proteins, putative chaperones, surface structure proteins, mobility proteins, putative enzymes, hypothetical proteins, and proteins of unknown function, as well as genes presumed to have been acquired by lateral transfer from sources such as phage, plasmids, or transposons. The results were in agreement with the physiological properties of the two strains. Whole genome comparisons by genomic interspecies microarray hybridization are shown to rapidly identify thousands of genes in a previously uncharacterized bacterial genome provided that the genome of a close relative has been fully sequenced. This approach will become increasingly more useful as more full genome sequences become available. PMID:11282649

  18. Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Characterization for Rapid Assessment of Magnetic Materials: Application of Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Besser, M. F.; Simsek, E.; Ott, R. T.

    2016-07-01

    A bulk combinatorial approach for synthesizing alloy libraries using laser engineered net shaping (LENS™; i.e., 3D printing) was utilized to rapidly assess material systems for magnetic applications. The LENS™ system feeds powders in different ratios into a melt pool created by a laser to synthesize samples with bulk (millimeters) dimensions. By analyzing these libraries with autosampler differential scanning calorimeter/thermal gravimetric analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry, we are able to rapidly characterize the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of the libraries. The Fe-Co binary alloy was used as a model system and the results were compared with data in the literature.

  19. Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Characterization for Rapid Assessment of Magnetic Materials: Application of Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Besser, M. F.; Simsek, E.; Ott, R. T.

    2016-04-01

    A bulk combinatorial approach for synthesizing alloy libraries using laser engineered net shaping (LENS™; i.e., 3D printing) was utilized to rapidly assess material systems for magnetic applications. The LENS™ system feeds powders in different ratios into a melt pool created by a laser to synthesize samples with bulk (millimeters) dimensions. By analyzing these libraries with autosampler differential scanning calorimeter/thermal gravimetric analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry, we are able to rapidly characterize the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of the libraries. The Fe-Co binary alloy was used as a model system and the results were compared with data in the literature.

  20. Rapid Mitochondrial Genome Evolution through Invasion of Mobile Elements in Two Closely Related Species of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Denis; Nadimi, Maryam; Iffis, Bachir; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are common and important plant symbionts. They have coenocytic hyphae and form multinucleated spores. The nuclear genome of AMF is polymorphic and its organization is not well understood, which makes the development of reliable molecular markers challenging. In stark contrast, their mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is homogeneous. To assess the intra- and inter-specific mitochondrial variability in closely related Glomus species, we performed 454 sequencing on total genomic DNA of Glomus sp. isolate DAOM-229456 and we compared its mtDNA with two G. irregulare isolates. We found that the mtDNA of Glomus sp. is homogeneous, identical in gene order and, with respect to the sequences of coding regions, almost identical to G. irregulare. However, certain genomic regions vary substantially, due to insertions/deletions of elements such as introns, mitochondrial plasmid-like DNA polymerase genes and mobile open reading frames. We found no evidence of mitochondrial or cytoplasmic plasmids in Glomus species, and mobile ORFs in Glomus are responsible for the formation of four gene hybrids in atp6, atp9, cox2, and nad3, which are most probably the result of horizontal gene transfer and are expressed at the mRNA level. We found evidence for substantial sequence variation in defined regions of mtDNA, even among closely related isolates with otherwise identical coding gene sequences. This variation makes it possible to design reliable intra- and inter-specific markers. PMID:23637766

  1. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers.

  2. Characterization of full-length HIV-1 CRF17_BF genomes and comparison to the prototype CRF12_BF strains.

    PubMed

    Aulicino, Paula C; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Bello, Gonzalo; Rocco, Carlos; Mangano, Andrea; Carr, Jean; Sen, Luisa; Foley, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the full-length intersubtype recombinant structure of the HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form CRF17_BF. A single genome of CRF17_BF was originally described in 2001 as being largely similar to CRF12_BF. Since then, more genomes of CRF17_BF have been sequenced but not adequately described in publications. Here we describe CRF17_BF as a genuine CRF, and analyze its recombination pattern based on bootscan analyses, subtype signature patterns, and phylogenetic reconstruction of subtype-delimited segments. We show that CRF17_BF can be distinguished from CRF12_BF in several regions of the genome, including vpu, pol, env and nef. A complete and accurate characterization and description of recombination breakpoints in CRFs is required for a proper surveillance of HIV-1 genotypes, and important for epidemiological purposes. PMID:22266022

  3. Investigation on microstructure characterization and property of rapidly solidified Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Tao; Chen Zhenhua; Yang Mingbo; Hu Jianjun; Xia Hua

    2012-01-15

    Rapidly solidified (RS) Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La (wt.%) alloys have been produced via atomizing the alloy melt and subsequent splat-quenching on the water-cooled copper twin-rollers in the form of flakes. Microstructure characterization, phase compositions and thermal stability of the alloys have been systematically investigated. The results showed that with addition of RE (Ce and La) to the Mg-6Zn-5Ca alloy, the stable intermetallic compounds i.e. the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub y}RE{sub z} phase with a few Ca (about 3 at.%), shortened as the T Prime phase, were formed at the expense of the binary Mg-Zn and Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} phases, which was possibly beneficial to the enhanced thermal stability of the alloy. In the Mg-6Zn-5Ca-3Ce-0.5La alloy, the composition of the T Prime phase in the grain interior was different from that at the grain boundaries, in which the segregation of the La elements was found, and the atomic percentage ratio of Zn to Ce in the T Prime phase within the grains was close to 2. Moreover, the stable Mg{sub 2}Ca phases were detected around the T Prime phases at the grain boundaries in the alloy. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase constitution of RS Mg-6Zn-5Ca alloy can be improved by RE additions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the Mg-Zn-Ca-Ce-La alloys, the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub y}RE{sub z} phase with a few Ca (T Prime phase) is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of the T Prime phase leads to the loss of the Mg-Zn and Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 6}Zn{sub 3} phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition of the T Prime phase differs from the grain interior to the grain boundary.

  4. Rapid Characterization of Molecular Chemistry, Nutrient Make-Up and Microlocation of Internal Seed Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.; Block, H.; Niu, Z.; Doiron, K.

    2007-01-01

    Wheat differs from corn in biodegradation kinetics and fermentation characteristics. Wheat exhibits a relatively high rate (23% h{sup 01}) and extent (78% DM) of biodegradation, which can lead to metabolic problems such as acidosis and bloat in ruminants. The objective of this study was to rapidly characterize the molecular chemistry of the internal structure of wheat (cv. AC Barrie) and reveal both its structural chemical make-up and nutrient component matrix by analyzing the intensity and spatial distribution of molecular functional groups within the intact seed using advanced synchrotron-powered Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. The experiment was performed at the U2B station of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, USA. The wheat tissue was imaged systematically from the pericarp, seed coat, aleurone layer and endosperm under the peaks at {approx}1732 (carbonyl C{double_bond}O ester), 1515 (aromatic compound of lignin), 1650 (amide I), 1025 (non-structural CHO), 1550 (amide II), 1246 (cellulosic material), 1160, 1150, 1080, 930, 860 (all CHO), 3350 (OH and NH stretching), 2928 (CH{sub 2} stretching band) and 2885 cm{sup -1} (CH{sub 3} stretching band). Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were applied to analyze the molecular FTIR spectra obtained from the different inherent structures within the intact wheat tissues. The results showed that, with synchrotron-powered FTIR microspectroscopy, images of the molecular chemistry of wheat could be generated at an ultra-spatial resolution. The features of aromatic lignin, structural and non-structural carbohydrates, as well as nutrient make-up and interactions in the seeds, could be revealed. Both principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis methods are conclusive in showing that they can discriminate and classify the different inherent structures within the seed tissue. The wheat exhibited distinguishable

  5. Comprehensive survey and genomic characterization of toll-like receptors in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: identification of novel fish TLRs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive survey of channel catfish Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) was undertaken following a genomic PCR approach based on degenerate primers. Twenty different TLRs were identified in channel catfish. Channel catfish TLR sequences were characterized by phylogenetic analysis based on their conserv...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of an NADC30-Like Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Characterized by Recombination with Other Strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Ji, Guobiao; Wang, Juan; Tan, Feifei; Zhuang, Jinshan; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Kegong

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an NADC30-like porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), HNyc15, which was characterized by recombination with VR-2332 and CH-1a PRRSV strains in open reading frames (ORFs) 2 to 4. PMID:27151798

  7. Exploiting genotyping by sequencing to characterize the genomic structure of the American cranberry through high-density linkage mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approaches, combined with data imputation methodologies, is narrowing the genetic knowledge gap between major and understudied, minor crops. GBS is an excellent tool to characterize the genomic structure of recently domesticated (~200 years) and unde...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of an NADC30-Like Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Characterized by Recombination with Other Strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingying; Ji, Guobiao; Wang, Juan; Tan, Feifei; Zhuang, Jinshan

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an NADC30-like porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), HNyc15, which was characterized by recombination with VR-2332 and CH-1a PRRSV strains in open reading frames (ORFs) 2 to 4. PMID:27151798

  9. Sequencing and characterizing the genome of Estrella lausannensis as an undergraduate project: training students and biological insights.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Claire; Aeby, Sébastien; Chassot, Bérénice; Clulow, James; Hilfiker, Olivier; Rappo, Samuel; Ritzmann, Sébastien; Schumacher, Paolo; Terrettaz, Céline; Benaglio, Paola; Falquet, Laurent; Farinelli, Laurent; Gharib, Walid H; Goesmann, Alexander; Harshman, Keith; Linke, Burkhard; Miyazaki, Ryo; Rivolta, Carlo; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies, sequencing projects have become pervasive in the molecular life sciences. The huge bulk of data generated daily must be analyzed further by biologists with skills in bioinformatics and by "embedded bioinformaticians," i.e., bioinformaticians integrated in wet lab research groups. Thus, students interested in molecular life sciences must be trained in the main steps of genomics: sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis. To reach that goal, a practical course has been set up for master students at the University of Lausanne: the "Sequence a genome" class. At the beginning of the academic year, a few bacterial species whose genome is unknown are provided to the students, who sequence and assemble the genome(s) and perform manual annotation. Here, we report the progress of the first class from September 2010 to June 2011 and the results obtained by seven master students who specifically assembled and annotated the genome of Estrella lausannensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium related to Chlamydia. The draft genome of Estrella is composed of 29 scaffolds encompassing 2,819,825 bp that encode for 2233 putative proteins. Estrella also possesses a 9136 bp plasmid that encodes for 14 genes, among which we found an integrase and a toxin/antitoxin module. Like all other members of the Chlamydiales order, Estrella possesses a highly conserved type III secretion system, considered as a key virulence factor. The annotation of the Estrella genome also allowed the characterization of the metabolic abilities of this strictly intracellular bacterium. Altogether, the students provided the scientific community with the Estrella genome sequence and a preliminary understanding of the biology of this recently-discovered bacterial genus, while learning to use cutting-edge technologies for sequencing and to perform bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25745418

  10. Using a Microscale Approach to Rapidly Separate and Characterize Three Photosynthetic Pigment Species from Fern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayudhya, Theppawut Israsena Na; Posey, Frederick T.; Tyus, Jessica C.; Dingra, Nin N.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid separation of three photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll "a" and "b" and xanthophyll) from fern ("Polystichum acrostichoides") is described using microscale solvent extraction and traditional thin layer chromatography that minimizes use of harmful chemicals and lengthy procedures. The experiment introduces…

  11. Rapid Characterization of Polyalcohols by Silylation and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method for rapid enumerating hydroxyl groups in analytes is described and applied to common polyalcohols (erythritol, mannitol, and xylitol). Polyalcohols were derivatized with trimethylsilylimidazole (TMSI) either separately or as mixtures, and were analyzed without chromatographic separation or...

  12. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes. PMID:25481634

  13. Akirin2 homologues from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus: Genomic and molecular characterization and transcriptional expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lim, Bong-Soo; Jung, Hyung-Bok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Akirins are conserved nuclear resident NF-κB signaling pathway molecules. Isoforms of akirins found in various organisms are known to play diverse roles. In this study, we have characterized two akirin2 homologues from rock bream, OfAk2(1) and OfAk2(2). The proteins derived from OfAk2(1) and OfAk2(2) revealed the presence of nuclear localization signal. Multiple sequence alignment and pairwise alignment of OfAk2(1) and OfAk2(2) with the akirin homologues, revealed high conservation and identity. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the distinct position of OfAk2(1) and OfAk2(2) was close to the fish homologues and separated from the mammals and invertebrates. Genomic structure characterization revealed two distinct structures. OfAk2(1) possessed 6 exons interrupted by 5 introns whereas OfAk2(2) possessed 5 exons interrupted by 4 introns. The promoter analysis revealed the presence of significant transcription factors, which suggests its regulation by diverse stimuli. In addition, transcript expression analysis using real time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction post immune challenges with lipopolysaccharide, Edwardsiella tarda and poly I:C revealed upregulation of both OfAk2(1) and OfAk2(2) in liver, spleen and head kidney. PMID:23770624

  14. Genome-wide characterization and comparative analysis of the MLO gene family in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Qifeng; Dou, Lingling; Liu, Zhen; Peng, Renhai; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-06-01

    In plants, MLO (Mildew Locus O) gene encodes a plant-specific seven transmembrane (TM) domain protein involved in several cellular processes, including susceptibility to powdery mildew (PM). In this study, a genome-wide characterization of the MLO gene family in G. raimondii L., G. arboreum L. and G. hirsutum L. was performed. In total, 22, 17 and 38 homologous sequences were identified for each species, respectively. Gene organization, including chromosomal location, gene clustering and gene duplication, was investigated. Homologues related to PM susceptibility in upland cotton were inferred by phylogenetic relationships with functionally characterized MLO proteins. To conduct a comparative analysis between MLO candidate genes from G. raimondii L., G. arboreum L. and G. hirsutum L., orthologous relationships and conserved synteny blocks were constructed. The transcriptional variation of 38 GhMLO genes in response to exogenous application of salt, mannitol (Man), abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ETH), jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) was monitored. Further studies should be conducted to elucidate the functions of MLO genes in PM susceptibility and phytohormone signalling pathways. PMID:26986931

  15. Rapid whole genome sequencing of Miyazaki-Bali/2007 Pteropine orthoreovirus by modified rolling circular amplification with adaptor ligation – next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuma, Aiko; Yang, Ming; Sugamata, Masami; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of orthoreoviruses as the causative agent of human respiratory illness over the past few years has led to a demand to determine their viral genome sequences. The whole genome sequencing of such RNA viruses using traditional methods, such as Sanger dideoxy sequencing following rapid amplification of cDNA ends presents a laborious challenge due to the numerous preparatory steps required before sequencing can commence. We developed a practical, time-efficient novel combination method capable of reducing the total time required from months to less than a week in the determination of whole genome sequence of Pteropine orthoreoviruses (PRV); through a combination of viral RNA purification and enrichment, adaptor ligation, reverse transcription, cDNA circularization and amplification, and next generation sequencing. We propose to call the method “modified rolling circular amplification with adaptor ligation – next generation sequencing (mRCA-NGS)”. Here, we describe the technological focus and advantage of mRCA-NGS and its expansive application, exemplified through the phylogenetic understanding of the Miyazaki-Bali/2007 PRV. PMID:26558341

  16. Rapid whole genome sequencing of Miyazaki-Bali/2007 Pteropine orthoreovirus by modified rolling circular amplification with adaptor ligation - next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuma, Aiko; Yang, Ming; Sugamata, Masami; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of orthoreoviruses as the causative agent of human respiratory illness over the past few years has led to a demand to determine their viral genome sequences. The whole genome sequencing of such RNA viruses using traditional methods, such as Sanger dideoxy sequencing following rapid amplification of cDNA ends presents a laborious challenge due to the numerous preparatory steps required before sequencing can commence. We developed a practical, time-efficient novel combination method capable of reducing the total time required from months to less than a week in the determination of whole genome sequence of Pteropine orthoreoviruses (PRV); through a combination of viral RNA purification and enrichment, adaptor ligation, reverse transcription, cDNA circularization and amplification, and next generation sequencing. We propose to call the method "modified rolling circular amplification with adaptor ligation - next generation sequencing (mRCA-NGS)". Here, we describe the technological focus and advantage of mRCA-NGS and its expansive application, exemplified through the phylogenetic understanding of the Miyazaki-Bali/2007 PRV. PMID:26558341

  17. A rapid and sensitive nonradioactive method applicable for genome-wide analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in small RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingyan; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2013-01-01

    The conventional small RNA isolation and detection methods for yeast cells have been designed for a small number of samples. In order to conduct a genome-wide assessment of how each gene product impacts upon small non-coding RNAs, we developed a rapid method for analyzing small RNAs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and mutants cells in the deletion and temperature-sensitive (ts) collections. Our method implements three optimized techniques: a procedure for growing small yeast cultures in 96-deepwell plates, a fast procedure for small RNA isolation from the plates, and a sensitive nonradioactive Northern method for RNA detection. The RNA isolation procedure is highly reproducible and requires only 4 hours for processing 96 samples, and yields RNA of good quality and quantity. The nonradioactive Northern method employs digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled DNA probes and chemiluminescence. It detects femtomole-level small RNAs within 1-minute exposure time. We minimized the processing time for large-scale analysis and optimized the stripping and re-probing procedures for analysis of multiple RNAs from a single membrane. The method described is rapid, sensitive, safe, and cost-effective for genome-wide screens of novel genes involved in the biogenesis, subcellular trafficking, and stability of small RNAs. Moreover, it will be useful to educational laboratory class venues and to research institutions with limited access to radioisotopes or robots. PMID:23417998

  18. Multiplexed chromosome conformation capture sequencing for rapid genome-scale high-resolution detection of long-range chromatin interactions.

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Kolovos, Petros; Brouwer, Rutger; Zuin, Jessica; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kockx, Christel; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Wendt, Kerstin S; Grosveld, Frank; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Soler, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for analyzing the spatial organization of genomes. Several 3C variants have been developed (e.g., 4C, 5C, ChIA-PET, Hi-C), allowing large-scale mapping of long-range genomic interactions. Here we describe multiplexed 3C sequencing (3C-seq), a 4C variant coupled to next-generation sequencing, allowing genome-scale detection of long-range interactions with candidate regions. Compared with several other available techniques, 3C-seq offers a superior resolution (typically single restriction fragment resolution; approximately 1-8 kb on average) and can be applied in a semi-high-throughput fashion. It allows the assessment of long-range interactions of up to 192 genes or regions of interest in parallel by multiplexing library sequencing. This renders multiplexed 3C-seq an inexpensive, quick (total hands-on time of 2 weeks) and efficient method that is ideal for the in-depth analysis of complex genetic loci. The preparation of multiplexed 3C-seq libraries can be performed by any investigator with basic skills in molecular biology techniques. Data analysis requires basic expertise in bioinformatics and in Linux and Python environments. The protocol describes all materials, critical steps and bioinformatics tools required for successful application of 3C-seq technology. PMID:23411633

  19. Molecular characterization of the complete genome of falconid herpesvirus strain S-18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Falconid herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is the causative agent of falcon inclusion body disease, an acute, highly contagious disease of raptors. The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of FHV-1 has been determined. The genome is arranged as a D-type genome with large inverted repeats flanking a ...

  20. Construction and characterization of a 10-genome equivalent yeast artificial chromosome library for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Zee, R.Y.L.; Schalkwyk, L.C.

    1997-02-01

    Increasing attention has been focused in recent years on the rat as a model organism for genetic studies, in particular for the investigation of complex traits, but progress has been limited by the lack of availability of large-insert genomic libraries. Here, we report the construction and characterization of an arrayed yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for the rat genome containing approximately 40,000 clones in the AB1380 host using the pCGS966 vector. An average size of 736 kb was estimated from 166 randomly chosen clones; thus the library provides 10-fold coverage of the genome, with a 99.99% probability of containing a unique sequence. Eight of 39 YACs analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization were found to be chimeric, indicating a proportion of about 20-30% of chimeric clones. The library was spotted on high-density filters to allow the identification of YAC clones by hybridization and was pooled using a 3-dimensional scheme for screening by PCR. Among 48 probes used to screen the library, an average of 9.3 positive clones were found, consistent with the calculated 10-fold genomic coverage of the library. This YAC library represents the first large-insert genomic library for the rat. It will be made available to the research community at large as an important new resource for complex genome analysis in this species. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels. PMID:24274140

  2. Identification and characterization of insect-specific proteins by genome data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojie; Wang, Hongsheng; Shi, Junjie; Wang, Xiaoling; Zheng, Hongkun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Clark, Terry; Wang, Wen; Wang, Jun; Kang, Le

    2007-01-01

    Background Insects constitute the vast majority of known species with their importance including biodiversity, agricultural, and human health concerns. It is likely that the successful adaptation of the Insecta clade depends on specific components in its proteome that give rise to specialized features. However, proteome determination is an intensive undertaking. Here we present results from a computational method that uses genome analysis to characterize insect and eukaryote proteomes as an approximation complementary to experimental approaches. Results Homologs in common to Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Bombyx mori, Tribolium castaneum, and Apis mellifera were compared to the complete genomes of three non-insect eukaryotes (opisthokonts) Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This operation yielded 154 groups of orthologous proteins in Drosophila to be insect-specific homologs; 466 groups were determined to be common to eukaryotes (represented by three opisthokonts). ESTs from the hemimetabolous insect Locust migratoria were also considered in order to approximate their corresponding genes in the insect-specific homologs. Stress and stimulus response proteins were found to constitute a higher fraction in the insect-specific homologs than in the homologs common to eukaryotes. Conclusion The significant representation of stress response and stimulus response proteins in proteins determined to be insect-specific, along with specific cuticle and pheromone/odorant binding proteins, suggest that communication and adaptation to environments may distinguish insect evolution relative to other eukaryotes. The tendency for low Ka/Ks ratios in the insect-specific protein set suggests purifying selection pressure. The generally larger number of paralogs in the insect-specific proteins may indicate adaptation to environment changes. Instances in our insect-specific protein set have been arrived at through experiments reported in the

  3. Genomic characterization of a large outbreak of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in Quebec City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; Plante, Pier-Luc; Mendis, Nilmini; Cantin, Philippe; Marchand, Geneviève; Charest, Hugues; Raymond, Frédéric; Huot, Caroline; Goupil-Sormany, Isabelle; Desbiens, François; Faucher, Sébastien P; Corbeil, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source. PMID:25105285

  4. Characterizing acetogenic metabolism using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarajan, H; Sahin, M; Nogales, J; Latif, H; Lovley, DR; Ebrahim, A; Zengler, K

    2013-11-25

    Background: The metabolic capabilities of acetogens to ferment a wide range of sugars, to grow autotrophically on H-2/CO2, and more importantly on synthesis gas (H-2/CO/CO2) make them very attractive candidates as production hosts for biofuels and biocommodities. Acetogenic metabolism is considered one of the earliest modes of bacterial metabolism. A thorough understanding of various factors governing the metabolism, in particular energy conservation mechanisms, is critical for metabolic engineering of acetogens for targeted production of desired chemicals. Results: Here, we present the genome-scale metabolic network of Clostridium ljungdahlii, the first such model for an acetogen. This genome-scale model (iHN637) consisting of 637 genes, 785 reactions, and 698 metabolites captures all the major central metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, in particular pathways involved in carbon fixation and energy conservation. A combination of metabolic modeling, with physiological and transcriptomic data provided insights into autotrophic metabolism as well as aided the characterization of a nitrate reduction pathway in C. ljungdahlii. Analysis of the iHN637 metabolic model revealed that flavin based electron bifurcation played a key role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth and helped identify genes for some of the critical steps in this mechanism. Conclusions: iHN637 represents a predictive model that recapitulates experimental data, and provides valuable insights into the metabolic response of C. ljungdahlii to genetic perturbations under various growth conditions. Thus, the model will be instrumental in guiding metabolic engineering of C. ljungdahlii for the industrial production of biocommodities and biofuels.

  5. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  6. Comparative Genomic Characterization of Francisella tularensis Strains Belonging to Low and High Virulence Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Eli B.; Nano, Francis E.; Keim, Paul; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Borowsky, Mark; Young, Sarah; Koehrsen, Michael; Engels, Reinhard; Pearson, Matthew; Howarth, Clint; Larson, Lisa; White, Jared; Alvarado, Lucia; Forsman, Mats; Bearden, Scott W.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Titball, Richard; Michell, Stephen L.; Birren, Bruce; Galagan, James

    2009-01-01

    Tularemia is a geographically widespread, severely debilitating, and occasionally lethal disease in humans. It is caused by infection by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. In order to better understand its potency as an etiological agent as well as its potential as a biological weapon, we have completed draft assemblies and report the first complete genomic characterization of five strains belonging to the following different Francisella subspecies (subsp.): the F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC033, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC257 and FSC022, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3548 and GA99-3549 strains. Here, we report the sequencing of these strains and comparative genomic analysis with recently available public Francisella sequences, including the rare F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain isolate from the Central Asian Region. We report evidence for the occurrence of large-scale rearrangement events in strains of the holarctica subspecies, supporting previous proposals that further phylogenetic subdivisions of the Type B clade are likely. We also find a significant enrichment of disrupted or absent ORFs proximal to predicted breakpoints in the FSC022 strain, including a genetic component of the Type I restriction-modification defense system. Many of the pseudogenes identified are also disrupted in the closely related rarely human pathogenic F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain, including modulator of drug activity B (mdaB) (FTT0961), which encodes a known NADPH quinone reductase involved in oxidative stress resistance. We have also identified genes exhibiting sequence similarity to effectors of the Type III (T3SS) and components of the Type IV secretion systems (T4SS). One of the genes, msrA2 (FTT1797c), is disrupted in F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica and has recently been shown to mediate bacterial pathogen survival in host organisms. Our findings suggest that in addition to the duplication of the Francisella

  7. Design and testing of multiplex RT-PCR primers for the rapid detection of influenza A virus genomic segments: Application to equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Shin, Yeun-Kyung; Song, Jae-Young

    2016-02-01

    The avian influenza A virus causes respiratory infections in animal species. It can undergo genomic recombination with newly obtained genetic material through an interspecies transmission. However, the process is an unpredictable event, making it difficult to predict the emergence of a new pandemic virus and distinguish its origin, especially when the virus is the result of multiple infections. Therefore, identifying a novel influenza is entirely dependent on sequencing its whole genome. Occasionally, however, it can be time-consuming, costly, and labor-intensive when sequencing many influenza viruses. To compensate for the difficulty, we developed a rapid, cost-effective, and simple multiplex RT-PCR to identify the viral genomic segments. As an example to evaluate its performance, H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV) was studied for the purpose. In developing this protocol to amplify the EIV eight-segments, a series of processes, including phylogenetic analysis based on different influenza hosts, in silico analyses to estimate primer specificity, coverage, and variation scores, and investigation of host-specific amino acids, were progressively conducted to reduce or eliminate the negative factors that might affect PCR amplification. Selectively, EIV specific primers were synthesized with dual priming oligonucleotides (DPO) system to increase primer specificity. As a result, 16 primer pairs were selected to screen the dominantly circulating H3N8 EIV 8 genome segments: PA (3), PB2 (1), PA (3), NP (3), NA8 (2), HA3 (1), NS (1), and M (2). The diagnostic performance of the primers was evaluated with eight sets composing of four segment combinations using viral samples from various influenza hosts. The PCR results suggest that the multiplex RT-PCR has a wide range of applications in detection and diagnosis of newly emerging EIVs. Further, the proposed procedures of designing multiplex primers are expected to be used for detecting other animal influenza A viruses. PMID

  8. The genome portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute: 2014 updates

    SciTech Connect

    Nordberg, Henrik; Cantor, Michael; Dusheyko, Serge; Hua, Susan; Poliakov, Alexander; Shabalov, Igor; Smirnova, Tatyana; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2013-11-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility, serves the diverse scientific community by providing integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis to enable system-based scientific approaches in support of DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization. The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. The JGI maintains extensive data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. In this paper, we describe major updates of the Genome Portal in the past 2 years with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI.

  9. Sequencing and characterizing the genome of Estrella lausannensis as an undergraduate project: training students and biological insights

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, Claire; Aeby, Sébastien; Chassot, Bérénice; Clulow, James; Hilfiker, Olivier; Rappo, Samuel; Ritzmann, Sébastien; Schumacher, Paolo; Terrettaz, Céline; Benaglio, Paola; Falquet, Laurent; Farinelli, Laurent; Gharib, Walid H.; Goesmann, Alexander; Harshman, Keith; Linke, Burkhard; Miyazaki, Ryo; Rivolta, Carlo; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies, sequencing projects have become pervasive in the molecular life sciences. The huge bulk of data generated daily must be analyzed further by biologists with skills in bioinformatics and by “embedded bioinformaticians,” i.e., bioinformaticians integrated in wet lab research groups. Thus, students interested in molecular life sciences must be trained in the main steps of genomics: sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis. To reach that goal, a practical course has been set up for master students at the University of Lausanne: the “Sequence a genome” class. At the beginning of the academic year, a few bacterial species whose genome is unknown are provided to the students, who sequence and assemble the genome(s) and perform manual annotation. Here, we report the progress of the first class from September 2010 to June 2011 and the results obtained by seven master students who specifically assembled and annotated the genome of Estrella lausannensis, an obligate intracellular bacterium related to Chlamydia. The draft genome of Estrella is composed of 29 scaffolds encompassing 2,819,825 bp that encode for 2233 putative proteins. Estrella also possesses a 9136 bp plasmid that encodes for 14 genes, among which we found an integrase and a toxin/antitoxin module. Like all other members of the Chlamydiales order, Estrella possesses a highly conserved type III secretion system, considered as a key virulence factor. The annotation of the Estrella genome also allowed the characterization of the metabolic abilities of this strictly intracellular bacterium. Altogether, the students provided the scientific community with the Estrella genome sequence and a preliminary understanding of the biology of this recently-discovered bacterial genus, while learning to use cutting-edge technologies for sequencing and to perform bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25745418

  10. Comparison of biotinylated DNA and RNA probes for rapid detection of varicella-zoster virus genome by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, B; Yu, G J; Hurst, J W

    1991-01-01

    We describe a general method for the production of nonisotopic DNA and RNA probes for the detection of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome by in situ hybridization. VZV DNA was extracted from purified viral nucleocapsids, cleaved with restriction enzyme (RE) BamHI, and cloned into plasmid pBR322 by the standard vector insert procedure. We cloned over 85% of the VZV genome and obtained 18 recombinants. Plasmids containing the B, F, G, H, and J fragments of VZV DNA were labeled by the nick translation method with biotin-11-dUTP as the dTTP analog. Additionally, the B fragment was cleaved with RE AvaI, subcloned into the plasmid pGEM-4 transcription vector, and subsequently linearized with REs PstI and EcoRI. RNA was transcribed with T7 or SP6 polymerase, with a substitution of allylamine-UTP as the UTP analog, and labeled with epsilon-caproylamidobiotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. The DNA and RNA probes were used under full-stringency conditions for in situ hybridization with alkaline phosphatase as the detector and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate-Nitro Blue Tetrazolium as the substrate. When tested under comparable conditions, the RNA probe was slightly more sensitive than was the DNA probe: both probes showed homology only with VZV-infected cells and clinical tissues and not with the other herpesviruses. Probes prepared from variable regions of the genome (fragments F and J) performed as well as did those from conserved regions (fragments B. G. and H). Biotinylated probes have distinct advantages over isotopic probes and retain their full potency for more than 2 years when stored properly. Images PMID:1645371

  11. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  12. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  13. Characterization of Genomic Variants Associated with Scout and Recruit Behavioral Castes in Honey Bees Using Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Southey, Bruce R; Zhu, Ping; Carr-Markell, Morgan K; Liang, Zhengzheng S; Zayed, Amro; Li, Ruiqiang; Robinson, Gene E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Among forager honey bees, scouts seek new resources and return to the colony, enlisting recruits to collect these resources. Differentially expressed genes between these behaviors and genetic variability in scouting phenotypes have been reported. Whole-genome sequencing of 44 Apis mellifera scouts and recruits was undertaken to detect variants and further understand the genetic architecture underlying the behavioral differences between scouts and recruits. The median coverage depth in recruits and scouts was 10.01 and 10.7 X, respectively. Representation of bacterial species among the unmapped reads reflected a more diverse microbiome in scouts than recruits. Overall, 1,412,705 polymorphic positions were analyzed for associations with scouting behavior, and 212 significant (p-value < 0.0001) associations with scouting corresponding to 137 positions were detected. Most frequent putative transcription factor binding sites proximal to significant variants included Broad-complex 4, Broad-complex 1, Hunchback, and CF2-II. Three variants associated with scouting were located within coding regions of ncRNAs including one codon change (LOC102653644) and 2 frameshift indels (LOC102654879 and LOC102655256). Significant variants were also identified on the 5'UTR of membrin, and 3'UTRs of laccase 2 and diacylglycerol kinase theta. The 60 significant variants located within introns corresponded to 39 genes and most of these positions were > 1000 bp apart from each other. A number of these variants were mapped to ncRNA LOC100578102, solute carrier family 12 member 6-like gene, and LOC100576965 (meprin and TRAF-C homology domain containing gene). Functional categories represented among the genes corresponding to significant variants included: neuronal function, exoskeleton, immune response, salivary gland development, and enzymatic food processing. These categories offer a glimpse into the molecular support to the behaviors of scouts and recruits. The level of association between

  14. Rapid and precise engineering of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome with lethal mutation co-conversion and inactivation of NHEJ repair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D

    2015-02-01

    As in other organisms, CRISPR/Cas9 methods provide a powerful approach for genome editing in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Oligonucleotides are excellent repair templates for introducing substitutions and short insertions, as they are cost effective, require no cloning, and appear in other organisms to target changes by homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, I describe a methodology in C. elegans to efficiently knock in epitope tags in 8-9 days, using a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation in the pha-1 gene as a co-conversion marker. I demonstrate that 60mer oligos with 29 bp of homology drive efficient knock-in of point mutations, and that disabling nonhomologous end joining by RNAi inactivation of the cku-80 gene significantly improves knock-in efficiency. Homology arms of 35-80 bp are sufficient for efficient editing and DSBs up to 54 bp away from the insertion site produced knock-ins. These findings will likely be applicable for a range of genome editing approaches in C. elegans, which will improve editing efficiency and minimize screening efforts. PMID:25491644

  15. Rapid and Precise Engineering of the Caenorhabditis elegans Genome with Lethal Mutation Co-Conversion and Inactivation of NHEJ Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As in other organisms, CRISPR/Cas9 methods provide a powerful approach for genome editing in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Oligonucleotides are excellent repair templates for introducing substitutions and short insertions, as they are cost effective, require no cloning, and appear in other organisms to target changes by homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, I describe a methodology in C. elegans to efficiently knock in epitope tags in 8–9 days, using a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation in the pha-1 gene as a co-conversion marker. I demonstrate that 60mer oligos with 29 bp of homology drive efficient knock-in of point mutations, and that disabling nonhomologous end joining by RNAi inactivation of the cku-80 gene significantly improves knock-in efficiency. Homology arms of 35–80 bp are sufficient for efficient editing and DSBs up to 54 bp away from the insertion site produced knock-ins. These findings will likely be applicable for a range of genome editing approaches in C. elegans, which will improve editing efficiency and minimize screening efforts. PMID:25491644

  16. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials.

    PubMed

    Zook, Justin M; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B R; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M; Chang, Christopher C; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T; Zaranek, Alexander W; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X Y; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S; Mudivarti, Patrice A; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly. PMID:27271295

  17. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials

    PubMed Central

    Zook, Justin M.; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E.; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B.R.; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M.; Chang, Christopher C.; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T.; Zaranek, Alexander W.; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M.; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X.Y.; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S.; Mudivarti, Patrice A.; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly. PMID:27271295

  18. Whole-genome amplification: a useful approach to characterize new genes in unculturable protozoan parasites such as Bonamia exitiosa.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alvarez, Maria; Couraleau, Yann; Chollet, Bruno; Tourbiez, Delphine; Arzul, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Bonamia exitiosa is an intracellular parasite (Haplosporidia) that has been associated with mass mortalities in oyster populations in the Southern hemisphere. This parasite was recently detected in the Northern hemisphere including Europe. Some representatives of the Bonamia genus have not been well categorized yet due to the lack of genomic information. In the present work, we have applied Whole-Genome Amplification (WGA) technique in order to characterize the actin gene in the unculturable protozoan B. exitiosa. This is the first protein coding gene described in this species. Molecular analysis revealed that B. exitiosa actin is more similar to Bonamia ostreae actin gene-1. Actin phylogeny placed the Bonamia sp. infected oysters in the same clade where the herein described B. exitiosa actin resolved, offering novel information about the classification of the genus. Our results showed that WGA methodology is a promising and valuable technique to be applied to unculturable protozoans whose genomic material is limited. PMID:26282916

  19. The partial mitochondrial genome of the Cephalothrix rufifrons (Nemertea, Palaeonemertea): characterization and implications for the phylogenetic position of Nemertea.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Smith, D M

    2007-06-01

    A continuous 10.1kb fragment of the Cephalothrix rufifrons (Nemertea, Palaeonemertea) mitochondrial genome was sequenced and characterized to further assess organization of protostome mitochondrial genomes and evaluate the phylogenetic potential of gene arrangement and amino acid characters. The genome is A-T rich (72%), and this biased base composition is partly reflected in codon usage. Inferred tRNA secondary structures are typical of those reported for other metazoan mitochondrial DNAs. The arrangement of the 26 genes contained in the fragment exhibits marked similarity to those of many protostome taxa, most notably molluscs with highly conserved arrangements and a phoronid. Separate and simultaneous phylogenetic analyses of inferred amino acid sequences and gene adjacencies place the nemertean within the protostomes among coelomate lophotrochozoan taxa, but do not find a well-supported sister taxon link. PMID:17210260

  20. The complete mtDNA genome of Triplophysa dorsalis (Cypriniformes, Balitoridae, Cobitoidea): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dujuan; Conteh Kanu, Unisa; Zhao, Guang; Xie, Peng; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yu; Niu, Jiangong; Ma, Xufa

    2016-09-01

    Based upon the morphological characters, the genus Triplophysa (plateau Loach) is a highly diverse group in the family Balitoridae (or Cypriniformes, Cobitoidea) with 133 valid species. Therefore, the taxonomic relationship of this species at the genetic level remains ambiguous. In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Triplophysa dorsalis. In order to understand its position and genetic background at the gene level, the characteristics of mitochondrial DNA sequences and phylogenetic relationship were examined. The mitochondrial genome of T. dorsalis is similar to those of the typical vertebrates, 16 572 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a non-coding control region (D-loop). All genes were encoded on the heavy strand except for ND6 and 8 tRNA genes. The overall base composition of the heavy strand was 28.16%, 28.41%, 25.62% and 17.82% for A, T, C and G, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the seven Triplophysa species clustered together with T. dorsalis to form a sister group with Triplophysa strauchii, T. bleekeri, T. stoliczkai and T. bombifrons. The two genera Triplophysa and Barbatula formed a sister-group relationship, the species Homatula potanini located in the intermediate position, and the genus Leptobotia elongata was in the basal position in the subfamily Nemacheilidae. Further investigations with more Triplophysa species need to be performed for better understanding of the evolutionary history of this fascinating genus. PMID:26457606

  1. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  2. Biological Characterization and Next-Generation Genome Sequencing of the Unclassified Cotia Virus SPAn232 (Poxviridae)

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Priscila P.; Silva, Patrícia M.; Schnellrath, Laila C.; Jesus, Desyreé M.; Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Renne, Rolf; Attias, Marcia; Condit, Richard C.; Moussatché, Nissin

    2012-01-01

    Cotia virus (COTV) SPAn232 was isolated in 1961 from sentinel mice at Cotia field station, São Paulo, Brazil. Attempts to classify COTV within a recognized genus of the Poxviridae have generated contradictory findings. Studies by different researchers suggested some similarity to myxoma virus and swinepox virus, whereas another investigation characterized COTV SPAn232 as a vaccinia virus strain. Because of the lack of consensus, we have conducted an independent biological and molecular characterization of COTV. Virus growth curves reached maximum yields at approximately 24 to 48 h and were accompanied by virus DNA replication and a characteristic early/late pattern of viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, COTV did not induce detectable cytopathic effects in BSC-40 cells until 4 days postinfection and generated viral plaques only after 8 days. We determined the complete genomic sequence of COTV by using a combination of the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies 454 and Illumina. A unique contiguous sequence of 185,139 bp containing 185 genes, including the 90 genes conserved in all chordopoxviruses, was obtained. COTV has an interesting panel of open reading frames (ORFs) related to the evasion of host defense, including two novel genes encoding C-C chemokine-like proteins, each present in duplicate copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the highest amino acid identity scores with Cervidpoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Yatapoxvirus. However, COTV grouped as an independent branch within this clade, which clearly excluded its classification as an Orthopoxvirus. Therefore, our data suggest that COTV could represent a new poxvirus genus. PMID:22345477

  3. Genomic characterization of three unique Dehalococcoides that respire on persistent polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanquan; Chng, Kern Rei; Wilm, Andreas; Zhao, Siyan; Yang, Kun-Lin; Nagarajan, Niranjan; He, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobic bacteria play critical roles in environmental bioremediation of halogenated compounds. However, their characterization and application have been largely impeded by difficulties in growing them in pure culture. Thus far, no pure culture has been reported to respire on the notorious polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and functional genes responsible for PCB detoxification remain unknown due to the extremely slow growth of PCB-respiring bacteria. Here we report the successful isolation and characterization of three Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains that respire on commercial PCBs. Using high-throughput metagenomic analysis, combined with traditional culture techniques, tetrachloroethene (PCE) was identified as a feasible alternative to PCBs to isolate PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides from PCB-enriched cultures. With PCE as an alternative electron acceptor, the PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides were boosted to a higher cell density (1.2 × 108 to 1.3 × 108 cells per mL on PCE vs. 5.9 × 106 to 10.4 × 106 cells per mL on PCBs) with a shorter culturing time (30 d on PCE vs. 150 d on PCBs). The transcriptomic profiles illustrated that the distinct PCB dechlorination profile of each strain was predominantly mediated by a single, novel reductive dehalogenase (RDase) catalyzing chlorine removal from both PCBs and PCE. The transcription levels of PCB-RDase genes are 5–60 times higher than the genome-wide average. The cultivation of PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides in pure culture and the identification of PCB-RDase genes deepen our understanding of organohalide respiration of PCBs and shed light on in situ PCB bioremediation. PMID:25028492

  4. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome. PMID:26024316

  5. Genome-Wide Characterization of RNA Editing in Chicken Embryos Reveals Common Features among Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Roux, Pierre-François; Klopp, Christophe; Fabre, Stéphane; Esquerré, Diane; Dehais, Patrice; Djari, Anis; Gourichon, David; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing results in a post-transcriptional nucleotide change in the RNA sequence that creates an alternative nucleotide not present in the DNA sequence. This leads to a diversification of transcription products with potential functional consequences. Two nucleotide substitutions are mainly described in animals, from adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) and from cytidine to uridine (C-to-U). This phenomenon is described in more details in mammals, notably since the availability of next generation sequencing technologies allowing whole genome screening of RNA-DNA differences. The number of studies recording RNA editing in other vertebrates like chicken is still limited. We chose to use high throughput sequencing technologies to search for RNA editing in chicken, and to extend the knowledge of its conservation among vertebrates. We performed sequencing of RNA and DNA from 8 embryos. Being aware of common pitfalls inherent to sequence analyses that lead to false positive discovery, we stringently filtered our datasets and found fewer than 40 reliable candidates. Conservation of particular sites of RNA editing was attested by the presence of 3 edited sites previously detected in mammals. We then characterized editing levels for selected candidates in several tissues and at different time points, from 4.5 days of embryonic development to adults, and observed a clear tissue-specificity and a gradual increase of editing level with time. By characterizing the RNA editing landscape in chicken, our results highlight the extent of evolutionary conservation of this phenomenon within vertebrates, attest to its tissue and stage specificity and provide support of the absence of non A-to-I events from the chicken transcriptome. PMID:26024316

  6. Genomic characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Insights from next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Koyama, Ryota; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-02-21

    Two major types of cancer occur in the esophagus: squamous cell carcinoma, which is associated with chronic smoking and alcohol consumption, and adenocarcinoma, which typically arises in gastric reflux-associated Barrett's esophagus. Although there is increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western counties, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most esophageal malignancies in East Asia, including China and Japan. Technological advances allowing for massively parallel, high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) of DNA have enabled comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large numbers of tumor samples. Recently, several studies were published in which whole exome or whole genome sequencing was performed in ESCC tumors and compared with matched normal DNA. Mutations were validated in several genes, including in TP53, CDKN2A, FAT1, NOTCH1, PIK3CA, KMT2D and NFE2L2, which had been previously implicated in ESCC. Several new recurrent alterations have also been identified in ESCC. Combining the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with information obtained from NGS studies may lead to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for ESCC. As this research becomes more prominent, it is important that gastroenterologist become familiar with the various NGS technologies and the results generated using these methods. In the present study, we describe recent research approaches using NGS in ESCC. PMID:26900290

  7. Genome-scale quantitative characterization of bacterial protein localization dynamics throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells display both spatial and temporal organization, and this complex structure is known to play a central role in cellular function. Although nearly one-fifth of all proteins in Escherichia coli localize to specific subcellular locations, fundamental questions remain about how cellular-scale structure is encoded at the level of molecular-scale interactions. One significant limitation to our understanding is that the localization behavior of only a small subset of proteins has been characterized in detail. As an essential step toward a global model of protein localization in bacteria, we capture and quantitatively analyze spatial and temporal protein localization patterns throughout the cell cycle for nearly every protein in E. coli that exhibits nondiffuse localization. This genome-scale analysis reveals significant complexity in patterning, notably in the behavior of DNA-binding proteins. Complete cell-cycle imaging also facilitates analysis of protein partitioning to daughter cells at division, revealing a broad and robust assortment of asymmetric partitioning behaviors. PMID:25353361

  8. Characterization of a second open reading frame in genome segment 10 of bluetongue virus

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Meredith; Hardy, Alexandra; Barry, Gerald; Pinto, Rute Maria; Caporale, Marco; Melzi, Eleonora; Hughes, Joseph; Taggart, Aislynn; Janowicz, Anna; Varela, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses have often evolved overlapping reading frames in order to maximize their coding capacity. Until recently, the segmented dsRNA genome of viruses of the Orbivirus genus was thought to be monocistronic, but the identification of the bluetongue virus (BTV) NS4 protein changed this assumption. A small ORF in segment 10, overlapping the NS3 ORF in the +1 position, is maintained in more than 300 strains of the 27 different BTV serotypes and in more than 200 strains of the phylogenetically related African horse sickness virus (AHSV). In BTV, this ORF (named S10-ORF2 in this study) encodes a putative protein 50–59 residues in length and appears to be under strong positive selection. HA- or GFP-tagged versions of S10-ORF2 expressed from transfected plasmids localized within the nucleoli of transfected cells, unless a putative nucleolar localization signal was mutated. S10-ORF2 inhibited gene expression, but not RNA translation, in transient transfection reporter assays. In both mammalian and insect cells, BTV S10-ORF2 deletion mutants (BTV8ΔS10-ORF2) displayed similar replication kinetics to wt virus. In vivo, S10-ORF2 deletion mutants were pathogenic in mouse models of disease. Although further evidence is required for S10-ORF2 expression during infection, the data presented provide an initial characterization of this ORF. PMID:26290332

  9. Characterization of the legumains encoded by the genome of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Santana, Juliano Oliveira; Freire, Laís; de Sousa, Aurizangela Oliveira; Fontes Soares, Virgínia Lúcia; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2016-01-01

    Legumains are cysteine proteases related to plant development, protein degradation, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens. In this study, we have identified and characterized three legumains encoded by Theobroma cacao genome through in silico analyses, three-dimensional modeling, genetic expression pattern in different tissues and as a response to the inoculation of Moniliophthora perniciosa fungus. The three proteins were named TcLEG3, TcLEG6, and TcLEG9. Histidine and cysteine residue which are part of the catalytic site were conserved among the proteins, and they remained parallel in the loop region in the 3D modeling. Three-dimensional modeling showed that the propeptide, which is located in the terminal C region of legumains blocks the catalytic cleft. Comparing dendrogram data with the relative expression analysis, indicated that TcLEG3 is related to the seed legumain group, TcLEG6 is related with the group of embryogenesis activities, and protein TcLEG9, with processes regarding the vegetative group. Furthermore, the expression analyses proposes a significant role for the three legumains during the development of Theobroma cacao and in its interaction with M. perniciosa. PMID:26691061

  10. Physiological and genomic characterization of two novel marine thaumarchaeal strains indicates niche differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Barbara; Vojvoda, Jana; Offre, Pierre; Alves, Ricardo J. E.; Elisabeth, Nathalie H.; Garcia, Juan A. L.; Volland, Jean-Marie; Srivastava, Abhishek; Schleper, Christa; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are ubiquitous throughout the oceanic water column, however, our knowledge on their physiological and ecological diversity in different oceanic regions is rather limited. Here, we report the cultivation and characterization of two novel Nitrosopumilus strains, originating from coastal surface waters of the Northern Adriatic Sea. The combined physiological and genomic information revealed that each strain exhibits different metabolic and functional traits, potentially reflecting contrasting life modes. Strain NF5 contains many chemotaxis-related genes and is able to express archaella, suggesting that it can sense and actively seek favorable microenvironments such as nutrient-rich particles. In contrast, strain D3C is non-motile and shows higher versatility in substrate utilization, being able to use urea as an alternative substrate in addition to ammonia. Furthermore, it encodes a divergent, second copy of the AmoB subunit of the key enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, which might have an additional catalytic function and suggests further metabolic versatility. However, the role of this gene requires further investigation. Our results provide evidence for functional diversity and metabolic versatility among phylogenetically closely related thaumarchaeal strains, and point towards adaptations to free-living versus particle-associated life styles and possible niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in marine ecosystems. PMID:26528837

  11. Mitochondrial genome variations and functional characterization in Han Chinese families with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bi, Rui; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiao; Chen, Shi-Yi; Yu, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants and schizophrenia has been strongly debated. To test whether mtDNA variants are involved in schizophrenia in Han Chinese patients, we sequenced the entire mitochondrial genomes of probands from 11 families with a family history and maternal inheritance pattern of schizophrenia. Besides the haplogroup-specific variants, we found 11 nonsynonymous private variants, one rRNA variant, and one tRNA variant in 5 of 11 probands. Among the nonsynonymous private variants, mutations m.15395 A>G and m.8536 A>G were predicted to be deleterious after web-based searches and in silico program affiliated analysis. Functional characterization further supported the potential pathogenicity of the two variants m.15395 A>G and m.8536 A>G to cause mitochondrial dysfunction at the cellular level. Our results showed that mtDNA variants were actively involved in schizophrenia in some families with maternal inheritance of this disease. PMID:26822593

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Carboxypeptidase Genes in Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junhong; Li, Yi; Liu, Hua-Wei; Li, Jifu; Dong, Zhaoming; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically-important insect that can secrete silk. Carboxypeptidases have been found in various metazoan species and play important roles in physiological and biochemical reactions. Here, we analyzed the silkworm genome database and characterized 48 carboxypeptidases, including 34 metal carboxypeptidases (BmMCP1–BmMCP34) and 14 serine carboxypeptidases (BmSCP1–BmSCP14), to better understand their diverse functions. Compared to other insects, our results indicated that carboxypeptidases from silkworm have more family members. These silkworm carboxypeptidases could be divided into four families: Peptidase_M2 carboxypeptidases, Peptidase_M14 carboxypeptidases, Peptidase_S10 carboxypeptidases and Peptidase_S28 carboxypeptidases. Microarray analysis showed that the carboxypeptidases had distinct expression patterns, whereas quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the expression level of 13 carboxypeptidases significantly decreased after starvation and restored after re-feeding. Overall, our study provides new insights into the functional and evolutionary features of silkworm carboxypeptidases. PMID:27483237

  13. Characterizing Variation of Branch Angle and Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Wenxiang; Mei, Desheng; Wang, Hui; Fu, Li; Liu, Daoming; Li, Yunchang; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the rapeseed branch angle alter plant architecture, allowing more efficient light capture as planting density increases. In this study, a natural population of rapeseed was grown in three environments and evaluated for branch angle trait to characterize their phenotypic patterns and genotype with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array. Significant phenotypic variation was observed from 20 to 70°. As a result, 25 significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with branch angle were identified on chromosomes A2, A3, A7, C3, C5, and C7 by the MLM model in TASSEL 4.0. Orthologs of the functional candidate genes involved in branch angle were identified. Among the key QTL, the peak SNPs were close to the key orthologous genes BnaA.Lazy1 and BnaC.Lazy1 on A3 and C3 homologous genome blocks. With the exception of Lazy (LA) orthologous genes, SQUMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE 14 (SPL14) and an auxin-responsive GRETCHEN HAGEN 3 (GH3) genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were identified close to two clusters of SNPs on the A7 and C7 chromosomes. These findings on multiple novel loci and candidate genes of branch angle will be useful for further understanding and genetic improvement of plant architecture in rapeseed. PMID:26870051

  14. Genomic characterization of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Insights from next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Koyama, Ryota; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Two major types of cancer occur in the esophagus: squamous cell carcinoma, which is associated with chronic smoking and alcohol consumption, and adenocarcinoma, which typically arises in gastric reflux-associated Barrett’s esophagus. Although there is increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in Western counties, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most esophageal malignancies in East Asia, including China and Japan. Technological advances allowing for massively parallel, high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) of DNA have enabled comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large numbers of tumor samples. Recently, several studies were published in which whole exome or whole genome sequencing was performed in ESCC tumors and compared with matched normal DNA. Mutations were validated in several genes, including in TP53, CDKN2A, FAT1, NOTCH1, PIK3CA, KMT2D and NFE2L2, which had been previously implicated in ESCC. Several new recurrent alterations have also been identified in ESCC. Combining the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with information obtained from NGS studies may lead to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for ESCC. As this research becomes more prominent, it is important that gastroenterologist become familiar with the various NGS technologies and the results generated using these methods. In the present study, we describe recent research approaches using NGS in ESCC. PMID:26900290

  15. Characterizing Variation of Branch Angle and Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Wenxiang; Mei, Desheng; Wang, Hui; Fu, Li; Liu, Daoming; Li, Yunchang; Hu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the rapeseed branch angle alter plant architecture, allowing more efficient light capture as planting density increases. In this study, a natural population of rapeseed was grown in three environments and evaluated for branch angle trait to characterize their phenotypic patterns and genotype with a 60K Brassica Infinium SNP array. Significant phenotypic variation was observed from 20 to 70°. As a result, 25 significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with branch angle were identified on chromosomes A2, A3, A7, C3, C5, and C7 by the MLM model in TASSEL 4.0. Orthologs of the functional candidate genes involved in branch angle were identified. Among the key QTL, the peak SNPs were close to the key orthologous genes BnaA.Lazy1 and BnaC.Lazy1 on A3 and C3 homologous genome blocks. With the exception of Lazy (LA) orthologous genes, SQUMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE 14 (SPL14) and an auxin-responsive GRETCHEN HAGEN 3 (GH3) genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were identified close to two clusters of SNPs on the A7 and C7 chromosomes. These findings on multiple novel loci and candidate genes of branch angle will be useful for further understanding and genetic improvement of plant architecture in rapeseed. PMID:26870051

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Carboxypeptidase Genes in Silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Ye, Junhong; Li, Yi; Liu, Hua-Wei; Li, Jifu; Dong, Zhaoming; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically-important insect that can secrete silk. Carboxypeptidases have been found in various metazoan species and play important roles in physiological and biochemical reactions. Here, we analyzed the silkworm genome database and characterized 48 carboxypeptidases, including 34 metal carboxypeptidases (BmMCP1-BmMCP34) and 14 serine carboxypeptidases (BmSCP1-BmSCP14), to better understand their diverse functions. Compared to other insects, our results indicated that carboxypeptidases from silkworm have more family members. These silkworm carboxypeptidases could be divided into four families: Peptidase_M2 carboxypeptidases, Peptidase_M14 carboxypeptidases, Peptidase_S10 carboxypeptidases and Peptidase_S28 carboxypeptidases. Microarray analysis showed that the carboxypeptidases had distinct expression patterns, whereas quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the expression level of 13 carboxypeptidases significantly decreased after starvation and restored after re-feeding. Overall, our study provides new insights into the functional and evolutionary features of silkworm carboxypeptidases. PMID:27483237

  17. Physiological and genomic characterization of two novel marine thaumarchaeal strains indicates niche differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Barbara; Vojvoda, Jana; Offre, Pierre; Alves, Ricardo J E; Elisabeth, Nathalie H; Garcia, Juan Al; Volland, Jean-Marie; Srivastava, Abhishek; Schleper, Christa; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are ubiquitous throughout the oceanic water column; however, our knowledge on their physiological and ecological diversity in different oceanic regions is rather limited. Here, we report the cultivation and characterization of two novel Nitrosopumilus strains, originating from coastal surface waters of the Northern Adriatic Sea. The combined physiological and genomic information revealed that each strain exhibits different metabolic and functional traits, potentially reflecting contrasting life modes. Strain NF5 contains many chemotaxis-related genes and is able to express archaella, suggesting that it can sense and actively seek favorable microenvironments such as nutrient-rich particles. In contrast, strain D3C is non-motile and shows higher versatility in substrate utilization, being able to use urea as an alternative substrate in addition to ammonia. Furthermore, it encodes a divergent, second copy of the AmoB subunit of the key enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, which might have an additional catalytic function and suggests further metabolic versatility. However, the role of this gene requires further investigation. Our results provide evidence for functional diversity and metabolic versatility among phylogenetically closely related thaumarchaeal strains, and point toward adaptations to free-living versus particle-associated life styles and possible niche differentiation among AOA in marine ecosystems. PMID:26528837

  18. Genome-wide Scanning and Characterization of Sorghum bicolor L. Heat Shock Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, M; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kumar, S Anil; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Kishor, P B Kavi; Rao, D Manohar

    2015-08-01

    A genome-wide scanning of Sorghum bicolor resulted in the identification of 25 SbHsf genes. Phylogenetic analysis shows the ortholog genes that are clustered with only rice, representing a common ancestor. Promoter analysis revealed the identification of different cis-acting elements that are responsible for abiotic as well as biotic stresses. Hsf domains like DBD, NLS, NES, and AHA have been analyzed for their sequence similarity and functional characterization. Tissue specific expression patterns of Hsfs in different tissues like mature embryo, seedling, root, and panicle were studied using real-time PCR. While Hsfs4 and 22 are highly expressed in panicle, 4 and 9 are expressed in seedlings. Sorghum plants were exposed to different abiotic stress treatments but no expression of any Hsf was observed when seedlings were treated with ABA. High level expression of Hsf1 was noticed during high temperature as well as cold stresses, 4 and 6 during salt and 5, 6, 10, 13, 19, 23 and 25 during drought stress. This comprehensive analysis of SbHsf genes will provide an insight on how these genes are regulated in different tissues and also under different abiotic stresses and help to determine the functions of Hsfs during drought and temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27006630

  19. Genome-wide Scanning and Characterization of Sorghum bicolor L. Heat Shock Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, M.; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kumar, S. Anil; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Kishor, P. B. Kavi; Rao, D. Manohar

    2015-01-01

    A genome-wide scanning of Sorghum bicolor resulted in the identification of 25 SbHsf genes. Phylogenetic analysis shows the ortholog genes that are clustered with only rice, representing a common ancestor. Promoter analysis revealed the identification of different cis-acting elements that are responsible for abiotic as well as biotic stresses. Hsf domains like DBD, NLS, NES, and AHA have been analyzed for their sequence similarity and functional characterization. Tissue specific expression patterns of Hsfs in different tissues like mature embryo, seedling, root, and panicle were studied using real-time PCR. While Hsfs4 and 22 are highly expressed in panicle, 4 and 9 are expressed in seedlings. Sorghum plants were exposed to different abiotic stress treatments but no expression of any Hsf was observed when seedlings were treated with ABA. High level expression of Hsf1 was noticed during high temperature as well as cold stresses, 4 and 6 during salt and 5, 6, 10, 13, 19, 23 and 25 during drought stress. This comprehensive analysis of SbHsf genes will provide an insight on how these genes are regulated in different tissues and also under different abiotic stresses and help to determine the functions of Hsfs during drought and temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27006630

  20. Genomic organization and characterization of the white locus of the Mediterranean fruitfly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Gomulski, L M; Pitts, R J; Costa, S; Saccone, G; Torti, C; Polito, L C; Gasperi, G; Malacrida, A R; Kafatos, F C; Zwiebel, L J

    2001-03-01

    An approximately 14-kb region of genomic DNA encoding the wild-type white eye (w+) color gene from the medfly, Ceratitis capitata has been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. Comparison of the intron-exon organization of this locus among several dipteran insects reveals distinct organizational patterns that are consistent with the phylogenetic relationships of these flies and the dendrogram of the predicted primary amino acid sequence of the white loci. An examination of w+ expression during medfly development has been carried out, displaying overall similarity to corresponding studies for white gene homologues in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects. Interestingly, we have detected two phenotypically neutral allelic forms of the locus that have arisen as the result of an apparently novel insertion or deletion event located in the large first intron of the medfly white locus. Cloning and sequencing of two mutant white alleles, w1 and w2, from the we,wp and M245 strains, respectively, indicate that the mutant conditions in these strains are the result of independent events--a frameshift mutation in exon 6 for w1 and a deletion including a large part of exon 2 in the case of w2. PMID:11238408

  1. Characterization of a second open reading frame in genome segment 10 of bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Meredith; Hardy, Alexandra; Barry, Gerald; Pinto, Rute Maria; Caporale, Marco; Melzi, Eleonora; Hughes, Joseph; Taggart, Aislynn; Janowicz, Anna; Varela, Mariana; Ratinier, Maxime; Palmarini, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Viruses have often evolved overlapping reading frames in order to maximize their coding capacity. Until recently, the segmented dsRNA genome of viruses of the Orbivirus genus was thought to be monocistronic, but the identification of the bluetongue virus (BTV) NS4 protein changed this assumption. A small ORF in segment 10, overlapping the NS3 ORF in the +1 position, is maintained in more than 300 strains of the 27 different BTV serotypes and in more than 200 strains of the phylogenetically related African horse sickness virus (AHSV). In BTV, this ORF (named S10-ORF2 in this study) encodes a putative protein 50-59 residues in length and appears to be under strong positive selection. HA- or GFP-tagged versions of S10-ORF2 expressed from transfected plasmids localized within the nucleoli of transfected cells, unless a putative nucleolar localization signal was mutated. S10-ORF2 inhibited gene expression, but not RNA translation, in transient transfection reporter assays. In both mammalian and insect cells, BTV S10-ORF2 deletion mutants (BTV8ΔS10-ORF2) displayed similar replication kinetics to wt virus. In vivo, S10-ORF2 deletion mutants were pathogenic in mouse models of disease. Although further evidence is required for S10-ORF2 expression during infection, the data presented provide an initial characterization of this ORF. PMID:26290332

  2. Genome-wide identification and characterization of functional neuronal activity-dependent enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Athar N.; Vierbuchen, Thomas; Hemberg, Martin; Rubin, Alex A.; Ling, Emi; Couch, Cameron H.; Stroud, Hume; Spiegel, Ivo; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Harmin, David A.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Experience-dependent gene transcription is required for nervous system development and function. However, the DNA regulatory elements that control this program of gene expression are not well defined. Here we characterize the enhancers that function across the genome to mediate activity-dependent transcription in mouse cortical neurons. We find that the subset of enhancers enriched for monomethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) and binding of the transcriptional co-activator CREBBP (CBP) that shows increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) upon membrane depolarization of cortical neurons functions to regulate activity-dependent transcription. A subset of these enhancers appears to require binding of FOS, which previously was thought to bind primarily to promoters. These findings suggest that FOS functions at enhancers to control activity-dependent gene programs that are critical for nervous system function and provide a resource of functional cis-regulatory elements that may give insight into the genetic variants that contribute to brain development and disease. PMID:25195102

  3. Detection and characterization of endogenous retroviruses in the horse genome by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Jugo, Begoña M

    2012-12-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have become incorporated into the host genome. Little is known about ERVs in the horse genome. By combining 3 bioinformatic approaches, we detected 1947 putative ERVs in the horse genome. These equine ERVs are not scattered randomly across the genome and are especially abundant in the X chromosome. Based on phylogenetic relationships, some of these equine ERVs were classified into 15 previously uncharacterized families of Classes I, II and III. Compared with the cow and other species, the horse genome appears to container fewer ERVs. Although this could be due to limitations of the detection process, it could also stem from characteristics of the horse genome or the effect of the domestication process. PMID:23026066

  4. Rapid growth and short life spans characterize pipefish populations in vulnerable seagrass beds.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, K L; Booth, D J

    2016-05-01

    The life-history traits of two species of pipefish (Syngnathidae) from seagrass meadows in New South Wales, Australia, were examined to understand whether they enhance resilience to habitat degradation. The spotted pipefish Stigmatopora argus and wide-bodied pipefish Stigmatopora nigra exhibit some of the shortest life spans known for vertebrates (longevity up to 150 days) and rapid maturity (male S. argus 35 days after hatching (DAH) and male S. nigra at 16-19 DAH), key characteristics of opportunistic species. Growth rates of both species were extremely rapid (up to 2 mm day(-1) ), with seasonal and sex differences in growth rate. It is argued that short life spans and high growth rates may be advantageous for these species, which inhabit one of the most threatened marine ecosystems on earth. PMID:27005315

  5. Characterization of Genomic Variants Associated with Scout and Recruit Behavioral Castes in Honey Bees Using Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Southey, Bruce R.; Zhu, Ping; Carr-Markell, Morgan K.; Liang, Zhengzheng S.; Zayed, Amro; Li, Ruiqiang; Robinson, Gene E.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Among forager honey bees, scouts seek new resources and return to the colony, enlisting recruits to collect these resources. Differentially expressed genes between these behaviors and genetic variability in scouting phenotypes have been reported. Whole-genome sequencing of 44 Apis mellifera scouts and recruits was undertaken to detect variants and further understand the genetic architecture underlying the behavioral differences between scouts and recruits. The median coverage depth in recruits and scouts was 10.01 and 10.7 X, respectively. Representation of bacterial species among the unmapped reads reflected a more diverse microbiome in scouts than recruits. Overall, 1,412,705 polymorphic positions were analyzed for associations with scouting behavior, and 212 significant (p-value < 0.0001) associations with scouting corresponding to 137 positions were detected. Most frequent putative transcription factor binding sites proximal to significant variants included Broad-complex 4, Broad-complex 1, Hunchback, and CF2-II. Three variants associated with scouting were located within coding regions of ncRNAs including one codon change (LOC102653644) and 2 frameshift indels (LOC102654879 and LOC102655256). Significant variants were also identified on the 5’UTR of membrin, and 3’UTRs of laccase 2 and diacylglycerol kinase theta. The 60 significant variants located within introns corresponded to 39 genes and most of these positions were > 1000 bp apart from each other. A number of these variants were mapped to ncRNA LOC100578102, solute carrier family 12 member 6-like gene, and LOC100576965 (meprin and TRAF-C homology domain containing gene). Functional categories represented among the genes corresponding to significant variants included: neuronal function, exoskeleton, immune response, salivary gland development, and enzymatic food processing. These categories offer a glimpse into the molecular support to the behaviors of scouts and recruits. The level of association

  6. Rapid High Resolution Genotyping of Francisella tularensis by Whole Genome Sequence Comparison of Annotated Genes (“MLST+”)

    PubMed Central

    Mellmann, Alexander; Höppner, Sebastian; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Harmsen, Dag

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism’s highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks. PMID:25856198

  7. AFSM sequencing approach: a simple and rapid method for genome-wide SNP and methylation site discovery and genetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Zou, Meiling; Zhang, Shengkui; Feng, Binxiao; Wang, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    We describe methods for the assessment of amplified-fragment single nucleotide polymorphism and methylation (AFSM) sites using a quick and simple molecular marker-assisted breeding strategy based on the use of two restriction enzyme pairs (EcoRI-MspI and EcoRI-HpaII) and a next-generation sequencing platform. Two sets of 85 adapter pairs were developed to concurrently identify SNPs, indels and methylation sites for 85 lines of cassava population in this study. In addition to SNPs and indels, the simplicity of the AFSM protocol makes it particularly suitable for high-throughput full methylation and hemi-methylation analyses. To further demonstrate the ease of this approach, a cassava genetic linkage map was constructed. This approach should be widely applicable for genetic mapping in a variety of organisms and will improve the application of crop genomics in assisted breeding. PMID:25466435

  8. Bacterial genomic epidemiology, from local outbreak characterization to species-history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gaiarsa, Stefano; De Marco, Leone; Comandatore, Francesco; Marone, Piero; Bandi, Claudio; Sassera, Davide

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriology has embraced the next-generation sequencing revolution, swiftly moving from the time of single genome sequencing to the age of genomic epidemiology. Hundreds and now even thousands of genomes are being sequenced for single bacterial species, allowing unprecedented levels of resolution and insight in the evolution and epidemic diffusion of the main bacterial pathogens. Here, we present a review of some of the most recent and groundbreaking studies in this field. PMID:26878934

  9. Genomic Characterization of Variable Surface Antigens Reveals a Telomere Position Effect as a Prerequisite for RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Baranasic, Damir; Oppermann, Timo; Cheaib, Miriam; Cullum, John; Schmidt, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic or phenotypic variation is a widespread phenomenon of expression of variable surface protein coats on eukaryotic microbes. To clarify the mechanism behind mutually exclusive gene expression, we characterized the genetic properties of the surface antigen multigene family in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia and the epigenetic factors controlling expression and silencing. Genome analysis indicated that the multigene family consists of intrachromosomal and subtelomeric genes; both classes apparently derive from different gene duplication events: whole-genome and intrachromosomal duplication. Expression analysis provides evidence for telomere position effects, because only subtelomeric genes follow mutually exclusive transcription. Microarray analysis of cultures deficient in Rdr3, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, in comparison to serotype-pure wild-type cultures, shows cotranscription of a subset of subtelomeric genes, indicating that the telomere position effect is due to a selective occurrence of Rdr3-mediated silencing in subtelomeric regions. We present a model of surface antigen evolution by intrachromosomal gene duplication involving the maintenance of positive selection of structurally relevant regions. Further analysis of chromosome heterogeneity shows that alternative telomere addition regions clearly affect transcription of closely related genes. Consequently, chromosome fragmentation appears to be of crucial importance for surface antigen expression and evolution. Our data suggest that RNAi-mediated control of this genetic network by trans-acting RNAs allows rapid epigenetic adaptation by phenotypic variation in combination with long-term genetic adaptation by Darwinian evolution of antigen genes. PMID:25389173

  10. Purification and characterization of Fab fragments with rapid reaction kinetics against myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyung-Nam; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myung Kyu; Paek, Se-Hwan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2015-01-01

    Myoglobin is an early biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we isolated the antibody IgG-Myo2-7ds, which exhibits unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid dissociation kinetics are thought to be premature IgG forms that are produced during the early stage of in vivo immunization. In the present study, we identified the epitope region of the IgG-Myo2-7ds antibody to be the C-terminal region of myoglobin, which corresponds to 144-154 aa. The Fab fragment was directly purified by papain cleavage and protein G affinity chromatography and demonstrated kinetics of an association constant of 4.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and a dissociation constant of 2.28 × 10(-2) s(-1), which retained the unique reaction kinetics of intact IgG-Myo2-7ds antibodies. Because a rapid dissociation antibody can be utilized for antibody recycling, the results from this study would provide a platform for the development of antibody engineering in potential diagnostic areas such as a continuous monitoring system for heart disease. PMID:25561012

  11. A comprehensive characterization of simple sequence repeats in pepper genomes provides valuable resources for marker development in Capsicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Zicheng; Li, Bo; Qin, Cheng; Wu, Zhiming; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L.; Luo, Xirong; Cui, Junjie; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F.; Li, Shuaicheng; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    The sequences of the full set of pepper genomes including nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast are now available for use. However, the overall of simple sequence repeats (SSR) distribution in these genomes and their practical implications for molecular marker development in Capsicum have not yet been described. Here, an average of 868,047.50, 45.50 and 30.00 SSR loci were identified in the nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes of pepper, respectively. Subsequently, systematic comparisons of various species, genome types, motif lengths, repeat numbers and classified types were executed and discussed. In addition, a local database composed of 113,500 in silico unique SSR primer pairs was built using a homemade bioinformatics workflow. As a pilot study, 65 polymorphic markers were validated among a wide collection of 21 Capsicum genotypes with allele number and polymorphic information content value per marker raging from 2 to 6 and 0.05 to 0.64, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the clustering results with those of a previous study indicated the usability of the newly developed SSR markers. In summary, this first report on the comprehensive characterization of SSR motifs in pepper genomes and the very large set of SSR primer pairs will benefit various genetic studies in Capsicum. PMID:26739748

  12. A comprehensive characterization of simple sequence repeats in pepper genomes provides valuable resources for marker development in Capsicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jia