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Sample records for rapid-response splicing reporter

  1. Rapid generation of splicing reporters with pSpliceExpress

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Khanna, Amit; Stamm, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all human protein-coding transcripts undergo pre-mRNA splicing and a majority of them is alternatively spliced. The most common technique used to analyze the regulation of an alternative exon is through reporter minigene constructs. However, their construction is time-consuming and is often complicated by the limited availability of appropriate restriction sites. Here, we report a fast and simple recombination-based method to generate splicing reporter genes, using a new vector, pSpliceExpress. The system allows generation of minigenes within one week. Minigenes generated with pSpliceExpress show the same regulation as displayed by conventionally cloned reporter constructs and provide an alternate avenue to study splice site selection in vivo. PMID:18930792

  2. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence. PMID:24749484

  3. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.D.; Waddell, W.L.

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  4. Lupus erythematosus and lichen planus overlap syndrome:a case report with a rapid response to topical corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Altunay, Ilknur Kıvanç; Sarıkaya, Sezgi; Sakiz, Damlanur

    2011-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) and lichen planus (LP) may occur as an overlap syndrome. We report the clinical characteristics of a young man with lesions diagnosed as LE and LP by histopathological and direct immunoflurosence examinations. We achieved remarkable clinical response from the treatment with topical corticosteroids and no recurrence was seen in a 6 months of follow up time. We found this case interesting because of the rapid improvement with corticosteroid and discussed if there is a real overlap or a coexistence according to the literature. PMID:25386300

  5. Early detection and rapid response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  6. Splicing fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Koodathingal, Prakash; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome discriminates against suboptimal substrates, both during assembly and catalysis, thereby enhancing specificity during pre-mRNA splicing. Central to such fidelity mechanisms are a conserved subset of the DEAD- and DEAH-box ATPases, which belong to a superfamily of proteins that mediate RNP rearrangements in almost all RNA-dependent processes in the cell. Through an investigation of the mechanisms contributing to the specificity of 5′ splice site cleavage, two related reports, one from our lab and the other from the Cheng lab, have provided insights into fidelity mechanisms utilized by the spliceosome. In our work, we found evidence for a kinetic proofreading mechanism in splicing in which the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 discriminates against substrates undergoing slow 5′ splice site cleavage. Additionally, our study revealed that discriminated substrates are discarded through a general spliceosome disassembly pathway, mediated by another DEAH-box ATPase Prp43. In their work, Tseng et al. described the underlying molecular events through which Prp16 discriminates against a splicing substrate during 5′ splice site cleavage. Here, we present a synthesis of these two studies and, additionally, provide the first biochemical evidence for discrimination of a suboptimal splicing substrate just prior to 5′ splice site cleavage. Together, these findings support a general mechanism for a ubiquitous superfamily of ATPases in enhancing specificity during RNA-dependent processes in the cell. PMID:23770752

  7. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Germann, Sophie; Gratadou, Lise; Dutertre, Martin; Auboeuf, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing indicate that splicing alterations can affect the products of gene networks involved in key cellular programs. In addition, many splicing variants identified as being misregulated in cancer are expressed in normal tissues. These observations suggest that splicing programs contribute to specific cellular programs that are altered during cancer initiation and progression. Supporting this model, recent studies have identified splicing factors controlling cancer-associated splicing programs. The characterization of splicing programs and their regulation by splicing factors will allow a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved in cancer initiation and progression and the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:22132318

  8. Integration of palliative care in the context of rapid response: a report from the Improving Palliative Care in the ICU advisory board.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Judith E; Mathews, Kusum S; Weissman, David E; Brasel, Karen J; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J Randall; Frontera, Jennifer A; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M; Mosenthal, Anne C; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Ray, Daniel E; Weiss, Stefanie P; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D; Lustbader, Dana R

    2015-02-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) can effectively foster discussions about appropriate goals of care and address other emergent palliative care needs of patients and families facing life-threatening illness on hospital wards. In this article, The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU (IPAL-ICU) Project brings together interdisciplinary expertise and existing data to address the following: special challenges for providing palliative care in the rapid response setting, knowledge and skills needed by RRTs for delivery of high-quality palliative care, and strategies for improving the integration of palliative care with rapid response critical care. We discuss key components of communication with patients, families, and primary clinicians to develop a goal-directed treatment approach during a rapid response event. We also highlight the need for RRT expertise to initiate symptom relief. Strategies including specific clinician training and system initiatives are then recommended for RRT care improvement. We conclude by suggesting that as evaluation of their impact on other outcomes continues, performance by RRTs in meeting palliative care needs of patients and families should also be measured and improved. PMID:25644909

  9. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco; Hansen, Thomas V O; Pedersen, Inge S; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Menéndez, Mireia; Fachal, Laura; Santamariña, Marta; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars; Agata, Simona; Whiley, Phillip; Tognazzo, Silvia; Tornero, Eva; Jensen, Uffe B; Balmaña, Judith; Kruse, Torben A; Goldgar, David E; Lázaro, Conxi; Diez, Orland; Spurdle, Amanda B; Vega, Ana

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. A common problem in clinical genetic testing is interpretation of variants with unknown clinical significance. The Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortium was initiated to evaluate and implement strategies to characterize the clinical significance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants. As an initial project of the ENIGMA Splicing Working Group, we report splicing and multifactorial likelihood analysis of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants from seven different laboratories. Splicing analysis was performed by reverse transcriptase PCR or mini gene assay, and sequencing to identify aberrant transcripts. The findings were compared to bioinformatic predictions using four programs. The posterior probability of pathogenicity was estimated using multifactorial likelihood analysis, including co-occurrence with a deleterious mutation, segregation and/or report of family history. Abnormal splicing patterns expected to lead to a non-functional protein were observed for 7 variants (BRCA1 c.441+2T>A, c.4184_4185+2del, c.4357+1G>A, c.4987-2A>G, c.5074G>C, BRCA2 c.316+5G>A, and c.8754+3G>C). Combined interpretation of splicing and multifactorial analysis classified an initiation codon variant (BRCA2 c.3G>A) as likely pathogenic, uncertain clinical significance for 7 variants, and indicated low clinical significance or unlikely pathogenicity for another 10 variants. Bioinformatic tools predicted disruption of consensus donor or acceptor sites with high sensitivity, but cryptic site usage was predicted with low specificity, supporting the value of RNA-based assays. The findings also provide further evidence that clinical RNA-based assays should be extended from analysis of invariant dinucleotides to routinely include all variants located within the donor and acceptor consensus splicing sites. Importantly, this study demonstrates the added value of

  10. Acute incident rapid response at a mass-gathering event through comprehensive planning systems: a case report from the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle.

    PubMed

    Başdere, Mehmet; Ross, Colleen; Chan, Jennifer L; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Smilowitz, Karen; Chiampas, George

    2014-06-01

    Planning and execution of mass-gathering events involves various challenges. In this case report, the Chicago Model (CM), which was designed to organize and operate such events and to maintain the health and wellbeing of both runners and the public in a more effective way, is described. The Chicago Model also was designed to prepare for unexpected incidents, including disasters, during the marathon event. The model has been used successfully in the planning and execution stages of the Bank of America Shamrock Shuffle and the Bank of America Chicago Marathon since 2008. The key components of the CM are organizational structure, information systems, and communication. This case report describes how the organizers at the 2013 Shamrock Shuffle used the key components of the CM approach in order to respond to an acute incident caused by a man who was threatening to jump off the State Street Bridge. The course route was changed to accommodate this unexpected event, while maintaining access to key health care facilities. The lessons learned from the incident are presented and further improvements to the existing model are proposed. PMID:24820906

  11. Alternative Splicing in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Megan; Oltean, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) has emerged in the postgenomic era as one of the main drivers of proteome diversity, with ≥94% of multiexon genes alternatively spliced in humans. AS is therefore one of the main control mechanisms for cell phenotype, and is a process deregulated in disease. Numerous reports describe pathogenic mutations in splice factors, splice sites, or regulatory sequences. Additionally, compared with the physiologic state, disease often associates with an abnormal proportion of splice isoforms (or novel isoforms), without an apparent driver mutation. It is therefore essential to study how AS is regulated in physiology, how it contributes to pathogenesis, and whether we can manipulate faulty splicing for therapeutic advantage. Although the disease most commonly linked to deregulation of AS in several genes is cancer, many reports detail pathogenic splice variants in diseases ranging from neuromuscular disorders to diabetes or cardiomyopathies. A plethora of splice variants have been implicated in CKDs as well. In this review, we describe examples of these CKD-associated splice variants and ideas on how to manipulate them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26763787

  12. Spliced leader trans-splicing in the nematode Trichinella spiralis uses highly polymorphic, noncanonical spliced leaders.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette

    2008-04-01

    The trans-splicing of short spliced leader (SL) RNAs onto the 5' ends of mRNAs occurs in a diverse range of taxa. In nematodes, all species so far characterized utilize a characteristic, conserved spliced leader, SL1, as well as variants that are employed in the resolution of operons. Here we report the identification of spliced leader trans-splicing in the basal nematode Trichinella spiralis, and show that this nematode does not possess a canonical SL1, but rather has at least 15 distinct spliced leaders, encoded by at least 19 SL RNA genes. The individual spliced leaders vary in both size and primary sequence, showing a much higher degree of diversity compared to other known trans-spliced leaders. In a survey of T. spiralis mRNAs, individual mRNAs were found to be trans-spliced to a number of different spliced leader sequences. These data provide the first indication that the last common ancestor of the phylum Nematoda utilized spliced leader trans-splicing and that the canonical spliced leader, SL1, found in Caenorhabditis elegans, evolved after the divergence of the major nematode clades. This discovery sheds important light on the nature and evolution of mRNA processing in the Nematoda. PMID:18256244

  13. Precise autofocusing microscope with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The rapid on-line or off-line automated vision inspection is a critical operation in the manufacturing fields. Accordingly, this present study designs and characterizes a novel precise optics-based autofocusing microscope with a rapid response and no reduction in the focusing accuracy. In contrast to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes with centroid method, the proposed microscope comprises a high-speed rotating optical diffuser in which the variation of the image centroid position is reduced and consequently the focusing response is improved. The proposed microscope is characterized and verified experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. The experimental results show that compared to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes, the proposed microscope achieves a more rapid response with no reduction in the focusing accuracy. Consequently, the proposed microscope represents another solution for both existing and emerging industrial applications of automated vision inspection.

  14. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L.; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-01-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  15. Identification of Coilin Mutants in a Screen for Enhanced Expression of an Alternatively Spliced GFP Reporter Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Tatsuo; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Jason L; Wu, Ming-Tsung; Yang, Ho-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2016-08-01

    Coilin is a marker protein for subnuclear organelles known as Cajal bodies, which are sites of various RNA metabolic processes including the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Through self-associations and interactions with other proteins and RNA, coilin provides a structural scaffold for Cajal body formation. However, despite a conspicuous presence in Cajal bodies, most coilin is dispersed in the nucleoplasm and expressed in cell types that lack these organelles. The molecular function of coilin, particularly of the substantial nucleoplasmic fraction, remains uncertain. We identified coilin loss-of-function mutations in a genetic screen for mutants showing either reduced or enhanced expression of an alternatively spliced GFP reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana The coilin mutants feature enhanced GFP fluorescence and diminished Cajal bodies compared with wild-type plants. The amount of GFP protein is several-fold higher in the coilin mutants owing to elevated GFP transcript levels and more efficient splicing to produce a translatable GFP mRNA. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing data from two distinct coilin mutants revealed a small, shared subset of differentially expressed genes, many encoding stress-related proteins, and, unexpectedly, a trend toward increased splicing efficiency. These results suggest that coilin attenuates splicing and modulates transcription of a select group of genes. The transcriptional and splicing changes observed in coilin mutants are not accompanied by gross phenotypic abnormalities or dramatically altered stress responses, supporting a role for coilin in fine tuning gene expression. Our GFP reporter gene provides a sensitive monitor of coilin activity that will facilitate further investigations into the functions of this enigmatic protein. PMID:27317682

  16. Evaluation of a 5-tier scheme proposed for classification of sequence variants using bioinformatic and splicing assay data: inter-reviewer variability and promotion of minimum reporting guidelines.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Whiley, Phillip J; Houdayer, Claude; Hansen, Thomas V O; Vega, Ana; Santamarina, Marta; Blanco, Ana; Fachal, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Lafferty, Alan; Colombo, Mara; De Vecchi, Giovanna; Radice, Paolo; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2013-10-01

    Splicing assays are commonly undertaken in the clinical setting to assess the clinical relevance of sequence variants in disease predisposition genes. A 5-tier classification system incorporating both bioinformatic and splicing assay information was previously proposed as a method to provide consistent clinical classification of such variants. Members of the ENIGMA Consortium Splicing Working Group undertook a study to assess the applicability of the scheme to published assay results, and the consistency of classifications across multiple reviewers. Splicing assay data were identified for 235 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 unique variants, from 77 publications. At least six independent reviewers from research and/or clinical settings comprehensively examined splicing assay methods and data reported for 22 variant assays of 21 variants in four publications, and classified the variants using the 5-tier classification scheme. Inconsistencies in variant classification occurred between reviewers for 17 of the variant assays. These could be attributed to a combination of ambiguity in presentation of the classification criteria, differences in interpretation of the data provided, nonstandardized reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data for the aberrant transcripts. We propose suggestions for minimum reporting guidelines for splicing assays, and improvements to the 5-tier splicing classification system to allow future evaluation of its performance as a clinical tool. PMID:23893897

  17. Rapid response team for behavioral emergencies.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Jeannine; Rutledge, Dana N; Hatch, Beverly; Morrison, Victoria

    2010-03-01

    Behaviors of patients with psychiatric illness who are hospitalized on nonbehavioral health units can be difficult to address by staff members. Instituting a rapid response team to proactively de-escalate potential volatile situations on nonpsychiatric units in a hospital allows earlier treatment of behavioral issues with these patients. The behavioral emergency response team (BERT) consists of staff members (registered nurses, social workers) from behavioral health services who have experience in caring for patients with acute psychiatric disorders as well as competence in management of assaultive behavior. BERT services were trialed on a medical pulmonary unit; gradual housewide implementation occurred over 2 years. Tools developed for BERT include an activation algorithm, educational cue cards for staff, and a staff survey. Results of a performance improvement survey reveal that staff nurses have had positive experiences with BERT but that many nurses are still not comfortable caring for psychiatric patients on their units. PMID:21659266

  18. Rapid Response to Treatment for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Wilson, Terence G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined rapid response among 108 patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 16-week treatments: fluoxetine, placebo, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus fluoxetine, or CBT plus placebo. Rapid response, defined as 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week, was determined…

  19. A 32-nucleotide exon-splicing enhancer regulates usage of competing 5' splice sites in a differential internal exon.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M B; Bryan, J; Cooper, T A; Berget, S M

    1995-01-01

    Large alternatively spliced internal exons are uncommon in vertebrate genes, and the mechanisms governing their usage are unknown. In this report, we examined alternative splicing of a 1-kb internal exon from the human caldesmon gene containing two regulated 5' splice sites that are 687 nucleotides apart. In cell lines normally splicing caldesmon RNA via utilization of the exon-internal 5' splice site, inclusion of the differential exon required a long purine-rich sequence located between the two competing 5' splice sites. This element consisted of four identical 32-nucleotide purine-rich repeats that resemble exon-splicing enhancers (ESE) identified in other genes. One 32-nucleotide repeat supported exon inclusion, repressed usage of the terminal 5' splice site, and functioned in a heterologous exon dependent on exon enhancers for inclusion, indicating that the caldesmon purine-rich sequence can be classified as an ESE. The ESE was required for utilization of the internal 5' splice site only in the presence of the competing 5' splice site and had no effect when placed downstream of the terminal 5' splice site. In the absence of the internal 5' splice site, the ESE activated a normally silent cryptic 5' splice site near the natural internal 5' splice site, indicating that the ESE stimulates upstream 5' splice site selection. We propose that the caldesmon ESE functions to regulate competition between two 5' splice sites within a differential internal exon. PMID:7623794

  20. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  1. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  2. Integration of Palliative Care in the Context of Rapid Response

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Mathews, Kusum S.; Weissman, David E.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J. Randall; Frontera, Jennifer A.; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Weiss, Stefanie P.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Lustbader, Dana R.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) can effectively foster discussions about appropriate goals of care and address other emergent palliative care needs of patients and families facing life-threatening illness on hospital wards. In this article, The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU (IPAL-ICU) Project brings together interdisciplinary expertise and existing data to address the following: special challenges for providing palliative care in the rapid response setting, knowledge and skills needed by RRTs for delivery of high-quality palliative care, and strategies for improving the integration of palliative care with rapid response critical care. We discuss key components of communication with patients, families, and primary clinicians to develop a goal-directed treatment approach during a rapid response event. We also highlight the need for RRT expertise to initiate symptom relief. Strategies including specific clinician training and system initiatives are then recommended for RRT care improvement. We conclude by suggesting that as evaluation of their impact on other outcomes continues, performance by RRTs in meeting palliative care needs of patients and families should also be measured and improved. PMID:25644909

  3. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  4. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  5. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes. PMID:20659016

  6. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  7. Onboard Radar Processing Development for Rapid Response Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Chien, Steve; Clark, Duane; Doubleday, Josh; Muellerschoen, Ron; Wang, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing onboard processor (OBP) technology to streamline data acquisition on-demand and explore the potential of the L-band SAR instrument onboard the proposed DESDynI mission and UAVSAR for rapid response applications. The technology would enable the observation and use of surface change data over rapidly evolving natural hazards, both as an aid to scientific understanding and to provide timely data to agencies responsible for the management and mitigation of natural disasters. We are adapting complex science algorithms for surface water extent to detect flooding, snow/water/ice classification to assist in transportation/ shipping forecasts, and repeat-pass change detection to detect disturbances. We are near completion of the development of a custom FPGA board to meet the specific memory and processing needs of L-band SAR processor algorithms and high speed interfaces to reformat and route raw radar data to/from the FPGA processor board. We have also developed a high fidelity Matlab model of the SAR processor that is modularized and parameterized for ease to prototype various SAR processor algorithms targeted for the FPGA. We will be testing the OBP and rapid response algorithms with UAVSAR data to determine the fidelity of the products.

  8. The Resistance and Strength of Soft Solder Splices between Conductors in MICE Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Pan, Heng; Green, Michael A; Dietderich, Dan; Gartner, T. E.; Higley, Hugh C; Mentink, M.; Xu, FengYu; Trillaud, F.; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Zheng, S. X.; Tam, D.G.

    2010-08-03

    Two of the three types of MICE magnets will have splices within their coils. The MICE coupling coils may have as many as fifteen one-meter long splices within them. Each of the MICE focusing coils may have a couple of 0.25-meter long conductor splices. Equations for the calculation of resistance of soldered lap splices of various types are presented. This paper presents resistance measurements of soldered lap splices of various lengths. Measured splice resistance is shown for one-meter long splices as a function of the fabrication method. Another important consideration is the strength of the splices. The measured breaking stress of splices of various lengths is presented in this paper. Tin-lead solders and tin-silver solders were used for the splices that were tested. From the data given in this report, the authors recommend that the use of lead free solders be avoided for low temperature coils.

  9. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations. PMID:19773425

  10. Guatemala's ministry of health rapid response team manuals.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Luis; Hanson, Kimberly M; Martel, Lise D

    2014-01-01

    The function of public health rapid response teams (RRTs) is to quickly identify, investigate, and control an outbreak before it can spread. The Central America Regional Office in Guatemala provided assistance to the Guatemalan Ministry of Health and Social Assistance (MSPAS) to develop RRT manuals at the district and regional levels. The manuals are divided into 4 sections: background, activity lists, standard operating procedures, and annexes. The manuals outline Guatemala's RRT members' responsibilities and will be tested in the near future through tabletop exercises. The development of the manuals is a concrete and significant step toward the attainment of Guatemala's IHR goals and should be integrated into a larger emergency management system to promote "a world safe and secure from global health threats posed by infectious diseases." PMID:25254918

  11. Applying Bayesian belief networks in rapid response situations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, William L; Deborah, Leishman, A.; Van Eeckhout, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The authors have developed an enhanced Bayesian analysis tool called the Integrated Knowledge Engine (IKE) for monitoring and surveillance. The enhancements are suited for Rapid Response Situations where decisions must be made based on uncertain and incomplete evidence from many diverse and heterogeneous sources. The enhancements extend the probabilistic results of the traditional Bayesian analysis by (1) better quantifying uncertainty arising from model parameter uncertainty and uncertain evidence, (2) optimizing the collection of evidence to reach conclusions more quickly, and (3) allowing the analyst to determine the influence of the remaining evidence that cannot be obtained in the time allowed. These extended features give the analyst and decision maker a better comprehension of the adequacy of the acquired evidence and hence the quality of the hurried decisions. They also describe two example systems where the above features are highlighted.

  12. Rapid response radiation sensors for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory is developing a rapid response radiation detection system for homeland security field applications. The intelligence-driven system is deployed only when non-radiological information about the target is verifiable. The survey area is often limited, so the detection range is small; in most cases covering a distance of 10 meters or less suffices. Definitive response is required in no more than 3 seconds and should minimize false negative alarms, but can err on the side of positive false alarms. The detection system is rapidly reconfigurable in terms of size, shape, and outer appearance; it is a plug-and-play system. Multiple radiation detection components (viz., two or more sodium iodide scintillators) are used to independently "over-determine" the existence of the threat object. Rapid response electronic dose rate meters are also included in the equipment suite. Carefully studied threat signatures are the basis of the decision making. The use of Rad-Detect predictive modeling provides information on the nature of the threat object. Rad-Detect provides accurate dose rate from heavily shielded large sources; for example those lost in Mexico were Category 1 radiation sources (~3,000 Ci of 60Co), the most dangerous of five categories defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Taken out of their shielding containers, Category 1 sources can kill anyone who is exposed to them at close range for a few minutes to an hour. Whenever possible sub-second data acquisition will be attempted, and, when deployed, the system will be characterized for false alarm rates. Although the radiation detection materials selected are fast (viz., faster scintillators), their speed is secondary to sensitivity, which is of primary importance. Results from these efforts will be discussed and demonstrated.

  13. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  14. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  15. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A; Sturm, Nancy R; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3'-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  16. Swift: a Multi-frequency Rapid Response Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift Team

    2006-01-01

    Swift is a rapid-response, multi-wavelength space observatory dedicated to gamma-ray burst astronomy. The mission, an international collaboration between USA, Italy and UK, is scheduled for launch in October 2004. Swift will carry on-board a wide-field coded-mask gamma-ray camera, a X-ray telescope and a UV-Optical telescope, providing wide and narrow field-of-view instruments capability. The gamma ray camera is expected to detect and image ≈100 150 GRBs per year with a few arcminutes position accuracy. Following a GRB detection the Swift spacecraft will autonomously point its narrow-field telescopes towards the sources within 20-70 seconds to determine arcsec and subarcsec positions accuracy together with detailed spectral and timing information. The accurate positions will be quickly transmitted to the ground thus enabling the timely use of the most advanced ground- and space-based telescopes to gather high quality spectra during the early, brightest phases of the afterglow.

  17. Collaborative Intervention of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Rapid Response Team

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    On May 20th 2015, a 68 year old man was the first to be diagnosed with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Corona Virus (MERS-CoV) in Korea. He travelled to Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar for 16 days. On May 4th 2015, the patient entered Korea, with febrile sense and respiratory symptoms that appeared on May 11th. The MERS-CoV Outbreak became worse and several patients had to be admitted throughout various hospitals starting at the beginning of June. This situation led to a nationwide chaos. The Rapid Response Team (RRT) was organized after the Korean government's calling for specialists that were composed of 15 Infectious disease Doctors and 2 Infection Control professionals on the 8th of June 2015. The main purpose of the RRT were: 1) consultation to the Government controlling MERS-CoV outbreak. 2) Visit hospitals that were exposed to MERS-CoV infected patients, and to provide advice regarding infection control strategy for rehabilitating of the exposed hospitals. Since June 8th, the RRT visited more than 10 hospitals and an effective consultation was carried out. Most of the hospitals were recovering from the MERS outbreak since early July. Cooperation between the government and private sector experts was very effective. The efforts of government and private sector experts overcame the initial chaos situation. It could prevent further deterioration of the MERS outbreak. PMID:27433376

  18. Fast and Furious: Rapid Response to Young Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of supernovae within a few days of their explosion provide entirely diagnostics to probe the nature of supernova progenitors. Since 2013, I have used the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) to systematically study extraordinarily young supernovae. In this talk, I will give an overview of iPTF survey design, summarize the design and implementation of the near real-time discovery pipeline and then describe the rapid-response follow-up. The highlights from my thesis are: 1) We observed a strong declining UV emission from a low-velocity Type Ia supernova which is consistent with the expected emission from a supernova slamming into a companion star. Evidently some Type Ia supernovae arise from the so-called "single degenerate" channel. 2) We identified the first progenitor candidate of a Type Ib supernova in the pre-explosion HST images. Our multi-wavelength observations of this young Type Ib supernova constrain its progenitor to be smaller than several solar radii and with strong mass loss, consistent with our current ideas that the progenitor should be a Wolf-Rayet star. I will end my talk with prospects for this field with the upcoming Zwicky Transient Facility.

  19. Sensor Webs: Autonomous Rapid Response to Monitor Transient Science Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Grosvenor, Sandra; Frye, Stu; Sherwood, Robert; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Cichy, Ben; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix

    2005-01-01

    To better understand how physical phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions, evolve over time, multiple sensor observations over the duration of the event are required. Using sensor web approaches that integrate original detections by in-situ sensors and global-coverage, lower-resolution, on-orbit assets with automated rapid response observations from high resolution sensors, more observations of significant events can be made with increased temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. This paper describes experiments using Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) along with other space and ground assets to implement progressive mission autonomy to identify, locate and image with high resolution instruments phenomena such as wildfires, volcanoes, floods and ice breakup. The software that plans, schedules and controls the various satellite assets are used to form ad hoc constellations which enable collaborative autonomous image collections triggered by transient phenomena. This software is both flight and ground based and works in concert to run all of the required assets cohesively and includes software that is model-based, artificial intelligence software.

  20. Electrical-splicing connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Connection can be made without removing insulation, and connector case insulates splice. Device can be made in various sizes and saves time, especially when working on prototype boards with several interconnecting test leads.

  1. Cotranscriptional splicing of a group I intron is facilitated by the Cbp2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.S.; Thomas, J. Jr.; Tirupati, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the coupling between transcription and splicing of a mitochondrial group I intron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effect of the Cbp2 protein on splicing. 65 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Brief Report: Alternative Splicing of Extra Domain A (EIIIA) of Fibronectin Plays a Tissue-Specific Role in Hematopoietic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Malara, Alessandro; Gruppi, Cristian; Celesti, Giuseppe; Romano, Bina; Laghi, Luigi; De Marco, Luigi; Muro, Andrés F; Balduini, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major extracellular matrix protein implicated in cell adhesion and differentiation in the bone marrow (BM) environment. Alternative splicing of FN gene results in the generation of protein variants containing an additional EIIIA domain that sustains cell proliferation or differentiation during physiological or pathological tissue remodeling. To date its expression and role in adult hematopoiesis has not been explored. In our research, we demonstrate that during physiological hematopoiesis a small fraction of BM derived FN contains the EIIIA domain and that mice constitutively including (EIIIA(+/+) ) or excluding (EIIIA(-/-) ) the EIIIA exon present comparable levels of hematopoietic stem cells, myeloid and lymphoid progenitors within BM. Moreover, only minor alterations were detected in blood parameters and in hematopoietic frequencies of BM granulocytes/monocytes and B cells. As opposed to other tissues, unique compensatory mechanisms, such as increased FN accumulation and variable expression of the EIIIA receptors, Toll like receptor-4 and alpha9 integrin subunit, characterized the BM of these mice. Our data demonstrate that FN is a fundamental component of the hematopoietic tissue and that the EIIIA exon may play a key role in modulating hematopiesis in conditions of BM stress or diseases. Stem Cells 2016;34:2263-2268. PMID:27090359

  3. Spectrophotometric Rapid-Response Classification of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Butler, Nat; Axelrod, Tim; Moskovitz, Nick; Jedicke, Robert; Pichardo, Barbara; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    Small NEOs are, as a whole, poorly characterized, and we know nothing about the physical properties of the majority of all NEOs. The rate of NEO discoveries is increasing each year, and projects to determine the physical properties of NEOs are lagging behind. NEOs are faint, and generally even fainter by the time that follow-up characterizations can be made days or weeks after their discovery. There is a need for a high-throughput, high-efficiency physical characterization strategy in which hundreds of faint NEOs can be characterized each year. Broadband photometry in the near-infrared is sufficiently diagnostic to assign taxonomic types, and hence constrain both the individual and ensemble properties of NEOs.We present results from our rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization program of NEOs. We are using UKIRT (on Mauna Kea) and the RATIR instrument on the 1.5m telescope at the San Pedro Martir Observatory (Mexico) to allow us to make observations most nights of the year in robotic/queue mode. We derive taxonomic classifications for our targets using machine-learning techniques that are trained on a large sample of measured asteroid spectra. For each target we assign a probability for it to belong to a number of different taxa. Target selection, observation, data reduction, and analysis are highly automated, requiring only a minimum of user interaction, making this technique powerful and fast. Our targets are NEOs that are generally too faint for other characterization techniques, or would require many hours of large telescope time.

  4. Rapid-Response Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Anastasio, Noelle C.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Fink, Latham H.; Wing, Victoria C.; Mathias, Charles W.; Lane, Scott D.; Schutz, Christian; Swann, Alan C.; Lejuez, C.W.; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F. Gerard; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity in the context of these conditions is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response-impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Experts from the International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) met to discuss and evaluate RRI-measures in terms of reliability, sensitivity, and validity with the goal of helping researchers and clinicians make informed decisions about the use and interpretation of findings from RRI-measures. Their recommendations are described in this manuscript. Commonly-used clinical and preclinical RRI-tasks are described, and considerations are provided to guide task selection. Tasks measuring two conceptually and neurobiologically distinct types of RRI, “refraining from action initiation” (RAI) and “stopping an ongoing action” (SOA) are described. RAI and SOA-tasks capture distinct aspects of RRI that may relate to distinct clinical outcomes. The InSRI group recommends that: 1) selection of RRI-measures should be informed by careful consideration of the strengths, limitations, and practical considerations of the available measures; 2) researchers use both RAI and SOA tasks in RRI studies to allow for direct comparison of RRI types and examination of their associations with clinically relevant measures; and, 3) similar considerations should be made for human and non-human studies in an effort to harmonize and integrate pre-clinical and clinical research. PMID:25867840

  5. Rapid Responses of Groundwater Systems in Reservoir Sediment Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskiy, M.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Phreatic aquifers that develop within reservoir sediment deposits contribute to the water and mass balances of reservoir systems and in turn strongly influence their ecology. As a case study, we examine the response of an aquifer formed within the sediment deposit of Searsville Reservoir (California, U.S.A.) using data from a set of 18 piezometers installed in the deposit and the adjacent native material. Searsville Reservoir is located in the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve of Stanford University in the low foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains. As is typical of Mediterranean climates, almost all precipitation occurs as rain in the winters, and summers are dry. Approximately weekly data are available from the piezometers, in addition to high-frequency streamflow and meteorological data collected in the vicinity of the reservoir. High-frequency pressure head data at some of the piezometer locations are also available for portions of the record. We combine time series and spatial analysis to explore how the water table responds to precipitation and evaporation patterns. Analysis reveals that fluctuations in the water table are highly responsive to precipitation and evaporation stimuli, with more muted responses to reservoir water surface elevation and streamflow across the sediment surface. Spatially, we see distinct patterns across the sediment body, along with consistent, periodic reversals in direction of groundwater flow at some locations. Temporally, in addition to rapid responses during rainfall events, we observe diurnal fluctuations due to evapotranspiration and a seasonal signal tempered by water surface regulation at the dam. Taken together, our data reveal reservoir sediment deposits to be dynamic ecohydrologic environments over multiple scales.

  6. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal and quantitative manner. This regulation is achieved by a complex interplay between spliceosomal (trans) factors that bind to different sequence (cis) elements. cis-elements reside in both introns and exons and may either enhance or silence splicing. Differential combinations of cis-elements allows for a huge diversity of overall splicing signals, together comprising a complex 'splicing code'. Many cis-elements have been identified, and their effects on exon inclusion levels demonstrated in reporter systems. However, the impact of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs and changes in alternative splicing levels. This observation holds across different ESR exon positions, exon lengths, and 5' splice site strengths. We suggest that this lack of association is mainly due to the great importance of context for ESR functionality: many ESR-like motifs in primates may have little or no effect on splicing, and thus interspecific changes at short-time scales may primarily occur in these effectively neutral ESRs. These results underscore the difficulties of using current computational ESR prediction algorithms to identify truly functionally important motifs, and provide a cautionary tale for studies of the effect of SNPs on splicing in human disease. PMID:19495418

  7. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  8. Rapid response predicts treatment outcomes in binge eating disorder: implications for stepped care.

    PubMed

    Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2007-08-01

    The authors examined rapid response in 75 overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments (cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBTgsh] and behavioral weight loss [BWLgsh]). Rapid response, defined as a 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week, occurred in 62% of CBTgsh and 47% of BWLgsh participants. Rapid response was unrelated to most patient characteristics except for eating psychopathology and depressive symptoms. Participants with rapid response were more likely to achieve binge remission and had greater improvements in overall eating pathology and depressive symptomatology than participants without rapid response. Rapid response had different prognostic significance for the 2 treatments. In terms of binge eating, participants receiving CBTgsh, but not BWLgsh, did equally well regardless of whether they experienced rapid response. In terms of increasing restraint and weight loss, participants with rapid response receiving BWLgsh had greater restraint and weight loss than participants receiving CBTgsh. Rapid response has utility for predicting outcomes, provides evidence for specificity of treatment effects, and has implications for stepped care treatment models of BED. PMID:17663617

  9. Rapid Response Measurements of Hurricane Waves and Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravois, U.

    2010-12-01

    Andrew (1992), Katrina (2005), and Ike (2008) are recent examples of extensive damage that resulted from direct hurricane landfall. Some of the worst damages from these hurricanes are caused by wind driven waves and storm surge flooding. The potential for more hurricane disasters like these continues to increase as a result of population growth and real estate development in low elevation coastal regions. Observational measurements of hurricane waves and storm surge play an important role in future mitigation efforts, yet permanent wave buoy moorings and tide stations are more sparse than desired. This research has developed a rapid response method using helicopters to install temporary wave and surge gauges ahead of hurricane landfall. These temporary installations, with target depths from 10-15 m and 1-7 km offshore depending on the local shelf slope, increase the density of measurement points where the worst conditions are expected. The method has progressed to an operational state and has successfully responded to storms Ernesto (2006), Noel (2007), Fay (2008), Gustav (2008), Hanna (2008) and Ike (2008). The temporary gauges are pressure data loggers that measure at 1 Hz continuously for 12 days and are post-processed to extract surge and wave information. For the six storms studied, 45 out of 49 sensors were recovered by boat led scuba diver search teams, with 43 providing useful data for an 88 percent success rate. As part of the 20 sensor Hurricane Gustav response, sensors were also deployed in lakes and bays inLouisiana, east of the Mississippi river delta. Gustav was the largest deployment to date. Generally efforts were scaled back for storms that were not anticipated to be highly destructive. For example, the cumulative total of sensors deployed for Ernesto, Noel, Fay and Hanna was only 20. Measurement locations for Gustav spanned over 800 km of exposed coastline from Louisiana to Florida with sensors in close proximity to landfall near Cocodrie

  10. The Wallops Flight Facility Rapid Response Range Operations Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Bruce E.; Kremer, Steven E.

    2004-01-01

    becomes how can a launch site provide acceptably responsive mission services to a particular customer without dedicating extensive resources and while continuing to serve other projects? NASA's Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) is pursuing solutions to exactly this challenge. NASA, in partnership with the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority, has initiated the Rapid Response Range Operations Initiative (R3Ops). R3Ops is a multi-phased effort to incrementally establish and demonstrate increasingly responsive launch operations, with an ultimate goal of providing ELV-class services in a maximum of 7-10 days from initial notification routinely, and shorter schedules possible with committed resources. This target will be pursued within the reality of simultaneous concurrent programs, and ideally, largely independent of specialized flight system configurations. WFF has recently completed Phase 1 of R3Ops, an in-depth collection (through extensive expert interviews) and software modeling of individual steps by various range disciplines. This modeling is now being used to identify existing inefficiencies in current procedures, to identify bottlenecks, and show interdependencies. Existing practices are being tracked to provide a baseline to benchmark against as new procedures are implemented. This paper will describe in detail the philosophies behind WFF's R3Ops, the data collected and modeled in Phase 1, and strategies for meeting responsive launch requirements in a multi-user range environment planned for subsequent phases of this initiative.

  11. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  12. 20 CFR 665.320 - May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response? 665.320 Section 665.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Rapid Response Activities § 665.320...

  13. Rapid Response Predicts Treatment Outcomes in Binge Eating Disorder: Implications for Stepped Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined rapid response in 75 overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments (cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBTgsh] and behavioral weight loss [BWLgsh]). Rapid response, defined as a 65% or greater reduction in binge eating by the 4th treatment week,…

  14. A nationwide web-based automated system for outbreak early detection and rapid response in China

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yajia; Wang, Jinfeng; Ma, Jiaqi; Jin, Lianmei; Sun, Qiao; Lv, Wei; Lai, Shengjie; Liao, Yilan; Hu, Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    Timely reporting, effective analyses and rapid distribution of surveillance data can assist in detecting the aberration of disease occurrence and further facilitate a timely response. In China, a new nationwide web-based automated system for outbreak detection and rapid response was developed in 2008. The China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS) was developed by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention based on the surveillance data from the existing electronic National Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System (NIDRIS) started in 2004. NIDRIS greatly improved the timeliness and completeness of data reporting with real-time reporting information via the Internet. CIDARS further facilitates the data analysis, aberration detection, signal dissemination, signal response and information communication needed by public health departments across the country. In CIDARS, three aberration detection methods are used to detect the unusual occurrence of 28 notifiable infectious diseases at the county level and transmit information either in real time or on a daily basis. The Internet, computers and mobile phones are used to accomplish rapid signal generation and dissemination, timely reporting and reviewing of the signal response results. CIDARS has been used nationwide since 2008; all Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in China at the county, prefecture, provincial and national levels are involved in the system. It assists with early outbreak detection at the local level and prompts reporting of unusual disease occurrences or potential outbreaks to CDCs throughout the country. PMID:23908878

  15. An artificial riboswitch for controlling pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Suk; Gusti, Veronica; Pillai, Sailesh G; Gaur, Rajesh K

    2005-11-01

    Riboswitches, as previously reported, are natural RNA aptamers that regulate the expression of numerous bacterial metabolic genes in response to small molecule ligands. It has recently been shown that these RNA genetic elements are also present near the splice site junctions of plant and fungal introns, thus raising the possibility of their involvement in regulating mRNA splicing. Here it is shown for the first time that a riboswitch can be engineered to regulate pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. We show that insertion of a high-affinity theophylline binding aptamer into the 3' splice site (3' ss) region of a model pre-mRNA (AdML-Theo29AG) enables its splicing to be repressed by the addition theophylline. Our results indicate that the location of 3' ss AG within the aptamer plays a crucial role in conferring theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing. We also show that theophylline-mediated control of pre-mRNA splicing is highly specific by first demonstrating that a small molecule ligand similar in shape and size to theophylline had no effect on the splicing of AdML-Theo29AG pre-mRNA. Second, theophylline failed to exert any influence on the splicing of a pre-mRNA that does not contain its binding site. Third, theophylline specifically blocks the step II of the splicing reaction. Finally, we provide evidence that theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing is functionally relevant. PMID:16244133

  16. Regulation of alternative splicing of liver scavenger receptor class B gene by estrogen and the involved regulatory splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Moor, Andrea N; Merkler, Kathleen A; Liu, Qiyuan; McLean, Mark P

    2007-11-01

    The scavenger receptor class B isoforms (SR-B) type I and type II mediate the selective uptake of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and promote reverse cholesterol transport, an important atherosclerosis protection mechanism, in the liver. Previously it was shown that the hepatic expression of SR-BI and SR-BII is regulated by estrogen. In the present study, we demonstrate that estrogen differentially regulates expression of the glycosylated and nonglycosylated forms of SR-BI and SR-BII in rat liver and hepatic cells. We report that estrogen mainly induces the down-regulation of glycosylated SR-BI and the up-regulation of nonglycosylated SR-BII. To study how estrogen regulates expression of the SR-B isoforms, we constructed a SR-B minigene containing minimal genomic sequences and were able to demonstrate that estrogen directly regulates the pre-mRNA alternative splicing of the exogenously expressed SR-B minigene in hepatic cells. Furthermore, we showed that the overexpression of splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Transformer (Tra)-2alpha, and Tra2beta changes the splicing pattern of SR-B dramatically, whereas other splicing factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-G, SC-35, and arginine/serine-rich p40, had no effect. We also demonstrate that estrogen regulates Tra2beta expression levels in liver cells. These studies suggest that estrogen may regulate SR-B isoform expression at both the RNA splicing and posttranslational modification levels and that, for alternative splicing regulation, estrogen may function by regulating the expression of the splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Tra2alpha, and especially Tra2beta. PMID:17673517

  17. Should pharmacologists care about alternative splicing? IUPHAR Review 4

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, T I

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of mRNAs occurs in the majority of human genes, and most differential splicing results in different protein isoforms with possibly different functional properties. However, there are many reported splicing variations that may be quite rare, and not all combinatorially possible variants of a given gene are expressed at significant levels. Genes of interest to pharmacologists are frequently expressed at such low levels that they are not adequately represented in genome-wide studies of transcription. In single-gene studies, data are commonly available on the relative abundance and functional significance of individual alternatively spliced exons, but there are rarely data that quantitate the relative abundance of full-length transcripts and define which combinations of exons are significant. A number of criteria for judging the significance of splice variants and suggestions for their nomenclature are discussed. PMID:24670145

  18. Discovering Transcription and Splicing Networks in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wen, Jianguo; Chang, Chung-che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    More and more transcription factors and their motifs have been reported and linked to specific gene expression levels. However, focusing only on transcription is not sufficient for mechanism research. Most genes, especially in eukaryotes, are alternatively spliced to different isoforms. Some of these isoforms increase the biodiversity of proteins. From this viewpoint, transcription and splicing are two of important mechanisms to modulate expression levels of isoforms. To integrate these two kinds of regulation, we built a linear regression model to select a subset of transcription factors and splicing factors for each co-expressed isoforms using least-angle regression approach. Then, we applied this method to investigate the mechanism of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a precursor lesion of acute myeloid leukemia. Results suggested that expression levels of most isoforms were regulated by a set of selected regulatory factors. Some of the detected factors, such as EGR1 and STAT family, are highly correlated with progression of MDS. We discovered that the splicing factor SRSF11 experienced alternative splicing switch, and in turn induced different amino acid sequences between MDS and controls. This splicing switch causes two different splicing mechanisms. Polymerase Chain Reaction experiments also confirmed that one of its isoforms was over-expressed in MDS. We analyzed the regulatory networks constructed from the co-expressed isoforms and their regulatory factors in MDS. Many of these networks were enriched in the herpes simplex infection pathway which involves many splicing factors, and pathways in cancers and acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24244432

  19. Rapid response of the steatosis-sensing hepatokine LECT2 during diet-induced weight cycling in mice.

    PubMed

    Chikamoto, Keita; Misu, Hirofumi; Takayama, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Ishii, Kiyo-Aki; Lan, Fei; Takata, Noboru; Tajima-Shirasaki, Natsumi; Takeshita, Yumie; Tsugane, Hirohiko; Kaneko, Shuichi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-09-23

    Dieting often leads to body weight cycling involving repeated weight loss and regain. However, little information is available regarding rapid-response serum markers of overnutrition that predict body weight alterations during weight cycling. Here, we report the rapid response of serum leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 (LECT2), a hepatokine that induces insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, during diet-induced weight cycling in mice. A switch from a high-fat diet (HFD) to a regular diet (RD) in obese mice gradually decreased body weight but rapidly decreased serum LECT2 levels within 10 days. In contrast, a switch from a RD to a HFD rapidly elevated serum LECT2 levels. Serum LECT2 levels showed a positive correlation with liver triglyceride contents but not with adipose tissue weight. This study demonstrates the rapid response of LECT2 preceding body weight alterations during weight cycling in mice and suggests that measurement of serum LECT2 may be clinically useful in the management of obesity. PMID:27562717

  20. NIAAA's Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems Initiative: Reinforcing the Use of Evidence-Based Approaches in College Alcohol Prevention*

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, William; Larimer, Mary E.; Wood, Mark D.; Hartman, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) created the Rapid Response to College Drinking Problems initiative so that senior college administrators facing an alcohol-related crisis could get assistance from well-established alcohol researchers and NIAAA staff. Method: Based on a competitive grant process, NIAAA selected five teams of research scientists with expertise in college drinking research. NIAAA then invited college administrators to propose interventions to address a recently experienced alcohol-related problem. Between September 2004 and September 2005, NIAAA selected 15 sites and paired each recipient college with a scientific team. Together, each program development/evaluation team, working closely with NIAAA scientific staff, jointly designed, implemented, and evaluated a Rapid Response project. Results: This supplement reports the results of several Rapid Response projects, plus other findings of interest that emerged from that research. Eight articles present evaluation findings for prevention and treatment interventions, which can be grouped by the individual, group/interpersonal, institutional, and community levels of the social ecological framework. Additional studies provide further insights that can inform prevention and treatment programs designed to reduce alcohol-related problems among college students. This article provides an overview of these findings, placing them in the context of the college drinking intervention literature. Conclusions: College drinking remains a daunting problem on many campuses, but evidence-based strategies—such as those described in this supplement—provide hope that more effective solutions can be found. The Rapid Response initiative has helped solidify the necessary link between research and practice in college alcohol prevention and treatment. PMID:19538907

  1. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, M. Andrea; Heinrich, Bettina; Raitskin, Oleg; Adams, David J.; Mangs, Helena; Goy, Christine; Ladomery, Michael; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J. . E-mail: brianm@medsci.usyd.edu.au

    2006-10-15

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing.

  2. Nursing and Medical Perceptions of a Hospital Rapid Response System: New Process But Same Old Game?

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Osborne, Sonya; Windsor, Carol; Fox, Robyn; Booker, Catriona; Jones, Lee; Gardner, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps no other patient safety intervention depends so acutely on effective interprofessional teamwork for patient survival than the hospital rapid response system. Yet, little is known about nurse-physician relationships when rescuing at-risk patients. This study compared nursing and medical staff perceptions of a mature rapid response system at a large tertiary hospital. Findings indicate that the rapid response system may be failing to address a hierarchical culture and systems-level barriers to early recognition and response to patient deterioration. PMID:26132845

  3. BUILDING ROBUST TRANSCRIPTOMES WITH MASTER SPLICING FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jangi, Mohini; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent splicing networks arise from many discrete splicing decisions regulated in unison. Here, we examine the properties of robust, context-specific splicing networks. We propose that a subset of key splicing regulators, or “master splicing factors,” respond to environmental cues to establish and maintain tissue transcriptomes during development. PMID:25417102

  4. Light-Activated Rapid-Response Polyvinylidene-Fluoride-Based Flexible Films.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles; Yang, Zhenguo

    2016-06-01

    The design strategy and mechanical response mechanism of light-activated, rapid-response, flexible films are presented. Practical applications as a microrobot and a smart spring are demonstrated. PMID:27061392

  5. Non-Critical-Care Nurses' Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sheryl Henry; Astroth, Kim Schafer; Woith, Wendy Mann

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams can save lives but are only effective when activated. We surveyed 50 nurses for their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to activation. Findings showed that participants need more education on their role and when to activate the rapid response team. Nurses who comprise the team need help building their communication skills. We recommend nursing professional development specialists increase the frequency of offerings and expand the focus on roles, activation criteria, and communication skills. PMID:26381336

  6. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  7. The Deployment of Rapid Response Teams in U.S. Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Stolldorf, Deonni P.; Jones, Cheryl B.

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health system (1999), highlighted the need for improvements in the quality of health care, advocating for improvements in patient safety, preventing avoidable harm, and providing the necessary care to patients who could benefit from it. Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) are one crucial aspect of a hospital's RRS, providing hospitals with a mechanism to respond and care for patients experiencing an avoidable medical crisis. RRTs became imbedded in US hospitals following the launch of the 100 000 Lives Campaign in 2004 by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the introduction of RRTs as one of six initiatives to improve the quality of patient care. RRT adoption also provides hospitals the opportunity to meet a Joint Commission requirement for hospitals to implement a mechanism that enabled staff members to obtain help from experts when their patient's condition is worsening. Despite the proliferation of RRTs in hospitals, descriptive reports of these teams across groups of hospitals have been relatively few and provided limited descriptive information on RRTs. Therefore, using data we collected as part of a larger mixed-methods study of RRTs to examine their sustainability, we describe RRTs in a group of hospitals that were part of a collaborative to facilitate RRT adoption and implementation. PMID:25977203

  8. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  9. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  10. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide Alters Splicing of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Selectively Modulates Expression of Splicing Regulators in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Wen; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a central role in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signal transduction in the cardiovascular, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Alternative RNA splicing has emerged as a potential mechanism to modulate sGC expression and activity. C-α1 sGC is an alternative splice form that is resistant to oxidation-induced protein degradation and demonstrates preferential subcellular distribution to the oxidized environment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that splicing of C-α1 sGC can be modulated by H2O2 treatment in BE2 neuroblastoma and MDA-MD-468 adenocarcinoma human cells. In addition, we show that the H2O2 treatment of MDA-MD-468 cells selectively decreases protein levels of PTBP1 and hnRNP A2/B1 splice factors identified as potential α1 gene splicing regulators by in silico analysis. We further demonstrate that down-regulation of PTBP1 by H2O2 occurs at the protein level with variable regulation observed in different breast cancer cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that H2O2 regulates RNA splicing to induce expression of the oxidation-resistant C-α1 sGC subunit. We also report that H2O2 treatment selectively alters the expression of key splicing regulators. This process might play an important role in regulation of cellular adaptation to conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:22911749

  12. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy. PMID:26325627

  13. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs. PMID:27606339

  14. ERISdb: a database of plant splice sites and splicing signals.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Kabza, Michał; Pokrzywa, Rafał; Gudyś, Adam; Makałowska, Izabela

    2013-02-01

    Splicing is one of the major contributors to observed spatiotemporal diversification of transcripts and proteins in metazoans. There are numerous factors that affect the process, but splice sites themselves along with the adjacent splicing signals are critical here. Unfortunately, there is still little known about splicing in plants and, consequently, further research in some fields of plant molecular biology will encounter difficulties. Keeping this in mind, we performed a large-scale analysis of splice sites in eight plant species, using novel algorithms and tools developed by us. The analyses included identification of orthologous splice sites, polypyrimidine tracts and branch sites. Additionally we identified putative intronic and exonic cis-regulatory motifs, U12 introns as well as splice sites in 45 microRNA genes in five plant species. We also provide experimental evidence for plant splice sites in the form of expressed sequence tag and RNA-Seq data. All the data are stored in a novel database called ERISdb and are freely available at http://lemur.amu.edu.pl/share/ERISdb/. PMID:23299413

  15. Rapid Response to the Howard Hanson Dam Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, F. M.; Carter, G.; White, A.; Neiman, P. J.; King, C.; Jankov, I.; Colman, B.; Cook, K.; Buehner, T.

    2010-12-01

    mobile AR observatory (ARO) at Westport, Washington, in October 2009. Development of the mobile ARO is based on two decades of instrument and technology development at ESRL/PSD. ESRL/PSD also responded to the HHD crisis by rapidly deploying a fixed ARO couplet closer to HHD in order to detect and monitor the AR conditions that potentially could lead to flooding along the Green River. These deployments complemented a set of newly telemetered rain gauges surrounding the Green River basin provided by the NWS Western Region Headquarters. This paper will report on initial scientific findings resulting from the ARO deployments including recent AR results for Washington and will document use of the ARO observations in daily forecast operations.

  16. Inference of Splicing Regulatory Activities by Sequence Neighborhood Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Michael B; Shomron, Noam; Yeo, Gene W; Schneider, Aniket; Xiao, Xinshu; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic-acid motifs is critical to many cellular processes. We have developed a new and general method called Neighborhood Inference (NI) that predicts sequences with activity in regulating a biochemical process based on the local density of known sites in sequence space. Applied to the problem of RNA splicing regulation, NI was used to predict hundreds of new exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) and silencer (ESS) hexanucleotides from known human ESEs and ESSs. These predictions were supported by cross-validation analysis, by analysis of published splicing regulatory activity data, by sequence-conservation analysis, and by measurement of the splicing regulatory activity of 24 novel predicted ESEs, ESSs, and neutral sequences using an in vivo splicing reporter assay. These results demonstrate the ability of NI to accurately predict splicing regulatory activity and show that the scope of exonic splicing regulatory elements is substantially larger than previously anticipated. Analysis of orthologous exons in four mammals showed that the NI score of ESEs, a measure of function, is much more highly conserved above background than ESE primary sequence. This observation indicates a high degree of selection for ESE activity in mammalian exons, with surprisingly frequent interchangeability between ESE sequences. PMID:17121466

  17. In vitro splicing of fibronectin pre-mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A; Hynes, R O

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the alternative splicing of the EIIIB exon of the rat fibronectin gene. Mini-gene constructs containing this exon and portions of adjacent introns and exons, when transfected into HeLa cells, are transcribed and spliced, but omit the EIIIB exon. In vitro, HeLa nuclear extracts similarly splice out (skip) the EIIIB exon from similarly structured transcripts. Therefore, the HeLa splicing apparatus recognizes as atypical the EIIIB exon and its flanking intron sequences, both in vivo and in vitro. We also report that alterations in the ionic conditions of the in vitro splicing reaction can promote the initiation of EIIIB exon inclusion, as reflected by the formation of intermediate and product RNAs related to the removal of the intron upstream of EIIIB. Processing of this intron correlates with the formation of complexes resembling intermediates in spliceosome assembly. The branch sites involved in this alternative processing pathway are rather distant from the EIIIB 3' splice site, and lie within a region which is well conserved in the fibronectin genes of other species. Thus, the intron upstream of EIIIB shows singular structure and behavior which probably have a bearing on the regulated alternative splicing of this exon. Images PMID:2377454

  18. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Churbanov, Alexander; Rogozin, Igor B; Deogun, Jitender S; Ali, Hesham

    2006-01-01

    Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs) is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE) and Intronic (ISE) Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand. PMID:16584568

  19. Alternative Splicing of an Insect Sodium Channel Gene Generates Pharmacologically Distinct Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianguo; Liu, Zhiqi; Nomura, Yoshiko; Goldin, Alan L.; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism by which potassium and calcium channels increase functional diversity in animals. Extensive alternative splicing of the para sodium channel gene and developmental regulation of alternative splicing have been reported in Drosophila species. Alternative splicing has also been observed for several mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel genes. However, the functional significance of alternative splicing of sodium channels has not been demonstrated. In this study, we identified three mutually exclusive alternative exons encoding part of segments 3 and 4 of domain III in the German cockroach sodium channel gene, paraCSMA. The splice site is conserved in the mouse, fish, and human Nav1.6 sodium channel genes, suggesting an ancient origin. One of the alternative exons possesses a stop codon, which would generate a truncated protein with only the first two domains. The splicing variant containing the stop codon is detected only in the PNS, whereas the other two full-size variants were detected in both the PNS and CNS. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the two splicing variants produced robust sodium currents, but with different gating properties, whereas the splicing variant with the stop codon did not produce any detectable sodium current. Furthermore, these two functional splicing variants exhibited a striking difference in sensitivity to a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin. Exon swapping partially reversed the channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Our results therefore provide the first evidence that alternative splicing of a sodium channel gene produces pharmacologically distinct channels. PMID:12097481

  20. Nano-structured smart hydrogels with rapid response and high elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lie-Wen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qianming; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Smart hydrogels, or stimuli-responsive hydrogels, are three-dimensional networks composed of crosslinked hydrophilic polymer chains that are able to dramatically change their volume and other properties in response to environmental stimuli such as temperature, pH and certain chemicals. Rapid and significant response to environmental stimuli and high elasticity are critical for the versatility of such smart hydrogels. Here we report the synthesis of smart hydrogels which are rapidly responsive, highly swellable and stretchable, by constructing a nano-structured architecture with activated nanogels as nano-crosslinkers. The nano-structured smart hydrogels show very significant and rapid stimuli-responsive characteristics, as well as highly elastic properties to sustain high compressions, resist slicing and withstand high level of deformation, such as bending, twisting and extensive stretching. Because of the concurrent rapid and significant stimuli-response and high elasticity, these nano-structured smart hydrogels may expand the scope of hydrogel applications, and provide enhanced performance in their applications. PMID:23900497

  1. Accurate Splicing of HDAC6 Pre-mRNA Requires SON

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Vishnu Priya; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing requires proper splice site selection mediated by many factors including snRNPs and serine-arginine rich (SR) splicing factors. Our lab previously reported that the SR-like protein SON maintains organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in nuclear speckles as well as splicing of many human transcripts including mRNAs coding for the chromatin-modifying enzymes HDAC6, ADA and SETD8. However, the mechanism by which SON maintains accurate splicing is unknown. To build tools for understanding SON-dependent pre-mRNA splicing, we constructed a minigene reporter plasmid driving expression of the genomic sequence spanning exons 26 through 29 of HDAC6. Following SON depletion, we observed altered splicing of HDAC6 reporter transcripts that showed exclusion of exons 27 and 28, reflecting the splicing patterns of endogenous HDAC6 mRNA. Importantly, loss of HDAC6 biological function was also observed, as indicated by truncated HDAC6 protein and corresponding absence of aggresome assembly activities of HDAC6 binding-of-ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain. We therefore propose that SON-mediated splicing regulation of HDAC6 is essential for supporting protein degradation pathways that prevent human disease. PMID:25782155

  2. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  3. nagnag: Identification and quantification of NAGNAG alternative splicing using RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav; Feng, Gang; Ma, Jiaxin; Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Xiaoyong

    2015-07-01

    Regulation of proteome diversity by alternative splicing has been widely demonstrated in plants and animals. NAGNAG splicing, which was recently defined as a tissue specific event, results in the production of two distinct isoforms that are distinguished by three nucleotides (NAG) as a consequence of the intron proximal or distal to the splice site. Since the NAGNAG mechanism is not well characterized, tools for the identification and quantification of NAGNAG splicing events remain under-developed. Here we report nagnag, an R-based NAGNAG splicing detection tool, which accurately identifies and quantifies NAGNAG splicing events using RNA-Seq. Overall, nagnag produces user-friendly visualization reports and highlights differences between the DNA/RNA/protein across the identified isoforms of the reported gene. The package is available on https://sourceforge.net/projects/nagnag/files/; or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/nagnag.html. PMID:26028313

  4. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  5. Sip1, a novel RS domain-containing protein essential for pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W J; Wu, J Y

    1998-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein-protein interactions among splicing factors may play an important role in pre-mRNA splicing. We report here identification and functional characterization of a new splicing factor, Sip1 (SC35-interacting protein 1). Sip1 was initially identified by virtue of its interaction with SC35, a splicing factor of the SR family. Sip1 interacts with not only several SR proteins but also with U1-70K and U2AF65, proteins associated with 5' and 3' splice sites, respectively. The predicted Sip1 sequence contains an arginine-serine-rich (RS) domain but does not have any known RNA-binding motifs, indicating that it is not a member of the SR family. Sip1 also contains a region with weak sequence similarity to the Drosophila splicing regulator suppressor of white apricot (SWAP). An essential role for Sip1 in pre-mRNA splicing was suggested by the observation that anti-Sip1 antibodies depleted splicing activity from HeLa nuclear extract. Purified recombinant Sip1 protein, but not other RS domain-containing proteins such as SC35, ASF/SF2, and U2AF65, restored the splicing activity of the Sip1-immunodepleted extract. Addition of U2AF65 protein further enhanced the splicing reconstitution by the Sip1 protein. Deficiency in the formation of both A and B splicing complexes in the Sip1-depleted nuclear extract indicates an important role of Sip1 in spliceosome assembly. Together, these results demonstrate that Sip1 is a novel RS domain-containing protein required for pre-mRNA splicing and that the functional role of Sip1 in splicing is distinct from those of known RS domain-containing splicing factors. PMID:9447963

  6. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background. Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files) using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events. Availability and Implementation.Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http

  7. The transcription factor c-Myb affects pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Orvain, Christophe; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd S.

    2008-07-25

    c-Myb is a transcription factor which plays a key role in haematopoietic proliferation and lineage commitment. We raised the question of whether c-Myb may have abilities beyond the extensively studied transcriptional activation function. In this report we show that c-Myb influences alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This was seen by its marked effect on the 5'-splice site selection during E1A alternative splicing, while no effect of c-Myb was observed when reporters for the 3'-splice site selection or for the constitutive splicing process were tested. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence for interactions between c-Myb and distinct components of the splicing apparatus, such as the general splicing factor U2AF{sup 65} and hnRNPA1 involved in the 5'-splice site selection. The effect on 5'-splice site selection was abolished in the oncogenic variant v-Myb. Altogether, these data provide evidence that c-Myb may serve a previously unappreciated role in the coupling between transcription and splicing.

  8. Minimum Factorization Agreement of Spliced ESTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Raffaella

    Producing spliced EST sequences is a fundamental task in the computational problem of reconstructing splice and transcript variants, a crucial step in the alternative splicing investigation. Now, given an EST sequence, there can be several spliced EST sequences associated to it, since the original EST sequences may have different alignments against wide genomic regions.

  9. Interagency partnering for weed prevention--progress on development of a National Early Detection and Rapid Response System for Invasive Plants in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, R.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, experience has shown that interagency groups provide an effective forum for addressing various invasive species issues and challenges on multiple land units. However, more importantly, they can also provide a coordinated framework for early detection, reporting, identification and vouchering, rapid assessment, and rapid response to new and emerging invasive plants in the United States. Interagency collaboration maximizes the use of available expertise, resources, and authority for promoting early detection and rapid response (EDRR) as the preferred management option for addressing new and emerging invasive plants. Currently, an interagency effort is underway to develop a National EDRR System for Invasive Plants in the United States. The proposed system will include structural and informational elements. Structural elements of the system include a network of interagency partner groups to facilitate early detection and rapid response to new invasive plants, including the Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds (FICMNEW), State Invasive Species Councils, State Early Detection and Rapid Response Coordinating Committees, State Volunteer Detection and Reporting Networks, Invasive Plant Task Forces, and Cooperative Weed Management Areas. Informational elements and products being developed include Regional Invasive Plant Atlases, and EDRR Guidelines for EDRR Volunteer Network Training, Rapid Assessment and Rapid Response, and Criteria for Selection of EDRR Species. System science and technical support elements which are provided by cooperating state and federal scientists, include EDRR guidelines, training curriculum for EDRR volunteers and agency field personnel, plant identification and vouchering, rapid assessments, as well as predictive modeling and ecological range studies for invasive plant species.

  10. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  11. Rapid Response Team activation in New Zealand hospitals-a multicentre prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Psirides, A J; Hill, J; Jones, D

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to describe the epidemiology of Rapid Response Team (RRT) activation in New Zealand public hospitals. We undertook a prospective multicentre observational study of RRT activations in 11 hospitals for consecutive 14-day periods during October-December 2014. A standardised case report form was used to collect data on patient demographics, RRT activation criteria and timing, vital signs on RRT arrival, team composition and intervention, treatment limitation and patient outcome at day 30. Three hundred and thirteen patients received 351 RRT calls during the study period. Patients were admitted under a medical specialty in 177 (56.5%) instances. Median duration from hospital admission to first RRT call was two days. Eighty-six percent of RRT calls were to inpatient wards. A total of 43.4% of RRT calls occurred between 0800 and 1700 hours (38% of the day) and 75.5% of RRT calls were activated by ward nurses. A median of three staff attended each call. Common triggers for RRT activation were increased Early Warning Score (56.2%) and staff concern (25.7%). During the RRT call, 2.8% of patients died; 19.8% died by day 30. New 'Not For Resuscitation' orders were written in 22.5% of RRT calls. By day 30, 56.2% of patients had been discharged home alive. In conclusion, RRTs in New Zealand are multidisciplinary, mostly nurse-activated and predominantly respond to deteriorating medical (rather than surgical) patients. Most patients remain on the ward. The RRT frequently implements treatment limitations. Given almost one in five patients die within 30 days, over half of whom die within 72 hours of RRT review, surviving the RRT call may provide false reassurance that the patient will subsequently do well. PMID:27246940

  12. In vivo relevance for photoprotection by the vitamin D rapid response pathway.

    PubMed

    Dixon, K M; Deo, S S; Norman, A W; Bishop, J E; Halliday, G M; Reeve, V E; Mason, R S

    2007-03-01

    Vitamin D is produced by exposure of 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin to UV irradiation (UVR) and further converted in the skin to the biologically active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) and other compounds. UVR also results in DNA damage producing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). We previously reported that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) at picomolar concentrations, protects human skin cells from UVR-induced apoptosis, and decreases CPD in surviving cells. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) has been shown to generate biological responses via two pathways-the classical steroid receptor/genomic pathway or a rapid, non-genomic pathway mediated by a putative membrane receptor. Whether the rapid response pathway is physiologically relevant is unclear. A cis-locked, rapid-acting agonist 1,25(OH)(2)lumisterol(3) (JN), entirely mimicked the actions of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) to reduce fibroblast and keratinocyte loss and CPD damage after UVR. The effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) were abolished by a rapid-acting antagonist, but not by a genomic antagonist. Skh:hr1 mice exposed to three times the minimal erythemal dose of solar-simulated UVR and treated topically with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) or JN immediately after UVR showed reduction in UVR-induced UVR-induced sunburn cells (p<0.01 and <0.05, respectively), CPD (p<0.01 for both) and immunosuppression (p<0.001 for both) compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results show for the first time an in vivo biological response mediated by a rapid-acting analog of the vitamin D system. The data support the hypothesis that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) exerts its photoprotective effects via the rapid pathway and raise the possibility that other D compounds produced in skin may contribute to the photoprotective effects. PMID:17223553

  13. Characterization of the Regulation of CD46 RNA Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sze Jing; Luo, Shufang; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Ly, Phuong Thao; Goh, Eling; Roca, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a detailed analysis of the alternative splicing regulation of human CD46, which generates different isoforms with distinct functions. CD46 is a ubiquitous membrane protein that protects host cells from complement and plays other roles in immunity, autophagy, and cell adhesion. CD46 deficiency causes an autoimmune disorder, and this protein is also involved in pathogen infection and cancer. Before this study, the mechanisms of CD46 alternative splicing remained unexplored even though dysregulation of this process has been associated with autoimmune diseases. We proved that the 5' splice sites of CD46 cassette exons 7 and 8 encoding extracellular domains are defined by noncanonical mechanisms of base pairing to U1 small nuclear RNA. Next we characterized the regulation of CD46 cassette exon 13, whose inclusion or skipping generates different cytoplasmic tails with distinct functions. Using splicing minigenes, we identified multiple exonic and intronic splicing enhancers and silencers that regulate exon 13 inclusion via trans-acting splicing factors like PTBP1 and TIAL1. Interestingly, a common splicing activator such as SRSF1 appears to repress CD46 exon 13 inclusion. We also report that expression of CD46 mRNA isoforms is further regulated by non-sense-mediated mRNA decay and transcription speed. Finally, we successfully manipulated CD46 exon 13 inclusion using antisense oligonucleotides, opening up opportunities for functional studies of the isoforms as well as for therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. This study provides insight into CD46 alternative splicing regulation with implications for its function in the immune system and for genetic disease. PMID:27226545

  14. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E.; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5′ and 3′ splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a ∼40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5′–3′ order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing. PMID:16030351

  15. Tafazzin splice variants and mutations in Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, Susan M; Manolakos, Athena; Barnett, Sarah Swain; Gonzalez, Iris L

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome is caused by mutations in the TAZ (tafazzin) gene on human chromosome Xq28. The human tafazzin gene produces four major mRNA splice variants; two of which have been shown to be functional (TAZ lacking exon 5 and full-length) in complementation studies with yeast and Drosophila. This study characterizes the multiple alternative splice variants of TAZ mRNA and their proportions in blood samples from a cohort of individuals with Barth syndrome (BTHS). Because it has been reported that collection and processing methods can affect the expression of various genes, we tested and chose a stabilizing medium for collecting, shipping and processing of the blood samples of these individuals. In both healthy controls and in BTHS individuals, we found a greater variety of alternatively spliced forms than previously described, with a sizeable proportion of minor splice variants besides the four dominant isoforms. Individuals with certain exonic and intronic splice mutations produce additional mutant mRNAs that could be translated into two or more proteins with different amino acid substitutions in a single individual. A fraction of the minor splice variants is predicted to be non-productive. PMID:24342716

  16. Caring for our own: deploying a systemwide second victim rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Scott, Susan D; Hirschinger, Laura E; Cox, Karen R; McCoig, Myra; Hahn-Cover, Kristin; Epperly, Kerri M; Phillips, Eileen C; Hall, Leslie W

    2010-05-01

    A unique rapid response system was designed to provide social, psychological, emotional, and professional support for health care providers who are "second victims"--traumatized as a result of their involvement in an unanticipated adverse event, medical error, or patient-related injury. PMID:20480757

  17. 20 CFR 665.320 - May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... permanent closure or mass layoff, or a natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation, the... labor organizations: (1) Develop prospective strategies for addressing dislocation events, that ensure... potential dislocations, available adjustment assistance, and the effectiveness of rapid response...

  18. Early Detection Rapid Response Program Targets New Noxious Weed Species in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreas, Jennifer E.; Halpern, Alison D.; DesCamp, Wendy C.; Miller, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection, rapid response is a critical component of invasive plant management. It can be challenging, however, to detect new invaders before they become established if landowners cannot identify species of concern. In order to increase awareness, eye-catching postcards were developed in Washington State as part of a noxious weed educational…

  19. Splicing Efficiently Couples Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Method of splicing single-mode optical fibers results in very low transmission losses through joined fiber ends. Coupling losses between joined optical-fiber ends only 0.1 dB. Method needs no special operator training.

  20. Medical Rapid Response in Psychiatry: Reasons for Activation and Immediate Outcome.

    PubMed

    Manu, Peter; Loewenstein, Kristy; Girshman, Yankel J; Bhatia, Padam; Barnes, Maira; Whelan, Joseph; Solderitch, Victoria A; Rogozea, Liliana; McManus, Marybeth

    2015-12-01

    Rapid response teams are used to improve the recognition of acute deteriorations in medical and surgical settings. They are activated by abnormal physiological parameters, symptoms or clinical concern, and are believed to decrease hospital mortality rates. We evaluated the reasons for activation and the outcome of rapid response interventions in a 222-bed psychiatric hospital in New York City using data obtained at the time of all activations from January through November, 2012. The primary outcome was the admission rate to a medical or surgical unit for each of the main reasons for activation. The 169 activations were initiated by nursing staff (78.7 %) and psychiatrists (13 %) for acute changes in condition (64.5 %), abnormal physiological parameters (27.2 %) and non-specified concern (8.3 %). The most common reasons for activation were chest pain (14.2 %), fluctuating level of consciousness (9.5 %), hypertension (9.5 %), syncope or fall (8.9 %), hypotension (8.3 %), dyspnea (7.7 %) and seizures (5.9 %). The rapid response team transferred 127 (75.2 %) patients to the Emergency Department and 46 (27.2 %) were admitted to a medical or surgical unit. The admission rates were statistically similar for acute changes in condition, abnormal physiological parameters, and clinicians' concern. In conclusion, a majority of rapid response activations in a self-standing psychiatric hospital were initiated by nursing staff for changes in condition, rather than for policy-specified abnormal physiological parameters. The findings suggest that a rapid response system may empower psychiatric nurses to use their clinical skills to identify patients requiring urgent transfer to a general hospital. PMID:25796608

  1. Biochemical identification of new proteins involved in splicing repression at the Drosophila P-element exonic splicing silencer

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas; Yasuhara, Jiro C.; Kohlstaedt, Lori A.; Rio, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Splicing of the Drosophila P-element third intron (IVS3) is repressed in somatic tissues due to the function of an exonic splicing silencer (ESS) complex present on the 5′ exon RNA. To comprehensively characterize the mechanisms of this alternative splicing regulation, we used biochemical fractionation and affinity purification to isolate the silencer complex assembled in vitro and identify the constituent proteins by mass spectrometry. Functional assays using splicing reporter minigenes identified the proteins hrp36 and hrp38 and the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein PABPC1 as novel functional components of the splicing silencer. hrp48, PSI, and PABPC1 have high-affinity RNA-binding sites on the P-element IVS3 5′ exon, whereas hrp36 and hrp38 proteins bind with low affinity to the P-element silencer RNA. RNA pull-down and immobilized protein assays showed that hrp48 protein binding to the silencer RNA can recruit hrp36 and hrp38. These studies identified additional components that function at the P-element ESS and indicated that proteins with low-affinity RNA-binding sites can be recruited in a functional manner through interactions with a protein bound to RNA at a high-affinity binding site. These studies have implications for the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) in the control of alternative splicing at cis-acting regulatory sites. PMID:26545814

  2. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  3. SpliceVista, a Tool for Splice Variant Identification and Visualization in Shotgun Proteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yafeng; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Forshed, Jenny; Branca, Rui M. M.; Orre, Lukas M.; Lehtiö, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a pervasive process in eukaryotic organisms. More than 90% of human genes have alternatively spliced products, and aberrant splicing has been shown to be associated with many diseases. Current methods employed in the detection of splice variants include prediction by clustering of expressed sequence tags, exon microarray, and mRNA sequencing, all methods focusing on RNA-level information. There is a lack of tools for analyzing splice variants at the protein level. Here, we present SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization based on mass spectrometry proteomics data. SpliceVista retrieves gene structure and translated sequences from alternative splicing databases and maps MS-identified peptides to splice variants. The visualization module plots the exon composition of each splice variant and aligns identified peptides with transcript positions. If quantitative mass spectrometry data are used, SpliceVista plots the quantitative patterns for each peptide and provides users with the option to cluster peptides based on their quantitative patterns. SpliceVista can identify splice-variant-specific peptides, providing the possibility for variant-specific analysis. The tool was tested on two experimental datasets (PXD000065 and PXD000134). In A431 cells treated with gefitinib, 2983 splice-variant-specific peptides corresponding to 939 splice variants were identified. Through comparison of splice-variant-centric, protein-centric, and gene-centric quantification, several genes (e.g. EIF4H) were found to have differentially regulated splice variants after gefitinib treatment. The same discrepancy between protein-centric and splice-centric quantification was detected in the other dataset, in which induced pluripotent stem cells were compared with parental fibroblast and human embryotic stem cells. In addition, SpliceVista can be used to visualize novel splice variants inferred from peptide-level evidence. In summary, Splice

  4. SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization in shotgun proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yafeng; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Forshed, Jenny; Branca, Rui M M; Orre, Lukas M; Lehtiö, Janne

    2014-06-01

    Alternative splicing is a pervasive process in eukaryotic organisms. More than 90% of human genes have alternatively spliced products, and aberrant splicing has been shown to be associated with many diseases. Current methods employed in the detection of splice variants include prediction by clustering of expressed sequence tags, exon microarray, and mRNA sequencing, all methods focusing on RNA-level information. There is a lack of tools for analyzing splice variants at the protein level. Here, we present SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization based on mass spectrometry proteomics data. SpliceVista retrieves gene structure and translated sequences from alternative splicing databases and maps MS-identified peptides to splice variants. The visualization module plots the exon composition of each splice variant and aligns identified peptides with transcript positions. If quantitative mass spectrometry data are used, SpliceVista plots the quantitative patterns for each peptide and provides users with the option to cluster peptides based on their quantitative patterns. SpliceVista can identify splice-variant-specific peptides, providing the possibility for variant-specific analysis. The tool was tested on two experimental datasets (PXD000065 and PXD000134). In A431 cells treated with gefitinib, 2983 splice-variant-specific peptides corresponding to 939 splice variants were identified. Through comparison of splice-variant-centric, protein-centric, and gene-centric quantification, several genes (e.g. EIF4H) were found to have differentially regulated splice variants after gefitinib treatment. The same discrepancy between protein-centric and splice-centric quantification was detected in the other dataset, in which induced pluripotent stem cells were compared with parental fibroblast and human embryotic stem cells. In addition, SpliceVista can be used to visualize novel splice variants inferred from peptide-level evidence. In summary, Splice

  5. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing. PMID:15972844

  6. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Samuel E.; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing “minigene” in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  7. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A.; Perou, Charles M.; MacLeod, James N.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  8. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  9. A conserved intronic U1 snRNP-binding sequence promotes trans-splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-Li; Fan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Jia; Li, Liang; Shao, Wei; Zhan, Shuai; Hao, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Unlike typical cis-splicing, trans-splicing joins exons from two separate transcripts to produce chimeric mRNA and has been detected in most eukaryotes. Trans-splicing in trypanosomes and nematodes has been characterized as a spliced leader RNA-facilitated reaction; in contrast, its mechanism in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. Here we investigate mod(mdg4), a classic trans-spliced gene in Drosophila, and report that two critical RNA sequences in the middle of the last 5′ intron, TSA and TSB, promote trans-splicing of mod(mdg4). In TSA, a 13-nucleotide (nt) core motif is conserved across Drosophila species and is essential and sufficient for trans-splicing, which binds U1 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) through strong base-pairing with U1 snRNA. In TSB, a conserved secondary structure acts as an enhancer. Deletions of TSA and TSB using the CRISPR/Cas9 system result in developmental defects in flies. Although it is not clear how the 5′ intron finds the 3′ introns, compensatory changes in U1 snRNA rescue trans-splicing of TSA mutants, demonstrating that U1 recruitment is critical to promote trans-splicing in vivo. Furthermore, TSA core-like motifs are found in many other trans-spliced Drosophila genes, including lola. These findings represent a novel mechanism of trans-splicing, in which RNA motifs in the 5′ intron are sufficient to bring separate transcripts into close proximity to promote trans-splicing. PMID:25838544

  10. The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems: best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Benishek, Lauren E; Sonesh, Shirley C; Patzer, Brady; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Ruth; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Delays in care have been cited as one of the primary contributors of preventable mortality; thus, quality patient safety is often contingent upon the delivery of timely clinical care. Rapid response systems (RRSs) have been touted as one mechanism to improve the ability of suitable staff to respond to deteriorating patients quickly and appropriately. Rapid response systems are defined as highly skilled individual(s) who mobilize quickly to provide medical care in response to clinical deterioration. While there is mounting evidence that RRSs are a valid strategy for managing obstetric emergencies, reducing adverse events, and improving patient safety, there remains limited insight into the practices underlying the development and execution of these systems. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to synthesize the literature and answer the primary questions necessary for successfully developing, implementing, and evaluating RRSs within inpatient settings-the Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of RRSs. PMID:24595258

  11. A rapid response 64-channel photomultiplier tube camera for high-speed flow velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecker, Tobias; Lowe, K. Todd; Ng, Wing F.

    2015-02-01

    In this technical design note, the development of a rapid response photomultiplier tube camera, leveraging field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) for high-speed flow velocimetry at up to 10 MHz is described. Technically relevant flows, for example, supersonic inlets and exhaust jets, have time scales on the order of microseconds, and their experimental study requires resolution of these timescales for fundamental insight. The inherent rapid response time attributes of a 64-channel photomultiplier array were coupled with two-stage amplifiers on each anode, and were acquired using a FPGA-based system. Application of FPGA allows high data acquisition rates with many channels as well as on-the-fly preprocessing techniques. Results are presented for optical velocimetry in supersonic free jet flows, demonstrating the value of the technique in the chosen application example for determining supersonic shear layer velocity correlation maps.

  12. A purine-rich intronic element enhances alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M L; Wilson, C M; Munroe, S H

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian thyroid hormone receptor gene c-erbAalpha gives rise to two mRNAs that code for distinct isoforms, TRalpha1 and TRalpha2, with antagonistic functions. Alternative processing of these mRNAs involves the mutually exclusive use of a TRalpha1-specific polyadenylation site or TRalpha2-specific 5' splice site. A previous investigation of TRalpha minigene expression defined a critical role for the TRalpha2 5' splice site in directing alternative processing. Mutational analysis reported here shows that purine residues within a highly conserved intronic element, SEa2, enhance splicing of TRalpha2 in vitro as well as in vivo. Although SEalpha2 is located within the intron of TRalpha2 mRNA, it activates splicing of a heterologous dsx pre-mRNA when located in the downstream exon. Competition with wild-type and mutant RNAs indicates that SEalpha2 functions by binding trans-acting factors in HeLa nuclear extract. Protein-RNA crosslinking identifies several proteins, including SF2/ASF and hnRNP H, that bind specifically to SEalpha2. SEalpha2 also includes an element resembling a 5' splice site consensus sequence that is critical for splicing enhancer activity. Mutations within this pseudo-5' splice site sequence have a dramatic effect on splicing and protein binding. Thus SEa2 and its associated factors are required for splicing of TRalpha2 pre-mRNA. PMID:11421362

  13. Observed and self-perceived teamwork in a rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Pattie; Bawel-Brinkley, Karen; O'Leary-Kelley, Colleen

    2012-07-01

    Teamwork and communication between healthcare workers are vital for patient safety in the high-risk environment of health care. The purpose of this descriptive study was to measure the teamwork among members of the rapid response team (RRT) to design teamwork communication training for team members. Data were collected via live observation of RRT events and from RRT team member ratings of teamwork during events. PMID:22821023

  14. Physically flexible, rapid-response gas sensor based on colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Li, Min; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Hu, Long; Fu, Qiuyun; Zhou, Dongxiang; Xia, Zhe; Sargent, Edward H; Tang, Jiang

    2014-05-01

    A gas sensor based on PbS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is constructed on a paper substrate, yielding flexible, rapid-response NO₂ gas sensors, fabricated from the solution phase. The devices are highly sensitive and fully recoverable at room temperature, which is attributed to the excellent access of gas molecules to the CQD surface, realized by surface ligand removal, combined with the desirable binding energy of NO₂ with the PbS CQDs. PMID:24452852

  15. Alternatively Spliced Androgen Receptor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Dehm, Scott M.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for increasing functional diversity from a limited set of genes. De-regulation of this process is common in diverse pathologic conditions. The androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid receptor transcription factor with functions critical for normal male development as well as the growth and survival of normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Studies of AR function in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer (PCa) have demonstrated loss-of-function AR alterations in AIS, and gain-of-function AR alterations in PCa. Over the past two decades, AR gene alterations have been identified in various individuals with AIS, which disrupt normal AR splicing patterns and yield dysfunctional AR protein variants. More recently, altered AR splicing patterns have been identified as a mechanism of PCa progression and resistance to androgen-depletion therapy. Several studies have described the synthesis of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding truncated AR isoforms that lack the ligand-binding domain, which is the ultimate target of androgen depletion. Many of these truncated AR isoforms function as constitutively active, ligand-independent transcription factors that can support androgen-independent expression of AR target genes, as well as the androgen-independent growth of PCa cells. In this review, we will summarize the various alternatively spliced AR variants that have been discovered, with a focus on their role and origin in the pathologic conditions of AIS and PCa. PMID:21778211

  16. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  17. scaRNAs regulate splicing and vertebrate heart development.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prakash; Kibiryeva, Nataliya; Uechi, Tamayo; Marshall, Jennifer; O'Brien, James E; Artman, Michael; Kenmochi, Naoya; Bittel, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in regulating mammalian heart development, but a link between misregulated splicing and congenital heart defects (CHDs) has not been shown. We reported that more than 50% of genes associated with heart development were alternatively spliced in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the level of 12 small cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) that direct the biochemical modification of specific nucleotides in spliceosomal RNAs. We sought to determine if scaRNA levels influence patterns of AS and heart development. We used primary cells derived from the RV of infants with TOF to show a direct link between scaRNA levels and splice isoforms of several genes that regulate heart development (e.g., GATA4, NOTCH2, DAAM1, DICER1, MBNL1 and MBNL2). In addition, we used antisense morpholinos to knock down the expression of two scaRNAs (scarna1 and snord94) in zebrafish and saw a corresponding disruption of heart development with an accompanying alteration in splice isoforms of cardiac regulatory genes. Based on these combined results, we hypothesize that scaRNA modification of spliceosomal RNAs assists in fine tuning the spliceosome for dynamic selection of mRNA splice isoforms. Our results are consistent with disruption of splicing patterns during early embryonic development leading to insufficient communication between the first and second heart fields, resulting in conotruncal misalignment and TOF. Our findings represent a new paradigm for determining the mechanisms underlying congenital cardiac malformations. PMID:25916634

  18. 20 CFR 671.160 - What rapid response activities are required before a national emergency grant application is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... out by the State or its designee in collaboration with the Local Board(s) and chief elected official(s). Under 20 CFR 665.310, rapid response encompasses, among other activities, an assessment of the general...) The rapid response activities described in 20 CFR 665.310 have been initiated and carried out, or...

  19. 20 CFR 671.160 - What rapid response activities are required before a national emergency grant application is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...), to be carried out by the State or its designee in collaboration with the Local Board(s) and chief elected official(s). Under 20 CFR 665.310, rapid response encompasses, among other activities, an... must demonstrate that: (1) The rapid response activities described in 20 CFR 665.310 have...

  20. 20 CFR 671.160 - What rapid response activities are required before a national emergency grant application is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...), to be carried out by the State or its designee in collaboration with the Local Board(s) and chief elected official(s). Under 20 CFR 665.310, rapid response encompasses, among other activities, an... must demonstrate that: (1) The rapid response activities described in 20 CFR 665.310 have...

  1. 20 CFR 671.160 - What rapid response activities are required before a national emergency grant application is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... out by the State or its designee in collaboration with the Local Board(s) and chief elected official(s). Under 20 CFR 665.310, rapid response encompasses, among other activities, an assessment of the general...) The rapid response activities described in 20 CFR 665.310 have been initiated and carried out, or...

  2. 20 CFR 665.330 - Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for rapid response also required activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for rapid response also required activities? 665.330 Section 665.330 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Rapid Response Activities § 665.330 Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements...

  3. Alternative splicing of the FMR1 gene in human fetal brain neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Huang; Yan Shen; Xue-bin Qin; Guan-Yun Wu

    1996-08-09

    The alternative splicing expression of the FMR1 gene was reported in several human and mouse tissues. Five regions of FMR1 gene can be alternatively spliced, but the combination of them has not been investigated fully. We reported here the analysis of alternative splicing pattern of the FMR1 gene in cultured fetal human neurons, using a RT-PCR and cloning strategy. Eleven splicing types were cloned and different isoforms were not equally represented. The dominant isoform represents nearly 40%, and the other isoforms were relatively rare. One isoform has a different carboxyl-terminus. Most of the alternative spliced regions appear hydrophilic; thus, they may locate on the surface of the FMR1 protein. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  5. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  6. Comprehensive splicing functional analysis of DNA variants of the BRCA2 gene by hybrid minigenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The underlying pathogenic mechanism of a large fraction of DNA variants of disease-causing genes is the disruption of the splicing process. We aimed to investigate the effect on splicing of the BRCA2 variants c.8488-1G > A (exon 20) and c.9026_9030del (exon 23), as well as 41 BRCA2 variants reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) mutation database. Methods DNA variants were analyzed with the splicing prediction programs NNSPLICE and Human Splicing Finder. Functional analyses of candidate variants were performed by lymphocyte RT-PCR and/or hybrid minigene assays. Forty-one BIC variants of exons 19, 20, 23 and 24 were bioinformatically selected and generated by PCR-mutagenesis of the wild type minigenes. Results Lymphocyte RT-PCR of c.8488-1G > A showed intron 19 retention and a 12-nucleotide deletion in exon 20, whereas c.9026_9030del did not show any splicing anomaly. Minigene analysis of c.8488-1G > A displayed the aforementioned aberrant isoforms but also exon 20 skipping. We further evaluated the splicing outcomes of 41 variants of four BRCA2 exons by minigene analysis. Eighteen variants presented splicing aberrations. Most variants (78.9%) disrupted the natural splice sites, whereas four altered putative enhancers/silencers and had a weak effect. Fluorescent RT-PCR of minigenes accurately detected 14 RNA isoforms generated by cryptic site usage, exon skipping and intron retention events. Fourteen variants showed total splicing disruptions and were predicted to truncate or eliminate essential domains of BRCA2. Conclusions A relevant proportion of BRCA2 variants are correlated with splicing disruptions, indicating that RNA analysis is a valuable tool to assess the pathogenicity of a particular DNA change. The minigene system is a straightforward and robust approach to detect variants with an impact on splicing and contributes to a better knowledge of this gene expression step. PMID:22632462

  7. Characterization of a novel arginine/serine-rich splicing factor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, S; Waigmann, E; Barta, A

    1996-01-01

    Many splicing factors in vertebrate nuclei belong to a class of evolutionarily conserved proteins containing arginine/serine (RS) or serine/arginine (SR) domains. Previously, we demonstrated the existence of SR splicing factors in plants. In this article, we report on a novel member of this splicing factor family from Arabidopsis designated atRSp31. It has one N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a C-terminal RS domain highly enriched in arginines. The RNA recognition motif shows significant homology to all animal SR proteins identified to date, but the intermediate region does not show any homology to any other known protein. Subsequently, we characterized two cDNAs from Arabidopsis that are highly homologous to atRSp31 (designated atRSp35 and atRSp41). Their deduced amino acid sequences indicate that these proteins constitute a new family of RS domain splicing factors. Purified recombinant atRSp31 is able to restore splicing in SR protein-deficient human S100 extracts. This indicates that atRSp31 is a true plant splicing factor and plays a crucial role in splicing, similar to that of other RS splicing factors. All of the three genes are differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The isolation of this new plant splicing factor family enlarges the essential group of RS domain splicing factors. Furthermore, because no animal equivalent to this protein family has been identified to date, our results suggest that these proteins play key roles in constitutive and alternative splicing in plants. PMID:8989882

  8. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation Within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Walston, James M.; Cabrera, Daniel; Bellew, Shawna D.; Olive, Marc N.; Lohse, Christine M.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rapid-response teams (RRTs) are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED) disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS) at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations). The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10%) based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls). Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25–3.27]), tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73–4.92]), and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42–3.56]) upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65–4.60]), more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP) (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08–2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19–2.80] for high BP), higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44–7.07]) and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43–3.67]). Early RRT activation was associated with increased

  9. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  10. How a rapid response team is supporting people to remain at home.

    PubMed

    Clift, Esther

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the work of a rapid response team (RRT) in an English city. The RRT is a multiprofessional intermediate care team that is able to support patients to remain at home during clinical crises and changes to their social care needs. The service is popular with patients and cost effective. The National Audit of Intermediate Care is in its fourth year and benchmarks how intermediate care services are delivered across England. RRT data are compared with the national data, and show that keeping the team as a crisis intervention service has enabled it to maintain capacity to support patients at home without requiring hospital admission. PMID:26607624

  11. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  12. The genetics of splicing in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin; Hackett, Christopher S.; Zhang, Shile; Song, Young K.; Bell, Robert J.A.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Quigley, David A.; Balmain, Allan; Song, Jun S.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Dyke, Terry Van; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Weiss, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA splicing, a critical and tightly regulated cellular function, underlies the majority of proteomic diversity, and is frequently disrupted in disease. Using an integrative genomics approach, we combined both genome and exon level transcriptome data in two somatic tissues (cerebella and peripheral ganglia) from a transgenic mouse model of neuroblastoma, a tumor that arises from peripheral neural crest. Here we describe splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) associated with differential splicing across the genome that we use to identify genes with previously unknown functions within the splicing pathway and to define de novo intronic splicing motifs that influence splicing from hundreds of bases away. Our results show that these splicing motifs represent sites for functional recurrent mutations and highlight novel candidate genes in human cancers, including childhood neuroblastoma. PMID:25637275

  13. Traceless protein splicing utilizing evolved split inteins

    PubMed Central

    Lockless, Steve W.; Muir, Tom W.

    2009-01-01

    Split inteins are parasitic genetic elements frequently found inserted into reading frames of essential proteins. Their association and excision restore host protein function through a protein self-splicing reaction. They have gained an increasingly important role in the chemical modification of proteins to create cyclical, segmentally labeled, and fluorescently tagged proteins. Ideally, inteins would seamlessly splice polypeptides together with no remnant sequences and at high efficiency. Here, we describe experiments that identify the branched intermediate, a transient step in the overall splicing reaction, as a key determinant of the splicing efficiency at different splice-site junctions. To alter intein specificity, we developed a cell-based selection scheme to evolve split inteins that splice with high efficiency at different splice junctions and at higher temperatures. Mutations within these evolved inteins occur at sites distant from the active site. We present a hypothesis that a network of conserved coevolving amino acids in inteins mediates these long-range effects. PMID:19541616

  14. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  15. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  16. Cephalopod eye evolution was modulated by the acquisition of Pax-6 splicing variants

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masa-aki; Yura, Kei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the developmental processes of vertebrate eyes are controlled by four Pax-6 splicing variants, each modulating different downstream genes, whereas those of insect eyes are controlled by duplicated Pax-6 genes. Cephalopods belong to the Protostomes but possess a camera-type eye similar to those in vertebrates. We examined Pax-6 variations in the squid and found five types of Pax-6 splicing variants but no duplication of the Pax-6 gene. In the five splicing variants, the splicing patterns were produced by the combination of two additional exons to the ortholog and one jettisoned exon containing most of the Homeobox domain (HD). These five variants show spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression during development in the squid. Our study suggests that cephalopods acquired Pax-6 splicing variants independent of those in vertebrates and that these variants were similarly utilized in the development of the squid eye. PMID:24594543

  17. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Quantitative Imaging of Single mRNA Splice Variants in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation via the precise control of the post-transcriptional step that occurs before mRNA translation. Errors in RNA splicing have been known to correlate with different diseases; however, a key limitation is the lack of technologies for live cell monitoring and quantification to understand the process of alternative splicing. Here, we report a spectroscopic strategy for quantitative imaging of mRNA splice variants in living cells, using nanoplasmonic dimer antennas. The spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 were monitored at single copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of nanoplasmonic antennas targeting complementary mRNA sequences in live cells. Our study provides valuable insights on RNA and its transport in living cells, which has the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular protein complex, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis, and gene therapies. PMID:24747838

  19. The role of splicing factors in deregulation of alternative splicing during oncogenesis and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Asaf; Siegfried, Zahava; Karni, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    In past decades, cancer research has focused on genetic alterations that are detected in malignant tissues and contribute to the initiation and progression of cancer. These changes include mutations, copy number variations, and translocations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic changes, including alternative splicing, play a major role in cancer development and progression. There are relatively few studies on the contribution of alternative splicing and the splicing factors that regulate this process to cancer development and progression. Recently, multiple studies have revealed altered splicing patterns in cancers and several splicing factors were found to contribute to tumor development. Studies using high-throughput genomic analysis have identified mutations in components of the core splicing machinery and in splicing factors in several cancers. In this review, we will highlight new findings on the role of alternative splicing and its regulators in cancer initiation and progression, in addition to novel approaches to correct oncogenic splicing. PMID:27308389

  20. Genomic functions of U2AF in constitutive and regulated splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tongbin; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The U2AF heterodimer is generally accepted to play a vital role in defining functional 3′ splice sites in pre-mRNA splicing. Given prevalent mutations in U2AF, particularly in the U2AF1 gene (which encodes for the U2AF35 subunit) in blood disorders and other human cancers, there are renewed interests in these classic splicing factors to further understand their regulatory functions in RNA metabolism in both physiological and disease settings. We recently reported that U2AF has a maximal capacity to directly bind ˜88% of functional 3′ splice sites in the human genome and that numerous U2AF binding events also occur in various exonic and intronic locations, thus providing additional mechanisms for the regulation of alternative splicing besides their traditional role in titrating weak splice sites in the cell. These findings, coupled with the existence of multiple related proteins to both U2AF65 and U2AF35, beg a series of questions on the universal role of U2AF in functional 3′ splice site definition, their binding specificities in vivo, potential mechanisms to bypass their requirement for certain intron removal events, contribution of splicing-independent functions of U2AF to important cellular functions, and the mechanism for U2AF mutations to invoke specific diseases in humans. PMID:25901584

  1. DBASS3 and DBASS5: databases of aberrant 3′- and 5′-splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, Martin; Hwang, Gyulin; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    DBASS3 and DBASS5 provide comprehensive repositories of new exon boundaries that were induced by pathogenic mutations in human disease genes. Aberrant 5′- and 3′-splice sites were activated either by mutations in the consensus sequences of natural exon–intron junctions (cryptic sites) or elsewhere (‘de novo’ sites). DBASS3 and DBASS5 currently contain approximately 900 records of cryptic and de novo 3′- and 5′-splice sites that were produced by over a thousand different mutations in approximately 360 genes. DBASS3 and DBASS5 data can be searched by disease phenotype, gene, mutation, location of aberrant splice sites in introns and exons and their distance from authentic counterparts, by bibliographic references and by the splice-site strength estimated with several prediction algorithms. The user can also retrieve reference sequences of both aberrant and authentic splice sites with the underlying mutation. These data will facilitate identification of introns or exons frequently involved in aberrant splicing, mutation analysis of human disease genes and study of germline or somatic mutations that impair RNA processing. Finally, this resource will be useful for fine-tuning splice-site prediction algorithms, better definition of auxiliary splicing signals and design of new reporter assays. DBASS3 and DBASS5 are freely available at http://www.dbass.org.uk/. PMID:20929868

  2. Deep intron elements mediate nested splicing events at consecutive AG dinucleotides to regulate alternative 3' splice site choice in vertebrate 4.1 genes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gallagher, Thomas L; Amacher, Sharon L; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2012-06-01

    Distal intraexon (iE) regulatory elements in 4.1R pre-mRNA govern 3' splice site choice at exon 2 (E2) via nested splicing events, ultimately modulating expression of N-terminal isoforms of cytoskeletal 4.1R protein. Here we explored intrasplicing in other normal and disease gene contexts and found conservation of intrasplicing through vertebrate evolution. In the paralogous 4.1B gene, we identified ∼120 kb upstream of E2 an ultradistal intraexon, iE(B), that mediates intrasplicing by promoting two intricately coupled splicing events that ensure selection of a weak distal acceptor at E2 (E2dis) by prior excision of the competing proximal acceptor (E2prox). Mutating iE(B) in minigene splicing reporters abrogated intrasplicing, as did blocking endogenous iE(B) function with antisense morpholinos in live mouse and zebrafish animal models. In a human elliptocytosis patient with a mutant 4.1R gene lacking E2 through E4, we showed that aberrant splicing is consistent with iE(R)-mediated intrasplicing at the first available exons downstream of iE(R), namely, alternative E5 and constitutive E6. Finally, analysis of heterologous acceptor contexts revealed a strong preference for nested 3' splice events at consecutive pairs of AG dinucleotides. Distal regulatory elements may control intrasplicing at a subset of alternative 3' splice sites in vertebrate pre-mRNAs to generate proteins with functional diversity. PMID:22473990

  3. Rapid-response process reduces mortality, facilitates speedy treatment for patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    To reduce mortality and improve the care of patients with sepsis, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC, created a new rapid-response protocol aimed at facilitating earlier diagnosis and treatment. In this approach, clinicians who suspect a patient may have sepsis can call a Code Sepsis, which will fast-track the series of tests and evaluations that are needed to confirm the diagnosis and get appropriate patients on IV antibiotics quickly. Administrators say the approach fits in with the culture of the ED, and it has quickly slashed time-to-treatment in this environment. In just one year, the hospital has been able to reduce its risk-adjusted mortality index from 1.8 to less than 1.25. In the ED, where a modified version of the approach has been in place since April 1 of this year, the percentage of patients with sepsis receiving antibiotics within one hour of diagnosis has increased from 25% to 85%. Key to the success of the approach are specially trained rapid-response nurses who are called in on a case whenever a diagnosis of sepsis is suspected and a series of policy changes designed to facilitate needed diagnostic tests to confirm a diagnosis. A mandated online education module helped to bring all clinicians and staff up to speed on the new process quickly. PMID:23923521

  4. MODIS Rapid Response: On-the-ground, real time applications of scientific satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaltz, J. E.; Riebeek, H.; Kendall, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2001, NASA’s MODIS Rapid Response Project has been providing fire detections and imagery in near real time for a wide variety of application users. The project web site provides MODIS imagery in true color and false color band combinations, a vegetation index, and land surface temperature - in both uncorrected swath format and geographically corrected subset regions within a few hours of data acquisition. The uncorrected swath format data is available worldwide. Geographically corrected subset images cover the world's land areas and adjoining waters, as well as the entire Arctic and Antarctic. Images are available twice daily, in the morning from the Terra satellite and in the afternoon from the Aqua satellite. A wide range of user communities access this information to get a rapid, 250 meter-resolution overview of ground conditions for fire management, crop and famine monitoring and forecasting, disaster response (floods, storms), dust and aerosol monitoring, aviation (tracking volcanic ash), monitoring sea ice conditions, environmental monitoring, and more. The scientific community uses imagery to locate phenomena of interest prior to ordering and processing data and to support the day-to-day planning of field campaigns. Rapid Response imagery is used extensively to support education and public outreach, both by NASA and other organizations, and is frequently found in newspapers, books, TV, and the web. California wildfires, 26 October 2003, Terra MODIS

  5. Hypoxia-Induced Alternative Splicing in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Julia E.; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Gellert, Pascal; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation to low oxygen by changing gene expression is vitally important for cell survival and tissue development. The sprouting of new blood vessels, initiated from endothelial cells, restores the oxygen supply of ischemic tissues. In contrast to the transcriptional response induced by hypoxia, which is mainly mediated by members of the HIF family, there are only few studies investigating alternative splicing events. Therefore, we performed an exon array for the genome-wide analysis of hypoxia-related changes of alternative splicing in endothelial cells. Methodology/Principal findings Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2) for 48 h. Genome-wide transcript and exon expression levels were assessed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. We found altered expression of 294 genes after hypoxia treatment. Upregulated genes are highly enriched in glucose metabolism and angiogenesis related processes, whereas downregulated genes are mainly connected to cell cycle and DNA repair. Thus, gene expression patterns recapitulate known adaptations to low oxygen supply. Alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are shown for nine genes: six which are implicated in angiogenesis-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling (cask, itsn1, larp6, sptan1, tpm1 and robo1); one, which is involved in the synthesis of membrane-anchors (pign) and two universal regulators of gene expression (cugbp1 and max). Conclusions/Significance For the first time, this study investigates changes in splicing in the physiological response to hypoxia on a genome-wide scale. Nine alternative splicing events, until now not related to hypoxia, are reported, considerably expanding the information on splicing changes due to low oxygen supply. Therefore, this study provides further knowledge on hypoxia induced gene expression changes and presents new starting points to study the hypoxia adaptation of endothelial cells

  6. The mammalian homolog of suppressor-of-white-apricot regulates alternative mRNA splicing of CD45 exon 4 and fibronectin IIICS.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, M; Winne, A; Lafyatis, R

    1996-12-01

    We have previously described human (HsSWAP) and mouse (MmSWAP) homologs to the Drosophila alternative splicing regulator suppressor-of-white-apricot (su(wa) or DmSWAP). DmSWAP was formally defined as an alternative splicing regulator by studies showing that it autoregulates splicing of its own pre-mRNA. We report here that mammalian SWAP regulates its own splicing, and also the splicing of fibronectin and CD45. Using an in vivo system of cell transfection, mammalian SWAP regulated 5' splice site selection in splicing of its own second intron. SWAP enhanced splicing to the distal 5' splice site, whereas the SR protein ASF/SF2 enhanced splicing to the proximal site. SWAP also regulated alternative splicing of the fibronectin IIICS region by promoting exclusion of the entire IIICS region. In contrast, ASF/SF2 stimulated inclusion of the entire IIICS region. Finally, SWAP regulated splicing of CD45 exon 4, promoting exclusion of this exon, an effect also seen with ASF/SF2. Experiments using SWAP deletion mutants showed that splicing regulation of the fibronectin IIICS region and CD45 exon 4 requires a region including a carboxyl-terminal arginine/serine (R/S)-rich motif. Since R/S motifs of various splicing proteins have been shown to interact with each other, these results suggest that the R/S motif in SWAP may regulate splicing, at least in part, through interactions with other R/S containing splicing factors. PMID:8940107

  7. SLCO1B1 and SLC19A1 Gene Variants and Irinotecan-Induced Rapid Response and Survival: A Prospective Multicenter Pharmacogenetics Study of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xin; Yu, Qianqian; Feng, Jueping; Ma, Hong; Dai, Jing; Li, Min; Chen, Jigui; Zang, Aihua; Wang, Qian; Ge, Shuwang; Qin, Kai; Cai, Juan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid response to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients (response within 12 weeks of chemotherapy) may increase the chance of complete resection and improved survival. Few molecular markers predict irinotecan-induced rapid response and survival. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in solute carrier genes are reported to correlate with the variable pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and folate in cancer patients. This study aims to evaluate the predictive role of 3 SNPs in mCRC patients treated with irinotecan and fluoropyrimidine-containing regimens. Materials and Methods Three SNPs were selected and genotyped in 137 mCRC patients from a Chinese prospective multicenter trial (NCT01282658). The chi-squared test, univariate and multivariable logistic regression model, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate correlations between the genotypes and rapid response. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between genotypes and survival outcomes. Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate correction was used in multiple testing Results Genotype GA/AA of SNP rs2306283 of the gene SLCO1B1 and genotype GG of SNP rs1051266 of the gene SLC19A1 were associated with a higher rapid response rate (odds ratio [OR] =3.583 and 3.521, 95%CI =1.301-9.871 and 1.271-9.804, p=0.011 and p=0.013, respectively). The response rate was 70% in patients with both genotypes, compared with only 19.7% in the remaining patients (OR = 9.489, 95%CI = 2.191-41.093, Fisher's exact test p=0.002). Their significances were all maintained even after multiple testing (all pc < 0.05). The rs2306283 GA/AA genotype was also an independent prognostic factor of longer progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio = 0.402, 95%CI = 0.171-0.945, p=0.037). None of the SNPs predicted overall survival. Conclusions Polymorphisms of solute carriers’ may be useful to predict rapid response to

  8. Hallmarks of alternative splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, S; Bates, D O

    2014-11-13

    The immense majority of genes are alternatively spliced and there are many isoforms specifically associated with cancer progression and metastasis. The splicing pattern of specific isoforms of numerous genes is altered as cells move through the oncogenic process of gaining proliferative capacity, acquiring angiogenic, invasive, antiapoptotic and survival properties, becoming free from growth factor dependence and growth suppression, altering their metabolism to cope with hypoxia, enabling them to acquire mechanisms of immune escape, and as they move through the epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions and metastasis. Each of the 'hallmarks of cancer' is associated with a switch in splicing, towards a more aggressive invasive cancer phenotype. The choice of isoforms is regulated by several factors (signaling molecules, kinases, splicing factors) currently being identified systematically by a number of high-throughput, independent and unbiased methodologies. Splicing factors are de-regulated in cancer, and in some cases are themselves oncogenes or pseudo-oncogenes and can contribute to positive feedback loops driving cancer progression. Tumour progression may therefore be associated with a coordinated splicing control, meaning that there is the potential for a relatively small number of splice factors or their regulators to drive multiple oncogenic processes. The understanding of how splicing contributes to the various phenotypic traits acquired by tumours as they progress and metastasise, and in particular how alternative splicing is coordinated, can and is leading to the development of a new class of anticancer therapeutics-the alternative-splicing inhibitors. PMID:24336324

  9. Safely splicing glass optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korbelak, K.

    1980-01-01

    Field-repair technique fuses glass fibers in flammable environment. Apparatus consists of v-groove vacuum chucks on manipulators, high-voltage dc power supply and tungsten electrodes, microscope to observe joint alignment and fusion, means of test transmission through joint. Apparatus is enclosed in gas tight bos filled with inert gas during fusion. About 2 feet of fiber end are necessary for splicing.

  10. Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid Response Space Systems: The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology Microsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Andary, Jim; Oberright, John; So, Maria; Wegner, Peter; Hauser, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid-response (MR(sup 2)) space systems represent a paradigm shift in the way space assets of all sizes are designed, manufactured, integrated, tested, and flown. This paper will describe the MR(sup 2) paradigm in detail, and will include guidelines for its implementation. The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology microsatellite (RSAT) is a proposed flight system test-bed used for developing and implementing principles and best practices for MR(sup 2) spacecraft, and their supporting infrastructure. The initial goal of this test-bed application is to produce a lightweight (approx. 100 kg), production-minded, cost-effective, and scalable remote sensing micro-satellite capable of high performance and broad applicability. Such applications range from future distributed space systems, to sensor-webs, and rapid-response satellite systems. Architectures will be explored that strike a balance between modularity and integration while preserving the MR(sup 2) paradigm. Modularity versus integration has always been a point of contention when approaching a design: whereas one-of-a-kind missions may require close integration resulting in performance optimization, multiple and flexible application spacecraft benefit &om modularity, resulting in maximum flexibility. The process of building spacecraft rapidly (< 7 days), requires a concerted and methodical look at system integration and test processes and pitfalls. Although the concept of modularity is not new and was first developed in the 1970s by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft), it was never modernized and was eventually abandoned. Such concepts as the Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) became the preferred method for acquiring satellites. Notwithstanding, over the past 30 years technology has advanced considerably, and the time is ripe to reconsider modularity in its own right, as enabler of R(sup 2), and as a key element of transformational systems. The

  11. Underwater splice for submarine coaxial cable

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, A.T.; Roe, T. Jr.; Tausing, W.R.; Wilson, J.V.

    1984-10-30

    The invention is a device for splicing submarine coaxial cable underwater on the seafloor with a simple push-on operation to restore and maintain electrical and mechanical strength integrity; the splice device is mateable directly with the severed ends of a coaxial cable to be repaired. Splicing assemblies comprise a dielectric pressure compensating fluid filled guide cavity, a gelled castor oil cap and wiping seals for exclusion of seawater, electrical contacts, a cable strength restoration mechanism, and a pressure compensation system for controlled extrusion of and depletion loss prevention of dielectric seal fluid during cable splicing. A splice is made underwater by directly inserting prepared ends of coaxial cable, having no connector attachments, into splicing assemblies.

  12. Functional consequences of developmentally regulated alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kalsotra, Auinash; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses of metazoan transcriptomes have revealed an unexpected level of mRNA diversity that is generated by alternative splicing. Recently, regulatory networks have been identified through which splicing promotes dynamic remodeling of the transcriptome to promote physiological changes, which involve robust and coordinated alternative splicing transitions. The regulation of splicing in yeast, worms, flies and vertebrates affects a variety of biological processes. The functional classes of genes that are regulated by alternative splicing include both those with widespread homeostatic activities and genes with cell-type-specific functions. Alternative splicing can drive determinative physiological change or can have a permissive role by providing mRNA variability that is utilized by other regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21921927

  13. Investigating alternative RNA splicing in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Mereau, Agnès; Hardy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing, the process by which distinct mature mRNAs can be produced from a single primary transcript, is a key mechanism to increase the organism complexity. The generation of alternative splicing pattern is a means to expand the proteome diversity and also to control gene expression through the regulation of mRNA abundance. Alternative splicing is therefore particularly prevalent during development and accordingly numerous splicing events are regulated in a tissue or temporal manner. To study the roles of alternative splicing during developmental processes and decipher the molecular mechanisms that underlie temporal and spatial regulation, it is important to develop in vivo whole animal studies. In this chapter, we present the advantages of using the amphibian Xenopus as a fully in vivo model to study alternative splicing and we describe the experimental procedures that can be used with Xenopus laevis embryos and oocytes to define the cis-regulatory elements and identify the associated trans-acting factors. PMID:22956098

  14. Spectrum of splicing errors caused by CHRNE mutations affecting introns and intron/exon boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, K; Tsujino, A; Shen, X; Milone, M; Engel, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mutations in CHRNE, the gene encoding the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ε subunit, cause congenital myasthenic syndromes. Only three of the eight intronic splice site mutations of CHRNE reported to date have had their splicing consequences characterised. Methods: We analysed four previously reported and five novel splicing mutations in CHRNE by introducing the entire normal and mutant genomic CHRNEs into COS cells. Results and conclusions: We found that short introns (82–109 nucleotides) favour intron retention, whereas medium to long introns (306–1210 nucleotides) flanking either or both sides of an exon favour exon skipping. Two mutations are of particular interest. Firstly, a G→T substitution at the 3' end of exon 8 predicts an R286M missense mutation, but instead results in skipping of exon 8. In human genes, a mismatch of the last exonic nucleotide to U1 snRNP is frequently compensated by a matching nucleotide at intron position +6. CHRNE intron 8 has a mismatch at position +6, and accordingly fails to compensate for the exonic mutation at position –1. Secondly, a 16 bp duplication, giving rise to two 3' splice sites (g.IVS10-9_c.1167dup16), results in silencing of the downstream 3' splice site. This conforms to the scanning model of recognition of the 3' splice site, which predicts that the first "ag" occurring after the branch point is selected for splicing. PMID:16061559

  15. The Technical Efficiency of Earthquake Medical Rapid Response Teams Following Disasters: The Case of the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Tang, Bihan; Yang, Hongyang; Liu, Yuan; Xue, Chen; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Performance assessments of earthquake medical rapid response teams (EMRRTs), particularly the first responders deployed to the hardest hit areas following major earthquakes, should consider efficient and effective use of resources. This study assesses the daily technical efficiency of EMRRTs in the emergency period immediately following the 2010 Yushu earthquake in China. Methods: Data on EMRRTs were obtained from official daily reports of the general headquarters for Yushu earthquake relief, the emergency office of the National Ministry of Health, and the Health Department of Qinghai Province, for a sample of data on 15 EMRRTs over 62 days. Data envelopment analysis was used to examine the technical efficiency in a constant returns to scale model, a variable returns to scale model, and the scale efficiency of EMRRTs. Tobit regression was applied to analyze the effects of corresponding influencing factors. Results: The average technical efficiency scores under constant returns to scale, variable returns to scale, and the scale efficiency scores of the 62 units of analysis were 77.95%, 89.00%, and 87.47%, respectively. The staff-to-bed ratio was significantly related to global technical efficiency. The date of rescue was significantly related to pure technical efficiency. The type of institution to which an EMRRT belonged and the staff-to-bed ratio were significantly related to scale efficiency. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that supports improvements to EMRRT efficiency and serves as a reference for earthquake emergency medical rapid assistance leaders and teams. PMID:26690182

  16. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from pre-mRNA transcripts. However, some long D. melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, called a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing1,2. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis remain unclear. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of a “RS-exon” that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform due to competition with a reconstituted 5′ splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic exons or promoters that are prevalent in long introns, but which fail to reconstitute an efficient 5′ splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion may decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling inclusion of cryptic elements with RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  17. Tropomyosin exons as models for alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Clare; Smith, Christopher W J

    2008-01-01

    Three of the four mammalian tropomyosin (Tm) genes are alternatively spliced, most commonly by mutually exclusive selection from pairs of internal or 3' end exons. Alternative splicing events in the TPM1, 2 and 3 genes have been analysed experimentally in various levels ofdetail. In particular, mutually exclusive exon pairs in the betaTm (TPM2) and alphaTm (TPM1) genes are among the most intensively studied models for striated and smooth muscle specific alternative splicing, respectively. Analysis of these model systems has provided important insights into general mechanisms and strategies of splicing regulation. PMID:19209811

  18. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  19. Molecular aspects of DNA splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Yuhani; Lim, Wen Li; Goode, T. Elizabeth; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abd

    2015-05-01

    The pioneer model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a framework of Formal Language Theory was introduced by Head that led to the existence of other models of splicing system, namely Paun, Pixton and Yusof-Goode. These entire models are inspired by the molecular biological process of DNA splicing. Hence, this paper focuses on the translucent DNA splicing process, particularly on the generated language. Starting with some preliminaries in a limit graph, this paper also provides the experimental design with the predicted and actual result.

  20. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Liana F.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end. PMID:25576366

  1. Conserved mechanism of tRNA splicing in eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Zillmann, M; Gorovsky, M A; Phizicky, E M

    1991-01-01

    The ligation steps of tRNA splicing in yeast and vertebrate cells have been thought to proceed by fundamentally different mechanisms. Ligation in yeast cells occurs by incorporation of an exogenous phosphate from ATP into the splice junction, with concomitant formation of a 2' phosphate at the 5' junction nucleotide. This phosphate is removed in a subsequent step which, in vitro, is catalyzed by an NAD-dependent dephosphorylating activity. In contrast, tRNA ligation in vertebrates has been reported to occur without incorporation of exogenous phosphate or formation of a 2' phosphate. We demonstrate in this study the existence of a yeast tRNA ligase-like activity in HeLa cells. Furthermore, in extracts from these cells, the entire yeastlike tRNA splicing machinery is intact, including that for cleavage, ligation, and removal of the 2' phosphate in an NAD-dependent fashion to give mature tRNA. These results argue that the mechanism of tRNA splicing is conserved among eukaryotes. Images PMID:1922054

  2. RNA catalyzes nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Fica, Sebastian M.; Tuttle, Nicole; Novak, Thaddeus; Li, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Jun; Koodathingal, Prakash; Dai, Qing; Staley, Jonathan P.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In nuclear pre-messenger RNA splicing, introns are excised by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton machine composed of both proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Over thirty years ago, following the discovery of self-splicing group II intron RNAs, the snRNAs were hypothesized to catalyze splicing. However, no definitive evidence for a role of either RNA or protein in catalysis by the spliceosome has been reported to date. By using metal rescue strategies, here we show that the U6 snRNA catalyzes both splicing reactions by positioning divalent metals that stabilize the leaving groups during each reaction. Strikingly, all of the U6 catalytic metal ligands we identified correspond to the ligands observed to position catalytic, divalent metals in crystal structures of a group II intron RNA. These findings indicate that group II introns and the spliceosome share common catalytic mechanisms, and likely common evolutionary origins. Our results demonstrate that RNA mediates catalysis within the spliceosome. PMID:24196718

  3. Cancer-associated SF3B1 mutations affect alternative splicing by promoting alternative branchpoint usage

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Houy, Alexandre; Battistella, Aude; Popova, Tatiana; Wassef, Michel; Henry, Emilie; Tirode, Franck; Constantinou, Angelos; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Dutertre, Martin; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are reported in ∼20% of uveal melanomas. SF3B1 is involved in 3′-splice site (3′ss) recognition during RNA splicing; however, the molecular mechanisms of its mutation have remained unclear. Here we show, using RNA-Seq analyses of uveal melanoma, that the SF3B1R625/K666 mutation results in deregulated splicing at a subset of junctions, mostly by the use of alternative 3′ss. Modelling the differential junctions in SF3B1WT and SF3B1R625/K666 cell lines demonstrates that the deregulated splice pattern strictly depends on SF3B1 status and on the 3'ss-sequence context. SF3B1WT knockdown or overexpression do not reproduce the SF3B1R625/K666 splice pattern, qualifying SF3B1R625/K666 as change-of-function mutants. Mutagenesis of predicted branchpoints reveals that the SF3B1R625/K666-promoted splice pattern is a direct result of alternative branchpoint usage. Altogether, this study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying splicing alterations induced by mutant SF3B1 in cancer, and reveals a role for alternative branchpoints in disease. PMID:26842708

  4. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Li, Hongda; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  5. SON Controls Cell Cycle Progression by Coordinated Regulation of RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun-Young; DeKelver, Russell C.; Lo, Miao-Chia; Nguyen, Tuyet Ann; Matsuura, Shinobu; Boyapati, Anita; Pandit, Shatakshi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY It has been suspected that cell cycle progression might be functionally coupled with RNA processing. However, little is known about the role of the precise splicing control in cell cycle progression. Here, we report that SON, a large Ser/Arg (SR)-related protein, is a splicing co-factor contributing to efficient splicing of cell cycle regulators. Down-regulation of SON leads to severe impairment of spindle pole separation, microtubule dynamics, and genome integrity. These molecular defects result from inadequate RNA splicing of a specific set of cell cycle-related genes that possess weak splice sites. Furthermore, we show that SON facilitates the interaction of SR proteins with RNA polymerase II and other key spliceosome components, suggesting its function in efficient co-transcriptional RNA processing. These results reveal a mechanism for controlling cell cycle progression through SON-dependent constitutive splicing at suboptimal splice sites, with strong implications for its role in cancer and other human diseases. PMID:21504830

  6. A role for U2/U6 helix Ib in 5' splice site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Luukkonen, B G; Séraphin, B

    1998-01-01

    Selection of pre-mRNA splice sites is a highly accurate process involving many trans-acting factors. Recently, we described a role for U6 snRNA position G52 in selection of the first intron nucleotide (+1G). Because some U2 alleles suppress U6-G52 mutations, we investigated whether the corresponding U2 snRNA region also influenced 5' splice site selection. Our results demonstrate that U2 snRNAs mutated at position U23, but not adjacent nucleotides, specifically affect 5' splice site cleavage. Furthermore, all U2 position U23 mutations are synthetic lethal with the thermosensitive U6-G52U allele. Interestingly, the U2-U23C substitution has an unprecedented hyperaccurate splicing phenotype in which cleavage of introns with a +1G substitution is reduced, whereas the strain grows with wild-type kinetics. U2 position U23 forms the first base pair with U6 position A59 in U2/U6 helix Ib. Restoration of the helical structure suppresses 5' splice site cleavage defects, showing an important role for the helix Ib structure in 5' splice site selection. U2/U6 helix Ib and helix II have recently been described as being functionally redundant. This report demonstrates a unique role for helix Ib in 5' splice site selection that is not shared with helix II. PMID:9701283

  7. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghui; Dong, Qiping; Yuan, Xinni; Zeng, Xin; Gao, Yu; Chiao, Cassandra; Li, Hongda; Zhao, Xinyu; Keles, Sunduz; Wang, Zefeng; Chang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies. PMID:27352031

  8. The splice is right: Guarantors of fidelity in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Two recent papers, one from the Staley laboratory (Koodathingal and colleagues) and the other from the Cheng laboratory (Tseng and colleagues), show that the RNA-dependent ATPase Prp16, which is required for the second step of splicing, acts to reject slowly splicing pre-mRNAs immediately before the first catalytic reaction in pre-mRNA splicing. The results answer long-investigated questions about the actions of Prp16 and provide a wealth of molecular details on the proofreading process in pre-mRNA splicing. The discussion here reviews and integrates the results of the two papers and describes the implications for proofreading in splicing. PMID:21357751

  9. Strong Motion Networks - Rapid Response and Early Warning Applications in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfikar, C.; Alcik, H.; Ozel, O.; Erdik, M.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years several strong motion networks have been established in Istanbul with a preparation purpose for future probable earthquake. This study addresses the introduction of current seismic networks and presentation of some recent results recorded in these networks. Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning System Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning System has ten strong motion stations which were installed as close as possible to Marmara Sea main fault zone. Continuous on-line data from these stations via digital radio modem provide early warning for potentially disastrous earthquakes. Considering the complexity of fault rupture and the short fault distances involved, a simple and robust Early Warning algorithm, based on the exceedance of specified threshold time domain amplitude levels is implemented. The current algorithm compares the band-pass filtered accelerations and the cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) with specified threshold levels. Istanbul Earthquake Rapid Response System Istanbul Earthquake Rapid Response System has one hundred 18 bit-resolution strong motion accelerometers which were placed in quasi-free field locations (basement of small buildings) in the populated areas of the city, within an area of approximately 50x30km, to constitute a network that will enable early damage assessment and rapid response information after a damaging earthquake. Early response information is achieved through fast acquisition and analysis of processed data obtained from the network. The stations are routinely interrogated on regular basis by the main data center. After triggered by an earthquake, each station processes the streaming strong motion data to yield the spectral accelerations at specific periods and sends these parameters in the form of SMS messages at every 20s directly to the main data center through a designated GSM network and through a microwave system. A shake map and damage distribution map (using aggregate building inventories and fragility curves

  10. Cutting, Splicing, and Kelvin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2013-11-01

    Recent experimental advances have allowed us to create, visualize and track vortices of prescribed shape and topology in classical fluids. We study the effect of surgery (cutting and splicing) on the evolution of the geometry and topology of these vortex loops, with a particular focus on the wave-like excitations generated by these operations. We interpret the dynamics of these excitations and the role they play within the broader context of vortex evolution. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Materials Research and Engineering Centers (MRSEC) Program at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and the Packard Foundation through a Packard fellowship.

  11. E-DECIDER Rapid Response to the M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasscoe, M. T.; Parker, J. W.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Eguchi, R. T.; Huyck, C. K.; Hu, Z.; Chen, Z.; Yoder, M. R.; Rundle, J. B.; Rosinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    E-DECIDER initiated rapid response mode when the California Earthquake Clearinghouse was activated the morning following the M6 Napa earthquake. Data products, including: 1) rapid damage and loss estimates, 2) deformation magnitude and slope change maps, and 3) aftershock forecasts were provided to the Clearinghouse partners within 24 hours of the event via XchangeCore Web Service Data Orchestration sharing. NASA data products were provided to end-users via XchangeCore, EERI and Clearinghouse websites, and ArcGIS online for Napa response, reaching a wide response audience. The E-DECIDER team helped facilitate rapid delivery of NASA products to stakeholders and participated in Clearinghouse Napa earthquake briefings to update stakeholders on product information. Rapid response products from E-DECIDER can be used to help prioritize response efforts shortly after the event has occurred. InLET (Internet Loss Estimation Tool) post-event damage and casualty estimates were generated quickly after the Napa earthquake. InLET provides immediate post-event estimates of casualties and building damage by performing loss/impact simulations using USGS ground motion data and FEMA HAZUS damage estimation technology. These results were provided to E-DECIDER by their collaborators, ImageCat, Inc. and the Community Stakeholder Network (CSN). Strain magnitude and slope change maps were automatically generated when the Napa earthquake appeared on the USGS feed. These maps provide an early estimate of where the deformation has occurred and where damage may be localized. Using E-DECIDER critical infrastructure overlays with damage estimates, decision makers can direct response effort that can be verified later with field reconnaissance and remote sensing-based observations. Earthquake aftershock forecast maps were produced within hours of the event. These maps highlight areas where aftershocks are likely to occur and can also be coupled with infrastructure overlays to help direct response

  12. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations. PMID:26300000

  13. Functional selection of splicing enhancers that stimulate trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Boukis, L A; Bruzik, J P

    2001-01-01

    The role of exonic sequences in naturally occurring trans-splicing has not been explored in detail. Here, we have identified trans-splicing enhancers through the use of an iterative selection scheme. Several classes of enhancer sequences were identified that led to dramatic increases in trans-splicing efficiency. Two sequence families were investigated in detail. These include motifs containing the element (G/C)GAC(G/C) and also 5' splice site-like sequences. Distinct elements were tested for their ability to function as splicing enhancers and in competition experiments. In addition, discrete trans-acting factors were identified. This work demonstrates that splicing enhancers are able to effect a large increase in trans-splicing efficiency and that the process of exon definition is able to positively enhance trans-splicing even though the reaction itself is independent of the need for the 5' end of U1 snRNA. Due to the presence of internal introns in messages that are trans-spliced, the natural arrangement of 5' splice sites downstream of trans-splicing acceptors may lead to a general promotion of this unusual reaction. PMID:11421358

  14. Nuclear m(6)A Reader YTHDC1 Regulates mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Roundtree, Ian A; He, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    N(6)-Methyladenosine (m(6)A) is emerging as a chemical mark that broadly affects the flow of genetic information in various biological processes in eukaryotes. Recently, Xiao et al. reported that the nuclear m(6)A reader protein YTHDC1 impacts mRNA splicing, providing a transcriptome-wide glance of splicing changes affected by this mRNA methylation reader protein. PMID:27050931

  15. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  16. Subgroup Specific Alternative Splicing in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Northcott, Paul A; Yu, Emily PY; Shih, David; Peacock, John; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; van Meter, Timothy; Eberhart, Charles G; Pfister, Stefan; Marra, Marco A; Weiss, William A; Scherer, Stephen W; Rutka, James T; French, Pim J; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is comprised of four distinct molecular variants: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. We analyzed alternative splicing usage in 14 normal cerebellar samples and 103 medulloblastomas of known subgroup. Medulloblastoma samples have a statistically significant increase in alternative splicing as compared to normal fetal cerebella (2.3-times; P<6.47E-8). Splicing patterns are distinct and specific between molecular subgroups. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of alternative splicing events accurately assigns medulloblastomas to their correct subgroup. Subgroup-specific splicing and alternative promoter usage was most prevalent in Group 3 (19.4%) and SHH (16.2%) medulloblastomas, while observed less frequently in WNT (3.2%), and Group 4 (9.3%) tumors. Functional annotation of alternatively spliced genes reveals over-representation of genes important for neuronal development. Alternative splicing events in medulloblastoma may be regulated in part by the correlative expression of antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism affecting subgroup specific alternative splicing. Our results identify additional candidate markers for medulloblastoma subgroup affiliation, further support the existence of distinct subgroups of the disease, and demonstrate an additional level of transcriptional heterogeneity between medulloblastoma subgroups. PMID:22358458

  17. Phosphoregulation of Ire1 RNase splicing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R.; Carrara, Marta; Ali, Maruf M. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ire1 is activated in response to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is a unique enzyme, possessing both kinase and RNase activity that is required for specific splicing of Xbp1 mRNA leading to UPR activation. How phosphorylation impacts on the Ire1 splicing activity is unclear. In this study, we isolate distinct phosphorylated species of Ire1 and assess their effects on RNase splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We find that phosphorylation within the kinase activation loop significantly increases RNase splicing in vitro. Correspondingly, mutants of Ire1 that cannot be phosphorylated on the activation loop show decreased specific Xbp1 and promiscuous RNase splicing activity relative to wild-type Ire1 in cells. These data couple the kinase phosphorylation reaction to the activation state of the RNase, suggesting that phosphorylation of the activation loop is an important step in Ire1-mediated UPR activation.

  18. The Characterizations of Different Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Fariba; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan

    The concept of splicing system was first introduced by Head in 1987 to model the biological process of DNA recombination mathematically. This model was made on the basis of formal language theory which is a branch of applied discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. In fact, splicing system treats DNA molecule and the recombinant behavior by restriction enzymes and ligases in the form of words and splicing rules respectively. The notion of splicing systems was taken into account from different points of view by many mathematicians. Several modified definitions have been introduced by many researchers. In this paper, some properties of different kinds of splicing systems are presented and their relationships are investigated. Furthermore, these results are illustrated by some examples.

  19. Prp40 pre-mRNA processing factor 40 homolog B (PRPF40B) associates with SF1 and U2AF65 and modulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Soraya; Montes, Marta; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The first stable complex formed during the assembly of spliceosomes onto pre-mRNA substrates in mammals includes U1 snRNP, which recognizes the 5′ splice site, and the splicing factors SF1 and U2AF, which bind the branch point sequence, polypyrimidine tract, and 3′ splice site. The 5′ and 3′ splice site complexes are thought to be joined together by protein–protein interactions mediated by factors that ensure the fidelity of the initial splice site recognition. In this study, we identified and characterized PRPF40B, a putative mammalian ortholog of the U1 snRNP-associated yeast splicing factor Prp40. PRPF40B is highly enriched in speckles with a behavior similar to splicing factors. We demonstrated that PRPF40B interacts directly with SF1 and associates with U2AF65. Accordingly, PRPF40B colocalizes with these splicing factors in the cell nucleus. Splicing assays with reporter minigenes revealed that PRPF40B modulates alternative splice site selection. In the case of Fas regulation of alternative splicing, weak 5′ and 3′ splice sites and exonic sequences are required for PRPF40B function. Placing our data in a functional context, we also show that PRPF40B depletion increased Fas/CD95 receptor number and cell apoptosis, which suggests the ability of PRPF40B to alter the alternative splicing of key apoptotic genes to regulate cell survival. PMID:25605964

  20. Wing Leading Edge RCC Rapid Response Damage Prediction Tool (IMPACT2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert; Cottter, Paul; Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This rapid response computer program predicts Orbiter Wing Leading Edge (WLE) damage caused by ice or foam impact during a Space Shuttle launch (Program "IMPACT2"). The program was developed after the Columbia accident in order to assess quickly WLE damage due to ice, foam, or metal impact (if any) during a Shuttle launch. IMPACT2 simulates an impact event in a few minutes for foam impactors, and in seconds for ice and metal impactors. The damage criterion is derived from results obtained from one sophisticated commercial program, which requires hours to carry out simulations of the same impact events. The program was designed to run much faster than the commercial program with prediction of projectile threshold velocities within 10 to 15% of commercial-program values. The mathematical model involves coupling of Orbiter wing normal modes of vibration to nonlinear or linear springmass models. IMPACT2 solves nonlinear or linear impact problems using classical normal modes of vibration of a target, and nonlinear/ linear time-domain equations for the projectile. Impact loads and stresses developed in the target are computed as functions of time. This model is novel because of its speed of execution. A typical model of foam, or other projectile characterized by material nonlinearities, impacting an RCC panel is executed in minutes instead of hours needed by the commercial programs. Target damage due to impact can be assessed quickly, provided that target vibration modes and allowable stress are known.

  1. Rapid-Response Low Infrared Emission Broadband Ultrathin Plasmonic Light Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform. PMID:25418040

  2. Communication and relationship skills for rapid response teams at hamilton health sciences.

    PubMed

    Cziraki, Karen; Lucas, Janie; Rogers, Toni; Page, Laura; Zimmerman, Rosanne; Hauer, Lois Ann; Daniels, Charlotte; Gregoroff, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Rapid response teams (RRT) are an important safety strategy in the prevention of deaths in patients who are progressively failing outside of the intensive care unit. The goal is to intervene before a critical event occurs. Effective teamwork and communication skills are frequently cited as critical success factors in the implementation of these teams. However, there is very little literature that clearly provides an education strategy for the development of these skills. Training in simulation labs offers an opportunity to assess and build on current team skills; however, this approach does not address how to meet the gaps in team communication and relationship skill management. At Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS) a two-day program was developed in collaboration with the RRT Team Leads, Organizational Effectiveness and Patient Safety Leaders. Participants reflected on their conflict management styles and considered how their personality traits may contribute to team function. Communication and relationship theories were reviewed and applied in simulated sessions in the relative safety of off-site team sessions. The overwhelming positive response to this training has been demonstrated in the incredible success of these teams from the perspective of the satisfaction surveys of the care units that call the team, and in the multi-phased team evaluation of their application to practice. These sessions offer a useful approach to the development of the soft skills required for successful RRT implementation. PMID:18382164

  3. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    PubMed

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. PMID:23611153

  4. Phosphodiesterase 1C is dispensable for rapid response termination of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cygnar, Katherine D.; Zhao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    In the nose, odorants are detected on the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), where a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway transforms odor stimulation into electrical responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in OSN cilia was long thought to account for rapid response termination by degrading odor-induced cAMP. Two PDEs with distinct cellular localization have been found in OSNs: PDE1C in cilia; PDE4A throughout the cell but absent from cilia. We disrupted both genes in mice and performed electroolfactogram analysis. Unexpectedly, eliminating PDE1C did not prolong response termination. Prolonged termination occurred only in mice lacking both PDEs, suggesting that cAMP degradation by PDE1C in cilia is not a rate-limiting factor for response termination in wildtype. Pde1c−/− OSNs instead displayed reduced sensitivity and attenuated adaptation to repeated stimulation, suggesting potential roles for PDE1C in regulating sensitivity and adaptation. These observations provide new perspectives in regulation of olfactory transduction. PMID:19305400

  5. Rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Axelrod, Tim; Butler, Nat; Jedicke, Robert; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Pichardo, Barbara; Reyes, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    Small NEOs are, as a whole, poorly characterized, and we know nothing about the physical properties of the majority of all NEOs. The rate of NEO discoveries is increasing each year, and projects to determine the physical properties of NEOs are lagging behind. NEOs are faint, and generally even fainter by the time that follow-up characterizations can be made days or weeks later. There is a need for a high-throughput, high-efficiency physical characterization strategy in which hundreds of faint NEOs can be characterized each year. Broadband photometry in the near-infrared is sufficiently diagnostic to assign taxonomic types, and hence constrain both the individual and ensemble properties of NEOs. We will present results from our recently initiated program of rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of NEOs. We are using UKIRT (on Mauna Kea) and the RATIR instrument on the 1.5m telescope at the San Pedro Martir Observatory (Mexico) to allow us to make observations most nights of the year in robotic/queue mode. This technique is powerful and fast. We have written automated software that allows us to observe NEOs very soon after discovery. Our targets are NEOs that are generally too faint for other characterization techniques. We are on pace to characterize hundreds of NEOs per year.

  6. First Results from the Rapid-response Spectrophotometric Characterization of Near-Earth Objects using UKIRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.; Trilling, D. E.; Borth, D.; Jedicke, R.; Butler, N.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Pichardo, B.; Petersen, E.; Axelrod, T.; Moskovitz, N.

    2016-04-01

    Using the Wide Field Camera for the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), we measure the near-infrared colors of near-Earth objects (NEOs) in order to put constraints on their taxonomic classifications. The rapid-response character of our observations allows us to observe NEOs when they are close to the Earth and bright. Here we present near-infrared color measurements of 86 NEOs, most of which were observed within a few days of their discovery, allowing us to characterize NEOs with diameters of only a few meters. Using machine-learning methods, we compare our measurements to existing asteroid spectral data and provide probabilistic taxonomic classifications for our targets. Our observations allow us to distinguish between S-complex, C/X-complex, D-type, and V-type asteroids. Our results suggest that the fraction of S-complex asteroids in the whole NEO population is lower than the fraction of ordinary chondrites in the meteorite fall statistics. Future data obtained with UKIRT will be used to investigate the significance of this discrepancy.

  7. NOAA Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic Monitoring Using UASs (including Rapid Response)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, J. J.; Jacobs, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned systems have the potential to efficiently, effectively, economically, and safely bridge critical observation requirements in an environmentally friendly manner. As the United States' Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic areas of interest expand and include hard-to-reach regions of the Earth (such as the Arctic and remote oceanic areas) optimizing unmanned capabilities will be needed to advance the United States' science, technology and security efforts. Through increased multi-mission and multi-agency operations using improved inter-operable and autonomous unmanned systems, the research and operations communities will better collect environmental intelligence and better protect our Country against hazardous weather, environmental, marine and polar hazards. This presentation will examine NOAA's Atmospheric, Marine and Arctic Monitoring Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) strategies which includes developing a coordinated effort to maximize the efficiency and capabilities of unmanned systems across the federal government and research partners. Numerous intra- and inter-agency operational demonstrations and assessments have been made to verify and validated these strategies. This includes the introduction of the Targeted Autonomous Insitu Sensing and Rapid Response (TAISRR) with UAS concept of operations. The presentation will also discuss the requisite UAS capabilities and our experience in using them.

  8. Rapid-response low infrared emission broadband ultrathin plasmonic light absorber.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform. PMID:25418040

  9. Rapid-Response Low Infrared Emission Broadband Ultrathin Plasmonic Light Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-11-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform.

  10. The Integrity of ACSR Full Tension Single-Stage Splice Connector at Higher Operation Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King Jr, Thomas J

    2008-10-01

    Due to increases in power demand and limited investment in new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than those used for the original design criteria. This has led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors. It is manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increases in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reductions in the connector clamping strength, which could ultimately result in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector appears to be the weakest link in electric power transmission lines. This report presents a protocol for integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of full tension single-stage splice connector assemblies and the associated effective lifetime at high operating temperature.

  11. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Subunit of a Novel RNA Splicing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Kate; Hall, Michelle D.; Xu, Fangmin; Xue, Song; Li, Hong

    2010-07-13

    The RNA splicing endonuclease is responsible for recognition and excision of nuclear tRNA and all archaeal introns. Despite the conserved RNA cleavage chemistry and a similar enzyme assembly, currently known splicing endonuclease families have limited RNA specificity. Different from previously characterized splicing endonucleases in Archaea, the splicing endonuclease from archaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus was found to contain two different subunits and accept a broader range of substrates. Here, we report a crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of the S. solfataricus endonuclease at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure, together with analytical ultracentrifugation analysis, identifies the catalytic subunit as an inactive but stable homodimer, thus suggesting the possibility of two modes of functional assembly for the active enzyme.

  12. Probabilistic Splicing of Dscam1 Establishes Identity at the Level of Single Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Satoru K.; Martins, André; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila Dscam1 gene encodes a vast number of cell recognition molecules through alternative splicing. These exhibit isoform-specific homophilic binding and regulate self-avoidance, the tendency of neurites from the same cell to repel one another. Genetic experiments indicate that different cells must express different isoforms. How this is achieved is not known, as the expression of alternative exons in vivo has not been shown. Here, we modified the endogenous Dscam1 locus to generate splicing reporters for all variants of exon 4. We demonstrate that splicing does not occur in a cell-type specific fashion, that cells identified by their unique locations express different exon 4 variants in different animals, and that splicing in identified neurons can change over time. Probabilistic expression is compatible with a widespread role in neural circuit assembly through self-avoidance and is incompatible with models in which specific isoforms of Dscam1 mediate recognition between processes of different cells. PMID:24267895

  13. Meayamycin Inhibits pre-mRNA Splicing and Exhibits Picomolar Activity Against Multidrug Resistant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Brian J.; McPherson, Peter A.; O'Brien, Kristine; Czaicki, Nancy L.; DeStefino, Vincent; Osman, Sami; Li, Miaosheng; Day, Billy W.; Grabowski, Paula J.; Moore, Melissa J.; Vogt, Andreas; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    FR901464 is a potent antitumor natural product that binds to the SF3b complex and inhibits pre-mRNA splicing. Its analogue, meayamycin, is two orders of magnitude more potent as an antiproliferative agent against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the picomolar antiproliferative activity of meayamycin against various cancer cell lines and multidrug resistant cells. Time-dependence studies implied that meayamycin may form a covalent bond with its target protein(s). Meayamycin inhibited pre-mRNA splicing in HEK-293 cells but not alternative splicing in a neuronal system. Meayamycin exhibited specificity toward human lung cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic human lung fibroblasts and retained picomolar growth inhibitory activity against multi-drug resistant cells. These data suggest that meayamycin is a useful chemical probe to study pre-mRNA splicing in live cells and is a promising lead as an anticancer agent. PMID:19671752

  14. Splicing regulation: From a parts list of regulatory elements to an integrated splicing code

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Burge, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to both proteomic diversity and control of gene expression levels. Splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages, and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human diseases. An important long-term goal in the splicing field is to determine a set of rules or “code” for splicing that will enable prediction of the splicing pattern of any primary transcript from its sequence. Outside of the core splice site motifs, the bulk of the information required for splicing is thought to be contained in exonic and intronic cis-regulatory elements that function by recruitment of sequence-specific RNA-binding protein factors that either activate or repress the use of adjacent splice sites. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge of splicing cis-regulatory elements and their context-dependent effects on splicing, emphasizing recent global/genome-wide studies and open questions. PMID:18369186

  15. Role of the 3′ Splice Site in U12-Dependent Intron Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Rosemary C.; Peris, Marian J.; Seyboldt, Andrew S.; Padgett, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    U12-dependent introns containing alterations of the 3′ splice site AC dinucleotide or alterations in the spacing between the branch site and the 3′ splice site were examined for their effects on splice site selection in vivo and in vitro. Using an intron with a 5′ splice site AU dinucleotide, any nucleotide could serve as the 3′-terminal nucleotide, although a C residue was most active, while a U residue was least active. The penultimate A residue, by contrast, was essential for 3′ splice site function. A branch site-to-3′ splice site spacing of less than 10 or more than 20 nucleotides strongly activated alternative 3′ splice sites. A strong preference for a spacing of about 12 nucleotides was observed. The combined in vivo and in vitro results suggest that the branch site is recognized in the absence of an active 3′ splice site but that formation of the prespliceosomal complex A requires an active 3′ splice site. Furthermore, the U12-type spliceosome appears to be unable to scan for a distal 3′ splice site. PMID:11238930

  16. The habitus of 'rescue' and its significance for implementation of rapid response systems in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2014-11-01

    The need to focus on patient safety and improve the quality and consistency of medical care in acute hospital settings has been highlighted in a number of UK and international reports. When patients on a hospital ward become acutely unwell there is often a window of opportunity for staff, patients and relatives to contribute to the 'rescue' process by intervening in the trajectory of clinical deterioration. This paper explores the social and institutional processes associated with the practice of rescue, and implications for the implementation and effectiveness of rapid response systems (RRSs) within acute health care. An ethnographic case study was conducted in 2009 in two UK hospitals (focussing on the medical directorates in each organisation). Data collection involved 180 h of observation, 35 staff interviews (doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers) and documentary review. Analysis was informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice and his relational concept of the 'field' of the general medical ward. Three themes illustrated the nature of rescue work within the field and collective rules which guided associated occupational distinction practices: (1) the 'dirty work' of vital sign recording and its distinction from diagnostic (higher order) interpretive work; (2) the moral order of legitimacy claims for additional help; and (3) professional deference and the selective managerial control of rescue work. The discourse of rescue provided a means of exercising greater control over clinical uncertainty. The acquisition of 'rescue capital' enabled the social positioning of health care assistants, nurses and doctors, and shaped use of the RRS on the wards. Boundary work, professional legitimation and jurisdictional claims defined the social practice of rescue, as clinical staff had to balance safety, professional and organisational concerns within the field. This paper offers a nuanced understanding of patient safety on the front-line, challenging notions of

  17. Original Research: The Benefits of Rapid Response Teams: Exploring Perceptions of Nurse Leaders, Team Members, and End Users.

    PubMed

    Stolldorf, Deonni P

    2016-03-01

    : The perceived benefits of rapid response teams (RRTs) influence whether RRTs are used and sustained. Perceived benefits are particularly important to sustaining RRTs when limited RRT data are shared with organizational members. Nurse leaders' perceptions of the benefits of RRTs likely influence their support, which is crucial for sustained RRT use. The perceptions of RRT members and end users similarly will affect use. But little is known regarding the perceptions of nurse leaders, RRT members, and RRT users in this regard.This study sought to explore and compare the perceptions of nurse leaders, RRT members, and RRT users regarding the benefits of RRTs.A qualitative, multiple-case study design was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurse leaders, RRT members, and RRT users at four community hospitals, as part of a larger mixed-methods study examining RRT sustainability. Purposive and snowball sampling were used. Recruitment strategies included e-mail and listserv announcements, on-site presentations, direct personal contact, and a study flyer.All participants reported perceiving various ways that RRTs benefit the organization, staff members, and patients. Variations in the benefits perceived were observed between the three participant groups. Nurse leaders' perceptions tended to focus on macro-level benefits. RRT members emphasized the teaching and learning opportunities that RRTs offer. RRT users focused on the psychological support that RRTs can provide.Both similarities and differences were found between nurse leaders, RRT members, and RRT users regarding their perceptions of RRT benefits. Differences may be indicative of organizations' information-sharing processes; of variation in the priorities of nurse leaders, RRT members, and RRT users; and of the challenges nurses face daily in their work environments. Future research should investigate whether the perceived benefits of RRTs are borne out in actuality, as well as the relationships

  18. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease

  19. A volcano-seismic event spotting system for the use in rapid response systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Conny; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    The classification of seismic signals of volcanic origin is an important task in monitoring active volcanoes. The number and size of certain types of seismic events usually increase before periods of volcanic crisis and can be used to quantify the volcanic activity. Due to the advantage of providing consistent, objective and time-invariant results automatic classification systems are preferred. Most automatic classification systems are trained in a supervised fashion from a sufficiently large pre-classified data set. The setup of an automatic classification system thus requires the pre-existence of these training data. For a rapid volcano-response team, however, the situation is often different. In the worst case, no prior observations exist (e.g. re-awakening of a dormant volcano). More frequently, archive data exist for a particular observatory network, but no record of seismicity for a high volcanic activity level exists and new seismicity patterns occur. Usually, the networks are additionally sparse and new equipment will be installed for better surveillance during the actual crisis. For the new recording sites again no prior example data is available. Finally, due to the imminent crisis there might be no time for the time-consuming and tedious process of preparing a training data set. For all these reasons a classification system which allows a "learning-while-recording" approach would be very advantageous for use in rapid response systems. Within this study, we show a novel seismic event spotting approach in order to reduce the dependency on the existence of previously acquired data bases and classification schemes. One main goal is therefore to provide the observatory staff with a robust event classification system based on a minimum number of reference waveforms and thus allowing for a fast build-up of a volcanic signal classification scheme as early as interesting events have been identified. For implementation issues we make use of the Hidden Markov

  20. UMTS rapid response real-time seismic networks: implementation and strategies at INGV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Aladino; Margheriti, Lucia; Moretti, Milena; Lauciani, Valentino; Sensale, Gianpaolo; Bucci, Augusto; Criscuoli, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The benefits of portable real-time seismic networks are several and well known. During the management of a temporary experiment from the real-time data it is possible to detect and fix rapidly problems with power supply, time synchronization, disk failures and, most important, seismic signal quality degradation due to unexpected noise sources or sensor alignment/tampering. This usually minimizes field maintenance trips and maximizes both the quantity and the quality of the acquired data. When the area of the temporary experiment is not well monitored by the local permanent network, the real-time data from the temporary experiment can be fed to the permanent network monitoring system improving greatly both the real-time hypocentral locations and the final revised bulletin. All these benefits apply also in case of seismic crises when rapid deployment stations can significantly contribute to the aftershock analysis. Nowadays data transmission using meshed radio networks or satellite systems is not a big technological problem for a permanent seismic network where each site is optimized for the device power consumption and is usually installed by properly specialized technicians that can configure transmission devices and align antennas. This is not usually practical for temporary networks and especially for rapid response networks where the installation time is the main concern. These difficulties are substantially lowered using the now widespread UMTS technology for data transmission. A small (but sometimes power hungry) properly configured device with an omnidirectional antenna must be added to the station assembly. All setups are usually configured before deployment and this allows for an easy installation also by untrained personnel. We describe here the implementation of a UMTS based portable seismic network for both temporary experiments and rapid response applications developed at INGV. The first field experimentation of this approach dates back to the 2009 L

  1. Rapid Responsiveness to Practice Predicts Longer-Term Retention of Upper Extremity Motor Skill in Non-Demented Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Duff, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Skill acquisition is a form of motor learning that may provide key insights into the aging brain. Although previous work suggests that older adults learn novel motor tasks slower and to a lesser extent than younger adults, we have recently demonstrated no significant effect of chronological age on the rates and amounts of skill acquisition, nor on its long-term retention, in adults over the age of 65. To better understand predictors of skill acquisition in non-demented older adults, we now explore the relationship between early improvements in motor performance due to practice (i.e., rapid responsiveness) and longer-term retention of an upper extremity motor skill, and whether the extent of rapid responsiveness was associated with global cognitive status. Results showed significant improvements in motor performance within the first five (of 150) trials, and that this “rapid responsiveness” was predictive of skill retention 1 month later. Notably, the extent of rapid responsiveness was not dependent on global cognitive status, as measured by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Thus, rapid responsiveness appears to be an important variable in longer-term neurorehabilitative efforts with older adults, regardless of their cognitive status. PMID:26635601

  2. 20 CFR 665.330 - Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for rapid response also required activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Rapid Response Activities § 665.330 Are the NAFTA-TAA program requirements for... WIA are made available to workers who, under the NAFTA Implementation Act (Public Law 103-182),...

  3. Student Accomplishments in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program: A 10-Year Review.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rachel; Lechner, Breanne; Pulenzas, Natalie; Bedard, Gillian; Wong, Erin; Holden, Lori; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Szumacher, Ewa; Fenton, Gonenc; Chow, Edward; Popovic, Marko; Danjoux, Cyril

    2015-12-01

    In 1996, the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre developed the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP). The objective of this clinic is to consult, simulate, plan, and treat patients with palliative radiotherapy on the same day. In 2004, the RRRP initiated a program to provide clinical and research experience to undergraduate students interested in health sciences. The purpose of this study is to review the 10-year (2004-2013) experience of the RRRP and to examine whether the goals of the student program have been met. Students who worked in the RRRP from 2004 to 2013 were contacted to complete a short survey regarding their overall experience with the program and their current endeavors. Student accomplishments were collected from an internal database as well as PubMed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. A total of 54 students from ten postsecondary institutions have worked in the RRRP; 29 were from the University of Waterloo undergraduate co-op program. In total, 214 articles with first authorship from students were published, 93 (43%) of which can be found on PubMed. Other accomplishments include 40 book chapters, 58 invited presentations, and 99 awards cumulatively. Qualitative data regarding student perspectives of their experience in the RRRP were also analyzed. Over the past 10 years, the RRRP has achieved its goal of providing quality medical and research experience to students interested in the health sciences. Using the responses of past and present students, we hope to continue to shape our program and provide unique opportunities to future students. PMID:25370839

  4. Using Rapid-Response Scenario-Building Methodology for Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Stoepler, T. M.; Schuster, R.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid-response scenario-building methodology can be modified to develop scenarios for slow-onset disasters associated with climate change such as drought. Results of a collaboration between the Department of the Interior (DOI) Strategic Sciences Group (SSG) and the Southwest Colorado Social-Ecological Climate Resilience Project are presented in which SSG scenario-building methods were revised and applied to climate change adaptation planning in Colorado's Gunnison Basin, United States. The SSG provides the DOI with the capacity to rapidly assemble multidisciplinary teams of experts to develop scenarios of the potential environmental, social, and economic cascading consequences of environmental crises, and to analyze these chains to determine actionable intervention points. By design, the SSG responds to acute events of a relatively defined duration. As a capacity-building exercise, the SSG explored how its scenario-building methodology could be applied to outlining the cascading consequences of slow-onset events related to climate change. SSG staff facilitated two workshops to analyze the impacts of drought, wildfire, and insect outbreak in the sagebrush and spruce-fir ecosystems. Participants included local land managers, natural and social scientists, ranchers, and other stakeholders. Key findings were: 1) scenario framing must be adjusted to accommodate the multiple, synergistic components and longer time frames of slow-onset events; 2) the development of slow-onset event scenarios is likely influenced by participants having had more time to consider potential consequences, relative to acute events; 3) participants who are from the affected area may have a more vested interest in the outcome and/or may be able to directly implement interventions.

  5. Using a Novel Spatial Tool to Inform Invasive Species Early Detection and Rapid Response Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Alisha D.; Fusaro, Abigail J.; Kashian, Donna R.

    2015-07-01

    Management of invasive species has increasingly emphasized the importance of early detection and rapid response (EDRR) programs in limiting introductions, establishment, and impacts. These programs require an understanding of vector and species spatial dynamics to prioritize monitoring sites and efficiently allocate resources. Yet managers often lack the empirical data necessary to make these decisions. We developed an empirical mapping tool that can facilitate development of EDRR programs through identifying high-risk locations, particularly within the recreational boating vector. We demonstrated the utility of this tool in the Great Lakes watershed. We surveyed boaters to identify trips among water bodies and to quantify behaviors associated with high likelihood of species transfer (e.g., not removing organic materials from boat trailers) during that trip. We mapped water bodies with high-risk inbound and outbound boater movements using ArcGIS. We also tested for differences in high-risk behaviors based on demographic variables to understand risk differences among boater groups. Incorporation of boater behavior led to identification of additional high-risk water bodies compared to using the number of trips alone. Therefore, the number of trips itself may not fully reflect the likelihood of invasion. This tool can be broadly applied in other geographic contexts and with different taxa, and can be adjusted according to varying levels of information concerning the vector or species of interest. The methodology is straightforward and can be followed after a basic introduction to ArcGIS software. The visual nature of the mapping tool will facilitate site prioritization by managers and stakeholders from diverse backgrounds.

  6. Rapid-Response or Repeat-Mode Topography from Aerial Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, E.; Johnson, K. L.; Fitzgerald, F. S.; Morgan, M.; White, J.

    2014-12-01

    This decade has seen a surge of interest in Structure-from-Motion (SfM) as a means of generating high-resolution topography and coregistered texture maps from stereo digital photographs. Using an unstructured set of overlapping photographs captured from multiple viewpoints and minimal GPS ground control, SfM solves simultaneously for scene topography and camera positions, orientations and lens parameters. The use of cheap unmanned aerial vehicles or tethered helium balloons as camera platforms expedites data collection and overcomes many of the cost, time and logistical limitations of LiDAR surveying, making it a potentially valuable tool for rapid response mapping and repeat monitoring applications. We begin this presentation by assessing what data resolutions and precisions are achievable using a simple aerial camera platform and commercial SfM software (we use the popular Agisoft Photoscan package). SfM point clouds generated at two small (~0.1 km2), sparsely-vegetated field sites in California compare favorably with overlapping airborne and terrestrial LiDAR surveys, with closest point distances of a few centimeters between the independent datasets. Next, we go on to explore the method in more challenging conditions, in response to a major landslide in Mesa County, Colorado, on 25th May 2014. Photographs collected from a small UAV were used to generate a high-resolution model of the 4.5 x 1 km landslide several days before an airborne LiDAR survey could be organized and flown. An initial estimate of the mass balance of the landslide could quickly be made by differencing this model against pre-event topography generated using stereo photographs collected in 2009 as part of the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). This case study therefore demonstrates the rich potential offered by this technique, as well as some of the challenges, particularly with respect to the treatment of vegetation.

  7. The effect of rapid response teams on end-of-life care: A retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Benjamin; Salib, Mary; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A subset of critically ill patients have end-of-life (EOL) goals that are unclear. Rapid response teams (RRTs) may aid in the identification of these patients and the delivery of their EOL care. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the impact of RRT discussion on EOL care, and to examine how a preprinted order (PPO) set for EOL care influenced EOL discussions and outcomes. METHODS: A single-centre retrospective chart review of all RRT calls (January 2009 to December 2010) was performed. The effect of RRT EOL discussions and the effect of a hospital-wide PPO set on EOL care was examined. Charts were from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Critical Care Information Systemic database, and were interrogated by two reviewers. RESULTS: In patients whose EOL status changed following RRT EOL discussion, there were fewer intensive care unit (ICU) transfers (8.4% versus 17%; P<0.001), decreased ICU length of stay (5.8 days versus 20 days; P=0.08), increased palliative care consultations (34% versus 5.3%; P<0.001) and an increased proportion who died within 24 h of consultation (25% versus 8.3%; P<0.001). More patients experienced a change in EOL status following the introduction of an EOL PPO, from 20% (before) to 31% (after) (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: A change in EOL status following RRT-led EOL discussion was associated with reduced ICU transfers and enhanced access to palliative care services. Further study is required to identify and deconstruct barriers impairing timely and appropriate EOL discussions. PMID:25299222

  8. EASI--enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This directly purifies the single-stranded regions of heteroduplexes between alternative splices formed in the PCR, enabling direct sequencing of all the rare alternative splice forms of any gene. As a proof of principle the alternative transcripts of three tumour suppressor genes, TP53, MLH1 and MSH2, were isolated from testis cDNA. These contain missing exons, cryptic splice sites or include completely novel exons. EASI beads are stable for months in the fridge and can be easily combined with standard protocols to speed the cloning of novel transcripts. PMID:16951290

  9. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  11. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  12. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  13. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group ll Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor,N.; Keating, K.; Taylor, S.; Pyle, A.

    2008-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  14. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group II Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Taylor, Sean D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-04-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  15. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  16. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  17. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  18. Competition between pre-mRNAs for the splicing machinery drives global regulation of splicing.

    PubMed

    Munding, Elizabeth M; Shiue, Lily; Katzman, Sol; Donohue, John Paul; Ares, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    During meiosis in yeast, global splicing efficiency increases and then decreases. Here we provide evidence that splicing improves due to reduced competition for the splicing machinery. The timing of this regulation corresponds to repression and reactivation of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) during meiosis. In vegetative cells, RPG repression by rapamycin treatment also increases splicing efficiency. Downregulation of the RPG-dedicated transcription factor gene IFH1 genetically suppresses two spliceosome mutations, prp11-1 and prp4-1, and globally restores splicing efficiency in prp4-1 cells. We conclude that the splicing apparatus is limiting and that pre-messenger RNAs compete. Splicing efficiency of a pre-mRNA therefore depends not just on its own concentration and affinity for limiting splicing factor(s), but also on those of competing pre-mRNAs. Competition between RNAs for limiting processing factors appears to be a general condition in eukaryotes for a variety of posttranscriptional control mechanisms including microRNA (miRNA) repression, polyadenylation, and splicing. PMID:23891561

  19. Functional characterization of putative novel splicing mutations in the cardiomyopathy-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Millat, Gilles; Lafont, Estèle; Nony, Séverine; Rouvet, Isabelle; Bozon, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Molecular diagnosis of cardiomyopathies remains difficult not only because of the large number of causative genes and the high rate of private mutations but also due to the large number of unclassified variants (UVs) found in patients' DNA. This study reports the functional splicing impact of nine novel genomic variations previously identified in unrelated patients with cardiomyopathies. To identify splice variants among these UVs, a combination of in silico and in vitro hybrid minigene tools was used as transcript is not available. Using this two-step approach, these UVs were reclassified as splicing mutations (MYBPC3-c.655-25A>G, MYBPC3-c.1790G>A (p.Arg597Gln), MYBPC3-c.2414-36G>T) or as mutations with a majority of abnormally spliced transcripts (MYBPC3-c.1182C>A, TNNT2-c.460G>A (p.Glu154Lys), and TNNT2-c.822-3C>A) or as variations with a weak splicing effect (TNNT2-c.1000-38C>A). For the two remaining variations in intron 11 of the TNNT2 gene in the vicinity of the acceptor splice site (c.571-7G>A, c.571-29G>A), a minigene assay was inconclusive as exon 12 is neither recognized as an exon by HeLa nor by H9c2 cells. Our study highlights the importance of the combined use of in silico and in vitro splicing assays to improve the prediction of the functional splicing impact of identified genetic variants if the RNA sample from the patient is not easily available. PMID:25849606

  20. Kinetic characterization of the first step of the ribozyme-catalyzed trans excision-splicing reaction.

    PubMed

    Dotson, P Patrick; Sinha, Joy; Testa, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    Group I introns catalyze the self-splicing reaction, and their derived ribozymes are frequently used as model systems for the study of RNA folding and catalysis, as well as for the development of non-native catalytic reactions. Utilizing a group I intron-derived ribozyme from Pneumocystis carinii, we previously reported a non-native reaction termed trans excision-splicing (TES). In this reaction, an internal segment of RNA is excised from an RNA substrate, resulting in the covalent reattachment of the flanking regions. TES proceeds through two consecutive phosphotransesterification reactions, which are similar to the reaction steps of self-splicing. One key difference is that TES utilizes the 3'-terminal guanosine of the ribozyme as the first-step nucleophile, whereas self-splicing utilizes an exogenous guanosine. To further aid in our understanding of ribozyme reactions, a kinetic framework for the first reaction step (substrate cleavage) was established. The results demonstrate that the substrate binds to the ribozyme at a rate expected for simple helix formation. In addition, the rate constant for the first step of the TES reaction is more than one order of magnitude lower than the analogous step in self-splicing. Results also suggest that a conformational change, likely similar to that in self-splicing, exists between the two reaction steps of TES. Finally, multiple turnover is curtailed because dissociation of the cleavage product is slower than the rate of chemistry. PMID:18479464

  1. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-Von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2011-11-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex-associated protein/elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase WT IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine whether oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/d for 28 d. An increase in WT IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after 8 d in six of eight individuals; after 28 d, the mean increase compared with baseline was significant (p = 0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients but also that effect seems to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine whether kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  2. Nitric Oxide Receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Undergoes Splicing Regulation in Differentiating Human Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Vladislav G.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important mediator molecule in mammalian physiology, initiates a number of signaling mechanisms by activating the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Recently, a new role for NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in embryonic development and cell differentiation has emerged. The changes in expression of NO synthase isoforms and various sGC subunits has been demonstrated during human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiation. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that nascent α1 sGC transcript undergoes alternative splicing and that expression of α1 sGC splice forms directly affects sGC activity. Expression of sGC splice variants in the process of human ES (hES) cells differentiation has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate that α1 sGC undergoes alternative splicing during random hES differentiation for the first time. Our results indicate that C-α1 sGC splice form is expressed at high levels in differentiating cells and its intracellular distribution varies from canonical α1 sGC subunit. Together, our data suggest that alternative splicing of sGC subunits is associated with differentiation of hES cells. PMID:20964618

  3. Embracing the complexity of matricellular proteins: the functional and clinical significance of splice variation.

    PubMed

    Viloria, Katrina; Hill, Natasha J

    2016-05-01

    Matricellular proteins influence wide-ranging fundamental cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, growth and differentiation. They achieve this both through interactions with cell surface receptors and regulation of the matrix environment. Many matricellular proteins are also associated with diverse clinical disorders including cancer and diabetes. Alternative splicing is a precisely regulated process that can produce multiple isoforms with variable functions from a single gene. To date, the expression of alternate transcripts for the matricellular family has been reported for only a handful of genes. Here we analyse the evidence for alternative splicing across the matricellular family including the secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), thrombospondin, tenascin and CCN families. We find that matricellular proteins have double the average number of splice variants per gene, and discuss the types of domain affected by splicing in matricellular proteins. We also review the clinical significance of alternative splicing for three specific matricellular proteins that have been relatively well characterised: osteopontin (OPN), tenascin-C (TNC) and periostin. Embracing the complexity of matricellular splice variants will be important for understanding the sometimes contradictory function of these powerful regulatory proteins, and for their effective clinical application as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27135623

  4. CIR, a corepressor of CBF1, binds to PAP-1 and effects alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Hiroshi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi . E-mail: hiro@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M.

    2005-02-15

    We have reported that PAP-1, a product of a causative gene for autosomal retinitis pigmentosa, plays a role in splicing. In this study, CIR, a protein originally identified as a CBF1-interacting protein and reported to act as a transcriptional corepressor, was identified as a PAP-1 binding protein and its function as a splicing factor was investigated. In addition to a basic lysine and acidic serine-rich (BA) domain and a zinc knuckle-like motif, CIR has an arginine/serine dipeptide repeat (RS) domain in its C terminal region. The RS domain has been reported to be present in the superfamily of SR proteins, which are involved in splicing reactions. We generated CIR mutants with deletions of each BA and RS domain and studied their subcellular localizations and interactions with PAP-1 and other SR proteins, including SC35, SF2/ASF, and U2AF{sup 35}. CIR was found to interact with U2AF{sup 35} through the BA domain, with SC35 and SF2/ASF through the RS domain, and with PAP-1 outside the BA domain in vivo and in vitro. CIR was found to be colocalized with SC35 and PAP-1 in nuclear speckles. Then the effect of CIR on splicing was investigated using the E1a minigene as a reporter in HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of CIR with the E1a minigene changed the ratio of spliced isoforms of E1a that were produced by alternative selection of 5'-splice sites. These results indicate that CIR is a member of the family of SR-related proteins and that CIR plays a role in splicing regulation.

  5. UMTS rapid response real-time seismic networks: implementation and strategies at INGV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, A.; Margheriti, L.; Moretti, M.; Lauciani, V.; Sensale, G.; Bucci, A.; Criscuoli, F.

    2015-12-01

    Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) and its evolutions are nowadays the most affordable and widespread data communication infrastructure available almost world wide. Moreover the always growing cellular phone market is pushing the development of new devices with higher performances and lower power consumption. All these characteristics make UMTS really useful for the implementation of an "easy to deploy" temporary real-time seismic station. Despite these remarkable features, there are many drawbacks that must be properly taken in account to effectively transmit the seismic data: Internet security, signal and service availability, power consumption. - Internet security: exposing seismological data services and seismic stations to the Internet is dangerous, attack prone and can lead to downtimes in the services, so we setup a dedicated Virtual Private Network (VPN) service to protect all the connected devices. - Signal and service availability: while for temporary experiment a carefull planning and an accurate site selection can minimize the problem, this is not always the case with rapid response networks. Moreover, as with any other leased line, the availability of the UMTS service during a seismic crisis is basically unpredictable. Nowadays in Italy during a major national emergency a Committee of the Italian Civil Defense ensures unified management and coordination of emergency activities. Inside it the telecom companies are committed to give support to the crisis management improving the standards in their communication networks. - Power consumption: it is at least of the order of that of the seismic station and, being related to data flow and signal quality is largely unpredictable. While the most secure option consists in adding a second independent solar power supply to the seismic station, this is not always a very convenient solution since it doubles the cost and doubles the equipment on site. We found that an acceptable trade-off is to add an

  6. The Climate Science Rapid Response Team - A Model for Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandia, S. A.; Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Ashley, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, there have been many independent initiatives which have commenced with the goal of improving communication between scientists and the larger public. These initiatives have often been motivated by the recognition that concerns amongst scientists related to the pending threats of climate change are not universally shared by the general public. Multiple studies have conclusively demonstrated that while the vast majority of climate scientists are in broad agreement that human-emitted greenhouse gases are causing increases in the Earth's temperature, the larger public is divided. Often, this divide mirrors divides on other political, societal, economic, or scientific issues. One unique approach to improve the conveyance of the state of climate-change science to the public is reflected by a self-organized effort of scientists themselves. This approach has lead to the formation of the Climate Science Rapid Response Team (CSRRT). The mission of this organization is to provide accurate and rapid information on any climate-science topic to general media and governmental inquirers. The CSRRT currently consists of approximately 135 world-class climate scientists whose members cover the sub-disciplines of climate change and include not only the natural sciences but also economics and policy. Since its formation, the CSRRT has fielded approximately four inquires each week from institutions that include The Associated Press, ABC, CBS, CNN, BBC, New York Times, Time of London, National Public Radio, The Guardian, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the U.S. Congress, among others. Members of the CSRRT have been asked to provide quotations for news stories; they have also been asked to give radio, television, or print-media interviews. Some members of the CSRRT have undergone media training to help encourage the use of jargon-free language so that clear communication with the broader public can be more successful. The response from

  7. Rapid Response Tools and Datasets for Post-fire Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mary Ellen; MacDonald, Lee H.; Billmire, Michael; Elliot, William J.; Robichaud, Pete R.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid response is critical following natural disasters. Flooding, erosion, and debris flows are a major threat to life, property and municipal water supplies after moderate and high severity wildfires. The problem is that mitigation measures must be rapidly implemented if they are to be effective, but they are expensive and cannot be applied everywhere. Fires, runoff, and erosion risks also are highly heterogeneous in space, so there is an urgent need for a rapid, spatially-explicit assessment. Past post-fire modeling efforts have usually relied on lumped, conceptual models because of the lack of readily available, spatially-explicit data layers on the key controls of topography, vegetation type, climate, and soil characteristics. The purpose of this project is to develop a set of spatially-explicit data layers for use in process-based models such as WEPP, and to make these data layers freely available. The resulting interactive online modeling database (http://geodjango.mtri.org/geowepp/) is now operational and publically available for 17 western states in the USA. After a fire, users only need to upload a soil burn severity map, and this is combined with the pre-existing data layers to generate the model inputs needed for spatially explicit models such as GeoWEPP (Renschler, 2003). The development of this online database has allowed us to predict post-fire erosion and various remediation scenarios in just 1-7 days for six fires ranging in size from 4-540 km2. These initial successes have stimulated efforts to further improve the spatial extent and amount of data, and add functionality to support the USGS debris flow model, batch processing for Disturbed WEPP (Elliot et al., 2004) and ERMiT (Robichaud et al., 2007), and to support erosion modeling for other land uses, such as agriculture or mining. The design and techniques used to create the database and the modeling interface are readily repeatable for any area or country that has the necessary topography

  8. Group II Intron Self-Splicing.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-07-01

    Group II introns are large, autocatalytic ribozymes that catalyze RNA splicing and retrotransposition. Splicing by group II introns plays a major role in the metabolism of plants, fungi, and yeast and contributes to genetic variation in many bacteria. Group II introns have played a major role in genome evolution, as they are likely progenitors of spliceosomal introns, retroelements, and other machinery that controls genetic variation and stability. The structure and catalytic mechanism of group II introns have recently been elucidated through a combination of genetics, chemical biology, solution biochemistry, and crystallography. These studies reveal a dynamic machine that cycles progressively through multiple conformations as it stimulates the various stages of splicing. A central active site, containing a reactive metal ion cluster, catalyzes both steps of self-splicing. These studies provide insights into RNA structure, folding, and catalysis, as they raise new questions about the behavior of RNA machines. PMID:27391926

  9. Lessons from non-canonical splicing.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Christopher R; Blazquez, Lorea; Ule, Jernej

    2016-07-01

    Recent improvements in experimental and computational techniques that are used to study the transcriptome have enabled an unprecedented view of RNA processing, revealing many previously unknown non-canonical splicing events. This includes cryptic events located far from the currently annotated exons and unconventional splicing mechanisms that have important roles in regulating gene expression. These non-canonical splicing events are a major source of newly emerging transcripts during evolution, especially when they involve sequences derived from transposable elements. They are therefore under precise regulation and quality control, which minimizes their potential to disrupt gene expression. We explain how non-canonical splicing can lead to aberrant transcripts that cause many diseases, and also how it can be exploited for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27240813

  10. Re-splicing of mature mRNA in cancer cells promotes activation of distant weak alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts of the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) are aberrantly spliced in many cancers. A major aberrant splicing event on the TSG101 pre-mRNA involves joining of distant alternative 5′ and 3′ splice sites within exon 2 and exon 9, respectively, resulting in the extensive elimination of the mRNA. The estimated strengths of the alternative splice sites are much lower than those of authentic splice sites. We observed that the equivalent aberrant mRNA could be generated from an intron-less TSG101 gene expressed ectopically in breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we identified a pathway-specific endogenous lariat RNA consisting solely of exonic sequences, predicted to be generated by a re-splicing between exon 2 and exon 9 on the spliced mRNA. Our results provide evidence for a two-step splicing pathway in which the initial constitutive splicing removes all 14 authentic splice sites, thereby bringing the weak alternative splice sites into close proximity. We also demonstrate that aberrant multiple-exon skipping of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) pre-mRNA in cancer cells occurs via re-splicing of spliced FHIT mRNA. The re-splicing of mature mRNA can potentially generate mutation-independent diversity in cancer transcriptomes. Conversely, a mechanism may exist in normal cells to prevent potentially deleterious mRNA re-splicing events. PMID:22675076

  11. A point mutation within CD45 exon A is the cause of variant CD45RA splicing in humans.

    PubMed

    Zilch, C F; Walker, A M; Timón, M; Goff, L K; Wallace, D L; Beverley, P C

    1998-01-01

    The leukocyte common antigen (CD45) is alternatively spliced, generating various isoforms expressed on hemopoietic cells. The splicing pattern of CD45 in T cells is altered in some individuals who show abnormal expression of high molecular weight isoforms containing exon A. The variant splicing pattern was shown to be associated with heterozygosity for a silent point mutation within CD45 exon A. This C to G transition is located 77 nucleotides downstream of the splice acceptor junction of exon A (198 bp total length). Here we report that this mutation is the cause of abnormal splicing. To isolate the mutant gene, somatic cell hybrids of lymphocytes with a CD45 splicing defect and a mouse lymphoid line were produced and clones expressing different isoforms of CD45 were isolated. Expression of the high molecular weight isoform containing exon A was associated with the mutation within exon A. All hybrids expressing the low molecular weight isoforms lacking exon A contained the normal allele of CD45 only. In addition, minigenes including this mutation were constructed and transfected into various cell lines (COS-7, HeLa, CHO). Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed an increase of more than tenfold in splicing to CD45RA (concomitant with a decrease in splicing to CD45RO) when compared with the normal minigene. Taken together, these results demonstrate a causal relationship between the mutation in CD45 exon A and the variant splicing pattern observed. The involvement of trans-acting splicing factors that interact with this region of CD45 pre-mRNA is currently under investigation. PMID:9485182

  12. Splicing in action: assessing disease causing sequence changes

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, D; Baralle, M

    2005-01-01

    Variations in new splicing regulatory elements are difficult to identify exclusively by sequence inspection and may result in deleterious effects on precursor (pre) mRNA splicing. These mutations can result in either complete skipping of the exon, retention of the intron, or the introduction of a new splice site within an exon or intron. Sometimes mutations that do not disrupt or create a splice site activate pre-existing pseudo splice sites, consistent with the proposal that introns contain splicing inhibitory sequences. These variants can also affect the fine balance of isoforms produced by alternatively spliced exons and in consequence cause disease. Available genomic pathology data reveal that we are still partly ignorant of the basic mechanisms that underlie the pre-mRNA splicing process. The fact that human pathology can provide pointers to new modulatory elements of splicing should be exploited. PMID:16199547

  13. Identification of alternative splicing regulators by RNA interference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung W.; Parisky, Katherine; Celotto, Alicia M.; Reenan, Robert A.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2004-01-01

    Alternative splicing is thought to be regulated by nonspliceosomal RNA binding proteins that modulate the association of core components of the spliceosome with the pre-mRNA. Although the majority of metazoan genes encode pre-mRNAs that are alternatively spliced, remarkably few splicing regulators are currently known. Here, we used RNA interference to examine the role of >70% of the Drosophila RNA-binding proteins in regulating alternative splicing. We identified 47 proteins as splicing regulators, 26 of which have not previously been implicated in alternative splicing. Many of the regulators we identified are nonspliceosomal RNA-binding proteins. However, our screen unexpectedly revealed that altering the concentration of certain core components of the spliceosome specifically modulates alternative splicing. These results significantly expand the number of known splicing regulators and reveal an extraordinary richness in the mechanisms that regulate alternative splicing. PMID:15492211

  14. Does distance matter? Variations in alternative 3' splicing regulation.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Martin; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing constitutes a major mechanism creating protein diversity in humans. This diversity can result from the alternative skipping of entire exons or by alternative selection of the 5' or 3' splice sites that define the exon boundaries. In this study, we analyze the sequence and evolutionary characteristics of alternative 3' splice sites conserved between human and mouse genomes for distances ranging from 3 to 100 nucleotides. We show that alternative splicing events can be distinguished from constitutive splicing by a combination of properties which vary depending on the distance between the splice sites. Among the unique features of alternative 3' splice sites, we observed an unexpectedly high occurrence of events in which a polypyrimidine tract was found to overlap the upstream splice site. By applying a machine-learning approach, we show that we can successfully discriminate true alternative 3' splice sites from constitutive 3' splice sites. Finally, we propose that the unique features of the intron flanking alternative splice sites are indicative of a regulatory mechanism that is involved in splice site selection. We postulate that the process of splice site selection is influenced by the distance between the competitive splice sites. PMID:17704130

  15. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    of the ASTER Urgent Request Protocol (URP) for natural disaster monitoring and scientific analysis, has expanded the project to other volcanoes around the world and is in progress through 2011. The focus on ASTER data is due to the suitability of the sensor for natural disaster monitoring and the availability of data. The instrument has several unique facets that make it especially attractive for volcanic observations (Ramsey and Dehn, 2004). Specifically, ASTER routinely collects data at night, it has the ability to generate digital elevation models using stereo imaging, it can collect data in various gain states to minimize data saturation, it has a cross-track pointing capability for faster targeting, and it collects data up to ±85° latitude for better global coverage. As with any optical imaging-based remote sensing, the viewing conditions can negatively impact the data quality. This impact varies across the optical and thermal infrared wavelengths as well as being a function of the specific atmospheric window within a given wavelength region. Water vapor and cloud formation can obscure surface data in the visible and near infrared (VNIR)/shortwave infrared (SWIR) region due mainly to non-selective scattering of the incident photons. In the longer wavelengths of the thermal infrared (TIR), scattering is less of an issue, but heavy cloud cover can still obscure the ground due to atmospheric absorption. Thin clouds can be optically-transparent in the VNIR and TIR regions, but can cause errors in the extracted surface reflectance or derived surface temperatures. In regions prone to heavy cloud cover, optical remote sensing can be improved through increased temporal resolution. As more images are acquired in a given time period the chances of a clear image improve dramatically. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) routine monitoring, which commonly collects 4-6 images per day of any north Pacific volcano, takes advantage of this fact. The rapid

  16. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  17. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  18. Splicing therapy for neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Andrew G L; Wood, Matthew J A

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases in humans. Both conditions are fatal and no clinically available treatments are able to significantly alter disease course in either case. However, by manipulation of pre-mRNA splicing using antisense oligonucleotides, defective transcripts from the DMD gene and from the SMN2 gene in SMA can be modified to once again produce protein and restore function. A large number of in vitro and in vivo studies have validated the applicability of this approach and an increasing number of preliminary clinical trials have either been completed or are under way. Several different oligonucleotide chemistries can be used for this purpose and various strategies are being developed to facilitate increased delivery efficiency and prolonged therapeutic effect. As these novel therapeutic compounds start to enter the clinical arena, attention must also be drawn to the question of how best to facilitate the clinical development of such personalised genetic therapies and how best to implement their provision. PMID:23631896

  19. Alternative Splicing Signatures in RNA-seq Data: Percent Spliced in (PSI).

    PubMed

    Schafer, Sebastian; Miao, Kui; Benson, Craig C; Heinig, Matthias; Cook, Stuart A; Hubner, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of alternative exons are spliced out of messenger RNA to increase protein diversity. High-throughput sequencing of short cDNA fragments (RNA-seq) generates a genome-wide snapshot of these post-transcriptional processes. RNA-seq reads yield insights into the regulation of alternative splicing by revealing the usage of known or unknown splice sites as well as the expression level of exons. Constitutive exons are never covered by split alignments, whereas alternative exonic parts are located within highly expressed splicing junctions. The ratio between reads including or excluding exons, also known as percent spliced in index (PSI), indicates how efficiently sequences of interest are spliced into transcripts. This protocol describes a method to calculate the PSI without prior knowledge of splicing patterns. It provides a quantitative, global assessment of exon usage that can be integrated with other tools that identify differential isoform processing. Novel, complex splicing events along a genetic locus can be visualized in an exon-centric manner and compared across conditions. PMID:26439713

  20. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  1. BRCA1 EXON 11, a CERES (composite regulatory element of splicing) element involved in splice regulation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Claudia; Raponi, Michela; Wilson, David I; Baralle, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified variants (UV) of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a "silent" change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES). PMID:25056543

  2. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine. PMID:25525159

  3. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Hewison, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. PMID:25447737

  4. Tau exon 10 alternative splicing and tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities of microtubule-associated protein tau play a central role in neurofibrillary degeneration in several neurodegenerative disorders that collectively called tauopathies. Six isoforms of tau are expressed in adult human brain, which result from alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generated from a single tau gene. Alternative splicing of tau exon 10 results in tau isoforms containing either three or four microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau and 4R-tau, respectively). Approximately equal levels of 3R-tau and 4R-tau are expressed in normal adult human brain, but the 3R-tau/4R-tau ratio is altered in the brains in several tauopathies. Discovery of silence mutations and intronic mutations of tau gene in some individuals with frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), which only disrupt tau exon 10 splicing but do not alter tau's primary sequence, demonstrates that dysregulation of tau exon 10 alternative splicing and consequently of 3R-tau/4R-tau balance is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. Here, we review the gene structure, transcripts and protein isoforms of tau, followed by the regulation of exon 10 splicing that determines the expression of 3R-tau or 4R-tau. Finally, dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of tau in several tauopathies is discussed. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which tau exon 10 splicing is regulated and how it is disrupted in tauopathies will provide new insight into the mechanisms of these tauopathies and help identify new therapeutic targets to treat these disorders. PMID:18616804

  5. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  6. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  7. The HP1 homolog Rhino anchors a nuclear complex that suppresses piRNA precursor splicing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Jie; Schultz, Nadine; Zhang, Fan; Parhad, Swapnil S.; Tu, Shikui; Vreven, Thom; Zamore, Phillip D.; Weng, Zhiping; Theurkauf, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary piRNAs guide an adaptive genome defense system that silences transposons during germline development. The Drosophila HP1 homolog Rhino is required for germline piRNA production. We show that Rhino binds specifically to the heterochromatic clusters that produce piRNA precursors, and that binding directly correlates with piRNA production. Rhino co-localizes to germline nuclear foci with Rai1/DXO related protein Cuff and the DEAD box protein UAP56, which are also required for germline piRNA production. RNA sequencing indicates that most cluster transcripts are not spliced, and that rhino, cuff and uap56 mutations increase expression of spliced cluster transcripts over 100 fold. LacI∷Rhino fusion protein binding suppresses splicing of a reporter transgene, and is sufficient to trigger piRNA production from a trans combination of sense and antisense reporters. We therefore propose that Rhino anchors a nuclear complex that suppresses cluster transcript splicing, and speculate that stalled splicing differentiates piRNA precursors from mRNAs. PMID:24906152

  8. The in vivo dynamics of TCERG1, a factor that couples transcriptional elongation with splicing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Boireau, Stéphanie; Schmidt, Ute; Muñoz-Cobo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Bertrand, Edouard; Suñé, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Coupling between transcription and RNA processing is key for gene regulation. Using live-cell photobleaching techniques, we investigated the factor TCERG1, which coordinates transcriptional elongation with splicing. We demonstrate that TCERG1 is highly mobile in the nucleoplasm and that this mobility is slightly decreased when it is associated with speckles. Dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) but not α-amanitin treatment reduced the mobility of TCERG1, which suggests interaction with paused transcription elongation complexes. We found that TCERG1 mobility is rapid at the transcription site (TS) of a reporter that splices post-transcriptionally and that TCERG1 is recruited to the active TS independent of the CTD of RNAPII, thus excluding phosphorylated CTD as a requirement for recruiting this factor to the TS. Importantly, the mobility of TCERG1 is reduced when the reporter splices cotranscriptionally, which suggests that TCERG1 forms new macromolecular complexes when splicing occurs cotranscriptionally. In this condition, spliceostatin A has no effect, indicating that TCERG1 rapidly binds and dissociates from stalled spliceosomal complexes and that the mobility properties of TCERG1 do not depend on events occurring after the initial spliceosome formation. Taken together, these data suggest that TCERG1 binds independently to elongation and splicing complexes, thus performing their coupling by transient interactions rather than by stable association with one or the other complexes. This finding has conceptual implications for understanding the coupling between transcription and RNA processing. PMID:26873599

  9. Phosphoregulation of Ire1 RNase splicing activity

    PubMed Central

    Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R.; Carrara, Marta; Ali, Maruf M. U.

    2014-01-01

    Ire1 is activated in response to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is a unique enzyme, possessing both kinase and RNase activity that is required for specific splicing of Xbp1 mRNA leading to UPR activation. How phosphorylation impacts on the Ire1 splicing activity is unclear. In this study, we isolate distinct phosphorylated species of Ire1 and assess their effects on RNase splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We find that phosphorylation within the kinase activation loop significantly increases RNase splicing in vitro. Correspondingly, mutants of Ire1 that cannot be phosphorylated on the activation loop show decreased specific Xbp1 and promiscuous RNase splicing activity relative to wild-type Ire1 in cells. These data couple the kinase phosphorylation reaction to the activation state of the RNase, suggesting that phosphorylation of the activation loop is an important step in Ire1-mediated UPR activation. PMID:24704861

  10. Gene and alternative splicing annotation with AIR

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Liliana; Di Francesco, Valentina; Miller, Jason; Turner, Russell; Yao, Alison; Harris, Michael; Walenz, Brian; Mobarry, Clark; Merkulov, Gennady V.; Charlab, Rosane; Dew, Ian; Deng, Zuoming; Istrail, Sorin; Li, Peter; Sutton, Granger

    2005-01-01

    Designing effective and accurate tools for identifying the functional and structural elements in a genome remains at the frontier of genome annotation owing to incompleteness and inaccuracy of the data, limitations in the computational models, and shifting paradigms in genomics, such as alternative splicing. We present a methodology for the automated annotation of genes and their alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts based on existing cDNA and protein sequence evidence from the same species or projected from a related species using syntenic mapping information. At the core of the method is the splice graph, a compact representation of a gene, its exons, introns, and alternatively spliced isoforms. The putative transcripts are enumerated from the graph and assigned confidence scores based on the strength of sequence evidence, and a subset of the high-scoring candidates are selected and promoted into the annotation. The method is highly selective, eliminating the unlikely candidates while retaining 98% of the high-quality mRNA evidence in well-formed transcripts, and produces annotation that is measurably more accurate than some evidence-based gene sets. The process is fast, accurate, and fully automated, and combines the traditionally distinct gene annotation and alternative splicing detection processes in a comprehensive and systematic way, thus considerably aiding in the ensuing manual curation efforts. PMID:15632090