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Sample records for rapid intravenous infusion

  1. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  2. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  3. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  4. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  5. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410

  6. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  7. The Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Collard, Benjamin; Sturgeon, Jonathan; Patel, Natasha; Asharia, Shabbar

    2014-01-01

    Insulin use among inpatients is high and associated with severe and regular medication errors. An initial baseline audit showed a wide variation in the prescription of intravenous insulin within the trust. These included variation in the choice of fluid prescribed, electrolyte levels not consistently checked, handwritten illegible prescriptions, and varying parameters set for adjustment of the prescription. A Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion protocol (VRIII)) was introduced to standardize intravenous insulin prescription throughout the trust by all members of the clinical team. We looked at and measured uptake and effects of the VRIII protocol in improving standardization of insulin prescription for inpatients on insulin at St George's NHS trust. The protocol was uploaded to the intranet to allow access 24 hours a day and the staff educated about it. The VRIII protocol was routinely used successfully throughout the trust. Any initial problems were addressed through education of clinical staff. The protocol has shown decreased prescribing and administrative errors, whilst demonstrating good glucose and electrolyte control. Use of a standardized protocol helps reduce medication errors and demonstrates good glycaemic control. Regular and continued education of clinical staff is necessary to maintain its efficacy. PMID:26734228

  8. Intravenous pamidronate: infusion rate and safety.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, C J; Collinson, M; Madsen, E L; Ford, J M; Coleman, T

    1994-01-01

    In view of previous animal studies showing that pamidronate (Aredia) can cause renal damage, and human data indicating that pamidronate in doses of 60-90 mg is more effective in the control of tumor-induced hypercalcemia than when given at lower doses, we decided to investigate whether pamidronate 90 mg infused over 60 minutes at weekly intervals had any adverse effects on renal function in patients with bone metastases. Twelve patients, 7 female (all with breast cancer) and 5 male (4 with prostate cancer, 1 with bladder cancer) were entered into the trial. Each patient received weekly intravenous infusions of pamidronate 90 mg in 250 ml normal saline over 60 minutes for 4 weeks. 51Cr-EDTA clearances showed no significant changes in renal function. Urinary N-acetyl-B-D-glucosaminidase/creatinine ratios fluctuated considerably, but no consistent changes were found. No patient with a normal level of urinary beta 2-microglobulin had elevated levels at the end of the trial. Serum creatinine levels did not change significantly, though 1 patient had a corrected serum calcium level of < 2 mmol/L on a single occasion on day 8. No evidence of renal toxicity was detected. However, the possibility that neprohtoxicity would ultimately appear cannot be excluded, and these favourable short-term results cannot be extrapolated to patients with impaired renal function. PMID:7873459

  9. [The development of multifunction intravenous infusion quantitative packaging device].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Li, Ruihua; Shen, Lianhong

    2012-11-01

    Aimed at tackling the compatibility issues arising from the drug reaction in intravenous infusion tube, we developed a simple, suitable and multi-function intravenous infusion tube for the special use for rescuing critical patients, the elderly, children etc. Each drug in a transfusion process can be filtered to realize quantitative packet and packet delivery. Thus, the drugs in the infusion tube are prevented from meeting with each other. No overlap, no particle pollution occurred. Stable performance and accurate dosage are maintained. As a result safety is ensured during drug delivery. PMID:23461118

  10. In-Use Contamination of Intravenous Infusion Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Dennis G.; Anderson, Roger L.; Shulman, Jonas A.

    1974-01-01

    During the 1970 to 1971 nationwide epidemic of septicemias caused by Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter agglomerans traced to intrinsic contamination of Abbott intravenous infusion products, 94 infusion systems manufactured by Baxter Laboratories were studied microbiologically and epidemiologically during hospital use. Intravenous fluid from 10 systems (11%) contained microorganisms, usually Staphylococcus or Bacillus species; one infusion was heavily contaminated with Klebsiella pneumoniae. No national epidemic organisms, E. cloacae or E. agglomerans (formerly Erwinia), were recovered, suggesting that during this period frequent contamination with these organisms was unique to Abbott's infusion products. Contamination in this study appeared to be extrinsic in origin (introduced during clinical use) and related to the duration of continuous intravenous therapy. Nine of 61 systems (15%) that had been used longer than 48 h were contaminated, whereas only 1 of 33 used less than 48 h (3%) contained microorganisms. This study and the recent national outbreak indicate that contamination of infusion fluid, both from intrinsic and extrinsic sources, must be recognized as an additional risk of intravenous therapy; however, a once-daily replacement of the delivery apparatus can significantly diminish this hazard. PMID:4613269

  11. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2a: Ontario Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mark; Koczmara, Christine; Masino, Caterina; Cassano-Piché, Andrea; Trbovich, Patricia; Easty, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in earlier phases of this study prospectively identified a number of concerns related to the safe administration of multiple intravenous (IV) infusions in Ontario hospitals. Objective To investigate the potential prevalence of practices or policies that may contribute to the patient safety risks identified in Phase 1b of this study. Data Sources and Review Methods Sixty-four survey responses were analyzed from clinical units where multiple IV infusions may occur (e.g., adult intensive care units). Survey questions were organized according to the topics identified in Phase 1b as potential contributors to patient harm (e.g., labelling practices, patient transfer practices, secondary infusion policies). Results Survey results indicated suboptimal practices and policies in some clinical units, and variability in a number of infusion practices. Key areas of concern included the following: use of primary IV tubing without back check valves when administering secondary infusions administration of secondary infusions with/as high-alert continuous IV medications potential confusion about how IV tubing should be labelled to reflect replacement date and time interruptions to IV therapy due to IV pump and/or tubing changes when patients are transferred between clinical units coadministration of continuous or intermittent infusions on central venous pressure monitoring ports variability in respondents’ awareness of the infusion pump's bolus capabilities Limitations Due to the limited sample size, survey responses may not be representative of infusion practices across Ontario. Answers to some questions indicated that the intent of the questions might have been misunderstood. Due to a design error, 1 question about bolus administration methods was not shown to as many respondents as appropriate. Conclusions The Ontario survey revealed variability in IV infusion practice across the province and potential opportunities to improve safety. PMID

  12. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  13. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  14. Venipuncture and intravenous infusion access during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger; Bechtle, Perry; Creager, Gerald J.; Boyce, Joey B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to establish the difficulty associated with securing an intravenous (IV) catheter in place in microgravity flight and the techniques applicable in training the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) for Space Station Freedom, as well as aiding in the selection of appropriate hardware and supplies for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). The objectives are the following: (1) to determine the difficulties associated with venipuncture in a microgravity environment; (2) to evaluate the various methods of securing an IV catheter and attached tubing for infusion with regard to the unique environment; (3) to evaluate the various materials available for securing an intravenous catheter in place; and (4) to evaluate the fluid therapy administration system when functioning in a complete system. The inflight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic flight test to simulate microgravity are presented.

  15. [Effect of intravenous lidocaine infusion on arterial baroreflex].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, I

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of the first study was to identify the relationship between reflex sympathetic nerve activity and plasma concentration of lidocaine. Lidocaine was infused in 4 different doses: 2 mg.kg-1 bolus + 100 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, 3 mg.kg-1 bolus + 200 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1, 6 mg.kg-1 bolus + 400 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1 and 12 mg.kg-1 bolus + 800 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1. Baroreflex depressor and pressor tests using sodium nitroprusside (5-10 micrograms.kg-1) and phenylephrine (2-4 micrograms.kg-1) were performed before and at 10 min after the start of lidocaine infusion. Plasma lidocaine concentrations determined by HPLC revealed that its steady-state levels were maintained during the baroreflex tests. Baroreflex sensitivity was preserved at clinical concentrations of lidocaine (< 5 micrograms.ml-1). However, baroreflex was significantly attenuated when plasma lidocaine concentrations were above seizure levels (> 10 micrograms.ml-1). This result indicates that hemodynamic derangement observed in the lidocaine-induced CNS toxicity is, at least in part, due to the attenuated arterial baroreflex. In the second study, the author evaluated the effect of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on the baroreflex with or without lidocaine infusion (2 mg.kg-1 + 100 micrograms.kg-1 x min-1). Respiratory acidosis (PaCO2: 65.6 +/- 3.4) enhanced the baroreflex significantly, but lidocaine infusion abolished this acidosis-induced enhancement. The author concludes that hypercarbia should be avoided in patients receiving intravenous lidocaine infusion. PMID:8515540

  16. Immediate infusion-related adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in a prospective cohort of 1765 infusions.

    PubMed

    Bichuetti-Silva, Danielli C; Furlan, Fernanda P; Nobre, Fernanda A; Pereira, Camila T M; Gonçalves, Tessa R T; Gouveia-Pereira, Mariana; Rota, Rafael; Tavares, Lusinete; Mazzucchelli, Juliana T L; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is increasingly recommended for many diseases apart from primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Although effective and safe, adverse reactions may occur. We conducted a 2-year prospective observational study in 117 patients with PID who received regular IVIG replacement therapy at a median dose of 600 mg/kg every 3 to 4 weeks to examine IVIG's adverse effects; 1765 infusions were performed (mean=15/patient) in 75 males and 42 females (aged 3 months to 77 years) in 3 groups: ≤ 9 years (34.2%), 10-19 years (26.5%), and ≥ 20 years (39.3%). Fifty patients had common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), 11 had X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), and 55 had other immune system disorders. The drugs administered were Octagam® (49.1%), Tegeline® (17.3%), Imunoglobulin® (18.6%), Flebogama® (12.9%), Vigam® (1.2%), and Kiovig® (0.4%). Immediate infusion-related adverse reactions occurred in the cases of 38 out 1765 infusions (2.15%, IC95% 1.53%-2.94%), which were classified as mild (81.6%), moderate (10.5%), or severe (7.9%). Time until reaction ranged from 10 to 240 min (mean = 85.7, median = 60). Reaction rates were similar across age groups. The most common reactions were malaise, headache, and abdominal pain. Reported severe events were tightness of the throat and seizure. All symptoms improved with temporary or complete IVIG interruption and symptomatic medications. Sixteen of 38 reactions to infusions occurred in the presence of an acute infection (p=0.09). Tegeline® represented a greater reaction risk factor than Octagam® (p < 0.001). These results indicate that IVIG infusion can be considered a safe procedure. Low reaction incidence and few severe immediate infusion-related adverse reactions were observed. PMID:25257732

  17. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings. PMID:26407380

  18. Fat overload syndrome after the rapid infusion of SMOFlipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Fat overload syndrome is a well-known complication of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy. It is characterized by headaches, fever, jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, respiratory distress, and spontaneous hemorrhage. Other symptoms include anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, low fibrinogen levels, and coagulopathy. Several reports in the literature describe fat overload syndrome caused by rapid infusion of lipid emulsions, all with soybean-based lipid emulsions. We report fat overload syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with short bowel syndrome on home parenteral nutrition. Fat overload syndrome occurred as a result of accidental, very rapid infusion of a 20% soy oil, medium-chain triglyceride, olive and fish oil-based lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid) that showed the same complications seen with an earlier lipid emulsion (Intralipid). The patient was successfully treated with supportive care combining fluid infusion, transfusion of platelets, and substitution of serum albumin (0.5 g/kg/d) and fresh-frozen plasma (10 mL/kg). In the next couple of days, she received extra platelets, erythrocyte transfusion, and filgrastim (Neupogen; 5 µg/kg/d) due to a very low leukocyte count. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fat overload syndrome caused by SMOFlipid emulsion described in the literature. PMID:23520135

  19. Effect of intracerebroventricular deuterium oxide on water intake and AVP release induced by intravenous infusion of angiotensin II in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hjelmqvist, H; Rundgren, M

    1990-02-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion (0.02 ml min-1) of deuterium oxide (D2O), with NaCl added to isotonicity, on the water intake and arginine vasopressin (AVP) release caused by intravenous (i.v.) infusion of angiotensin II (AII) (4.8 nmol min-1) was studied in euhydrated sheep. The i.c.v. infusion of D2O, which started 80 min before commencement of the AII infusion, induced a water diuresis in four out of six animals and a measurable decrease in plasma AVP concentration. The i.v. infusion of AII effectively stimulated the AVP release and the response was unaffected by prior and simultaneous i.c.v. administration of D2O. However, the water intake measured 2 min after cessation of the AII administration was reduced by 50% when D2O was infused i.c.v. compared to that seen after simply the AII infusion. The inhibitory effect of D2O on AII-induced drinking disappeared rapidly after discontinuation of D2O administration. Compensatory increased drinking was seen during the first post-infusion hour, resulting in an equivalent cumulative intake of water at 60 min post-infusion in the two types of experiments. The present results support the idea that at least some of the cerebral effects of circulating AII on fluid balance are medicated via targets which are simultaneously accessible to influences from the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:2156405

  20. Intravenous albumin infusion is an effective therapy for hyponatraemia in cirrhotic patients with ascites.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, P A; Mistry, P; Kaye, G; Burroughs, A K; McIntyre, N

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of moderate to severe hyponatraemia in patients with decompensated liver disease is unsatisfactory. We report our preliminary experience using intravenous infusion of albumin to treat this condition. Three patients with cirrhosis, ascites, and hyponatraemia responded satisfactorily to treatment; one patient with fulminant hepatitis B did not respond. Intravenous albumin infusion is a safe and effective therapy for patients with cirrhosis complicated by hyponatraemia. Its main role may be in preparing patients for surgery, particularly liver transplantation. PMID:2311979

  1. Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Günther; Wenzel, Folker; Stockschläder, Markus; Riethmacher, Regina; Lorenz, Horst; Tutschek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Different therapeutic approaches have been used in fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, but many centers administer immunoglobulin G infusions to the pregnant woman. We studied the effect of maternal antenatal immunoglobulin infusions on fetal platelet counts in pregnancies with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical courses of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia whose mothers were treated with immunoglobulin G infusions in a single center between 1999 and 2005. In a center-specific protocol, weekly maternal immunoglobulin G infusions were given to 25 pregnant women with previously affected neonates and four women with strong platelet antibodies, but no previous history of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; before each infusion diagnostic fetal blood sampling was performed to determine fetal platelet counts and immunoglobulin G levels. Results There were 30 fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, confirmed by initial fetal blood sampling showing fetal platelet counts between 4×109/L and 130×109/L and antibody-coated fetal platelets using a glycoprotein specific assay. Despite weekly antenatal maternal immunoglobulin G infusions fetal platelet counts did not change significantly. Maternal and fetal immunoglobulin G levels, measured before every infusion, increased significantly with the number of maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. Conclusions In this group of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia no consistent increase of fetal platelets was achieved as a result of regular maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. PMID:20534698

  2. Arrangements of the intravenous parallel infusions with anti-reflux valves decreasing occlusion alarm delay

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Han Bum; Moon, Bong-Ki; Lee, Yeon-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Background The methods of arrangement of combined intravenous parallel infusions using anti-reflux valve (ARV), with and without anti-syphon valve (ASV) that could decrease occlusion alarm delay were investigated. Methods Occlusion challenge tests were mainly performed as bench experiments of four kinds of multiple parallel infusions (10 ml/h and 50 ml/h infusions), which were connected at the proximal or distal portion of ARV, with or without ASV. Alarm threshold was set to 1000 mmHg. Occlusion alarm delays and the compliances of the infusion systems were compared among groups. Results Without ASV, compared to 10 ml/h infusion alone distal to anti-reflux valve, 50 ml/h infusion distal to anti-reflux valve reduced the mean alarm delay from 416 ± 7 s to 81 ± 3 s (P < 0.001). Compared to 50 ml/h infusion alone, combined 10 ml/h and 50 ml/h infusion distal to ARV prolonged the alarm delay from 81 ± 3 s to 133 ± 6 s (P < 0.001). However, combined infusions distal to ARV with ASV significantly reduced the alarm delay from 133 ± 6 s to 74 ± 5 s (P < 0.001), and also reduced the compliance of the infusion system from 2.31 ± 0.12 to 1.20 ± 0.08 µl/mmHg (P < 0.001). Conclusions The infusion setup of faster infusion rate, lower compliant system using ASV could effectively decrease occlusion alarm delay during multiple intravenous parallel infusions using ARV. PMID:24851166

  3. Effects of Intrarenal and Intravenous Infusion of the Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitor Milrinone on Renin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that administration of the phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone increases renin secretion in conscious rabbits. The aim of the present study was to determine if the increase in renin secretion results from a direct renal action of milrinone, or from an indirect extrarenal effect of the drug. This was accomplished by comparing the effects of intrarenal and intravenous infusion of graded doses of milrinone on plasma renin activity in unilaterally nephrectomized conscious rabbits. Milrinone was infused into the renal artery in doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 micro-g/kg/min, and intravenously in the same rabbits in doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 micro-g/kg/min. Each dose was infused for 15 min. No intrarenal dose of milrinone altered plasma renin activity or arterial pressure, although at the highest dose, there was a small increase in heart rate. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1.0 micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 176 +/- 55% of the control value (P less than 0.05). Heart rate increased but arterial pressure did not change. Intravenous infusion of milrinone at 1O micro-g/kg/min increased plasma renin activity to 386 +/- 193% of control in association with a decrease in arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate. These results confirm that milrinone increases renin secretion, and indicate that the stimulation is due to an extrarenal effect of the drug.

  4. Liposome distribution after intravenous and selective intraarterial infusion in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.C.; Kasi, L.P.; Jahns, M.S.; Hashimoto, S.; Wallace, S. )

    1990-09-01

    In an effort to improve hepatic uptake of liposomes for drug delivery, empty vesicles were administered by means of selective arterial infusion. Negatively charged, multilamellar liposomes were labeled with technetium-99m and infused into healthy adult dogs. Each dog received 100 mg/m2 of lipid over 10 minutes at 2 mL/min. Liposomes were administered via the common hepatic artery after proximal occlusion of the gastroduodenal artery, via the cranial mesenteric artery, and via the cephalic vein. Distribution (liver, spleen, and lungs) was determined by computer-assisted external imaging techniques. On the average, after arterial infusion, 69.2% of the total activity was located in the liver, 3.6% in the spleen, 3.2% in the lungs, and 3.5% in the general circulation. Following venous injection, 50.7% of the radioactivity was found in the liver, 9.1% in the spleen, 8.6% in the lungs, and 6.7% in the peripheral blood. Once the liposomes entered the systemic circulation, they were cleared at the same rate (half-life beta = 21.5 hours) independent of their route of administration. Increased hepatic liposome uptake should translate into higher local and lower systemic liposomal drug levels.

  5. Durability of Benefit From Repeated Intravenous Lidocaine Infusions in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David M.; Newhouse, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful disorder with no curative treatments, and available medications typically provide partial relief of pain. Reported here is the effective use of serial intravenous lidocaine infusions for the chronic management of 3 patients with fibromyalgia. The details of the infusion procedure are described, and relevant literature is reviewed. Lidocaine infusions should be considered in fibromyalgia patients who are refractory to other treatments, and a positive response to 1 infusion may justify repeated infusions for chronic management. PMID:26835161

  6. Incidence of infusion-site reactions associated with peripheral intravenous administration of fosaprepitant

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Jordan D.; Crawford, Brooke Sorgen; Phillips, Gary; Berger, Michael J.; Wesolowski, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Fosaprepitant is known to cause infusion-site reactions. However, there is limited data regarding these reactions including the effect of peripheral intravenous administration or other potential factors on their incidence. This single-institution retrospective study was undertaken to investigate the incidence of infusion-site reactions with single-dose intravenous (IV) fosaprepitant when given through a peripheral line prior to administration of chemotherapy. Risk factors for the development of infusion-site reactions with fosaprepitant were also explored. Methods Medical records of patients with cancer receiving IV fosaprepitant through a peripheral line were reviewed. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of infusion-site reactions at our institution. Data collection included demographics, fosaprepitant infusion information, and grading of reactions. Results We found a 15 % incidence of infusion-site reactions among all peripherally administered doses of fosaprepitant. The 50 reactions occurred in 43 unique patients representing an incidence per patient of 28.7 % (43/150; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 21.6–36.6). Factors found to be associated with infusion-site reactions included age [odds ratio (OR) 0.97 (95 % CI 0.94–0.99)], location of IV line [OR forearm vs. hand 0.41 (95% CI 0.20–0.85); OR antecubital fossa vs. hand 0.31 (95 % CI 0.11–0.87)], and simultaneous maintenance IV fluid rate ≥100 mL/h during fosaprepitant infusion [OR 0.19 (95 % CI 0.08–0.44)]. Conclusions The incidence of infusion-site reactions with peripherally administered fosaprepitant as seen in this study is higher than that reported in the package insert. Risk factors for developing infusion-site reactions in our patient population include age, location of IV line, and simultaneous maintenance IV fluid rate of <100 mL/h. PMID:24402412

  7. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered. PMID:26986972

  8. Continuous infusion interleukin-2 and intravenous famotidine in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Milligan, Karen S; Quan, Francine M; Cuenca, Rosa E; Khan, Nawazish; Liles, Darla K; Walker, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    Lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) cytotoxicity against tumor cells is induced by the use of high-dose infusional interleukin-2 (IL-2). LAK cytotoxicity against neoplastic cells may be augmented by famotidine. Twelve (12) patients have been treated with continuous infusion IL-2 (18 MIU/m2/24 hours) for 72 hours and famotidine 20 mg IVPB twice per day. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. These patients were of median age--67 years (range, 25-79), had a median performance status of 1 (range, 0-1), and had metastatic sites, including lung, lymph node, subcutaneous/soft tissue, and liver. The most common toxicities of this regimen were fever, rigors, nausea/emesis, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia. Three (3) partial responses have been seen (25% response rate). One (1) of these responders has undergone complete surgical resection and is disease-free at 15+ months. Four (4) patients are alive at a median of > 25 months. The median survival for all patients is 13 months. This combination of infusional IL-2 with famotidine is active in metastatic melanoma. PMID:17257076

  9. Effects of Freeze-Thawing and Intravenous Infusion on Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, Martin J; de Witte, Samantha F H; Luk, Franka; van den Hout-van Vroonhoven, Mirjam C G N; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Strini, Tanja; Korevaar, Sander S; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Betjes, Michiel G H; Franquesa, Marcella; Moll, Guido; Baan, Carla C

    2016-04-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are increasingly used as an investigative therapeutic product for immune disorders and degenerative disease. Typically, MSC are isolated from human tissue, expanded in culture, and cryopreserved until usage. The safety and efficacy of MSC therapy will depend on the phenotypical and functional characteristics of MSC. The freeze-thawing procedure may change these characteristics. Furthermore, the cells encounter a microenvironment after administration that may impact their properties. It has been demonstrated that the majority of MSC localize to the lungs after intravenous infusion, making this the site to study the effects of the in vivo milieu on administered MSC. In this study, we investigated the effect of freeze-thawing and the mouse lung microenvironment on human adipose tissue-derived MSC. There were effects of freeze-thawing on the whole genome expression profile of MSC, although the effects did not exceed interdonor differences. There were no major changes in the expression of hemostatic regulators on transcriptional level, but significantly increased expression of procoagulant tissue factor on the surface of thawed adipose MSC, correlating with increased procoagulant activity of thawed cells. Exposure for 2 h to the lung microenvironment had a major effect on MSC gene expression and affected several immunological pathways. This indicates that MSC undergo functional changes shortly after infusion and this may influence the efficacy of MSC to modulate inflammatory responses. The results of this study demonstrate that MSC rapidly alter in response to the local milieu and disease-specific conditions may shape MSC after administration. PMID:26914168

  10. Intravenous infusion of glucose and insulin in relation to milk secretion in the sow.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L; Rook, J A

    1977-01-01

    1. A comparison was made of the composition of milk from front and rear tetas in four sows. There were small and not significant differences in fat, protein and lactose contents, and in the fatty-acid composition of the milk fat with the exception of the 18:3 acid where the difference was also small but significant. 2. The effects of intravenous infusions of glucose and insulin in lactating sows on milk secretion and blood composition were investigated in two sows. 3. Intravenous infusion of glucose had no effect on blood plasma glucose concentration but increased the yields of lactose, protein and water. 4. Intravenous infusion of insulin depressed plasma glucose concentration and the yields of lactose and water. The yield of protein was unaffected. 5. It is concluded that differences between the non-ruminant (the sow) and the ruminant in the responses in milk secretion to glucose infusion may be related to differences in the sensitivity to insulin of mammary tissue. PMID:849401

  11. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates during continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    van Boekholt, A; Fleuren, H; Mouton, J; Kramers, C; Sprong, T; Gerrits, P; Semmekrot, B

    2016-06-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used for the treatment of neonatal bacterial infection with intermittent dosing (ID) regimens. However, increasing bacterial resistance, in addition to a lack of new antimicrobial agents, urges the optimization of current therapeutic options. Clinical studies in adults suggest continuous infusion (CI) regimens of beta-lactam antibiotics to be superior to ID. There are as yet no guidelines concerning the CI dosing of amoxicillin. The present study was developed to describe the CI pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of amoxicillin during the first 3 days of life in search of the optimal dosing regimen. Neonates with a gestational age above 34 weeks, at risk of neonatal infection and requiring amoxicillin therapy, were included. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin were measured during CI on days 1 and 3 in the steady state. Twenty-two serum samples of 11 patients were collected. All patients reached and retained serum concentrations of amoxicillin within the therapeutic range without exceeding the toxic concentration (serum concentrations on day 1 mean 55.4 mg/l, range 30.9-69.5, SD 10.5, and on day 3 48.8 mg/l, range 25.5-92.4, SD 18.4). There was no significant decrease in concentration from day 1 to day 3 (p = 0.38). This study showed therapeutic, nontoxic concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates on CI of amoxicillin in the first 3 days of life. Randomized controlled trials should reveal whether the clinical benefits of the CI of amoxicillin exceed those of ID regimens. PMID:27039340

  12. Effect of infusion rate on intravenous nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Wing, Victoria C; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2013-09-01

    The reinforcing effects of addictive drugs are thought to be more robust when the onset of the drug's effects is fast. It is unclear whether this concept extends to intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of nicotine. We therefore sought to examine the effects of infusion duration on nicotine IVSA in rats. Male Lister hooded rats (n=8) were given daily 1 h limited access to fixed ratio-3 nicotine IVSA (0.03 mg/kg/infusion). Once nicotine IVSA was established, the effect of infusion duration on nicotine seeking was evaluated at a constant unit dose and volume (0.5, 5.0, and 19.6 s compared with the 1-s training infusion duration). Active responses were significantly reduced when the infusion duration was increased (i.e. 5 or 19.6 s compared with 0.5 and 1 s), and the effect was qualitatively similar to saline substitution. The likelihood of maintaining a reliable IVSA in rats was reduced by increasing the infusion duration. The infusion duration therefore represents an important determinant of nicotine reinforcement in rats. PMID:23907378

  13. Simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of IUdR and BrdU infused intravenously to cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, M A; Mazewski, C M; Yousuf, N; Sheikh, Y; White, L M; Yanik, G A; Hyams, D M; Lampkin, B C; Raza, A

    1991-04-01

    Cell cycle kinetics of solid tumors in the past have been restricted to an in vitro labeling index (LI) measurement. Two thymidine analogues, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), can be used to label S-phase cells in vivo because they can be detected in situ by use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against BrdU (Br-3) or IUdR (3D9). Patients with a variety of solid tumors (lymphoma, brain, colon cancers) received sequential intravenous IUdR and BrdU. Tumor tissue removed at the end of infusion was embedded in plastic and treated with MAb Br-3 and 3D9 sequentially, using a modification of a previously described method. Clearly single and double labeled cells were visible, which enabled us to determine the duration of S-phase (Ts) and the total cell cycle time (Tc), in addition to the LI in these tumors. Detailed control experiments using tissue culture cell lines as well as bone marrow cells from leukemic patients are described, including the comparison of this double label technique with our previously described BrdU-tritiated thymidine technique. We conclude that the two methods are comparable and that the IUdR/BrdU method permits rapid and reliable cell cycle measurements in solid tumors. PMID:2005370

  14. Effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Hu, Wei-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with cholelithiasis were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=39) that all had laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. The treatment group was intravenously infused with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine by using a venous pump under anesthesia induction at the speed of 2 mg·kg-1 ·h-1 until the end of surgery, while the control group was given normal saline with the same volume. Results: All patients successfully completed the surgery, with similar surgical time, incision length and intraoperative blood loss. The required lidocaine concentrations of the treatment group were 2.64±1.23 μg/ml, 1.14±0.4 μg/ml and 0.93±0.32 μg/ml respectively 2 hour, 12 hour and 48 hour after surgery. Pain score of the treatment group, which was significantly lower than that of the control group at the postoperative 2 hour (P<0.05), was similar to those of the control group at the postoperative 12 hour and 48 hour. With extended time, the pain score significantly decreased (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly shorter first anal exhaust time and first defecation time than those of the control group (P<0.05). Adverse reactions, such as nausea and vomiting, dizziness, headache, subcutaneous emphysema and fat liquefaction of incision, occurred similarly in the two groups, which were alleviated by symptomatic treatment. Conclusion: Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is a promising minimally invasive surgery for patients with cholelithiasis, during which intravenously infused lidocaine can rapidly recover the gastrointestinal function and exert short-term analgesic effects, with mild adverse reactions also. PMID:26648989

  15. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  16. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Andrew R; Strassman, Rick J

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel "alternate universe," often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient "beings." The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects-less than 20 min-militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent. PMID:27471468

  17. A Model for the Application of Target-Controlled Intravenous Infusion for a Prolonged Immersive DMT Psychedelic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gallimore, Andrew R.; Strassman, Rick J.

    2016-01-01

    The state of consciousness induced by N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is one of the most extraordinary of any naturally-occurring psychedelic substance. Users consistently report the complete replacement of normal subjective experience with a novel “alternate universe,” often densely populated with a variety of strange objects and other highly complex visual content, including what appear to be sentient “beings.” The phenomenology of the DMT state is of great interest to psychology and calls for rigorous academic enquiry. The extremely short duration of DMT effects—less than 20 min—militates against single dose administration as the ideal model for such enquiry. Using pharmacokinetic modeling and DMT blood sampling data, we demonstrate that the unique pharmacological characteristics of DMT, which also include a rapid onset and lack of acute tolerance to its subjective effects, make it amenable to administration by target-controlled intravenous infusion. This is a technology developed to maintain a stable brain concentration of anesthetic drugs during surgery. Simulations of our model demonstrate that this approach will allow research subjects to be induced into a stable and prolonged DMT experience, making it possible to carefully observe its psychological contents, and provide more extensive accounts for subsequent analyses. This model would also be valuable in performing functional neuroimaging, where subjects are required to remain under the influence of the drug for extended periods. Finally, target-controlled intravenous infusion of DMT may aid the development of unique psychotherapeutic applications of this psychedelic agent. PMID:27471468

  18. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of infusion to achieve a body temperature of 33 degrees C, the F(i)O(2) could be further reduced with unchanged PEEP. The infusion of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  19. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ashraf F.; Armstrong, Josh S.; Smith, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  20. Opiate refractory pain from an intestinal obstruction responsive to an intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed

    Bafuma, Patrick J; Nandi, Arun; Weisberg, Michael

    2015-10-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to our community emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain that had progressively worsened over the last 28 hours. Of note, 1 month prior to her presentation, the patient had a colostomy due to a rectal abscess and required stoma revision 5 days prior to her visit to our ED. The patient's pain was refractory to opiate analgesia in our ED, but experienced significant relief after an intravenous lidocaine infusion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis ultimately revealed a large bowel obstruction just proximal to the colostomy site. Historically, options for ED management of severe pain have been limited beyond narcotic analgesia. For patients whom are refractory to opiates in the ED, or for whom opiates are contraindicated, lidocaine infusions have shown promise for a variety of both acute and chronic painful conditions. PMID:26306434

  1. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ashraf F; Armstrong, Josh S; Smith, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  2. Effectiveness of intravenous ilomedin infusion and smoking cessation in the treatment of acutely symptomatic Buerger disease.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Kostas; Georgiou, Evangelia; Saleptsis, Vassileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Sakkas, Lazaros; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of iloprost treatment in the management of symptomatic Buerger disease (BD) and assessed smoking cessation compliance, based on a single-center experience. Thirteen patients with BD were treated with sessions of intravenous (IV) Ilomedin infusion. At 1-year follow-up, pain status alteration, number of analgesics required, ankle-brachial index (ABI) change, compliance with supervised smoking cessation, and amputation-free rate were recorded. The pain status improved considerably according to a visual analog scale, the number of analgesics required was significantly reduced, and all patients improved their pain-free walking distance, the ABI, and their self-reported quality of life. Only 2 patients required minor amputations. Combination of IV Ilomedin infusion, supervised smoking cessation, and a specific follow-up protocol may lead to improvement in pain-free walking distance, pain status, quality of life, and substantial reduction in amputation risk. PMID:24366824

  3. Identification Bracelet Precipitated Acute Compartment Syndrome during Intravenous Infusion in an Obtunded Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Wahib; Chaucer, Benjamin; Felek, Suleyman; Arsura, Edward L.; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious condition requiring immediate medical care. A lack of urgent medical treatment can result in serious complications such as loss of function and even amputation. While the pathophysiology of acute compartment syndrome is well understood, numerous potential causes are still being discovered. A rare cause of acute compartment syndrome is IV infiltration. We present a case of acute compartment syndrome resulting from intravenous infusion due to proximal placement of a patient identification bracelet. We conclude that both routine evaluation for IV infiltration and proximal placement of IV lines are essential for prevention of acute compartment syndrome. PMID:26904308

  4. Intravenous theophylline rapidly decreases post-lumbar puncture headaches.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Ufuk; Ünal-Artık, H Aybüke; İnan, Leven E; Yoldaş, Tahir

    2016-09-01

    When managing therapy for the post-lumbar puncture headaches (PLPHs), an efficacious, fast-acting, practical and safe method is preferred. Invasive methods have known complications and oral medications might be problematic when nausea and vomiting occurs with severe headaches. The aim of this study was to highlight the brief initial time for a remarkable decrease of PLPH pain levels after the administration of IV theophylline infusion. We observed that IV theophylline infusion has a rapid and marked effect on decreasing pain in PLPHs. At 30 min of theophylline infusion, mean VAS levels were decreased by 47.1 % and at 60 min of infusion, the decrease of pain was 61.9 %. We conclude that IV theophylline infusion is a rapidly effective, noninvasive, practical and low-cost way to treat PLPHs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight both the efficacy and the speed of the effect of pain relief in PLPHs. PMID:26563407

  5. Assessment of Injection Site Reactions for Peripheral Intravenous Oxaliplatin Infusion and Potential Remedies.

    PubMed

    Handa, Satoko; Kuroiwa, Ryohei; Miyano, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hisanori; Kamei, Daisuke; Takei, Hiromi; Sonou, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Murayama, JunIchiro; Sato, Atsushi; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the medical and nursing records of 19 patients with unresectable advanced recurrent colorectal cancers treated using oxaliplatin and capecitabine(CapeOX)with or without bevacizumab at the outpatient tumor center of Showa UniversityHospital between November 1, 2009 and November 30, 2011, to clarifydifferences in the incidence of injection site reactions according to the use or non-use of an intravenous infusion solution warming device. Vascular pain and other injection site reactions occurred in 13 patients(68.4%). Injection site reactions occurred in 33 of the total of 77 chemotherapytreatments (42.9%). No difference in incidence of injection site reactions was seen according to whether the intravenous infusion solution warmer was used. The most common time to onset of injection site reactions after commencing oxaliplatin administration was 60-90 min, and symptoms were seen to decrease when non-steroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs were coadministered. We intend to leverage these studyfindings to demonstrate the mechanism of onset for injection site reactions and to propose measures for handling adverse drug reactions. PMID:27539041

  6. Urinary iron excretion induced by intravenous infusion of deferoxamine in beta-thalassemia homozygous patients.

    PubMed

    Boturao-Neto, E; Marcopito, L F; Zago, M A

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify noninvasive methods to evaluate the severity of iron overload in transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia and the efficiency of intensive intravenous therapy as an additional tool for the treatment of iron-overloaded patients. Iron overload was evaluated for 26 beta-thalassemia homozygous patients, and 14 of them were submitted to intensive chelation therapy with high doses of intravenous deferoxamine (DF). Patients were classified into six groups of increasing clinical severity and were divided into compliant and non-compliant patients depending on their adherence to chronic chelation treatment. Several methods were used as indicators of iron overload. Total gain of transfusion iron, plasma ferritin, and urinary iron excretion in response to 20 to 60 mg/day subcutaneous DF for 8 to 12 h daily are useful to identify iron overload; however, urinary iron excretion in response to 9 g intravenous DF over 24 h and the increase of urinary iron excretion induced by high doses of the chelator are more reliable to identify different degrees of iron overload because of their correlation with the clinical grades of secondary hemochromatosis and the significant differences observed between the groups of compliant and non-compliant patients. Finally, the use of 3-9 g intravenous DF for 6-12 days led to a urinary iron excretion corresponding to 4.1 to 22.4% of the annual transfusion iron gain. Therefore, continuous intravenous DF at high doses may be an additional treatment for these patients, as a complement to the regular subcutaneous infusion at home, but requires individual planning and close monitoring of adverse reactions. PMID:12426631

  7. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  8. Pharmacokinetics of midazolam administered concurrently with ketamine after intravenous bolus or infusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Jacobson, J D; Hartsfield, S M

    1993-12-01

    Midazolam, a water-soluble benzodiazepine tranquilizer, has been considered by some veterinary anaesthesiologists to be suitable as a combination anaesthetic agent when administered concurrently with ketamine because of its water solubility and miscibility with ketamine. However, the pharmacokinetics of midazolam have not been extensively described in the dog. Twelve clinically healthy mixed breed dogs (22.2-33.4 kg) were divided into two groups at random and were administered ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) either as an intravenous bolus over 30 s (group 1) or as an i.v. infusion in 0.9% NaCl (2 ml/kg) over 15 min. Blood samples were obtained immediately before the drugs were injected and periodically for 6 h afterwards. Serum concentrations were determined using gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Serum concentrations were best described using a two-compartment open model and indicated a t1/2-alpha of 1.8 min and t1/2-beta of 27.8 min after i.v. bolus, and t1/2-alpha of 1.35 min and t1/2-beta of 31.6 min after i.v. infusion. The calculated pharmacokinetic coefficient B was significantly smaller after i.v. infusion (429 +/- 244 ng/ml) than after i.v. bolus (888 +/- 130 ng/ml, P = 0.004). Furthermore, AUC was significantly smaller after i.v. infusion (29,800 +/- 6120 ng/h/ml) than after i.v. bolus (42,500 +/- 8460 ng/h/ml, P < 0.05), resulting in a larger ClB after i.v. infusion (17.4 +/- 4.00 ml/min/kg than after i.v. bolus (12.1 +/- 2.24 ml/min/kg, P < 0.05). No other pharmacokinetic value was significantly affected by rate of intravenous administration. PMID:8126758

  9. Pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin: influence of rate of constant intravenous infusion in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Legg, B; Solomon, L R; Johnson, R W; Rowland, M

    1987-10-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin were studied in 12 renal transplant patients. Five patients received a constant rate (7 mg kg-1 day-1) intravenous infusion over 72 h and the remainder received rates of 7, 4 and 10 mg kg-1 day-1, consecutively each for at least 24 h. 2 Plasma, separated at 37 degrees C, was analysed by h.p.l.c. 3 The data were best described by a biexponential model. 4 Following the 72 h infusion, a plateau was reached by 24 h and clearance was 0.60 l h-1 kg-1. 5 Clearance associated with the 10 mg kg-1 day-1 infusion rate (0.43 l h-1 kg-1) was estimated to be lower than that following the 4 and 7 mg kg-1 day-1 rates (0.52 and 0.54 l h-1 kg-1 respectively) but the difference is unlikely to be of clinical significance. PMID:3318898

  10. Efficacy and safety of constant-rate intravenous cyclosporine infusion immediately after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, T J; Myre, S A; Melvin, D B; Van der Bel-Kahn, J; Stephens, G W; Collins, J A; Wolf, R K; Brown, L L; Pesce, A J; First, M R

    1989-01-01

    Oral cyclosporine therapy immediately after heart transplantation is erratic and difficult to predict. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficacy and safety of cyclosporine when administered by constant-rate infusion immediately after transplantation. Nineteen patients (17 men and two women) aged 50 years (range 25 to 61 years) who weighed 71 +/- 9 kg, participated in the study and received cyclosporine, 7 to 10 mg/hr (117 +/- 15 micrograms/kg/hr). The infusions were initially maintained for 26 +/- 5 hours (range 18 to 42 hours) without adjustments in dosage. Whole blood samples were obtained at hourly intervals for the first 8 to 12 hours and then daily throughout the 7-day study period and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Constant-rate cyclosporine infusion resulted in therapeutic blood levels (350 to 450 ng/ml) at 6 hours. These levels remained relatively steady throughout the 7-day infusion, requiring only minimal dosage adjustments. Kidney function was not altered significantly after 7 days of intravenous cyclosporine therapy as evidenced by a mean serum creatinine level of 1.3 mg/dl before therapy and 1.4 mg/dl after therapy. There, however, was a transient rise in serum creatinine level in most patients on the second or third day after transplantation that resolved without a reduction in cyclosporine dosage. The mean endomyocardial biopsy score at 1 week after transplantation was 0.1, and only four of the patients required additional immunosuppressive therapy to treat rejection during the first 6 weeks after transplantation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2647932

  11. Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

  12. Zinc content of commercial diluents widely used in drug admixtures prepared for intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Desai, Narendra R; Shah, Syed M; Koczone, Julianna; Vencl-Joncic, Maja; Sisto, Christopher; Ludwig, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    During ongoing quality improvement efforts with two Wyeth parenteral products, Protonix and Zosyn, we noted that dosing solutions prepared from the products yielded inconsistent results on the United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 788 test for subvisible particulates. This manuscript discusses variables that have a direct impact on intravenous products meeting compendial monograph specifications under conditions that are encountered in the clinical setting. The rubber stoppers of vials used for parenteral products, different parts of commercial admixture bags, and the tubing of the administration sets and devices contain residual amounts of metal ions, plasticizers, and other additives incorparated for specific functions. The transition metal ions, including zinc and copper, may leach into drug products during manufacture and during storage of dosing admixture bags prepared for infusion in hospital pharmacies or clinics. The metal ions may compromise the quality of the infusion admixture through catalytic drug degradation and/or generation of undesirable metal ion complexes, which may convert soluble drug molecules into insoluble particulates. To preserve the quality of the drug product, it is essential that metal ion leachables be controlled proactively during manufacture of the drug product; knowledge of metal ion contents in the commercial diluents use for reconstitution, admixture preparation, and flushing of the administration lines is also critical. PMID:23969523

  13. Exploring the Current Landscape of Intravenous Infusion Practices and Errors (ECLIPSE): protocol for a mixed-methods observational study

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Ann; Furniss, Dominic; Chumbley, Gill; Iacovides, Ioanna; Wei, Li; Cox, Anna; Mayer, Astrid; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David Westfall; Dykes, Patricia C; Bell, Helen; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous medication is essential for many hospital inpatients. However, providing intravenous therapy is complex and errors are common. ‘Smart pumps’ incorporating dose error reduction software have been widely advocated to reduce error. However, little is known about their effect on patient safety, how they are used or their likely impact. This study will explore the landscape of intravenous medication infusion practices and errors in English hospitals and how smart pumps may relate to the prevalence of medication administration errors. Methods and analysis This is a mixed-methods study involving an observational quantitative point prevalence study to determine the frequency and types of errors that occur in the infusion of intravenous medication, and qualitative interviews with hospital staff to better understand infusion practices and the contexts in which errors occur. The study will involve 5 clinical areas (critical care, general medicine, general surgery, paediatrics and oncology), across 14 purposively sampled acute hospitals and 2 paediatric hospitals to cover a range of intravenous infusion practices. Data collectors will compare each infusion running at the time of data collection against the patient's medication orders to identify any discrepancies. The potential clinical importance of errors will be assessed. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively; interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from an NHS Research Ethics Committee (14/SC/0290); local approvals will be sought from each participating organisation. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences for academic and health professional audiences. Results will also be fed back to participating organisations to inform local policy, training and procurement. Aggregated findings will inform the debate on costs and benefits of the NHS investing in smart pump technology

  14. Effectiveness of intravenous infusion of N-acetylcysteine in cirrhotic patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Eman Sayed; Sharawy, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in patients with chronic liver disease. We prospectively evaluated effectiveness of the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in preserving postoperative renal functions in cirrhotic patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 cirrhotic patients child A to B were randomized into two groups of 30 each. NAC groupwas received intravenous infusion of NAC (1200 mg/12h starting immediately before surgery and continued for 72h h postoperative) and controls group received a similar volume of glucose 5% solution as a a placebo. Systemic hemodynamics, hepatic and renal functions, serum cystatin C and cystatin C glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (GFR) were compared between both groups. Results: Serum level of cystatin C was raised significantly above the basal value at postoperative day 1 and day 3 associated with significantly decreased in cystatin C GFR below the basal value in the control group (P = 0.001). 6 (20%) (PP = 0.03) in control group developed AKI based on cystatin C GFR criteria (GFR <55 ml/min/1.73m2). Mean values of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were increased significantly above the basal values in both groups, but the increases were significantly lower in NAC group (P = 0.00). Chest infection was significantly lower associated with shorter hospital stay in the NAC group than the control group. Conclusion: Intravenous administration of NAC NAC in cirrhotic patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries reduces the incidence of cystatin C GFR-based AKI, postoperative renal and liver functions were well-preserved and improved outcome. PMID:26240545

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells are short-lived and do not migrate beyond the lungs after intravenous infusion

    PubMed Central

    Eggenhofer, E.; Benseler, V.; Kroemer, A.; Popp, F. C.; Geissler, E. K.; Schlitt, H. J.; Baan, C. C.; Dahlke, M. H.; Hoogduijn, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are under investigation as a therapy for a variety of disorders. Although animal models show long term regenerative and immunomodulatory effects of MSC, the fate of MSC after infusion remains to be elucidated. In the present study the localization and viability of MSC was examined by isolation and re-culture of intravenously infused MSC. C57BL/6 MSC (500,000) constitutively expressing DsRed-fluorescent protein and radioactively labeled with Cr-51 were infused via the tail vein in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. After 5 min, 1, 24, or 72 h, mice were sacrificed and blood, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, and bone marrow removed. One hour after MSC infusion the majority of Cr-51 was found in the lungs, whereas after 24 h Cr-51 was mainly found in the liver. Tissue cultures demonstrated that viable donor MSC were present in the lungs up to 24 h after infusion, after which they disappeared. No viable MSC were found in the other organs examined at any time. The induction of ischemia-reperfusion injury in the liver did not trigger the migration of viable MSC to the liver. These results demonstrate that MSC are short-lived after i.v. infusion and that viable MSC do not pass the lungs. Cell debris may be transported to the liver. Long term immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of infused MSC must therefore be mediated via other cell types. PMID:23056000

  16. Study on toxicity of danshensu in beagle dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Guisheng; Gao, Yonglin; Li, Shenjun; Li, Chunmei; Zhu, Xiaoyin; Li, Min; Liu, Zhifeng

    2009-09-01

    Danshensu (3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) lactic acid), a natural phenolic acid, is isolated from root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, and is widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, toxicity of danshensu was evaluated in male and female dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion. Beagle dogs were treated with danshensu at doses of 17, 50, and 150 mg/kg/day, and observed for 90 days followed by recovery periods. Measurements included clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, temperature, electro-cardiography (EGC), hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, gross necropsy, organ weight, and histopathology. No significant adverse effects on these parameters were observed. The only treatment-related finding was a hard knot at injection site observed in the 150 mg/kg group after 2-3 weeks continuous administration, and returned to normal after 3-4 days withdrawal. From these results, it might be concluded that danshensu did not produce any significant cumulative toxicity at the doses administered, as reflected by the various parameters investigated. PMID:19778246

  17. Therapeutic Effect of Intravenous Infusion of Perfluorocarbon Emulsion on LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qi; Yin, Xiaofeng; Song, Jianqi; Landén, Ning Xu; Fan, Haojun

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the leading causes of death in critical care. Despite extensive efforts in research and clinical medicine, mortality remains high in these diseases. Perfluorocarbon (PFC), a chemical compound known as liquid ventilation medium, is capable of dissolving large amounts of physiologically important gases (mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide). In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of PFC emulsion on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced ALI in rats and elucidate its mechanism of action. Forty two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 6 rats were treated with saline solution by intratracheal instillation (control group), 18 rats were treated with LPS by intratracheal instillation (LPS group) and the other 18 rats received PFC through femoral vein prior to LPS instillation (LPS+PFC group). The rats in the control group were sacrificed 6 hours later after saline instillation. At 2, 4 and 6 hours of exposure to LPS, 6 rats in the LPS group and 6 rats in LPS+PFC group were sacrificed at each time point. By analyzing pulmonary pathology, partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (PaO2) and lung wet-dry weight ratio (W/D) of each rat, we found that intravenous infusion of PFC significantly alleviated acute lung injury induced by LPS. Moreover, we showed that the expression of pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of endothelial cells and CD11b of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) induced by LPS were significantly decreased by PFC treatment in vivo. Our results indicate that intravenous infusion of PFC inhibits the infiltration of PMNs into lung tissue, which has been shown as the core pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Thus, our study provides a theoretical foundation for using intravenous infusion of PFC to prevent and treat ALI/ARDS in clinical practice. PMID:24489970

  18. Therapeutic effect of intravenous infusion of perfluorocarbon emulsion on LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shike; Ding, Hui; Lv, Qi; Yin, Xiaofeng; Song, Jianqi; Landén, Ning Xu; Fan, Haojun

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the leading causes of death in critical care. Despite extensive efforts in research and clinical medicine, mortality remains high in these diseases. Perfluorocarbon (PFC), a chemical compound known as liquid ventilation medium, is capable of dissolving large amounts of physiologically important gases (mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide). In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of PFC emulsion on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced ALI in rats and elucidate its mechanism of action. Forty two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 6 rats were treated with saline solution by intratracheal instillation (control group), 18 rats were treated with LPS by intratracheal instillation (LPS group) and the other 18 rats received PFC through femoral vein prior to LPS instillation (LPS+PFC group). The rats in the control group were sacrificed 6 hours later after saline instillation. At 2, 4 and 6 hours of exposure to LPS, 6 rats in the LPS group and 6 rats in LPS+PFC group were sacrificed at each time point. By analyzing pulmonary pathology, partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (PaO2) and lung wet-dry weight ratio (W/D) of each rat, we found that intravenous infusion of PFC significantly alleviated acute lung injury induced by LPS. Moreover, we showed that the expression of pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of endothelial cells and CD11b of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) induced by LPS were significantly decreased by PFC treatment in vivo. Our results indicate that intravenous infusion of PFC inhibits the infiltration of PMNs into lung tissue, which has been shown as the core pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Thus, our study provides a theoretical foundation for using intravenous infusion of PFC to prevent and treat ALI/ARDS in clinical practice. PMID:24489970

  19. [A case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with dramatic improvement in consciousness immediately after intravenous infusion of thiamine].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, A; Chida, K; Misu, T; Okita, N; Nomura, H; Konno, H; Takase, S; Takeda, A; Itoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized on March 4, 1998 for disturbances in consciousness. In 1995, he had received proximal subtotal gastrectomy and reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition for gastric cancer. Thereafter he had been taking enough food without the habit of taking liquor. In October 1997, his short term memory was becoming gradually worse. On February 12, 1998, he suffered from numbness in the feet, and then dysphagia, unsteady gait, and diplopia developed gradually. On February 26, brain MRI showed no abnormalities. On March 3, he had a fever of 38.5 degrees C and his consciousness became unclear. Neurological examination revealed semi-coma, total ophthalmoplegia, and absence of doll's eye movement. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. The serum thiamine level was 9 ng/ml (normal range: 20-50). Brain MRI demonstrated symmetrical high intensity lesions in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, dorsomedial nuclei of bilateral thalami, and vestibular nuclei. About 30 seconds after intravenous infusion of thiamine, his consciousness improved dramatically, but returned to semi-coma after about two minutes. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually occurs acutely. In the present case, however, the disease showed slow onset, chronic progression, and then rapid worsening after fever. Reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition might have caused the slow onset of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and fever might have facilitated the rapid progression of the disease. An immediate high concentration of thiamine modifies the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor ion channels, thereby maintaining wakefulness, and the level of consciousness may change dramatically. PMID:10689693

  20. Supplemental morphine infusion into the posterior ventral tegmentum extends the satiating effects of self-administered intravenous heroin

    PubMed Central

    Steidl, S; Myal, S; Wise, RA

    2015-01-01

    Rats learn to self-administer intravenous heroin; well-trained animals lever-press at a slow and regular pace over a wide range of intravenous doses. The pauses between successive earned infusions are proportional to the dose of the previous injection and are thought to reflect periods of drug satiety. Rats will also self-administer opiates by microinjection directly into sites in the posterior regions of the ventral tegmentum. To determine if the pauses between self-administered intravenous injections are due to opiate actions in posterior ventral tegmentum, we delivered supplemental morphine directly into this region during intravenous self-administration sessions in well-trained rats. Reverse dialysis of morphine into the posterior ventral tegmentum increased the intervals between earned injections. The inter-response intervals were greatest for infusion into the most posterior ventral tegmental sites, sites in a region variously known as the tail of the ventral tegmental area or as the rostromedial tegmental nucleus. These sites at which morphine prolongs inter-response intervals, correspond to the sites at which opiates have been found most effective in reinforcing instrumental behavior. PMID:25913296

  1. Stability studies of lincomycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution and intravenous infusion fluids

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Boddy, Michael; Sunderland, Bruce; Hughes, Jeff D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of Lincocin® (lincomycin hydrochloride) in commonly used intravenous fluids at room temperature (25°C), at accelerated-degradation temperatures and in selected buffer solutions. Materials and methods The stability of Lincocin® injection (containing lincomycin 600 mg/2 mL as the hydrochloride) stored at 25°C±0.1°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s), 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% glucose, and 10% glucose solutions was investigated over 31 days. Forced degradation of Lincocin® in hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide was performed at 60°C. The effect of pH on the degradation rate of lincomycin hydrochloride stored at 80°C was determined. Results Lincomycin hydrochloride w as found to maintain its shelf life at 25°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution, with less than 5% lincomycin degradation occurring in all intravenous solutions over a 31-day period. Lincomycin hydrochloride showed less rapid degradation at 60°C in acid than in basic solution, but degraded rapidly in hydrogen peroxide. At all pH values tested, lincomycin followed first-order kinetics. It had the greatest stability near pH 4 when stored at 80°C (calculated shelf life of 4.59 days), and was least stable at pH 2 (calculated shelf life of 0.38 days). Conclusion Lincocin® injection was chemically found to have a shelf life of at least 31 days at 25°C when added to sodium lactate (Hartmann’s) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution. Solutions prepared at approximately pH 4 are likely to have optimum stability. PMID:27022242

  2. Effect of intravenous infusion of ranitidine on intragastric acidity in fasting subjects: comparison with bolus or Gastrojet (pH-stat-adjusted) infusion.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B; Kirdeikis, P; Simon, K; Zuk, L; Pinchbeck, B; Wasarab-Rolland, D; Kersey, K

    1993-12-01

    This study was undertaken in nine fasting healthy volunteers to compare the effect of intravenous continuous infusion versus bolus injection of ranitidine on 12-h intragastric pH, and to compare the efficacy of these two modes of administration of pH-stat-adjusted infusion of ranitidine using the Gastrojet. Each volunteer had three study sessions with 12-h pH measurements. In the ranitidine infusion treatment arm (RAN-INF), ranitidine was continually infused intravenously using an IVAC-pump at a dose of 0.125 mg mg.kg over a 12-h period. In the ranitidine bolus treatment arm (RAN-BOL), ranitidine bolus 50 mg was given over 10 min, every 6 h. When ranitidine infusion was given by the pH stat method using the Gastrojet (RAN-JET), sufficient ranitidine was given to maintain a present value of pH > or = 5. The study was analysed with a 3 x 3 Latin square cross-over design with multiple measurements of each phase of the cross-over. No difference was found between RAN-INF and RAN-BOL in 12-h or in daytime (10.00-18.00 h) mean pH, median pH, or percentage of pH > or = 5. Using RAN-JET, 89.5% of the pH values were > or = 5., compared with 39.7% and 40.0% with RAN-INF or RAN-BOL. RAN-JET also gave higher (P < 0.05) mean and median 12-h or daytime pH values, as compared with RAN-INF or RAN-BOL. The mean doses of ranitidine given in the 12-h infusion periods were 100 mg, 109 mg and 112 mg (RAN-BOL, RAN-INF and RAN-JET, respectively). Thus, this superior inhibition of acid inhibition achieved with Gastrojet does not require higher mean doses of ranitidine. These findings cannot necessarily be applied to persons with duodenal ulcer disease or to patients in an intensive-care unit setting. However, the data do raise the possibility that much greater inhibition of acid inhibition can be achieved by individualizing the dose of ranitidine using the Gastrojet. PMID:8161672

  3. Intravenous labetolol in treating hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion for procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Moni, Amarnath; Mathews, Lailu; Balaji, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is widely used for procedural sedation because of its unique combination of sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis with minimal respiratory depression. Transient hypertension has been reported during the use of dexmedetomidine which is usually benign and is taken over by the hypotensive response on continuing the infusion. We report a case of hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion used for procedural sedation, necessitating discontinuation of the infusion and treatment of hypertension. The dilemmas involved in treating hypertension caused by dexmedetomidine are discussed. PMID:26897444

  4. Hemodynamic responses of the equine digit to intravenous and digital arterial infusion of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R J; Moore, J N; Allen, D

    1990-04-01

    In 6 adult horses anesthetized with pentobarbital, the hemodynamic responses of the equine digit to infusion of dopamine were evaluated by use of an isolated extra corporeal pump perfused digital preparation. Digital blood flow was maintained at a constant rate that was independent of systemic hemodynamic changes. Three sequential experiments were performed on each horse. In the first experiment (n = 6), dopamine was infused IV at rates of 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 micrograms/kg/min. For the second experiment (n = 5), dopamine (400 micrograms/ml) was infused into the digital artery at the rates of 0.07, 0.7, and 1.2 ml/min. The third experiment (n = 5) consisted of a 5-minute intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine followed by the intra-arterial infusion of dopamine while continuing the infusion of phentolamine. Digital venous, arterial, and capillary pressures, total digital vascular resistance, and precapillary to postcapillary resistance ratios were determined in each experiment. Systemic infusion of dopamine did not induce changes in the hemodynamics of the digital vasculature. Digital arterial infusion of dopamine alone resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, total digital vascular resistance, and an increase in the precapillary to postcapillary resistance ratio. Phentolamine attenuated the vasoconstrictive response elicited by intra-arterial infusion of dopamine. PMID:2327616

  5. Plasma nitrate plus nitrite changes during continuous intravenous infusion interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, G.; Pellegatta, F.; Lucca, G. D.; Fragasso, G.; Scaglietti, U.; Pini, D.; Fortis, C.; Tresoldi, M.; Rugarli, C.

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a biologically active mediator generated in many cell types by the enzyme NO synthase, may play an important role in cardiovascular toxicity that is frequently observed in cancer patients during intravenous (i.v.) interleukin 2 (IL-2) therapy. The induction of NO synthase and the production of NO seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of the vascular leakage syndrome, as well as in the regulation of myocardial contractility. In the present study, we evaluated the pattern of plasmatic NO changes during multiple cycles of continuous i.v. infusion (CIVI) of IL-2 in ten advanced cancer patients (five males, five females, median age 59 years, range 33-67 years; eight affected by renal cell cancer and two affected by malignant melanoma). The patients received IL-2 at 18 MIU m-2 day-1 (14 cycles) or 9 MIU m-2 day-1 (seven cycles) for 96 h, repeated every 3 weeks. Interferon alpha (IFN alpha) was also administered subcutaneously (s.c) during the 3 week interval between IL-2 cycles. For each cycle, plasma samples were collected before treatment (t0), 24 h (t1), 48 h (t2), 72 h (t3) and 96 h (t4) after the start of IL-2 infusion, and 24 h after the end of the cycle. NO concentration was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the accumulation of both nitrite and nitrate (after reduction to nitrite). The following observations may be drawn from data analysis: (1) plasma nitrate + nitrite significantly raised during treatment (P = 0.0226 for t0 vs t3), but statistical significance was retained only when cycles administered with IL-2 18 MIU m-2 day-1 are considered (P = 0.0329 for t0 vs t3; P = 0.0354 for t0 vs t2 vs t4) (dose-dependent pattern); (2) during subsequent cycles a significant trend toward a progressive increase of plasma nitrate + nitrite levels, with increasing cumulative dose of IL-2, was observed (linear regression coefficient r = 0.62, P = 0.0141 for t0; r = 0.80, P = 0.0003 for t1; r = 0.62, P = 0.013 for t2; r = 0.69, P = 0.045 for

  6. Arterial medial necrosis and hemorrhage induced in rats by intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, E. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Arena, E.; Kupp, R. P.; Saunders, L. Z.; Lewis, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective, postsynaptic, dopaminergic vasodilator, was administered to rats for assessment of its clinical, toxicologic, and pathologic effects. Groups of 8 male and 8 female rats received 5, 25, 50, or 100 micrograms/kg/min by intravenous infusion for 24 hours. Groups of 12 male and 12 female rats received 2, 8, 16, or 20 mg/kg/day by intravenous injection once daily for 12 days. Tissues were examined by light microscopy. Rats infused for 24-hours with 5-100 micrograms/kg/min of fenoldopam had lesions of renal and splanchnic arteries characterized by medial necrosis and hemorrhage. None were seen in control rats or those administered the compound by intravenous injection. Arteries with four to five layers of medial smooth-muscle cells were most severely and frequently affected. Lesions were particularly severe in interlobular pancreatic arteries and subserosal gastric arteries. They occurred first at 4 hours, were present at low incidence at 8 hours, were induced in unrestrained rats, and were not caused by the experimental procedures employed. The nature and disposition of this novel arterial lesion in the rat suggests that its pathogenesis may be related to the pharmacologic activity of fenoldopam mesylate at the dopamine receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2858975

  7. Effect of peri-operative intravenous infusion of lignocaine on haemodynamic responses to intubation, extubation and post-operative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shruti; Khan, Rashid M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Lignocaine in intravenous (IV) bolus dose has been used for minimising haemodynamic changes associated with intubation and extubation. Furthermore, IV infusion has been used for post-operative analgesia. We investigated whether IV peri-operative lignocaine (bolus and infusion) would be able to produce both the effects simultaneously in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods: In this randomised prospective study, 60 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. In Group A, patients received 6 ml normal saline as bolus over 10 min followed by 6 ml/h infusion whereas in Group B, patients received preservative free 2% lignocaine 1.5 mg/kg IV bolus (made to a volume of 6 ml with normal saline) administered over a period of 10 min and thereafter an infusion at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/h (pre-diluted in normal saline made to a volume of 6 ml/h. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The rise in pulse rate (PR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were less in Group B as compared to the Group A (P < 0.05) during intubation as well as during extubation. Furthermore, the Group B had significant longer mean pain-free post-operative period of 5½ h as compared to 54.43 min in the Group A (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Administration of lignocaine infusion attenuates the rise in PR as well as MAP during the peri-intubation and peri-extubation period. Furthermore, infusion of lignocaine significantly increases the mean pain-free period post-operatively. PMID:26195829

  8. Pharmacokinetic profile of cefbuperazone in healthy Chinese volunteers after single and multiple drip intravenous infusion by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongbo; Geng, Taohua; Wang, Yiya; Ding, Li

    2016-09-10

    A selective and reproducible HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and fully validated for the determination of cefbuperazone in human plasma and urine. Samples were prepared using protein precipitation and separated on a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 column (2.1×50mm, 3.5μm). The API-4000 mass spectrometer was operated under multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) using the electrospray ionization technique. Linearity was achieved from 0.250 to 250μg/mL in plasma and 20.0-5000μg/mL in urine. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of cefbuperazone in healthy Chinese volunteers after drip intravenous infusion of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0g cefbuperazone sodium injection. Cefbuperazone reached a maximum concentration (Cmax) of 44.7±8.1μg/mL, 86.7±12.7μg/mL and 168±14μg/mL in 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0g dose groups respectively, at 60min after the start of infusion. The half-life (t1/2) was between 1.8-1.9h, and the elimination constant (kel) was between 0.36-0.39h(-1). The results proved that cefbuperazone showed linear pharmacokinetic profile in the dose range of 0.5-2.0g without gender difference. Drug accumulation was not observed. Cefbuperazone reached the maximum excretion rate in urine 2h after the start of infusion. About 60.0% of the administered drug was excreted via urine as unchanged form within 12h. The cumulative excretion of cefbuperazone after single drip intravenous infusion was proportional to the administered dose within the range from 0.5g to 2.0g. PMID:27394175

  9. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p < 0.001; peak insulin level: 370.4 ± 66.5 vs. 109.6 ± 21.5 pmol/l; t(14) = 4.563, p < 0.001) followed by a sharp decline in glycaemia to a nadir of 3.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l (vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 mmol/l at the corresponding time in the control condition; t(14) = -3.972, p = 0.001) after stopping the infusion. Despite this wide glycemic fluctuation in the glucose infusion condition subjective feelings of hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety. PMID

  10. Activity of hepatic but not skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase enzyme is depressed by intravenous glucose infusions in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Al-Trad, B; Wittek, T; Gäbel, G; Fürll, M; Reisberg, K; Aschenbach, J R

    2010-12-01

    A positive energy balance in dairy cows pre-partum may decrease hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) enzyme activity, which might contribute to disturbances of lipid metabolism post-partum. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle CPT activity can also be downregulated during positive energy balance. Mid-lactating dairy cows were maintained on intravenous infusion of either saline (control) or glucose solutions that increased linearly over 24 days, remained at the 24-day level until day 28 and were suspended thereafter. Liver and skeletal muscle biopsies, as well as four diurnal blood samples, were taken on days 0, 8, 16, 24, and 32, representing infusion levels equivalent to 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 0% of the net energy for lactation (NE(L)) requirement respectively. Glucose infusion increased serum insulin concentrations on day 16 and 24 while plasma glucose levels were increased at only a single time point on day 24. Serum beta-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations decreased between day 8 and 24; whereas changes in non-esterified fatty acids were mostly insignificant. Total lipid contents of liver and skeletal muscle were not affected by treatment. Hepatic CPT activity decreased with glucose infusion (by 35% on day 24) and remained decreased on day 32. Hepatic expression levels of CPT-1A and CPT-2 mRNA were not significantly altered but tended to reflect the changes in enzyme activity. In contrast to the liver, no effect of glucose infusion was observed on skeletal muscle CPT activity. We conclude that suppression of CPT activity by positive energy balance appears to be specific for the liver in mid-lactating dairy cows. PMID:20546068

  11. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mailis, Angela; Taenzer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society has produced consensus-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain. The society aimed to generate an additional guideline for other forms of neuropathic pain treatments. OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations for neuropathic pain interventional treatments. METHODS: A task force was created and engaged the Institute of Health Economics in Edmonton, Alberta, to survey the literature pertaining to multiple treatments. Sufficient literature existed on four interventions only: spinal cord stimulation; epidural injections; intravenous infusions; and nerve blocks. A comprehensive search was conducted for systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines; a critical review was generated on each topic. A modified United States Preventive Services Task Force tool was used for quality rating and grading of recommendations. RESULTS: Investigators reviewed four studies of spinal cord stimulation, 19 studies of intravenous infusions, 14 studies of epidural injections and 16 studies of nerve blocks that met the inclusion criteria. The task force chairs rated the quality of evidence and graded the recommendations. Feedback was solicited from the members of the task force. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to support recommendations for some of these interventions for selected neuropathic pain conditions. This evidence is, at best, moderate and is often limited or conflicting. Pain practitioners are encouraged to explore evidence-based treatment options before considering unproven treatments. Full disclosure of risks and benefits of the available options is necessary for shared decision making and informed consent. PMID:22606679

  12. Influence of fine-bore catheter length on infusion thrombophlebitis in peripheral intravenous nutrition: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, N. J.; McMahon, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the risk of thrombophlebitis associated with continuous infusion of intravenous nutrition (IVN) via peripheral veins was reduced when fine-bore catheters, inserted to 15 cm, were used in place of standard intravenous cannulas. An explanation has not been identified, but may be owing to the greater length of the catheters. A randomised controlled study was performed in which a standard nutritional solution was infused via 22G polyurethane catheters inserted to a length of either 5 cm or 15 cm. Catheters were reviewed twice each day and removed when complications occurred, or when IVN was no longer required. There was no significant difference in median time to thrombophlebitis or extravasation, or in daily risk of thrombophlebitis, between insertion lengths. Survival proportions were similar for each length at all times. Catheters inserted into cephalic veins were more prone to thrombophlebitis or extravasation (nine episodes, 14 catheters) than catheters inserted into basilic veins (five episodes, 24 catheters, P = 0.009). The survival proportion was at all times greater when catheter tips lay in basilic veins. Thus, the risk of thrombophlebitis or extravasation was not influenced by the length of catheter within the vein. However, the vein in which the catheter tip lay appeared to influence the development of morbidity. PMID:9196346

  13. Stability of morphine sulfate in infusion devices and containers for intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Duafala, M E; Kleinberg, M L; Nacov, C; Flora, K P; Hines, J; Davis, K; McDaniel, A; Scott, D

    1990-01-01

    The stability of morphine sulfate in one brand of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) container, one brand of glass syringe, and two brands of disposable infusion devices was determined. Solutions of morphine sulfate 2 and 15 mg/mL were used to fill the PVC containers and drug administration devices. Stability was determined for both concentrations of morphine sulfate at room temperature (23-25 degrees C) and 4 degrees C in the PVC containers, glass syringes, and disposable infusion devices; stability was also determined at 31 degrees C in the disposable infusion devices. At 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, 12, and 15 days, portions of the solutions were removed and assayed in triplicate by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method. At each time point the drug-infusion fluid combinations were inspected visually for color changes and the presence of particulate matter, and pH was measured. Morphine sulfate 2 and 15 mg/mL remained stable for at least 12 days in all the containers and devices at each temperature tested. No substantial changes in the pH or physical appearance of the solutions were observed. Morphine sulfate can be repackaged in the disposable glass syringe, PVC container, and both disposable infusion devices for routine clinical use. PMID:2301422

  14. A guideline for the use of variable rate intravenous insulin infusion in medical inpatients.

    PubMed

    George, S; Dale, J; Stanisstreet, D

    2015-06-01

    The present paper summarizes the key recommendations in a recent publication produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care on the use of variable rate i.v. insulin infusion in 'medical' inpatients. The full guideline is available at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_VRIII.pdf and is designed to be a practical guide that can used by any healthcare professional who manages medical inpatients with hyperglycaemia. Its main aim is to allow variable rate i.v. insulin infusion to be used safely, effectively and efficiently for this specific group of inpatients. PMID:25980646

  15. Cardiorespiratory effects of intravenous bolus administration and infusion of ketamine-midazolam in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J D; Hartsfield, S M

    1993-10-01

    Twelve healthy dogs were used to determine the cardiorespiratory effects of i.v. administered ketamine (10 mg/kg of body weight) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg). Half the dogs received a ketamine-midazolam combination (K-M) as a bolus over 30 seconds and the other half received the K-M as an infusion over 15 minutes. Induction of anesthesia by use of K-M was good in all dogs. Ketamine-midazolam combination as a bolus or infusion induced minimal cardiorespiratory effects, except for significant (P < 0.05) increases in mean heart rate and rate-pressure product. The increase in heart rate was greater in dogs of the infusion group. Mild and transient respiratory depression was observed in dogs of both groups immediately after administration of K-M, but was greater in dogs of the bolus group than in dogs of the infusion group. Duration of action of K-M for chemical restraint was short. Salivation and defecation were observed in a few dogs. Extreme muscular tone developed in 1 dog after K-M bolus administration. PMID:8250397

  16. A randomized trial evaluating low doses of propofol infusion after intravenous ketamine for ambulatory pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Divya; Gupta, Madhu; Subramanian, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our study compared the discharge time after pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following sedation with propofol infusion dose of 100, 75 and 50 mcg/kg/min given after a bolus dose of ketamine and propofol. Materials and Methods: One hundred children of American Society of Anesthesiologists status 1/2, aged 6 months to 8 years, scheduled for elective MRI were enrolled and randomized to three groups to receive propofol infusion of 100, 75 or 50 mcg/kg/min (Groups A, B, and C, respectively). After premedicating children with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.), sedation was induced with bolus dose of ketamine and propofol (1 mg/kg each) and the propofol infusion was connected. During the scan, heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored. Results: The primary outcome that is, discharge time was shortest for Group C (44.06 ± 18.64 min) and longest for Group A (60.00 ± 18.66 min), the difference being statistically and clinically significant. The secondary outcomes that is, additional propofol boluses, scan quality and awakening time were comparable for the three groups. The systolic blood pressure at 20, 25 and 30 min was significantly lower in Groups A and B compared with Group C. The incidence of sedation related adverse events was highest in Group A and least in Group C. Conclusion: After a bolus dose of ketamine and propofol (1 mg/kg each), propofol infusion of 50 mcg/kg/min provided sedation with shortest discharge time for MRI in children premedicated with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg i.v. It also enabled stable hemodynamics with less adverse events. PMID:25422610

  17. Pharmacokinetics of R 82913 in AIDS patients: a phase I dose-finding study of oral administration compared with intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, S; Hermans, P; Sommereijns, B; O'Doherty, E; Westenborghs, R; van de Velde, V; Cauwenbergh, G F; Clumeck, N

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral administration of R 82913, or tetrahydroimidazol [4,5,1-jk]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one or -thione (TIBO), was compared with those of intravenous administration in five AIDS patients. TIBO was administered as a single daily 1-h infusion of 100 mg for 29 days and orally as a single daily dose for 14 days with three consecutive regimens of 100, 200, and 100 mg with probenecid (1 g) daily. Each cycle was followed by a wash-out period. Oral bioavailability of TIBO appears to be low and is not improved by the adjunction of probenecid. Trough levels obtained with oral administration systematically remained far below the 90% inhibitory concentration of TIBO against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Tolerance of TIBO was excellent. No clinical efficacy could be demonstrated. p24 antigenemia decreased significantly in one patient under intravenous therapy. TIBO derivatives are promising anti-HIV-1 agents in vitro, but improvement of oral bioavailability is needed before implementation of long-term efficacy and tolerability studies. Moreover, rapid emergence of resistance, which has been recently documented, constitutes a major problem with most nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:1482134

  18. Intravenous ethanol increases dopamine release in the ventral striatum in humans: PET study using bolus-plus-infusion administration of [11C]raclopride

    PubMed Central

    Aalto, Sargo; Ingman, Kimmo; Alakurtti, Kati; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Virkkala, Jussi; Någren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O; Scheinin, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol increases the interstitial dopamine (DA) concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of experimental animals, but positron emission tomography (PET) studies using the single-bolus protocol of the [11C]-raclopride competition paradigm have yielded conflicting results in humans. To resolve disparate previous findings, we utilized the bolus-plus-infusion (B/I) method, allowing both baseline and intervention quantification of [11C]raclopride binding during a single 105-minute PET scan, to investigate possible ethanol-induced DA release in nine healthy male subjects. A 25-minute intravenous ethanol (7.6%) infusion, resulting in a 1.3 g/L mean blood ethanol concentration, was administered using masked timing during the PET scan. Automated region-of-interest analysis testing the difference between baseline (40–50 minutes) and intervention (60–85 minutes) revealed an average 12.6% decrease in [11C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum (VST, P=0.003) including the NAcc. In addition, a shorter time interval from the start of ethanol infusion to the first subjective effect was associated with a greater binding potential decrease bilaterally in the VST (r=0.92, P=0.004), and the feeling of pleasure was associated with a decrease in binding potential values in both the caudate nucleus (r=−0.87, P=0.003) and putamen (r=−0.74; P=0.02). These results confirm that ethanol induces rapid DA release in the limbic striatum, which can be reliably estimated using the B/I method in one imaging session. PMID:25492110

  19. Accidental intravenous infusion of a large dose of magnesium sulphate during labor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kamal; Al Arebi, Arif; Singh, Indu

    2013-07-01

    During labor and child delivery, a wide range of drugs are administered. Most of these medications are high-alert medications, which can cause significant harm to the patient due to its inadvertent use. Errors could be caused due to unfamiliarity with safe dosage ranges, confusion between similar looking drugs, mislabeling of drugs, equipment misuse, or malfunction and communication errors. We report a case of inadvertent infusion of a large dose of magnesium sulphate in a pregnant woman. PMID:24106365

  20. Increasing LH Pulsatility in Women With Hypothalamic Amenorrhoea Using Intravenous Infusion of Kisspeptin-54

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, Channa N.; Abbara, Ali; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Comninos, Alexander N.; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; De Silva, Akila; Nijher, Gurjinder M. K.; Ganiyu-Dada, Zainab; Mehta, Amrish; Todd, Catriona; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Bloom, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is the one of the most common causes of period loss in women of reproductive age and is associated with deficient LH pulsatility. High-dose kisspeptin-54 acutely stimulates LH secretion in women with HA, but chronic administration causes desensitization. GnRH has paradoxical effects on reproductive activity; we therefore hypothesized that a dose-dependent therapeutic window exists within which kisspeptin treatment restores the GnRH/LH pulsatility in women with HA. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine whether constant iv infusion of kisspeptin-54 temporarily increases pulsatile LH secretion in women with HA. Methods: Five patients with HA each underwent six assessments of LH pulsatility. Single-blinded continuous iv infusion of vehicle or kisspeptin-54 (0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, or 1.00 nmol/kg/h) was administered. The LH pulses were detected using blinded deconvolution. Results: Kisspeptin increased LH pulsatility in all patients with HA, with peak responses observed at different doses in each patient. The mean peak number of pulses during infusion of kisspeptin-54 was 3-fold higher when compared with vehicle (number of LH pulses per 8 h: 1.6 ± 0.4, vehicle; 5.0 ± 0.5, kisspeptin-54, P < .01 vs vehicle). The mean peak LH pulse secretory mass during kisspeptin-54 was 6-fold higher when compared with vehicle (LH pulse secretory mass in international units per liter: 3.92 ± 2.31, vehicle; 23.44 ± 12.59, kisspeptin-54; P < .05 vs vehicle). Conclusions: Kisspeptin-54 infusion temporarily increases LH pulsatility in women with HA. Furthermore, we have determined the dose range within which kisspeptin-54 treatment increases basal and pulsatile LH secretion in women with HA. This work provides a basis for studying the potential of kisspeptin-based therapies to treat women with HA. PMID:24517142

  1. Nonstationary disposition of valproic acid during prolonged intravenous infusion: contributions of unbound clearance and protein binding.

    PubMed

    Arens, T L; Pollack, G M

    2001-09-01

    Circadian variations in disposition have been observed for a variety of agents, including anticonvulsants. Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant used to control generalized and partial seizures, has exhibited diurnal oscillations in steady-state concentrations during long-term administration to humans and non-human primates. The present study was conducted to assess potential diurnal changes in the disposition of VPA during prolonged i.v. infusion in rats. Animals, maintained on a strict 12-h per day light cycle, were equipped with venous cannulae and an arterial microdialysis probe. VPA was administered as a 50-mg/kg loading dose followed by a 42 mg/kg/h infusion for 70 h. Blood and microdialysate samples were obtained at timed intervals after establishment of steady-state throughout two complete light/dark cycles; and total (serum) and unbound (microdialysate) VPA was determined by gas chromatography. Modest oscillations (6-7 h period) in total and unbound VPA were observed; clearance and binding parameters were not different between light and dark periods. However, unbound clearance increased, and unbound fraction decreased, with time over the course of the infusion. These results suggest that time-dependent changes in VPA disposition occur in rats, although oscillations in steady-state concentrations do not appear to be diurnal in nature. PMID:11754040

  2. Optimal intravenous infusion to decrease the haematocrit level in patient of DHF infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, D.; Nuraini, N.; Saragih, R.; Wijaya, K. P.; Naiborhu, J.

    2014-02-01

    The optimal control of infusion model for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) infection is formulated here. The infusion model will be presented in form of haematocrit level. The input control aim to normalize the haematocrit level and is expressed as infusion volume on mL/day. The stability near the equilibrium points will be analyzed. Numerical simulation shows the dynamic of each infection compartments which gives a description of within-host dynamic of dengue virus. These results show particularly that infected compartments tend to be vanished in ±15days after the onset of the virus. In fact, without any control added, the haematocrit level will decrease but not up to the normal level. Therefore the effective haematocrit normalization should be done with the treatment control. Control treatment for a fixed time using a control input can bring haematocrit level to normal range 42-47%. The optimal control in this paper is divided into three cases, i.e. fixed end point, constrained input, and tracking haematocrit state. Each case shows different infection condition in human body. However, all cases require that the haematocrit level to be in normal range in fixed final time.

  3. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  4. Intravenous Infusion of Magnesium Chloride Improves Epicenter Blood Flow during the Acute Stage of Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Muradov, Johongir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80–90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury. PMID:23302047

  5. [Vasopressin intravenous infusion causes dose dependent adverse cardiovascular effects in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Cláudio; Sabha, Maricene; Paganelli, Maria Ondina; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Ferreira-Melo, Silvia Elaine; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Cavalho, Adriana Camargo de; Araujo, Sebastião; Moreno Junior, Heitor

    2010-01-15

    BACKGROUND: Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been broadly used in the management of vasodilatory shock. However, there are many concerns regarding its clinical use, especially in high doses, as it can be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cardiovascular effects of AVP in continuous IV infusion on hemodynamic parameters in dogs. METHODS: Sixteen healthy mongrel dogs, anesthetized with pentobarbital were intravascularly catheterized, and randomly assigned to: control (saline-placebo; n=8) and AVP (n=8) groups. The study group was infused with AVP for three consecutive 10-minute periods at logarithmically increasing doses (0.01; 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min), at them 20-min intervals. Heart rate (HR) and intravascular pressures were continuously recorded. Cardiac output was measured by the thermodilution method. RESULTS: No significant hemodynamic effects were observed during 0.01U/kg/min of AVP infusion, but at higher doses (0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min) a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were observed, with a significant decrease in HR and the cardiac index (CI). A significant increase in the pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) was also observed with the 1.0U/kg/min dose, mainly due to the decrease in the CI. CONCLUSION: AVP, when administered at doses between 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min, induced significant increases in MAP and SVRI, with negative inotropic and chronotropic effects in healthy animals. Although these doses are ten to thousand times greater than those routinely used for the management of vasodilatory shock, our data confirm that AVP might be used carefully and under strict hemodynamic monitoring in clinical practice, especially if doses higher than 0.01 U/kg/min are needed. Martins, LC et al. PMID:20084333

  6. Regression of atherosclerosis by the intravenous infusion of specific biochemical nutrient substrates in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary studies in 400 New Zealand albino rabbits produced a reliable animal model of nutrient-induced atherosclerosis that simulated that observed in humans. Atherosclerosis was then induced in an additional 1600 rabbits in sets of 40 animals each, maintaining plasma cholesterol concentrations between 1000 and 2000 mg/dL for 6-20 weeks. In each set, 10 control rabbits were killed to document baseline atherosclerosis, and the other 30 rabbits were assigned randomly to one of three groups of 10 rabbits. Groups of 10 rabbits were either continued on the atherogenic diet (group I), given standard laboratory rabbit pellets (group II), or infused continuously with specially formulated anticholesterol solutions via central venous catheters (group III) for 6 weeks. At autopsy, atherosclerotic lesions consistently involved 85-95% of the aorta in group I. In group II, atherosclerosis was comparable with the baseline control group with no regression. In group III, regression of atherosclerosis by 90-95% was consistently documented. Correlations between plasma amino acids and plasma cholesterol concentrations were established in four humans with severe atherosclerosis to maximize the cholesterol reduction capacity of the amino acid formulation. Infusion of the modified total parenteral nutrition solution induced prompt reduction in plasma cholesterol levels by 40-60% regardless of the initial level and was accompanied by evidence of regression of atherosclerosis after a 90-day infusion therapy period. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. PMID:3115205

  7. A phase I trial of bryostatin 1 in patients with advanced malignancy using a 24 hour intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Crowther, D.; Prendiville, J.; McGown, A. T.; Scheid, C.; Stern, P.; Young, R.; Brenchley, P.; Chang, J.; Owens, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a macrocyclic lactone derived from the marine invertebrate Bugula neritina. In vitro, bryostatin 1 activates protein kinase C (PKC), induces the differentiation of a number of cancer cell lineages, exhibits anti-tumour activity and augments the response of haemopoietic cells to certain growth factors. In vivo, bryostatin 1 is also immunomodulatory, but the range of tumours which respond to bryostatin 1 in xenograft tumour models is mostly the same as the in vitro tumour types, suggesting a direct mode of action. Nineteen patients with advanced malignancy were entered into a phase I study in which bryostatin 1 was given as a 24 h intravenous infusion, weekly, for 8 weeks. Myalgia was the dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose was 25 micrograms m-2 per week. The myalgia was cumulative and dose related, and chiefly affected the thighs, calves and muscles of extraocular movement. The mechanism of the myalgia is unknown. CTC grade 1 phlebitis affected every patient for at least one cycle and was caused by the diluent, PET, which contains polyethylene glycol, ethanol and Tween 80. Most patients experienced a 1 g dl-1 decrease in haemoglobin within 1 h of commencing the infusion which was associated with a decrease in haematocrit. Radiolabelled red cell studies were performed in one patient to investigate the anaemia. The survival of radiolabelled red cells during the week following treatment was the same as that seen in the week before treatment. However, there was a temporary accumulation of radiolabelled red cells in the liver during the first hour of treatment, suggesting that pooling of erythrocytes in the liver might account for the decrease in haematocrit. Total or activated PKC concentrations were measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of three patients for the first 4 h of treatment and during the last hour of the infusion. This showed that PKC activity was significantly modulated during the infusion. Bryostatin

  8. Cardiopulmonary effects of an intravenous infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and xylazine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Benson, G J; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Smith, C W

    1985-09-01

    A 5% solution of dextrose in water containing 50 mg of guaifenesin, 0.25 mg of xylazine, and 1 mg of ketamine/ml was infused IV at the rate of 2.2 ml X kg-1 X hour-1 in dogs. Heart rate, systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, rate-pressure product, and arterial oxygen tension were not altered significantly from baseline values during 2 hours of anesthesia. Cardiac index was significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased from base-line values. Hypoventilation resulted in increased arterial carbon dioxide tension and decreased arterial pH. After the dogs were given glycopyrrolate, cardiac index returned to base line, and heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rate-pressure product were significantly greater (P less than 0.05) than base-line values. PMID:3931517

  9. First Clinical Experience with a High-Capacity Implantable Infusion Pump for Continuous Intravenous Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Patelli, Gianluigi; Frigerio, Laura F.; Lanocita, Rodolfo; Di Tolla, Giuseppe; Marchiano, Alfonso; Spreafico, Carlo; Garbagnati, Francesco; Bonalumi, Maria G.; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Ticha, Vladimira; Prino, Aurelio

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a new high-capacity pump for systemic venous chemotherapy and to verify the quality of implantation by interventional radiology staff. Methods: A total of 47 infusion pumps with a 60-ml reservoir and variable flow rates (2, 6, 8, or 12 ml/24 hr) were implanted by radiologists in 46 patients with solid tumor metastases requiring treatment with a single, continuously infused cytostatic agent. The reservoir was refilled transcutaneously, usually once weekly. The flow accuracy of the pump was assessed from actual drug delivery recorded on 34 patients over a minimum observation period of 180 days. Results: No early complications occurred in any of the 47 implants in 46 patients. A total of 12 (25.53%) complications occurred between 3 and 24 months after implantation. Seven (14.90%) of these were due to the external design of the pump, while five (10.63%) were related to the central venous catheter. In the 34 patients available for pump evaluation (follow-up of at least 180 days), the system was used for a total of 14,191 days (range 180-911 days, mean 417.38 days), giving an overall complication rate of 0.84 per 1000 days of operation. The mean flow rate accuracy was 90.26%. Conclusion: The new implantable pump showed good flow rate accuracy and reliable operation. The pump-related complications were related to its external design and have now been corrected by appropriate modifications. From a radiologic and surgical viewpoint, the venous implantation procedure is identical to that of conventional vascular access devices and can be performed by radiologists familiar with these techniques. The current limitations lie in the high cost of the pump and, for certain drugs, the short time between refills.

  10. [Amelioration of glucose tolerance and correction of reactive hypoglycemias induced by intravenous calcium infusion cannot be explained by modifications in blood glucagon levels].

    PubMed

    Vexiau, P; Cathelineau, G; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P

    1986-08-01

    Glucagon is not involved in intravenous calcium-induced improvement in glucose tolerance nor in correction of reactive hypoglycemia. Recent investigations have shown that intravenous (IV) calcium infusion improved blood glucose values in patients with moderately impaired glucose tolerance, and suppressed hypoglycemia in patients with isolated reactive hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that these changes were secondary to calcium induced alterations in glucagon (IRG) secretion. Four groups of subjects were studied: group 1: normal controls (n = 7); group 2: patients with isolated hypoglycemia (n = 9); group 3: patients with impaired glucose tolerance without reactive hypoglycemia (n = 9) and group 4: patients with impaired glucose tolerance and reactive hypoglycemia (n = 10). All patients were submitted in randomized order to two 5 hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT, 75 g glucose), during a simultaneous infusion, either of saline or of calcium (calcium gluconate 36.3 mEq/5 h.), starting 30 minutes before the OGTT. In none of the groups did calcium infusion influence basal plasma IRG. In group 1 and 3, oral glucose significantly suppressed IRG, and during IV calcium infusion this suppression disappeared. In group 2, glucose ingestion resulted in a paradoxical increase in IRG both during saline and during calcium infusion. In group 4, oral glucose induced a significant drop in plasma IRG and a rebound rise during hypoglycemia, results which were unaffected by IV calcium infusion. These data suggest that glucagon is not involved in the alterations of blood glucose profiles during OGTT observed during intravenous calcium infusion. PMID:3770273

  11. Evaluation of platelet deposition at local thrombophlebitis, caused by intravenous infusion of anticancer drug (Bisantrene), with In-111-platelets in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Powis, G.; Chowdhury, S.

    1985-05-01

    Several anticancer drugs produce localized thrombophlebitis (LTP) when infused intravenously and LTP is the dose-limiting factor. LTP was studied in New Zealand albino rabbits by I.V. infusion of Bisantrene (BS: approx. = 40 mg/rabbit, six rabbits via ear veins, five via jugular veins, two control, 0.9% saline). Radioactivity in three sections of each harvested vein was determined with a gamma counter, and the ratio of radioactivity per mg of infused vein and control vein was determined and the results are presented in this paper. Scanning electron micrograph of BS-infused vein lumen revealed plaques of amorphous material (BS) and adherent platelet thrombus. Platelet deposition at BS-induced LTP in jugular and ear veins reached a maximum at four to eight hours. Thus, LTP could be imaged and quantified with In-111-labeled platelets.

  12. Postoperative analgesia in children: a prospective study in intermittent intramuscular injection versus continuous intravenous infusion of morphine.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, M; Myre, L; Johnson, D G; Matlak, M E; Black, R E; Sullivan, J J

    1990-02-01

    Few advancements in postoperative pain control in children have been made despite longstanding inadequacies in conventional intramuscular analgesic regimens. While overestimating narcotic complication rates, physicians often underestimate efficacious doses, nurses are reluctant to give injections, and many children in pain shy away from shots. This study prospectively focuses on the safety, efficacy, and complication rate of intermittent intramuscular (IM) versus continuous intravenous infusion (IV) of morphine sulfate (MS) in 46 nonventilated children following major chest, abdominal, or orthopedic surgical procedures. Twenty patients assigned to the IM group had a mean age of 6.17 years and a mean weight of 23.0 kg. Twenty-six patients assigned to the IV group had a mean age of 8.74 years and a mean weight of 27.4 kg. The mean IM MS dose was 12.3 micrograms/kg/h while the mean IV dose was 19.8 micrograms/kg/h (P less than .001). Postoperative pain was assessed with a linear analogue scale from 1 to 10 (1, "doesn't hurt"; 10, "worst hurt possible") for 3 days following operation. Using the analysis of covariance (ANACOVA), nurse, parent, and patient mean pain scores in the IV group were significantly lower than those of the IM group when controlled for age, MS dose, and complications (P less than .007). Nurse assessment of pain correlated well with the patient and parent assessments (Pearson correlation coefficients greater than 0.6). Not only did IV infusion give better pain relief than IM injections, but there were no major complications such as respiratory depression. Minor complications in this study (nausea, urinary retention, drowsiness, vomiting, hallucinations, lightheadedness, and prolonged ileus) were not significantly different between IM and IV groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303987

  13. Effects of Continuous Intravenous Infusion of Methoxamine on the Intraoperative Hemodynamics of Elderly Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Defeng; Wu, Yue; Yang, Lin; Han, Jun; Liu, Ruochuan; Wang, Lijie

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic disturbances are common during continuous epidural anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. This study aimed to investigate the effects of methoxamine on the intraoperative hemodynamics in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty under epidural anesthesia. Material/Methods This prospective study included 150 elderly patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty under epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomly assigned into 5 groups (n=30 per group): a control group receiving saline (Group C), a dopamine group receiving 7 μg/kg/min dopamine (Group D), and methoxamine groups receiving 1, 2, or 3 μg/kg/min methoxamine (Groups M1, M2, and M3, respectively). Hemodynamic parameters were assessed 10 min before anesthesia (T1); 10 min (T2), 20 min, (T3), 30 min (T4), and 60 min (T5) after anesthesia; and at the conclusion of surgery (T6). Results At T2–T6, the mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output, stroke volume, stroke volume ratio, and pulmonary vascular resistance were higher in Groups D, M2, and M3 compared to Group C (p<0.05). Compared to Group D, the heart rate and rate pressure product were significantly lower in Groups M1–M3. Infusion volume, ephedrine dose, and postoperative 24-h urine volume were significantly lower and intraoperative urine volume was significantly greater in Groups D, M2, and M3 compared with Group C. Hypertension occurred more frequently in Group M3 than in any other group. Conclusions Continuous intravenous infusion of 2 μg/kg/min methoxamine is safe and effective in maintaining hemodynamic stability in elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25326008

  14. Continuous intravenous infusion of enfuvirtide in a patient with a multidrug-resistant HIV strain.

    PubMed

    Neijzen, Robert W; Van Maarseveen, Erik M; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Bonora, Stefano; D'Avolio, Antonio; Mudrikova, Tania

    2016-08-01

    Case description To evaluate whether continuous intravenous (i.v.) administration of enfuvirtide (T20) could be a suitable alternative to subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of T20 in a patient with extensively drug-resistant HIV experiencing difficulties administering T20 subcutaneously. T20 was administered to a patient through 100 mL cassettes once daily via a CADD. Plasma samples were drawn and the pharmacokinetic profile compared to that of s.c. twice daily administration of T20. Also, viral replication and CD4+ count were monitored over a period of 9 months for this study. Continuous i.v. administration of T20 resulted in significantly higher T20 plasma levels compared to s.c. administration, continued viral suppression, a rise in CD4+ count and strong patient preference over s.c. administration. Conclusion This method of T20 administration may be a suitable alternative for selected patients who are not able to tolerate it when given subcutaneously. It may even be considered a priori in selected patients with extensive viral resistance who are unable or unwilling to inject T20 subcutaneously. PMID:27180258

  15. Effect of prolonged intravenous glucose and essential amino acid infusion on nitrogen balance, muscle protein degradation and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene expression in calves

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Fouzia; Crompton, Leslie A; Scaife, Jes R; Lomax, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusions of glucose and amino acids increase both nitrogen balance and muscle accretion. We hypothesised that co-infusion of glucose (to stimulate insulin) and essential amino acids (EAA) would act additively to improve nitrogen balance by decreasing muscle protein degradation in association with alterations in muscle expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Methods We examined the effect of a 5 day intravenous infusions of saline, glucose, EAA and glucose + EAA, on urinary nitrogen excretion and muscle protein degradation. We carried out the study in 6 restrained calves since ruminants offer the advantage that muscle protein degradation can be assessed by excretion of 3 methyl-histidine and multiple muscle biopsies can be taken from the same animal. On the final day of infusion blood samples were taken for hormone and metabolite measurement and muscle biopsies for expression of ubiquitin, the 14-kDa E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and proteasome sub-units C2 and C8. Results On day 5 of glucose infusion, plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were increased while urea nitrogen excretion and myofibrillar protein degradation was decreased. Co-infusion of glucose + EAA prevented the loss of urinary nitrogen observed with EAA infusions alone and enhanced the increase in plasma IGF-1 concentration but there was no synergistic effect of glucose + EAA on the decrease in myofibrillar protein degradation. Muscle mRNA expression of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, 14-kDa E2 and proteasome sub-unit C2 were significantly decreased, after glucose but not amino acid infusions, and there was no further response to the combined infusions of glucose + EAA. Conclusion Prolonged glucose infusion decreases myofibrillar protein degradation, prevents the excretion of infused EAA, and acts additively with EAA to increase plasma IGF-1 and improve net nitrogen balance. There was no evidence of synergistic effects between

  16. Comparison of the pharmacodynamics of biapenem in bronchial epithelial lining fluid in healthy volunteers given half-hour and three-hour intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Eiki; Kikuchi, Junko; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Oizumi, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-07-01

    The time above the MIC (T>MIC) is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameter that correlates with the therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics. A prolonged infusion can provide plasma drug concentrations that remain above the MIC for a long period. The objective of this study was to compare the PK/PD parameters in bronchial epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of biapenem given as 0.5-h and 3-h infusions by using bronchoscopic microsampling (BMS). Six healthy adult volunteers received 0.5-h and 3-h infusions of 0.3 g of biapenem with a washout interval. BMS was performed repeatedly from 0.5 to 24 h after biapenem administration in order to determine the pharmacokinetics in bronchial ELF. The subjects received intravenous biapenem with the same regimens again and then underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at the end of infusion in order to determine the concentration of the drug in alveolar ELF. The percentages (means +/- standard deviations) of T>MIC in bronchial ELF at MICs from 0.25 to 4 microg/ml ranged from zero to 34.6% +/- 5.2% after the 0.5-h infusion and from 5.1% +/- 5.6% to 52.2% +/- 17.0% after the 3-h infusion. The percentage of T>MIC in bronchial ELF after the 3-h infusion tended to be higher than that after the 0.5-h infusion. The concentrations of the drug in alveolar ELF after 0.5-h and 3-h infusions were 3.5 +/- 1.2 microg/ml and 1.3 +/- 0.3 microg/ml, respectively. The present results support the use of prolonged infusions of beta-lactam antibiotics and may provide critical information for successful treatment of lower respiratory tract infections based on PK/PD parameters in bronchial ELF. PMID:19380601

  17. Intra-arrest Hypothermia: Both Cold Liquid Ventilation with Perfluorocarbons and Cold Intravenous Saline Rapidly Achieve Hypothermia, but Only Cold Liquid Ventilation Improves Resumption of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Riter, Henry G.; Brooks, Leonard A.; Pretorius, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Laynez W.; Kerber, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid intra-arrest induction of hypothermia using total liquid ventilation (TLV) with cold perfluorocarbons improves resuscitation outcome from ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cold saline intravenous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a simpler method of inducing hypothermia. We compared these 2 methods of rapid hypothermia induction for cardiac resuscitation. Methods Three groups of swine were studied: cold preoxygenated TLV (TLV, n=8), cold intravenous saline infusion (S, n=8), and control (C, n=8). VF was electrically induced. Beginning at 8 minutes of VF, TLV and S animals received 3 minutes of cold TLV or rapid cold saline infusion. After 11 minutes of VF, all groups received standard air ventilation and closed chest massage. Defibrillation was attempted after 3 minutes of CPR (14 minutes of VF). The end point was resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Pulmonary arterial (PA) temperature decreased after 1 minute of CPR from 37.2°C to 32.2°C in S and from 37.1°C to 34.8°C in TLV (S or TLV vs. C p<0.0001). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was higher in TLV than S animals during the initial 3 minutes of CPR. Arterial pO2 was higher in the preoxygenated TLV animals. ROSC was achieved in 7 of 8 TLV, 2 of 8 S, and 1 of 8 C (TLV vs. C, p=0.03). Conclusions Moderate hypothermia was achieved rapidly during VF and CPR using both cold saline infusion and cold TLV, but ROSC was higher than control only in cold TLV animals, probably due to better CPP and pO2. The method by which hypothermia is achieved influences ROSC. PMID:19249149

  18. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (16 or 20%) therapy in obese patients with primary immunodeficiency: a retrospective analysis of administration by infusion pump or subcutaneous rapid push.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R

    2013-08-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted at a single centre, capturing data on 173 primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) patients, including 40 obese patients, using subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulin (Ig) (SCIG) (16 or 20%) delivered by infusion pump or subcutaneous (s.c.) rapid push. Patients previously using Ig administered as intravenous (i.v.) infusions (IVIG) were converted to SCIG dosing on a 1:1 basis. In both obese and non-obese patients, mean serum Ig levels were higher during SCIG administration (steady state) compared with IVIG administration (trough values). Similar SCIG dose : serum IgG level relationships were observed between obese and non-obese patients, suggesting the consistent bioavailability of SCIG regardless of body mass index (BMI). The mean SCIG volume per dosing site and the mean number of dosing days per week were greater with s.c. rapid push compared with infusion pump in this cohort, but the mean number of sites per infusion session was lower with s.c. rapid push. Both methods were well tolerated. The use of 20 versus 16% SCIG in obese patients improved dosing efficiency, resulting in smaller weekly volumes (54·7 versus 74·5 ml/week) and dosing on fewer days per week (2·3 versus 3·4 days). These data do not suggest a need for SCIG dosing adjustments in obese individuals relative to non-obese patients. The administration of SCIG using either infusion pump or s.c. rapid push is a practical and well-tolerated alternative to IVIG in obese patients. Offering various administration techniques provides a greater opportunity for treatment satisfaction and patient empowerment, which may support high levels of patient compliance. PMID:23607310

  19. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (16 or 20%) therapy in obese patients with primary immunodeficiency: a retrospective analysis of administration by infusion pump or subcutaneous rapid push

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, R

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted at a single centre, capturing data on 173 primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) patients, including 40 obese patients, using subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulin (Ig) (SCIG) (16 or 20%) delivered by infusion pump or subcutaneous (s.c.) rapid push. Patients previously using Ig administered as intravenous (i.v.) infusions (IVIG) were converted to SCIG dosing on a 1:1 basis. In both obese and non-obese patients, mean serum Ig levels were higher during SCIG administration (steady state) compared with IVIG administration (trough values). Similar SCIG dose : serum IgG level relationships were observed between obese and non-obese patients, suggesting the consistent bioavailability of SCIG regardless of body mass index (BMI). The mean SCIG volume per dosing site and the mean number of dosing days per week were greater with s.c. rapid push compared with infusion pump in this cohort, but the mean number of sites per infusion session was lower with s.c. rapid push. Both methods were well tolerated. The use of 20 versus 16% SCIG in obese patients improved dosing efficiency, resulting in smaller weekly volumes (54·7 versus 74·5 ml/week) and dosing on fewer days per week (2·3 versus 3·4 days). These data do not suggest a need for SCIG dosing adjustments in obese individuals relative to non-obese patients. The administration of SCIG using either infusion pump or s.c. rapid push is a practical and well-tolerated alternative to IVIG in obese patients. Offering various administration techniques provides a greater opportunity for treatment satisfaction and patient empowerment, which may support high levels of patient compliance. PMID:23607310

  20. Acute intravenous leptin infusion increases glucose turnover but not skeletal muscle glucose uptake in ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Burcelin, R; Kamohara, S; Li, J; Tannenbaum, G S; Charron, M J; Friedman, J M

    1999-06-01

    The mouse ob gene encodes leptin, an adipocyte hormone that regulates body weight and energy expenditure. Leptin has potent metabolic effects on fat and glucose metabolism. A mutation of the ob gene results in mice with severe hereditary obesity and diabetes that can be corrected by treatment with the hormone. In lean mice, leptin acutely increases glucose metabolism in an insulin-independent manner, which could account, at least in part, for some of the antidiabetic effect of the hormone. To investigate further the acute effect of leptin on glucose metabolism in insulin-resistant obese diabetic mice, leptin (40 ng x g(-1) x h(-1)) was administered intravenously for 6 h in C57Bl/6J ob/ob mice. Leptin increased glucose turnover and stimulated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT), brain, and heart with no increase in heart rate. A slight increase in all splanchnic tissues was also noticed. Conversely, no increase in skeletal muscle or white adipose tissue (WAT) glucose uptake was observed. Plasma insulin concentration increased moderately but neither glucose, glucagon, thyroid hormones, growth hormone, nor IGF-1 levels were different from phosphate-buffered saline-infused C57Bl/6J ob/ob mice. In addition, leptin stimulated hepatic glucose production, which was associated with increased glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Conversely, PEPCK activity was rather diminished. Interestingly, hepatic insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity was slightly elevated, but neither the content of glucose transporter GLUT2 nor the phosphorylation state of the insulin receptor and IRS-1 were changed by acute leptin treatment. Hepatic lipid metabolism was not stimulated during the acute leptin infusion, since the content of triglycerides, glycerol, and citrate was unchanged. These findings suggest that in ob/ob mice, the antidiabetic antiobesity effect of leptin could be the result of a profound alteration of glucose metabolism in liver

  1. Time Savings with Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection versus Rituximab Intravenous Infusion: A Time and Motion Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Erwin; Kritikou, Persefoni; Sandoval, Mariana; Tao, Sunning; Wiesner, Christof; Carella, Angelo Michele; Ngoh, Charles; Waterboer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab is a standard treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The SABRINA trial (NCT01200758) showed that a subcutaneous (SC) rituximab formulation did not compromise efficacy or safety compared with intravenous (IV) infusion. We aimed to quantify active healthcare professional (HCP) time and patient chair time for rituximab SC and IV, including potential time savings. Methods This non-interventional time and motion study was run in eight countries and 30 day oncology units. Rituximab SC data were collected alongside the MabCute trial (NCT01461928); IV data were collected per routine real-world practice. Trained observers recorded active HCP time for pre-specified tasks (stopwatch) and chair time (time of day). A random intercept model was used to analyze active HCP time (by task and for all tasks combined) in the treatment room and drug preparation area, drug administration duration, chair time and patient treatment room time by country and/or across countries. Active HCP and chair time were extrapolated to a patient’s first year of treatment (11 rituximab sessions). Results Mean active HCP time was 35.0 and 23.7 minutes for IV and SC process, respectively (-32%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction in time was 27–58%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated active HCP time (first year of treatment) was 1.1–5.2 hours. Mean chair time was 262.1 minutes for IV, including 180.9 minutes infusion duration, vs. 67.3 minutes for SC, including 8.3 minutes SC injection administration (-74%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction was 53–91%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated chair time for the first year of treatment was 3.1–5.5 eight-hour days. Conclusions Compared with rituximab IV, rituximab SC was associated with reduced chair time and active HCP time. The latter could be invested in other activities, whereas the former may lead to more available appointments, reducing waiting lists and increasing the efficiency of day oncology units. Trial

  2. Effects of Rate of Infusion and Probenecid on Serum Levels, Renal Excretion, and Tolerance of Intravenous Doses of Cefoxitin in Humans: Comparison with Cephalothin

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Stewart; Raftery, E. B.; Goldberg, A. D.; Skeggs, H.; Till, A. E.; Martin, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using a randomized crossover design, 1-g intravenous doses of cephalothin and cefoxitin, a cephalosporinase-resistant cephamycin, were infused into 12 normal adult males over periods of 120, 30, and 3 min, the last with and without prior intravenous infusions of probenecid (1 g). Mean peak serum concentrations of antibiotic activity after cephalothin infusions were 23, 56, 103, and 102 μg/ml, respectively, and after cefoxitin infusions they were 27, 74, 115, and 125 μg/ml, respectively. Probenecid treatment prolonged the terminal serum half-life of cephalothin-like activity from 0.52 to 1.0 h, and of cefoxitin from 0.68 to 1.4 h. In contrast to cephalothin, which was found to be metabolized about 25% to the less active desacetyl form, cefoxitin was metabolized less than 2% to the virtually inactive descarbamyl form, as judged from urinary recoveries. Neither antibiotic displayed detectable organ toxicity. Of 300 recent clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli other than Pseudomonas spp., 83% were susceptible to cephalothin but 95% were susceptible to cefoxitin. Organisms resistant to cephalothin but susceptible to cefoxitin included strains of Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella spp., Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter spp., and Bacteroides spp. PMID:15830485

  3. Intravenous PGF2 alpha infusion does not enhance hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during canine one-lung hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Miller, F L; Malmkvist, G; Cooley, R; Marshall, C; Marshall, B E

    1988-02-01

    The effect of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) on the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response was studied in 12 closed-chest dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital and paralyzed with pancuronium. The right lung was ventilated continuously with 100% O2, while the left lung was either ventilated with 100% O2 ("hyperoxia") or ventilated with an hypoxic gas mixture ("hypoxia:" end-tidal PO2 approximately equal to 50.0 +/- 0.1 mmHg). Cardiac output (CO) was altered from a "normal" value of 2.89 +/- 0.26 1.min-1 to a "high" value of 3.55 +/- 0.26 1.min-1 by opening arteriovenous fistulae which allowed measurements of two points along a pressure-flow line. These four phases of left lung hypoxia or hyperoxia with normal and high cardiac output were performed in the absence of, and in the presence of, PGF2 alpha administered as a constant peripheral intravenous infusion of 1.0 microgram.kg-1.min-1. During left lung hypoxia, mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) increased significantly when compared to hyperoxia. With PGF2 alpha administration, mean PAP increased significantly during both hyperoxia and hypoxia. The presence or absence of PGF2 alpha had no effect on cardiac output or PaO2 during hypoxia. Relative blood flow to each lung was measured with a differential CO2 excretion (VCO2) method corrected for the Haldane effect. With both lungs hyperoxic, the percent left lung blood flow (%QL-VCO2) was 45 +/- 1%. When the left lung was exposed to hypoxia, the %QL-VCO2 decreased significantly to 29 +/- 3%. However, with the administration of PGF2 alpha, the %QL-VCO2 during left lung hypoxia did not change significantly 26 +/- 3%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3422547

  4. Disposition, metabolism, and excretion of [14C]doripenem after a single 500-milligram intravenous infusion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Iolanda; Mannens, Geert; Janssen, Cor; Vermeir, Marc; Cuyckens, Filip; Desai-Krieger, Daksha; Vaccaro, Nicole; Kao, L Mark; Devineni, Damayanthi; Redman, Rebecca; Turner, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    In this open-label, single-center study, eight healthy men each received a single 500-mg dose of [(14)C]doripenem, containing 50 microCi of [(14)C]doripenem, administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion. The concentrations of unchanged doripenem and its primary metabolite (doripenem-M-1) resulting from beta-lactam ring opening were measured in plasma and urine by a validated liquid chromatography method coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry assay. Total radioactivity was measured in blood, plasma, urine, and feces by liquid scintillation counting. Further metabolite profiling was conducted on urine samples using liquid chromatography coupled to radiochemical detection and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Unchanged doripenem and doripenem-M-1 accounted for means of 80.7% and 12.7% of the area under the plasma total-radioactivity-versus-time curve (area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity) and exhibited elimination half-lives of 1.1 and 2.5 h, respectively. Total clearance of doripenem was 16 liters/h, and renal clearance was 12.5 liters/h. At 7 days after the single dose, 95.3% of total doripenem-related radioactivity was recovered in urine and 0.72% in feces. A total mean of 97.2% of the administered dose was excreted in the urine as unchanged doripenem (78.7% +/- 5.7%) and doripenem-M-1 (18.5% +/- 2.6%). Most of the urinary recovery occurred within 4 h of dosing. Three additional minor metabolites were identified in urine: the glycine and taurine conjugates of doripenem-M-1 and oxidized doripenem-M-1. These results show that doripenem is predominantly eliminated in urine as unchanged drug, with only a fraction metabolized to doripenem-M-1 and other minor metabolites. PMID:18644951

  5. Does pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with 5-azacytidine or double intravenous infusion improve their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sirui; Piao, Jinhua; Jin, Lianhua; Zhou, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate whether pretreatment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with 5-azacytidine (5-aza) or double intravenous infusion could enhance their therapeutic potential for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Material/Methods BMSCs were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence or absence of 5-aza and DCM serum. The cultured BMSCs (Groups 1 and 2), 5-aza-induced BMSCs (Groups 3 and 4), and medium alone (model control) were transplanted into 80 female Wistar rats by intravenous tail vein injection. Double infusion of BMSCs with 1-day time-interval was carried out in Groups 2 and 4. Postmortem histological analysis and evaluation of heart function were performed at 4 weeks post-transplantation. Results Some transplanted BMSCs engrafted into myocardial tissue and were positive for cardiac marker troponin T. The hearts containing transplanted BMSCs secreted a larger amount of vascular endothelial growth factor. Cardiac function parameters and serum level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) did not differ among Groups 1, 3, and the model control. As compared with model control, BMSC transplantation in Groups 2 and 4 significantly decreased the serum level of BNP and improved cardiac contractile function, as evidenced by reduced left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, elevated ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Conclusions BMSC transplantation is a promising strategy for the treatment of DCM. Pretreatment of BMSCs with 5-aza and DCM serum does not enhance their therapeutic efficacy, and the double intravenous BMSC infusion method is superior to single infusion for preserving cardiac contractile function in a rat model of DCM. PMID:23314418

  6. [Massive transfusion with the Rapid Infusion System. Its effect on core body temperature].

    PubMed

    Booke, M; Sielenkämper, A

    2001-12-01

    Extensive blood loss requires adequate volume replacement. However the infused volume cannot be adequately warmed especially when high infusion rates are necessary. Subsequently, hypothermia develops and results in hemodynamic instability and coagulopathy. The Rapid Infusion System (RIS) allows high infusion rates (up to 1.5 l/min) while at the same time guaranteeing sufficient warming. The efficacy of the RIS was investigated in 43 consecutive patients who required a massive transfusion. The average volume transfused in these patients was 31.7 +/- 4.5 l (minimum: 7.8 l; maximum: 165.3 l) which is equal to an average exchange of 6.4 times the circulating blood volume (maximum: 39.4 blood volumes). The replacement of such high blood volumes has not yet been published in a series of patients. Despite these high transfusion rates, the body core temperature was maintained at 35.85 +/- 0.1 degrees C. Only five patients had a body core temperature below 34 degrees C, all were trauma patients and four of these five patients already had a preoperative temperature below 34 degrees C. The mortality in this study was 28%, which is markedly reduced in comparison to previous publications although they all considered at patients with significantly less blood loss. Maintaining normothermia and normovolemia by the use of the RIS may explain the improved outcome. PMID:11824076

  7. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus: its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Jan G; Kirberger, Robert M; Steyl, Johan C A; Soley, John T; Booyse, Dirk G; Huchzermeyer, Fritz W; Lowers, Russel H; Guillette, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2) by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions. PMID:24831995

  8. Bilateral cortical hyperactivity detected by fMRI associates with improved motor function following intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Junpei; Sasaki, Masanori; Harada, Kuniaki; Bando, Michio; Kataoka, Yuko; Onodera, Rie; Mikami, Takeshi; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Kocsis, Jeffery D; Honmou, Osamu

    2013-02-25

    Intravenous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow ameliorates functional deficits in rat cerebral infarction models. In this study, MSCs were intravenously administered 6h after right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) induction in rat. Functional MRI (fMRI) during electrical stimulation of the left forepaw and behavioral testing (treadmill stress test) were carried out at day 1, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42 following MCAO. In medium infused group (n=20) electrical stimulation of the left forepaw elicited a unilateral (right cortex) activated signal detected by fMRI in the infarcted somatosensory cortex. In the MSC infused animals two fMRI patterns were observed: unilateral (n=17) and bilateral (n=19) activation of sensorimotor cortex. In the MSC group both unilateral and bilateral cortical activated animals displayed significantly improved motor function compared to the medium infused group. However, the bilateral activated pattern in the MSC group showed the greatest functional recovery. Lesion volume as calculated from high intensity signals using T2WI was less in the MSC groups as compared to the medium group, but the lesion volume for the unilateral and bilateral signals in the MSC group was the same. These results suggest that the presence of a bilateral signal in sensorimotor cortex as detected by fMRI was more predictive of improved functional outcome than lesion volume alone. PMID:23274536

  9. The Rapid Initiation, Titration, and Transition from Intravenous to Oral Treprostinil in a Patient with Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, James Benjamin; Dolan, Justin; Piran, Pirouz; Rahaghi, Franck Farzad

    2015-01-01

    In patients who require urgent initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension medications due to disease progression, it is customary to start intravenous prostacyclin therapy, typically during a hospital admission. If there are complicating factors or relative contraindications to intravenous and subcutaneous prostanoids, oral treprostinil provides another pathway to prostanoid therapy, but this usually requires a prolonged titration. We describe the case of a thirty-six-year-old male with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension and contraindication to intravenous and subcutaneous prostanoid therapy due to congenital deafness and the risk of not hearing the intravenous pump alarms. Intravenous treprostinil was initiated, titrated to high dose, and then rapidly transitioned to oral treprostinil. A rapid initiation, titration, and transition from intravenous to oral treprostinil can be safely performed under watchful supervision in order to achieve higher and more efficacious doses of oral treprostinil in a timely manner. PMID:26457220

  10. Changes in the linear attenuation coefficient of canine appendicular bone following intravenous infusion of strontium lactate, measured using gamma-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Overton, T R; Snyder, R E; Hangartner, T N; Girgis, S; Audette, R J; Secord, D C

    1992-04-01

    Changes in the average linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) within a fixed measurement volume in the proximal end of the dog tibia, which contains trabecular bone and associated soft tissues (the trabecular bone "space"), were monitored continuously using gamma-ray computed tomography (gamma-CT) prior to, during, and following intravenous infusion of strontium (Sr) lactate. An infusion of 1.3-4.7 g of Sr over a period of 110-160 minutes into 20-kg dogs resulted, within 6-8 hours, in an increase of 0.019-0.045 cm-1 (P less than 0.002) in the LAC. Calibration of the gamma-CT system showed that 0.44 mg/cm3 of Sr produced a change of 0.01 cm-1 in the LAC. Using this conversion factor, the Sr concentration in the trabecular bone space resulting from infusion, as measured by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, agreed with that predicted by the change observed in the LAC. Sr present in the serum and urine was consistent with the changes observed in the LAC over the study period. Control dogs infused with mineral-free solutions showed no change in LAC. Calcium equivalents required to give the changes observed in the LAC using Sr indicate that variations in skeletal turnover in man can be monitored in the peripheral skeleton using gamma-CT. PMID:1571847

  11. Recovery of intravenously infused chromium EDTA and lithium sulphate in the urine of cattle and their use as markers to measure urine volume.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M K; Poppi, D P; McLennan, S R

    2009-04-01

    A series of metabolism experiments investigated the recovery of continuous-, intravenously infused chromium complexed with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (CrEDTA) and lithium sulphate in the urine of cattle with a view to using the markers to estimate urine and metabolite output in grazing cattle. The recovery of Cr in urine from these infusions was similar (90%) in metabolism trials when cattle consumed three very contrasting diets: high-grain formulated pellet, lucerne hay (Medicago sativa) or low-quality native grass hay (predominantly Heteropogon contortus). By contrast, Li recovery in urine averaged 46.3 ± 0.40% and 72.6 ± 0.43% for native pasture and lucerne hays, respectively, but was not constant across days. There was negligible transfer of Cr from CrEDTA in blood serum to the rumen or faeces, whereas appreciable quantities of infused Li were found in both. The ratio of urine volume estimated by spot samples and marker dilution of Cr, to urine volume measured gravimetrically, was 1.05. In grazing studies using rumen-fistulated (RF) steers grazing seven different tropical and temperate grass and legume pastures, the ratio of concentrations of purine derivatives (PD) to Cr in spot samples of urine was shown to vary diurnally in the range of 49% to 157% of the average 24 h value. This finding indicated the need for regular sampling of urine to achieve an accurate average value for the PD : Cr ratio in urine for use in estimating urinary PD excretion and hence microbial protein production in the rumen. It was concluded that continuous, intravenous infusion of CrEDTA resulted in a constant recovery of Cr in the urine of cattle across diets and, provided an intensive sampling regime was followed to account for diurnal variation, it would be suitable as a marker to estimate urine volume and urinary output of PD in grazing cattle. PMID:22444379

  12. Rapid, dynamic changes in glomerular permeability to macromolecules during systemic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Josefin; Rippe, Anna; Oberg, Carl M; Rippe, Bengt

    2012-09-15

    The actions of systemic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusions on glomerular permeability were investigated in vivo. In anesthetized Wistar rats (250-280 g), the left ureter was cannulated for urine collection, while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Rats were continuously infused intravenously with either of four doses of ANG II ranging from 16 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) (Lo-ANG II) to 1.82 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) (Hi-ANG II), and in separate experiments with aldosterone (Aldo; 0.22 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), or with the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, or with the Aldo antagonist spironolactone together with a high ANG II dose (910 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1); Hi-Int-ANG II), respectively, and with polydisperse FITC-Ficoll-70/400 (molecular radius 10-80 Å) and (51)Cr-EDTA. Plasma and urine samples were taken at 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min and analyzed by high performance size-exclusion chromatography for determination of glomerular sieving coefficients (θ) to Ficoll. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were also assessed. For ANG II, there was a rapid, marked, partly reversible increase in glomerular permeability (θ) for Ficoll molecules >34 Å in radius, peaking at 5-15 min, which was completely abrogated by the ANG II blocker candesartan but not affected by spironolactone at 15 and 30 min. For Aldo, the response was similar to that found for the lowest dose of ANG II infused. For the two highest ANG II doses given (Hi-Int-ANG II and Hi-ANG II), GFR decreased transiently, concomitant with marked, sustained increases in MAP. Nimodipine completely blocked all hemodynamic ANG II actions, whereas the glomerular permeability response remained unchanged. Thus ANG II directly increased glomerular permeability independently of its hemodynamic actions and largely independently of the concomitant Aldo response. The ANG II-induced increases in glomerular permeability were, according to a two-pore and a log-normal distributed pore model, compatible with an

  13. Cardiovascular effects of intravenous bolus administration and infusion of ketamine-midazolam in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J D; Hartsfield, S M

    1993-10-01

    Cardiovascular effects of IV administered ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) were determined in 12 healthy isoflurane-anesthetized (1.7% end-tidal concentration) dogs. Six dogs received a ketamine-midazolam combination (K-M) as a bolus over 30 seconds and 6 dogs received K-M as an infusion over 15 minutes. Ketamine-midazolam combination as a bolus and an infusion caused early significant (P < 0.05) reductions in mean systemic blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke index, which returned to baseline values near the end of the study. Heart rate decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in dogs of the infusion group and returned to the baseline value near the end of the study. One dog died after K-M bolus administration. Mean maximal decreases from baseline for systemic blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke index were significantly (P < 0.05) greater in dogs of the bolus group than in dogs of the infusion group; therefore, cardiovascular effects of K-M after infusion were less severe than those after bolus. Base excess and pHa decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in the infusion group, although similar changes occurred in both groups. Four dogs were maintained with 1.7% end-tidal isoflurane to determine temporal effects of isoflurane; these dogs did not receive K-M. Increases in heart rate, cardiac index, stroke index, and left and right ventricular stroke work indexes were significant (P < 0.05) at various sample collection intervals, particularly during the later stages of the study. Isoflurane anesthesia effectively blocked the cardiostimulatory properties of K-M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8250398

  14. Evaluation of Meropenem Regimens Suppressing Emergence of Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii with Human Simulated Exposure in an In Vitro Intravenous-Infusion Hollow-Fiber Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xian-Jia; Yang, Yang; Gong, Wei-Tao; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Ying-Qun

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to carbapenems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be suppressed by optimizing the administration of meropenem. However, whether the same is true for Acinetobacter baumannii is not fully understood. We assessed the bactericidal activity of meropenem and its potency to suppress the emergence of resistance in A. baumannii with human simulated exposure in an in vitro intravenous-infusion hollow-fiber infection model (HFIM). Two clinical strains of carbapenem-susceptible multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (CS-MDRAB), CSRA24 and CSRA91, were used, and their MICs and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) were determined. Six meropenem dosage regimens (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g given every 8 h [q8h] with a 0.5-h or 3-h infusion for seven consecutive days) were simulated and then evaluated in the HFIM. Both the total population and resistant subpopulations of the two strains were quantified. Drug concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. All dosage regimens, except for the lowest dosage (0.5 g for both the 0.5-h and 3-h infusions), showed 3-log CFU/ml bacterial killing. Dosage regimens of 2.0 g with 0.5-h and 3-h infusions exhibited an obvious bactericidal effect and suppressed resistance. Selective amplification of subpopulations with reduced susceptibility to meropenem was suppressed with a percentage of the dosage interval in which meropenem concentrations exceeded the MPC (T>MPC) of ≥20% or with a ratio of T>MPC to the percentage of the dosage interval in which drug concentrations are within the mutant selection window of ≥0.25. Our in vitro data support the use of a high dosage of meropenem (2.0 g q8h) for the treatment of severe infection caused by CS-MDRAB. PMID:25182633

  15. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) in childhood: rapid resolution after intravenous immunoglobulins treatment.

    PubMed

    Pavone, P; Le Pira, A; Greco, F; Vitaliti, G; Smilari, P L; Parano, E; Falsaperla, R

    2014-01-01

    Three young patients with Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) are reported. Some weeks following an upper tract infection, the children after a short period of recovery, showed acute onset of symmetric weakness of the lower limbs with difficulty in standing by and walking. The distal muscle weakness had a rapid progression with involvement of the cranial nerve, and then with severe impairment of the consciousness till to coma in one of the three children. BBE is a rare and often underdiagnosed affection in childhood. Common neuro-immune pathogenesis, overlap of clinical signs and strict correlation among BBE with Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barrè syndrome lead to think that these affections represent an unique spectrum with different central and peripheral involvement. In these children, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins resulted in a progressive and rapid resolution of the clinical features. PMID:25268095

  16. The efficacy of the time-scheduled decremental continuous infusion of fentanyl for postoperative patient-controlled analgesia after total intravenous anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Park, Sung-Yong; Chang, Hyuk Soo; Nam, Si-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous fentanyl has been used for acute postoperative pain management, but has not always provided reliable adequate analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of time-scheduled decremental infusion of fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Methods Ninety-nine patients, aged 20-65 years, undergoing laparoscopic-assisted hysterectomy using total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) were randomly assigned into one of the three groups. Their background infusions of fentanyl diluent (2 ml/hr of diluent was equivalent with 0.5 µg/kg/hr of fentanyl) with PCA were maintained at the fixed-rate of 2 ml/hr until the postoperative 24 hr (FX2-2-2), or at the decremental rates of 6.0, 4.0, 2.0 ml/hr (D6-4-2) and 8.0, 4.0, 2.0 ml/hr (D8-4-2). The visual analogue score (VAS), incidence of inadequate analgesia, frequency of PCA intervention, and side effects were evaluated. Results VAS was significantly higher in FX2-2-2 than in D6-4-2 and D8-4-2 until postoperative 3 hr (P < 0.05). After postoperative 4 hr, VAS was significantly higher in FX2-2-2 than D8-4-2 (P < 0.05). The incidence of inadequate analgesia of FX2-2-2 was significantly greater than D6-4-2 (P = 0.038) and D8-4-2 (P < 0.001) until postoperative 1 hr. None of the patients had ventilatory depression, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were not significant among the groups. Conclusions The time-scheduled decremental background infusion regimens of fentanyl, based on the pharmacokinetic model, could provide more effective postoperative pain management after TIVA, and the side effects and the risk for morbidity were not different from the fixed-rate infusion regimen. PMID:24427461

  17. Le morte du tumour: histological features of tumor destruction in chemo-resistant cancers following intravenous infusions of pathotropic nanoparticles bearing therapeutic genes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Chan, Maria Teresa; Geraldino, Nelson; Lopez, Francisco F; Cornelio, Gerardo H; Lorenzo, Conrado C; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Liu, Liqiong; Hall, Frederick L

    2007-06-01

    The pathotropic targeting of therapeutic nanoparticles to cancerous lesions is an innovative concept that has recently been reduced to practice in clinical trials for the treatment of metastatic cancer. Previously, we reported that intravenous infusions of Rexin-G, a pathotropic nanoparticle (or vector) bearing a cyto-ablative construct, induced tumor regression, reduced tumor burden, and improved survival, while enhancing the overall quality-of-life of patients with otherwise intractable chemotherapy-resistant cancers. In this report, we describe the major histopathological and radiologic features that are characteristic of solid tumors under the destructive influences of Rexin-G administered as a single therapeutic agent. To further promote tumor eradication and enhance cancer survival, we explored the potential of an auxiliary gene transfer strategy, specifically intended to induce a localized cancer auto-immunization in addition to assisting in acute tumor destruction. This immunization strategy uses Rexin-G in combination with Reximmune-C, a tumor targeted expression vector bearing a granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene. Intravenous infusions of Rexin-G were given first to induce apoptosis and necrosis in the metastatic tumor nodules, thus exposing tumor neo-antigens, followed by Reximmune-C infusions, intended to recruit immune cells discretely into the same compartments (or lesions). The intent of this two-step approach is to bring a complement of cells involved in humoral and cell-mediated immunity in close proximity to the immunizing tumor antigens in a concerted effort to assist in tumor eradication and to promote a cancer vaccination in situ. Herein, we also describe the distinctive histopathologic and immunocytochemical features of tumors in terminal cancer patients who received Rexin-G infusions in combination with Reximmune-C. In addition to documenting the first histological indications of clinical efficacy achieved by this

  18. Safety and efficacy of rapid (1,000 mg in 1 hr) intravenous iron dextran for treatment of maternal iron deficient anemia of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lee; Smith, Samuel; Gilstrop, Marisa; Derman, Richard; Auerbach, Sarah; London, Nicola; Lenowitz, Steven; Bahrain, Huzefa; McClintock, Jessica; Auerbach, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Maternal iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. Oral iron is recommended to reverse anemia, but has gastrointestinal toxicity and frequent non-adherence. Intravenous (IV) iron is reserved for intolerance of, or unresponsiveness to, oral therapy, malabsorption, and severe anemia (1% with hemoglobin [Hgb] levels <7 g/dL). With rare (<100 per one million) adverse events (AEs) ability to infuse a sufficient dose of low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID) over 60 min, LMWID is an attractive option. This study demonstrated safety and efficacy of rapid IV infusion of 1,000 mg LMWID to gravidas with moderate to severe IDA. An observational treatment study of 1,000 mg LMWID administered over 1 hr for IDA in 189 consecutive, unselected second and third trimester gravidas after oral iron failure was conducted. All received a test dose of 25 mg LMWID and were monitored for AEs during the 60-min infusion. No premedication was administered unless more than one drug allergy or asthma was present in which case IV methylprednisolone was administered. All were followed through pregnancy and delivery. Monitored parameters included Hgb, mean corpuscular volume, serum ferritin, and percent transferrin saturation. About 189 subjects received 1,000 mg LMWID. No serious AEs occurred. About 2% experienced transient infusion reactions. Hgb improved by 1-1.9 g/dL in 82% and ≥2 g/dL in 24%. Second trimester treatment was not associated with greater Hgb improvement than third trimester treatment. Anemia resolved in 95%. Administration of a single large dose of IV LMWID was effective, safe, and convenient. Am. J. Hematol. 91:590-593, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971581

  19. Effect of Intra-Medullar and Intra-Venous Infusions of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cell Engraftment by In-Vivo Cell Tracking and Osteoinductivity in Rabbit Long Bones: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Ohmine, Ken; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stem cell therapy can be an efficacious treatment option for bone fragility disorders (eg, osteogenesis imperfecta, disuse osteopenia, and osteoporosis), and successful cell therapy application may be dependent on optimal cell engraftment in target bones. The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency of intra-medullar and intra-venous delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to improve cell engraftment rate, bone mineral density, and micro-architecture. Methods By using six healthy juvenile New Zealand White rabbits, MSC were isolated from cancellous bone harvests and confirmed to have osteogenic capacity by inducing ectopic bone formation. The MSC were cultured, transduced by foamy viral vectors with marker genes for in vivo cell tracking, and expanded. All rabbits had one randomly selected limb receive intra-medullar infusion of 3×107 to 1×108 autologous MSC in the distal femur or the distal femur and proximal tibia. Two of six rabbits also received an intra-venous MSC infusion. At 28 days, MSC bone engraftment was assessed by PCR and the bone density and microstructure assessed by computed tomography and histomorphometry. Results The intra-medullar-infused MSC were detected in epiphysis or diaphysis of the distal femurs and/or proximal tibiae. Infused MSC comprised 0.01 to 0.3% of all cells in the bone tissues. The intra-venous-infused MSC were not detected in any location. Neither intra-medullar nor intra-venous MSC infusion altered bone volume, bone mineral density, or cortical bone porosity/thickness. Systemic biodistribution of intra-medullar-infused MSC was not evident. Conclusions Our results indicated that intra-medullar infusion can be an effective cell delivery route for stem cell therapy potentially for orthopedic disorders, in preference to systemic administration. Further research is warranted to demonstrate an efficacy of intra-medullar MSC infusion on bone density and micro-architecture using animal models of bone disorders

  20. Rapid Resolution of Grief with IV Infusion of Ketamine: A Unique Phenomenological Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Mahesh Ramanna; Srinivasa, Preethi; Kumbar, Prabha S.; Ramalingaiah, Vinay Hosagavi; Muthyalappa, Chandrashekar; Durgoji, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a primarily FDA-approved anaesthetic agent is also used as recreational drug. Based on preclinical findings and later the clinical observations it is noted to have rapid antidepressant effect due to its mechanisms related to NMDA antagonism. In spite of established evidence of ketamine being effective in depression with significant role in treatment resistant cases as well, there was absolute dearth of literature regarding its utility in grief-related disorders. In this context we present a case of 28-year-old graduate male who presented to us in complicated grief following death of his wife due to obstetric complications. With the patient and immediate family members consenting for use of ketamine as off-label use, patient had single IV infusion of ketamine following which he had unique phenomenological experience ultimately resolving his grief in few minutes. Through this case we highlight the enormous therapeutic promise of ketamine in complicated grief. PMID:27011405

  1. Rapid Resolution of Grief with IV Infusion of Ketamine: A Unique Phenomenological Experience.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Mahesh Ramanna; Srinivasa, Preethi; Kumbar, Prabha S; Ramalingaiah, Vinay Hosagavi; Muthyalappa, Chandrashekar; Durgoji, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a primarily FDA-approved anaesthetic agent is also used as recreational drug. Based on preclinical findings and later the clinical observations it is noted to have rapid antidepressant effect due to its mechanisms related to NMDA antagonism. In spite of established evidence of ketamine being effective in depression with significant role in treatment resistant cases as well, there was absolute dearth of literature regarding its utility in grief-related disorders. In this context we present a case of 28-year-old graduate male who presented to us in complicated grief following death of his wife due to obstetric complications. With the patient and immediate family members consenting for use of ketamine as off-label use, patient had single IV infusion of ketamine following which he had unique phenomenological experience ultimately resolving his grief in few minutes. Through this case we highlight the enormous therapeutic promise of ketamine in complicated grief. PMID:27011405

  2. Intravenous infusion of H2-saline suppresses oxidative stress and elevates antioxidant potential in Thoroughbred horses after racing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Masahiko; Kusano, Kanichi; Ishibashi, Toru; Kiuchi, Masataka; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Upon intensive, exhaustive exercise, exercise-induced reactive oxygen species may exceed the antioxidant defence threshold, consequently resulting in muscular damage or late-onset chronic inflammation. Recently, the therapeutic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) for human rheumatoid arthritis have been demonstrated. However, it is also important to clarify the effects of administrating H2 in large animals other than humans, as H2 is thought to reach the target organ by passive diffusion upon delivery from the blood flow, indicating that the distance from the administration point to the target is critical. However, data on the effects of H2 on oxidative stress in real-life exhaustive exercise in large animals are currently lacking. We here investigated 13 Thoroughbred horses administered intravenous 2-L saline with or without 0.6-ppm H2 (placebo, N = 6; H2, N = 7) before participating in a high-intensity simulation race. Intravenous H2-saline significantly suppressed oxidative stress immediately, 3 h, and 24 h after the race, although the antioxidant capability was not affected throughout the study. The serum creatine kinase, lactate, and uric acid levels were increased in both groups. Taken together, these results indicate that intravenous H2-saline can significantly and specifically suppress oxidative stress induced after exhaustive racing in Thoroughbred horses. PMID:26493164

  3. Rapid blood clearance of biotinylated IgG after infusion of avidin

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, V.V.; Mamontova, A.G.; Checkneva, Y.Y.; Shnyra, A.A.; Domogatsky, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The techniques of immunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging suffer from the problem of background: intravenously injected antibodies remain in the circulation much longer than it is necessary for effective binding to the target. Various approaches, including the postinjection of second antibodies, were explored to overcome the problem with some success. The phenomenon of a 100-fold more rapid blood clearance of biotinylated immunoglobulins after postinjection of an equivalent dose of avidin is described. The concentration of /sup 125/I-labeled biotinylated IgG in the circulation of rats slowly decreased to 20% of initial in 24 hr. Avidin injection at any interval during this period induced 90-95% reduction of radioactivity in blood in 15 min. Up to 70% of the radioactivity was recovered in the liver. Avidin-induced blood clearance of biotinylated immunoglobulins may find applications in immunotherapy and radio- or nuclear magnetic resonance immunoimaging.

  4. Oligodeoxynucleotide CpG 7909 delivered as intravenous infusion demonstrates immunologic modulation in patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian K; Ballas, Zuhair K; Weisdorf, Daniel; Wooldridge, James E; Bossler, Aaron D; Shannon, Mary; Rasmussen, Wendy L; Krieg, Arthur M; Weiner, George J

    2006-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN) can alter various immune cell subsets important in antibody therapy of malignancy. We undertook a phase I trial of CPG 7909 (also known as PF-3512676) in patients with previously treated lymphoma with the primary objective of evaluating safety across a range of doses, and secondary objectives of evaluating immunomodulatory effects and clinical effects. Twenty-three patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma received up to 3 weekly 2-hour intravenous (IV) infusions of CPG ODN 7909 at dose levels 0.01 to 0.64 mg/kg. Evaluation of immunologic parameters and clinical endpoints occurred for 6 weeks. Infusion-related toxicity included grade 1 nausea, hypotension, and IV catheter discomfort. Serious adverse hematologic events observed more than once included anemia (2=Gr3, 2=Gr4), thrombocytopenia (4=Gr3), and neutropenia (2=Gr3), and were largely judged owing to progressive disease. Immunologic observations included: (1) The mean ratio of NK-cell concentrations compared with pretreatment at day 2 was 1.44 (95% CI=0.94-1.94) and at day 42 was 1.53 (95% CI=1.14-1.91); (2) NK activity generally increased in subjects; and (3) Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity increased in select cohorts. No clinical responses were documented radiographically at day 42. Two subjects demonstrated late response. We conclude CpG 7909 can be safely given as a 2-hour IV infusion to patients with previously treated non-Hodgkin lymphoma at doses that have immunomodulatory effects. PMID:16971811

  5. Evaluation of the serotonin receptor blockers ketanserin and methiothepin on the pulmonary hypertensive responses of broilers to intravenously infused serotonin.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M E; Wideman, R F

    2006-04-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension remains incompletely understood. Many factors have been implicated; however, there has been great interest in the potent pulmonary vasoconstrictor serotonin (5-HT) due to episodes of primary pulmonary hypertension in humans triggered by serotoninergic appetite-suppressant drugs. Pulmonary hypertensive patients have elevated blood 5-HT levels and pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 5-HT is believed to be mediated through 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors that are expressed by pulmonary smooth muscle cells. The vascular remodeling associated with pulmonary hypertension also appears to require the serotonin transporter. We investigated the roles of 5-HT receptor blockers on the development of pulmonary hypertension induced by infusing 5-HT i.v. in broilers. For this purpose, we treated broilers with the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin (5 mg/ kg of BW) or with the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist methiothepin (3 mg/kg of BW). Receptor blockade was followed by infusion of 5-HT while recording pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary arterial blood flow. The results demonstrate that methiothepin, but not ketanserin, eliminated the 5-HT-induced pulmonary hypertensive responses in broilers. The 5-HT2A receptor does not, therefore, appear to play a role in the 5-HT-induced pulmonary hypertensive responses in broilers. Methiothepin did not inhibit pulmonary vascular contractility per se, because the pulmonary hypertensive response to the thromboxane A2 mimetic U44069 remained intact in methiothepin-treated broilers. Methiothepin will be a useful tool for evaluating the role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) as well as the onset of pulmonary hypertension triggered by inflammatory stimuli such as bacterial lipolysaccharide. PMID:16615363

  6. Effects of continuous rate intravenous infusion of butorphanol on physiologic and outcome variables in horses after celiotomy.

    PubMed

    Sellon, Debra C; Roberts, Malcolm C; Blikslager, Anthony T; Ulibarri, Catherine; Papich, Mark G

    2004-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed to determine whether butorphanol administered by continuous rate infusion (CRI) for 24 hours after abdominal surgery would decrease pain and surgical stress responses and improve recovery in horses. Thirty-one horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for abdominal pain were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol CRI (13 microg/kg/h for 24 hours after surgery; treatment) or isotonic saline (control). All horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV q12h). There were no significant differences between treatment and control horses in preoperative or operative variables. Treatment horses had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentration compared with control horses at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after surgery. Mean weight loss while hospitalized was significantly less for treatment horses than control horses, whether expressed as total decrease in body weight (13.9+/-3.4 and 27.9+/-4.5 kg, respectively) or as a percentage decrease in body weight (2.6+/-0.7 and 6.3+/-1.1%, respectively). Treatment horses were significantly delayed in time to first passage of feces (median times of 15 and 4 hours, respectively). Treatment horses had significantly improved behavior scores during the first 24 hours after surgery, consistent with the conclusion that they experienced less pain during that time. Butorphanol CRI during the immediate postoperative period significantly decreased plasma cortisol concentrations and improved recovery characteristics in horses undergoing abdominal surgery. PMID:15320598

  7. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  8. Phase I trial of systemic intravenous infusion of interleukin-13-Pseudomonas exotoxin in patients with metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Kumar, Parag; Patel, Dhaval; Aufforth, Rachel; Neychev, Vladimir; Sadowski, Samira; Gara, Sudheer K; Joshi, Bharat H; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Yang, Lily; Miettinen, Markku; Puri, Raj K; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but lethal malignancy without effective current therapy for metastatic disease. IL-13-PE is a recombinant cytotoxin consisting of human interleukin-13 (IL-13) and a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). The main objectives of this Phase I dose-escalation trial were to assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of IL-13-PE in patients with metastatic ACC. Eligible patients had confirmed IL-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2) expressions in their tumors. IL-13-PE at dose of 1–2 μg/kg was administered intravenously (IV) on day 1, 3, and 5 in a 4-week cycle. Six patients received 1 μg/kg and two patients received 2 μg/kg of IL-13-PE. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 2 μg/kg, at which patients exhibited thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency without requiring dialysis. PK analysis demonstrated that at MTD, the mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) of IL-13-PE was 21.0 ng/mL, and the terminal half-life of IL-13-PE was 30–39 min. Two (25%) of the eight patients had baseline neutralizing antibodies against PE. Three (75%) of the remaining four tested patients developed neutralizing antibodies against IL-13-PE within 14–28 days of initial treatment. Of the five patients treated at MTD and assessed for response, one patient had stable disease for 5.5 months before disease progression; the others progressed within 1–2 months. In conclusion, systemic IV administration of IL-13-PE is safe at 1 μg/kg. All tested patients developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies during IL-13-PE treatment. Use of strategies for immunodepletion before IL-13-PE treatment should be considered in future trials. PMID:25767039

  9. Pontine μ-opioid receptors mediate bradypnea caused by intravenous remifentanil infusions at clinically relevant concentrations in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Prkic, Ivana; Mustapic, Sanda; Radocaj, Tomislav; Stucke, Astrid G.; Stuth, Eckehard A. E.; Hopp, Francis A.; Dean, Caron

    2012-01-01

    Life-threatening side effects such as profound bradypnea or apnea and variable upper airway obstruction limit the use of opioids for analgesia. It is yet unclear which sites containing μ-opioid receptors (μORs) within the intact in vivo mammalian respiratory control network are responsible. The purpose of this study was 1) to define the pontine region in which μOR agonists produce bradypnea and 2) to determine whether antagonism of those μORs reverses bradypnea produced by intravenous remifentanil (remi; 0.1–1.0 μg·kg−1·min−1). The effects of microinjections of agonist [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO; 100 μM) and antagonist naloxone (NAL; 100 μM) into the dorsal rostral pons on the phrenic neurogram were studied in a decerebrate, vagotomized, ventilated, paralyzed canine preparation during hyperoxia. A 1-mm grid pattern of microinjections was used. The DAMGO-sensitive region extended from 5 to 7 mm lateral of midline and from 0 to 2 mm caudal of the inferior colliculus at a depth of 3–4 mm. During remi-induced bradypnea (∼72% reduction in fictive breathing rate) NAL microinjections (∼500 nl each) within the region defined by the DAMGO protocol were able to reverse bradypnea by 47% (SD 48.0%) per microinjection, with 13 of 84 microinjections producing complete reversal. Histological examination of fluorescent microsphere injections shows that the sensitive region corresponds to the parabrachial/Kölliker-Fuse complex. PMID:22875901

  10. Rapid and sustained oral theophylline loading. An alternative to intravenous aminophylline therapy.

    PubMed

    Brown, D L; Maddux, M S; Organek, H W; Bauman, J L

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated an oral theophylline loading-dose procedure that was designed to rapidly achieve and sustain theophylline serum concentrations of approximately 10 to 12 micrograms/mL. Ten healthy adults were given an oral loading dose of approximately 6 mg/kg of aminophylline, (Aminophyllin) (ie, 4.8 mg/kg of theophylline). Two hours later, each subject was given approximately 6 mg/kg of a sustained-release theophylline tablet (Theo-Dur). Serum samples were collected at 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours, then assayed for theophylline concentration. The mean theophylline concentration (+/- SD) one hour after the initial loading dose was 10.5 +/- 2.3 micrograms/mL. Subsequent theophylline concentrations demonstrated minimal fluctuation, with means ranging from 10.7 +/- 1.6 to 13.6 +/- 2.8 micrograms/mL. Four of the subjects reported headache; none vomited or experienced severe nausea. We conclude that this method of oral theophylline loading can be effective in achieving prompt and sustained therapeutic theophylline levels without significant side effects and that this may provide a valuable therapeutic alternative in those asthmatic patients who do not clearly require intravenous aminophylline therapy. PMID:6838301

  11. [Continuous intravenous infusion of insulin to girls with hereditary tall growth and secretion of human growth hormone, prior to and during Deposiston treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Heine, W; Rudolf, K; Uhlmann, M

    1980-01-01

    Continuous intravenous insulin infusion tests, accompanied by growth hormone determination, were applied to 40 girls of tall growth whose final lengths were predicted to be in excess of 181 cm. The girls were aged between nine and half and 14 years and one month, all of them being in the premenarchic phase. The tests were conducted prior to and following at least one year of Deposiston therapy (oestrogen/gestagen). - Really effective inhibition of growth (7.4 +/- 0.6 cm) was obtained only from five girls, aged between nine years and ten months and eleven years, in whom basal secretion of HGH was lower with significance than that of the whole group, with their stimulation reaction being fully retained. Secretion of somatotropic hormone (STH) of the other girls remained unaffected, prior to and following treatment. The weekly oestrogen dose of 1 mg was relatively low, when compared to propositions made by other authors, but it seemed to be justified by the average reduction in expected final body length obtained for the probands reviewed (5.4 +/- 2.0 cm). PMID:7008461

  12. Effects of Total Dose Infusion of Iron Intravenously in Patients With Acute Heart Failure and Anemia (Hemoglobin < 13 g/dl).

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Bonnie M; Pogue, Kristen T; Hanigan, Sarah; Koelling, Todd M; Dorsch, Michael P

    2016-06-15

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF), and intravenous (IV) iron therapy has been associated with improved clinical status in ambulatory patients with HF. There are limited data to support the safety and efficacy of IV iron administration in patients with acute HF. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the University of Michigan Health System for HF with low iron studies during admission. Patients were grouped based on the receipt of IV iron therapy. Study outcomes included change in hemoglobin, 30-day readmission, and adverse events. Forty-four patients who received IV iron and 128 control patients were identified. The mean dose of IV iron received was 1,057 (±336) mg. IV iron resulted in a significantly greater increase in hemoglobin over time (p = 0.0001). The mean change in hemoglobin in the iron and control groups was 0.74 g/dl and 0.01 g/dl at day 7 and 2.61 g/dl and 0.23 g/dl at day 28, respectively. Thirty-day readmission rates were 30% and 22% for patients in the iron and control groups, respectively (p = 0.2787). In conclusion, total dose infusion IV iron is well tolerated and associated with significant improvement in hemoglobin in acute HF. PMID:27161817

  13. Propofol as sole agent for paediatric day-case dental surgery. A randomised study comparing an intravenous propofol infusion with 100% inspired oxygen versus a nitrous oxide/oxygen/halothane maintenance technique.

    PubMed

    Moore, W J; Underwood, S

    1994-09-01

    After intravenous induction of anaesthesia with propofol (4 mg.kg-1) 80 unpremedicated children admitted for day-case dental extractions were randomly allocated to receive either an intravenous propofol infusion whilst breathing 100% oxygen, or inhalational nitrous oxide, oxygen and halothane for maintenance of anaesthesia. In both groups, the quality of anaesthesia was acceptable to both anaesthetist and surgeon. Recovery times and postoperative analgesia requirements did not differ significantly between the two groups. No child vomited. Propofol appears to be suitable for use as a sole agent in paediatric day case dental surgery. PMID:7978143

  14. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  15. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  16. Acute Intravenous Injection of Serelaxin (Recombinant Human Relaxin‐2) Causes Rapid and Sustained Bradykinin‐Mediated Vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Chen Huei; Jelinic, Maria; Parkington, Helena C.; Tare, Marianne; Parry, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent clinical trial (RELAXin in Acute Heart Failure [RELAX‐AHF]) demonstrated that 48 hours of continuous intravenous infusion of the vasorelaxant peptide serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin‐2) to patients with acute heart failure reduced cardiovascular mortality at 180 days. The persistence of a vasorelaxant response as a potential mechanism for this long‐term benefit and the vascular effects of a bolus intravenous injection of serelaxin have not been examined. This study investigates changes in resistance artery reactivity and passive mechanical wall properties following an intravenous serelaxin injection and whether these vascular effects persist in the absence of detectable circulating serelaxin. Methods and Results Male rats were injected with 13.3 μg/kg serelaxin into the tail vein; mesenteric arteries were assessed 3 and 24 hours after treatment by using wire‐myography. Serelaxin increased basal nitric oxide synthase activity and reduced maximal contraction to endothelin‐1 at 3 hours after administration. Serelaxin treatment also selectively enhanced bradykinin‐mediated endothelium‐dependent relaxation. This effect was sustained for 24 hours in the absence of circulating serelaxin. Serelaxin‐mediated augmentation of bradykinin‐evoked relaxation involved endothelium‐derived hyperpolarization after 3 hours and prostacyclin‐mediated relaxation after 24 hours. Furthermore, upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylation of protein kinase B at Ser473 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase at Ser1177 was observed at 24 hours after serelaxin injection. There were no effects of serelaxin on passive arterial wall stiffness. Conclusion Our data show that a bolus intravenous injection of serelaxin modulates endothelial vasodilator function 3 hours after administration, an effect that was sustained for 24 hours. The prolonged bradykinin‐mediated vasorelaxation is principally mediated through prostacyclin. PMID

  17. Satellite Sensornet Gateway Technology Infusion Through Rapid Deployments for Environmental Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzel, T.; Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Ye, W.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Satellite Sensornet Gateway (SSG) is an ongoing ESTO Advanced Information Systems Technology project, at the University of Southern California. The major goal of SSG is to develop a turnkey solution for building environmental observation systems based on sensor networks. Our system has been developed through an iterative series of deployment-driven design, build, test, and revise which maximizes technology infusion to the earth scientist. We have designed a robust and flexible sensor network called Sensor Processing and Acquisition Network (SPAN). Our SPAN architecture emphasizes a modular and extensible design, such that core building blocks can be reused to develop different scientific observation systems. To support rapid deployment at remote locations, we employ satellite communications as the backhaul to relay in-situ sensor data to a central database. To easily support various science applications, we have developed a unified sensor integration framework that allows streamlined integration of different sensors to the system. Our system supports heterogeneous sets of sensors, from industry-grade products to research- specific prototypes. To ensure robust operation in harsh environments, we have developed mechanisms to monitor system status and recover from potential failures along with additional remote configuration and QA/QC functions. Here we briefly describe the deployments, the key science missions of the deployments and the role that the SSG technology played in each mission. We first deployed our SSG technology at the James Reserve in February 2007. In a joint deployment with the NEON project, SDSC, and UC Riverside, we set up a meteorological station, using a diverse set of sensors, with the objective of validating our basic technology components in the field. This system is still operational and streaming live sensor data. At Stunt Ranch, a UC Reserve near Malibu, CA, we partnered with UCLA biologist Phillip Rundel in order to study the drought

  18. [Cases of advanced cholangiocarcinoma showing partial response by the combination chemotherapy including protracted continuous infusion of 5-FU combined with intravenous administration of low-dose leucovorin and intra-arterial administration of MMC and CQ].

    PubMed

    Tsushima, K; Sakata, Y; Shiratori, Y; Sakamoto, J; Koeda, J; Yamada, Y; Soma, N; Tamura, K; Yoshiwara, A; Soma, Y

    1991-12-01

    We treated a patient with advanced cholangiocarcinoma with a new combination chemotherapy (modified MQF). The regimen consisted of intra-arterial administration of MMC (20 mg/body) and CQ (4 mg/body), protracted continuous infusion of 5-FU (500 mg/body) and intravenous administration of low-dose leucovorin (30 mg/body). More than 50% reduction in the liver tumor for over 4 weeks was obtained by the therapy. As for toxicity, diarrhea and stomatitis were observed. PMID:1660702

  19. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  20. XG-102 administered to healthy male volunteers as a single intravenous infusion: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study

    PubMed Central

    Deloche, Catherine; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Mouz, Sébastien; Perino, Julien; Abadie, Claire; Combette, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the JNK inhibitor XG-102 in a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, sequential ascending dose parallel group Phase 1 Study. Three groups of male subjects received as randomly assigned ascending single XG-102 doses (10, 40, and 80 μg/kg; 6 subjects per dose) or placebo (2 subjects per dose) as an intravenous (IV) infusion over 60 min. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiography, eye examination, clinical laboratory tests and adverse events (AEs). PK was analyzed using noncompartmental methods. All reported AEs were mild to moderate and neither their number nor their distribution by System Organ Class suggest a dose relationship. Only headache and fatigue were considered probably or possibly study drug related. Headache frequency was similar for active and placebo, consequently this was not considered to be drug related but probably to study conditions. The other examinations did not show clinically relevant deviations or trends suggesting a XG-102 relationship. Geometric mean half-life was similar among doses, ranging from 0.36 to 0.65 h. Geometric mean XG-102 AUC0–last increased more than linearly with dose, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) did not overlap for the two highest doses. Geometric mean dose normalized Cmax values suggest a more than linear increase with dose but 90% CIs overlap. It may be concluded that XG-102 single IV doses of 10–80 μg/kg administered over 1 h to healthy male subjects were safe and well tolerated. PMID:25505576

  1. 17β-Estradiol infusions into the dorsal striatum rapidly increase dorsal striatal dopamine release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shams, Waqqas M; Sanio, Christian; Quinlan, Matthew G; Brake, Wayne G

    2016-08-25

    Systemic injections of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats rapidly enhance dorsal striatal dopamine (DA) release in response to amphetamine (AMPH). Additionally, a single injection of E2 rapidly (within 30min) enhances amphetamine-induced DA release. In situ studies show that this rapid effect of E2 occurs specifically within the dorsal striatum (DS). The present study investigated the in vivo effects of E2 infused into the DS, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or the substantia nigra (SN) on dorsal striatal DA release. Rats were OVX and implanted with a silastic tube containing 5% E2 in cholesterol, previously shown to mimic low physiological serum concentrations of 18-32pg/ml. Single-probe microdialysis was used to measure extracellular DA levels in the DS. In addition, DA release was measured subsequent to systemic injections of the indirect DA agonist, AMPH (0.5mg/kg SC), administered simultaneously with E2 (0.544μg/100μl) or its vehicle, cyclodextrin (VEH) (0.520μg/100μl). Local infusions of E2 into the DS resulted in a greater amphetamine-induced dorsal striatal DA release in comparison to vehicle. Local infusions of E2 into the mPFC or the SN did not result in an enhancement of amphetamine-induced DA levels in the DS. These studies suggest that increases in dorsal striatal DA release in response to systemic E2 are a consequence of E2 actions within the DS itself. PMID:27256507

  2. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  3. Formation of biologically active 13,14-dihydro-prostaglandin E1 during intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1 in newborns with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, A; Schweer, H; Wolf, D; Seyberth, H W

    1992-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of prostaglandin (PG) E1 (12-150, median 25 pg ml-1) and 13,14-dihydro-PGE1 (3-62, median 45.5 pg ml-1) were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in eight newborns with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease during continuous intravenous infusion of PGE1. Formation of 13,14-dihydro-PGE1 was demonstrated for the first time in neonates. Since 13,14-dihydro-PGE1 has similar biological activities as the parent compound PGE1, pharmacological effects during PGE1 infusion are most likely related to both PGE1 and the generation and action of 13,14-dihydro-PGE1. PMID:1576056

  4. Rapid Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Synthesis by Porcine Myocardium Upon Ethanol Infusion into the Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yoerger, Danita M.; Best, Catherine A.; McQuillan, Brendan M.; Supple, Gregory E.; Guererro, J. Luis; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E.; Hasaba, Ali; Picard, Michael H.; Stone, James R.; Laposata, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol, have been implicated in ethanol-induced heart injury. To assess the in vivo production of FAEEs by myocardial tissue, we used a modified ethanol ablation procedure in pigs. A controlled 60-minute ethanol infusion was administered into the distal left anterior descending coronary artery in seven swine; serial blood sampling of the coronary sinus and peripheral vein before, during, and after infusion allowed measurement of FAEE production and ethanol levels in the coronary sinus and the peripheral circulation. In a single animal, FAEEs were also quantified from nine different sites within the myocardium. FAEEs were produced by the heart within 5 minutes of exposure to ethanol, with very high concentrations of FAEEs detected in coronary sinus blood. Significant variability in amounts of FAEEs was detected in different regions of the heart tissue. A strong correlation was found between coronary sinus FAEEs and ethanol concentration (r = 0.9241, P < 0.00001). FAEE production by the heart after delivery of ethanol into the left anterior descending coronary artery was rapid, reaching levels in the coronary sinus blood 4 to 10 times greater than that found in peripheral blood after ethanol intake. These data demonstrate that FAEEs may be mediators of ethanol-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:16651611

  5. Does a single dose of intravenous nicardipine or nimodipine affect the bispectral index following rapid sequence intubation?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Jin; Ahn, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Yang, Mikyung; Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yang, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background Theoretically, L-type calcium channel blockers could modulate anesthetic effects. Nicardipine does not affect the bispectral index (BIS), but nimodipine, which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a single dose of intravenous nicardipine or nimodipine could affect BIS following rapid sequence intubation. Methods This study was done in a double-blind, randomized fashion. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl 2 µg/kg, thiopental sodium 5 mg/kg, and 100% oxygen. After loss of consciousness, patients received rocuronium 1.0 mg/kg and either a bolus of 20 µg/kg nicardipine, nimodipine, or a comparable volume of normal saline (n = 20). Intubation was performed 1 min after study drug administration. BIS, mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR) were measured before anesthetic induction, after loss of consciousness, before intubation, during intubation, and 1, 2 and 5 min after intubation. Results BIS dropped rapidly after induction but increased to 60 before intubation in all groups irrespective of study drug. In nimodipine, the increase in BIS during intubation was not significant compared to pre-intubation, in contrast to the other two groups, but there was no difference in BIS during intubation. HR significantly increased, but MBP just rose to pre-induction values after intubation in nicardipine and nimodipine groups. BIS, MBP, and HR following intubation increased in control group. Conclusions A single dose of intravenous nicardipine or nimodipine could attenuate blood pressure increases but not affect BIS increases in rapid sequence intubation. PMID:21057615

  6. Rapid Resolution of Severe Myocardial Dysfunction in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Steroid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yi; Huang, Po-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) presented to our emergency department with severe chest tightness and dyspnea. His electrocardiography (ECG) showed multiple premature atrial complexes (PACs) with wide QRS, and transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe hypokinesis of the left ventricle. The patient later developed sudden cardiovascular collapse with presumed fulminant myocarditis and cardiogenic shock. Further investigation showed that coronary angiogram, viral studies and autoimmune vasculitis markers were all negative. After high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and systemic steroid were administered, a dramatic improvement of clinical conditions was observed, with an increase of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from 10% to 42% within one week, and a resolution of the wide QRS on the ECG. The rapid recovery from left ventricular dysfunction by treatment with IVIG and systemic steroid suggests immunotherapy might be effective in RA patients with acute fulminant myocarditis. PMID:27122836

  7. Bioequivalence of oral and intravenous carbamazepine formulations in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Dwain; Cloyd, James; Biton, Victor; Bekersky, Ihor; Walzer, Mark; Wesche, David; Drummond, Rebecca; Lee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and comparative pharmacokinetics (PK) of intravenous and oral carbamazepine. Methods In this phase 1, open-label study, adult patients with epilepsy on a stable oral carbamazepine dosage (400–2,000 mg/day) were converted to intravenous carbamazepine (administered at 70% of the oral dosage). A 28-day outpatient period preceded an up to 10-day inpatient period and a 30-day follow-up period. Intravenous carbamazepine was administered over 15 or 30 min every 6 h on days 1–7; some patients in the 15-min group were eligible to receive four 2- to 5-min (rapid) infusions on day 8. Patients underwent blood sampling to determine the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) for carbamazepine and metabolite carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide following oral (day 0) and intravenous carbamazepine administration (days 1, 7, and 8). Bioequivalence was evaluated in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance >80 ml/min). Safety assessments were conducted through day 38. Results Ninety-eight patients enrolled and 77 completed the PK component. The mean daily oral and intravenous carbamazepine dosage for 64 PK-evaluable patients with normal renal function was 962.5 and 675.1 mg (70% of oral dosage), respectively. Steady-state minimum concentration (Cmin) and overall exposure (AUC0–24) for intravenous carbamazepine infused over 30, 15, or 2–5 min were similar to oral carbamazepine. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratios of the adjusted means for AUC0–24, maximum concentration (Cmax), and Cmin were within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for 30-min intravenous infusions versus oral administration, but exceeded the upper limit for Cmax for the 15-min and rapid infusions. All intravenous carbamazepine infusions were well tolerated. Significance Intravenous carbamazepine infusions (70% of oral daily dose) of 30-, 15-, and 2- to 5-min duration, given every 6 h, maintained patients’ plasma

  8. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  9. Rapid and complete urinary elimination of (/sup 14/C)-5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde administered orally or intravenously to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Germond, J.E.; Philippossian, G.; Richli, U.; Bracco, I.; Arnaud, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), is a major product of sugar degradation found in food and solutions used in parenteral nutrition. Labeled (/sup 14/C)HMF was synthesized by dehydration of (/sup 14/C)fructose on ion-exchange resin and administered per os (po) and intravenously (iv) to rats. Metabolic balance of radioactivity demonstrated that HMF or its metabolites are rapidly eliminated in the urine with a recovery of 95-100% after 24 h. Literature reported, in some cases, 50% retention in the body. HMF was completely converted to two metabolites, which have been identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid and N-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoyl)glycine. Administration of high doses of HMF showed a similar rapid elimination, but a proportional reduction of the amount of the glycine conjugate produced. Whole-animal-body autoradiography confirm that shortly after administration radioactive material was present in the liver but was mostly in the kidney and the bladder. The only significant difference between po and iv administration was the presence of a higher level of radioactive material in the brain of iv-treated rats.

  10. Rapid infusion rituximab in combination with corticosteroid-containing chemotherapy or as maintenance therapy is well tolerated and can safely be delivered in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Sehn, Laurie H; Donaldson, Jane; Filewich, Allison; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Gill, Karamjit K; Runzer, Nancy; Searle, Barb; Souliere, Sheila; Spinelli, John J; Sutherland, Judy; Connors, Joseph M

    2007-05-15

    The increasing usage of rituximab in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has created huge logistical challenges with respect to the delivery of this time- and labor-intensive drug. To address these challenges, we developed and tested the feasibility of a 90-minute infusion schedule for rituximab (20% of the dose administered in the first 30 minutes, remaining 80% administered over 60 minutes). A safety analysis performed in 150 patients receiving rituximab with corticosteroid-containing chemotherapy and 56 patients receiving rituximab as maintenance therapy demonstrated that this schedule was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 infusion reactions observed. In addition, no increase in minor reactions was noted. More than 1200 patients have been treated with this rapid rituximab infusion schedule in the province of British Columbia (BC), demonstrating its safety in the community setting. The adoption of this 90-minute schedule as standard practice has had a positive impact on resource utilization. PMID:17244675

  11. A low dose euglycemic infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I rapidly suppresses fasting-enhanced pulsatile growth hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Clayton, P E; Johnson, M L; Celniker, A; Perlman, A J; Alberti, K G; Thorner, M O

    1993-01-01

    To determine if insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) inhibits pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion in man, recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was infused for 6 h at 10 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 during a euglycemic clamp in 10 normal men who were fasted for 32 h to enhance GH secretion. Saline alone was infused during an otherwise identical second admission as a control. As a result of rhIGF-I infusion, total and free IGF-I concentrations increased three- and fourfold, respectively. Mean GH concentrations fell from 6.3 +/- 1.6 to 0.59 +/- 0.07 micrograms/liter after 120 min. GH secretion rates, calculated by a deconvolution algorithm, decreased with a t 1/2 of 16.6 min and remained suppressed thereafter. Suppression of GH secretion rates occurred within 60 min when total and free IGF-I concentrations were 1.6-fold and 2-fold above baseline levels, respectively, and while glucose infusion rates were < 1 mumol.kg-1.min-1. During saline infusion, GH secretion rates remained elevated. Infusion of rhIGF-I decreased the mass of GH secreted per pulse by 84% (P < 0.01) and the number of detectable GH secretory pulses by 32% (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin and glucagon decreased to nearly undetectable levels after 60 min of rhIGF-I. Serum free fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate were unaffected during the first 3 h of rhIGF-I but decreased thereafter to 52, 32, and 50% of levels observed during saline. We conclude that fasting-enhanced GH secretion is rapidly suppressed by a low-dose euglycemic infusion of rhIGF-I. This effect of rhIGF-I is likely mediated through IGF-I receptors independently of its insulin-like metabolic actions. PMID:8514857

  12. Rapid EEG desynchronization and EMG activation induced by intravenous cocaine in freely moving rats: a peripheral, nondopamine neural triggering.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Smirnov, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    Many important physiological, behavioral, and psychoemotional effects of intravenous (IV) cocaine (COC) are too fast and transient compared with pharmacokinetic predictions, suggesting a possible involvement of peripheral neural mechanisms in their triggering. In the present study, we examined changes in cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) and neck electromyogram (EMG) induced in freely moving rats by IV COC administration at low, reinforcing doses (0.25-1.0 mg/kg) and compared them with those induced by an auditory stimulus and IV COC methiodide, which cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. We found that COC induces rapid, strong, and prolonged EEG desynchronization, associated with decrease in alpha and increase in beta and gamma activities, and EMG activation and that both begin within 2-6 s following the start of a 10-s injection; immediate components of this effect were dose independent. The rapid COC-induced changes in EEG and EMG resembled those induced by an auditory stimulus; the latter effects had shorter onset latencies and durations and were fully blocked during urethane anesthesia. Although urethane anesthesia completely blocked COC-induced EMG activation and rapid components of EEG response, COC still induced EEG desynchronization that was much weaker, greatly delayed (approximately 60 s), and associated with tonic decreases in delta and increases in alpha, beta, and gamma activities. Surprisingly, IV saline delivered during slow-wave sleep (but not quite wakefulness) also induced a transient EEG desynchronization but without changes in EMG activity; these effects were also fully blocked during anesthesia. Peripherally acting COC methiodide fully mimicked rapid EEG and EMG effects of regular COC, but the effects at an equimolar dose were less prolonged than those with regular COC. These data suggest that in awake animals IV COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, induces cortical activation and a subsequent motor response via its action on peripheral neural

  13. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate. PMID:24419513

  14. Biodistribution of boron after intravenous 4-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) infusion in meningioma and schwannoma patients: A feasibility study for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kulvik, Martti; Kallio, Merja; Laakso, Juha; Vähätalo, Jyrki; Hermans, Raine; Järviluoma, Eija; Paetau, Anders; Rasilainen, Merja; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Seppälä, Matti; Jääskeläinen, Juha

    2015-12-01

    We studied the uptake of boron after 100 mg/kg BPA infusion in three meningioma and five schwannoma patients as a pre-BNCT feasibility study. With average tumour-to-whole blood boron concentrations of 2.5, we discuss why BNCT could, and probably should, be developed to treat severe forms of the studied tumours. However, analysing 72 tumour and 250 blood samples yielded another finding: the plasma-to-whole blood boron concentrations varied with time, suggesting that the assumed constant boron ratio of 1:1 between normal brain tissue and whole blood deserves re-assessment. PMID:26298436

  15. Intravenous smart pumps.

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous (IV) smart pumps provide substantial safety features during infusion. However, nurses need to understand the requisite education necessary to fully benefit from and improve IV smart pump use and clinical integration. Failure to use IV smart pumps places the nurse and patient at increased risk. PMID:23558918

  16. Rapid changes in extracellular glutamate induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine in the nucleus accumbens shell and core

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken T.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, playing a crucial role in the functioning of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical area implicated in somatosensory integration and regulation of motivated behavior. In this study, high-speed amperometry with enzyme-based biosensors was used in freely moving rats to examine changes in extracellular Glu in the NAc shell and core induced by a tone, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with a male conspecific (SI), and intravenous (iv) cocaine (1 mg/kg). To establish the contribution of Glu to electrochemical signal changes, similar recordings were conducted with null (Glu0) sensors, which were exposed to the same chemical and physical environment but were insensitive to Glu. TP, SI, and cocaine, but not a tone, induced relatively large and prolonged current increases detected by both Glu and Glu0 sensors. However, current differentials revealed very rapid, much smaller, and transient increases in extracellular Glu levels, more predominantly in the NAc shell than core. In contrast to monophasic responses with natural stimuli, cocaine induced a biphasic Glu increase in the shell, with a transient peak during the injection and a slower postinjection peak. Therefore, Glu is phasically released in the NAc after exposure to natural arousing stimuli and cocaine; this release is rapid, stimulus dependent, and structure specific, suggesting its role in triggering neural and behavioral activation induced by these stimuli. This study also demonstrates the need for multiple in vitro and in vivo controls to reveal relatively small, highly phasic, and transient fluctuations in Glu levels occurring under behaviorally relevant conditions. PMID:22496525

  17. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  18. Effect of intraoperative magnesium intravenous infusion on the hemodynamic changes associated with right lobe living donor hepatotomy under transesophageal Doppler monitoring-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, G; Sayed, E; Eskander, A; ElSheikh, M; Lotfy, M; Yassen, K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver donors are subjected to specific postresection hemodynamic changes. The aim was to monitor these changes and to evaluate the effect of magnesium sulfate infusion (MgSO4) on these changes together with total anesthetic agents consumption. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 donors scheduled for right hepatotomy were divided into two equal groups. Controls (C) received saline and magnesium group (Mg) received MgSO4 10% (30 mg/kg over 20 min) administered immediately after induction of anesthesia, followed by infusion (10 mg/kg/h) till the end of surgery. Hemodynamics, transesophageal Doppler (TED) data and anesthetic depth guided by Entropy were recorded. Results: Postresection both groups demonstrated an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (COP) in association with lowering of systemic vascular resistance (SVR). The increase in HR with Mg was lower when compared with C, P = 0.00. Increase in COP was lower with Mg compared to (C) (6.1 ± 1.3 vs. 7.5 ± 1.6 L/min, P = 0.00) and with less reduction in SVR compared to C (1145 ± 251 vs. 849.2 ± 215 dynes.s/cm5, P < 0.01), respectively. Sevoflurane consumption was lower with Mg compared to C (157.1 ± 35.1 vs. 187.6 ± 25.6 ml, respectively, P = 0.001). Reduced fentanyl and rocuronium consumption in Mg group are compared to C (P = 0.00). Extubation time, postoperative patient-controlled fentanyl were lower in Mg than C (P = 0.001). Conclusion: TED was able to detect significant hemodynamic changes associated with major hepatotomy. Prophylactic magnesium helped to reduce these changes with lower anesthetic and analgesics consumption and an improvement in postoperative pain relief. PMID:27051361

  19. Placebo- and amitriptyline-controlled evaluation of central nervous system effects of the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant and intravenous alcohol infusion at pseudo-steady state.

    PubMed

    te Beek, Erik T; Tatosian, Daniel; Majumdar, Anup; Selverian, Diana; Klaassen, Erica S; Petty, Kevin J; Gargano, Cynthia; van Dyck, Kristien; McCrea, Jacqueline; Murphy, Gail; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-08-01

    Recent interest in NK1 receptor antagonists has focused on a potential role in the treatment of drug addiction and substance abuse. In the present study, the potential for interactions between the NK1 receptor antagonist aprepitant and alcohol, given as an infusion at a target level of 0.65 g/L, was evaluated. Amitriptyline was included as positive control to provide an impression of the profile of central nervous system (CNS) effects. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo- and amitriptyline-controlled study, the pharmacokinetics and CNS effects of aprepitant and alcohol were investigated in 16 healthy volunteers. Cognitive and psychomotor function tests included the visual verbal learning test (VVLT), Bond and Lader visual analogue scales (VAS), digit symbol substitution test (DSST), visual pattern recognition, binary choice reaction time, critical flicker fusion (CFF), body sway, finger tapping, and adaptive tracking. Alcohol impaired finger tapping and body sway. Amitriptyline impaired DSST performance, VAS alertness, CFF, body sway, finger tapping, and adaptive tracking. No impairments were found after administration of aprepitant. Co-administration of aprepitant with alcohol was generally well tolerated and did not cause significant additive CNS effects, compared with alcohol alone. Therefore, our study found no indications for clinically relevant interactions between aprepitant and alcohol. PMID:23775877

  20. First-in-human, phase I study of elisidepsin (PM02734) administered as a 30-min or as a 3-hour intravenous infusion every three weeks in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ratain, Mark J; Geary, David; Undevia, Samir D; Coronado, Cinthya; Alfaro, Vicente; Iglesias, Jorge L; Schilsky, Richard L; Miguel-Lillo, Bernardo

    2015-08-01

    This first-in-human, phase I clinical trial was designed to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and the dose for phase II trials (P2D) of elisidepsin (PM02734) administered as a 30-min or as a 3-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks (q3wk). Between March 2006 and April 2011, 53 patients with advanced malignant solid tumors were enrolled and treated with elisidepsin on the two different q3wk infusion schedules: 22 (30-min) and 31 (3-h), respectively. Doses evaluated ranged from 0.1 to 1.6 mg/m(2) (30-min q3wk) and from 2.0 to 11.0 mg flat dose (FD) (3-h q3wk). In the 30-min q3wk schedule, transient grade 3/4 increases in hepatic transaminases were the DLT, which appeared at the highest doses tested (from 1.1 to 1.6 mg/m(2)). No DLTs were observed on the 3-h schedule at doses up to 11.0 mg q3wk. Common adverse events were grade 1/2 pruritus, nausea, fatigue and hypersensitivity. Of note, myelotoxicity was not observed. Plasma maximum concentration and total drug exposure increased linearly with dose. Prolonged (≥3 months) disease stabilization was observed in pretreated patients with pleural mesothelioma (n = 1) in the 30-min q3wk arm, and with colorectal adenocarcinoma (n = 3), esophagus adenocarcinoma, endometrium adenocarcinoma, pleural mesothelioma, and head and neck carcinoma (n = 1 each) in the 3-h q3wk arm. In conclusion, elisidepsin doses of 1.1 mg/m(2) (equivalent to a FD of 2.0 mg) and 11.0 mg FD are the dose levels achieved for further phase II trials testing the 30-min q3wk and 3-h q3wk schedules, respectively. PMID:25947566

  1. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Martha C.; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H.; Sayegh, Ayman I.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03 nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites. PMID:24291388

  2. Phase I clinical trial of hepatic arterial infusion of cisplatin in combination with intravenous liposomal doxorubicin in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, Stacy; Fu, Siqing; Wen, Sijin; Naing, Aung; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Daring, Shawn; Uehara, Cynthia; Ng, Chaan; Wallace, Michael; Camacho, Luis; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) cisplatin and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement. Methods Patients were treated with HAI cisplatin 100–125 mg/m2 (and 3,000 IU heparin) intraarterially and liposomal doxorubicin (doxil) 20–35 mg/m2 IV (day 1) every 28 days. A “3 + 3” study design was used. Results Thirty patients were treated (median age, 56 years). Diagnoses were breast cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 8), ocular melanoma (n = 4), and other (n = 7). The median number of prior therapies was 5. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was at the 100/35 mg/m2 level. Dose-limiting toxicities were Grade 4 neutropenia (2 of 4 patients), and Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n = 1) at the cisplatin 125 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2 dose level. The most common toxicities were nausea/vomiting and fatigue. Of 24 patients evaluable for response, 4 (17%) had a partial response (PR) and 7 (29%) had stable disease (SD) for ≥4 months. Of the 11 patients with breast cancer, 3 (27%) had a PR and 5 (45%) had SD for ≥4 months. Of 4 patients with ocular melanoma, 1 had a PR and 1 SD for 4 months. One patient with hepatocellular carcinoma had SD for 4 months. Of 12 evaluable patients treated at the MTD, 2 (17%) had a PR and 5 (42%) had SD. Conclusion The MTD was HAI cisplatin 100 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2. This regimen demonstrated anti-tumor activity, especially in breast cancer. PMID:20204368

  3. Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ghassan SA; Kaabneh, Mahmmoud AF; Almasaeed, Mai N; Alquran, Mohammad IA

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW) are born at a time when the fetus is undergoing rapid intrauterine brain and body growth. Continuation of this growth in the first several weeks postnatally during the time these infants are on ventilator support and receiving critical care is often a challenge. These infants are usually highly stressed and at risk for catabolism. Parenteral nutrition is needed in these infants because most cannot meet the majority of their nutritional needs using the enteral route. Despite adoption of a more aggressive approach with amino acid infusions, there still appears to be a reluctance to use early intravenous lipids. This is based on several dogmas that suggest that lipid infusions may be associated with the development or exacerbation of lung disease, displace bilirubin from albumin, exacerbate sepsis, and cause CNS injury and thrombocytopena. Several recent reviews have focused on intravenous nutrition for premature neonate, but very little exists that provides a comprehensive review of intravenous lipid for very low birth and other critically ill neonates. Here, we would like to provide a brief basic overview, of lipid biochemistry and metabolism of lipids, especially as they pertain to the preterm infant, discuss the origin of some of the current clinical practices, and provide a review of the literature, that can be used as a basis for revising clinical care, and provide some clarity in this controversial area, where clinical care is often based more on tradition and dogma than science. PMID:25698888

  4. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-01

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  5. A comparative study of the effects of the intravenous self-administration or subcutaneous minipump infusion of nicotine on the expression of brain neuronal nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Milena; Mugnaini, Manolo; Tessari, Michela; Zoli, Michele; Gaimarri, Annalisa; Manfredi, Irene; Pistillo, Francesco; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2010-08-01

    Long-term nicotine exposure changes neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtype expression in the brains of smokers and experimental animals. The aim of this study was to investigate nicotine-induced changes in nAChR expression in two models commonly used to describe the effects of nicotine in animals: operant (two-lever presses) intravenous self-administration (SA) and passive subcutaneous nicotine administration via an osmotic minipump (MP). In the MP group, alpha4beta2 nAChRs were up-regulated in all brain regions, alpha6beta2* nAChRs were down-regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen, and alpha7 nAChRs were up-regulated in the caudal cerebral cortex (CCx); the up-regulation of alpha4beta2alpha5 nAChRs in the CCx was also suggested. In the SA group, alpha4beta2 up-regulation was lower and limited to the CCx and NAc; there were no detectable changes in alpha6beta2* or alpha7 nACRs. In the CCx of the MP rats, there was a close correlation between the increase in alpha4beta2 binding and alpha4 and beta2 subunit levels measured by means of Western blotting, demonstrating that the up-regulation was due to an increase in alpha4beta2 proteins. Western blotting also showed that the increase in the beta2 subunit exceeded that of the alpha4 subunit, suggesting that a change in alpha4beta2 stoichiometry may occur in vivo as has been shown in vitro. These results show that nicotine has an area-specific effect on receptor subtypes, regardless of its administration route, but the effect is quantitatively greater in the case of MP administration. PMID:20439469

  6. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide K after intravenous infusion of ginkgo diterpene lactones in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyao; Ouyang, Bingchen; Aa, Jiye; Geng, Jianliang; Fei, Fei; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jiankun; Peng, Ying; Geng, Ting; Li, Yanjing; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Guangji

    2016-07-15

    Ginkgo diterpene lactones are compounds that are extracted from the Ginkgo biloba leaf and possess pharmacologic activities with neuroprotective effects. To address the poor bioavailability of ginkgo diterpene lactones, ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection (GDLI) was formulated and is commercially available. In this study, a simple, sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for assessing the total amount and the amount of the prototype forms of ginkgolides A (GA), B (GB) and K (GK) in rat plasma and tissues. This method was used to calculate the concentrations of the hydrolysed carboxylic forms and assess the pharmacokinetics of the ginkgolides after intravenous (i.v.) GDLI administration in rats. Generally, all three ginkgolide forms showed dose-dependent plasma concentrations, and no obvious differences in pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration versus time and half-life, were observed after GDLI administration on 7 consecutive days. These ginkgolides primarily existed in the carboxylic form in the plasma, and the systemic concentrations of the carboxylic forms of GA and GB were 11- to 17- and 3- to 4-fold higher than those of their prototype forms, respectively. In contrast, dramatically increased levels of the GA and GB prototype lactones were detected in the liver and heart. GA, GB, and GK were extensively distributed in various organs/tissues; the highest levels were found in the kidneys, liver, and intestine, and the lowest levels were found in the brain. These data suggest that ginkgolides have difficulty crossing the blood-brain barrier and that their targets for protecting against cerebral ischaemia are located outside the central system. PMID:27182682

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin in pediatrics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, A.N.; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    There has been a rapid expansion of the use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for an ever-growing number of conditions. IVIG is used at a ‘replacement dose’ (400–600 mg/kg/month) in antibody deficiencies and is used at a high dose (2 g/kg) as an ‘immunomodulatory’ agent in an increasing number of immune and inflammatory disorders.1 The limitations for IVIG are the cost of the preparation and the need for intravenous infusions. Due to the cost, shortages and growing use of IVIG there have been attempts to develop evidence-based guidelines for the use of IVIG in a wide variety of immune disorders in children and neonates. This commentary provides the recommendations and recent publication regarding the use of IVIG in various conditions in children. PMID:25378784

  8. Determination of hydromorphone in human plasma by a sensitive RP-HPLC-ESI-MS method and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study in postoperative patients after low dose intravenous administration with infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luning; Pan, Yinbin; Ding, Li; Luo, Xuemei; Yan, Zhengyu; Liu, Cunming; Qian, Yanning; Chu, Yan

    2012-03-01

    A sensitive reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the determination of hydromorphone in human plasma using naloxone as the internal standard (IS). After alkalization with saturated sodium bicarbonate, the plasma samples were extracted with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column with the column temperature of 50 °C and a mobile phase of 5mM ammonium acetate buffer containing 1% formic acid-methanol (88:12, v/v). Hydromorphone and the IS were detected by selected ion monitoring using the protonated molecules at m/z 286.2 for hydromorphone and m/z 328.2 for the IS. Calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.01-50 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 0.01 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study in postoperative patients after intravenous infusion of 1.5mg hydromorphone hydrochloride. The obtained main pharmacokinetic parameters of hydromorphone in postoperative patients were as follows: the maximum hydromorphone plasma concentration (C(max)) was (24.15 ± 12.51)ng/mL, the time to the C(max) was (10.0 ± 0.0)min, and the elimination half-life was (2.7 ± 0.8)h. PMID:22169470

  9. A Case Report of Long-Term Survival following Hepatic Arterial Infusion of L-Folinic Acid Modulated 5-Fluorouracil Combined with Intravenous Irinotecan and Cetuximab Followed by Hepatectomy in a Patient with Initially Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Van Bael, Kobe; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Engels, Benedikt; Delvaux, Georges

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old women admitted to our hospital for weight loss, anorexia, and abdominal pain was diagnosed with sigmoid neoplasm and multiple bilobar liver metastases. This patient received six cycles of systemic FOLFOX prior to a laparoscopically assisted anterior resection of the rectosigmoid for a poorly differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma T2N2M1, K-RAS negative (wild type). Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of L-folinic acid modulated 5-fluorouracil (LV/5-FU) with intravenous (iv) irinotecan (FOLFIRI) and cetuximab as adjuvant therapy resulted in a complete metabolic response (CR) with CEA normalization. A right hepatectomy extended to segment IV was performed resulting in (FDG-)PET negative remission for 7 months. Solitary intrahepatic recurrence was effectively managed by local radiofrequent ablation following 6c FOLFIRI plus cetuximab iv. Multiple lung lesions and recurrence of pulmonary and local lymph node metastases were successfully treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (50 Gy) and iv LV/5-FU/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus cetuximab finally switched to panitumumab with CR as a result. At present the patient is in persistent complete remission of her stage IV colorectal cancer, more than 5 years after initial diagnosis of the advanced disease. Multidisciplinary treatment with HAI of chemotherapy (LV/5-FU + CPT-11) plus EGFR-inhibitor can achieve CR of complex unresectable LM and can even result in hepatectomy with possible long-term survival. PMID:26064730

  10. Successful use of daily intravenous infusion of C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate in the treatment of a hereditary angioedema patient with ascites, hypovolemic shock, sepsis, renal and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoang; Santucci, Stephanie; Yang, William H

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease most commonly associated with defects in C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). HAE manifests as recurrent episodes of edema in various body locations. Atypical symptoms, such as ascites, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and hypovolemic shock, have also been reported. Management of HAE conventionally involves the treatment of acute attacks, as well as short- and long-term prophylaxis. Since attacks can be triggered by several factors, including stress and physical trauma, prophylactic therapy is recommended for patients undergoing surgery. Human plasma-derived C1-INH (pdC1-INH) concentrate is indicated for the treatment of both acute HAE attacks and pre-procedure prevention of HAE episodes in patients undergoing medical, dental, or surgical procedures. We report the first case of a patient with HAE who experienced an abdominal attack precipitated by a retroperitoneal bleed while being converted from warfarin to heparin in preparation for surgery. Subsequently, the patient had a protracted course in hospital with other complications, which included hypovolemic shock, ascites, severe sepsis from nosocomial pneumonia, renal and respiratory failure. Despite intensive interventions, the patient remained in a critical state for months; however, after a trial of daily intravenous infusion of pdC1-INH concentrate (Berinert®, CSL Behring GmbH, Marburg, Germany), clinical status improved, particularly renal function. Therefore, pdC1-INH concentrate may be an effective treatment option to consider for critically-ill patients with HAE. PMID:25520740

  11. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  12. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  13. RAPID TRANSPORT AND INFUSION OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS IS ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVED OUTCOME AFTER MYELOABLATIVE THERAPY AND UNRELATED DONOR TRANSPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Hillard M.; Kan, Fangyu; Tarima, Sergey; Champlin, Richard E.; Confer, Dennis L.; Frey, Noelle; Gee, Adrian P.; Wagner, John E.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Eapen, Mary

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated effects of graft transport time on outcomes after transplantation of 938 unrelated donor bone marrow (BM) or 507 peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) in patients with acute or chronic leukemia and myelodysplasia. BM grafts were collected at 107 centers and PBPC, 89 centers. Median time from end of collection to infusion was 14 hours for BM and 15 hours for PBPC. Platelet recovery was less likely in BM recipients when the interval from end of collection to receipt at transplant center was ≥ 20 hours (odds ratio 0.47, p=0.010) and when the interval from receipt to infusion was ≥ 6 hours (odds ratio 0.57, p=0.001). Mortality rates were higher in recipients of HLA-matched BM when the interval from end of collection to receipt at transplant center was ≥ 20 hours (relative risk 2.67, p<0.001) after adjustment for other significant prognostic factors. Mortality after HLA-mismatched BM transplants was not associated with transport time. Transport times had no demonstrable effect on outcomes after PBPC transplants. These data support a general review of current transport procedures, especially for BM grafts requiring longer transport time and every effort made to minimize time from collection to infusion. PMID:19361751

  14. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  15. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  16. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  17. Effect of insulin with concurrent amino acid infusion on protein metabolism in rapidly growing pubertal children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Godil, Mushtaq A; Wilson, Thomas A; Garlick, Peter J; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2005-08-01

    Insulin treatment of prepubertal children with insulin-dependent diabetes improves body protein balance by decreasing the rate of protein degradation without stimulating protein synthesis. However, insulin also causes hypoaminoacidemia, so the inability of insulin to stimulate protein synthesis may have been limited by substrate availability. We investigated the ability of insulin to stimulate protein synthesis in growing pubertal children who were given sufficient amino acids to counter insulin-induced hypoaminoacidemia. Protein metabolism in six pubertal children with type 1 diabetes was assessed from leucine kinetics during a primed, 6-h infusion of L-[1-(13)C]leucine. The children were studied in the postabsorptive state during a basal (insulin withdrawn) period and during the infusion of 0.83 mU * kg(-1) * min(-1) human regular insulin. Amino acids and glucose were given with insulin to prevent hypoaminoacidemia and hypoglycemia. Net leucine balance was significantly higher with insulin than in the basal state, the result of decreased protein degradation but also decreased protein synthesis. The data suggest that insulin alone does not increase protein synthesis in pubertal children with type 1 diabetes. PMID:16006430

  18. Intravenous Ibandronate Rapidly Reduces Pain, Neurochemical Indices of Central Sensitization, Tumor Burden, and Skeletal Destruction in a Mouse Model of Bone Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Sevcik, Molly A.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Sullivan, Lucy J.; Koewler, Nathan J.; Bauss, Frieder; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2008-01-01

    Over half of all chronic cancer pain arises from metastases to bone and bone cancer pain is one of the most difficult of all persistent pain states to fully control. Currently, bone pain is treated primarily by opioid-based therapies, which are frequently accompanied by significant unwanted side effects. In an effort to develop non-opioid-based therapies that could rapidly attenuate tumor-induced bone pain, we examined the effect of intravenous administration of the bisphosphonate, ibandronate, in a mouse model of bone cancer pain. Following injection and confinement of green fluorescent protein-transfected murine osteolytic 2472 sarcoma cells into the marrow space of the femur of male C3H/HeJ mice, ibandronate was administered either as a single dose (300 µg/kg), at day 7 post-tumor injection, when tumor-induced bone destruction and pain were first evident, or in three consecutive doses (100 µg/kg/day) at day 7, 8 and 9 post-tumor injection. Intravenous ibandronate administered once or in three consecutive doses reduced ongoing and movement-evoked bone cancer pain-related behaviors, neurochemical markers of central sensitization, tumor burden and tumor-induced bone destruction. These results support limited clinical trials that suggest the potential of ibandronate to rapidly attenuate bone pain and illuminate the mechanisms that may be responsible for limiting pain and disease progression. PMID:18411018

  19. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  20. Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization - Ion Mobility - High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) for Rapid Characterization of Potential Bioprocess Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisamy, Sharon M.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Becker, Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Direct infusion electrospray ionization - ion mobility - high resolution mass spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) has been utilized as a rapid technique for the characterization of total molecular composition in "whole-sample" biomass hydrolysates and extracts. IM-HRMS data reveal a broad molecular weight distribution of sample components (up to 1100 m/z) and provide trendline isolation of feedstock components from those introduced "in process." Chemical formulas were obtained from HRMS exact mass measurements (with typical mass error less than 5 ppm) and were consistent with structural carbohydrates and other lignocellulosic degradation products. Analyte assignments are supported via IM-MS collision-cross-section measurements and trendline analysis (e.g., all carbohydrate oligomers identified in a corn stover hydrolysate were found to fall within 6 % of an average trendline). These data represent the first report of collision cross sections for several negatively charged carbohydrates and other acidic species occurring natively in biomass hydrolysates.

  1. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1989-02-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:2653027

  2. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1991-10-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:1772112

  3. [Portable elastomeric infusion system applied to patients with knee prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Soler, Gemma; Quiles, Olga; Nicolau, Agnes; Faura, Teresa; Moreno, Cristina

    2007-03-01

    An LV infuser consists of an infusion pump which can administer medicines via various methods: intravenous, epidural, subdural, o subcutaneous. Its usefulness is based on the administration of medicines such as oncological drugs and/or analgesic by means of a continuous infusion. PMID:17474369

  4. Glucose Infusion into Exercising Dogs after Confinement: Rectal and Active Muscle Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kruk, B.; Nazar, K.; Falecka-Wieczorek, I.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous glucose infusion into ambulatory dogs results in attenuation of exercise-induced increase of both rectal and thigh muscle temperatures. That glucose (Glu) infusion attenuates excessive increase in body temperature from restricted activity during confinement deconditioning. Intravenous glucose infusion attenuates the rise in exercise core temperature in deconditioned dogs by a yet undefined mechanism.

  5. Propofol infusion for sedation in the intensive care unit: preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, R M; Lalor, J M; Lumley, J; Royston, D; Morgan, M

    1987-01-01

    Propofol (2,6,di-isopropylphenol) was given by continuous intravenous infusion to provide sedation after cardiac surgery in 30 patients and its effects compared with those of midazolam given to a further 30 patients. Propofol infusion allowed rapid and accurate control of the level of sedation, which was satisfactory for longer than with midazolam. Patients given propofol recovered significantly more rapidly from their sedation once they had fulfilled the criteria for weaning from artificial ventilation and as a result spent a significantly shorter time attached to a ventilator. There were no serious complications in either group. Both medical and nursing staff considered the propofol infusion to be superior to midazolam in these patients. These findings suggest that propofol is a suitable replacement for etomidate and alphaxalone-alphadolone for sedating patients receiving intensive care. PMID:3101895

  6. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  7. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  8. Subcutaneous infusion and capillary "finger stick" sampling of stable isotope tracer in metabolic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic studies utilizing stable isotope tracer in humans have typically used intravenous tracer infusions and venous blood sampling. These studies explore subcutaneous infusion of isotope and "finger stick" capillary blood sampling to measure glucose turnover. Five subjects received simultaneous ...

  9. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2–6 s) increased (30–70 μM or 6–14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (−20–40 μM or 5–10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  10. Intravenous Cocaine Induces Rapid, Transient Excitation of Striatal Neurons via its Action on Peripheral Neural Elements: Single-cell, Iontophoretic Study in Awake and Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Brown, Paul Leon

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine’s (COC) direct interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter is usually considered the most important action underlying the psychomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of this drug. However, some physiological, behavioral and psycho-emotional effects of COC are very rapid and brief and they remain intact during DA receptor blockade, suggesting possible involvement of peripheral non-DA neural mechanisms. To assess this issue, single-unit recording with microiontophoresis was used to examine changes in impulse activity of dorsal and ventral striatal neurons to intravenous (iv) COC (0.25–0.5 mg/kg) in the same rats under two conditions: awake with dopamine (DA) receptor blockade and anesthetized with urethane. In the awake preparation ~70% striatal neurons showed rapid and transient (latency ~ 6 s, duration ~15 s) COC-induced excitations. These effects were stronger in ventral than dorsal striatum. During anesthesia, these phasic effects were fully blocked and COC slowly decreased neuronal discharge rate. COC-methiodide (COC-M), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, also caused phasic excitations in the awake, but not anesthetized condition. In contrast to regular COC, COC-M had no tonic effect on discharge rate in either preparation. Most striatal neurons that were phasically excited by both COC forms also showed short-latency excitations during tail-touch and tail-pinch in the awake preparation, an effect strongly attenuated during anesthesia. Finally, most striatal neurons that in awake conditions were phasically excited by somato-sensory stimuli and COC salts were also excited by iontophoretic glutamate (GLU). Although striatal neurons were sensitive to GLU in both preparations, the response magnitude at the same GLU current was higher in awake than anesthetized conditions. These data suggest that in awake animals iv COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, transiently excites striatal neurons via its action on peripheral neural elements

  11. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  12. Intravenous conivaptan.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D; Keating, Gillian M

    2008-01-01

    *Conivaptan is an arginine vasopressin V1A and V2 receptor antagonist. The intravenous formulation is approved in the US for use in the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. Conivaptan produces a dose-dependent electrolyte-sparing aquaresis (solute-free water excretion), increasing serum sodium levels. *In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial in adults with euvolemic or hypervolemic hyponatremia, the area under the serum sodium concentration-time curve over a 4-day treatment duration (primary endpoint) was significantly greater in intravenous conivaptan 40 mg/day recipients than in placebo recipients. *The total time during treatment that patients had serum sodium levels > or = 4 mEq/L above baseline was significantly longer in intravenous conivaptan than placebo recipients. In conivaptan recipients, an increase in serum sodium levels of > or = 4 mEq/L above baseline was achieved approximately 1 day after the first dose of the drug. *In addition, the mean change from baseline in free water clearance and effective water clearance over the first day of treatment was significantly greater with intravenous conivaptan than with placebo. *Given the nature of the treatment, the tolerability profile for intravenous conivaptan was generally acceptable in patients with hyponatremia. The most common adverse events were injection related (e.g. injection-site phlebitis), hypotension, and pyrexia. PMID:18828645

  13. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  14. High-dose diazepam facilitates core cooling during cold saline infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Northington, William E; Callaway, Clifton W

    2009-08-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, cardiac arrest, or exertional heat illness. While infusion of cold normal saline is a simple and inexpensive method for reducing core temperature, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesized that intravenous administration of diazepam during a rapid infusion of 30 mL.kg-1 of cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline to healthy subjects would be more comfortable and reduce core body temperature more than the administration of cold saline alone. Fifteen subjects received rapidly infused cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive, intravenously, 20 mg diazepam (HIGH), 10 mg diazepam (LOW), or placebo (CON). Main outcomes were core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption. Data for the main outcomes were analyzed with generalized estimating equations to identify differences in group, time, or a group x time interaction. Core temperature decreased in all groups (CON, 1.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C; LOW, 1.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C; HIGH, 1.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), while skin temperature was unchanged. Mean (95% CI) oxygen consumption was 315.3 (253.8, 376.9) mL.kg-1.min-1 in the CON group, 317.9 (275.5, 360.3) in the LOW group, and 226.1 (216.4, 235.9) in the HIGH group. Significant time and group x time interaction was observed for core temperature and oxygen consumption (p < 0.001). Administration of high-dose diazepam resulted in decreased oxygen consumption during cold saline infusion, suggesting that 20 mg of intravenous diazepam may reduce the shivering threshold without compromising respiratory or cardiovascular function. PMID:19767791

  15. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  16. Bronchodilating effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate in bronchial astham

    SciTech Connect

    Okayama, H.; Aikawa, T.; Okayama, M.; Sasaki, H.; Mue, S.; Takishima, T.

    1987-02-27

    The bronchodilating effect of magnesium sulfate (MgSO/sub 4/) was studied in ten asthmatic patients with mild attacks. In five patients, 0.5 mmol/min of MgSO/sub 4/ was administered intravenously for 20 minutes, and the time courses of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume at 1 s were studied. In another five patients, MgSO/sub 4/ dose-response curves were obtained. Soon after administration began, MgSO/sub 4/ relieved bronchoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum responses of respiratory resistance, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume were 71%, 117%, and 118% of initial values, respectively, and were similar to the effects of additional albuterol inhalation. The infusion of MgSO/sub 4/ also improved dyspnea and piping rales in three other asthmatic patients with a severe attack. The authors conclude that intravenous infusion of MgSO/sub 4/ produces a rapid and marked bronchodilation in both mild and severe asthma and may be a unique bronchodilating agent.

  17. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Suicidality in Treatment-Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Price, Rebecca B.; Nock, Matthew K.; Charney, Dennis S.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intravenous ketamine has shown rapid antidepressant effects in early trials, making it a potentially attractive candidate for depressed patients at imminent risk of suicide. The Implicit Association Test (IAT), a performance-based measure of association between two concepts, may have utility in suicide assessment. Methods Twenty-six patients with treatment-resistant depression were assessed for suicidality 2 hours prior to, and 24 hours following, a single subanesthetic dose of intravenous ketamine using the suicidality item of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-SI). Ten patients also completed IATs assessing implicit suicidal associations at comparable time points. In a second study, 9 patients received thrice-weekly ketamine infusions over a 12-day period. Results 24-hours after a single infusion, MADRS-SI scores were reduced by an average of 2.08 points on a 0–6 scale (p<.001; d=1.37), and 81% of patients received a rating of 0 or 1 post-infusion. Implicit associations between self- and escape-related words were also reduced following ketamine (p=.003; d=1.36), with reductions correlated across implicit and explicit measures. MADRS-SI reductions were sustained for 12 days by repeated-dose ketamine (2.9-point mean reduction; p<.001; d=2.42). Conclusions These preliminary findings support the premise that ketamine has rapid beneficial effects on suicidal cognition and warrants further study. PMID:19545857

  18. Intravenous disopyramide phosphate and ventricular overdrive pacing in the termination of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Camm, J; Ward, D; Washington, H G; Spurrell, R A

    1979-07-01

    Both antiarrhythmic drugs and bursts of rapid ventricular pacing provide alternatives to DC cardioversion for the treatment of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. This report considers the individual and combined success of burst ventricular pacing and intravenous disopyramide phosphate in the tretment of 11 examples of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. Rapid ventricular pacing, at a rate of up to 50 beats/min faster than the tachycardia rate terminated 7 of the tachycardias. Intravenous disopyramide resulted in increased tachycardiac cycle length (342 +/- 34 ms-385 +/- 56 ms), increased QRS complex width (147 +/- 42 ms-180 +/- 41 ms) and termination of 8 the tachycardias. The remaining 3 tachycardias could be terminated by bursts of ventricular pacing following the infusion of disopyramide. Of these, 2 could not be terminated prior to disopyramide. The use of both techniques allowed the extinction of all 11 tachycardias and prevented the need to proceed to DC conversion. PMID:95308

  19. Respective hydrolysis and esterification of esterified and free plant stanols occur rapidly in human intestine after their duodenal infusion in triacyl- or diacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Nissinen, Markku J; Vuoristo, Matti; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A

    2007-07-01

    Esterification of dietary phytosterols and glycerols may affect intestinal absorption of cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols. We infused plant stanol esters in triacylglycerol (TAG) (F1) and diacylglycerol (DG) (F2) oils, and free plant stanols in F1 and F2 (F3) to the duodenum of healthy human subjects and sampled the contents from the proximal jejunum (PJ). Free and ester sterols were analysed from the infusates, and intestinal contents before and after ultracentrifuge separation of oil, micelle and sediment phases. During the 60-cm intestinal passage, over 40% of plant stanol esters were hydrolysed (P < 0.05) but around 30% of the infused free plant stanols (P < 0.05) and up to 40% of cholesterol (P < 0.05) were esterified in PJ after infusions. TAG in F1 favoured accumulation of plant stanol esters in the oil phase of the PJ aspirates as compared with respective values of F2 and F3 (P < 0.05 for both). About one third of free plant stanols of F3 had been esterified (P < 0.05) and 17% precipitated mainly in free form in the PJ aspirates (P < 0.05 compared with F1 and F2). In conclusion, DG- and TAG-oils had no profound superiority over each other as intestinal carriers regarding hydrolysis/esterification of administered plant stanol esters and cholesterol and their partition in oil, micellar and sediment phases in the PJ. The unesterified plant stanols experienced partial esterification and sedimentation during their intestinal passage, which might influence their biochemical properties in that segment of the gut where cholesterol is absorbed. PMID:17551763

  20. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  1. Correlation between zoledronic acid infusion and repeat vertebroplasty surgery in osteoporotic patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2016-05-01

    Objective The incidence of bone fractures rapidly increases as people age, mostly due to bone loss resulting from osteoporosis. The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of repeat vertebroplasty in osteoporotic patients treated with or without zoledronic acid (ZOL) infusion following initial vertebroplasty. Research design and methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of osteoporotic patients who underwent vertebroplasty from June 2009 to June 2012. Patients with existing vertebral fracture(s) were retrospectively divided into two groups according to whether or not they received zoledronic acid infusion after initial vertebroplasty. Zoledronic acid infusion was intravenously administered once a year for three consecutive years, as a single 5 mg dose in 100 mL solution infused over at least 15 minutes. The primary efficacy variable was the number of patients requiring repeat vertebroplasty procedures after the initial surgery due to subsequent vertebral fractures. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the risk ratios of repeat vertebroplasty between these two groups. Results A total of 1646 patients, including 456 males and 1190 females (age range: 65-89 years), were enrolled. Compared to the 1595 patients who did not receive osteoporosis medication, the 51 patients treated with zoledronic acid infusion demonstrated a significantly lower rate of repeat vertebroplasty. In the ZOL-treated group, only 4% of the patients (2/51) required a second vertebroplasty, compared to 13% (206/1595) in the non-ZOL-treated group (p = 0.032). Conclusions The results indicate that osteoporotic patients who undergo vertebroplasty are significantly less likely to require reoperation if treated with zoledronic acid infusion. However, since the number of male patients in the ZOL-treated group was limited, and since Taiwan's National Health System program does not cover the cost of receiving zoledronic acid infusions for male patients, the

  2. Energy sources for intravenous nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, B J

    1987-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the appropriate use of carbohydrate solutions and fat emulsions as energy sources in intravenous nutritional regimens. Current evidence suggests that glucose is the carbohydrate energy source of choice and that when infused with appropriate quantities of protein it provides cheap and effective nutritional support in the majority of patients and clinical circumstances. During glucose infusion, blood glucose and acid-base balance should be closely monitored and, when indicated, exogenous insulin should be added to the regimen to combat hyperglycaemia and improve protein anabolism. Fat emulsions, although expensive, may justifiably be used in patients with moderate or severe stress to provide up to 50% of non-protein energy, especially in circumstances where attempts to satisfy energy requirements exclusively with glucose would impose an additional metabolic stress. PMID:3109093

  3. Effects of arterial and venous volume infusion on coronary perfusion pressures during canine CPR.

    PubMed

    Gentile, N T; Martin, G B; Appleton, T J; Moeggenberg, J; Paradis, N A; Nowak, R M

    1991-08-01

    Intraarterial (IA) volume infusion has been reported to be more effective than intravenous (IV) infusion in treating cardiac arrest due to exsanguination. A rapid IA infusion was felt to raise intraaortic pressure and improve coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). The purpose of this study was to determine if IA or IV volume infusion could augment the effect of epinephrine on CPP during CPR in the canine model. Nineteen mongrel dogs with a mean weight of 26.3 +/- 4.2 kg were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Thoracic aortic (Ao), right atrial (RA) and pulmonary artery catheters were placed for hemodynamic monitoring. Additional Ao and central venous catheters were placed for volume infusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and Thumper CPR was begun after 5 min (t = 5). At t = 10, all dogs received 45 micrograms/kg IV epinephrine. Six animals received epinephrine alone (EPI). Five dogs received EPI plus a 500 cc bolus of normal saline over 3 min intravenously (EPI/IV). Another group (n = 8) received EPI plus the same fluid bolus through the aortic catheter (EPI/IA). Resuscitation was attempted at t = 18 using a standard protocol. There was a significant increase in CPP over baseline in all groups. The changes in CPP from baseline induced by EPI, EPI/IV and EPI/IA were 20.6 +/- 3.7, 22.8 +/- 4.2 and 22.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg, respectively. Volume loading did not augment the effect of therapeutic EPI dosing. By increasing both preload and afterload, volume administration may in fact be detrimental during CPR. PMID:1658894

  4. Intravenous ampicillin pharmacokinetics in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kubacka, R T; Johnstone, H E; Tan, H S; Reeme, P D; Myre, S A

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single dose of intravenous ampicillin were studied in nine patients during their third trimester of pregnancy. Each volunteer was given either 500 mg (5.7-8.8 mg/kg) or 1 g (15.4-21.4 mg/kg) of sodium ampicillin by rapid infusion. Postinfusion plasma concentration-time curves followed biexponential decay in all subjects. Calculated parameters included a mean plasma distribution volume of 177.1 +/- 97.5 ml/kg, tissue or peripheral distribution volume of 246.2 +/- 143.9 ml/kg, elimination half-life of 1.60 +/- 0.51 h, and total body clearance of 4.59 +/- 1.48 ml/min/kg. Dose-dependent disposition was not observed. Gestation-specific drug therapy research during pregnancy is discussed. PMID:6845399

  5. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions. PMID:26055373

  6. Pulmonary vascular resistance during lipid infusion in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Prasertsom, W.; Phillipos, E. Z.; Van Aerde, J. E.; Robertson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Using two-dimensional echocardiography, pulmonary vascular resistance was estimated from right ventricular pre-ejection period to ejection time (RVPEP/ET) in 11 preterm infants with respiratory distress, to test the effect of different doses of continuous lipid infusion. Echocardiography was performed at baseline with no lipid infusing 2 and 24 hours after 1.5 and 3 g/kg/day of intravenous lipid, 24 hours after discontinuing intravenous lipid emulsion, and 2 hours after restarting intravenous lipid. After 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 1.5 g/kg/day the RVPEP/ET rose to mean (SD) 0.287 (0.03) from a baseline value of 0.225 (0.02) and to 0.326 (0.05) after 24 hours of intravenous lipid at 3 g/kg/day. Pulmonary arterial pressure returned to baseline 24 hours after the intravenous lipid had been discontinued. Continuous 24 hour infusion of lipid caused significant dose and time-dependent increases in pulmonary vascular resistance. Intravenous lipid may aggravate pulmonary hypertension. PMID:8777674

  7. Infusion thrombophlebitis: a prospective comparison of 645 Vialon and Teflon cannulae in anaesthetic and postoperative use.

    PubMed

    Gaukroger, P B; Roberts, J G; Manners, T A

    1988-08-01

    A prospective study of the incidence and severity of infusion thrombophlebitis in peripheral intravenous infusions used for anaesthetic and postoperative purposes in 645 patients was conducted over a four-month period. Conditions of insertion were carefully controlled while ward management was according to standard practice. A total of 330 polyurethane Vialon and 315 FEP-A Teflon cannulae were used. The results show that the nature of the cannula was the single most important factor in the incidence and severity of infusion thrombophlebitis, Vialon cannulae being associated with a 46% lower incidence than the Teflon type. Less important but significant factors included intravenous antibiotics, duration of infusion, cannula tip damage and caesarean section. Factors not associated with infusion thrombophlebitis included potassium therapy, blood transfusion or site of insertion in the upper limb. Heparinisation increased duration of infusion without affecting the incidence of infusion thrombophlebitis. PMID:3189736

  8. [How to control postoperative pain: intravenous route].

    PubMed

    Occella, P; Vivaldi, F

    2003-12-01

    Intravenous administration of analgesic drugs is one of the most common ways to control post-operative pain. It can be used in almost all kinds of surgical interventions and particularly those of medium and high complexity. Besides, when other techniques are contraindicated because of clinical and/or managing problems, intravenous way finds its best application. Among analgesic drugs NSAID (ketorolac) and opioids (tramadol, morphine, buprenorphine) are most frequently used. As to administration techniques, elastomeric pump is, according to personal experience, a simple-to-manage, practical and precise device with lower cost respect to other administration set. Elastomeric pump is a single use reservoir that allows continuous administration of drugs with a uniform pre-set infusion speed. Finally, guide-lines, showing pre-load and infusion doses of analgesic drugs, based on pain intensity, are presented. PMID:14663417

  9. Safety of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Fatih; Kamali, Sevil; Erer, Burak; Gul, Ahmet; Inanc, Murat; Ocal, Lale; Konice, Meral; Aral, Orhan

    2007-11-01

    It is reported that the usage of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (HD-IVIG) in systemic autoimmune diseases is associated with various adverse events in a wide range of severity. We aimed to investigate the frequency and profile of adverse events in a group of patients with diffuse connective tissue diseases and Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) who were administrated HD-IVIG for different indications. We recorded the data of 38 patients (25 females and 13 males) aged 38 +/- 15 (12-75) years who were followed up with the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases between 1994 and 2006 according to a predefined protocol. Patients with active disease were treated with HD-IVIG and standard immunosuppressives concomitantly. We evaluated the occurrence of allergy, acute renal failure, thromboembolic events, neutropenia, hemolytic anemia, aseptic meningitis, and vasculitis during infusion therapy of HD-IVIG and in the following 3 weeks. We commenced a total of 130 infusions of HD-IVIG. Patients were administrated 1-12 (3.4 +/- 2.6) infusions of HD-IVIG as needed. Indications for HD-IVIG were unresponsiveness or partial response to standard treatment, severe infections along with disease activity, and severe thrombocytopenia in the preoperative period in 97, 23, and 5% of patients, respectively. Minor adverse events were seen in two patients during HD-IVIG infusions. One patient with WG developed rapidly progressive renal failure during severe disease flare between HD-IVIG infusions. Another patient with WG developed recurrence of deep-vein thrombosis during severe disease flare 3 months after HD-IVIG. Both events were attributed to severe disease activity. Adverse events like allergy, acute renal failure, thromboembolic events, hematological problems, aseptic meningitis, and vasculitis are reported in different frequencies (1-81%) in patients who were administered HD-IVIG for systemic autoimmune diseases. HD-IVIG is considered a safe treatment in selected patients

  10. Serum levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP): a rapid decrease in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis undergoing intravenous steroid treatment.

    PubMed

    Skoumal, M; Haberhauer, G; Feyertag, J; Kittl, E M; Bauer, K; Dunky, A

    2006-09-01

    To examine the influence of intravenous steroid-treatment (IST) on serum levels of Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Serum levels of COMP and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in 12 patients with highly active RA (Steinbrocker stages II-IV) and in 5 patients with highly active reactive arthritis (ReA) (positive testing for HLA-B27) before starting daily IST. Patients received a total steroid dosage between 100 and 500 mg of prednisolone. COMP was measured by a commercially available sandwich-type ELISA-kit developed by AnaMar Medical AB, Sweden. Statistical evaluation was calculated by paired t test. In the RA group, COMP levels ranged from 6.3 to 19.4 U/l (mean 12.9 U/l), CRP from 5 to 195 mg/l (mean 77.8 mg/l), the COMP levels of the ReA group ranged from 5.1 to 7.4 U/l (mean 7.9 U/l), the CRP levels from 13 to 126 mg/l (mean 49 mg/l). We found a significant difference between the initial COMP levels in RA+ and ReA patients (P<0.005). In contrast to the ReA group, serum-COMP levels of RA+ patients (P<0.004) and the VAS (P<0.0001) decreased significantly within 2-10 days after the first treatment with steroids. The CRP levels remained unchanged in both groups. Our results indicate that the intravenous treatment with steroids in patients with highly active RA leads to a significant decrease of cartilage degradation. COMP seems to be a valuable parameter not even as a prognostic factor, but as a marker for monitoring the therapy response in patients with RA. PMID:16485108

  11. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  12. Intravenous access: a comparison of two methods.

    PubMed

    Duffy, B L; Lee, J S

    1983-05-01

    The reliability in providing a continued venous route to the circulation is compared between a winged needle (Abbott "Butterfly--23 INT") and a plastic catheter (Jelco Teflon "Catheter Placement Unit", 22 gauge). The catheter remained within the vein in all cases and had a much lower incidence of total obstruction during the study period. Where an intravenous infusion is not in place, a plastic catheter provides a more reliable access route to the circulation than does a winged needle. PMID:6869776

  13. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  14. Conditioning Effects of Chronic Infusions of Dobutamine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Seng; Tuttle, Ronald R.; Hood, William B.; Gavras, Haralambos

    1979-01-01

    We studied the conditioning effects of chronic infusion of dobutamine and exercise training in three groups of chronically instrumented dogs. One group was infused with normal saline, a second group was infused with dobutamine (40 μg/kg per min), and the third group was exercised on a treadmill at 4 mph, up a 10° incline. Each group was either infused or exercised for 2 h a day, 5 d a week for 5 consecutive wk. Resting heart rate and arterial blood lactate concentration, measured at weekly intervals, decreased progressively in the dobutamine and exercise groups, but not in the group that received normal saline infusion. Cardiovascular responses to submaximal treadmill exercise were not changed by 5 wk of normal saline infusion. However, the increases in heart rate, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, arterial blood lactate, plasma renin activity, and norepinephrine concentration during exercise were significantly smaller after 5 wk of conditioning with either dobutamine or exercise training. After conditioning, the increases in arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise were larger in the latter two groups, but the increases in total body oxygen consumption did not differ before and after conditioning. To assess ventricular function, we intravenously infused methoxamine both before and after conditioning. The slope of the line that related systolic aortic blood pressure and mean left atrial pressure increased in the animals conditioned with either dobutamine or exercise, indicating enhanced myocardial contractility. Left ventricular blood flow was lower in these two groups of animals than it was in the normal saline group. Left ventricular weight did not differ among the three groups. Our results show that chronic infusion of dobutamine produced cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning effects like those produced by exercise training, and further suggest that sympathetic stimulation during exercise plays a role in physical conditioning. PMID:457872

  15. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion(®) Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  16. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion® Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  17. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  18. Labetalol infusion for refractory hypertension causing severe hypotension and bradycardia: an issue of patient safety.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Samir; Grum, Daniel F; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Incremental doses of intravenous labetalol are safe and effective and, at times, such therapy may need to be augmented by a continuous infusion of labetalol to control severe hypertension. Continuous infusions of labetalol may exceed the recommended maximum daily dose of 300 mg on occasion. We report a case in which hypertension occurring after an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, initially responsive to intermittent intravenous beta-blockade, became resistant to this therapy leading to the choice of an intravenous labetalol infusion as the therapeutic option. The labetalol infusion resulted in a profound cardiovascular compromise in this postoperative critically ill patient. While infusions of labetalol have successfully been used, prolonged administration in the intensive care unit requires vigilance and the establishment of a therapeutic rationale/policy for interventions, such as the ready availability of glucagon, beta-agonists, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, insulin, and vasopressin when severe cardiovascular depression occurs. PMID:18505576

  19. Intravenous/oral ciprofloxacin therapy versus intravenous ceftazidime therapy for selected bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaut, P L; Carron, W C; Ching, W T; Meyer, R D

    1989-11-30

    The efficacy and toxicity of sequential intravenous and oral ciprofloxacin therapy was compared with intravenously administered ceftazidime in a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-blinded trial. Thirty-two patients (16 patients receiving ciprofloxacin and 16 patients receiving ceftazidime) with 38 infections caused by susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enteric gram-negative rods, Salmonella group B, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Xanthomonas maltophilia at various sites were evaluable for determination of efficacy. Length of therapy varied from seven to 25 days. Concomitant antimicrobials included intravenously administered beta-lactams for gram-positive organisms, intravenous/oral metronidazole and clindamycin for anaerobes, and intravenous/local amphotericin B for Candida albicans. Intravenous administration of 200 mg ciprofloxacin every 12 hours to 11 patients produced peak serum levels between 1.15 and 3.12 micrograms/ml; trough levels ranged between 0.08 and 0.86 micrograms/ml. Overall response rates were similar for patients receiving ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime. Emergence of resistance was similar in both groups--one Enterobacter cloacae and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ciprofloxacin therapy and two P. aeruginosa became resistant after ceftazidime therapy. The frequency of superinfection with a variety of organisms was also similar in both groups. Adverse events related to ciprofloxacin included transient pruritus at the infusion site and generalized rash leading to drug discontinuation (one patient each), and with ceftazidime adverse effects included pain at the site of infusion and the development of allergic interstitial nephritis (one patient each). Overall, intravenous/oral ciprofloxin therapy appears to be as safe and effective as intravenous ceftazidime therapy in the treatment of a variety of infections due to susceptible aerobic gram-negative organisms. PMID:2686417

  20. Acid-Base Homeostasis: Overview for Infusion Nurses.

    PubMed

    Masco, Natalie A

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential to normal function of the human body. Even slight alterations can significantly alter physiologic processes at the tissue and cellular levels. To optimally care for patients, nurses must be able to recognize signs and symptoms that indicate deviations from normal. Nurses who provide infusions to patients-whether in acute care, home care, or infusion center settings-have a responsibility to be able to recognize the laboratory value changes that occur with the imbalance and appreciate the treatment options, including intravenous infusions. PMID:27598068

  1. How to Keep an Infusion Log: Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tions relating to the donor pool and the manufacturing process may arise and knowing which brand and ... thousands of donors is pooled together during the manufacturing process and each pool is given a “lot” ...

  2. Biological disposition of sodium dichloroacetate in animals and humans after intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Lukas, G; Vyas, K H; Brindle, S D; Le Sher, A R; Wagner, W E

    1980-04-01

    Sodium dichloroacetate, a potential antidote for lactic acidosis, was administered intravenously to rats, dogs, and four humans. In three rats, maximum plasma sodium dichloroacetate concentrations were 120-164 microgram/ml after a 100-mg/kg dose and declined with half-lives of 2.1-4.4 hr. In two dogs, maximal concentrations of 447 and 508 microgram/ml were attained after a 100-mg/kg dose. The subsequent decline was relatively slow with approximate half-lives of 17.1 and 24.6 hr. An intravenous infusion of 10 mg/kg was administered over 20 min to two human subjects. Two other subjects received 20 mg/kg. After the infusion, maximum plasma concentrations of 19.9 and 24.7 microgram/ml were seen with the lower dose and 57.3 and 74.9 microgram/ml were achieved with the higher dose. Thereafter, concentrations declined rapidly with half-lives of 20-36 min. The observed large interspecies differences in half-lives could be explained in terms of differences in the apparent volume of distribution and/or clearance. PMID:7373538

  3. Fluid shifts following 7% hypertonic saline (2400 mosmol/L) infusion.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H

    1995-05-01

    Small volumes of hyperosmolar saline solutions may rapidly improve MAP and CO in hemorrhagic shock. In the present study, the effects of infusion of 7% NaCl on interstitial fluid volume and intracellular fluid volume were determined. In anesthetized, normovolemic rats either 7% NaCl (1.1 mL/100 g, intravenously), acetated Ringer's solution (10 mL/100 g), or no fluid (controls) were infused and extracellular volume (ECV) and plasma volume were determined in samples from skin, skeletal muscle, small intestine, liver, and lung. Intracellular volume was determined as local tissue water content minus ECV. Extracellular fluid volumes were 21.1 +/- .6 mL/ 100 g(mean +/- SEM; n = 6) (control animals), 26.1 +/- .4 mL/100 g (following 7% NaCl) (p < .05), and 32.8 +/- .5 mL/100 g (following Ringer's) (p < .05). Following 7% NaCl ECV increased by four to five times the infused volume. With 7% NaCl ECV in skin, muscle and intestine increased significantly, whereas cell volume was reduced by 10% in muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle, constituting > 40% of body mass with a large cell volume, was the main source for fluid mobilized by administration of 7% NaCl. PMID:7648336

  4. Intravenous versus oral rehydration in athletes.

    PubMed

    van Rosendal, Simon Piet; Osborne, Mark Andrew; Fassett, Robert Gordon; Lancashire, Bill; Coombes, Jeff Scott

    2010-04-01

    Fluid is typically administered via intravenous (IV) infusion to athletes who develop clinical symptoms of heat illness, based on the perception that dehydration is a primary factor contributing to the condition. However, other athletes also voluntarily rehydrate with IV fluid as opposed to, or in conjunction with, oral rehydration. The voluntary use of IV fluids to accelerate rehydration in dehydrated, though otherwise healthy athletes, has recently been banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency. However, the technique remains appealing to many athletes. Given that it now violates the Anti-Doping Code, it is important to determine whether potential benefits of using this technique outweigh the risks involved. Several studies have shown that rehydration is more rapid with IV fluid. However, the benefits are generally transient and only small differences to markers of hydration status are seen when comparing IV and oral rehydration. Furthermore, several studies have shown improvements in cardiovascular function and thermoregulation with IV fluid, while others have indicated that oral fluid is superior. Subsequent exercise performance has not been improved to a greater extent with one technique over the other. The paucity of definitive findings is probably related to the small number of studies investigating these variables and the vast differences in the designs of studies that have been conducted. The major limitation of IV rehydration is that it bypasses oropharyngeal stimulation, which has an influence on factors such as thirst sensation, antidiuretic hormone (arginine vasopressin) release, cutaneous vasodilation and mean arterial pressure. Further research is necessary to determine the relative benefits of oral and IV rehydration for athletes. PMID:20364876

  5. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  6. Safety recommendations for administering intravenous prostacyclins in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Kingman, Martha S; Chin, Kelly

    2013-10-01

    Prostacyclins are a high-risk category of continuous intravenous infusions increasingly used in hospitals to treat advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare condition characterized by vasoconstriction and vascular proliferation of the pulmonary arteries. Prostacyclins are given in doses of nanograms per kilogram per minute and have a narrow therapeutic dosing range for each patient. Sudden increases or decreases in dose can be life threatening. Previous studies revealed errors in the administration of these high-risk infusions, which in some instances led to serious adverse events, including death. The literature was reviewed for safety measures in administration of high-risk intravenous medications and input was obtained from leading experts in pulmonary arterial hypertension to create a set of safety recommendations for infusion of prostacyclins. PMID:24085826

  7. Experience with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Bregman, David B; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2014-04-01

    Erythropoiesis may be limited by absolute or functional iron deficiency or when chronic inflammatory conditions lead to iron sequestration. Intravenous iron may be indicated when oral iron cannot address the deficiency. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a nondextran iron preparation recently approved in the United States for intravenous treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in adult patients with intolerance or unsatisfactory response to oral iron or with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The full dose is two administrations of up to 750 mg separated by at least 7 days (up to 1500 mg total). FCM can be injected in 7-8 min or diluted in saline for slower infusion. The efficacy and safety of this dose was established in two prospective trials that randomized over 3500 subjects, 1775 of whom received FCM. One trial showed similar efficacy of FCM to an approved intravenous iron regimen (1000 mg of iron sucrose) in 2500 subjects with chronic kidney disease and additional cardiovascular risk factors. The other trial showed superior efficacy of FCM to oral iron in subjects with IDA due to various etiologies (e.g. gastrointestinal or uterine bleeding). In these trials, there was no significant difference between FCM and comparator with respect to an independently adjudicated composite safety endpoint, including death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. A database of 5799 subjects exposed to FCM provided a safety profile acceptable for regulatory approval. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the transient, asymptomatic reduction in serum phosphate observed following FCM administration results from induction of fibroblast growth factor 23, which in turn induces renal phosphate excretion. An elevated hepcidin level may identify patients with IDA who will not respond to oral iron but will respond to FCM. The ability to administer FCM in two rapid injections or infusions will likely be viewed favorably by patients and healthcare providers. PMID:24688754

  8. Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; FUKUI, Sho; KAWASE, Kodai; ITAMI, Takaharu; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol drug combination (KMP-TIVA) were determined in 5 Thoroughbred horses undergoing surgery. The horses were anesthetized with intravenous administration (IV) of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) following premedication with medetomidne (5 µg/kg, IV) and artificially ventilated. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling propofol infusion rate (initially 0.20 mg/kg/min following an IV loading dose of 0.5 mg/kg) and constant rate infusions of ketamine (1 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (1.25 µg/kg/hr). The horses were anesthetized for 175 ± 14 min (range from 160 to 197 min). Propofol infusion rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mg/kg/min, and plasma concentration (Cpl) of propofol ranged from 11.4 to 13.3 µg/ml during surgery. Cardiovascular measurements during surgery remained within clinically acceptable ranges in the horses (heart rate: 33 to 37 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure: 111 to 119 mmHg, cardiac index: 48 to 53 ml/kg/min, stroke volume: 650 to 800 ml/beat and systemic vascular resistance: 311 to 398 dynes/sec/cm5). The propofol Cpl declined rapidly after the cessation of propofol infusion and was significantly lower at 10 min (4.5 ± 1.5 µg/ml), extubation (4.0 ± 1.2 µg/ml) and standing (2.4 ± 0.9 µg/ml) compared with the Cpl at the end of propofol administration (11.4 ± 2.7 µg/ml). All the horses recovered uneventfully and stood at 74 ± 28 min after the cessation of anesthesia. KMP-TIVA provided satisfactory quality and control of anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in horses undergoing surgery. PMID:25409552

  9. Impact of priming the infusion system on the performance of target-controlled infusion of remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Moon, Bong-Ki; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Jo, Youn Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background The start-up behavior of syringe and syringe pump is known to be one of the causes of inaccurate intravenous infusion. This study evaluated the method of priming the infusion system (PRIMING), and its impact on the target-controlled infusion (TCI) of two remifentanil diluents. Methods PRIMING was performed using an evacuation of 2.0 ml to the atmosphere prior to TCI. Forty-eight TCI, using 50 µg/ml (Remi50) or 20 µg/ml (Remi20) of diluents, were performed targeting 4.0 ng/ml of effect-site concentration (Ceff), with PRIMING or not. The gravimetrical measurements of the delivered infusates reproduced actual Ceff. The bolus amount and time to reach 95% target were compared. Results Without PRIMING, Remi50 infused less bolus (43 ± 23 %) than Remi20 (19 ± 9 %) (P = 0.003), and showed more delayed increase of Ceff (11.2 ± 4.0 min) than Remi20 (7.4 ± 0.4 min) (P = 0.028). However, PRIMING significantly decreased the deficit of the bolus (2 ± 1%), as well as the delay of the increase of Ceff in Remi50 (1.2 ± 0.2 min) (both P < 0.001). In addition, with PRIMING, the start-up bolus showed minimal difference to the nominal bolus (1 and 2%), and Ceff were increased to 4.0 ± 0.1 ng/ml at the expected time of peak effect, irrespective of the diluents. Conclusions Proper operation of the syringe pump used in the priming of the syringe may be helpful in reduction of the inaccuracy of TCI, particularly during the early phase of infusion, or the infusion of a more concentrated diluent. PMID:23741562

  10. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  11. MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps for laboratory animal research, preclinical, and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in implantable drug delivery devices is needed for novel pharmaceutical compounds such as certain biologics, gene therapy, and other small molecules that are not suitable for administration by oral, topical, or intravenous routes. This invasive dosing scheme seeks to directly bypass physiological barriers presented by the human body, release the appropriate drug amount at the site of treatment, and maintain the drug bioavailability for the required duration of administration to achieve drug efficacy. Advances in microtechnologies have led to novel MEMS-enabled implantable drug infusion pumps with unique performance and feature sets. In vivo demonstration of micropumps for laboratory animal research and preclinical studies include acute rapid radiolabeling, short-term delivery of nanomedicine for cancer treatment, and chronic ocular drug dosing. Investigation of MEMS actuators, valves, and other microstructures for on-demand dosing control may enable next generation implantable pumps with high performance within a miniaturized form factor for clinical applications. PMID:22926321

  12. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  13. Intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen).

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous paracetamol (rINN)/intravenous acetaminophen (USAN) is an analgesic and antipyretic agent, recommended worldwide as a first-line agent for the treatment of pain and fever in adults and children. In double-blind clinical trials, single or multiple doses of intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally provided significantly better analgesic efficacy than placebo treatment (as determined by primary efficacy endpoints) in adult patients who had undergone dental, orthopaedic or gynaecological surgery. Furthermore, where evaluated, intravenous paracetamol 1 g generally showed similar analgesic efficacy to a bioequivalent dose of propacetamol, and a reduced need for opioid rescue medication. In paediatric surgical patients, recommended doses of intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg were not significantly different from propacetamol 30 mg/kg for the treatment of pain, and showed equivocal analgesic efficacy compared with intramuscular pethidine 1 mg/kg in several randomized, active comparator-controlled studies. In a randomized, noninferiority study in paediatric patients with an infection-induced fever, intravenous paracetamol 15 mg/kg treatment was shown to be no less effective than propacetamol 30 mg/kg in terms of antipyretic efficacy. Intravenous paracetamol was well tolerated in clinical trials, having a tolerability profile similar to placebo. Additionally, adverse reactions emerging from the use of the intravenous formulation of paracetamol are extremely rare (<1/10 000). [table: see text]. PMID:19192939

  14. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  15. Clinical and economic evidence for intravenous acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yu-Chen; Reddy, Prabashni

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in November 2010 for the management of mild-to-moderate pain, management of moderate-to-severe pain with adjunctive opioid analgesics, and reduction of fever. Although intravenous acetaminophen generally improved pain relief and demonstrated opioid-sparing effects compared with placebo, it did not consistently reduce the frequency of opioid-related adverse events (e.g., postoperative nausea and vomiting). The safety and efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen as an antipyretic agent have been documented in adults and children; however, its cost is several-fold higher than that of the oral and rectal formulations. Although use of intravenous acetaminophen has reduced other postoperative resource utilization (e.g., hospital length of stay) in some studies outside the United States in patients undergoing abdominal surgery, a full economic evaluation in the United States has yet to be undertaken. In addition, its administration time (15-min infusion) and packaging (glass, single-use vial) have the potential to adversely affect patient flow in the postanesthesia care unit, create burden on patient care units, and lead to drug waste. Furthermore, 1 g of intravenous acetaminophen is formulated in 100 ml of solution, which may be an issue for patients with fluid restrictions. Given the clinical and economic evidence currently available, intravenous acetaminophen should not replace oral or rectal acetaminophen, but its use may be considered in a limited number of patients who cannot receive drugs orally and rectally and who cannot tolerate other parenteral nonopioid analgesic or antipyretic agents. PMID:22570116

  16. Repeated cycles with 72-hour continuous infusion interleukin-2 in kidney cancer and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter; Brick, Wendy; Vinogradov, Mikhail; Taylor, W Chris; Khan, Nawazish; Burgess, Russell

    2004-06-01

    While high-dose bolus inpatient interleukin-2 is generally given on 8-week cycles, continuous infusion interleukin-2 could potentially allow for more rapidly repeated cycles. Fourteen (14) patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of 0 or 1, having either kidney cancer (6) or melanoma (8), have been treated with continuous infusion (CIV) interleukin-2 (IL-2) 18 MIU/m(2)/24 hours for 72 hours. Cycles were repeated every 3 weeks up to 4 cycles, then every 3-4 weeks for 2 cycles, then every 6-8 weeks, until progression or intolerable toxicity. All patients received famotidine 20 mg intravenously (i.v.) twice per day during the 72-hour infusions. Patient characteristics included a median ECOG performance status of 1; median age = 63 (range: 25-79); most common metastatic sites: lung (9), bone (5), lymph nodes (5), and the liver (3). No patients with metastatic kidney cancer underwent a nephrectomy prior to interleukin-2. Median number of cycles received = 5 (1-9). No patients required Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. There have been no treatment-related deaths. Most common toxicities have been rigors, fever, nausea/emesis, and the reversible elevation of creatinine. One complete response and three partial responses (67% response rate; 95% confidence interval: 30%-90%) have been seen in kidney cancer, and two partial responses (25% response rate; 95% confidence interval: 7%-60%) have occurred in melanoma. Median survival has not been reached at >9+ months. Responding sites include the liver, bone, lung, lymph node and subcutaneous sites. Inpatient 72-hour continuous infusion interleukin-2 at this dose and schedule is well tolerated by patients with an ECOG performance status of 0 or 1 and has activity in kidney cancer and melanoma. PMID:15285881

  17. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion.

  18. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of intravenous fenoldopam, a dopamine1-receptor agonist, in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, R R; McCoy, C E; Ziemniak, J A; Frederickson, E D; Goldberg, L I; Murphy, M B

    1988-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetic properties of intravenous fenoldopam, a selective dopamine1-receptor agonist, were studied in 10 patients with essential hypertension. 2 Reduction in blood pressure was linearly related to the log fenoldopam plasma concentration (r = 0.69) and the log fenoldopam infusion rate (r = 0.71). 3 The mean elimination half-life (+/- s. e. mean) was 9.8 +/- 1.0 min. The total body clearance was 30.3 +/- 2.3 ml kg-1 min-1 and the volume of distribution was 582 +/- 62 ml kg-1. 4 The rapid onset of action, short elimination half-life, linear dose-response relationship, and ease of administration suggest that fenoldopam may have a role where parenteral treatment of hypertension is required. PMID:2897206

  19. Stability of thyroid hormones during continuous infusion.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G; Alpan, Gad; Frey, Michael; Corbi, Dominick; Lagamma, Edmund F

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the stability of thyroid hormones during a mode of continuous drug infusion via polypropylene tubing using the same conditions that would be applied to treating patients in a hospital setting. The diluted thyroid hormones were prepared using aseptic technique, stored at 2-8°C (36-46°F) and tested within 24 h of preparation for stability and percent recovery from within plastic tubing. Experiments were done in duplicate with triplicate sets of readings for each assay point. Only T(4) prepared with 5% dextrose water (D5W) containing 1 mg/mL albumin remained constant, stable, predictable and accurate over time under various conditions. Other methods of preparation lost drug by adhering to the plastic containers and tubing by as much as 40% of starting concentration. T(3) recovery in the presence of 1 mg/mL of albumin was 107±2% (mean±standard error of the mean) of anticipated drug concentrations. We conclude from this series of experiments that to maintain an accurate and stable dosing of patients receiving intravenous thyroid hormones, 1 mg/mL of albumin must be added to the infusate to prevent lost on the plastic intravenous tubing. PMID:21501101

  20. Pharmacogenomics: Overview of Applications and Relation to Infusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kisor, David F; Bright, David R; Manion, Chelsea R; Smith, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) describes the relationship between an individual's genes and his or her response to drug therapy. Data are accumulating that indicate that PGx has application in the clinical setting for drugs across therapeutic categories, including drugs that are administered intravenously and are of greater familiarity to infusion nurses. This article provides an overview of the science and presents common examples of PGx as it relates to drug and/or drug dose selection. Additionally, there are brief summaries of the role infusion nurses can play relative to toxicity monitoring, patient education, and other aspects of PGx. PMID:27074990

  1. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in healthy human volunteers during intravenous administration of sodium sulphide

    PubMed Central

    Toombs, Christopher F; Insko, Michael A; Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Usansky, Helen; Jamil, Khurram; Goldstein, Brahm; Cooreman, Michael; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule and potential therapeutic agent. Emerging studies indicate its therapeutic potential in a variety of cardiovascular diseases and in critical illness. Augmentation of endogenous sulphide concentrations by intravenous administration of sodium sulphide can be used for the delivery of H2S to the tissues. In the current study, we have measured H2S concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy human volunteers subjected to increasing doses sodium sulphide in a human phase I safety and tolerability study. METHODS We have measured reactive sulphide in the blood via ex vivo derivatization of sulphide with monobromobimane to form sulphide-dibimane and blood concentrations of thiosulfate (major oxidative metabolite of sulphide) via ion chromatography. We have measured exhaled H2S concentrations using a custom-made device based on a sulphide gas detector (Interscan). RESULTS Administration of IK-1001, a parenteral formulation of Na2S (0.005–0.20 mg kg−1, i.v., infused over 1 min) induced an elevation of blood sulphide and thiosulfate concentrations over baseline, which was observed within the first 1–5 min following administration of IK-1001 at 0.10 mg kg−1 dose and higher. In all subjects, basal exhaled H2S was observed to be higher than the ambient concentration of H2S gas in room air, indicative of on-going endogenous H2S production in human subjects. Upon intravenous administration of Na2S, a rapid elevation of exhaled H2S concentrations was observed. The amount of exhaled H2S rapidly decreased after discontinuation of the infusion of Na2S. CONCLUSION Exhaled H2S represents a detectable route of elimination after parenteral administration of Na2S. PMID:20565454

  2. Kiovig for primary immunodeficiency: reduced infusion and decreased costs per infusion.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark; Simoens, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Kiovig is a ready-to-use 10% liquid immunoglobulin preparation that is medically indicated for the treatment of primary immunodeficiency. This study aims to conduct an economic evaluation which compares the intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations Kiovig, Multigam, and Sandoglobulin from the Belgian societal perspective. As three prospective studies have observed no difference in outcomes, a cost-minimization analysis is considered appropriate to evaluate differences in treatment costs that can arise from IVIgs. A decision-analytic model simulated treatment costs attributed to one infusion. Resource use data were derived from a Dutch costing study. Cost items included immunoglobulin costs, pharmacy administration and nursing costs, mini-forfait for hospital infusion, costs of adverse events, and lost productivity with 2009 as base year. Cost data were identified from published sources and Belgian hospital administrators. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis explored the impact of parameter uncertainty on cost results. Costs per infusion cycle in adult primary immunodeficiency patients were €1,046 (95% confidence interval: €1,006-1,093) with Kiovig; €1,102 (€1,064-1,147) with Multigam; and €1,147 (€1,108-1,193) with Sandoglobulin. The average cost savings per infusion with Kiovig as compared to Multigam and Sandoglobulin amounted to €56 and €101 per infusion. In conclusion, treatment costs with Kiovig were shown to be lower as compared to other IVIgs in Belgium. Reduced costs per infusion were attributed to lower costs associated with treating adverse events and the opportunity cost of nursing time and time off work for working adults. PMID:21570491

  3. The effects of infusions of synthetic adrenocorticotrophin in the conscious calf

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. V.; Hardy, R. N.; Malinowska, Krystyna W.

    1974-01-01

    1. A technique is described by which the whole of the effluent blood from the right adrenal gland can be collected as required from conscious, unrestrained calves. The technique may be used to measure adrenal blood flow gravimetrically and to compute the output of adrenal hormones under various conditions in the normal calf. 2. In a group of seven calves mean cortisol output from the right adrenal gland was found to vary between 20 and 40 ng.kg-1 min-1 and corticosterone between 6 and 18 ng.kg-1 min-1 during a 2 hr period, 24 hr after surgery. 3. Intravenous infusions of synthetic adrenocorticotrophin (5 ng.kg-1 min-1) produced a significant increase in the output of both cortisol and corticosterone within 5 min. The output of both hormones rose to maximal values within 10-20 min and mean values of approximately 300 ng.kg-1 min-1 (cortisol) and 120 ng.kg-1 min-1 (corticosterone) were maintained thereafter for the duration of the infusion (120 min). The output of both steroids fell to values comparable with those observed initially within 45-60 min after the infusion was discontinued. 4. These changes in glucocorticoid output in response to adrenocorticotrophin produced a significant rise in the concentration of both cortisol and corticosterone in peripheral plasma. It is noteworthy that the rise in the mean corticosterone concentration in the peripheral plasma was substantially less than that which might be expected from relating the rise in mean plasma cortisol concentration to cortisol output. 5. The results of control experiments have eliminated the possibility that the sampling procedure might itself increase steroid output or peripheral plasma concentration. Comparison of results from calves of widely disparate ages (8-38 days) provided no evidence that either the resting output of cortisol or corticosterone or the response to adrenocorticotrophin changes with age within the range examined. 6. Infusion of adrenocorticotrophin (5 ng.kg-1 min-1) also stimulated

  4. Pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Meredith C; Barshop, Bruce A; Gangoiti, Jon A; Deutsch, Reena; Martin, Michael; Schneider, Jerry A; Dohil, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Aims Although cysteamine was first used in the treatment of cystinosis in 1976 and approved by the FDA as cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon™) in 1994, surprisingly little pharmacological data are available for this compound. Cysteamine and its related drugs are currently being evaluated for the treatment of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease. The aim of te study was to understand the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion. Method Cysteamine bitartrate was delivered through a naso-enteric catheter into the stomach (n = 8), small intestine (n = 8) and caecum (n = 4) of normal subjects. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results The rate and extent of drug absorption were assessed by comparing AUC(0, ∞), Cmax and tmax, among the gastrointestinal infusion sites. Total cysteamine exposure, expressed as area under the curve (AUC(0, ∞)) was greatest when the drug was infused into the small intestine (4331.3 ± 1907.6 min × µm) followed by stomach (3901.9 ± 1591.9 min × µm) and caecum (3141.4 ± 1627.6 min × µm). Cysteamine infusion into the small intestine resulted in the most rapid rise to maximal plasma concentrations (tmax = 21 ± 0.56 min); tmax was delayed to 50 ± 26 min and 64 ± 26 min after gastric and caecal infusion, respectively. The maximum cysteamine plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached after infusion of the drug into the small intestine (51 ± 21 µm), which was higher than plasma Cmax concentrations after gastric (39 ± 16 µm) and caecal infusion (23 ± 15 µm). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data generated help extend our understanding of cysteamine. PMID:17229040

  5. Effects of cholic acid infusion in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prolonged intravenous infusions of cholic acid into fetal lambs are described in this study. The ewes (n = 10, 11 fetuses) were operated on at 114 days of gestation (term = 150 days) by placing plastic catheters in maternal and fetal vessels and in the amniotic cavity. Gestational ages were confirmed after delivery by radiographic examination of the ossification centers of the fetal legs. Infusions of cholic acid (1.6 mumoles/min-1) started 8 to 10 days after surgery in 5 fetuses (including one twin). The remaining 6 fetuses (also including one twin) were infused with 5% dextrose in water. Total plasma bile acids at the beginning of the experiment were similar in both groups (23.8 +/- 6.6 vs. 24.3 +/- 5.7 microM). No significant changes in fetal heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases or pH were detected during the infusion. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid was observed during the third day of infusion in all the fetuses infused with cholic acid and in one control fetus. Fetuses infused with cholic acid were delivered alive 19-26 days before term. The concentration of plasma bile acids in the experimental group at delivery was 829 +/- 305 microM, i.e. significantly higher than that of the control group (24.4 +/- 5.7 microM). Control fetuses (except one twin) were delivered at term. We concluded that cholic acid, even at the high dose infused, is neither lethal nor severely harmful for the fetus. Meconium passage of the fetuses infused with cholic acid, in our experiment, appeared to be related to the stimulatory effect of cholic acid on fetal colonic motility rather than to fetal hypoxia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3716776

  6. Disposition of intravenous radioactive acyclovir

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda, P.; Good, S.S.; Laskin, O.L.; Krasny, H.C.; Connor, J.D.; Lietman, P.S.

    1981-11-01

    The kinetic and metabolic disposition of (8-14C)acyclovir (ACV) was investigated in five subjects with advanced malignancy. The drug was administered by 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg. Plasma and blood radioactivity-time, and plasma concentration-time data were defined by a two-compartment open kinetic model. There was nearly equivalent distribution of radioactivity in blood and plasma. The overall mean plasma half-life and total body clearance +/- SD of ACV were 2.1 +/- 0.5 hr and 297 +/- 53 ml/min/1.73 m2. Binding of ACV to plasma proteins was 15.4 +/- 4.4%. Most of the radioactive dose excreted was recovered in the urine (71% to 99%) with less than 2% excretion in the feces and only trace amounts in the expired Co2. Analyses by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine was the only significant urinary metabolite of ACV, accounting for 8.5% to 14.1% of the dose. A minor metabolite (less than 0.2% of dose) had the retention time of 8-hydroxy-9-((2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl)guanine. Unchanged urinary ACV ranged from 62% to 91% of the dose. There was no indication of ACV cleavage to guanine. Renal clearance of ACV was approximately three times the corresponding creatinine clearances.

  7. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery. PMID:27269663

  8. [Use of intravenous iron supplementation in chronic kidney disease: Interests, limits, and recommendations for a better practice].

    PubMed

    Rottembourg, Jacques; Rostoker, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency is an important clinical concern in chronic kidney disease (CKD), giving rise to iron-deficiency anaemia, and various impaired cellular functions. Oral supplementation, in particular with ferrous salts, is associated with a high rate of gastro-intestinal side effects and is poorly absorbed, a problem that is avoided with intravenous (IV) irons. Recently, with the approval of the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use, the French Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament et des produits de santé (ANSM) took adequate measures to minimize the risk of allergic reactions, by correction on the summary of intravenous iron products characteristics. All IV iron products should be prescribed, administered and injected, inside public or private hospitals exclusively, and a clinical follow-up after the infusion for at least 30 minutes is mandatory. The most stable intravenous iron complexes (low molecular weight iron dextran, ferric carboxymaltose, and iron isomaltoside 1000 [under agreement]) can be given in higher single doses and more rapidly than less recent preparations such as iron sucrose (originator or similars). Test doses are advisable for conventional low molecular weight iron dextrans, but are no more mandatory. Iron supplementation is recommended for all CKD patients with iron-deficiency anaemia and those who receive erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, whether or not they require dialysis. Intravenous iron is the preferred route of administration in haemodialysis patients, with randomized trials showing a significantly greater increase in haemoglobin levels for intravenous versus oral iron and a low rate of treatment-related adverse events during these trials. According ANSM, physicians should apply the product's label recommendations especially the posology. In the non-dialysis CKD population, the erythropoietic response is also significantly higher using intravenous versus oral iron, and tolerability is at

  9. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  10. Intravenous support for the patient in sickle cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Odesina, V

    2001-01-01

    Sickle cell episodes (otherwise known as crises) are inevitable complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). Successful management of these episodes includes hydration, medication administration, and blood transfusion. Intravenous support is an essential component in the management of sickle cell-related complications. This article gives an overview of SCD and its complications and treatments, focusing on infusion therapy support of the patient during a sickle cell episode. PMID:11836842