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Sample records for rapid thermal oxides

  1. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-04-29

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  2. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2003-05-13

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  3. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  4. Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of thin silicon oxide films using silane and nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Kuehn, R. T.; Wortman, J. J.; Öztürk, M. C.

    1992-06-01

    Thin (80-200 Å) silicon dioxide (SiO2) films have been deposited by low pressure rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD), using silane (SiH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) as the reactive gases for the first time. A deposition rate of 55 Å/min has been achieved at 800 °C with a SiH4/N2O flow rate ratio of 2%. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy (RBS) have shown a uniform and stoichiometric composition throughout the deposited oxide films. Electrical characterization of the films have shown an average catastrophic breakdown field of 13 MV/cm and a midgap interface trap density (Dit) of equal to or less than 5×1010 eV-1 cm-2. The results suggest that the deposited RTCVD SiO2 films using SiH4-N2O gas system may have the potential to be used as the gate dielectric in future low-temperature metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) device processes for ultralarge scale integration (ULSI).

  5. Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cellmembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

    2004-01-02

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes were developed in which zirconia-based electrolyte thin films were supported by a composite metal/ceramic electrode, and were subjected to rapid thermal cycling between 200 and 800 C. The effects of this cycling on membrane performance were evaluated. The membranes, not yet optimized for performance, showed a peak power density of 350mW/cm2at 900 C in laboratory-sized SOFCs that was not affected by the thermal cycling. This resistance to cycling degradation is attributed to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficient of the cermet support electrode with that of the zirconia electrolyte.

  6. N + doping of gallium arsenide by rapid thermal oxidation of a silicon cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadana, D. K.; de Souza, J. P.; Cardone, F.

    1990-10-01

    Shallow (<200 nm) Si profiles with doping levels in excess of 2×1018 cm-3 were reproducively obtained in GaAs by rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of Si caps (50 or 160 nm) in 0.1% O2/Ar ambient at 850-1050 °C. The doping level as well as distribution of the diffused Si can be controlled by the thickness of the Si cap, RTO temperature, RTO time, and oxygen level in the annealing ambient. It appears that the generation of Si interstitials at the oxidizing surface of the Si cap during RTO is responsible for the Si diffusion into the underlying GaAs substrate.

  7. Improved Si/SiOx interface passivation by ultra-thin tunneling oxide layers prepared by rapid thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad, Karim M.; Vössing, Daniel; Balamou, Patrice; Hiller, Daniel; Stegemann, Bert; Angermann, Heike; Kasemann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the influence of different oxidation methods on the chemical passivation quality of silicon oxide-nanolayers on crystalline silicon wafers with surface photo voltage and quasi-steady-state photo conductance measurements. We present a simple method by means of rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) and subsequent annealing in forming gas, which requires no complex surface pre-treatment or surface pre-conditioning after cleaning. This technique allows a reproducible preparation of high-quality ultra-thin oxide-nanolayers (1.3-1.6 nm) with a nearly intrinsic energetic distribution of interface states and a defect density of states of only 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 at the minimum of the distribution. These results are compared with silicon oxide-nanolayers prepared by wet chemical oxidation and plasma oxidation where only a slight reduction of the interface defect density is achieved by subsequent anneal in forming gas environment. Furthermore, it is shown that applying the RTO oxide-nanolayer as an intermediate layer between Si and an a-SiNx:H layer, leads to a significant improvement of the surface passivation quality.

  8. Formation of highly n-doped gallium arsenide layers by rapid thermal oxidation followed by rapid thermal annealing of silicon-capped gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadana, D. K.; de Souza, J. P.; Cardone, F.

    1991-03-01

    Carrier concentrations at a level of ≳1×1019 cm-3 were achieved when Si-capped GaAs underwent rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) in Ar+0.1% O2 ambient at 850-1000 °C for 10-60 s followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in Ar ambient at 850-950 °C. Carrier concentrations in the RTO only samples were in the range of 2-5×1018 cm-3. Kinetic data on the diffusion of Si under RTO and RTO+RTA conditions are presented. The enhancement in the electrical activation of the diffused Si during RTA appears to be partly due to its local atomic rearrangement and partly due to redistribution in the GaAs. Ohmic contacts to the doped layer were made using Au-Ge-Ni alloy and contact resistances of ≲0.1 Ω mm were obtained.

  9. On the mobility of n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors prepared by low-pressure rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, P. K.; Misra, V.; Hill, W.; Wortman, J. J.; Hauser, J. R.; Morfouli, P.; Ouisse, T.

    1995-01-01

    The factors affecting the channel mobility of metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors fabricated using as-deposited rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) of silicon dioxide are investigated and compared to thermal silicon dioxide at various temperatures. The results indicate that the observed differences in the mobility values of thermal and rapid thermal chemical vapor deposed oxides at channel concentrations where Coulombic scattering is important is due to increased oxide trapping in the RTCVD films. It was also observed that the rapid thermal chemical vapor deposited oxides exhibited slightly larger mobility degradation rates at high fields when compared to thermal oxides.

  10. Growth and structure of rapid thermal silicon oxides and nitroxides studied by spectroellipsometry and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, N.; Gagnaire, A.; Barbier, D.; Glachant, A.

    1994-11-01

    Rapid thermal oxidation of Czochralski-grown silicon in either O2 or N2O atmospheres have been studied using spectroellipsometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. Multiwavelength ellipsometric data were processed in order to separately derive the thickness and refractive indexes of rapid thermal dielectrics. Results revealed a significant increase of the mean refractive index as the film thickness falls below 20 nm for both O2 or N2O oxidant species. A multilayer structure including an about 0.3-nm-thick interfacial region of either SiO(x) or nitroxide in the case of O2 and N2O growth, respectively, followed by a densified SiO2 layer, was found to accurately fit the experimental data. The interfacial region together with the densified state of SiO2 close to the interface suggest a dielectric structure in agreement with the continuous random network model proposed for classical thermal oxides. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of noncrystalline Si-Si bonds in the interfacial region, mostly in the case of thin oxides grown in O2. It was speculated that the initial fast growth regime was due to a transient oxygen supersaturation in the interfacial region. Besides, the self-limiting growth in N2O was confirmed and explained in agreement with several recently published data, by the early formation of a very thin nitride or oxynitride membrane in the highly densified oxide beneath the interface. The beneficial effect of direct nitrogen incorporation by rapid thermal oxidation in N2O instead of O2 for the electrical behavior of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors is likely a better SiO2/Si lattice accommodation through the reduction of stresses and Si-Si bonds in the interfacial region of the dielectric.

  11. Internal photoemission study on charge trapping behavior in rapid thermal oxides on strained-Si/SiGe heterolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, M. K.; Mahata, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Armstrong, B. M.; Gamble, H. S.; Maiti, C. K.

    2008-12-01

    A comparative study on the nature of defects and their relationship to charge trapping with enhanced photosensitivity has been investigated through magnetic resonance and internal photoemission (IPE) experiments for rapid thermal grown oxides (RTO) on strained-Si/Si 0.8Ge 0.2 and on co-processed bulk-Si (1 0 0) substrates. Both the band and defect-related electronic states were characterized through EPR, IPE, C- V and I- V measurements under UV-illumination. Surface chemical characterization of as-grown ultrathin oxides (5-7 nm) has been performed using high-resolution XPS. Enhancement in Ge-segregation with increasing oxidation temperature is reported. Comparative studies on interface properties and leakage current behavior of rapid thermal oxides have also been studied through fabricating metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor structures. A degraded electrical property with increasing oxidation temperature is reported. Constant voltage stressing (CVS) in the range of 5.5-7 V was used to study the breakdown characteristics of different samples. We observe a distinguishably different time-to-breakdown ( tbd) phenomenon for bulk-Si and strained-Si/SiGe samples. Whereas the oxide on bulk-Si shows a typical breakdown behavior, the RTO grown oxide on strained-Si/SiGe samples showed a quasi-or soft-breakdown with lower tbd value. It may be pointed out that quasi-breakdown may be a stronger reliability limiting factor for strained-Si/SiGe devices in the oxide thickness range studied.

  12. Gas-phase generation of noble metal-tipped NiO nanorods by rapid thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kenji; Hirasawa, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    The thermal oxidation of alloy nanoparticles (NPs) composed of nickel and a noble metal was investigated by high-resolution electron microscopic observations of the NPs oxidized in a gas phase under different oxidation conditions. When Ni0.8Au0.2 NPs were heated with oxygen from room temperature, oxidation progressed to form Au-NiO core-shell structures, however, the Au core spilled out by breaking the NiO shell at high temperatures. In contrast, when the alloy NPs were subjected to rapid thermal oxidation, which was enabled by heating the NPs at high temperatures (≥500 °C) and then abruptly exposed to oxygen, oxidation advanced anisotropically such that a NiO island protruded and built up to form a NiO nanorod. This resulted in the formation of Au-tipped NiO nanorods in which a hemispherical Au tip bonded to a NiO nanorod via a Au {111}/NiO{100} interface. We found that the relative sizes of Au and NiO in Au-tipped NiO nanorods were easily and widely controlled by changing the Au mole fraction (0.05-0.8) of the alloy NPs. Similarly, rapid thermal oxidation of Ni-Pt NPs generated Pt-tipped NiO nanorods in which a spherical Pt tip was half-embedded in a NiO nanorod. The present gas-phase approach has great potential for fabricating functional asymmetric hybrid nanostructures in clean conditions.

  13. Growth of oxide-mediated ternary silicide controlled by a Si cap layer by rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Vantomme, A.; Vanormelingen, K.; Yao, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    We reported a simple method to grow good-quality CoSi 2 film by using Si cap technology and introducing moderate Ni. First, a cobalt layer of ∼15 nm with a Si cap layer with a different thickness deposited onto the Si surface with a thin silicon oxide buffer is applied to investigate the formation of CoSi 2 by ex situ rapid thermal annealing. It was found that a 13 nm thick Si cap layer could significantly improve the crystal quality of oxide-mediated CoSi 2 film. Setting the Si cap thickness at 13 nm, we revealed that introduction of Ni can further improve the crystal quality of the silicide film in comparison to the pure Co silicide, and a ratio of Ni to Co at round 1:8 causes the lowest sheet resistance, ∼5 Ω/sq.

  14. Electrical characterization of rapid thermal nitrided and re-oxidized low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, S. S.; Shi, Y. J.; Brown, W. D.

    1996-02-01

    The electrical characteristics of rapid thermal nitrided and re-oxidized low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) structures were investigated. Both nitridation temperature and time affect the properties of the MOS structures as revealed by capacitance-voltage characteristics. Nitridation at 1000 °C for 15 s followed by re-oxidation for 60 s at 1000 °C in an oxygen/nitrogen ambient was found to be superior to the same nitridation for 60 s with no re-oxidation. Typical values of fixed charge and interface state densities for devices subjected to nitridation and re-oxidation in a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen were 4×1010 cm-2 and 7×1010 eV-1 cm-2, respectively. Avalanche electron injection using electric fields of 3-3.5 MV/cm produced positive shifts in flatband voltage for devices nitrided at 1000 °C for 15 s followed by re-oxidation, whereas samples nitrided at 1000 °C for 60 s without the re-oxidation yielded negative shifts in flatband voltage. An electron barrier height of 2.4 eV was found for these nitrided samples. These results strongly suggest that device quality MOS dielectrics for high-voltage power MOS field-effect-transistors can be realized by nitridation/re-oxidation of LPCVD oxide.

  15. Rapid low-temperature processing of metal-oxide thin film transistors with combined far ultraviolet and thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Leppäniemi, J. Ojanperä, K.; Kololuoma, T.; Huttunen, O.-H.; Majumdar, H.; Alastalo, A.; Dahl, J.; Tuominen, M.; Laukkanen, P.

    2014-09-15

    We propose a combined far ultraviolet (FUV) and thermal annealing method of metal-nitrate-based precursor solutions that allows efficient conversion of the precursor to metal-oxide semiconductor (indium zinc oxide, IZO, and indium oxide, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) both at low-temperature and in short processing time. The combined annealing method enables a reduction of more than 100 °C in annealing temperature when compared to thermally annealed reference thin-film transistor (TFT) devices of similar performance. Amorphous IZO films annealed at 250 °C with FUV for 5 min yield enhancement-mode TFTs with saturation mobility of ∼1 cm{sup 2}/(V·s). Amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films annealed for 15 min with FUV at temperatures of 180 °C and 200 °C yield TFTs with low-hysteresis and saturation mobility of 3.2 cm{sup 2}/(V·s) and 7.5 cm{sup 2}/(V·s), respectively. The precursor condensation process is clarified with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Introducing the FUV irradiation at 160 nm expedites the condensation process via in situ hydroxyl radical generation that results in the rapid formation of a continuous metal-oxygen-metal structure in the film. The results of this paper are relevant in order to upscale printed electronics fabrication to production-scale roll-to-roll environments.

  16. Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition of in situ boron-doped polycrystalline silicon-germanium films on silicon dioxide for complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, V. Z.-Q.; Mirabedini, M. R.; Kuehn, R. T.; Wortman, J. J.; Öztürk, M. C.; Batchelor, D.; Christensen, K.; Maher, D. M.

    1997-12-01

    In situ boron-doped polycrystalline Si1-xGex (x>0.4) films have been formed on the thermally grown oxides in a rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition processor using SiH4-GeH4-B2H6-H2 gas system. Our results showed that in situ boron-doped Si1-xGex films can be directly deposited on the oxide surface, in contrast to the rapid thermal deposition of undoped silicon-germanium (Si1-xGex) films on oxides which is a partially selective process and requires a thin silicon film pre-deposition to form a continuous film. For the in situ boron-doped Si1-xGex films, we observed that with the increase of the germane percentage in the gas source, the Ge content and the deposition rate of the film are increased, while its resistivity is decreased down to 0.66 mΩ cm for a Ge content of 73%. Capacitance-voltage characteristics of p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with p+-Si1-xGex gates showed negligible polydepletion effect for a 75 Å gate oxide, indicating that a high doping level of boron at the poly-Si1-xGex/oxide interface was achieved.

  17. Rapid nanosheets and nanowires formation by thermal oxidation of iron in water vapour and their applications as Cr(VI) adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiman, Faisal; Bashirom, Nurulhuda; Tan, Wai Kian; Razak, Khairunisak Abdul; Matsuda, Atsunori; Lockman, Zainovia

    2016-09-01

    Thermal oxidation of iron foil was done at 400 °C and 500 °C in for 2 h to form multilayered oxide scale with outer oxide layer of α-Fe2O3 comprising of nanowires and nanosheets respectively. Iron oxidized at 300 °C formed a rather compact film with no noticeable nanostructures. The morphologies of oxide formed in different oxidation environment (water vapour or dry air) were compared; densely packed nanostructures were produced in water vapour compared to dry air. Time variation study indicated rapid growth of nanostructure whereby for 1 min at 500 °C dense nanowires with some noticeable nanosheets were already observed. The nanowires and nanosheets were used to adsorb Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Adsorption of 10 ppm of Cr(VI) on the nanowires and nanosheets was found to be successful with much faster removal efficiency for the nanosheets. Both samples displayed complete adsorption for less than 1 h.

  18. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Rapid thermal processing by stamping

    DOEpatents

    Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

    2013-03-05

    A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

  20. Surface morphology and electrical transport of rapid thermal annealed chromium-doped indium zinc oxides: The influence of zinc interstitials and out-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2013-12-09

    We investigate the complex impedance (CI) spectra of chromium-doped indium zinc oxide (CIZO) films with different rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The CI spectra drawn from the impedance contributions of Zn-O and In-O bondings in CIZO films were analyzed by two sets of parallel resistance and capacitance components in series. The result demonstrates that zinc interstitials controls electron concentration and transition of electrical transport from semiconducting to metallic. At higher RTA temperature, high-density zinc interstitial promotes Zn atom diffusion from the surface, modifying surface morphology.

  1. Surface morphology and electrical transport of rapid thermal annealed chromium-doped indium zinc oxides: The influence of zinc interstitials and out-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the complex impedance (CI) spectra of chromium-doped indium zinc oxide (CIZO) films with different rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperatures. The CI spectra drawn from the impedance contributions of Zn-O and In-O bondings in CIZO films were analyzed by two sets of parallel resistance and capacitance components in series. The result demonstrates that zinc interstitials controls electron concentration and transition of electrical transport from semiconducting to metallic. At higher RTA temperature, high-density zinc interstitial promotes Zn atom diffusion from the surface, modifying surface morphology.

  2. Low thermal conductivity oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Phillpot, Simon R.; Wan, Chunlei; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Qu, Zhixue

    2012-10-09

    Oxides hold great promise as new and improved materials for thermal-barrier coating applications. The rich variety of structures and compositions of the materials in this class, and the ease with which they can be doped, allow the exploration of various mechanisms for lowering thermal conductivity. In this article, we review recent progress in identifying specific oxides with low thermal conductivity from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. We explore the mechanisms of lowering thermal conductivity, such as introducing structural/chemical disorder, increasing material density, increasing the number of atoms in the primitive cell, and exploiting the structural anisotropy. We conclude that further systematic exploration of oxide crystal structures and chemistries are likely to result in even further improved thermal-barrier coatings.

  3. Direct synthesis and characterization of optically transparent conformal zinc oxide nanocrystalline thin films by rapid thermal plasma CVD

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report a rapid, self-catalyzed, solid precursor-based thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition process for depositing a conformal, nonporous, and optically transparent nanocrystalline ZnO thin film at 130 Torr (0.17 atm). Pure solid zinc is inductively heated and melted, followed by ionization by thermal induction argon/oxygen plasma to produce conformal, nonporous nanocrystalline ZnO films at a growth rate of up to 50 nm/min on amorphous and crystalline substrates including Si (100), fused quartz, glass, muscovite, c- and a-plane sapphire (Al2O3), gold, titanium, and polyimide. X-ray diffraction indicates the grains of as-deposited ZnO to be highly textured, with the fastest growth occurring along the c-axis. The individual grains are observed to be faceted by (103) planes which are the slowest growth planes. ZnO nanocrystalline films of nominal thicknesses of 200 nm are deposited at substrate temperatures of 330°C and 160°C on metal/ceramic substrates and polymer substrates, respectively. In addition, 20-nm- and 200-nm-thick films are also deposited on quartz substrates for optical characterization. At optical spectra above 375 nm, the measured optical transmittance of a 200-nm-thick ZnO film is greater than 80%, while that of a 20-nm-thick film is close to 100%. For a 200-nm-thick ZnO film with an average grain size of 100 nm, a four-point probe measurement shows electrical conductivity of up to 910 S/m. Annealing of 200-nm-thick ZnO films in 300 sccm pure argon at temperatures ranging from 750°C to 950°C (at homologous temperatures between 0.46 and 0.54) alters the textures and morphologies of the thin film. Based on scanning electron microscope images, higher annealing temperatures appear to restructure the ZnO nanocrystalline films to form nanorods of ZnO due to a combination of grain boundary diffusion and bulk diffusion. PACS: films and coatings, 81.15.-z; nanocrystalline materials, 81.07.Bc; II-VI semiconductors, 81.05.Dz. PMID:22040295

  4. Electrical characterization of rapid thermal nitrided and reoxidized plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, S. S.; Shi, Y. J.; Brown, W. D.

    1994-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of rapid thermal nitrided and reoxidized plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (PECVD) silicon dioxide metal-oxide-silison (MOS) structures were investigated. Both nitridation temperature and time affect the properties of the MOS structures as revealed by capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. Nitridation at 1000 C for 60 s followed by reoxidtion for 60 s at 1000 C in an oxygen/ nitrogen ambient was found to be superior to the same nitridation followed by reoxidation in pure oxygen. Typical vlaues of fixed charge and interface state densities for devices subjected to nitridation and reoxidation in a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen were 4 x 10(exp 10) cm(exp -2) and 7 x 10(exp 10) eV(exp -1) cm(exp -2), respectively. Avalanche electron injection using electric field of 3-5 MV/cm produced negative shifts in flatband voltage for low fluence levels and positive flatband voltage shifts for larger fluence levels. Furthermore, the magnitudes of both positive and negative shifts and the electron fluence level at which turnaround occurs increase with electric field. However, independent of the electric field, the flatband voltage saturates very close to its preinjection vlaue. These results strongly suggest that device quality MOS dielectrics can be realized by nitridation/reoxidation of PECVD oxide.

  5. Shrinking of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxide matrix during rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, M.; Fusi, A.; Xie, L.; Ali, H.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Leifer, K.; Zeman, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen on the crystallization process of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide matrix. We show that hydrogen gas during annealing leads to a lower sub-band gap absorption, indicating passivation of defects created during annealing. Samples annealed in pure nitrogen show expected trends according to crystallization theory. Samples annealed in forming gas, however, deviate from this trend. Their crystallinity decreases for increased annealing time. Furthermore, we observe a decrease in the mean nanocrystal size and the size distribution broadens, indicating that hydrogen causes a size reduction of the silicon nanocrystals.

  6. Rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide/Pt-TiO2 nanotube arrays for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic reduction of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Lan Ching; Leong, Kah Hon; Saravanan, Pichiah; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a complicate natural photosynthesis process was prototyped through a photocatalysis process by reducing CO2 to light hydrocarbon, CH4. The composite photocatalyst employed for this study utilized Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) and rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) deposited over the surface of the TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTs). The existence and contribution of both Pt NPs and RGO in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, FESEM, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-DRS and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The TNTs in the composite exhibited pure anatase phase. The absorption bands at around 450 nm obtained from UV-DRS spectrum supported the existence of LSPR phenomenon of Pt NPs. The promising lower work function of RGO promoted the electrons transfer from TNTs to RGO efficiently. The successful depositions of Pt and RGO onto the surface of TNTs contributed for the improved photocatalytic activity (total CH4 yield of 10.96 μmol m-2) in the reduction of CO2 over TNTs and Pt-TNTs. Both of RGO and Pt NPs are equally important to exert a significant impact on the improvement of CH4 production rates.

  7. Formation of Pd nanocrystals in titanium-oxide film by rapid thermal annealing of reactively cosputtered TiPdO films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Wanyi; Ding Shijin; Chen Hongbing; Sun Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2011-03-15

    In this article, the authors report a novel method for preparation of Pd nanocrystals embedded in TiO{sub 2} film; i.e., the TiPdO films are first deposited by reactively cosputtering Ti and Pd targets in a plasma mixture of O{sub 2} and Ar, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The experimental results indicate that the TiPdO film with a high content of Pd is inclined to produce big nanocrystals. Furthermore, the higher the RTA temperature, the bigger the Pd nanocrystals become. In addition, our analyses of the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra reveal that PdO, PdO{sub 2}, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TiO{sub 2} coexist in the as-deposited film, and the RTA at 600 deg. C leads to decomposition of the entire PdO{sub 2} and partial PdO, together with the growth of Pd nanocrystals. At the same time, the released oxygen oxidizes fully Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} into TiO{sub 2} during the decomposition. As the RTA temperature is increased up to 900 deg. C, more and more PdO is decomposed and the Pd nanocrystals become bigger and bigger.

  8. Thermal oxidation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebova, N. V.; Nechitailov, A. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Sokolov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The process of the thermal oxidation of various carbon nanomaterials (multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon black, nanoporous carbon and graphite) used in the catalytic layers of electrochemical energy converters (electrolyzers, fuel cells) has been studied. The thermal stability of these materials has been determined. Relationships between the structural characteristics of carbon nanomaterials and the parameters of their thermal oxidation in air have determined using the methods of differential thermal analysis and adsorption-structure analysis.

  9. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2015-10-27

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  10. Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications

    DOEpatents

    Scharman, Alan J.; Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

  11. Thermal oxidation of gallium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, O.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Here we present some results of transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy of thermally oxidized gallium arsenide with different types of dopants. At temperatures below 400 /sup 0/C an amorphous oxide is formed. Oxidation at temperatures between 500 and 600 /sup 0/C initially produces an epitaxial film of ..gamma..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. As the reaction proceeds, this film becomes polycrystalline and then transforms to ..beta..-Ga/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This film contains small crystallites of As/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and As/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the case of the chromium doped samples, whereas only the former was detected in the case of silicon and tellurium doped samples. Elemental arsenic was always found at the interface between the oxide and GaAs. Chromium doped gallium also exhibited a slower oxidation kinetics than the other materials.

  12. RAPID ARSENITE OXIDATION BY THERMUS AQUATICUS AND THERMUS THERMOPHILUS: FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed ...

  13. Feasibility study on rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karle, S. C.; Shaligram, A. D.

    2009-09-01

    The rapid thermal processing is widely used for heating of substrates in microelectronics. The use of radiation (UV/Visible/IR) as source of energy provides several advantages. Apart from thermal effects, photonic effects play a significant role in the RTP. Using array of tungsten halogen lamps as a continuous source of radiation, RTP covers a wide range of processing steps such as annealing, dielectric fabrication, metal alloying, diffusion and chemical vapor deposition. This paper reports an attempt made to use RTP in the field of thick film processing. Firing of thick films is an important high temperature step. The desirable physical and chemical properties of the films can be obtained through firing. A paste consisting of active chemicals, solvent, binder, glass powder is transferred on the substrate by means of screen-printing techniques. Further heating the substrates to about 600 °C fires this patterned thick film. This paper reports a novel technique for firing the paste in RTP system. The parameters viz. temperature and time were optimized for resistive paste of Cd-Cu-Cl. The thick films thus obtained were studied for their photosensitivity, I- V characteristics and microscopic structures.

  14. A rapid-temperature-cycling apparatus for oxidation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, A.L.; Kirner, J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    An oxidation test with rapid temperature cycling was developed to evaluate small coated parts. The samples in the form of wire or foils are resistively heated with a high-current AC power supply, allowing fast heating and cooling of the samples. Fast temperature cycling of the samples permits to complete more than 100 cycles in one day. A variety of steels coated with silicon diffusion coatings were tested and the results compared with oxidation via traditional thermal cycling. The test accurately predicts enhanced performance for siliconized 1010 steel, an increase by a factor of three for the life of siliconized 302 stainless steel, and an inadequate siliconized coating for 410 stainless steel. Details of the rapid temperature cycling apparatus as well as testing of the coated steels are described in the paper.

  15. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  16. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  17. Rapid PCR thermocycling using microscale thermal convection.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Radha; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2011-01-01

    Many molecular biology assays depend in some way on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an initially dilute target DNA sample to a detectable concentration level. But the design of conventional PCR thermocycling hardware, predominantly based on massive metal heating blocks whose temperature is regulated by thermoelectric heaters, severely limits the achievable reaction speed(1). Considerable electrical power is also required to repeatedly heat and cool the reagent mixture, limiting the ability to deploy these instruments in a portable format. Thermal convection has emerged as a promising alternative thermocycling approach that has the potential to overcome these limitations(2-9). Convective flows are an everyday occurrence in a diverse array of settings ranging from the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and interior, to decorative and colorful lava lamps. Fluid motion is initiated in the same way in each case: a buoyancy driven instability arises when a confined volume of fluid is subjected to a spatial temperature gradient. These same phenomena offer an attractive way to perform PCR thermocycling. By applying a static temperature gradient across an appropriately designed reactor geometry, a continuous circulatory flow can be established that will repeatedly transport PCR reagents through temperature zones associated with the denaturing, annealing, and extension stages of the reaction (Figure 1). Thermocycling can therefore be actuated in a pseudo-isothermal manner by simply holding two opposing surfaces at fixed temperatures, completely eliminating the need to repeatedly heat and cool the instrument. One of the main challenges facing design of convective thermocyclers is the need to precisely control the spatial velocity and temperature distributions within the reactor to ensure that the reagents sequentially occupy the correct temperature zones for a sufficient period of time(10,11). Here we describe results of our efforts to probe the full 3-D velocity and

  18. A new VLSI compatible rapid thermal processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, D.; Mehta, S.; Parisi, N.; Russo, C. J.; Schwartz, V.

    Rapid thermal processing (RTP) is increasingly becoming a significant tool to meet the challenge of fabricating miniaturized MOS and bipolar devices. The primary advantages of RTP over conventional furnace annealing include the shorter heat cycle, well-controlled soak times at peak temperatures and the capability to rapidly change anneal ambients, thereby enhancing its flexibility as a process tool. The major applications of RTP in VLSI technology that are presently being pursued include: (i) implant-damage annealing/dopant activation, (ii) silicide formation, (iii) glass reflow, (iv) thin film growth/deposition (oxides, nitrides, oxy-nitrides) and (v) contact alloying. This paper discusses a new rapid thermal processor, RTP-800/8000, recently introduced by Varian. The discussion will include mechanical and electrical design, software, heating process compatibility, process uniformity and repeatability, process setup and noncontact temperature measurement. The heating system consists of a tungsten lamp array surrounded by a highly reflective mirror system designed to provide good temperature uniformity for wafer sizes up to 200 mm. The RTP-8000 has a serial cassette-to-cassette automatic wafer handling system. The RTP-800 possesses a single wafer, operator-assisted wafer handling system. The RTP-800/8000 has an automated multiple gas flow control and also has the optional capability of processing wafers in vacuum. An infrared optical pyrometer measures the wafer temperature from the backside of the wafer. In the RTP-8000, touch screen operation of the menu-driven recipes is easy with user-friendly software. A separate electroluminescent flat panel display provides information for maintenance and servicing and reports the system status. Process information is provided on this display in the RTP-800.

  19. Success of Rapid Continuous Thermal Demagnetization When Conventional Methods Failed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, R. S.; Le Goff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Conventional stepwise thermal demagnetization of samples spanning a basalt flow erupted during a polarity transition at Steens Mountain, Oregon yielded scattered directions of high-temperature remanence, whereas the results of continuous thermal demagnetization cluster convincingly among the characteristic directions of the next several flows below. The continuous demagnetization was performed using the Triaxe1, a 3-axis vibrating sample magnetometer in which the directions of ~1 cm3 sub-samples were measured repeatedly as temperature increased during heated from 20 to 500-550°C in only 12-13 minutes. The demagnetization trajectories suggest that normal-polarity secondary magnetization, acquired both at room temperature in today's polarity chron and during modest reheating in a normal field during cooling of the overlying flow, was responsible for the failure of conventional thermal demagnetization. Our favored explanation is that alteration during ordinary thermal demagnetization raised the blocking temperature while preserving the direction of the overprint, thereby masking the primary component. The rapid heating (~40°C/min) during continuous demagnetization appears to have been fast enough to demagnetize the normal overprint before this masking could happen. Thermomagnetic cycles exhibit significant irreversibility starting around 300°C, both in air and in argon. Changes in room-temperature hysteresis parameters after heating in air to temperature T also start to change around T=300°C. Titanomagnetite of composition TM65-70, partially oxidized to titanomaghemite, plus a minor low-Ti, oxyexsolved phase are observed in thin section and inferred from thermomagnetic curves. Thus, inversion of secondary titanomaghemite that carries a normal overprint could be the masking mechanism. The failure of AF demagnetization, on the other hand, we attribute to overlapping coercivity spectra of primary and secondary magnetization. 1Le Goff and Gallet, 2004, Earth Planet

  20. Fabrication of large area silicon solar cells by rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1995-10-01

    Large area n+pp+ solar cells have been fabricated on 10 cm×10 cm pseudo-quasi-square CZ silicon wafers (1 Ω cm, p-type) predominantly used by the photovoltaic (PV) industry. All the high-temperature steps have been performed by rapid thermal processing (RTP). Emitter formation, back surface field (BSF) formation, and surface oxidation have been performed in just two RTP steps each lasting 50 s. Solar cells of 15% efficiency have been fabricated this way, demonstrating the applicability of this low thermal budget technology to large area, modulable size, industrial quality Si wafers. Furthermore, the rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) is shown to result in good quality thin oxides with Si/SiO2 interface trap densities (Dit)<1011 cm-3 eV-1 near-midgap.

  1. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  2. The study of thermal silicon dioxide electrets formed by corona discharge and rapid-thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Teng C.; Baker-Finch, Simeon C.; McIntosh, Keith R.

    2011-03-01

    A silicon dioxide (SiO2) electret passivates the surface of crystalline silicon (Si) in two ways: (i) when annealed and hydrogenated, the SiO2-Si interface has a low density of interface states, offering few energy levels through which electrons and holes can recombine; and (ii) the electret's quasipermanent charge repels carriers of the same polarity, preventing most from reaching the SiO2-Si interface and thereby limiting interface recombination. In this work, we engineer a charged thermal SiO2 electret on Si by depositing corona charge onto the surface of an oxide-coated Si wafer and subjecting the wafer to a rapid thermal anneal (RTA). We show that the surface-located corona charge is redistributed deeper into the oxide by the RTA. With 80 s of charging, and an RTA at 380 °C for 60 s, we measure an electret charge density of 5 × 1012 cm-2, above which no further benefit to surface passivation is attained. The procedure leads to a surface recombination velocity of less than 20 cm/s on 1 Ω-cm n-type Si, which is commensurate with the best passivation schemes employed on high-efficiency Si solar cells. In this paper, we introduce the method of SiO2 electret formation, analyze the relationship between charge density and interface recombination, and assess the redistribution of charge by the RTA.

  3. Rapid solar-thermal decarbonization of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Jaimee Kristen

    Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy and the concern over the environmental impact of continuing to produce energy using current methods, there is interest in developing a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen is a desirable energy source because it is abundant in nature and burns cleanly. One method for producing hydrogen is to utilize a renewable energy source to obtain high enough temperatures to decompose a fossil fuel into its elements. This thesis work is directed at developing a solar-thermal aerosol flow reactor to dissociate methane to carbon black and hydrogen. The technology is intended as a "bridge" between current hydrogen production methods, such as conventional steam-methane reformers, and future "zero emission" technology for producing hydrogen, such as dissociating water using a renewable heating source. A solar furnace is used to heat a reactor to temperatures in excess of 2000 K. The final reactor design studied consists of three concentric vertical tubes---an outer quartz protection tube, a middle solid graphite heating tube, and an inner porous graphite reaction tube. A "fluid-wall" is created on the inside wall of the porous reaction tube in order to prevent deposition of the carbon black co-product on the reactor tube wall. The amorphous carbon black produced aids in heating the gas stream by absorbing radiation from the reactor wall. Conversions of 90% are obtained at a reactor wall temperature of 2100 K and an average residence time of 0.01 s. Computer modeling is also performed to study the gas flow and temperature profiles in the reactor as well as the kinetics of the methane dissociation reaction. The simulations indicate that there is little flow of the fluid-wall gas through the porous wall in the hot zone region, but this can be remedied by increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid-wall gas and/or increasing the tube permeability only in the hot zone region of the wall. The following expression describes the kinetics of methane

  4. Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) of semiconductors in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. J.; Jones, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The progress achieved on the project entitled 'Rapid Thermal Processing of Semiconductors in Space' for a 12 month period of activity ending March 31, 1993 is summarized. The activity of this group is being performed under the direct auspices of the ROMPS program. The main objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the use of advanced robotics in space with rapid thermal process (RTP) of semiconductors providing the test technology. Rapid thermal processing is an ideal processing step for demonstration purposes since it encompasses many of the characteristics of other processes used in solid state device manufacturing. Furthermore, a low thermal budget is becoming more important in existing manufacturing practice, while a low thermal budget is critical to successful processing in space. A secondary objective of this project is to determine the influence of microgravity on the rapid thermal process for a variety of operating modes. In many instances, this involves one or more fluid phases. The advancement of microgravity processing science is an important ancillary objective.

  5. Formation of niobium nitride by rapid thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Angelkort, C; Lewalter, H; Warbichler, P; Hofer, F; Bock, W; Kolbesen, B O

    2001-09-01

    The formation of group V transition metal nitride films by means of rapid thermal processing (RTP) has been investigated. Here we focus on the nitridation of niobium films of 200-500 nm thickness in the temperature range from 500 to 1,100 degrees C under laminar flow of molecular nitrogen or ammonia. The nitride phases formed were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were carried out on samples of selected experiments to provide more detailed information about the initial stages of nitride formation and the microstructure of the films. A classical formation sequence of nitride phases was observed with increasing nitrogen content in the order: alpha-Nb(N) --> beta-Nb2N --> gamma-Nb4N3 --> delta'-NbN --> Nb5N6. Furthermore, oxide enriched regions were discovered inside the metal films. These turned out to be formed mainly in the nitride sequence between the a-alphaNb(N) and beta-Nb2N-phases at the Nb/SiO2 interface due to a reaction of the Nb with the SiO2 layer of the silicon substrates on which the films had been deposited. The SiO2 layer acts as diffusion barrier for nitrogen but also as source for oxygen, according to SNMS and TEM/EELS studies, resulting in the formation of Nb-oxides and/or oxynitrides at the Nb/SiO2 interface. PMID:11666087

  6. Formation of niobium nitride by rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelkort, C.; Lewalter, H.; Warbichler, P.; Hofer, F.; Bock, W.; Kolbesen, B. O.

    2001-09-01

    The formation of group V transition metal nitride films by means of rapid thermal processing (RTP) has been investigated. Here we focus on the nitridation of niobium films of 200-500 nm thickness in the temperature range from 500 to 1100°C under laminar flow of molecular nitrogen or ammonia. The nitride phases formed were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were carried out on samples of selected experiments to provide more detailed information about the initial stages of nitride formation and the microstructure of the films. A classical formation sequence of nitride phases was observed with increasing nitrogen content in the order: α-Nb(N)→β-Nb 2N→γ-Nb 4N 3→δ'-NbN→Nb 5N 6. Furthermore, oxide enriched regions were discovered inside the metal films. These turned out to be formed mainly in the nitride sequence between the a-αNb(N) and β-Nb 2N-phases at the Nb/SiO 2 interface due to a reaction of the Nb with the SiO 2 layer of the silicon substrates on which the films had been deposited. The SiO 2 layer acts as diffusion barrier for nitrogen but also as source for oxygen, according to SNMS and TEM/EELS studies, resulting in the formation of Nb-oxides and/or oxynitrides at the Nb/SiO 2 interface.

  7. Oxidation behavior of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings, consisting of a plasma sprayed calcium silicate ceramic layer and a CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coat, were applied on B-1900 coupons and cycled hourly in air in a rapid-response furnace to maximum temperatures of 1030, 1100, or 1160 C. Eight specimens were tested for each of the six conditions of bond-coat composition and temperature. Specimens were removed from test at the onset of failure, which was taken to be the formation of a fine surface crack visible at 10X magnification. Specimens were weighed periodically, and plots of weight gain vs time indicate that weight is gained at a parabolic rate after an initial period where weight was gained at a much greater rate. The high initial oxidation rate is thought to arise from the initially high surface area in the porous bond coat. Specimen life (time to first crack) was found to be a strong function of temperature. However, while test lives varied greatly with time, the weight gain at the time of specimen failure was quite insensitive to temperature. This indicates that there is a critical weight gain at which the coating fails when subjected to this test.

  8. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Rapid persulfate oxidation predicts PAH bioavailability in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cuypers, C.; Grotenhuis, T.; Joziasse, J.; Rulkens, W.

    2000-05-15

    Persulfate oxidation was validated as a method to predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability in soils and sediments. It was demonstrated for 14 field contaminated soils and sediments that residual PAH concentrations after a short (3 h) persulfate oxidation correspond well to residual PAH concentrations after 21 days of biodegradation. Persulfate oxidation of samples that had first been subjected to biodegradation yielded only limited additional PAH oxidation. This implies that oxidation and biodegradation removed approximately the same PAH fraction. Persulfate oxidation thus provides a good and rapid method for the prediction of PAH bioavailability. Thermogravimetric analysis of oxidized and untreated samples showed that persulfate oxidation primarily affected expanded organic matter. The results indicate that this expanded organic matter contained mainly readily bioavailable PAHs.

  10. Rapid change in the thermal tolerance of a tropical lizard.

    PubMed

    Leal, Manuel; Gunderson, Alex R

    2012-12-01

    The predominant view is that the thermal physiology of tropical ectotherms, including lizards, is not labile over ecological timescales. We used the recent introduction (∼35 years ago) of the Puerto Rican lizard Anolis cristatellus to Miami, Florida, to test this thermal rigidity hypothesis. We measured lower (critical thermal minimum [CT(min)]) and upper (critical thermal maximum [CT(max)]) thermal tolerances and found that the introduced population tolerates significantly colder temperatures (by ∼3°C) than does the Puerto Rican source population; however, CT(max) did not differ. These results mirror the thermal regimes experienced by each population: Miami reaches colder ambient temperatures than Puerto Rico, but maximum ambient temperatures are similar. The differences in CT(min) were observed even though lizards from both sites experienced nearly identical conditions for 49 days before CT(min) measurement. Our results demonstrate that changes in thermal tolerance occurred relatively rapidly (∼35 generations), which strongly suggests that the thermal physiology of tropical lizards is more labile than previously proposed. PMID:23149405

  11. Rapid arsenite oxidation by Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus: Field and laboratory investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gihring, T.M.; Druschel, G.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Hamers, R.J.; Banfield, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed conserved total arsenic transport and rapid arsenite oxidation occurring within the drainage channel. This environment was heavily colonized by Thermus aquaticus. In laboratory experiments, arsenite oxidation by cultures of Thermus aquaticus YT1 (previously isolated from Yellowstone National Park) and Thermus thermophilus HB8 was accelerated by a factor of over 100 relative to abiotic controls. Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus may therefore play a large and previously unrecognized role in determining arsenic speciation and bioavailability in thermal environments.

  12. Rapid Charging of Thermal Energy Storage Materials through Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongyong; Tao, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hao; Ye, Qinxian; Hu, Hang; Song, Chengyi; Chen, Zhaoping; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites. PMID:25175717

  13. Opportunities for functional oxides in yttrium oxide-titanium oxide-zirconium oxide system: Applications for novel thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francillon, Wesley

    This dissertation is an investigation of materials and processed under consideration for next generation thermal structural oxides with potential applications as thermal barrier coatings; wherein, high temperature stability and mechanical properties affect durability. Two notable next generation materials systems under investigation are pyrochlore and co-doped zirconia oxides. The motivation for this work is based on current limitations of the currently used thermal barrier material of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) deposited by the plasma spray processes. The rapid quenching associated with the plasma spray process, results in a metastable structure that is a non-transformable tetragonal structure in the yttria partially stabilized zirconia system rather than the equilibrium anticipated two phase mixture of cubic and monoclinic phases. It has been shown that this metastable structure offers enhanced toughness and thus durability during thermomechanical cycling from the operating temperatures in excess of 1000C to ambient. However, the metastable oxides are susceptible to partitioning at temperatures greater than 1200C, thus resulting in a transformation of the tetragonal phase oxides. Transformations of the tetragonal prime phase into the parent cubic and tetragonal prime phase result in coating degradation. Several of the emerging oxides are based on rare earth additions to zirconia. However, there is limited information of the high temperature stability of these oxide coatings and more notably these compositions exhibit limited toughness for durable performance. A potential ternary composition based on the YSZ system that offers the ability to tailor the phase structure is based YO1.5-TiO2 -ZrO2. The ternary of YO1.5-TiO2-ZrO 2 has the current TBC composition of seven molar percent yttria stabilized zirconia, pyrochlore phase oxide and zirconia doped with yttria and titania additions (Ti-YSZ). The Ti-YSZ phase field is of interest because at equilibrium it is

  14. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  15. Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

  16. Flameless Thermal Oxidation. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (Plcs ).

  17. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalklethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Harris, D. H.; Smythe, M. E.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the mechanisms operative in thermal and thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids has not been established. It was determined that this behavior was not associated with hydrogen end-groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres was found to be dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio was reached, a steady rate appeared to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, -CF2OCF2CF2O-, not -CF2CF2O-, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys was found to be much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexalfuoropropane oxide derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation/anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys was very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appeared to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes; this took place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  18. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms operative in thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes are investigated. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids is not established. It was determined that this behavior is not associated with hydrogen end groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres is dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio is reached, a steady rate appears to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, CF2OCF2CF2O2, no. CF2CF2O, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys is much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexafluoropropene derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys is very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appears to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes this takes place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  19. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fractionated products from oil thermally oxidated

    SciTech Connect

    Yashida, H.; Alexander, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of the acylglycerol products obtained from thermally oxidized vegetable oils was studied. Corn, sunflower and soybean oils were heated in the laboratory at 180/sup 0/C for 50, 70 and 100 hr with aeration and directly fractionated by silicic acid column chromatography. By successive elution with 20%, then 60% isopropyl ether in n-hexane, and diethyl ether, the thermally oxidized oils were separated into three fractions: the nonpolar fraction (monomeric compounds), slightly polar fraction (dimeric compounds), and polar fraction comprising oligomeric compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase showed that the monomers were hydrolyzed as rapidly as the corresponding unheated oils, the dimers much more slowly, and the oligomeric compounds barely at all. Overall, the hydrolysis of the dimers was less than 23% of that for the monomers, with small differences among the oils. Longer heating periods resulted in greater reductions in hydrolysis of the dimeric compounds. These results suggest that the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of the fractionated acylglycerol compounds is related to differences in the thermal oxidative deterioration, and amounts of polar compounds in the products. (33 Refs.)

  20. Oxidation and degradation of thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, James Allen

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which consist of an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating overlaid with a thermally-insulating Ysb2Osb3-stabilized ZrOsb2 (YSZ) top coating, are used to protect superalloy hardware in gas turbine engines. Spallation of the YSZ is accelerated by growth of an interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale at high temperatures. The mechanisms of oxidation-related degradation are not well understood for air plasma-sprayed (APS) TBCs, whereas Alsb2Osb3 thermomechanical failure is the dominant degradation mode in electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs. This work investigated the isothermal oxidation and thermocyclic degradation of various TBC systems; with particular emphasis on the growth kinetics, microstructures, flaw content, fracture behavior and micro-mechanical properties of the Alsb2Osb3 interfacial scales. The isothermal oxidation kinetics of plasma-sprayed NiCrAlY were not influenced by the presence of an APS YSZ top coating (at 1150sp°C). However, the isothermal oxidation rate constants of NiCoCrAlY bond coatings were accelerated by a factor of 2 (at 950, 1050 and 1150sp°C) when overlaid with a commercial EB-PVD TBC. Thermocyclic failure of APS TBCs occurred by progressive YSZ fracture and crack link-up. Severe fracture and buckling of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 during thermal cycling did not induce rapid failure of APS TBCs. Evaluation of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale microstructures (on APS TBCs) after thermal cycling revealed the following: thermocyclic damage occurred by both oxide-metal delamination and by internal fracture; Alsb2Osb3 scale crack healing by sintering occurred at 1150sp°C; surfaces with a sharp radius of curvature induced less Alsb2Osb3 damage than gradually convex surfaces; scale grain boundary void growth was accelerated by thermal cycling; and higher void contents were observed in scales which formed on convex surfaces. There were no significant changes in the hardness or Young's modulus of the Alsb2

  1. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  2. Rapid evolution of thermal tolerance in the water flea Daphnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, A. N.; Vanoverbeke, J.; Vanschoenwinkel, B.; van Doorslaer, W.; Feuchtmayr, H.; Atkinson, D.; Moss, B.; Davidson, T. A.; Sayer, C. D.; De Meester, L.

    2015-07-01

    Global climate is changing rapidly, and the degree to which natural populations respond genetically to these changes is key to predicting ecological responses. So far, no study has documented evolutionary changes in the thermal tolerance of natural populations as a response to recent temperature increase. Here, we demonstrate genetic change in the capacity of the water flea Daphnia to tolerate higher temperatures using both a selection experiment and the reconstruction of evolution over a period of forty years derived from a layered dormant egg bank. We observed a genetic increase in thermal tolerance in response to a two-year ambient +4 °C selection treatment and in the genotypes of natural populations from the 1960s and 2000s hatched from lake sediments. This demonstrates that natural populations have evolved increased tolerance to higher temperatures, probably associated with the increased frequency of heat waves over the past decades, and possess the capacity to evolve increased tolerance to future warming.

  3. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    This dissertation presents a study of thermal and electrical transport phenomena in heterostructures of transition metal oxides, with specific interest in understanding and tailoring thermoelectricity in these systems. Thermoelectric energy conversion is a promising method for waste heat recovery and the efficiency of such an engine is directly related to a material dependent figure of merit, Z, given as S2sigma/kappa, where S is thermopower and sigma and kappa are electrical and thermal conductivity respectively. Achieving large figure of merit has been hampered by the coupling between these three thermoelectric coefficients, and the primary aim of this study is to understand the nature of thermoelectricity in complex oxides and identify mechanisms which can allow tuning of one or more thermoelectric coefficients in a favorable manner. Unlike the heavily studied conventional thermoelectric semiconductors, transition metals based complex oxides show conduction band characteristics dominated by d-bands, with much larger effective masses and varying degrees of electron correlations. These systems provide for exotic thermoelectric effects which are typically not explained by conventional theories and hence provide an ideal platform for exploring the limits of thermoelectricity. Meanwhile, oxides are composed of earth abundant elements and have excellent high temperature stability, thus providing compelling technological possibilities for thermoelectrics based power generation. In this dissertation, we address specific aspects of thermoelectricity in model complex oxide systems such as perovskite titanates and layered cobaltates to understand thermal and thermoelectric behavior and explore the tunability of thermoelectricity in these systems. The demonstration of band engineering as a viable method to tune physical properties of materials is explored. The model system used for this case is strontium titanate, where two dopants such as La on the Sr-site and oxygen

  4. Rapid Determination of the Thermal Nociceptive Threshold in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Fernandez-Conti, Filipe; Araujo, Amanda; DiFulvio, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is characterized by hyperalgesia i.e., increased sensitivity to noxious stimulus, and allodynia i.e., hypersensitivity to normally innocuous stimuli1. Hyperalgesia and allodynia have been studied in many different rodent models of diabetes mellitus2. However, as stated by Bölcskei et al, determination of "pain" in animal models is challenging due to its subjective nature3. Moreover, the traditional methods used to determine behavioral responses to noxious thermal stimuli usually lack reproducibility and pharmacological sensitivity3. For instance, by using the hot-plate method of Ankier4, flinch, withdrawal and/or licking of either hind- and/or fore-paws is quantified as reflex latencies at constant high thermal stimuli (52-55 °C). However, animals that are hyperalgesic to thermal stimulus do not reproducibly show differences in reflex latencies using those supra-threshold temperatures3,5. As the recently described method of Bölcskei et al.6, the procedures described here allows for the rapid, sensitive and reproducible determination of thermal nociceptive thresholds (TNTs) in mice and rats. The method uses slowly increasing thermal stimulus applied mostly to the skin of mouse/rat plantar surface. The method is particularly sensitive to study anti-nociception during hyperalgesic states such as PDN. The procedures described bellow are based on the ones published in detail by Almási et al5 and Bölcskei et al3. The procedures described here have been approved the Laboratory Animal Care and Use Committee (LACUC), Wright State University. PMID:22643870

  5. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  6. Liquid hydrogen turbopump rapid start program. [thermal preconditioning using coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    This program was to analyze, test, and evaluate methods of achieving rapid-start of a liquid hydrogen feed system (inlet duct and turbopump) using a minimum of thermal preconditioning time and propellant. The program was divided into four tasks. Task 1 includes analytical studies of the testing conducted in the other three tasks. Task 2 describes the results from laboratory testing of coating samples and the successful adherence of a KX-635 coating to the internal surfaces of the feed system tested in Task 4. Task 3 presents results of testing an uncoated feed system. Tank pressure was varied to determine the effect of flowrate on preconditioning. The discharge volume and the discharge pressure which initiates opening of the discharge valve were varied to determine the effect on deadhead (no through-flow) start transients. Task 4 describes results of testing a similar, internally coated feed system and illustrates the savings in preconditioning time and propellant resulting from the coatings.

  7. A review of wet air oxidation and Thermal Hydrolysis technologies in sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Hii, Kevin; Baroutian, Saeid; Parthasarathy, Raj; Gapes, Daniel J; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2014-03-01

    With rapid world population growth and strict environmental regulations, increasingly large volumes of sludge are being produced in today's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) with limited disposal routes. Sludge treatment has become an essential process in WWTP, representing 50% of operational costs. Sludge destruction and resource recovery technologies are therefore of great ongoing interest. Hydrothermal processing uses unique characteristics of water at elevated temperatures and pressures to deconstruct organic and inorganic components of sludge. It can be broadly categorized into wet oxidation (oxidative) and thermal hydrolysis (non-oxidative). While wet air oxidation (WAO) can be used for the final sludge destruction and also potentially producing industrially useful by-products such as acetic acid, thermal hydrolysis (TH) is mainly used as a pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion. This paper reviews current hydrothermal technologies, roles of wet air oxidation and thermal hydrolysis in sludge treatment, and challenges faced by these technologies. PMID:24457302

  8. Rapid Methane Oxidation in a Landfill Cover Soil †

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S. C.; Reeburgh, W. S.; Sandbeck, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    Methane oxidation rates observed in a topsoil covering a retired landfill are the highest reported (45 g m−2 day−1) for any environment. This microbial community had the capacity to rapidly oxidize CH4 at concentrations ranging from <1 ppm (microliters per liter) (first-order rate constant [k] = −0.54 h−1) to >104 ppm (k = −2.37 h−1). The physiological characteristics of a methanotroph isolated from the soil (characteristics determined in aqueous medium) and the natural population, however, were similar to those of other natural populations and cultures: the Q10 and optimum temperature were 1.9 and 31°C, respectively, the apparent half-saturation constant was 2.5 to 9.3 μM, and 19 to 69% of oxidized CH4 was assimilated into biomass. The CH4 oxidation rate of this soil under waterlogged (41% [wt/vol] H2O) conditions, 6.1 mg liter−1 day−1, was near rates reported for lake sediment and much lower than the rate of 116 mg liter−1 day−1 in the same soil under moist (11% H2O) conditions. Since there are no large physiological differences between this microbial community and other CH4 oxidizers, we attribute the high CH4 oxidation rate in moist soil to enhanced CH4 transport to the microorganisms; gas-phase molecular diffusion is 104-fold faster than aqueous diffusion. These high CH4 oxidation rates in moist soil have implications that are important in global climate change. Soil CH4 oxidation could become a negative feedback to atmospheric CH4 increases (and warming) in areas that are presently waterlogged but are projected to undergo a reduction in summer soil moisture. PMID:16348346

  9. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  10. Polarization-Mediated Thermal Stability of Metal/Oxide Heterointerface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qintong; You, Lu; Shen, Xi; Wan, Caihua; Yuan, Zhonghui; Zhang, Xuan; Huang, Li; Kong, Wenjie; Wu, Hao; Yu, Richeng; Wang, Junling; Han, Xiufeng

    2015-11-18

    A polarization-mediated heterointerface is designed to research the thermal stability of magnetic metal/oxide interfaces. Using polarization engineering, the thermal stability of the interface between BiFeO3 and CoFeB can be improved by about 100°C. This finding provides new insight into the chemistry of the metal/oxide heterointerface. PMID:26421975

  11. A review of liquid lubricant thermal/oxidative degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental processes occurring during the thermal and oxidative degradation of hydrocarbons are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to various classes of liquid lubricants such as mineral oils, esters, polyphenyl ethers, C-ethers, and fluorinated polyethers. Experimental techniques for determining thermal and oxidative stabilities of lubricants are discussed. The role of inhibitors and catalysis is also covered.

  12. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, H.P.; Wittwer, C.T.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes an apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column. 6 figs.

  13. On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling

    DOEpatents

    Swerdlow, Harold P.; Wittwer, Carl T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column.

  14. Thermally stable crystalline mesoporous metal oxides with substantially uniform pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Ulrich; Orilall, Mahendra Christopher; Lee, Jinwoo; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2015-01-27

    Highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites, as precursors to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, are coated with a layer of amorphous carbon. Using a `one-pot` method, highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites are converted to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, having highly crystalline mesopore walls, without causing the concomitant collapse of the mesostructure. The `one-pot` method uses block copolymers with an sp or sp 2 hybridized carbon containing hydrophobic block as structure directing agents which converts to a sturdy, amorphous carbon material under appropriate heating conditions, providing an in-situ rigid support which maintains the pores of the oxides intact while crystallizing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg C. A highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composite can be heated to produce a thermally stable mesoporous metal oxide consisting of a single polymorph.

  15. Investigation on the Thermal Crack Evolution and Oxidation Effect of Compacted Graphite Iron Under Thermal Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weizheng; Guo, Bingbin

    2015-09-01

    For a better understanding of the thermal fatigue behavior in compacted graphite cast iron (CGI), the cyclic thermal shock test is carried out through alternating induction heating and water quenching. The optical and scanning electron microscopy observations are used to examine the cracks and oxidation behavior on the cross section and heating surface of the material specimen, respectively. The results show that the thermal cracks in CGI initiate at the graphite phases mostly, and the multi-sourced thermal cracks would result in stable cracks morphology finally through crack shielding effect. In the oxidation analysis, it is found that the oxidation of graphite is selective, and the graphite is the potential channels for oxygen diffusion from the outside into the matrix, resulting in local oxidation of matrix around graphite and continuous oxygen diffusion paths in the microstructure. Thermal cracks nucleate from the oxidation holes at graphite caused by decarburization, and they prefer to propagate and coalesce by penetrating the oxide bridges.

  16. Thermal Shock Behavior of Single Crystal Oxide Refractive Concentrators for High Temperatures Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystal oxides such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO) and sapphire (Al2O3) have been considered as refractive secondary concentrator materials for high temperature solar propulsion applications. However, thermal mechanical reliability of the oxide components in severe thermal environments during space mission sun/shade transitions is of great concern. In this paper, critical mechanical properties of these oxide crystals are determined by the indentation technique. Thermal shock resistance of the oxides is evaluated using a high power CO, laser under high temperature-high thermal gradients. Thermal stress fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of these oxide materials are investigated under various temperature and heating conditions.

  17. Salmonella Rapidly Regulates Membrane Permeability To Survive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Joris; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Deng, Wanyin; Mills, Allan; Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Foster, Leonard J.; Duong, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides protection against toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreased OM permeability can promote bacterial survival under harsh circumstances and protects against antibiotics. To better understand the regulation of OM permeability, we studied the real-time influx of hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella bacteria and discovered two novel mechanisms by which they rapidly control OM permeability. We found that pores in two major OM proteins, OmpA and OmpC, could be rapidly opened or closed when oxidative stress is encountered and that the underlying mechanisms rely on the formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasmic domain of OmpA and TrxA, respectively. Additionally, we found that a Salmonella mutant showing increased OM permeability was killed more effectively by treatment with antibiotics. Together, these results demonstrate that Gram-negative bacteria regulate the influx of ROS for defense against oxidative stress and reveal novel targets that can be therapeutically targeted to increase bacterial killing by conventional antibiotics. PMID:27507830

  18. Thermal-oxidative Pretreatment and Evaluation of Poly (hexafluoropropene Oxide) Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. J. L.; Masuda, S. R.; Lin, W-H.; Jones, W. R., Jr.; Helmick, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    Two commercial poly(hexafluoropropene oxide) fluids were thermally pretreated at 343 C in pure oxygen. IR and NMR spectra indicate that this pretreatment was effective in removing hydrogen end-capped impurities. Decrease in the quantity of volatile material produced during thermal oxidative decomposition and increase in the thermal decomposition temperature indicated improvement in the stability of the fluids. However, this pretreatment failed to render the fluids completely stable in oxidizing atmospheres at 316 C in the presence of metal alloys.

  19. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  20. Rapid oxidation of DL-selenomethionine by peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, S; Squadrito, G L; Lemercier, J N; Cueto, R; Pryor, W A

    1996-01-01

    Peroxynitrite, the reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, rapidly oxidizes DL-selenomethionine (MetSe) with overall second-order kinetics, first-order in peroxynitrite and first-order in MetSe. The oxidation of MetSe by peroxynitrite goes by two competing mechanism. The first produces ethylene by what we propose to be a one-electron oxidation of MetSe. In the second mechanism, MetSe undergoes a two-electron oxidation that gives methionine selenoxide (MetSe = O); the apparent second-order rate constant, k2(app), for this process is (2.4 +/- 0.1) x 10(3) M-1s-1 at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C. The kinetic modeling of the experimental data suggests that both peroxynitrous acid (k2 = 20,460 +/- 440 M-1s-1 at 25 degrees C) and the peroxynitrite anion (k3 = 200 +/- 170 M-1s-1 at 25 degrees C) are involved in the second-order reaction leading to selenoxide. These rate constants are 10- to 1,000-fold higher than those for the reactions of methionine (Met) with peroxynitrite. With increasing concentrations of MetSe at pH 7.4, the yield of ethylene decreases, while that of MetSe = O increases, suggesting that the reactions leading to ethylene and selenoxide have different kinetic orders. These results are analogous to those we previously reported for methionine and 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutanoic acid (KTBA),where ethylene is produced in a first-order reaction and sulfoxide in a second-order reaction. Therefore, we suggest that the reaction of peryoxynitrite with MetSe involves a mechanism similar to that we proposed for Met, in which an activated intermediate of peroxynitrous acid (HOONO) is the one-electron oxidant and reacts with first-order kinetics and ground-state peroxynitrite is the two-electron oxidant and reacts with second-order kinetics. PMID:8855442

  1. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  2. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbin, Andrew R.; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions.

  3. Nitrogen cycling. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions. PMID:26045434

  4. Photocatalytic and thermal catalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde on Pt/TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Falconer, J.L.; Magrini-Bair, K.A.

    1998-10-01

    Low concentrations of acetaldehyde in air (60 ppm) were oxidized over TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P25) and 0.5% Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalysts from 24 to 200 C by photocatalytic and thermal catalytic reactions. On Pt/TiO{sub 2}, the contribution by photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is a maximum at 140 C, where conversion is 2.8 times that at 24 C. Titania without Pt deactivates rapidly during PCO at elevated temperature due to a thermal catalytic reaction that takes place in parallel with PCO, but the addition of Pt dramatically slows deactivation. Apparently, Pt supplies spillover oxygen onto the TiO{sub 2}, and the oxygen oxidizes the acetaldehyde decomposition products in a dark reaction. Deactivated TiO{sub 2} without Pt was regenerated by PCO at room temperature. Seven distinct reactions (photocatalytic and thermal catalytic) are identified on Pt/TiO{sub 2}.

  5. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-07

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm{sup −1} of FWHM 10.3 cm{sup −1} and atomic smooth interfaces.

  6. Dynamics of metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films by rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yuanxun; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Conibeer, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    Though Ge crystallization has been widely studied, few works investigate metal-induced crystallization of ultrathin Ge films. For 2 nm Ge films in oxide matrix, crystallization becomes challenging due to easy oxidation and low mobility of Ge atoms. Introducing metal atoms may alleviate these problems, but the functions and the behaviours of metal atoms need to be clarified. This paper investigates the crystallization dynamics of a multilayer structure 1.9 nm Ge/0.5 nm Al/1.5 nm Al2O3 under rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The functions of metal atoms, like effective anti-oxidation, downshifting Raman peaks, and incapability to decrease crystallization temperature, are found and explained. The metal behaviours, such as inter-diffusion and defect generation, are supported with direct evidences, Al-Ge nanobicrystals, and Al cluster in Ge atoms. With these understandings, a two-step RTA process achieves high-quality 2 nm nanocrystal Ge films with Raman peak at 298 cm-1 of FWHM 10.3 cm-1 and atomic smooth interfaces.

  7. Insertion of oxidized nucleotide triggers rapid DNA polymerase opening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taejin; Freudenthal, Bret D; Beard, William A; Wilson, Samuel H; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-05-19

    A novel mechanism is unveiled to explain why a pro-mutagenic nucleotide lesion (oxidized guanine, 8-oxoG) causes the mammalian DNA repair polymerase-β (pol-β) to rapidly transition to an inactive open conformation. The mechanism involves unexpected features revealed recently in time-lapse crystallography. Specifically, a delicate water network associated with a lesion-stabilizing auxilliary product ion Mg(p) triggers a cascade of events that leads to poor active site geometry and the rupture of crucial molecular interactions between key residues in both the anti(8-oxoG:C) and syn(8-oxoG:A) systems. Once the base pairs in these lesioned systems are broken, dislocation of both Asp192 (a metal coordinating ligand) and the oxoG phosphate group (PO4) interfere with the hydrogen bonding between Asp192 and Arg258, whose rotation toward Asp192 is crucial to the closed-to-open enzyme transition. Energetically, the lesioned open states are similar in energy to those of the corresponding closed complexes after chemistry, in marked contrast to the unlesioned pol-β anti(G:C) system, whose open state is energetically higher than the closed state. The delicate surveillance system offers a fundamental protective mechanism in the cell that triggers DNA repair events which help deter insertion of oxidized lesions. PMID:27034465

  8. Insertion of oxidized nucleotide triggers rapid DNA polymerase opening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taejin; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    A novel mechanism is unveiled to explain why a pro-mutagenic nucleotide lesion (oxidized guanine, 8-oxoG) causes the mammalian DNA repair polymerase-β (pol-β) to rapidly transition to an inactive open conformation. The mechanism involves unexpected features revealed recently in time-lapse crystallography. Specifically, a delicate water network associated with a lesion-stabilizing auxilliary product ion Mg(p) triggers a cascade of events that leads to poor active site geometry and the rupture of crucial molecular interactions between key residues in both the anti(8-oxoG:C) and syn(8-oxoG:A) systems. Once the base pairs in these lesioned systems are broken, dislocation of both Asp192 (a metal coordinating ligand) and the oxoG phosphate group (PO4) interfere with the hydrogen bonding between Asp192 and Arg258, whose rotation toward Asp192 is crucial to the closed-to-open enzyme transition. Energetically, the lesioned open states are similar in energy to those of the corresponding closed complexes after chemistry, in marked contrast to the unlesioned pol-β anti(G:C) system, whose open state is energetically higher than the closed state. The delicate surveillance system offers a fundamental protective mechanism in the cell that triggers DNA repair events which help deter insertion of oxidized lesions. PMID:27034465

  9. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants rapidly oxidize and disrupt zinc-cysteine/histidine clusters in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    Zinc is an abundant cellular transition metal ion, which binds avidly to protein cysteine (Cys) and histidine (His) residues to form zinc-Cys/His clusters; these play a key role in the function of many proteins (e.g., DNA binding and repair enzymes, transcription factors, nitric oxide synthase). Leukocyte-derived myeloperoxidase generates powerful oxidants including hypochlorous (HOCl), hypobromous (HOBr), and hypothiocyanous (HOSCN) acids from H(2)O(2) and (pseudo)halide ions. Excessive or misplaced formation of these species is associated with cellular dysfunction, apoptosis and necrosis, and multiple inflammatory diseases. HOCl and HOBr react rapidly with sulfur-containing compounds, and HOSCN reacts specifically with thiols. Consequently, we hypothesized that zinc-Cys/His clusters would be targets for these oxidants, and the activity of such enzymes would be perturbed. This hypothesis has been tested using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), which contains a well-characterized Zn(1)Cys(2)His(1) cluster. Incubation of YADH with pathologically relevant concentrations of HOSCN, HOCl, and HOBr resulted in rapid oxidation of the protein (rate constants, determined by competition kinetics, for reaction of HOCl and HOSCN with YADH being (3.3±0.9)×10(8) and (2.9±0.4)×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) per YADH monomer, respectively), loss of enzyme activity, Zn(2+) release, changes in protein structure (particularly formation of disulfide cross-links), and oxidation of Cys residues. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with Zn(2+) release, loss of thiols, and changes in protein structure. We conclude that exposure of zinc-Cys/His clusters to inflammatory oxidants can result in impaired protein activity, thiol oxidation, and Zn(2+) release. These reactions may contribute to inflammation-induced tissue damage. PMID:23032100

  10. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  11. Electrochemically tunable thermal conductivity of lithium cobalt oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jiung; Losego, Mark D.; Zhang, Hui Gang; Kim, Honggyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Petrov, Ivan; Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.

    2014-06-01

    Using time-domain thermoreflectance, the thermal conductivity and elastic properties of a sputter deposited LiCoO2 film, a common lithium-ion cathode material, are measured as a function of the degree of lithiation. Here we report that via in situ measurements during cycling, the thermal conductivity of a LiCoO2 cathode reversibly decreases from ~5.4 to 3.7 W m-1 K-1, and its elastic modulus decreases from 325 to 225 GPa, as it is delithiated from Li1.0CoO2 to Li0.6CoO2. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on lithiation appears correlated with the lithiation-dependent phase behaviour. The oxidation-state-dependent thermal conductivity of electrolytically active transition metal oxides provides opportunities for dynamic control of thermal conductivity and is important to understand for thermal management in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  12. Electrochemically tunable thermal conductivity of lithium cobalt oxide.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jiung; Losego, Mark D; Zhang, Hui Gang; Kim, Honggyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Petrov, Ivan; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2014-01-01

    Using time-domain thermoreflectance, the thermal conductivity and elastic properties of a sputter deposited LiCoO2 film, a common lithium-ion cathode material, are measured as a function of the degree of lithiation. Here we report that via in situ measurements during cycling, the thermal conductivity of a LiCoO2 cathode reversibly decreases from ~5.4 to 3.7 W m(-1) K(-1), and its elastic modulus decreases from 325 to 225 GPa, as it is delithiated from Li1.0CoO2 to Li0.6CoO2. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on lithiation appears correlated with the lithiation-dependent phase behaviour. The oxidation-state-dependent thermal conductivity of electrolytically active transition metal oxides provides opportunities for dynamic control of thermal conductivity and is important to understand for thermal management in electrochemical energy storage devices. PMID:24892640

  13. Automotive body panel containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Adamson, Douglas (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An automotive body panel containing a polymer composite formed of at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  14. Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal emissivity of alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upshaw, V.

    1966-01-01

    Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal radiation characteristics of alumina-coated heater-cathode systems in vacuum tubes. Chromium oxide is applied either as a surface layer or as a doping material. The new coatings eliminate the high temperature migration problems of carbon surface treatments.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of thermal oxidation of polyisoprene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Hsu, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted concerning the microstructural changes occurring in cis- and trans-1,4-polyisoprenes during uncatalized thermal oxidation in the solid phase. The investigation made use of approaches based on proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. The oxidation of squalene and dihydromyrcene in the liquid phase was also studied. The studies provide the first NMR spectroscopic evidence for the presence of epoxy and peroxide, hydroperoxide, and alcohol groups within the oxidized polyisoprene chain.

  16. Epoxide composites with thermally reduced graphite oxide and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. A.; Muradyan, V. E.; Tarasov, B. P.; Sokolov, E. A.; Babenko, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    The properties of epoxide composites modified by thermal reduced graphite oxide are studied. The dielectric permittivities of epoxide composites with additives of up to 1.5 wt % of reduced graphite oxide are studied at a frequency of 9.8 GHz. It is shown that despite its low electrical conductivity, the large specific surface area of reduced graphite oxide allows us to create epoxide composites with high complex dielectric permittivities and dielectric loss tangents.

  17. Core shell micron-scale composites of titanium oxide and carbide formed through controlled thermal-plasma oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Li; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2003-01-01

    Core-shell structured micron-scale spheres of titanium oxide and carbide were prepared by the controlled in-flight oxidation of a powder of irregularly shaped titanium-carbide particles in an argon-oxygen thermal plasma. Mono-dispersed core-shell particles with rutile shells and TiC cores were formed by an intermediate-rate input of oxygen to the plasma gas. The partial oxidation of the TiC particles in the liquid phase was accompanied by spheroidization of the surface oxide melt, thus giving rise to a core-shell composite under rapid quenching. TiO 2-TiC core-shell composites have potential as new materials for roles such as light-scattering media, photo-catalysts, and electro-rheorogical fluids.

  18. The role of thermal shock in cyclic oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of thermal shock on the spalling of oxides from the surfaces of several commercial alloys was determined. The average cooling rate was varied from approximately 240 C per second to less than 1.0 C per second during cyclic oxidation tests in air. The tests consisted of one hundred cycles of one hour at the maximum temperature (1100 or 1200 C). The alloys were HOS-875, TD-Ni, TD-NiCrAl, IN-601, IN-702, and B-1900 plus Hf. All of these alloys exhibited partial spalling within the oxide rather than total oxide loss down to bare metal. Thermal shock resulted in deformation of the metal which in turn resulted, in most cases, in changing the oxide failure mode from compressive to tensile. Tensile failures were characterized by cracking of the oxide and little loss, while compressive failures were characterized by explosive loss of platelets of oxide. This behavior was confirmed by examination of mechanically stressed oxide scales. The thermally shocked oxides spalled less than the slow cooled samples with the exception of TD-NiCrAl. This material failed in a brittle manner rather than by plastic deformation.

  19. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of linear perfluoroalky lethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paciorek, K. J. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and thermal oxidative stability studies were performed on linear perfluoro alkyl ether fluids. The effect on degradation by metal catalysts and degradation inhibitors are reported. The liner perfluoro alkylethers are inherently unstable at 316 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. The metal catalysts greatly increased the rate of degradation in oxidizing atmospheres. In the presence of these metals in an oxidizing atmosphere, the degradation inhibitors were highly effective in arresting degradation at 288 C. However, the inhibitors had only limited effectiveness at 316 C. The metals promote degradation by chain scission. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, the linear perfluoro alkylether fluids have a structural arrangement based on difluoroformyl and tetrafluoroethylene oxide units, with the former predominating.

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Thermal conductivity of silver alloy stabilizers for high temperature superconductor current leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putti, M.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.; Goldacker, W.; Vase, P.

    2001-02-01

    In this rapid communication, we present thermal and electrical conductivity measurements of several Ag alloy sheaths for Bi-2223 tapes suitable for current lead applications. The main result is that sheaths based on AgAu alloys with a small addition of Mg and, mainly, AgMg tapes used as dispersion hardened sheaths for mechanical reinforcement show an unexpected low thermal conductivity. SEM analysis of these samples emphasizes a small grain size due to a partial oxidation of Mg, which causes a strong reduction of the phonon mean free path. Moreover, resistivity measurements show that the Mg atoms dispersed in the Ag matrix provide a significant reduction of the electron mean free path. Anyway, the AgAu alloy is preferable in order to preserve the performances of the superconducting filaments, therefore a compromise can be obtained by developing composite Bi-2223 tapes with the AgAu alloy around the superconducting filaments and an outer layer containing Mg around the filament bundle.

  1. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  2. Alternative method for steam generation for thermal oxidation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, Jeffrey J.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of silicon is an important process step in MEMS device fabrication. Thicker oxide layers are often used as structural components and can take days or weeks to grow, causing high gas costs, maintenance issues, and a process bottleneck. Pyrolytic steam, which is generated from hydrogen and oxygen combustion, was the default process, but has serious drawbacks: cost, safety, particles, permitting, reduced growth rate, rapid hydrogen consumption, component breakdown and limited steam flow rates. Results from data collected over a 24 month period by a MEMS manufacturer supports replacement of pyrolytic torches with RASIRC Steamer technology to reduce process cycle time and enable expansion previously limited by local hydrogen permitting. Data was gathered to determine whether Steamers can meet or exceed pyrolytic torch performance. The RASIRC Steamer uses de-ionized water as its steam source, eliminating dependence on hydrogen and oxygen. A non-porous hydrophilic membrane selectively allows water vapor to pass. All other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic compounds (TOC), particles, and metals can be removed in the steam phase. The MEMS manufacturer improved growth rate by 7% over the growth range from 1μm to 3.5μm. Over a four month period, wafer uniformity, refractive index, wafer stress, and etch rate were tracked with no significant difference found. The elimination of hydrogen generated a four-month return on investment (ROI). Mean time between failure (MTBF) was increased from 3 weeks to 32 weeks based on three Steamers operating over eight months.

  3. The role of thermal shock in cyclic oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of thermal shock on the spalling of oxides from the surfaces of several commercial alloys was determined. The average cooling rate was varied from approximately 240 C/sec to less than 1.0 C/sec during cyclic oxidation tests in air. The tests consisted of one hundred cycles of one hour at the maximum temperature (1100 or 1200 C). The alloys were HOS-875, TD-Ni, TD-NiCrAl, IN-601, IN-702, and B-1900 plus Hf. Thermal shock resulted in deformation of the metal which in turn resulted, in most cases, in changing the oxide failure mode from compressive to tensile. Tensile failures were characterized by cracking of the oxide and little loss, while compressive failures were characterized by explosive loss of platelets of oxide. The thermally shocked oxides spalled less than the slow cooled samples with the exception of TD-NiCrAl. This material failed in a brittle manner rather than by plastic deformation. The HOS-875 and the TD-Ni did not spall during either type of cooling. Thus, the effect of thermal shock on spalling is determined, in large part, by the mechanical properties of the metal.

  4. Comparison of thermal oxidation and plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) for surface flattening

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hui; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-10

    The thermal oxidation and water vapor plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) were investigated. The initial oxidation rate of helium-based atmospheric-pressure plasma oxidation was six times higher than that of thermal oxidation. The oxide-SiC interface generated by plasma oxidation became flatter with increasing thickness of the oxide, whereas the interface generated by thermal oxidation was atomically flat regardless of the oxide thickness. Many pits were generated on the thermally oxidized surface, whereas few pits were observed on the surface oxidized by plasma. After the oxide layer generated plasma oxidation was removed, an atomically flat and pit-free SiC surface was obtained.

  5. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  6. Firearm suppressor having enhanced thermal management for rapid heat dissipation

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.; Anderson, Andrew T.

    2014-08-19

    A suppressor is disclosed for use with a weapon having a barrel through which a bullet is fired. The suppressor has an inner portion having a bore extending coaxially therethrough. The inner portion is adapted to be secured to a distal end of the barrel. A plurality of axial flow segments project radially from the inner portion and form axial flow paths through which expanding propellant gasses discharged from the barrel flow through. The axial flow segments have radially extending wall portions that define sections which may be filled with thermally conductive material, which in one example is a thermally conductive foam. The conductive foam helps to dissipate heat deposited within the suppressor during firing of the weapon.

  7. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  8. Rapid thermal tuning of chromophore structure in membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2009-04-01

    We show that the configuration and the optical property of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) can be tuned dynamically from the all-trans configuration to the 13-cis by using a nanosecond laser-induced temperature-jump. The rapid bleach in the visible absorption optical density of retinal has an apparent formation time of ca. 170 ns, whereas the relaxation process finishes within tens of ms. The dynamical transition of retinal from the all-trans to 13-cis species is believed to occur as a result of rapid protein conformational change especially in the vicinity of retinal binding site. Our study reveals the intrinsic dynamical aspect of the retinal chromophore with respect to the protein structure. PMID:19275202

  9. Subsampling phase retrieval for rapid thermal measurements of heated microstructures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lucas N; Talghader, Joseph J

    2016-07-15

    A subsampling technique for real-time phase retrieval of high-speed thermal signals is demonstrated with heated metal lines such as those found in microelectronic interconnects. The thermal signals were produced by applying a current through aluminum resistors deposited on soda-lime-silica glass, and the resulting refractive index changes were measured using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a microscope objective and high-speed camera. The temperatures of the resistors were measured both by the phase-retrieval method and by monitoring the resistance of the aluminum lines. The method used to analyze the phase is at least 60× faster than the state of the art but it maintains a small spatial phase noise of 16 nm, remaining comparable to the state of the art. For slowly varying signals, the system is able to perform absolute phase measurements over time, distinguishing temperature changes as small as 2 K. With angular scanning or structured illumination improvements, the system could also perform fast thermal tomography. PMID:27420492

  10. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  11. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  12. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  13. Thermal instability of GaSb surface oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, K.; Matsukura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Aoki, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the development of InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared photodetectors, the surface leakage current at the mesa sidewall must be suppressed. To achieve this requirement, both the surface treatment and the passivation layer are key technologies. As a starting point to design these processes, we investigated the GaSb oxide in terms of its growth and thermal stability. We found that the formation of GaSb oxide was very different from those of GaAs. Both Ga and Sb are oxidized at the surface of GaSb. In contrast, only Ga is oxidized and As is barely oxidized in the case of GaAs. Interestingly, the GaSb oxide can be formed even in DI water, which results in a very thick oxide film over 40 nm after 120 minutes. To examine the thermal stability, the GaSb native oxide was annealed in a vacuum and analyzed by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. These analyses suggest that SbOx in the GaSb native oxide will be reduced to metallic Sb above 300°C. To directly evaluate the effect of oxide instability on the device performance, a T2SL p-i-n photodetector was fabricated that has a cutoff wavelength of about 4 μm at 80 K. As a result, the surface leakage component was increased by the post annealing at 325°C. On the basis of these results, it is possible to speculate that a part of GaSb oxide on the sidewall surface will be reduced to metallic Sb, which acts as an origin of additional leakage current path.

  14. Thermal effects in rapid directional solidification - Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntley, D. A.; Davis, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    We study the morphological instability of the planar solid/liquid interface for a unidirectionally-solidified dilute binary mixture. We use a model developed by Boettinger et al. (1985, 1986), Aziz (1982), and Jackson et al. (1980), which allows for nonequilibrium effects on the interface through velocity-dependent segregation and attachment kinetics. Two types of instabilities are found in the linear stability analysis: (1) a cellular instability, and (2) an oscillatory instability driven by disequilibrium effects. Merchant and Davis (1990) characterized these instabilities subject to the frozen-temperature approximation (FTA). The present work relaxes the FTA by including the effects of latent heat and the full temperature distribution. Thermal effects slightly postpone the onset of the cellular instability but dramatically postpone the onset of the oscillatory instability; however, the absolute-stability conditions, at which at high speed the cellular and oscillatory instabilities are suppressed, remain unchanged from the FTA.

  15. Thermal oxidation vitrification flue gas elimination system

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, W.; Angelo, F.; Clemens, M.

    1995-06-01

    With minor modifications to a Best Demonstrated Available Technology hazardous waste incinerator, it is possible to obtain combustion without potentially toxic emissions by using technology currently employed in similar applications throughout industry. Further, these same modifications will reduce waste handling over an extended operating envelope while minimizing energy consumption. Three by-products are produced: industrial grade carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a final waste form that will exceed Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures requirements and satisfy nuclear waste product consistency tests. The proposed system utilizes oxygen rather than air as an oxidant to reduce the quantities of total emissions, improve the efficiency of the oxidation reactions, and minimize the generation of toxic NO{sub x} emissions. Not only will less potentially hazardous constituents be generated; all toxic substances can be contained and the primary emission, carbon dioxide -- the leading ``greenhouse gas`` contributing to global warming -- will be converted to an industrial by-product needed to enhance the extraction of energy feedstocks from maturing wells. Clearly, the proposed configuration conforms to the provisions for Most Achievable Control Technology as defined and mandated for the private sector by the Clear Air Act Amendments of 1990 to be implemented in 1997 and still lacking definition.

  16. Oxygen-enhanced wet thermal oxidation of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, J. F.; Fenlon, R. E.; Seibert, C. S.; Yuan, W.; Plunkett, J. S. B.; Li, J.; Hall, D. C.

    2011-10-01

    An oxygen-enhanced wet thermal oxidation process is used to grow smooth, uniform, insulating native oxides of GaAs. At 420 °C, a maximum linear growth rate of 4.8 nm/min is observed for oxidation in water vapor with 2000 ppm O2 added relative to the N2 carrier gas, with growth ceasing by 7000 ppm. Films as thick as 800 nm with surface roughness as low as 0.2 nm are demonstrated. In fabricated metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors, a 412 nm thick native oxide film exhibits a factor of ˜2700 reduction in leakage current density at 1 V relative to a direct metal (Au:Ti) to GaAs contact.

  17. Scientists set to destroy VOCs with thermal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, K.A

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on a thermal oxidation process that boasts a 99.99 percent destruction removal efficiency (DRE) and minimal formation of products of incomplete combustion (PICs). Together with a high reliability, corrosion resistant,non-catalytic design, these attributes make the technology ideal for processing chlorinated compounds, say company officials.

  18. Carbon monoxide oxidation rates computed for automobile thermal reactor conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brokaw, R. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation rates in thermal reactors for exhaust manifolds are computed by integrating differential equations for system of twenty-nine reversible chemical reactions. Reactors are noncatalytic replacements for conventional exhaust manifolds and are a system for reducing carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons in automobile exhausts.

  19. Thermal stability of sputtered iridium oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjines, R.; Aruchamy, A.; Levy, F. )

    1989-06-01

    Dry and partially hydrated films of IrO/sub 2/ were prepared by reactive sputtering. The authors discuss their thermal stability investigated by means of XPS, x-ray diffraction, and resistivity measurements. Dry films decomposed at about 400{sup 0}C iin air and at 200{sup 0}C in vacuum (10/sup -2/ Pa), whereas partially hydrated films decomposed at 350{sup 0} and 150{sup 0}C, respectively. After electrochemical treatments of the films mounted as electrochromic electrodes in an electrolytic cell, the decomposition occurred at different temperatures. In particular, the bleached state was found to have the relatively low decomposition temperature of about 100{sup 0}C in air.

  20. Choose the best heat-recovery method for thermal oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Klobucar, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal oxidation is current the most economically favorable add-on method of controlling hydrocarbon air emissions of moderate to low concentration (below 10,000 ppm). This concentration range covers emissions from a wide variety of chemical process industries (CPI) sources, including dryers, reactor vents, tank vents, and coaters. Thermal oxidizer systems consist of three basic sub-systems--burner, combustion chamber, and primary heat recovery. Selecting the type of primary heat recovery is probably the most important decision in the design of a thermal oxidizer, and requires consideration of a wide range of factors. The two most widely used types of primary heat recovery--recuperative and regenerative--each have distinct advantages and disadvantages. In general, recuperative oxidizers are simpler and less costly to purchase, whereas regenerative oxidizers offer substantially lower operating costs. Selecting between recuperative and regenerative heat recovery requires balancing a number of factors, such as capital and operating costs, exhaust gas composition and temperature, and secondary heat demand. This article provides guidance on when, where, and how to use each.

  1. Rapid thermal processing of high-efficiency silicon solar cells with controlled in-situ annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A.; Ropp, M.; Chen, Z.; Ruby, D.; Meier, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 17.1%, 16.4%, 14.8%, and 14.9% have been achieved on FZ, Cz, multicrystalline (mc-Si), and dendritic web (DW) silicon, respectively, using simplified, cost-effective rapid thermal processing (RTP). These represent the highest reported efficiencies for solar cells processed with simultaneous front and back diffusion with no conventional high-temperature furnace steps. Appropriate diffusion temperature coupled with the added in-situ anneal resulted in suitable minority-carrier lifetime and diffusion profiles for high-efficiency cells. The cooling rate associated with the in-situ anneal can improve the lifetime and lower the reverse saturation current density (J{sub 0}), however, this effect is material and base resistivity specific. PECVD antireflection (AR) coatings provided low reflectance and efficient front surface and bulk defect passivation. Conventional cells fabricated on FZ silicon by furnace diffusions and oxidations gave an efficiency of 18.8% due to greater short wavelength response and lower J{sub 0}.

  2. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  3. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowojoba, Ganiu B.; Eslava, Salvador; Gutierrez, Eduardo S.; Kinloch, Anthony J.; Mattevi, Cecilia; Rocha, Victoria G.; Taylor, Ambrose C.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites. However, several challenges need to be overcome to take full advantage of the aforementioned properties of graphene. These include achieving good dispersion and interfacial properties between the graphene filler and the polymeric matrix. In the present work, we report the thermal and mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites prepared via a facile, scalable and commercially viable method. Electron micrographs of the composites demonstrate that the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is well dispersed throughout the composite. Although no improvements in glass transition temperature, tensile strength and thermal stability in air of the composites were observed, good improvements in thermal conductivity (about 36 %), tensile and storage moduli (more than 13 %) were recorded with the addition of 2 wt% of rGO.

  4. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  5. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm(-2) at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  6. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  7. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress. PMID:25976784

  8. Ultrasonic characterization of thermally grown oxide in thermal barrier coating by reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Yang; Luo, Zhongbing; Lin, Li

    2014-04-01

    The thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface of ceramic coating/bond coating in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated by ultrasonic reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum (URCAS). A theoretical analysis was performed about the influence of acoustic impedance match relationship between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media on URCAS. The immersion ultrasonic narrow pulse echo method was carried out on the TBC specimen before and after oxidation under 1050°C×1h for 15cycles. The resonant peaks of URCAS obtained before and after oxidation showed that TGO which generated between the ceramic coating and bond coating due to the oxidation, changed the acoustic impedance match between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media. This method is able to nondestructively characterize the generation of TGO in TBCs, and is important to practical engineering application. PMID:24359869

  9. Enhanced Formation of Si Nanocrystals in SiO2 by Light-Filtering Rapid Thermal Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Chen, Guangping

    2015-04-01

    In this work, silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films with designed thickness of 100 nm were deposited by a bipolar pulse and radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering. For comparison, the samples were then treated in a nitrogen atmosphere by conventional rapid thermal annealing (CRTA) or light-filtering rapid thermal annealing (LRTA) at 900-1100°C for 2 min. Raman spectra, grazing incident X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Hall measurements, and current density-voltage measurements were carried out to analyze the microstructural and electrical properties of samples. Compared with the control sample using CRTA method, the crystalline volume fraction and number density of Si nanocrystals (SiNCs) in silicon oxide prepared by LRTA were greatly increased. The quantum effects of the short wave-length light (less than 800 nm) of these tungsten halogen lamps during the rapid thermal annealing process have negative effects on the formation of SiNCs in SiO2 films. SiNCs with crystal volume fraction of 73%, average size of 2.53 nm, and number density of 1.1 × 1012 cm-2 embedded in the amorphous SiO2 matrix can be formed by LRTA at 1100°C. Enhancement of more than one order of magnitude in conductivity and higher current density were obtained from the LRTA annealed sample compared to the CRTA annealed sample. The improvements in conductivity and current density were attributed to the high density SiNCs. Our results show that the LRTA method is a suitable annealing tool for the formation of SiNC in thin SiOx films.

  10. Rapid thermal processing of ion implanted silicon as a viable solar cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozgonyi, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of the past quarter was to find the optimal pre-process heat treatment for enhancing minority carrier lifetime. The silicon substrates were both n- and p-type and had varied oxygen concentration and process induced defects. Pre-process heat treatments include traditional furnace thermal cycling and low thermal budget rapid thermal process (RTP). The rapid thermal process was performed in Ar, while furnace annealing had either N2 or O2 ambients. Chemical etch-pit delineation, x-ray topography and FTIR techniques were used to determine the bulk gettering and oxygen precipitation for the heat-treated Si substrates. Minority carrier generation lifetime and the change of oxygen content were measured before and after heat treatment.

  11. Ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate oxidation of coal tar DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Libin; Wang, Li; Hu, Xingting; Wu, Peihui; Wang, Xueqing; Huang, Chumei; Wang, Xiangyang; Deng, Dayi

    2016-11-15

    The feasibility of ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate for effective oxidation of twenty 2-6 ringed coal tar PAHs in a biphasic tar/water system and a triphasic tar/soil/water system were investigated and established. The results indicate that ultrasonic assistance, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature are all required to achieve effective oxidation of coal tar PAHs, while the heating needed can be provided by ultrasonic induced heating as well. Further kinetic analysis reveals that the oxidation of individual PAH in the biphasic tar/water system follows the first-order kinetics, and individual PAH oxidation rate is primary determined by the mass transfer coefficients, tar/water interfacial areas, the aqueous solubility of individual PAH and its concentration in coal tar. Based on the kinetic analysis and experimental results, the contributions of ultrasound, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature to PAHs oxidation were characterized, and the effects of ultrasonic intensity and oxidant dosage on PAHs oxidation efficiency were investigated. In addition, the results indicate that individual PAH degradability is closely related to its reactivity as well, and the high reactivity of 4-6 ringed PAHs substantially improves their degradability. PMID:27450342

  12. Native defect engineering of interdiffusion using thermally grown oxides of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. M.; Li, Gang; Jagadish, C.; Burke, Patrick T.; Gal, Michael

    1998-08-01

    Interdiffusion can be either increased or decreased when annealing epitaxial layers covered by an oxide of GaAs. AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) of different widths were grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. A top layer of GaAs was thermally oxidized at 450 °C, and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was performed at 950 °C under Ar. Photoluminescence showed that an order of magnitude increase in interdiffusion occurred in the oxide-covered QWs compared to uncovered QWs. However, when a thin layer of Al was evaporated over the oxide layer prior to RTA, the rate of interdiffusion was reduced by more than order of magnitude compared to that of uncovered QWs. Interdiffusion slows because the oxide, composed primarily of Ga2O3, is quickly reduced by Al metal during RTA to form atomic Ga and Al2O3. The Al2O3 layer formed over the QWs traps the free Ga as interstitials in the GaAs. The excess Ga interstitial concentration reduces the group III vacancy concentration, and it is this reduction in group III vacancy concentration which slows the interdiffusion rate. The results show that metallurgical reactions may be used as a tool for engineering native defect concentrations and associated diffusivities.

  13. New perspectives on thermal and hyperthermal oxidation of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilov, Umedjon

    The growth of (ultra)thin silica (SiO2) layers on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and controlling the thickness of SiO2 is an important issue in the fabrication of microelectronics and photovoltaic devices (e.g., MOSFETs, solar cells, optical fibers etc.). Such ultrathin oxide can be grown and tuned even at low temperature (including room temperature), by hyperthermal oxidation or when performed on non-planar Si surfaces (e.g., Si nanowires or spheres). However, hyperthermal silica growth as well as small Si-NW oxidation in general and the initial stages in particular have not yet been investigated in full detail. This work is therefore devoted to controlling ultrathin silica thickness on planar and non-planar Si surfaces, which can open new perspectives in nanodevice fabrication. The simulation of hyperthermal (1-100 eV) Si oxidation demonstrate that at low impact energy (<10 eV), oxygen does not damage the Si surface and this energy region could thus beneficially be used for Si oxidation. In contrast to thermal oxidation, 10 eV species can directly oxidize Si subsurface layers. A transition temperature of about 700 K was found: below this temperature, the oxide thickness only depends on the impact energy of the impinging species. Above this temperature, the oxide thickness depends on the impact energy, type of oxidant and the surface temperature. The results show that control over the ultrathin oxide (a-SiO2) thickness is possible by hyperthermal oxidation of silicon surfaces at temperatures below the transition temperature. In small Si-NWs, oxidation is a self-limiting process that occurs at low temperature, resulting in small Si core - SiO2 shell (semiconductor + dielectric) or c-Si|SiOx| a-SiO2 nanowire, which has also being envisaged to be used as nanowire field-effect transistors and photovoltaic devices in near-future nanotechnology. Above the transition temperature such core-shell nanowires are completely converted to a-SiO2 nanowires. It can be concluded that

  14. Degradation of Teflon(trademark) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1999-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(trademark) FEP.

  15. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon' FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon FEP.

  16. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Powers, Charles E.; Viens, Michael J.; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary T.; Munoz, Bruno F.

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon' FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(registered trademark) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(registered trademark) FEP.

  17. Degradation of Teflon(tm) FEP Following Charged Particle Radiation and Rapid Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline; Powers, Charles; Viens, Michael; Ayres-Treusdell, Mary; Munoz, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    During the Second Servicing Mission (SM2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) severe degradation was observed on the outer layer of the thermal control blankets. Astronaut observations and photographs revealed large cracks in the metallized Teflon(R) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene), the outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI), in many locations around the telescope. In an effort to understand what elements of the space environment might cause such damage, pristine Teflon(R) FEP was tested for durability to radiation and thermal cycling. Specimens were subjected to electron and proton fluences comparable to those experienced by HST and were subsequently thermal cycled in a custom-built rapid thermal cycle chamber. Tensile tests of the specimens showed that radiation followed by thermal cycling significantly reduced the ultimate strength and elongation of Teflon(R) FEP.

  18. Regenerative thermal oxidation for non-conventional applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gosselin, G.; Gravel, J.J.O.

    1999-07-01

    Regenerative Thermal Oxidation has been applied by Biothermica to treat non-conventional emissions. These emissions include pollutants as VOC, COC, TRS, PAH, PCB, HCl and odors. In the kraft pulping industry, environmental requirements for reduced emissions of total reduced sulfur (TRS) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) from pulping operations are leading to incinerators of high destruction efficiency and thermal performance. The first installation in Canada of a Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) was placed in service early in 1997 at a kraft pulp mill in the province of Quebec. Tests have shown a TRS reduction of 99.6% with a thermal efficiency of 88.5% in the RTO. It can be considered the best method to comply with the new norms for TRS atmospheric emissions in the pulp and paper industry. In the primary aluminum process, a marked improvement in anode properties can be gained by preparing the paste at high temperature, followed by cooling with a water addition in an intensive mixer. However, the addition of cooling water results in a large increase in the emissions of VOC and PAH which can prejudice the process. A number of emission control processes were evaluated. An improved Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) unit was installed in a modern aluminum plant in Canada. The emissions of VOCs and PAHs from an EIRICH intensive mixer-cooler were reduced by more than 99.9% while all troublesome deposits in the fumes collection system were eliminated. This enabled the plant to remain well within the emission levels allowed by the environmental authority while enjoying considerable benefits from improved anode qualities. In the asphalt roofing industry, RTO was applied to treat the VOC and COC emissions and several units have been in operation since 1990. In the United States two units were installed in asphalt shingle plants and new features in the process show a VOC and COC reduction of 99%.

  19. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Desheng Meng, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA.

  20. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m-2ṡs-1). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  1. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran B; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alex P; St Clair, Jason M; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m(-2)⋅s(-1)). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  2. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m−2⋅s−1). GEOS−Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS−Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  3. Rapid Deposition of Oxidized Biogenic Compounds to a Temperate Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (approx. 1 nmol m(exp.-2)·s(exp.-1)). GEOS-Chem, awidely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  4. Rapid degradation of zinc oxide nanoparticles by phosphate ions

    PubMed Central

    García-García, F Javier; Reller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Zinc oxide nanoparticles are highly sensitive towards phosphate ions even at pH 7. Buffer solutions and cell culture media containing phosphate ions are able to destroy ZnO nanoparticles within a time span from less than one hour to one day. The driving force of the reaction is the formation of zinc phosphate of very low solubility. The morphology of the zinc oxide particles has only a minor influence on the kinetics of this reaction. Surface properties related to different production methods and the presence and absence of labelling with a perylene fluorescent dye are more important. Particles prepared under acidic conditions are more resistant than those obtained in basic or neutral reaction medium. Surprisingly, the presence of a SiO2 coating does not impede the degradation of the ZnO core. In contrast to phosphate ions, β-glycerophosphate does not damage the ZnO nanoparticles. These findings should be taken into account when assessing the biological effects or the toxicology of zinc oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25383310

  5. Examining rapid onset drought development using the thermal infrared based evaporative stress index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable indicators of rapid drought onset are necessary to improve the utility of drought early warning systems. In this study, the Evaporative Stress Index (ESI), which uses remotely-sensed thermal infrared imagery to estimate evapotranspiration (ET), is compared to meteorological data and United...

  6. Ion implantation and rapid thermal processing of III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Crawford, M.H.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.; Yuan, C.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    Ion implantation doping and isolation coupled with rapid thermal annealing has played a critical role in the realization of high performance photonic and electronic devices in all mature semiconductor material systems. This is also expected to be the case for the binary III-V nitrides (InN, GaN, and AlN) and their alloys as the epitaxial material quality improves and more advanced device structures are fabricated. In this article, we review the recent developments in implant doping and isolation along with rapid thermal annealing of GaN and the In-containing ternary alloys InGaN and InAlN. In particular, the successful n- and p-type doping of GaN by ion implantation of Si and Mg+P, respectively, and subsequent high temperature rapid thermal anneals in excess of 1000{degree}C is reviewed. In the area of implant isolation, N-implantation has been shown to compensate both n- and p-type GaN, N-, and O-implantation effectively compensates InAlN, and InGaN shows limited compensation with either N- or F-implantation. The effects of rapid thermal annealing on unimplanted material are also presented. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Ion implantation and rapid thermal processing of Ill-V nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolper, J. C.; Hagerott Crawford, M.; Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.; Vartuli, C. B.; Yuan, C.; Stall, R. A.

    1996-05-01

    Ion implantation doping and isolation coupled with rapid thermal annealing has played a critical role in the realization of high performance photonic and electronic devices in all mature semiconductor material systems. This is also expected to be the case for the binary III-V nitrides (InN, GaN, and A1N) and their alloys as the epitaxial material quality improves and more advanced device structures are fabricated. In this article, we review the recent developments in implant doping and isolation along with rapid thermal annealing of GaN and the In-containing ternary alloys InGaN and InAlN. In particular, the successful n- and p-type doping of GaN by ion implantation of Si and Mg+P, respectively, and subsequent high temperature rapid thermal anneals in excess of 1000°C is reviewed. In the area of implant isolation, N-implantation has been shown to compensate both n- and p-type GaN, N-, and O-implantation effectively compensates InAlN, and InGaN shows limited compensation with either N- or F-implantation. The effects of rapid thermal annealing on unimplanted material are also presented.

  8. Electronic, Thermal and Structural Properties of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic, thermal, and structural properties of a series of graphene oxide frameworks (GOFs) using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The molecular structure of GOFs is systematically studied by varying the nature and concentration of linear boronic acid pillars and the thermal stability is assessed using ab initio molecular dynamics. The results demonstrate that GOFs are thermally stable up to 550 K and that electronic properties, such as their band gap, can be modified controllably by an appropriate choice of pillaring unit and pillar concentration. The tunability of the electronic structure using non-chemical means, e.g., mechanical strain, is also quantified. Overall, this class of materials is predicted to offer highly tunable materials electronic properties ranging from metallic to semiconducting.

  9. Electronic, Thermal, and Structural Properties of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic, thermal, and structural properties of a series of graphene oxide frameworks (GOFs) using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The molecular structure of GOFs is systematically studied by varying the nature and concentration of linear boronic acid pillars, and the thermal stability is assessed using ab initio molecular dynamics. The results demonstrate that GOFs are thermally stable up to 550 K and that electronic properties, such as their band gap, can be modified controllably by an appropriate choice of pillaring unit and pillar concentration. The tunability of the electronic structure using nonchemical means, e.g., mechanical strain, is also quantified. Overall, this class of materials is predicted to offer highly tunable materials electronic properties ranging from metallic to semiconducting.

  10. Mechanical stiffening and thermal softening of superionic alkali metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, S.; Shriya, S.; Kumar, J.; Ameri, M.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical (pressure) and thermal (temperature) dependent nature of superionic cubic M2O (M = Li, Na, K, and Rb) alkali metal oxides is studied. The model Hamiltonian in ab initio theory include long-range Coulomb, charge transfer, covalency, van der Waals interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions. The second order elastic constants as functions of pressure discern increasing trend, while to that they decreases with enhanced temperature. From the knowledge of elastic constants, Pugh ratio, Poisson's ratio, heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient are calculated. It is noticed that cubic M2O is brittle on applied pressure and temperature and mechanically stiffened as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening and thermally softened due to bond expansion and bond weakening due to lattice vibrations.

  11. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data for alloy/braze combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained for 62 brazed specimens of 3 iron-, 3 nickel-, and 1 cobalt-base alloy. Fluidized bed thermal cycling was conducted over the range 740/25 C employing 10 cm long single-edge wedge specimens. Immersion time was always 4 minutes in each bed. Types of test specimens employed in the program include those with brazed overlays on the specimen radius, those butt brazed at midspan and those with a brazed foil overlay on the specimen radius. Of the 18 braze overlay specimens, 5 generated fatigue cracks by 7000 cycles. Thermal cracking of butt brazed specimens occurred exclusively through the butt braze. Of the 23 butt brazed specimens, 7 survived 11,000 thermal cycles without cracking. Only 2 of the 21 foil overlaid specimens exhibiting cracking in 7,000 cycles. Blistering of the foil did occur for 2 alloys by 500 cycles. Oxidation of the alloy/braze combination was limited at the test maximum test temperature of 740 C.

  12. Rhodium Oxide Cluster Ions Studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Takenouchi, Masato; Miyajima, Ken; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-01-28

    Gas-phase rhodium oxide clusters, RhnOm(+), were investigated by measuring the rate constants of oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry. RhnOm(+) was suggested to be categorized into different states as m/n ≤ 1, 1 < m/n ≤ 1.5, and 1.5 < m/n in terms of energy and kinetics. For m/n ≤ 1, the O atoms readily adsorbed on the cluster with a large binding energy until RhO was formed. Under the O2-rich environment, oxidation proceeded until Rh2O3 was formed with a moderate binding energy. In addition, O2 molecules attached weakly to the cluster, and Rh2O3 formed RhnOm(+) (1.5 < m/n). The energetics and geometries of Rh6Om(+) (m = 6-12) were obtained using density functional theory calculations and were found to be consistent with the experimental results. PMID:26730616

  13. Surface state of GaN after rapid-thermal-annealing using AlN cap-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zammar, G.; Khalfaoui, W.; Oheix, T.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E.; Cayrel, F.; Alquier, D.

    2015-11-01

    Critical issues need to be overcome to produce high performance Schottky diodes on gallium nitride (GaN). To activate dopant, high temperature thermal treatments are required but damage GaN surface where hexagonal pits appear and prevent any device processing. In this paper, we investigated the efficiency of cap-layers on GaN during thermal treatments to avoid degradation. Aluminum nitride (AlN) and silicon oxide (SiOx) were grown on GaN by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. AlN growth parameters were studied to understand their effect on the grown layers and their protection efficiency. Focused ion beam was used to measure AlN layer thickness. Crystalline quality and exact composition were verified using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Two types of rapid thermal annealing at high temperatures were investigated. Surface roughness and pits density were evaluated using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cap-layers wet etching was processed in H3PO4 at 120 °C for AlN and in HF (10%) for SiOx. This work reveals effective protection of GaN during thermal treatments at temperatures as high as 1150 °C. Low surface roughness was obtained. Furthermore, no hexagonal pit was observed on the surface.

  14. Rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs using thermal desorption - SALDI mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Kubasov, A. E.; Georgieva, V. B.; Borodkov, A. S.; Nikiforov, S. M.; Simanovsky, Ya O.; Alimpiev, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach to the rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs by surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry with the rotating ball interface coupled with temperature programmed thermal desorption has been developed. Analytes were thermally desorbed and deposited onto the surface of amorphous silicon substrate attached to the rotating ball. The ball was rotated and the deposited analytes were analyzed using SALDI. The effectiveness of coupling SALDI mass spectrometry with thermal desorption was evaluated by the direct and rapid analysis of tablets containing lidocaine, diphenhydramine and propranolol without any sample pretreatment. The overall duration of the screening procedure was 30÷40 sec. Real urine samples were studied for drug analysis. It is shown that with simple preparation steps, urine samples can be quantitatively analyzed using the proposed technique with the detection limits in the range of 0.2÷0.5 ng/ml.

  15. Enzymatic hydrolysis of fractionated products from oils thermally oxidized in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Alexander, J C

    1983-06-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of the acylglycerol products obtained from thermally oxidized vegetable oils was studied. Corn, sunflower and soybean oils were heated in the laboratory at 180 C for 50, 70 and 100 hr with aeration and directly fractionated by silicic acid column chromatography. By successive elution with 20%, then 60% isopropyl ether in n-hexane, and diethyl ether, the thermally oxidized oils were separated into three fractions: the nonpolar fraction (monomeric compounds), slightly polar fraction (dimeric compounds), and polar fraction comprising oligomeric compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase showed that the monomers were hydrolyzed as rapidly as the corresponding unheated oils, the dimers much more slowly, and the oligomeric compounds barely at all. Overall, the hydrolysis of the dimers was less than 23% of that for the monomers, with small differences among the oils. Longer heating periods resulted in greater reductions in hydrolysis of the dimeric compounds. These results suggest that the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis of the fractionated acylglycerol compounds is related to differences in the thermal oxidative deterioration, and amounts of polar compounds in the products. PMID:6877045

  16. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanová, Soňa; Zarevúcká, Marie; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-03-01

    The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels.The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed

  17. Thermal oxidation of 3-5 compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteironeto, Othon Derego

    1988-11-01

    Thermal oxidation of 3-5 compound semiconductors has been studied in the temperature range of 300 to 600 C. Two members of this class of materials, namely InP and GaAs, were the object of the experimental work carried out here. The main analytical tools used were transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). TEM was employed to access microstructural changes and SIMS to access the composition redistribution that takes place as a consequence of the oxidation reaction. Below 400 C oxidation of both materials led to the formation of amorphous scales, which consisted of a mixture of gallium and arsenic oxides in the case of GaAs, and indium phosphate and oxide in the case of InP. The oxidation kinetics of InP was found to be slower than that of GaAs. In the high temperature regime, i.e., above 400 C, the oxidation of both materials resulted in crystalline products. Precipitation of the group 5 element at the scale/semiconductor interface took place during oxidation. At the GaAs/Ga2O3interface, As precipitates were formed with a truncated square pyramid shape bound by (111) sub GaAs planes. The precipitates found at the InPO4/InP interface were either a phosphorus rich phase or red phosphorus. Strong vaporization under the electron beam prohibited a more accurate determination. The morphology of those precipitates were very similar to the As ones in GaAs.

  18. The growth of one-dimensional oxide nanostructures by thermal oxidation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lu

    Fundamental understanding of metals and alloys oxidation and reduction is important for the next generation technology. A detailed study on the oxide nanostructures growth from the oxidation of model metal systems, Cu, Fe, Zn and brass has been investigated to bridge the information gap between the oxidation mechanisms of buck metals and alloys to metal oxide nanostructures. It is observed that CuO nanowires have a bicrystal structure and form directly on top of underlying CuO grains. The driving force for the oxide nanowire growth is attributed to the compressive stresses generated during the oxidation. To verify this growth mechanism, Cu foils are bent or sandblasted to create stresses. We show that the oxide nanowire formation can be effectively promoted by surface bending tensile stresses or surface roughening via sandblasting. The formation of alpha-Fe2O3 nanowires by oxidation of Fe also follows the same stress driven mechanism as Cu. It is also found that decreasing the oxygen pressure or modifying the surface roughness by sandblasting can be employed to tune the hematite nanostructures from nanowires to nanobelts or nanoblades. The growth of ZnO nanowires by direct oxidation of pure Zn follows different mechanisms depending on the temperatures: the oxidation below the melting point of Zn is dominated by a solid-solid transformation process, a liquid-solid process between the melting and boiling points of Zn, and a vapor-solid process above the boiling point of Zn. ZnO nanowires can also be synthesized by thermal oxidation of brass (Cu0.7Zn0.3). With increasing the oxidation temperature or exerting sandblasting onto brass, the formation of ZnO nanowires can be effectively suppressed. The thermally induced reduction of CuO nanowires are studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Reduction of CuO nanowires results in the formation of a unique hierarchical hybrid nanostructure, in which the lower oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles partially embedded into the

  19. Oxidative degradation of diclofenac by thermally activated persulfate: implication for ISCO.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Qian, Yajie; Liu, Hongmei; Huang, Tianyin

    2016-02-01

    Diclofenac (DCF), one of the typically recalcitrant pharmaceuticals, has been frequently detected in groundwater in recent years. This work investigated the performance of DCF degradation by thermally activated persulfate (PS) to further understand its application in in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for DCF-contaminated groundwater. The effects of various factors, including activation temperature, solution pH, PS/DCF ratio, and common constitutes, e.g., HCO3 (-), Cl(-) and humic acid, and the toxicity of transformation products were evaluated. The results indicated that the oxidation of DCF was well-fitted with a pseudo-first-order kinetic model, and the rate constants increased with the elevated temperatures. The rate constants from 50-70 °C were further fitted to the Arrhenius equation, yielding an activation energy of 157.63 kJ·mol(-1). In addition, the oxidation of DCF was highly pH-dependent, with the rate constants rapidly decreased from pH 5 to 7, then slightly increased at the alkaline pH. The presence of a low dosage of Cl(-) (0-10 mM) promoted the degradation of DCF, whereas high Cl(-) addition (>10 mM) inhibited DCF degradation. HCO3 (-) exhibited a negligible effect on DCF removal, while natural organic matters, e.g., humic acids, lightly inhibited DCF degradation. The rapid degradation of DCF was also confirmed in the real groundwater sample, which might be attributed to the pH drop during the reaction. Moreover, the radical quenching experiments revealed that sulfate radicals (SO4 (·-)) was the dominant reactive species for DCF oxidation. Finally, the acute toxicity of the DCF solution, as tested with a bioluminescent assay, was gradually decreased during the reaction, indicating that a thermally activated PS oxidation was a promising alternative approach for DCF-contaminated groundwater remediation. PMID:26498962

  20. Rheological characterization of thermal, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative degradation of LDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor Hugo; Wagner, Manfred Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Rheology has been used to study thermal degradation (V. H. Rolón-Garrido et al., Rheol. Acta 50, 519-535, 2011), thermo-oxidative degradation (V. H. Rolón-Garrido et al., Rheol. Acta 50, 519-535, 2011; V. H. Rolón-Garrido et al., J. Rheol. 57, 105-129, 2013) and photo-oxidative degradation (V. H. Rolón-Garrido and M. H. Wagner, Polym. Degrad. Stab. 99, 136-145, 2014; V. H. Rolón-Garrido and M. H. Wagner, J. Rheol. 58, 199-22 2, 2014; V. H. Rolón-Garrido et al., Polym. Degrad. Stab. 111, 46-54, 2015) of low-density polyethylene (LDPE). This contribution presents the analogies and differences between these types of degradations of LDPE on the linear (by use of van-Gurp Palmen plots) and non-linear viscoelastic properties (by use of the parameters of the MSF model, fmax2 and β), as well as on the failure mode of the samples (through the maximum strain and stress achieved experimentally). In contrast to thermal and thermo-oxidative degradation, the linear viscoelastic properties of photo-oxidated samples were more affected by degradation. In the non-linear regime, for thermal and thermo-oxidative treated samples, the elongational measurements elucidated the role of chain scission and long-chain branching (LCB) formation, while for photo-oxidated LDPE even the competition between chain scission, LCB formation, and gel formation was demonstrated. The failure behavior was found to be determined by a constant maximum strain in thermo-oxidative degradation, if the LDPE has high content in branching points, or in photo-oxidative degraded LDPE, if a considerable portion of gel structure is present. Otherwise, either the maximum strain or stress measured was found to be strain-rate dependent.

  1. Mechanical and tribological properties of oxide layers obtained on titanium in the thermal oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniołek, K.; Kupka, M.; Barylski, A.; Dercz, G.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of tests concerning a modification to the surface of titanium Grade 2 in the thermal oxidation process. It describes the oxidation kinetics of the tested material in the temperature range of 600-800 °C, with a duration from 20 min to 72 h. The greatest increase in mass was found in specimens oxidised at a temperature of 800 °C. The morphology of the obtained oxide layers was determined. The particles of oxides formed were noticeably larger after oxidation at a temperature of 600 °C. Raising temperature resulted in the formation of fine compact particles in the oxide layer. A phase analysis of oxidation products showed that TiO2 in the crystallographic form of rutile and Ti3O are the prevalent types of oxide at a temperature of 600 and 700 °C. On the other hand, only rutile formed at a temperature of 800 °C. Tribological tests showed that the presence of an oxide layer on the surface of titanium significantly improved resistance to abrasive wear. It was found that volumetric wear had decreased by 48% for a specimen oxidised at a temperature of 600 °C and by more than 60% for a specimen subjected to isothermal soaking at a temperature of 700 °C.

  2. Characterization of a rapid thermal anneal TiNxOy/TiSi2 contact barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, V. Q.

    1989-07-01

    In this paper, the physical and electrical properties of a TiNxOy/TiSi2 dual layer contact barrier are reported. The TiNxOy/TiSi2 barrier was formed by rapidly annealing a Ti thin film on Si in an N2 ambient. During this process, the Ti film surface reacts with N2 to form a TiNxOy skin layer and the bulk of the Ti film reacts with Si to form an underlying TiSi2 layer. The influences of rapid thermal anneal (RTA) conditions on the TiNxOy layer were investigated by varying the RTA temperature from 600 to 1100° C and cycle duration from 30 to 100 s. It is found that the resulting TiNxOy and TiSi2 layer thicknesses are dependent on RTA temperature and the starting Ti thickness. For a starting Ti thickness of 500Å, 150Å thick TiNxOy and 800Å thick TiSi2 are obtained after an RTA at 900° C for 30 s. The TiNxOy thickness is limited by a fast diffusion of Si into Ti to form TiSi2. When a Ti film is deposited on SiO2, Ti starts to react with SiO2 from 600° C and a significant reduction of the SiO2 thickness is observed after an RTA at 900° C. The resulting layer is composed of a surface TiNxOy layer followed by a complex layer of titanium oxide and titanium suicide. In addition, when Ti is depos-ited on TiSi2, thicker TiNxOy and TiSi2 layers are obtained after RTA. This is because the TiSi2 layer retards the diffusion of Si from the underlying substrate into the Ti layer. NMOSFETs were fabricated using the TiNxOy/TiSi2 as a contact barrier formed by RTA at 900° C for 30 s and a significant reduction of contact resistance was obtained. In addition, electromigration test at a high current density indicated that a significant improvement in mean time to failure (MTF) has been obtained with the barrier.

  3. Preparation and properties of small diameter tubular solid oxide fuel cells for rapid start-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbride, I. P.

    The feasibility of producing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) which could be rapidly heated to operating temperature was investigated. Small diameter (2.4 mm) 3 and 8 mol% yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) tubes were used both as the electrolyte and the cell support tube. Cells were prepared by winding with pure silver, Ni80/Cr20 and Nimonic 90 wires over lanthanumstrontiummanganite (LSM) cathodes. Specific power outputs of up to 250 mA/cm 2 at 900 °C, 0.7 V were achieved in silver wound cells with 5 mm long cathodes. Longer cathodes produced progressively lower specific outputs. This was attributed to increasing cathode and winding resistance with length. The base metal windings achieved up to 80% of the performance of a similar length cell wound with pure silver wire. Silver wound cells were successfully cycled between 200 and 900 °C at an average 25 °C/min (peak 100 °C/min) over 50 cycles with no degradation due to the thermal cycling. Degradation in cells wound with base metals was attributable to the increase in contact resistance found between the cathode and the wire with time.

  4. Rapid changes in biomass burning aerosols by atmospheric oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakkari, Ville; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Beukes, Johan Paul; Tiitta, Petri; Zyl, Pieter G.; Josipovic, Miroslav; Venter, Andrew D.; Jaars, Kerneels; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku; Laakso, Lauri

    2014-04-01

    Primary and secondary aerosol particles originating from biomass burning contribute significantly to the atmospheric aerosol budget and thereby to both direct and indirect radiative forcing. Based on detailed measurements of a large number of biomass burning plumes of variable age in southern Africa, we show that the size distribution, chemical composition, single-scattering albedo, and hygroscopicity of biomass burning particles change considerably during the first 2-4 h of their atmospheric transport. These changes, driven by atmospheric oxidation and subsequent secondary aerosol formation, may reach a factor of 6 for the aerosol scattering coefficient and a factor >10 for the cloud condensation nuclei concentration. Since the observed changes take place over the spatial and temporal scales that are neither covered by emission inventories nor captured by large-scale model simulations, the findings reported here point out a significant gap in our understanding on the climatic effects of biomass burning aerosols.

  5. Sonochemical approach for rapid growth of zinc oxide nanowalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Avinash P.; Katzenmeyer, Aaron M.; Gosho, Yasuhiro; Tekin, Bayram; Islam, M. Saif

    2012-06-01

    The sonochemical process drives chemical reactions with sound fields by creating extraordinarily high density of energy, pressure and temperatures. The process resulted in a number of unexpected chemical species and thought-provoking results in the recent past. In this paper, we present a new sonochemical approach to synthesize ZnO (zinc oxide) nanowalls (NWalls) on aluminum and alumina coated substrates at room ambient conditions. We achieved highly dense and uniform ZnO NWalls in areas that are coated with Al or Al2O3 (alumina). The synthesis process was shown not to occur on Si, SiO2, Cr, or Ag surfaces. A series of experiments on understanding the growth kinetics offers detailed insight into the growth dynamics over time. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements, UV Vis spectroscopy, and SEM-EDS results confirm NWalls composed of crystalline ZnO that are formed via Al assisted growth induced by phase transformations under extraordinary pressure, temperature, and chemical growth kinetics. The chemical growth method as reported here, is applicable to arbitrary substrates coated with an Al thin film. We demonstrate the applications of the as-formed NWalls in UV photoconductors and gas sensors.

  6. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  7. Substituted Cyclohexene Endcaps for Polymers with Thermal-Oxidative Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This invention relates to polyimides having improved thermal-oxidative stability, to the process of preparing said polyimides, and the use of polyimide prepolymers in the preparation of prepregs and composites. The polyimides are particularly usefull in the preparation of fiber-reinforced, high-temperature composites for use in various engine parts including inlets, fan ducts, exit flaps and other parts of high speed aircraft. The polyimides are derived from the polymerization of effective amounts of at least one tetracarboxylic dianhydride, at least one polyamine and a novel dicarboxylic endcap having the formula presented.

  8. Thermal imaging of solid oxide cells operating under electrolysis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, D. J.; Elder, R. H.

    2015-04-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells remain at the forefront of research into electrochemical energy conversion technology. More recent interest has focused on operating in electrolyser mode to convert steam or carbon dioxide into hydrogen or carbon monoxide, respectively. The mechanism of these reactions is not fully understood, particularly when operated in co-electrolysis mode using both steam and CO2. This contribution reports the use of a thermal camera to directly observe changes in the cell temperature during operation, providing a remote, non-contact and highly sensitive method for monitoring an operational cell.

  9. Fate of lead oxide during thermal treatment with tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Oleszek, Sylwia; Grabda, Mariusz; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the bromination reaction between lead oxide and hydrogen bromide originating from the thermal decomposition of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), under inert and oxidizing atmospheres, was investigated, using a laboratory-scale furnace. The results obtained under inert conditions indicated that bromination of PbO proceeded simultaneously with debromination of TBBPA, with an average effectiveness of 69% (max. 80%). Volatilization of the formed PbBr2 began at 315°C, intensified at 750°C, and reached 98% at 850°C. The formed organic char served as a source of carbon for reduction of the unreacted lead oxide to metallic lead in the range 315-750°C. Additional experiments conducted at selected temperatures under slightly oxidizing (5 vol% O2) and quasi-atmospheric (20 vol% O2) conditions showed no significant effects on bromination-evaporation of lead in the studied mixture. However, in isothermal treatment under quasi-atmospheric oxygen levels, complete vaporization of the formed lead bromide was obtained at a temperature of only 650°C. PMID:23921179

  10. Thermal deoxygenation of graphite oxide at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampars, V.; Legzdina, M.

    2015-03-01

    Synthesis of graphene via the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide (GO) is a method for the large-scale production of this nanomaterial possessing exceptional mechanical, electrical and translucent properties. Graphite oxide sheet contains at least four different oxygen atoms connected to the Csp3 and Csp2 atoms of the sheet in the form of hydroxyl, epoxy, carboxyl or carbonyl groups. Some of these functional groups are located at the surface but others situated at the edges of the platelets. To obtain the graphene nanoplatelets or the few-layer graphene the oxygen functionalities must be removed. Exfoliation and deoxygenation can be accomplished by the use of chemical reductants or heat. Thermal deoxygenation as greener and simpler approach is more preferable over chemical reduction approach. Usually a considerable mass loss of GO observed upon heating at temperatures starting at 200 °C and is attributed to the deoxygenation process. In order to avoid the defects of the obtained graphene sheets it is very important to find the methods for lowering the deoxygenation temperature of GO. Herein, we have investigated the way treatment of the Hummer's synthesis product with acetone and methyl tert-butyl ether under ultrasonication in order to lower the thermal stability of the graphite oxide and its deoxygenation temperature. The obtained results indicate that treatment of the graphite oxide with solvents mentioned above substantially reduces the reduction and exfoliation temperature (130 °C) under ambient atmosphere. The investigation of the composition of evolved gases by hyphenated Pyr/GC/MS method at different experimental conditions under helium atmosphere shows that without the expected H2O, CO and CO2 also sulphur dioxide and acetone has been released.

  11. Rapid fingerprinting of milk thermal processing history by intact protein mass spectrometry with nondenaturing chromatography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Phil; Philo, Mark; Watson, Andrew; Mills, E N Clare

    2011-12-14

    Thermal processing of foods results in proteins undergoing conformational changes, aggregation, and chemical modification notably with sugars via the Maillard reaction. This can impact their functional, nutritional, and allergenic properties. Native size-exclusion chromatography with online electrospray mass spectrometry (SEC-ESI-MS) was used to characterize processing-induced changes in milk proteins in a range of milk products. Milk products could be readily grouped into either pasteurized liquid milks, heavily processed milks, or milk powders by SEC behavior, particularly by aggregation of whey proteins by thermal processing. Maillard modification of all major milk proteins by lactose was observed by MS and was primarily present in milk powders. The method developed is a rapid tool for fingerprinting the processing history of milk and has potential as a quality control method for food ingredient manufacture. The method described here can profile milk protein oligomeric state, aggregation, and Maillard modification in a single shot, rapid analysis. PMID:22007861

  12. Rapid thermal annealing of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon (a-C:H) films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on silicon and quartz substrates by a 30 kHz plasma discharge technique using methane. Rapid thermal processing of the films was accomplished in nitrogen gas using tungsten halogen light. The rapid thermal processing was done at several fixed temperatures (up to 600 C), as a function of time (up to 1800 sec). The films were characterized by optical absorption and by ellipsometry in the near UV and the visible. The bandgap, estimated from extrapolation of the linear part of a Tauc plot, decreases both with the annealing temperature and the annealing time, with the temperature dependence being the dominating factor. The density of states parameter increases up to 25 percent and the refractive index changes up to 20 percent with temperature increase. Possible explanations of the mechanisms involved in these processes are discussed.

  13. Rapid thermal annealing of spin-coated phosphoric acid films for shallow junction formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1997-07-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of spin-coated phosphoric acid (H3PO4) films on silicon substrates has been studied for the formation of shallow junctions. The junctions are characterized by spreading resistance profiling. Device quality, shallow (<0.2 μm), n+p junctions are formed by the resulting phosphorous diffusion with the junction depth and surface concentration depending on the RTA conditions. The films have been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after various RTA treatments. The presence of P=O bonds in the films becomes evident after the RTA treatment at elevated temperatures (>750 °C), below which absorption bands originating from water species are noted. More than 15% efficient, shallow emitter, large-area (10 cm×10 cm) n+pp+ silicon solar cells are fabricated with a short-time processing using this rapid thermal processing technique.

  14. Effect of Back Contact and Rapid Thermal Processing Conditions on Flexible CdTe Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Meysing, D. M.; Rance, Will L.; Burst, James M.; Reese, Matthew O.; Wolden, C. A.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Garner, S.; Barnes, Teresa M.

    2015-06-14

    Flexible CdTe solar cells on ultra-thin glass substrates can enable new applications that require high specific power, unique form-factors, and low manufacturing costs. To be successful, these cells must be cost competitive, have high efficiency, and have high reliability. Here we present back contact processing conditions that enabled us to achieve over 16% efficiency on flexible Corning (R) Willow (R) Glass substrates. We used co-evaporated ZnTe:Cu and Au as our back contact and used rapid thermal processing (RTP) to activate the back contact. Both the ZnTe to Cu ratio and the RTP activation temperature provide independent control over the device performance. We have investigated the influence of various RTP conditions to Cu activation and distribution. Current density-voltage, capacitance-voltage measurements along with device simulations were used to examine the device performance in terms of ZnTe to Cu ratio and rapid thermal activation temperature.

  15. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation: in-ground thermal destruction of organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K. G.; Aines, R.D.; Dibley, M.J.; Leif, R.N.; Mew, D.A.

    1997-03-11

    Experimental work with organic solvents at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has suggested that in situ thermal oxidation of these compounds via hydrous pyrolysis forms the basis for a whole new remediation method, called hydrous pyrolysis oxidation. Preliminary results of hydrothermal oxidation using both dissolved 0{sub 2} gas and mineral oxidants present naturally in soils (e.g., MnO{sub 2}) demonstrate that TCE, TCA, and even PCE can be rapidly and completely degraded to benign products at moderate conditions, easily achieved in thermal remediation. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) have an even larger thermodynamic driving force favoring oxidation, and they are also amenable to in situ destruction. Today, the principal treatment methods for chlorinated solvent- and PAH-contaminated soil are to remove it to landfills, or incinerate it on site. The most effective method for treating ground water, Dynamic Underground Stripping (Newmark et al., 1995), still involves removing the contaminant for destruction elsewhere. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation would eliminate the need for long-term use of expensive treatment facilities by converting all remaining contaminant to benign products (e.g., carbon dioxide, water, and chloride ion). The technique is expected to be applicable to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) and dissolved organic components. Soil and ground water would be polished without bringing them to the surface. This would dramatically decrease the cost of final site closure efforts. Large-scale cleanup using hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation may cost less than $10/yd. The end product of hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation is expected to be a clean site. The delivery concept for hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation utilizes the established experience in heating large volumes of ground developed in the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration (Newmark et al., 1995). Steam and possibly oxygen are injected together, building a heated, oxygenated zone in the

  16. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings. PMID:24733903

  17. Evolution of nano-structures of silver due to rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shyamal Bhattacharyya, S. R.

    2014-04-24

    This report deals with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) effect on continuous silver film on Si(100) substrate. For this purpose silver films of different thicknesses were deposited and subsequently annealed at 500 and 800 °C. The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Formations of different nano-structures have been observed. Fragmentation of formed nanoislands also observed at temperature below melting temperature.

  18. Rapid thermal processing of Czochralski silicon substrates: Defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozgonyi, G. S.; Yang, D. K.; Cao, Y. H.; Radzimski, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid thermal processing (RTP) of Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrates is discussed with its attendant effects on defects, denuded zones, and minority carrier lifetime. Preferential chemical etching and X-ray topography was used to delineate defects which were subsequently correlated with minority carrier lifetime; determined by a pulse metallo-organic decompositon (MOD) test device. The X-ray delineation of grown-in defects was enhanced by a lithium decoration procedure. Results, thus far, show excellent correlation between process-induced defects.

  19. Rapid thermal process-induced recombination centers in ion implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhammer, W.; Hage-Ali, M.; Stuck, R.; Siffert, P.

    1990-04-01

    This work presents direct evidence for a correlation between rapid thermal process-induced recombination centers and co-implanted metallic impurities in ion implanted silicon. Experimental evidence includes the dose dependence of the minority carrier diffusion length measured by the SPV technique, SIMS and RBS analysis of high-dose implantations which show the presence of heavy metals, the dependence of the final diffusion lengths on the mass of the implanted ions, as well as the successful modification of an implantation equipment.

  20. Method for the rapid synthesis of large quantities of metal oxide nanowires at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros

    2009-09-22

    A process for the rapid synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles at low temperatures and methods which facilitate the fabrication of long metal oxide nanowires. The method is based on treatment of metals with oxygen plasma. Using oxygen plasma at low temperatures allows for rapid growth unlike other synthesis methods where nanomaterials take a long time to grow. Density of neutral oxygen atoms in plasma is a controlling factor for the yield of nanowires. The oxygen atom density window differs for different materials. By selecting the optimal oxygen atom density for various materials the yield can be maximized for nanowire synthesis of the metal.

  1. Modeling of thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, F.; Maghsoudipour, A.; Alizadeh, M.; Khakpour, Z.; Javaheri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Artificial intelligence models have the capacity to eliminate the need for expensive experimental investigation in various areas of manufacturing processes, including the material science. This study investigates the applicability of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approach for modeling the performance parameters of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode. Oxides (Ln = La, Nd, Sm and M = Fe, Ni, Mn) have been prepared and characterized to study the influence of the different cations on TEC. Experimental results have shown TEC decreases favorably with substitution of Nd3+ and Mn3+ ions in the lattice. Structural parameters of compounds have been determined by X-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy has been used for the morphological study. Comparison results indicated that the ANFIS technique could be employed successfully in modeling thermal expansion coefficient of perovskite oxide for solid oxide fuel cell cathode, and considerable savings in terms of cost and time could be obtained by using ANFIS technique.

  2. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  3. Thermal Behavior of Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles, when the EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. The generated heat increases significantly the cell temperature and causes possibly bad influences on the battery performance and the safely requirement. So we have studied the thermal behavior of nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles, applying our previous battery thermal model, which have been confirmed to agree with the experimental results at smaller charge current than the rated current. The heat sources by the entropy change, the hydrogen occlusion and the side reaction have been referred to the published data, and the overpotential resistance and the current efficiency, the ratio of main reaction current to charge current, have been measured experimentally through the rapid charge and discharge characteristics with constant current. By using these data our thermal model for Ni/MH battery has estimated its temperature increase, which agrees well with the measured temperature rise, with the root mean square error of 1.5°C and 2.1°C for charge and discharge cycles, respectively.

  4. Identification of Oxidation Compounds of 1-Stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine during Thermal Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Zhao, Minjie; Bindler, Françoise; Marchioni, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Heat-induced oxidative modification of phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species as potential functional food components was investigated. 1-Stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (SLPE) was chosen as a model. The optimal temperature for hydroperoxide formation was determined by mass spectrometry. The maximal level of formation of this compound was obtained at 125 °C. The structures of nonvolatile organic compounds (non-VOCs) were identified using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with an acid treatment. Kinetics of formation of non-VOCs was monitored over time. Results showed that the level of the SLPE precursor rapidly decreased during thermal oxidation and oxygenated products, such as hydroxyl, oxo, or epoxy groups, were formed. The VOCs formed from oxidized SLPE were determined by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The result showed that a saturated methyl ketone (2-heptanone) was the most predominant VOC of SLPE. Kinetics indicated that the formation of VOCs was related not only to the decomposition of hydroperoxides but also to the further decomposition of non-VOCs. PMID:26478449

  5. Transfer RNAs Mediate the Rapid Adaptation of Escherichia coli to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gaofei; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong

    2015-01-01

    Translational systems can respond promptly to sudden environmental changes to provide rapid adaptations to environmental stress. Unlike the well-studied translational responses to oxidative stress in eukaryotic systems, little is known regarding how prokaryotes respond rapidly to oxidative stress in terms of translation. In this study, we measured protein synthesis from the entire Escherichia coli proteome and found that protein synthesis was severely slowed down under oxidative stress. With unchanged translation initiation, this slowdown was caused by decreased translation elongation speed. We further confirmed by tRNA sequencing and qRT-PCR that this deceleration was caused by a global, enzymatic downregulation of almost all tRNA species shortly after exposure to oxidative agents. Elevation in tRNA levels accelerated translation and protected E. coli against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide and the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Our results showed that the global regulation of tRNAs mediates the rapid adjustment of the E. coli translation system for prompt adaptation to oxidative stress. PMID:26090660

  6. Rapid thermal cycling of solar array blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been conducting rapid thermal cycling on blanket coupons for Space Station Freedom. This testing includes two designs (8 coupons total) of the solar array. Four coupons were fabricated as part of the Photovoltaic Array Environmental Protection Program (PAEP), NAS3-25079, at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company. These coupons began cycling in early 1989 and have completed 172,000 thermal cycles. Four other coupons were fabricated a year later and included several design changes; cycling of these began in early 1990 and has reached 90,000 cycles. The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime (15 yrs.) of the welded interconnects within a low earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycling environment. The blanket coupons, design changes, test description, status to date including performance and observed anomalies, and any insights related to the testing of these coupons are described. The description of a third design is included.

  7. Novel developments in rapid thermal processing (RTP) temperature measurement and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. E.; Hunter, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    Since the development of integrated circuits in the 1960's, the semiconductor industry has continued to see the reduction of transistor size in accordance with Moore's law. Rapid thermal processing (RTP) has been an enabling technology for the continued evolution of these ultra-small devices. As thermal budgets have progressively dropped, equipment manufacturers have greatly increased the thermal ramp rates and reduced temperatures for many key processes. Lamp heated technology has developed sub-second dwell times and laser based systems have reduced processing time to milliseconds and shorter. This paper will highlight the key development in RTP temperature measurement and control for two distinct applications. The first is the development of temperature measurements of laser heated substrates. The work will discuss the unique challenges and requirements in this rapidly expanding processing space. These challenges arise from the very high background radiation from the laser sources, the extremely short dwell times, and the high processing temperatures. The second area under discussion is a solution to very low temperature silicon processes-primarily driven by Ni and NiPt silicides that have constrained thermal budgets, thus requiring high ramp rates and short dwell times, but in temperatures below the fundamental limits of standard radiation pyrometry. In particular, this work describes a novel system capable of measuring temperature down to room temperature in a state of the art RTP system.

  8. Thermal Behavior of Small Lithium-Ion Secondary Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo

    The secondary batteries for the electric vehicle (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles than the rated condition, when EV starts quickly consuming the battery power and stops suddenly recovering the inertia energy. During rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature rises significantly and may increase more than the allowable temperature. So we calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles using our battery thermal behavior model, which we have developed being confirmed its validity during discharge cycle at the smaller current than the discharge rate of 1C. The heat source factors were measured by the methods described in our previous study, because the present batteries have been improved in their performance and have low overpotential resistance. The battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient was measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, and was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The calculated temperature by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple. Therefore we can confirm the validity of this model again during rapid charge and discharge cycles.

  9. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  10. Thermally reduced kaolin-graphene oxide nanocomposites for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyun; Alecrim, Viviane; Hummelgård, Magnus; Andres, Britta; Forsberg, Sven; Andersson, Mattias; Olin, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    Highly sensitive graphene-based gas sensors can be made using large-area single layer graphene, but the cost of large-area pure graphene is high, making the simpler reduced graphene oxide (rGO) an attractive alternative. To use rGO for gas sensing, however, require a high active surface area and slightly different approach is needed. Here, we report on a simple method to produce kaolin-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites and an application of this nanocomposite as a gas sensor. The nanocomposite was made by binding the GO flakes to kaolin with the help of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The GO flakes in the nanocomposite were contacting neighboring GO flakes as observed by electron microscopy. After thermal annealing, the nanocomposite become conductive as showed by sheet resistance measurements. Based on the conductance changes of the nanocomposite films, electrical gas sensing devices were made for detecting NH3 and HNO3. These devices had a higher sensitivity than thermally annealed multilayer GO films. This kaolin-GO nanocomposite might be useful in applications that require a low-cost material with large conductive surface area including the demonstrated gas sensors.

  11. Leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances - structural safeguards for rapid ambient fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.; Zwieniecki, M.

    2011-12-01

    Leaves may be subjected to rapidly fluctuating irradiation or thermal conditions due to motion of sun flecks and clouds or passage of warm and dry wind gusts. Given a stomatal characteristic time scale (~5 min) for adjusting transpiration flux, fluctuations of environmental conditions at shorter time scales (~1 min) could push leaf hydraulic and thermal status beyond its operational limits resulting in xylem cavitation or overheating. As active stomatal protection may not be adequate, we propose that leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances and hence leaf specific mass (hydrated thickness) provide passive protection and play a critical role for autonomous and intrinsic capacitive-based responses to rapid fluctuations. For example, a simple variable leaf mass per unit area can affect both thermal and hydraulic capacitances. Thus a thin leaf (0.2 mm) exposed to a sunfleck can experience an increase in leaf temperature by 20K in the order of 3 minutes, i.e. before stomata can activate evaporative cooling. Increasing leaf thickness can be an effective measure to increase the buffer for such environmental fluctuations, so that slower regulatory measures such as stomatal adjustments can take over before detrimental effects take place. Systematic measurements of thermal changes in response to step changes in radiation conditions were obtained using laser illumination and infra-red thermal imaging of leaf laser-illuminated area across a wide range of leaf morphologies from major plant divisions (ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms). Results confirm inverse relationships between leaf thickness and temperature rise (measured as steady state temperature increase). Hydraulic impacts of such structural capacitance on xylem function will be discussed.

  12. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings. PMID:25942897

  13. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    PubMed

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change. PMID:16604078

  14. Comments on "thermal degradation behavior of hypochlorite-oxidized starch nanocrystals under different oxidized levels".

    PubMed

    Trache, Djalal

    2016-10-20

    This paper intends to discuss the employment of the Coats-Redfern equation to compute the kinetic parameters of the thermal degradation of hypochlorite-oxidized starch nancrystals by Wei et al. [Carbohydrate Polymers 124 (2015) 124-130]. The original paper has shown some fundamental errors when presenting the Coats-Redfern (CR) integral kinetic model. This CR equation is commonly used to calculate the activation energy of the thermal degradation from a single non isothermal thermogravimetric curve. However, the use of a set of experiments recorded under different heating rates is often required to obtain accurate results, as recommended by the International Confederation for Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC) Kinetics Committee. The present comments are focused on these statements giving some arguments and elucidations concerning the Coats-Redfern equation. PMID:27474597

  15. A Rapid and Low-Cost PCR Thermal Cycler for Low Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Grace; Wong, Isaac; Chan, Kamfai; Hsieh, Yicheng; Wong, Season

    2015-01-01

    Background Many modern molecular diagnostic assays targeting nucleic acids are typically confined to developed countries or to the national reference laboratories of developing-world countries. The ability to make technologies for the rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases broadly available in a portable, low-cost format would mark a revolutionary step forward in global health. Many molecular assays are also developed based on polymerase chain reactions (PCR), which require thermal cyclers that are relatively heavy (>20 pounds) and need continuous electrical power. The temperature ramping speed of most economical thermal cyclers are relatively slow (2 to 3°C/s) so a polymerase chain reaction can take 1 to 2 hours. Most of all, these thermal cyclers are still too expensive ($2k to $4k) for low-resource setting uses. Methodology/Principal Findings In this article, we demonstrate the development of a low-cost and rapid water bath based thermal cycler that does not require active temperature control or continuous power supply during PCR. This unit costs $130 to build using commercial off-the-shelf items. The use of two or three vacuum-insulated stainless-steel Thermos food jars containing heated water (for denaturation and annealing/extension steps) and a layer of oil on top of the water allow for significantly stabilized temperatures for PCR to take place. Using an Arduino-based microcontroller, we automate the “archaic” method of hand-transferring PCR tubes between water baths. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that this innovative unit can deliver high speed PCR (17 s per PCR cycle) with the potential to go beyond the 1,522 bp long amplicons tested in this study and can amplify from templates down to at least 20 copies per reaction. The unit also accepts regular PCR tubes and glass capillary tubes. The PCR efficiency of our thermal cycler is not different from other commercial thermal cyclers. When combined with a rapid nucleic acid detection approach

  16. Thermal NF3 fluorination/oxidation of cobalt, yttrium, zirconium, and selected lanthanide oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Neiner, Doinita

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents results of our continuing investigation on the use of nitrogen trifluoride as a fluorination or fluorination/oxidation agent for separating valuable constituents from used nuclear fuels by exploiting the different volatilities of the constituent fission product and actinide fluorides. This article focuses on fission products that do not have volatile fluorides or oxyfluorides at expected operations temperatures. Our thermodynamic calculations show that nitrogen trifluoride has the potential to completely fluorinate fission product oxides to their fluorides. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses show that the oxides of cobalt, zirconium, and the lanthanides are fluorinated but do not form volatile fluorides when treated with nitrogen trifluoride at temperatures up to 550°C. Our studies of gadolinium-doped commercial nuclear fuel indicate that nitrogen trifluoride can extract uranium from the non-volatile gadolinium.

  17. NOTE: Measuring oxidative gelation of aqueous flour suspensions using the Rapid Visco Analyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rapid Visco Analyzer (RVA) was investigated as a tool to measure oxidative gelation capacity (OGC) of aqueous wheat-flour suspensions. One, club-wheat patent flour was used to determine optimal hydration time and 33 straight-grade flours (representing 12 hard and 31 soft varieties) were used to ...

  18. Packaging material and flexible medical tubing containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A packaging material or flexible medical tubing containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g.

  19. Bulk-micromachined submicroliter-volume PCR chip with very rapid thermal response and low power consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sik; Park, Se Ho; Yang, Haesik; Chung, Kwang-Hyo; Yoon, Tae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kyuwon; Kim, Youn Tae

    2004-08-01

    The current paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a micromachined submicroliter-volume polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip with a fast thermal response and very low power consumption. The chip consists of a bulk-micromachined Si component and hot-embossed poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) component. The Si component contains an integral microheater and temperature sensor on a thermally well-isolated membrane, while the PMMA component contains a submicroliter-volume PCR chamber, valves, and channels. The micro hot membrane under the submicroliter-volume chamber is a silicon oxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxide (O/N/O) diaphragm with a thickness of 1.9 microm, resulting in a very low thermal mass. In experiments, the proposed chip only required 45 mW to heat the reaction chamber to 92 degrees C, the denaturation temperature of DNA, plus the heating and cooling rates are about 80 degrees C s(-1) and 60 degrees C s(-1), respectively. We validated, from the fluorescence results from DNA stained with SYBR Green I, that the proposed chip amplified the DNA from vector clone, containing tumor suppressor gene BRCA 1 (127 base pairs at 11th exon), after 30 thermal cycles of 3 s, 5 s, and 5 s at 92 degrees C, 55 degrees C, and 72 degrees C, respectively, in a 200 nL-volume chamber. As for specificity of DNA products, owing to difficulty in analyzing the very small volume PCR results from the micro chip, we vicariously employed the larger volume PCR products after cycling with the same sustaining temperatures as with the micro chip but with much slower ramping rates (3.3 degrees C s(-1) when rising, 2.5 degrees C s(-1) when cooling) within circa 20 minutes on a commercial PCR machine and confirmed the specificity to BRCA 1 (127 base pairs) with agarose gel electrophoresis. Accordingly, the fabricated micro chip demonstrated a very low power consumption and rapid thermal response, both of which are crucial to the development of a fully integrated and battery

  20. DEAD ZONES AS THERMAL BARRIERS TO RAPID PLANETARY MIGRATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2010-02-20

    Planetary migration in standard models of gaseous protoplanetary disks is known to be very rapid ({approx}10{sup 5} years), jeopardizing the existence of planetary systems. We present a new mechanism for significantly slowing rapid planetary migration, discovered by means of radiative transfer calculations of the thermal structure of protoplanetary disks irradiated by their central stars. Rapid dust settling in a disk's dead zone-a region with very little turbulence-leaves a dusty wall at its outer edge. We show that the back-heating of the dead zone by this irradiated wall produces a positive gradient of the disk temperature, which acts as a thermal barrier to planetary migration which persists for the disk lifetime. Although we analyze in detail the migration of a super-Earth in a low-mass disk around an M star, our findings can apply to a wide variety of young planetary systems. We compare our findings with other potentially important stopping mechanisms and show that there are large parameter spaces for which dead zones are likely to play the most important role for reproducing the observed mass-period relation in longer planetary periods.

  1. Preparation and modification of VO2 thin film on R-sapphire substrate by rapid thermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nai-Wei; Hu, Ming; Xia, Xiao-Xu; Wei, Xiao-Ying; Liang, Ji-Ran

    2014-04-01

    The VO2 thin film with high performance of metal-insulator transition (MIT) is prepared on R-sapphire substrate for the first time by magnetron sputtering with rapid thermal process (RTP). The electrical characteristic and THz transmittance of MIT in VO2 film are studied by four-point probe method and THz time domain spectrum (THz-TDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and search engine marketing (SEM) are employed to analyze the crystalline structure, valence state, surface morphology of the film. Results indicate that the properties of VO2 film which is oxidized from the metal vanadium film in oxygen atmosphere are improved with a follow-up RTP modification in nitrogen atmosphere. The crystallization and components of VO2 film are improved and the film becomes compact and uniform. A better phase transition performance is shown that the resistance changes nearly 3 orders of magnitude with a 2-°C hysteresis width and the THz transmittances are reduced by 64% and 60% in thermal and optical excitation respectively.

  2. Light out-coupling enhancement of organic light emitting devices using nano-structured substrate produced by rapid thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Grover, Rakhi; Mehta, D. S.; Saxena, K.

    2015-07-01

    We report significant enhancement in light out-coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) using a nano-structured substrate by rapid thermal processing (RTP). On the backside of the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate a thin film of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) was coated by thermal evaporation. Nano-structured films of MgF2 and ITO were then produced by RTP on both sides of the glass substrate. Bottom-emitting OLEDs were fabricated on the ITO-coated glass substrate with α-NPD as the hole transport layer, Alq3 as the emissive layer, and LiF and aluminum as the cathode. On the backside of the glass substrate nano-structured MgF2 were fabricated by RTP. Experimental results of enhancement of electroluminescent intensity (EL) with and without nano-structured films are presented. Results of EL intensity of OLED are also compared with the uniform MgF2 film coated on the backside of the substrate. It was found that the enhancement of EL intensity is much higher in the case of nano-porous MgF2 film than in the case of uniform MgF2 coated on the backside of the glass substrate.

  3. Structural and compositional properties of CZTS thin films formed by rapid thermal annealing of electrodeposited layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, J.; Ganchev, M.; Loorits, M.; Revathi, N.; Raadik, T.; Raudoja, J.; Grossberg, M.; Mellikov, E.; Volobujeva, O.

    2013-10-01

    In this work Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of sequentially electrodeposited Cu-Zn and Sn films in 5% H2S containing atmosphere. Six different thermal profiles were used in the experiments. In three of these, the temperature ramping up was varied, while the variable in the other three profiles was the cooling down rate. The optimising parameters for RTA of electrodeposited films were found and annealed films were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM+EDS). The material parameters such as lattice strain and crystallite size were also determined and the influence of annealing temperature and heating rate on these parameters was discussed.The pathway of MoS2 formation was investigated.

  4. A rapid and simple method to draw polyethylene nanofibers with enhanced thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Yin; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Juekuan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2016-07-01

    We report on a rapid and simple method to fabricate polyethylene (PE) nanofibers by one-step drawing from PE solution. The diameter of the fiber prepared with this method can be as small as 40 nm. The thermal conductivity of the drawn PE nanofiber was measured with suspended microdevices, and the highest value obtained is 8.8 W m-1 K-1, which is very close to that of electrospun PE nanofibers, and over 20 times higher than bulk value. Raman spectra of these drawn PE nanofibers indicate that molecular chains in these fibers can be as well aligned as that in electrospun fibers, which results in the enhanced thermal conductivity of the drawn PE nanofibers.

  5. Rapid microplate, green method for high-throughput evaluation of vinegar acidity using thermal infrared enthalpimetry.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Wagner, Roger; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2017-01-15

    Infrared thermal imaging was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis using an infrared camera to monitor temperature without contact. The proposed thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was used to determine the total, fixed and volatile acidities of vinegars. Sample preparation and analysis were performed in the same vessel, avoiding excessive sample handling and reducing energy expenditure by more than ten times. The results agreed with those of the conventional method for different kinds of vinegars, with values of 1.7%, and 2.3% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. A linear calibration curve was obtained from 0.040 to 1.30molL(-1). The proposed method provided rapid results (within 10s) for four samples simultaneously, a sample throughput of up to 480 samples per hour. In addition, the method complies with at least eight of twelve recommendations for green analytical chemistry, making TIE a promising tool for routine vinegar analysis. PMID:27542445

  6. Microstructural modifications induced by rapid thermal annealing in plasma deposited SiOxNyHz films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Prado, A.; San Andrés, E.; Mártil, I.; González-Díaz, G.; Bravo, D.; López, F. J.; Fernández, M.; Martínez, F. L.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processes on the structural properties of SiOxNyHz films was investigated. The samples were deposited by the electron cyclotron resonance plasma method, using SiH4, O2 and N2 as precursor gases. For SiOxNyHz films with composition close to that of SiO2, which have a very low H content, RTA induces thermal relaxation of the lattice and improvement of the structural order. For films of intermediate composition and of compositions close to SiNyHz, the main effect of RTA is the release of H at high temperatures (T>700 °C). This H release is more significant in films containing both Si-H and N-H bonds, due to cooperative reactions between both kinds of bonds. In these films the degradation of structural order associated to H release prevails over thermal relaxation, while in those films with only N-H bonds, thermal relaxation predominates. For annealing temperatures in the 500-700 °C range, the passivation of dangling bonds by the nonbonded H in the films and the transition from the paramagnetic state to the diamagnetic state of the K center result in a decrease of the density of paramagnetic defects. The H release observed at high annealing temperatures is accompanied by an increase of density of paramagnetic defects.

  7. High sensitivity of positron annihilation to thermal oxidation of polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Nanasawa, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate the high sensitivity of positron annihilation to compositional changes related to the thermal degradation of polyethylene (PE). Positron annihilation γ-ray and lifetime measurements were conducted for PE films with and without antioxidant (1000-ppm Ciba® IRGANOX® 1076), subjected to heat treatment at 100 °C for different periods, to a maximum of 30 days. For the film without antioxidant, the positron Doppler parameter (S) and ortho-positronium formation probability (Io-Ps) appreciably decreased with increased heat treatment times, whereas they barely changed for the film with antioxidant. This, together with the Fourier transform infrared measurements, demonstrated that the variations of S and Io-Ps are caused by the thermal oxidation of PE. The S parameter was found to be sensitive to the early stage of degradation, where the carbonyl concentration is inferred to be lower than 100 ppm. The high sensitivity results from the large positron mobility in PE and from the high positron affinity of oxygen-containing polar groups. This work provides the basis for an application of positron annihilation to sensitive detection of the initial degradation of PE and other nonpolar polymers.

  8. Emitter of hetero-junction solar cells created using pulsed rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Diao, Hong-Wei; Hao, Hui-Ying; Zeng, Xiang-Bo; Liao, Xian-Bo

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we use a pulsed rapid thermal processing (RTP) approach to create an emitter layer of hetero-junction solar cell. The process parameters and crystallization behaviour are studied. The structural, optical and electric properties of the crystallized films are also investigated. Both the depth of PN junction and the conductivity of the emitter layer increase with the number of RTP pulses increasing. Simulation results show that efficiencies of such solar cells can exceed 15% with a lower interface recombination rate, but the highest efficiency is 11.65% in our experiments.

  9. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on recombination centres in boron-doped Czochralski-grown silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, D. C. Lim, B.; Bothe, K.; Schmidt, J.; Voronkov, V. V.; Falster, R.

    2014-01-27

    Rapid thermal annealing in a belt furnace results in a dramatic change of the recombination properties of boron-doped Czochralski silicon: (1) the lifetime degraded by applying a prolonged illumination at room temperature was significantly improved, (2) after subsequent dark recovery, the lifetime has a remarkably high value, and (3) the permanent recovery, by annealing at 185 °C under illumination, is enormously accelerated, and the finally achieved stable lifetime acquires a record value of 1.5 ms, as compared to 110 μs after permanent recovery of not-annealed reference samples.

  10. Pore Size Control of Ultra-thin Silicon Membranes by Rapid Thermal Carbonization

    PubMed Central

    Fang, David Z.; Striemer, Christopher C.; Gaborski, Thomas R.; McGrath, James L.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid thermal carbonization in a dilute acetylene (C2H2) atmosphere has been used to chemically modify and precisely tune the pore size of ultrathin porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si). The magnitude of size reduction was controlled by varying the process temperature and time. Under certain conditions, the carbon coating displayed atomic ordering indicative of graphene layer formation conformal to the pore walls. Initial experiments show that carbonized membranes follow theoretical predictions for hydraulic permeability and retain the precise separation capabilities of untreated membranes. PMID:20839831

  11. The application of computational simulation to design optimization of an axisymmetric rapid thermal processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, P.A.; Winters, W.S.; Kee, R.J.; Kermani, A.

    1994-08-01

    We are developing and applying computational models to guide the development of a rapid-thermal-processing system. This work concentrates on scale-up and commercialization of the axisymmetric, multiple-lamp-ring approach that was pioneered by Texas Instruments in the Microelectronics Manufacturing Science and Technology program. CVC Products intends to incorporate the tool into their open-architecture MESC compatible cluster environment. Integration of modeling into the product development process can reduce time-to-market and development costs, as well as improve tool performance.

  12. Thin film poly-crystalline silicon fabrication based on Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Li, Jirong; Liao, Yang; Shi, Weimin; Kuang, Huahui; Ming, Xiuchun; Liu, Jin; Jin, Jing; Qin, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) process was introduced to the experiment of Aluminum-induced crystallization of a-Si, based on sputtering method, on low cost glass substrate. A stack of glass/Al (150 nm)/Si (220 nm) was deposited by sputtering sequentially. Samples were annealed under RTA process, then annealed in the tube annealing furnace at 400 °C for 5 h. The grain crystallization was inspected by optical microscopy (OM), ,Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD),and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The preferential orientation (111) was observed, with a Raman Peak at 520.8cm-1, Different annealing periods were discussed.

  13. Thermal behavior of small lithium-ion battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Kazuo; Ohshima, Takamasa; Nakayama, Masato; Fukuda, Kenichi; Araki, Takuto

    The secondary batteries for electric vehicles (EV) generate much heat during rapid charge and discharge cycles at current levels exceeding the batteries' rating, such as when the EV quickly starts consuming battery power or when recovering inertia energy during sudden stops. During these rapid charge and discharge cycles, the cell temperature may increase above allowable limits. We calculated the temperature rise of a small lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. The heat-source factors were measured again by the methods described in our previous study, because the performance of the battery reported here has been improved, showing lower overpotential resistance. Battery heat capacity was measured by a twin-type heat conduction calorimeter, and determined to be a linear function of temperature. Further, the heat transfer coefficient, measured again precisely by the method described in our previous study, was arranged as a function of cell and ambient temperatures. The temperature calculated by our battery thermal behavior model using these measured data agrees well with the cell temperature measured by thermocouple during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Also, battery radial temperature distributions were calculated to be small, and confirmed experimentally.

  14. Thermal Plasma Spraying Applied on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soysal, D.; Arnold, J.; Szabo, P.; Henne, R.; Ansar, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), attractive for diverse applications in a broad range from small portable and auxiliary power units, up to central power systems, are conventionally produced by sintering methods. However, plasma spraying promises some advantages particularly for cells with metal support. In the present paper, research activities conducted in recent years at DLR as well as latest developments on plasma sprayed functional layers for SOFC as cathodes, electrolytes, and anodes are reported. Power densities of more than 800 mW/cm2 were achieved for plasma sprayed single cells of 12.56 cm2 size, and 300 mW/cm2, respectively, with a 250 W stack made of 10 cells. These values were attained at 0.7 V and 800 °C, with H2:N2 = 1:1 as fuel gas and air as oxidizing gas. Furthermore, continuous operation of more than 5000 h was attained with a plasma sprayed metal-supported SOFC stack which could also withstand more than 30 redox and thermal cycles.

  15. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan. PMID:27261762

  16. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  17. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  18. Rapid Deposition of Titanium Oxide and Zinc Oxide Films by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yasutaka

    In order to develop a high rate atmospheric film deposition process for functional films, as a basic study, deposition of titanium oxide film and zinc oxide film by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) was conducted in open air. Consequently, in the case of titanium oxide film deposition, anantase film and amorphous film as well as rutile film could be deposited by varying the deposition distance. In the case of anatase dominant film, photo-catalytic properties of the films could be confirmed by wettability test. In addition, the dye sensitized sollar cell (DSC) using the TiO2 film deposited by this SPPS technique as photo voltaic device generates 49mV in OCV. On the other hand, in the case of zinc oxide film deposition, it was proved that well crystallized ZnO films with photo catalytic properties could be deposited. From these results, this process was found to have high potential for high rate functional film deposition process conducted in the air.

  19. A study on thermal barrier coatings including thermal expansion mismatch and bond coat oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, George C.; Phucharoen, Woraphat; Miller, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation deals with a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) intended for high temperature applications to advanced gas turbine blades. Typically, this type of coating system consists of a zirconia-yttria ceramic layer with a nickel-chromium-aluminum bond coat on a superalloy substrate. The problem on hand is a complex one due to the fact that bond coat oxidation and thermal mismatch occur in the TBC. Cracking in the TBC has also been experimentally illustrated. A clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of the TBC is investigated. The stress states in a model thermal barrier coating as it cools down in air is studied. The powerful finite element method was utilized to model a coating cylindrical specimen. Four successively refined finite element models were developed. Some results obtained using the first two models have been reported previously. The major accomplishment is the successful development of an elastic TBC finite element model known as TBCG with interface geometry between the ceramic layer and the bond coat. An equally important milestone is the near-completion of the new elastic-plastic TBC finite element model called TBCGEP which yielded initial results. Representative results are presented.

  20. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, A. T.; Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2016-05-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  1. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    A. T. Bollinger; Wu, J.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  2. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data of oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained 24 specimens representing 9 discrete oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy compositions or fabricating techniques. Double edge wedge specimens, both bare metal and coated for each systems, were cycled between fluidized beds maintained at 1130 C with a three minute immersion in each bed. The systems included alloys identified as 262 in hardness of HRC 38; 264 in hardness of HRC 38, 40 and 43; 265 HRC 39, 266 of HRC 37 and 40; 754; and 956. Specimens in the bare condition of 265 HRC 39 and 266 HRC 37 survived 6000 cycles without cracking on the small radius of the double edge wedge specimen. A coated specimen of 262 HRC 38, 266 HRC 37 and 266 HRC40 also survived 6000 cycles without cracking. A duplicate coated specimen of 262 HRC 38 alloy survived 5250 cycles before cracks appeared. All the alloys showed little weight change compared compared to alloys tested in prior programs.

  3. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells. PMID:23206541

  4. Damp and dry heat degradation of thermal oxide passivation of p+ silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Andrew; Gardner, Matthew; McIntosh, Keith; Shalav, Avi; Bullock, James

    2014-03-01

    Thermal SiO2 passivates both moderately and heavily doped silicon surfaces irrespective of the dopant type, which is advantageous in high-efficiency solar cell designs. Commercial photovoltaic cells are submitted to accelerated ageing tests, such as damp-heat exposure, to ensure they maintain their performance for at least 20 yr. We find damp-heat exposure causes a severe and rapid degradation of thermal SiO2 passivation on p+ silicon surfaces. The reaction is so severe that the diffused-region recombination in the degraded state is limited by the diffusion of minority carriers to the Si-SiO2 interface not the density of interface defects Dit. Certainly, this effect renders the thermal-oxide passivation useless if employed on a solar cell. To study the cause of the degradation, we also test the effects of storage in dry heat and room ambient conditions. Examination of the rate of degradation in the tested storage conditions in comparison with modelled diffusion of moisture in SiO2, we find a significant correlation between the time dependent J0e and moisture supplied to the interface, leading us to the conclusion that moisture ingression and subsequent reaction at the SiO2-Si interface are the cause of both damp-heat and room- ambient degradation.

  5. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on the structural and local atomic properties of ZnO: Ge nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Abdullah Ozcan, Sadan; Rumaiz, Abdul K.; Caliskan, Deniz; Ozbay, Ekmel; Woicik, J. C.

    2015-03-14

    We have investigated the structural and local atomic properties of Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs) embedded ZnO (ZnO: Ge) thin films. The films were deposited by sequential sputtering of ZnO and Ge thin film layers on z-cut quartz substrates followed by an ex-situ rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 600 °C for 30, 60, and 90 s under forming gas atmosphere. Effects of RTA time on the evolution of Ge-ncs were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). XRD patterns have clearly shown that fcc diamond phase Ge-ncs of sizes ranging between 18 and 27 nm are formed upon RTA and no Ge-oxide peak has been detected. However, cross-section SEM images have clearly revealed that after RTA process, Ge layers form varying size nanoclusters composed of Ge-ncs regions. EXAFS performed at the Ge K-edge to probe the local atomic structure of the Ge-ncs has revealed that as prepared ZnO:Ge possesses Ge-oxide but subsequent RTA leads to crystalline Ge structure without the oxide layer. In order to study the occupied electronic structure, HAXPES has been utilized. The peak separation between the Zn 2p and Ge 3d shows no significant change due to RTA. This implies little change in the valence band offset due to RTA.

  6. Thermal Behavior of Prismatic Lithium-Ion Battery during Rapid Charge and Discharge Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takuto; Wakahara, Kenji; Fukuda, Kenichi; Ohmori, Yositake; Nakayama, Masato; Onda, Kazuo

    The temperature of secondary batteries may increase above allowable limits and deteriorate its performance, during rapid charge and discharge cycles. Therefore, assessing thermal behavior of battery is essential. On the other hand, rectangular parallelepiped shape batteries are supposedly going to be used more commonly for cars and electrical devices because of their better space efficiency. Then, we constructed a two dimensional Cartesian coordinates battery thermal behavior model for a prismatic lithium-ion secondary battery during rapid charge and discharge cycles. It was extended from one dimensional cylindrical coordinates model, which had been developed and experimentally verified. As parameters of the numerical model, battery heat source factors such as overpotential resistance, entropy change, heat transfer coefficient and heat capacity have been measured. The radiation thermometer was used for obtaining battery surface temperature variance and distributions. Battery temperature generally increases as charge and discharge cycle proceeds, nevertheless temperature drops were observed at begging of low rate charge cycle and vicinity of SOC=0.8 in discharge cycle. Our modified model could predict these phenomena and agreed well with experimental results. Then the reliability of our numerical model and measuring techniques of heat source factors are confirmed each other.

  7. Thermal decomposition and oxidation of CH3OH.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Fang; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Xu, Ding-Wei; Wang, Niann-Shiah

    2013-01-24

    Thermal decomposition of CH(3)OH diluted in Ar has been studied by monitoring H atoms behind reflected shock waves of 100 ppm CH(3)OH + Ar. The total decomposition rate k(1) for CH(3)OH + M → products obtained in this study is expressed as, ln(k(1)/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) = -(14.81 ± 1.22) - (38.86 ± 1.82) × 10(3)/T, over 1359-1644 K. The present result on k(1) is indicated to be substantially smaller than the extrapolation of the most of the previous experimental data but consistent with the published theoretical results [Faraday Discuss. 2002, 119, 191-205 and J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 3932-3950]. Oxidation of CH(3)OH has been studied also by monitoring H atoms behind shock waves of (0.35-100) ppm CH(3)OH + (100-400) ppm O(2) + Ar. For the low concentration CH(3)OH (below 10 ppm) + O(2) mixtures, the initial concentration of CH(3)OH is evaluated by comparing evolutions of H atoms in the same concentration of CH(3)OH with addition of 300 ppm H(2) diluted in Ar. The branching fraction for CH(3)OH + Ar → (1)CH(2) + H(2)O + Ar has been quantitatively evaluated from this comparative measurements with using recent experimental result on the yield of H atoms in the reaction of (1,3)CH(2) + O(2) [J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9245-9254]; i.e., the branching fraction for the above reaction is evaluated as, φ(1a) = 0.20 ± 0.04 at T = 1880-2050 K, in the 1.3 and 3.5 ppm CH(3)OH + 100 ppm O(2) samples. An extended reaction mechanism for the pyrolysis and oxidation of CH(3)OH is constructed based on the results of the present study combined with the oxidation mechanism of natural gas [GRI-Mech 3.0]; evolution of H atoms can be predicted very well with this new reaction scheme over a wide concentration range for the pyrolysis (0.36-100 ppm CH(3)OH), and oxidation (0.36-100 ppm CH(3)OH + 100/400 ppm O(2)) of methanol. PMID:23244587

  8. Evidence of nanocrystalline semiconducting graphene monoxide during thermal reduction of graphene oxide in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Eric C; Pu, Haihui; Cui, Shumao; Schofield, Marvin A; Rhim, Sonny; Lu, Ganhua; Nasse, Michael J; Ruoff, Rodney S; Weinert, Michael; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen, Junhong; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2011-12-27

    As silicon-based electronics are reaching the nanosize limits of the semiconductor roadmap, carbon-based nanoelectronics has become a rapidly growing field, with great interest in tuning the properties of carbon-based materials. Chemical functionalization is a proposed route, but syntheses of graphene oxide (G-O) produce disordered, nonstoichiometric materials with poor electronic properties. We report synthesis of an ordered, stoichiometric, solid-state carbon oxide that has never been observed in nature and coexists with graphene. Formation of this material, graphene monoxide (GMO), is achieved by annealing multilayered G-O. Our results indicate that the resulting thermally reduced G-O (TRG-O) consists of a two-dimensional nanocrystalline phase segregation: unoxidized graphitic regions are separated from highly oxidized regions of GMO. GMO has a quasi-hexagonal unit cell, an unusually high 1:1 O:C ratio, and a calculated direct band gap of ∼0.9 eV. PMID:22098501

  9. Thermally-driven structural changes of graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazauskas, A.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Grigaliūnas, V.; Guobienė, A.; Prosyčevas, I.; Narmontas, P.; Abakevičienė, B.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2014-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been recognized as an important intermediate compound for a potential low-cost large-scale graphene-like film fabrication. In this work, graphene oxide multilayer films deposited on glass substrate were reduced using different thermal reduction methods, including low-temperature annealing, flame-induced and laser reduction, and the corresponding surface morphology and structural properties were investigated. These graphene oxide thermal reduction methods strongly affected surface morphology and differently facilitated structural and chemical transformations of graphene oxide. As evidenced by Raman measurements, thermal annealing and laser reduction of graphene oxide produced more ordered graphene-like structure multilayer films. However, surface morphological differences were observed and attributed to the different de-oxidation mechanisms of GO. This Letter provides an important systematic comparison between the GO reduction methods and thermally-driven structural changes they provide to the reduced GO multilayer films obtained.

  10. The Rotary Zone Thermal Cycler: A Low-Power System Enabling Automated Rapid PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Michael S.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Van de Vreugde, James L.; Kim, Hanyoup; Knight, Daniel L.; Sinha, Anupama; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology, microfluidics, and laboratory automation continue to expand the accessibility and applicability of these methods beyond the confines of conventional, centralized laboratory facilities and into point of use roles in clinical, military, forensic, and field-deployed applications. As a result, there is a growing need to adapt the unit operations of molecular biology (e.g., aliquoting, centrifuging, mixing, and thermal cycling) to compact, portable, low-power, and automation-ready formats. Here we present one such adaptation, the rotary zone thermal cycler (RZTC), a novel wheel-based device capable of cycling up to four different fixed-temperature blocks into contact with a stationary 4-microliter capillary-bound sample to realize 1-3 second transitions with steady state heater power of less than 10 W. We demonstrate the utility of the RZTC for DNA amplification as part of a highly integrated rotary zone PCR (rzPCR) system that uses low-volume valves and syringe-based fluid handling to automate sample loading and unloading, thermal cycling, and between-run cleaning functionalities in a compact, modular form factor. In addition to characterizing the performance of the RZTC and the efficacy of different online cleaning protocols, we present preliminary results for rapid single-plex PCR, multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) amplification, and second strand cDNA synthesis. PMID:25826708

  11. The rotary zone thermal cycler: A low-power system enabling automated rapid PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Michael S.; Edwards, Harrison S.; Lee, Daniel; Moseley, Caroline E.; Tew, Karen E.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Van de Vreugde, James L.; Kim, Hanyoup; Knight, Daniel L.; Sinha, Anupama; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-03-31

    In this study, advances in molecular biology, microfluidics, and laboratory automation continue to expand the accessibility and applicability of these methods beyond the confines of conventional, centralized laboratory facilities and into point of use roles in clinical, military, forensic, portable, and field-deployed applications. As a result, there is a growing need to adapt the unit operations of molecular biology such as aliquoting, centrifuging, mixing, and thermal cycling to compact, portable, low-power, and automation-ready formats. Here we present one such adaptation, the rotary zone thermal cycler (RZTC), a novel wheel-based device capable of cycling up to four different fixed-temperature blocks into contact with a stationary 4-microliter capillary-bound sample to realize 1-3 second transitions with steady state heater power of less than 10 W. We further demonstrate the utility of the RZTC for DNA amplification as part of a highly integrated rotary zone PCR (rzPCR) system using low-volume valves and syringe-based fluid handling to automate sample loading and unloading, thermal cycling, and between run cleaning functionalities in a compact, modular form factor. In addition to characterizing the performance of the RZTC and the efficacy of different online cleaning protocols, preliminary results are presented for rapid single-plex PCR, multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) amplification, and second strand cDNA synthesis.

  12. The rotary zone thermal cycler: A low-power system enabling automated rapid PCR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bartsch, Michael S.; Edwards, Harrison S.; Gas Transmission Systems, Walnut Creek, CA; Lee, Daniel; California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA; Moseley, Caroline E.; Tew, Karen E.; Utah State Univ., Logan, UT; Renzi, Ronald F.; Van de Vreugde, James L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    In this study, advances in molecular biology, microfluidics, and laboratory automation continue to expand the accessibility and applicability of these methods beyond the confines of conventional, centralized laboratory facilities and into point of use roles in clinical, military, forensic, portable, and field-deployed applications. As a result, there is a growing need to adapt the unit operations of molecular biology such as aliquoting, centrifuging, mixing, and thermal cycling to compact, portable, low-power, and automation-ready formats. Here we present one such adaptation, the rotary zone thermal cycler (RZTC), a novel wheel-based device capable of cycling up to four different fixed-temperature blocks intomore » contact with a stationary 4-microliter capillary-bound sample to realize 1-3 second transitions with steady state heater power of less than 10 W. We further demonstrate the utility of the RZTC for DNA amplification as part of a highly integrated rotary zone PCR (rzPCR) system using low-volume valves and syringe-based fluid handling to automate sample loading and unloading, thermal cycling, and between run cleaning functionalities in a compact, modular form factor. In addition to characterizing the performance of the RZTC and the efficacy of different online cleaning protocols, preliminary results are presented for rapid single-plex PCR, multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) amplification, and second strand cDNA synthesis.« less

  13. Size-dependent thermal oxidation of copper: single-step synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Christopher J.; Smith, J. David; Cui, Yuehua; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal oxidation of copper is a simple and scalable method to produce copper oxide nanowires. We report for the first time the formation of nanowires on copper powder during thermal oxidation and the resulting nanowire coverage that is dependent on the initial particle size. Systematic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of thermal oxidation of particles of different sizes provide insights into the size-dependent process and evolution of the various phases of copper and copper oxide with time. Furthermore, we find that a large void is formed within these particles after oxidation and propose a mechanism based on the Kirkendall effect. The unique tunability of hierarchical features and hollow interior can be used to create new scalable structures for applications in a variety of areas including thermal management and catalysis.Thermal oxidation of copper is a simple and scalable method to produce copper oxide nanowires. We report for the first time the formation of nanowires on copper powder during thermal oxidation and the resulting nanowire coverage that is dependent on the initial particle size. Systematic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of thermal oxidation of particles of different sizes provide insights into the size-dependent process and evolution of the various phases of copper and copper oxide with time. Furthermore, we find that a large void is formed within these particles after oxidation and propose a mechanism based on the Kirkendall effect. The unique tunability of hierarchical features and hollow interior can be used to create new scalable structures for applications in a variety of areas including thermal management and catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images, XRD spectra, and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10993f

  14. Influence of rapid thermal cycles in multipass welding on heat-affected-zone properties in ferritic cryogenic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Shin, H.K.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    The results of both welding and weld simulation studies on 2BT-treated 9Ni steel show that multiple rapid thermal cycles have a very beneficial effect on heat-affected zone toughness at cryogenic temperatures. The metallurgical sources of toughness are, however, different from those in the furnace-treated base plate. The rapidly cycled material contains no detectable austenite phase. The alloy is grain-refined by the rapid thermal cycle, and the matrix carbon content is relieved by the formation of interlathcementite precipitates which do not destroy toughness.

  15. Dominance of Ferritrophicum populations at an AMD site with rapid iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grettenberger, C.; Pearce, A.; Bibby, K. J.; Burgos, W.; Jones, D. S.; Macalady, J.

    2015-12-01

    Acid mine drainage is a major environmental problem affecting watersheds across the globe. Bioremediation of AMD relies on microbial communities to oxidize and thus remove iron from the system. Iron-oxidation rates in AMD environments are highly variable across sites. At Scalp Level Run in Summerset County PA, iron-oxidation rates are five to eight times faster than other coal-associated AMD sites. We examined the microbial community at Scalp Level Run to determine whether a unique microbial community may be responsible for the observed rapid iron-oxidation rates. Using MiSeq sequence tags, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that Scalp Level Run sediments host microbial populations closely related to the betaproteobacterium Ferritrophicum radicicola, an iron-oxidizing species isolated from an acid mine drainage wetland in Virginia. Ferritrophicum spp. was not found at the four other coal-associated AMD sites in the study and is uncommon in the published literature. The influence of Ferritrophicum spp. populations in biogeochemical cycling, specifically their role in determining the iron-oxidation rate at Scalp Level Run is unknown. Therefore, we employed metagenomic sequencing to examine the metabolic potential of the microbial community at Scalp Level Run.

  16. Oxidative reduction of glove box wipers with a downdraft thermal oxidation system

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.R.; Wilcox, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    Wipers (rags) used for decontamination and glove box cleanup in the Plutonium Finishing Plant often become soaked with acid and plutonium-rich solutions. After use, these wipers are rinsed in a dilute NaOH solution and dried, but the formation of unstable nitrates and the hydrogen gas caused by hydrolysis are concerns that still must be addressed. This report gives the results of testing with a small downdraft thermal oxidation system that was constructed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to stabilize glove wiper waste, reduce the waste volume, and reclaim plutonium. Proof-of-principle testing was conducted with eight runs using various combinations of rag moisture and chemical pretreatment. All runs went to planned completion. Results of these tests indicate that the thermal oxidation system has the potential for providing significant reductions in waste volume. Weight reductions of 150:1 were easily obtainable during this project. Modifications could result in weight reductions of over 200:1, with possible volume reductions of 500:1.

  17. Thermally Stable Super Ionic Conductor from Carbon Sphere Oxide.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Saidul; Karim, Mohammad Razaul; Hatakeyama, Kazuto; Takehira, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaaki; Koinuma, Michio; Hayami, Shinya

    2016-08-19

    A highly stable proton conductor has been developed from carbon sphere oxide (CSO). Carbon sphere (CS) generated from sucrose was oxidized successfully to CSO using Hummers' graphite oxidation technique. At room temperature and 90 % relative humidity, the proton conductivity of thin layer CSO on microsized comb electrode was found to be 8.7×10(-3)  S cm(-1) , which is higher than that for a similar graphene oxide (GO) sample (3.4×10(-3)  S cm(-1) ). The activation energy (Ea ) of 0.258 eV suggests that the proton is conducted through the Grotthuss mechanism. The carboxyl functional groups on the CSO surface are primarily responsible for transporting protons. In contrast to conventional carbon-based proton conductors, in which the functional groups decompose around 80 °C, CSO has a stable morphology and functional groups with reproducible proton conductivity up to 400 °C. Even once annealed at different temperatures at high relative humidity, the proton conductivity of CSO remains almost unchanged, whereas significant change is seen with a similar GO sample. After annealing at 100 and 200 °C, the respective proton conductivity of CSO was almost the same, and was about ∼50 % of the proton conductivity at room temperature. Carbon-based solid electrolyte with such high thermal stability and reproducible proton conductivity is desired for practical applications. We expect that a CSO-based proton conductor would be applicable for fuel cells and sensing devices operating under high temperatures. PMID:27411089

  18. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.

    2014-09-29

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  19. A Rapid and Low-Cost PCR Thermal Cycler for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Wong, Pui-Yan; Yu, Peter; Hardick, Justin; Wong, Kah-Yat; Wilson, Scott A.; Wu, Tiffany; Hui, Zoe; Gaydos, Charlotte; Wong, Season S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases broadly available in a portable, low-cost format would mark a great step forward in global health. Many molecular diagnostic assays are developed based on using thermal cyclers to carry out polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription PCR for DNA and RNA amplification and detection, respectively. Unfortunately, most commercial thermal cyclers are expensive and need continuous electrical power supply, so they are not suitable for uses in low-resource settings. We have previously reported a low-cost and simple approach to amplify DNA using vacuum insulated stainless steel thermoses food cans, which we have named it thermos thermal cycler or TTC. Here, we describe the use of an improved set up to enable the detection of viral RNA targets by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), thus expanding the TTC’s ability to identify highly infectious, RNA virus-based diseases in low resource settings. The TTC was successful in demonstrating high-speed and sensitive detection of DNA or RNA targets of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and dengue fever. Our innovative TTC costs less than $200 to build and has a capacity of at least eight tubes. In terms of speed, the TTC’s performance exceeded that of commercial thermal cyclers tested. When coupled with low-cost endpoint detection technologies such as nucleic acid lateral-flow assay or a cell-phone-based fluorescence detector, the TTC will increase the availability of on-site molecular diagnostics in low-resource settings. PMID:26872358

  20. A Rapid and Low-Cost PCR Thermal Cycler for Infectious Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Wong, Pui-Yan; Yu, Peter; Hardick, Justin; Wong, Kah-Yat; Wilson, Scott A; Wu, Tiffany; Hui, Zoe; Gaydos, Charlotte; Wong, Season S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases broadly available in a portable, low-cost format would mark a great step forward in global health. Many molecular diagnostic assays are developed based on using thermal cyclers to carry out polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription PCR for DNA and RNA amplification and detection, respectively. Unfortunately, most commercial thermal cyclers are expensive and need continuous electrical power supply, so they are not suitable for uses in low-resource settings. We have previously reported a low-cost and simple approach to amplify DNA using vacuum insulated stainless steel thermoses food cans, which we have named it thermos thermal cycler or TTC. Here, we describe the use of an improved set up to enable the detection of viral RNA targets by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), thus expanding the TTC's ability to identify highly infectious, RNA virus-based diseases in low resource settings. The TTC was successful in demonstrating high-speed and sensitive detection of DNA or RNA targets of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and dengue fever. Our innovative TTC costs less than $200 to build and has a capacity of at least eight tubes. In terms of speed, the TTC's performance exceeded that of commercial thermal cyclers tested. When coupled with low-cost endpoint detection technologies such as nucleic acid lateral-flow assay or a cell-phone-based fluorescence detector, the TTC will increase the availability of on-site molecular diagnostics in low-resource settings. PMID:26872358

  1. Effect of nano-sized oxide particles on thermal and electrical properties of epoxy silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Choi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Polymer matrix composites were fabricated using a modified injection molding technique in which nano-sized silicon oxides, titanium oxides, and aluminium oxides were contained. Nano-sized oxides were uniformly distributed in the composites produced by modified injection molding combining vacuum degassing and curing at a moderate temperature. The thermal decomposition and evaporation of the epoxy resin matrix depended on the composition of the composites. The relative permittivity of the nano-sized silicon carbide-epoxy composites increased from 5.16 to 5.37 by adding 2.0 wt % titanium oxide. The addition of titanium oxide of up to 2.0 wt % had little influence on the permittivity. The addition of 2.0 wt % of titanium oxide to epoxy resin showed the maximum thermal properties. Both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the silicon oxide-epoxy composites tended to increase with titanium oxide content. The maximum thermal conductivity was observed in the composites with 2.0 wt % titanium oxide.

  2. Study of the doping of thermally evaporated zinc oxide thin films with indium and indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palimar, Sowmya; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports observations made on investigations carried out to study structural, optical and electrical properties of thermally evaporated ZnO thin films and their modulations on doping with metallic indium and indium oxide separately. ZnO thin film in the undoped state is found to have a very good conductivity of 90 Ω-1 cm-1 with an excellent transmittance of up to 90 % in the visible region. After doping with metallic indium, the conductivity of the film is found to be 580 Ω-1 cm-1, whereas the conductivity of indium oxide-doped films is increased up to 3.5 × 103 Ω-1 cm-1. Further, the optical band gap of the ZnO thin film is widened from 3.26 to 3.3 eV when doped with indium oxide and with metallic indium it decreases to 3.2 eV. There is no considerable change in the transmittance of the films after doping. All undoped and doped films were amorphous in nature with smooth and flat surface without significant modifications due to doping.

  3. Development of the Army thermal oxidation lube oil tester

    SciTech Connect

    Valtierra, M.; Lestz, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a bench-scale test capable of evaluating ground vehicle engine and gear lubricant performance in the area of oil deposition. The test should be capable of providing initial screening for candidate military specification lubricants, oil base stocks, and re-refined oils and should correlate with full-scale engine tests. The following conclusions may be drawn from this work: (1) the Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory-developed LUBTOT, thermal oxidation lube oil tester appears to be an effective test device for evaluating lubricants regarding oil deposits that are formed under a set of controlled test conditions. The tester has several distinct advantages, namely: ease of controlling test variables, small oil sample required, ease of cleaning between tests, simple unbias deposit rating method, and low cost per test; (2) the test method developed thus far does correlate with some of the Caterpillar single-cylinder reference tests. However, the method does not correlate with the 1-D, 1-H, and 1-H2 test results performed on selected REO oils; (3) the LUBTOT appears to be capable of differentiating between different re-refined base stock, which can be important in identifying base stock consistency; and (4) the LUBTOT can determine the effectiveness of the additive package in formulated oils regarding oil deposits caused by high-temperature operation.

  4. Thin copper oxide films prepared by ion beam sputtering with subsequent thermal oxidation: Application in chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, P.; Bejsovec, V.; Vacik, J.; Lavrentiev, V.; Vrnata, M.; Kormunda, M.; Danis, S.

    2016-12-01

    Copper oxide films were prepared by thermal oxidation of thin Cu films deposited on substrates by ion beam sputtering. The subsequent oxidation was achieved in the temperature range of 200 °C-600 °C with time of treatment from 1 to 7 h (with a 1-h step) in a furnace open to air. At temperatures 250 °C-600 °C, the dominant phase formed was CuO, while at 200 °C mainly the Cu2O phase was identified. However, the oxidation at 200 °C led to a more complicated composition - in the depth Cu2O phase was observed, though in the near-surface layer the CuO dominant phase was found with a significant presence of Cu(OH)2. A limited amount of Cu2O was also found in samples annealed at 600 °C. The sheet resistance RS of the as-deposited Cu sample was 2.22 Ω/□, after gradual annealing RS was measured in the range 2.64 MΩ/□-2.45 GΩ/□. The highest RS values were obtained after annealing at 300 °C and 350 °C, respectively. Oxygen depth distribution was studied using the 16O(α,α) nuclear reaction with the resonance at energy 3032 keV. It was confirmed that the higher oxidation degree of copper is located in the near-surface region. Preliminary tests of the copper oxide films as an active layer of a chemiresistor were also performed. Hydrogen and methanol vapours, with a concentration of 1000 ppm, were detected by the sensor at an operating temperature of 300 °C and 350 °C, respectively. The response of the sensors, pointed at the p-type conductivity, was improved by the addition of thin Pd or Au catalytic films to the oxidic film surface. Pd-covered films showed an increased response to hydrogen at 300 °C, while Au-covered films were more sensitive to methanol vapours at 350 °C.

  5. Thermal Mechanical Stability of Single-Crystal-Oxide Refractive Concentrators Evaluated for High-Temperature Solar-Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, refractive secondary solar concentrator systems were developed for solar thermal power and propulsion (ref. 1). Single-crystal oxides-such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO), and sapphire (Al2O3)-are candidate refractive secondary concentrator materials. However, the refractive concentrator system will experience high-temperature thermal cycling in the solar thermal engine during the sun/shade transition of a space mission. The thermal mechanical reliability of these components in severe thermal environments is of great concern. Simulated mission tests are important for evaluating these candidate oxide materials under a variety of transient and steady-state heat flux conditions. In this research at the NASA Lewis Research Center, a controlled heat flux test approach was developed for investigating the thermal mechanical stability of the candidate oxide. This approach used a 3.0-kW continuous-wave (wavelength, 10.6 mm) carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (ref. 2). The CO2 laser is especially well-suited for single-crystal thermal shock tests because it can directly deliver well-characterized heat energy to the oxide surfaces. Since the oxides are opaque at the 10.6-mm wavelength of the laser beam, the light energy is absorbed at the surfaces rather than transmitting into the crystals, and thus generates the required temperature gradients within the specimens. The following figure is a schematic diagram of the test rig.

  6. Microstructural modeling of thermal conductivity of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael; Novascone, Stephen; Hayes, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON [1] fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez-Lucuta model was favorable.

  7. Microstructural Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Stephen Novascone; Steven Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez–Lucuta model was favorable.

  8. Thermal-Mechanical Stability of Single Crystal Oxide Refractive Concentrators for High-Temperature Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystal oxides such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO) and sapphire (Al2O3) are candidate refractive secondary concentrator materials for high temperature solar propulsion applications. However, thermo-mechanical reliability of these components in severe thermal environments during the space mission sun/shade transition is of great concern. Simulated mission tests are important for evaluating these candidate oxide materials under a variety of transient and steady-state heat flux conditions, and thus provide vital information for the component design. In this paper, a controlled heat flux thermal shock test approach is established for the single crystal oxide materials using a 3.0 kW continuous wave CO2 laser, with a wavelength 10.6 micron. Thermal fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of these oxide materials are investigated and critical temperature gradients are determined under various temperature and heating conditions. The test results show that single crystal sapphire is able to sustain the highest temperature gradient and heating-cooling rate, and thus exhibit the best thermal shock resistance, as compared to the yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium aluminum garnet and magnesium oxide.

  9. Thermal-Mechanical Stability of Single Crystal Oxide Refractive Concentrators for High-Temperature Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Single crystal oxides such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y2O3-ZrO2), yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12, or YAG), magnesium oxide (MgO) and sapphire (Al2O3) are candidate refractive secondary concentrator materials for high temperature solar propulsion applications. However, thermo-mechanical reliability of these components in severe thermal environments during the space mission sun/shade transition is of great concern. Simulated mission tests are important for evaluating these candidate oxide materials under a variety of transient and steady-state heat flux conditions, and thus provide vital information for the component design. In this paper, a controlled heat flux thermal shock test approach is established for the single crystal oxide materials using a 3.0 kW continuous wave CO2 laser, with a wavelength 10.6 micron. Thermal fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of these oxide materials are investigated and critical temperature gradients are determined under various temperature and heating conditions. The test results show that single crystal sapphire is able to sustain the highest temperature gradient and heating-cooling rate, and thus exhibit the best thermal shock resistance, as compared to the yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium aluminum garnet, and magnesium oxide.

  10. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhenyu; Huang, Shujuan; Green, Martin A; Conibeer, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC) matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%). Si nanocrystals (Si-NC) containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results. PMID:21711625