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Sample records for rare earths ce

  1. Rare earth magnetism in CeFeAsO: a single crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesche, A.; Krellner, C.; de Souza, M.; Lang, M.; Geibel, C.

    2009-10-01

    Single crystals of CeFeAsO, large enough to study the anisotropy of the magnetic properties, were grown by an optimized Sn-flux technique. The high quality of our single crystals is apparent from the highest residual resistivity ratio (RRR)≈12, reported among undoped RFeAsO compounds (R=rare earth) as well as sharp anomalies in resistivity, specific heat, C(T), and thermal expansion at the different phase transitions. The magnetic susceptibility χ(T) presents a large easy-plane anisotropy consistent with the lowest crystal electric field doublet having a dominant Γ6 character. Curie-Weiss-like susceptibilities for magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the crystallographic c-axis do not reveal an influence of a staggered field on the Ce site induced by magnetic ordering of the Fe. Furthermore, the standard signatures for antiferromagnetic order of Ce at TN4f=3.7 K observed in χ(T) and C(T) are incompatible with a Zeeman splitting Δ≈10 K of the CEF ground state doublet at low temperature due to the Fe-magnetic order as previously proposed. Our results can be reconciled with the earlier observation by assuming a comparatively stronger effect of the Ce-Ce exchange leading to a reduction of this Zeeman splitting below 15 K.

  2. Magnetization switching of rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yiming; Cao, Shixun Ren, Wei; Feng, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Lu, Bo

    2014-06-09

    We report the synthesis of single phase rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3} and its magnetic properties. A canted antiferromagnetic transition with thermal hysteresis at T = 260 K is observed, and a magnetic compensation (zero magnetization) near 133 K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Ce{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments. At low temperature, field induced magnetization reversal starting from 43 K for H = 1.2 kOe reveals the spin flip driven by Zeeman energy between the net moments and the applied field. These findings may find potential uses in magnetic switching devices such as nonvolatile magnetic memory which facilitates two distinct states of magnetization.

  3. Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.; Sinha, S.P.; Kosynkin, V.D.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral loparite (Ce, NA, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3 is the principal ore of the light-group rare-earth elements (LREE) in Russia. The complex oxide has a perovskite (ABO3) structure with coupled substitutions, polymorphism, defect chemistry and a tendency to become metamict. The A site generally contains weakly bonded, easily exchanged cations of the LREE, Na and Ca. The B site generally contains smaller, highly charged cations of Ti, Nb or Fe+3. Mine production is from Russia's Kola Peninsula. Ore is beneficiated to produce a 95% loparite concentrate containing 30% rare-earth oxides. Loparite concentrate is refined by either a chlorination process or acid decomposition process to recover rare-earths, titanium, niobium and tantalum. Rare-earths are separated by solvent extraction and selective precipitation/dissolution. The concentrate is processed at plants in Russia, Estonia and Kazakstan.

  4. Competition Between Organic Matter and Solid Surface for Cation Sorption: Ce and Rare Earth Element as Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davranche, M.; Pourret, O.; Gruau, G.; Dia, A.

    2006-12-01

    Aquatic or soil organic matter are well-known to be strong adsorbent of many cations due to their adsorption capacity. Among these cations, the trivalent rare earth element (REE) and particularly Ce seem to be promising tools to investigate the impact of competition in between organic or inorganic ligands. Ce (III) is oxidized into Ce (IV) by oxidative surface such as Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides. Since Ce (IV) is preferentially adsorbed (as compared to other REE), a positive and negative Ce anomaly is developed respectively onto the solid and within the solution. Previous studies (Davranche et al., 2004, 2005) highlighted the suppression of this feature when Ce occurs to be complexed with organic matter (as humate species). Recent experiments were designed to evaluate the competition between humate and Mn oxide for REE complexation (each reactant being added simultaneously). Two parameters control the competition: time and pH. While organic matter does adsorb immediately the free REE, a desorption of REE occurs through time. Desorption is marked by the development of a Ce anomaly in the REE pattern that reflects the complexation with Mn oxide surface. Along the time, solid surface becomes thus more competitive than the organic matter. PH still influences the competition since at basic pH, REE and organic matter - probably as REE-organic complexes - are adsorbed onto the solid surface. Ultrafiltration analyses at 5 KD were also performed to separate organic matter and organic complexes from the solution. Results provide evidence that in presence of a solid surface, HREE (high rare earth element) desorption from the organic matter occurs through time. This leads to HREE enrichment in solution. All these results suggest that complexation of organic matter is kinetically favoured as compared to the complexation with solid surfaces. However, the organic complex formed during the first stage of the complexation process involves weak bindings. These bindings are easily broken

  5. Ternary rare-earth iron arsenides RE12Fe57.5As41 (RE = La, Ce).

    PubMed

    Stoyko, Stanislav S; Blanchard, Peter E R; Mar, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    The rare-earth iron arsenides RE(12)Fe(57.5)As(41) (RE = La, Ce) have been prepared by direct reactions of the elements in the presence of a Sn flux. Analysis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data reveals that they adopt a new orthorhombic structure type (Pearson symbol oP236, space group Pmmn, Z = 2; a = 10.8881(9) A, b = 25.753(2) A, c = 12.5436(10) A for RE = La; a = 10.8376(8) A, b = 25.639(2) A, c = 12.4701(9) A for RE = Ce). In this metal-rich arsenide, the complex three-dimensional network (derived from 4 RE, 24 Fe, and 17 As sites) can be described as being built from unusual wavelike layers of connected As-centered trigonal prisms. Five of the Fe sites are partially occupied. The electronic structure of these compounds was probed through core-line X-ray photoelectron spectra. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated ferromagnetic ordering at T(C) = 125 and 95 K for the La and Ce compounds, respectively. Electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of Ce(12)Fe(57.5)As(41) showed metallic behavior with a prominent transition that coincides closely with the ferromagnetic ordering temperature. PMID:20128600

  6. Site-preference and valency for rare-earth sites in (R-Ce)(2)Fe14B magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, A; Khan, M; McCallum, RW; Johnson, DD

    2013-01-28

    Rare-earth (R) permanent magnets of R2Fe14B have technological importance due to their high energy products, and they have two R-sites (Wyckoff 4f and 4g, with four-fold multiplicity) that affect chemistry and valence. Designing magnetic behavior and stability via alloying is technologically relevant to reduce critical (expensive) R-content while retaining key properties; cerium, an abundant (cheap) R-element, offers this potential. We calculate magnetic properties and Ce site preference in (R1-xCex)(2)Fe14B [R = La, Nd] using density functional theory (DFT) methods-including a DFT+U scheme to treat localized 4f-electrons. Fe moments compare well with neutron data-almost unaffected by Hubbard U, and weakly affected by spin-orbit coupling. In La2Fe14B, Ce alloys for 0 <= x <= 1 and prefers smaller R(4f) sites, as observed, a trend we find unaffected by valence. Whereas, in Nd2Fe14B, Ce is predicted to have limited alloying (x <= 0.3) with a preference for larger R(4g) sites, resulting in weak partial ordering and segregation. The Curie temperatures versus x for (Nd, Ce) were predicted for a typical sample processing and verified experimentally. (C) 2013 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4789527

  7. Rare earth elements in Japan Sea sediments and diagenetic behavior of Ce/Ce∗: Results from ODP Leg 127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Richard W.; Buchholtzten Brink, Marilyn R.; Brumsack, Hans J.; Gerlach, David C.; Russ, G. Price

    1991-09-01

    The relative effects of paleoceanographic and paleogeographic variations, sediment lithology, and diagenetic processes on the recorded rare earth element (REE) chemistry of Japan Sea sediments are evaluated by investigating REE total abundances and relative fractionations in 59 samples from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 127. REE total abundances (ΣREE) in the Japan Sea are strongly dependent upon the paleoceanographic position of a given site with respect to terrigenous and biogenic sources. REE concentrations at Site 794 (Yamato Basin) overall correspond well to aluminosilicate chemical indices and are strongly diluted by SiO2 within the late Miocene-Pliocene diatomaceous sequence. Eu/Eu∗ values at Site 794 reach a maximum through the diatomaceous interval as well, most likely suggesting an association of Eu/Eu∗ with the siliceous component, or reflecting slight incorporation of a detrital feldspar phase. ΣREE at Site 795 (Japan Basin) also is affiliated strongly with aluminosilicate phases, yet is diluted only slightly by siliceous input. At Site 797 (Yamato Basin), REE is not as clearly associated with the aluminosilicate fraction, is correlated moderately to siliceous input, and may be sporadically influenced by detrital heavy minerals originating from the nearby rifted continental fragment composing the Yamato Rise. The biogenic influence is largest at Site 794, moderately developed at Site 797, and of only minor importance at Site 795, reflecting basinal contrasts in productivity such that the Yamato Basin records greater biogenic input than the Japan Basin, while the most productive waters overlie the easternmost sequence of Site 794. Ce/Ce∗ profiles at all three sites increase monotonically with depth, and record progressive diagenetic LREE fractionation. The observed Ce/Ce∗ record does not respond to changes in oxygenation state of the overlying water, and Ce/Ce∗ correlates slightly better with depth than with age. The downhole increase in Ce

  8. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Hussain, T; Ahuja, R; Kang, T W; Luo, W

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  9. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  10. Influence of yttrium content on the location of rare earth ions in LYSO:Ce crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dongzhou; Weng, Linhong; Yang, Jianhua; Ren, Guohao; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-15

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) measurements were performed to investigate structure details and segregation coefficients of (Lu{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}){sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (x=0 at%, 8.7 at%, 25.7 at%, 44.7 at%, 65.7 at%, 87.9 at% and 100 at%). Y{sup 3+} cations were found to have a preferential occupation for RE1 site (7-oxygen-coordinated) over RE2 site (6-oxygen-coordinated), which results in a greater increase of cell parameter c than that of a with increase in Y content due to LYSO's microstructure characteristics. Results presented here revealed that the less the difference in electronegativity and effective ionic radius between the two ions, the easier substitution of one ion by the other, and hence the higher segregation coefficients. Besides, the contribution of luminescence of Ce1 and Ce2 in the whole XEL was evaluated, and the location of Ce{sup 3+} ion was discussed. - Graphical abstract: Segregation coefficients of (Lu{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}){sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Cce:italic> at RT/ce:italic>. Display Omitted.

  11. Effect of rare earth Ce on the far infrared radiation property of iron ore tailings ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Duan, Xinhui; Huo, Xiaoli; Tang, Qingguo

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Detailed process proposed for preparation of iron ore tailings ceramics. • Replace natural minerals with iron ore tailings as raw materials for preparing functional ceramics. • Impact mechanism of Ce on far infrared ceramics, as well as its optimum addition amounts can be obtained. • Propose a new perspective on considering the mechanism of far infrared radiation. - Abstract: A kind of far infrared radiation ceramics was prepared by using iron ore tailings, CaCO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} as main raw materials, and Ce as additive. The result of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the sample exhibits excellent radiation value of 0.914 when doping 7 wt.% Ce. Ce{sup 4+} dissolved into iron diopside and formed interstitial solid solution with it sintered at 1150 °C. The oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} caused by Ce{sup 4+} led to a decrease of crystallite sizes and enhancement of Mg–O and Fe–O vibration in iron diopside, which consequently improved the far infrared radiation properties of iron ore tailings ceramics.

  12. Electrical transport mechanism in a newly synthesized rare earth double perovskite oxide Sr2CeTaO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Chandrahas; Chanda, Sadhan; Sinha, T. P.

    2013-01-01

    A rare earth double perovskite oxide strontium cerium tantalate, Sr2CeTaO6 (SCT) is synthesized by the solid state reaction technique for the first time. The determination of lattice parameters and the identification of phase are carried out by the Rietveld refinement method (RRM) using the Fullprof program in the space group P21/n (C52h). A structure of SCT is obtained from RRM. The bond angle and bond length are calculated and listed in Table 1 for SCT. A small amount of impurity of CeO2 is found in the refinement with space group Fm3m. The scanning electron micrograph shows the average grain size ∼2 μm. The ac electrical property is investigated in the temperature range from 303 to 703 K and in the frequency range from 0.1 kHz to 1 MHz using impedance spectroscopy. The relaxation mechanism of SCT is explained in detail by fitting experimental impedance and electric modulus data with the modified Debye (Cole-Cole) model. The frequency-dependent electrical data are analyzed in the framework of the conductivity and modulus formalisms. The σac data are fitted with Jonscher's universal power law. The dc conductivity (σdc) (calculated from σac) follows an Arrhenius law with the estimated conduction activation energy =0.78 eV. The scaling behavior of imaginary part of electrical impedance (Z″) shows that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at various temperatures.

  13. Infrared and visible emissions of rare-earth-doped CeO2 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, D; Kaur, J; Dubey, V; Suryanarayana, N S; Parganiha, Y

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of Er(3+)-doped CeO2 phosphor with variable concentrations of erbium. The sample was synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, which is useful for the large-scale production of phosphors and is also eco-friendly. The prepared sample was characterized using an X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The XRD pattern confirmed that sample has the pure cubic fluorite crystal structure of CeO2. The crystallite size of the prepared phosphor was determined by Scherer's formula and the crystallite size giving an intense XRD peak is 40.06 nm. The surface morphology of the phosphor was determined by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM). From the FEGSEM image, good surface morphology with some agglomerates was found. The functional group in the prepared sample was analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. All samples prepared with variable concentrations of Er(3+) (0.1-2 mol%) were studied by photoluminescence analysis and it was found that the excitation spectra of the prepared phosphor shows broad excitation centred at 251 nm. Emission spectra at different concentrations of Er(3+) show strong peaks at 413 and 470 nm and a weaker peak at 594 nm. The dominant peaks at 413 and 470 nm are caused by the allowed electronic transition (4)S3/2 → (4)I15/2 and the weaker transition at 594 nm is due to the transition (4)F9/2 → (4)I15/2. Spectrophotometric determinations of peaks were evaluated using the Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) technique. The emission spectra were also observed using an infrared (IR) laser 980 nm source, and three distinct peaks were found in the IR region at 848, 870 and 980 nm. The prepared phosphor has utility for application in display devices. PMID:25810371

  14. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  15. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  16. Effects of rare-earth substitution in the oxyarsenides REFeAsO (RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd) and CeNiAsO by X-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Cavell, Ronald G.; Mar, Arthur

    2010-08-16

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been applied to examine the electronic structure of the rare-earth transition-metal oxyarsenides REFeAsO (RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd) and CeNiAsO. Within the metal-arsenic layer [MAs], the bonding character is predominantly covalent and the As atoms are anionic, as implied by the small energy shifts in the M 2p and As 3d XPS spectra. Within the rare-earth-oxygen layer [REO], the bonding character is predominantly ionic, as implied by the similarity of the O 1s binding energies to those in highly ionic oxides. Substitution with a smaller RE element increases the O 1s binding energy, a result of an enhanced Madelung potential. The Ce 3d XPS and Ce L{sub 3}-edge XANES spectra have lineshapes and energies that confirm the presence of trivalent cerium in CeFeAsO and CeNiAsO. A population analysis of the valence band spectrum of CeNiAsO supports the formal charge assignment [Ce{sup 3+}O{sup 2-}][Ni{sup 2+}As{sup 3-}].

  17. Photon management properties of rare-earth (Nd,Yb,Sm)-doped CeO2 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Matteo; Colis, Silviu; Gallart, Mathieu; Schmerber, Guy; Bazylewski, Paul; Chang, Gap Soo; Ziegler, Marc; Gilliot, Pierre; Slaoui, Abdelilah; Dinia, Aziz

    2016-01-28

    CeO2 is a promising material for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics due to its large band gap and values of the refractive index and lattice parameters, which are suitable for silicon-based devices. In this study, we show that trivalent Sm, Nd and Yb ions can be successfully inserted and optically activated in CeO2 films grown at a relatively low deposition temperature (400 °C), which is compatible with inorganic photovoltaics. CeO2 thin films can therefore be efficiently functionalized with photon-management properties by doping with trivalent rare earth (RE) ions. Structural and optical analyses provide details of the electronic level structure of the films and of their energy transfer mechanisms. In particular, we give evidence of the existence of an absorption band centered at 350 nm from which energy transfer to rare earth ions occurs. The transfer mechanisms can be completely explained only by considering the spontaneous migration of Ce(3+) ions in CeO2 at a short distance from the RE(3+) ions. The strong absorption cross section of the f-d transitions in Ce(3+) ions efficiently intercepts the UV photons of the solar spectrum and therefore strongly increases the potential of these layers as downshifters and downconverters. PMID:26699802

  18. Ce53Fe12S90X3 (X = Cl, Br, I): the first rare-earth transition-metal sulfide halides.

    PubMed

    Mills, Allison M; Ruck, Michael

    2006-06-26

    The compounds Ce53Fe12S90X3 (X = Cl, Br, I), which represent the first examples of rare-earth transition-metal sulfide halides, were prepared using the reactive-flux method, through reaction of Ce2S3, FeS, or Fe and S in a CeX3 flux at 1320 K. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds are isostructural, crystallizing in the trigonal space group Rm with Z = 1 [Ce53Fe12S90Cl3, a = 13.9094(9) A, c = 21.604(2) A, V = 3619.7(4) A3; Ce(53)Fe(12)S(90)Br(3), a = 13.916(1) A, c = 21.824(2) A, V = 3660.0(5) A3; Ce53Fe12S90I3, a = 13.863(3) A, c = 21.944(6) A, V = 3652(2) A3]. The structure adopted is a stuffed variant of the La52Fe12S90 structure type. Fe2S9 dimers of face-sharing octahedra are linked by face- and vertex-sharing capped CeS6 trigonal prisms, forming a three-dimensional framework containing cuboctahedral cavities of two sizes. The smaller cavities accommodate alternative sites for disordered cerium atoms. The larger cavities, which remain empty in the parent structure, are filled by halogen atoms in Ce53Fe12S90X3. Alternatively, the structure can be described as a 9-fold superstructure of the Mn5Si3 structure type (P6(3)/mcm), with a = a' and c = 3c'. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements suggest that Ce53Fe12S90I3 may order antiferromagnetically at low temperatures. PMID:16780341

  19. Characterization of the rare earth orthophosphates and Ce-doped LaPO{sub 4} by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Perry, D.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f {yields} 3d{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} (M{sub 4,5}) transitions that contain a wealth of spectroscopic features. XAS is a useful technique for the characterization of 4f-occupancy, 4f-hybridization, and valence in RE-containing materials. The XAS measurements of the single crystal RE-orthophosphates, as well as a range of Cedoped ({approx}1--30%) LaPO{sub 4} hosts were performed at the 3d edge in the total electron yield mode at beamline 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble that of the corresponding RE metal and emphasize the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions occurring at the 3d edge. There is no energy shift of the La and Ce absorption peaks with Ce doping and furthermore, no additional transitions are observed in either spectral region. However, accompanying the Ce doping there is a significant narrowing of the La absorption peak full width half maximum that contrasts to the Ce features that exhibit no contraction. The La and Ce spectra indicate that the Ce-doping of LaPO{sub 4} is purely substitutional.

  20. Preparation with a facile template-free method of uniform-sized mesoporous microspheres of rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Pengfei; Xing, Mingyang; Bagwasi, Segomotso; Tian, Baozhu; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jinlong

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Mesoporous microspheres of light rare earth hydroxycarbonates and oxides were fabricated. {yields} The supersaturated urea has important effect on formation of mesoporous microspheres. {yields} The influences of [cation]/[urea] ratio and amount of water on the formation of spherical crystallites were discussed. -- Abstract: Mesoporous microspheres of light rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) hydroxycarbonates and oxides were successfully fabricated by a facile surfactant free hydrothermal method in supersaturated aqueous urea solution. The techniques of XRD, TEM, SEM, TG/DTA and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption were employed to investigate the structure and formation process of mesoporous microspheres. It was revealed that supersaturated urea not only serve as a reactant and pH modifier in the reaction system but also guide the oriented assembly of hydroxycarbonate crystallites into microspheres by acting as a structure-directing agent. The microspheres of rare earth oxides could easily be obtained by simple calcination of corresponding hydroxycarbonates precursors without undergoing morphology changes. In addition, the influences of rare earth precursor and urea concentrations on the formation of microspheres were also investigated.

  1. Synthesis and crystal structure of the isotypic rare earth thioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}], and Nd[BS{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, Jens; Borna, Marija; Kniep, Ruediger

    2010-03-15

    The orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared from mixtures of the rare earth (RE) metals together with amorphous boron and sulfur summing up to the compositions CeB{sub 3}S{sub 6}, PrB{sub 5}S{sub 9} and NdB{sub 3}S{sub 6}. The following preparation routes were used: solid state reactions with maximum temperatures of 1323 K and high-pressure high-temperature syntheses at 1173 K and 3 GPa. Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were also obtained from rare earth chlorides RECl{sub 3} and sodium thioborate Na{sub 2}B{sub 2}S{sub 5} by metathesis type reactions at maximum temperatures of 1073 K. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The thioborates are isotypic and crystallize in the orthorhombic spacegroup Pna2{sub 1} (No. 33; Z=4; Ce: a=7.60738(6)A, b=6.01720(4)A, c=8.93016(6)A; Pr: a=7.56223(4)A, b=6.00876(2)A, c=8.89747(4)A; Nd: a=7.49180(3)A, b=6.00823(2)A, c=8.86197(3)A) . The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of undulated kagome nets, which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species. - Abstract: Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure The isotypic orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared using different preparation routes. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of corrugated kagome nets (sketched with blue dotted lines), which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is

  2. The significant role of the rare earth ions on the elastic and thermodynamic parameters of LiCoDy- and ZnCoCe-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishay, Samiha T.

    2006-06-01

    Two types of rare earth ferrites [Li 0.6Co 0.1Dy xFe 2.3-xO 4; 0.0⩽ x⩽0.2] and [Zn 0.5Co 0.5Ce yFe 2-yO 4; 0.0⩽ y⩽0.2] were prepared by standard ceramic technique with a view to investigate their elastic behavior and some essential thermodynamic parameters. The elastic properties were studied by measuring the ultrasonic velocities by adopting the pulse transmission technique. Longitudinal ( V) and shear ( V) velocities, Young's modulus ( E), Debye temperature ( θ) and specific heat capacity ( C) have been evaluated for all the investigated samples. The rare earth content as well as its ionic radius plays a significant role in the evaluated parameters. According to the experimental results, the two investigated types of rare earth ferrite are considered as insulator magnetic solids. It was found that for each composition there exists a characteristic temperature, down to which the resonance frequency of the investigated samples drops smoothly, but above this temperature the resonance frequency stays constant. Accordingly, these samples seem to be of importance in industrial applications especially in the field of electronics.

  3. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  4. Magnetic structures and interplay between rare-earth Ce and Fe magnetism in single-crystal CeFeAsO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Wei; Li, Haifeng; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yan, Jiaqiang; McCallum, Robert William; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Zarestky, Jerel L.; Budko, Sergey L.; McQueeney, Robert J.; Vaknin, David

    2013-11-27

    Neutron and synchrotron resonant x-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) complemented by heat capacity and resistivity measurements reveal the evolution of the magnetic structures of Fe and Ce sublattices in a CeFeAsO single crystal. The RXMS of magnetic reflections at the Ce LII edge shows a magnetic transition that is specific to the Ce antiferromagnetic long-range ordering at TCe≈ 4 K with short-range Ce ordering above TCe, whereas neutron diffraction measurements of a few magnetic reflections indicate a transition at T∗≈ 12 K with an unusual order parameter. Detailed order-parameter measurements on several magnetic reflections by neutrons show a weak anomaly at 4 K that we associate with the Ce ordering. The successive transitions at TCe and T∗ can also be clearly identified by two anomalies in heat capacity and resistivity measurements. The higher transition temperature at T∗≈ 12 K is mainly ascribed to Fe spin reorientation transition, below which Fe spins rotate uniformly and gradually in the ab plane. The Fe spin reorientation transition and short-range Ce ordering above TCe reflect the strong Fe-Ce couplings prior to long-range ordering of the Ce. The evolution of the intricate magnetic structures in CeFeAsO going through T∗ and TCe is proposed.

  5. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Light Lanthanides (Ce-Eu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the volume devoted to the evaluation of experimental solubility data for rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water as well as in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. Fluorides of Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, and Eu (so-called light lanthanides), as the main solutes, are covered in the present part, which has thorough coverage of the experimental literature through the end of 2012. The experimentally unknown solubility value for PmF3 in water was predicted by an interpolation of the solubility values for NdF3 and SmF3 at 298 K. General features of the systems, such as the nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  6. Rare earth-copper-magnesium compounds RECu 9Mg 2 ( RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb) with ordered CeNi 3-type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solokha, P.; Pavlyuk, V.; Saccone, A.; De Negri, S.; Prochwicz, W.; Marciniak, B.; Różycka-Sokołowska, E.

    2006-10-01

    A series of ternary compounds RECu 9Mg 2 ( RE=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb) have been synthesized via induction melting of elemental metal ingots followed by annealing at 400 °C for 4 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) was used for examining microstructure and phase composition. These phases crystallize with an ordered version of the binary hexagonal structure type first reported for CeNi 3. The crystal structure was solved for TbCu 9Mg 2 from single crystal X-ray counter data (TbCu 9Mg 2-structure type, P6 3/mmc-space group, hP24-Pearson symbol, a=0.49886 (7) nm, c=1.61646 (3) nm, RF=0.0474 for 190 unique reflections). The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray powder diffraction patterns of RECu 9Mg 2 confirmed the same crystal structure for the reported rare earth metals. The unit cell volumes for RECu 9Mg 2 smoothly follow the lanthanide contraction. The existence of a RECu 9Mg 2 phase was excluded for RE=Er and Tm under the investigated experimental conditions.

  7. Influence of rare-earth doping on the microstructure and conductivity of BaCe 0.9Ln 0.1O 3- δ proton conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsif, M.; Marrero-Lopez, D.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Savvin, S. N.; Gabás, M.; Nunez, P.

    Doped barium cerates BaCe 0.9Ln 0.1O 3- δ containing earth-rare dopants with different ionic radii, Ln = La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Yb, Tb and Y, have been investigated as candidate materials for fuel cells and other electrochemical applications. The synthesis of these materials was performed using a precursor method based on freeze-drying, which allows a precise control of the homogeneity of the ceramic powders. Dense ceramic pellets were obtained at 1400 °C under identical sintering conditions. The microstructure of the ceramics exhibits similar features with relative density higher than 95% and the grain size decreasing as the ionic radius of the dopant decreases. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed to study separately the different contributions to the total conductivity. The bulk, grain boundary and total conductivities depend on the ionic radius of the dopant, reaching a maximum for Gd-doped samples with a value of 0.02 S cm -1 for the total conductivity at 600 °C.

  8. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  9. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  10. Magnetic hyperfine interactions on Cd sites of the rare-earth cadmium compounds R Cd (R =Ce , Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. H. M.; Leite Neto, O. F. L. S.; Saitovitch, H.; Cavalcante, J. T. P. D.; Carbonari, A. W.; Saxena, R. N.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Pereira, L. F. D.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Forker, M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the investigation of the magnetic hyperfine field Bh f in a series of rare-earth (R ) cadmium intermetallic compounds R Cd and GdCd2 measured by perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using 111In/111Cd as probe nuclei at Cd sites as well as first-principles calculations of Bh f at Cd sites in the studied compounds. Vapor-solid state reaction of R metals with Cd vapor and the 111In radioisotope was found to be an appropriate route of doping rare-earth cadmium compounds with the PAC probe 111In/111Cd. The observation that the hyperfine parameters depend on details of the sample preparation provides information on the phase preference of diffusing 111In in the rare-earth cadmium phase system. The 111Cd hyperfine field has been determined in the compounds R Cd for the R constituents Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, in several cases as a function of temperature. For most R constituents, the temperature dependence Bh f(T ) of 111Cd:R Cd is consistent with ferromagnetic order of the compound. DyCd, however, presents a remarkable anomaly: a finite magnetic hyperfine field is observed only in the temperature interval 35 K ≤ T ≤ 80 K which indicates a transition from ferromagnetic order to a spin arrangement where all 4 f -induced contributions to the magnetic hyperfine field at the Cd site cancel. First-principles calculation results for DyCd show that the (π , π , 0) antiferromagnetic configuration is energetically more favorable than the ferromagnetic. The approach used in the calculations to simulate the R Cd system successfully reproduces the experimental values of Bh f at Cd sites and shows that the main contribution to Bh f comes from the valence electron polarization. The de Gennes plot of the hyperfine field Bh f of 111Cd:R Cd vs the 4 f -spin projection (g -1 )J reflects a decrease of the strength of indirect 4 f -4 f exchange across the R series. Possible mechanisms are discussed and the experimental results indicate that

  11. China's rare-earth industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  12. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  13. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  14. Rare-earth pneumoconiosis: a new case

    SciTech Connect

    Sulotto, F.; Romano, C.; Berra, A.; Botta, G.C.; Rubino, G.F.; Sabbioni, E.; Pietra, R.

    1986-01-01

    A new case of rare-earth (RE) pneumoconiosis is described. The subject had worked as a photoengraver for 13 years and had not been exposed for 17 years. Chest X-ray showed a diffuse nodular pattern (q 2/3-ILO/1980). The patient was asymptomatic despite a restrictive spirometric impairment. The diagnosis derived from the finding, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, of abnormal levels of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Yb, and Lu. The presence of these elements was demonstrated by two methods: the neutron activation analysis and (as regards Ce alone) the X-ray energy spectrometry of mineral particles observed with electron microscope. Abnormal levels of rare earths were demonstrated also in the nails, suggesting an absorption of the RE from the lung.

  15. Recovery Behavior of Separating Britholite (Ca3Ce2[(Si,P)O4]3F) Phase from Rare-Earth-rich Slag by Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juncheng; Guo, Zhancheng; Yang, Tao; Yue, Zicheng; Ma, Changhao

    2015-05-01

    A new approach to separate britholite phase from the rare-earth-rich slag by super gravity was investigated. With the parameter of G = 500, t = 5 min, T = 1423 K, almost all britholite phase is enriched in the concentrate, while the tailing is made up of CaF2 phase. Under the hypothesis that the RE exists in the slag in terms of RE2O3, with the gravity coefficient G = 500, t = 5 min and T = 1423 K, the mass fraction of RE2O3 in the concentrate is up to 24.67%, while the mass fraction of CaF2 in the tailing is 50.01%. Considering that the mass fraction of RE2O3 is 12.01% in the parallel sample, the recovery ratio of rare earth in the concentrate is up to 76.47% by centrifugal separation.

  16. Magnetic interactions in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd) studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S N

    2009-03-01

    Applying the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique we have measured electric and magnetic hyperfine fields of the 111Cd impurity in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr and Gd) showing antiferro- and ferromagnetism with unusually high ordering temperatures. The Cd nuclei occupying the Sc site show high magnetic hyperfine fields with saturation values Bhf(0) = 21 kG, 45 kG and 189 kG in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe, respectively. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data of Cd in rare-earth metals and estimations from the RKKY model, we find evidence for the presence of additional spin density at the probe nucleus, possibly due to spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The principal electric field gradient component Vzz in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe has been determined to be 5.3 × 1021 V m-2, 5.5 × 1021 V m-2 and 5.6 × 1021 V m-2, respectively. Supplementing the experimental measurements, we have carried out ab initio calculations for pure and Cd-doped RScGe compounds with R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). From the total energies calculated with and without spin polarization we find ferrimagnetic ground states for CeScGe and PrScGe while NdScGe and GdScGe are ferromagnetic. In addition, we find a sizable magnetic moment at the Sc site, increasing from ≈0.10 μB in CeScGe to ≈0.3 μB in GdScGe, confirming the spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The calculated electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine fields of the Cd impurity closely agree with the experimental values. We believe spin polarization of Sc 3d band electrons, strongly hybridized with spin polarized 5d band electrons of the rare-earth, enables a long range Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between RE 4f moments which in turn leads to high magnetic ordering temperatures in RScGe compounds.

  17. Magnetic interactions in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd) studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S N

    2009-03-18

    Applying the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique we have measured electric and magnetic hyperfine fields of the (111)Cd impurity in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr and Gd) showing antiferro- and ferromagnetism with unusually high ordering temperatures. The Cd nuclei occupying the Sc site show high magnetic hyperfine fields with saturation values B(hf)(0) = 21 kG, 45 kG and 189 kG in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe, respectively. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data of Cd in rare-earth metals and estimations from the RKKY model, we find evidence for the presence of additional spin density at the probe nucleus, possibly due to spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The principal electric field gradient component V(zz) in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe has been determined to be 5.3 × 10(21) V m(-2), 5.5 × 10(21) V m(-2) and 5.6 × 10(21) V m(-2), respectively. Supplementing the experimental measurements, we have carried out ab initio calculations for pure and Cd-doped RScGe compounds with R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). From the total energies calculated with and without spin polarization we find ferrimagnetic ground states for CeScGe and PrScGe while NdScGe and GdScGe are ferromagnetic. In addition, we find a sizable magnetic moment at the Sc site, increasing from ≈0.10 μ(B) in CeScGe to ≈0.3 μ(B) in GdScGe, confirming the spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The calculated electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine fields of the Cd impurity closely agree with the experimental values. We believe spin polarization of Sc 3d band electrons, strongly hybridized with spin polarized 5d band electrons of the rare-earth, enables a long range Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between RE 4f moments which in turn leads to high magnetic ordering temperatures in

  18. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  19. Rare Earth impurities in yb(6) and zrb(12).

    PubMed

    Fisk, Z; Matthias, B T; Corenzwit, E

    1969-12-01

    We present data on the depression of the superconducting transition temperatures of YB(6) and ZrB(12) by rare earth impurities. These data show unusual features. Ce in YB(6) is in some ways analogous to Yb in ZrB(12), and this analogy also appears to hold between Ce in CeB(6) and YB in YbB(12). PMID:16591805

  20. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  1. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  2. Electronic structure of rare-earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Nanba, T.; Tomikawa, M.; Kunii, S.; Kasuya, T.

    1992-11-01

    Reflectivity spectra of all rare-earth hexaboride RB6 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, and Y) single crystals have been measured systematically in the energy region from 1 meV to 40 eV at 300 K in order to investigate the electronic state and the contribution of the 4f electron to the band structure. The analysis of the optical conductivity and the loss-function spectra, which were derived from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of the reflectivity spectra, allowed us to make clear the origin of the peak structure in the spectrum due to the various interband transitions. The origins of the main peaks in the spectrum were assigned to the interband transitions from the bonding to the antibonding bands of the boron 2s and 2p states and to the rare-earth 5d state. The intra-atomic transition from the 4f and the 5p to the 5d(t2g) states in the rare-earth ion was also observed.

  3. Study on optical properties of rare-earth ions in nanocrystalline monoclinic SrAl2O4: Ln (Ln = Ce3+, Pr3+, Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Fu, Zuoling; Zhou, Shihong; Zhang, Siyuan

    2005-08-01

    SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) nanocrystals have been synthesized by the combustion method. The results of XRD indicated that the resulting SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) nanocrystals have a reduced and distorted monoclinic lattice compared with bulk materials. The spectral properties are measured, and it is found that the excitation peaks of 5d energy levels red shift in nanocrystals in contrast to that in bulk crystals. The mechanism of spectra and energy changes is investigated. The order of the degree of red shift for nano SrAl(2)O(4): Ln (Ln = Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Tb(3+)) crystals is Pr(3+) > Ce(3+) > Tb(3+), which is in good agreement with our predicted results. PMID:16852811

  4. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Wolford, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A new optical temperature sensor suitable for high temperatures (greater than 1700 K) and harsh environments is introduced. The key component of the sensor is the rare earth material contained at the end of a sensor that is in contact with the sample being measured. The measured narrow wavelength band emission from the rare earth is used to deduce the sample temperature. A simplified relation between the temperature and measured radiation was verified experimentally. The upper temperature limit of the sensor is determined by material limits to be approximately 2000 C. The lower limit, determined by the minimum detectable radiation, is found to be approximately 700 K. At high temperatures 1 K resolution is predicted. Also, millisecond response times are calculated.

  5. Replacing critical rare earth materials in high energy density magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, R. William

    2012-02-01

    High energy density permanent magnets are crucial to the design of internal permanent magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily meet the performance goals, however, the rising concerns over cost and foreign control of the current supply of rare earth resources has motivated a search for non-rare earth based permanent magnets alloys with performance metrics which allow the design of permanent magnet motors and generators without rare earth magnets. This talk will discuss the state of non-rare-earth permanent magnets and efforts to both improve the current materials and find new materials. These efforts combine first principles calculations and meso-scale magnetic modeling with advance characterization and synthesis techniques in order to advance the state of the art in non rare earth permanent magnets. The use of genetic algorithms in first principle structural calculations, combinatorial synthesis in the experimental search for materials, atom probe microscopy to characterize grain boundaries on the atomic level, and other state of the art techniques will be discussed. In addition the possibility of replacing critical rare earth elements with the most abundant rare earth Ce will be discussed.

  6. Physicochemical properties of rare earth doped ceria Ce0.9Ln0.1O1.95 (Ln = Nd, Sm, Gd) as an electrolyte material for IT-SOFC/SOEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, Nityanand; Wani, B. N.; Bharadwaj, S. R.; Chattopadhyaya, M. C.

    2013-06-01

    Nanosized crystallites of rare earth doped ceria Ce0.9Ln0.1O1.95 (Ln = Nd, Sm, Gd) a promising electrolyte material for Intermediate Temperature - Solid Oxide Fuel Cells/electrolysis cells have been synthesized by standard ceramic route. Detection of impurities in the samples was done by FTIR spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction studies were used for the determination of phase purity, crystal structure and average crystallite size of the samples. Kinetics involved in phase formation has been discussed. Raman study showed a major band around 465 cm-1 in all the samples, which is attributed to the cubic fluorite structure of ceria. It was also found that for samples Ce0.9Ln0.1O1.95 (Ln = Nd, Sm, Gd) the frequency of F2g shifts to lower value. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure the ionic conductivity of the samples at elevated temperatures. The Gd doped sample showed the highest grain boundary and total conductivity in comparison to Sm and Nd doped sample. Bulk thermal expansion behavior, sintered densities and micro structural features of the samples have also been studied.

  7. Evolution of the atomic order and valence state of rare-earth atoms and uranium in a new carbon-metal composite—diphthalocyanine pyrolysate C64H32N16 Me ( Me = Y, La, Ce, Eu, and U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovestnov, A. E.; Kapustin, V. K.; Tikhonov, V. I.; Fomin, E. V.; Chernenkov, Yu. P.

    2014-08-01

    The structure of a metal-carbon composite formed by the pyrolysis of diphthalocyanine of some rare-earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Eu) and uranium in the temperature range T ann = 800-1700°C has been investigated for the first time by the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray line shift. It has been shown that, in the general case, the studied pyrolysates consist of three phases. One phase corresponds to the structure of graphite. The second phase corresponds to nitrides, carbides, and oxides of basic metal elements with a crystallite size ranging from 5 to 100 nm. The third phase is amorphous or consisting of crystallites with a size of ˜1 nm. It has been found that all the basic elements (Y, La, Ce, Eu, U) and incorporated iodine atoms in the third phase are in a chemically bound state. The previously unobserved electronic configurations have been revealed for europium. The possibility of including not only atoms of elements forming diphthalocyanine but also other elements (for example, iodine) in the composite structure is of interest, in particular, for the creation of a thermally, chemically, and radiation resistant metal-carbon matrix for the radioactive waste storage.

  8. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility. PMID:24009098

  9. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  10. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  11. Removal of Phosphorus in Metallurgical Silicon by Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Safarian, Jafar; Ma, Xiang; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Removal of phosphorus in metallurgical silicon is one of the crucial steps for the production of solar grade Si feedstock. The possibility of doping rare earth elements for phosphorus removal has in this work been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Thermochemical properties of Ce, Nd, and Pr monophosphides have first been estimated by ab initio thermodynamic simulations based on density functional theory and the direct phonon method. The reliability of the first principles calculations was assessed by coupling with the phase diagram data of the Pr-P system. Equilibrium calculations confirmed the existence of stable rare earth monophosphides in solid silicon. Experimental investigations were then carried out, employing a high temperature resistance furnace. The Ce-doped silicon samples were examined by electron probe micro analyzer and inductively coupled plasma analysis. The efficiency of phosphorus removal by means of rare earth doping was discussed in detail in the paper.

  12. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, rare earths were not mined in the United States. The major supplier, Molycorp, continued to maintain a large stockpile of rare-earth concentrates and compounds. Consumption decreased of refined rare-earth products. The United States remained a major importer and exporter of rare earths in 2005. During the same period, yttrium was not mined or refined in the US. Hence, supply of yttrium compounds for refined yttrium products came from China, France and Japan. Scandium was not also mined. World production was primarily in China, Russia and Ukraine. Demand for rare earths in 2006 is expected to be closely tied to economic conditions in the US.

  13. Rare-earth metal(III) oxide selenides M4O4Se[Se2] (M=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) with discrete diselenide units: crystal structures, magnetic frustration, and other properties.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Sabine; Choudhury, Amitava; Dorhout, Peter K; Lipp, Christian; Schleid, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    The rare-earth metal(III) oxide selenides of the formula La4O4Se[Se2], Ce4O4Se[Se2], Pr4O4Se[Se2], Nd4O4Se[Se2], and Sm4O4Se[Se2] were synthesized from a mixture of the elements with selenium dioxide as the oxygen source at 750 degrees C. Single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to determine their crystal structures. The isostructural compounds M4O4Se[Se2] (M=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Amm2 with cell dimensions a=857.94(7), b=409.44(4), c=1316.49(8) pm for M=La; a=851.37(6), b=404.82(3), c=1296.83(9) pm for M=Ce; a=849.92(6), b=402.78(3), c=1292.57(9) pm for M=Pr; a=845.68(4), b=398.83(2), c=1282.45(7) pm for M=Nd; and a=840.08(5), b=394.04(3), c=1263.83(6) pm for M=Sm (Z=2). In their crystal structures, Se2- anions as well as [Se-Se]2- dumbbells interconnect {[M4O4]4+} infinity 2 layers. These layers are composed of three crystallographically different, distorted [OM4]10+ tetrahedra, which are linked via four common edges. The compounds exhibit strong Raman active modes at around 215 cm(-1), which can be assigned to the Se-Se stretching vibration. Optical band gaps for La4O4Se[Se2], Ce4O4Se[Se2], Pr4O4Se[Se2], Nd4O4Se[Se2], and Sm4O4Se[Se2] were derived from diffuse reflectance spectra. The energy values at which absorption takes place are typical for semiconducting materials. For the compounds M4O4Se[Se2] (M=La, Pr, Nd, Sm) the fundamental band gaps, caused by transitions from the valence band to the conduction band (VB-CB), lie around 1.9 eV, while for M=Ce an absorption edge occurs at around 1.7 eV, which can be assigned to f-d transitions of Ce3+. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Ce4O4Se[Se2] and Nd4O4Se[Se2] show Curie-Weiss behavior above 150 K with derived experimental magnetic moments of 2.5 micro B/Ce and 3.7 micro B/Nd and Weiss constants of theta p=-64.9 K and theta p=-27.8 K for the cerium and neodymium compounds, respectively. Down to 1.8 K no long-range magnetic ordering could be detected. Thus, the large

  14. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  15. Rare Earth-Bearing Murataite Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Stefanovsky, Olga; Yudintsev, Sergey; Nikonov, Boris

    2007-07-01

    Phase composition of the murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, yttrium, zirconium oxides was studied. The ceramics were prepared by melting of oxide mixtures in 20 mL glass-carbon crucibles in air at {approx}1500 deg. C. They are composed of predominant murataite-type phases and minor extra phases: rutile, crichtonite, perovskite, ilmenite/pyrophanite, and zirconolite (in the Zr-bearing sample only). Three murataite-related phases with five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) elementary fluorite unit cell are normally present in all the ceramics. These phases form core, intermediate zone, and rim of the murataite grains, respectively. They are predominant host phases for the rare earth elements whose concentrations are reduced in a row: 5C>8C>3C. Appreciate fraction of La and Ce may enter the perovskite phase. (authors)

  16. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  17. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.A.; Chubb, D.L.; Farmer, S.C.; Good, B.S.

    1994-09-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon{sub {lambda}}) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l{sub 15/2}) - ((4)l{sub 13/2}), for Er-YAG and epsilon{sub {lambda}} approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l{sub 7})-((5)l{sub 8}) for (Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper the authors present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon{sub {lambda}} measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic properties of rare earth (RE=Ce,Tb,Eu,Tm,Sm)-doped hexagonal KCaGd(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. J.; Yuan, J. L.; Duan, C. J.; Xiong, D. B.; Chen, H. H.; Zhao, J. T.; Zhang, G. B.; Shi, C. S.

    2007-11-01

    Hexagonal KCaGd(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}:RE{sup 3+} (RE=Ce,Tb,Eu,Tm,Sm) were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their vacuum ultraviolet-ultraviolet (VUV-UV) spectroscopic properties were investigated. The bands at about 165 nm in the VUV excitation spectra are attributed to the host lattice absorptions. For Ce{sup 3+}-doped samples, the bands at 207, 256, 275, and 320 nm are assigned to the 4f-5d transitions of Ce{sup 3+} in KCaGd(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. For Tb{sup 3+}-doped sample, the bands at 203 and 222 nm are related to the 4f-5d spin-allowed transitions. For Eu{sup 3+}-doped sample, the O{sup 2-}-Eu{sup 3+} charge-transfer band (CTB) at 229 nm is observed, and the fine emission spectrum of Eu{sup 3+} indicates that Eu{sup 3+} ions prefer to occupy Gd{sup 3+} or Ca{sup 2+} sites in the host lattice. For Tm{sup 3+}- and Sm{sup 3+}-doped samples, the O{sup 2-}-Tm{sup 3+} and O{sup 2-}-Sm{sup 3+} CTBs are observed to be at 176 and 186 nm, respectively. From the standpoints of the absorption band, color purity, and luminescent intensity, Tb{sup 3+}-doped KCaGd(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} is a potential candidate for 172 nm excited green plasma display phosphors.

  19. Comparative study of sensitization of the luminescence of trivalent rare earth ions by Ce/sup 3 +/ in LaOBr

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, L.Y.; Fouassier, C.; Guillen, F.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1985-03-01

    Energy transfer from cerium to the Pr/sup 3 +/, Nd/sup 3 +/, Tb/sup 3 +/, Dy/sup 3 +/, Ho/sup 3 -/, and Er/sup 3 +/ ions has been observed in LaOBr. Comparison of the effect of the activator ions on the cerium emission intensity suggests that transfer occurs mainly by an exchange mechanism, after migration of the excitation among donor ions. With increasing cerium concentration, the /sup 3/P /SUB o/ praseodymium, /sup 5/S/sub 2/ holmium, and /sup 4/S /SUB 3/2/ erbium emissions are quenched, the energy difference between the transition to the next lowest level and the /sup 2/F /SUB 5/2/ ..-->.. cerium transition being sufficiently small for energy transfer. The cerium emission is quenched at room temperature by the Sm/sup 3 +/, Eu/sup 3 +/, Tm/sup 3 +/, and Yb/sup 3 +/ ions without sensitization of the activator as a result of the formation of a charge-transfer (Ce/sup 4 +/-divalent activator ion) state.

  20. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  1. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.; Bleiwas, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, rare earths were recovered from bastnasite concentrates at the Mountain Pass Mine in California. Consumption of refined rare-earth products decreased in 2011 from 2010. U.S. rare-earth imports originated primarily from China, with lesser amounts from Austria, Estonia, France and Japan. The United States imported all of its demand for yttrium metal and yttrium compounds, with most of it originating from China. Scandium was imported in various forms and processed domestically.

  2. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  3. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  4. Rare earth elements in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, M.; Seyler, P.; Benedetti, M. F.; Alves, V. P.; Boaventura, G. R.; Sondag, F.

    2003-05-01

    The rare earth element (REE) concentrations of the dissolved and particulate fractions and bed sediment between Manaus and Santarém in the Amazon River, and in some major tributaries, were evaluated. A very important zone in the Amazon basin, the encontro das aguas area where the Rio Solimões and the Rio Negro meet, was especially sampled. Different size fractions were isolated by ultrafiltration. Water samples were collected at different stages of the mixing. Three groups of waters are distinguished: group I has a low pH (<5·5) and is represented by the Negro basin rivers; group II has alkalinity less than 0·2 meq l-1 and is represented by the Rios Tapajós and Trombetas; group III has high alkalinity (>0·2 meq l-1) and higher pH (>6·5) and is represented by the Madeira basin rivers, the Solimões and the Amazon. The highest dissolved REE concentration is in the Rio Negro and the lowest in the Rio Tapajós (dissolved REEs vary by more than a factor of ten). The solubility of REEs is pH dependent: in river waters with a pH < 6 the Ce concentration is twice that of La, whereas in rivers with a higher pH the concentrations of Ce and La are similar. Dissolved REE concentrations are positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon. Correlations between Fe, Al, and La suggest that La is associated with Al (Fe)-rich organic matter and/or related to dissolved Fe-rich inorganic material. Dissolved REEs normalized to North American shale composite show an enrichment in intermediate/heavy REEs (from Eu to Er), except for the shields rivers (such as Rio Negro and Rio Trombetas). Both of them are depleted in heavy REEs and show a relative Ce enrichment. In contrast, for the Andeans rivers (such as Rio Solimões), light REEs are slightly depleted and a negative Ce relative anomaly occurs. The pattern of the Amazon River at Óbidos confirms the major influence of the Rios Negro and Solimões with REE fractionation. For the Rio Negro, 60 to 70% of REEs are

  5. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  6. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner JR., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  8. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  9. Soluble rare-earth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Christopher G.

    1999-11-01

    The cluster Eu8(DMF)13(mu4-O)(mu 3-OH)12(Se3)(Se4)2(Se 5)2 was synthesized from the reaction of EuCl3 dissolved in tetrahydrofaran with K2Se4 dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The Eu8(O)(OH)12 10+ core is the first example such a polyoxometallo-core. The compound is further unusual in that it contains three different polyselenide chain lengths attaching adjacent Eu atoms. A similar reaction between Ln Cl3·6H2O and K2Se4 in DMF was found to produce the cluster compounds Gd8(DMF) 13(mu4-O)(mu3-OH)12(Se3)(Se 4)2(Se5)2, Yb8 (DMF) 11(mu4-O)(mu3-OH)12(Se4) 2(Se5)2Cl2·(DMF), and Y 8(DMF)12(mu4-O)(mu3-OH)12 (Se4)4Cl2·(DMF)6. Each of these clusters has a similar Ln8(mu 4-OH)(mu3-OH)1210+ core coordinated by a variety of polyselenide and chloride ligands. The organometallic rare-earth chalcogenide compounds (C5H 5)2Y [N( Q PPh2)2] ( Q = S, Se) have been prepared in good yield from the protonolysis reaction between CP3Y and HN( Q PPh2)2 in THF. In both compounds, the [N( Q PPh2)2]-- ligand is bound eta 3 to the Y center. The Y atom is also coordinated to two (C5 H5)-- ligands and so is formally 9-coordinate. 1H, 31P, 77Se, and 89Y NMR data indicate that the solid state connectivity is retained in solution. The compounds (C5H5)2Ln[N( Q PPh2)2] (Ln = La, Gd, Er, Yb, for Q = Se; Ln = Yb for Q = S) were synthesized. The series of compounds indicates that the smaller rare-earth elements cannot accommodate eta3-bonding from the imidodiphosphinochalcogenido ligand. The compounds Y[N( Q PPh2)2]3 ( Q = S (1), Se(2)) have been synthesized from the reactions between Y[N(SiMe3)2]3 and HN( Q PPh2)2. In 1, the Y atom is surrounded by three similar [N(SPPh2)2]-- ligands bound eta3 through two S atoms and an N atom. In 2 , the Y atom is surrounded again by three [N(SePPh2) 2]-- ligands, but two are bound eta2 through the two Se atoms and the other ligand is bound eta3 through the two Se atoms and an N atom. Although a fluxional process is detected in the 31P and 77Se NMR spectra

  10. Rare-earth manganese germanides RE{sub 2+x}MnGe{sub 2+y} (RE=La, Ce) built from four-membered rings and stellae quadrangulae of Mn-centred tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Oliynyk, Anton O.; Mar, Arthur

    2013-10-15

    Reactions of the elements through arc-melting and annealing at 800 °C have led to the ternary rare-earth manganese germanides RE{sub 2+x}MnGe{sub 2+y} (RE=La, Ce). The approximate composition is RE{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2}, as determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies on the La member (space group P4/nmm, a=16.0491(4) Å, c=8.1587(2) Å, Z=16). Although this composition is close to other germanides RE{sub 2}MGe{sub 2} (Sc{sub 2}CoSi{sub 2}-type), the structure is completely unrelated. Rather, La{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2} contains layers built up of Mn-centred tetrahedra in two types of arrangements, four-membered rings and stellae quadrangulae, with La and additional Ge atoms in the intervening spaces. Disorder of La atoms, isolated Ge atoms, and Ge{sub 2} dimers takes place within tunnels in the structure. Electrical and magnetic measurements on La{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2} indicate metallic behaviour and likely ferromagnetic ordering with a transition temperature above 300 K. - Graphical abstract: MnGe{sub 4} tetrahedra share corners to form four-membered rings and edges to form stellae quandrangulae in the structure of La{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • RE{sub 2+x}MnGe{sub 2+y} (RE=La, Ce) is unrelated to RE{sub 2}MGe{sub 2} with similar composition. • La{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2} adopts a new tetragonal structure type. • MnGe{sub 4} tetrahedra are found in four-membered rings and stellae quadrangulae. • La{sub 2.1}MnGe{sub 2.2} is likely ferromagnetic with a transition temperature above 300 K.

  11. Development of a Rare Earth Element Paleoproxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, B. A.; Klinkhammer, G. P.; McManus, J.

    2002-12-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) have demonstrated considerable potential as paleoproxies for changes in seawater chemistry. However, their utilization in paleoceanographic investigations has been mainly limited to neodymium isotopic analyses in metalliferous deposits and fossil apatite. The goal of being able to use the entire group of elements in foraminiferal shells has proven difficult. The problem with analysis of these elements in this matrix stems mainly from: (1) the ability to clean the shells of diagenetic aberrations and (2) the paucity of REE data in the environment where forams obtain their primary signature. We recently measured pore water profiles of REEs using an interfaced Ion Chromatograph (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) in a depth transect off the Coast of California, and a profile from off the Peru-Chile margin. The pore water results are surprising and will alter our view of REE marine geochemistry. For example, they call into question the traditional method of calculating a "Ce-anomaly." The profiles also show dramatic changes in REE concentrations and patterns with depth, and demonstrate that the REE signature preserved in epifaunal benthic versus infaunal foram species and diagenetically added phases should be easily identifiable. Preliminary REE results from forams cleaned via a recently developed flow-through technique will be shown and compared to matching pore water data. We will conclude by outlining the potential of foraminiferal REE content for paleoceanography that ranges from water mass tracer to proxies for organic carbon flux and oxygen concentration.

  12. High temperature rare earth solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Rare earth trifluorides have potential use as lubricating fillers for mechanical carbons and as coatings on metallic substrates. Friction experiments show that they are effective in reducing metallic wear.

  13. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  14. Corrosion behavior of rare earth modified WC-12Co coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Tu, Mingjing

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nano-modified and CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings are produced by using high speed oxygen flaming (HVOF) spraying technology. Long-term immersion and electrochemical tests of these coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution are conducted. The surface morphologies were observed to investigate the corrosion mechanisms. The results show CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings to possess the best corrosion resistance but the nano-modified WC-12Co coating has the worst performance. Results suggest that the improvement of corrosion resistance for CeO2 modified WC-12Co coating can be attributed to the enhancement of interfacial strength between Co binder phase and WC particles.

  15. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J., Jr.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  16. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Rare-Earth Hexaboride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhenchen

    2001-03-01

    Rare-earth hexaboride ReB6 (Re = Gd, Ce and Nd) thin films were fabricated by a novel laser-initiated chemical processing Laser-induced deposition form solution (LISD). The advantage of this LISD technique is selective patterned area deposition and uniform thin films. This technique also has both privileges of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and electroless deposition - efficient and simple (no chambers, no electrodes, and at room temperature). The Structures and Surfaces of the deposited rare-earth hexaboride ReB6 (Re = Gd, Ce and Nd) thin films were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that these films grew with a strong texture axis. The microstructure, morphology and surface evolution in the deposited films are dependent both on the choice of solvents and laser parameters (e.g, wavelength, laser power etc) used in LISD. Rare-earth hexaborides are typically low work function materials. They can be applied as cathodes in DC plasma display panels and micro X-ray tubes.

  18. Chemiluminescent Diagnostics of Free-Radical Processes in an Abiotic System and in Liver Cells in the Presence of Nanoparticles Based on Rare-Earth Elements nReVO4:Eu3+ (Re = Gd, Y, La) and CeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averchenko, E. A.; Kavok, N. S.; Klochkov, V. K.; Malyukin, Yu. V.

    2014-11-01

    We have used luminol-dependent chemiluminescence with Fenton's reagent to study the effect of nanoparticles based on rare-earth elements of different sizes and shapes on free-radical processes in abiotic and biotic cell-free systems, and also in isolated cells in vitro. We have estimated the effects of rare-earth orthovanadate nanoparticles of spherical (GdYVO4:Eu3+, 1-2 nm), spindle-shaped (GdVO4:Eu3+, 25 ×8 nm), and rod-shaped (LaVO4:Eu3+, 57 × (6-8) nm) nanoparticles and spherical CeO2 nanoparticles (sizes 1-2 nm and 8-10 nm). We have shown that in contrast to the abiotic system, in which all types of nanoparticles exhibit antiradical activity, in the presence of biological material, extra-small spherical (1-2 nm) nanoparticles of both types exhibit pro-oxidant activity, and also enhance pro-oxidant induced oxidative stress (for the pro-oxidants hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide). The effect of rare-earth orthovanadate spindle and rod shaped nanoparticles in this system was neutral; a moderate antioxidant effect was exhibited by 8-10 nm CeO2 nanoparticles.

  19. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  20. Intermediate phases in some rare earth-ruthenium systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharifrazi, P.; Raman, A.; Mohanty, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    The phase equilibria and crystal structures of intermediate phases were investigated in eight representative RE-Ru systems using powder X-ray diffraction and metallographic techniques. The Fe3C, Mn5C2 and Er5Ru3 structures occur in all but the Ce-Ru systems. Phases analogous to Er5Ru3 possess an unknown crystal structure similar to Er5Rh3(I). MgCu2 and MgZn2 type Laves phases are encountered in the light rare earth and heavy rare earth systems, respectively, and RERu2 phases, where RE = Nd and Sm, possess both the Laves phase structures. An intermediate phase, NdRu, with an unknown structure, occurs only in the Nd-Ru system. A bcc structure with 40 atoms per unit cell is encountered in the phases Er3Ru2 and Y3Ru2. The behavior of cerium in Ce-Ru alloys is unique in that four unidentified structures, not encountered in other RE-Ru systems, have been encountered. Also a phase designated as Ce3Ru is found with the Th7Fe3 type structure.

  1. Interplay of iron and rare-earth magnetic order in rare-earth iron pnictide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei-Lei, Yang; Da-Yong, Liu; Dong-Meng, Chen; Liang-Jian, Zou

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of iron pnictide superconductors with magnetic rare-earth ions under strong magnetic field are investigated based on the cluster self-consistent field method. Starting from an effective Heisenberg model, we present the evolution of magnetic structures on magnetic field in R/FeAsO (R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, and Tb) and R/Fe2As2 (R = Eu) compounds. It is found that spin-flop transition occurs in both rare-earth and iron layers under magnetic field, in good agreement with the experimental results. The interplay between rare-earth and iron spins plays a key role in the magnetic-field-driven magnetic phase transition, which suggests that the rare-earth layers can modulate the magnetic behaviors of iron layers. In addition, the factors that affect the critical magnetic field for spin-flop transition are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104274, 11274310, and 11474287) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 27R1310020A).

  2. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  3. Preparation and processing of rare earth chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1998-10-01

    Rare earth chalcogenides are initially prepared by a direct combination of the pure rare earth metal and the pure chalcogen element with or without a catalyst. The use of iodine (10 to 100 mg) as a fluxing agent (catalyst), especially to prepare heavy lanthanide chalcogenides, greatly speeds up the formation of the rare earth chalcogenide. The resultant powders are consolidated by melting, pressure assisted sintering (PAS), or pressure assisted reaction sintering (PARS) to obtain near theoretical density solids. Mechanical alloying is a useful technique for preparing ternary alloys. In addition, mechanical alloying and mechanical milling can be used to form metastable allotropic forms of the yttrium and heavy lanthanide sulfides. Chemical analysis techniques are also described because it is strongly recommended that samples prepared by melting should have their chemical compositions verified because of chalcogen losses in the melting step.

  4. Rare earth element content of cryptocrystalline magnesites of Konya, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedef, Veysel; Russell, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We examined the rare earth element content of several cryptocrystalline magnesites as well as hydromagnesite, host rock serpentinites, lake water and hot spring water from Turkey. Southwestern Turkey hosts cryptocrystalline magnesites, sedimentary magnesites with presently forming, biologically mediated hydromagnesites and travertines. Our results show the REE content of the minerals, rocks and waters are well below detection limits. One hydromagnesite sample from Lake Salda has slightly high La (2.38ppb), Ce (3.91 ppb) and Nd (1.68 ppb) when compared to other samples, but these are also still below detection limits of the method we followed.

  5. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained

  7. Uncovering the Global Life Cycles of the Rare Earth Elements

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging, critical technologies. Knowledge of the life cycles of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in their future availability. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supplies vulnerable to short and long-term disruption. To provide an improved perspective we derived the first quantitative life cycles (for the year 2007) for ten REE: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), and yttrium (Y). Of these REE, Ce and Nd in-use stocks are highest; the in-use stocks of most REE show significant accumulation in modern society. Industrial scrap recycling occurs only from magnet manufacture. We believe there is no post-customer recycling of any of these elements. PMID:22355662

  8. What about the rare-earth elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is insufficient understanding of the nutritional physiology of pecan trees and orchards; thus, affecting nutmeat yield and quality, disease resistance and alternate bearing. An analysis of the rare-earth element composition of pecan and related hickory cousins found that they hyperaccumulate ...

  9. Rare earths in nanocrystalline glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Iparraguirre, I.; Azkargorta, J.; Mendioroz, A.; Balda, R.; Fernández, J.; Lavín, V.

    2005-10-01

    The optical spectroscopic analysis of rare earth ions in transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics obtained from SiO2-Al2O3-PbF2-CdF2 based precursor glasses is presented. The oscillator strengths of the optical transitions were measured from the absorption spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics doped with rare earth ions. The results were analysed in the framework of the Judd-Ofelt theory giving the values of the three Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6 intensity parameters over the rare earth series. On the other hand, high efficient infrared-to-blue upconversion has been observed in Tm3+-Yb3+ codoped glass and glass-ceramic compared to the Tm3+ single doped matrices. The contributions to the upconversion process of the rare earth ions in the nanocrystalline and in the vitreous phase of the glass-ceramics have been distinguished. Finally, laser action in Nd3+-doped glass-ceramic has been studied. Losses due to UV and visible upconverted emissions inside the laser cavity have been also estimated.

  10. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  11. Rare earth activated yttrium aluminate phosphors with modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Muresan, L E; Popovici, E J; Perhaita, I; Indrea, E; Oro, J; Casan Pastor, N

    2016-06-01

    Yttrium aluminate (Y3 A5 O12 ) was doped with different rare earth ions (i.e. Gd(3+) , Ce(3+) , Eu(3+) and/or Tb(3+) ) in order to obtain phosphors (YAG:RE) with general formula,Y3-x-a Gdx REa Al5 O12 (x = 0; 1.485; 2.97 and a = 0.03). The synthesis of the phosphor samples was done using the simultaneous addition of reagents technique. This study reveals new aspects regarding the influence of different activator ions on the morpho-structural and luminescent characteristics of garnet type phosphor. All YAG:RE phosphors are well crystallized powders containing a cubic-Y3 Al5 O12 phase as major component along with monoclinic-Y4 Al2 O9 and orthorhombic-YAlO3 phases as the impurity. The crystallites dimensions of YAG:RE phosphors vary between 38 nm and 88 nm, while the unit cell slowly increase as the ionic radius of the activator increases. Under UV excitation, YAG:Ce exhibits yellow emission due to electron transition in Ce(3+) from the 5d level to the ground state levels ((2) F5/2 , (2) F7/2 ). The emission intensity of Ce(3+) is enhanced in the presence of the Tb(3+) ions and is decreased in the presence of Eu(3+) ions due to some radiative or non-radiative processes that take place between activator ions. By varying the rare earth ions, the emission colour can be modulated from green to white and red. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26553167

  12. Promising wastewater treatment using rare earth-doped nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Bishay, Samiha T.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; Saleh, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Single-phases of the spinel nanoferrites Zn0.5Co0.5Al0.5R0.04Fe1.46O4; R=Sm, Pr, Ce and La, were synthesized using the flash auto combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that doping nanoferrites with small concentrations of rare earth elements (RE) allowed their entrance to the spinel lattice. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images revealed that doping with different RE elements resulted in the formation of different nanometric shapes such as nanospheres and nanowires. Doping with Sm3+ and Ce3+ resulted in the formation of nanospheres with average diameter of 14 and 30 nm respectively. In addition to the granular nanospheres, doping with Pr3+ and La3+ resulted in the formation of some nanowires with different aspect ratios (average length of ≈100 nm and diameter of ≈9 nm) and (average length of ≈150 nm and outer diameter of ≈22 nm) respectively. At fixed temperature, the Ac conductivity (σ) increased as the RE ionic radius increases except for Ce, due to the role of valance fluctuation from Ce3+ to Ce4+ ions. La- and Pr-doped nanoferrites showed the highest ac conductivity values, which is most probably due to the presence of large numbers of nanowires in these two types of ferrites. For all entire samples, the effective magnetic moment (μeff) decreased, while the Curie temperature (TC) increased as the RE ionic radius increases. The synthesized rare earth nanoferrites showed promising results in purifying colored wastewater. La-doped ferrite was capable for up-taking 92% of the dye content, followed by Pr-doped ferrite, which adsorbed 85% of the dye, while Sm- and Ce-doped ferrites showed lower dye removal efficiency of 80% and 72% respectively. High dye uptake shown by La- and Pr-doped ferrites is most probably due to the presence of nanowires and their higher Ac conductivity values. These excellent results were not previously reported.

  13. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  14. Structural properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Ramakant; Bhardwaj, Purvee; Singh, Sadhna

    2016-05-01

    The pressure induced NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) structural phase transition of rare earth mono-chalcogenide (PuTe) has been investigated in this paper. A modified interaction potential model (MIPM) (including the covalency effect) has been developed. Phase transition pressures are associated with a sudden collapse in volume. The phase transition pressures and associated volume collapses obtained from present potential model show a generally good agreement with available experimental data than others.

  15. Rare earth element systematics in hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Michard, A. )

    1989-03-01

    Rare earth element concentrations have been measured in hydrothermal solutions from geothermal fields in Italy, Dominica, Valles Caldera, Salton Sea and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The measured abundances show that hydrothermal activity is not expected to affect the REE balance of either continental or oceanic rocks. The REE enrichment of the solutions increases when the pH decreases. High-temperature solutions (> 230{degree}C) percolating through different rock types may show similar REE patterns.

  16. SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1960-10-11

    A process is given for separating lanthanide rare earths from each other from an aqueous mineral acid solution, e.g., hydrochloric or nitric acid of a concentration of above 3 M, preferably 12 to 16 M, by extraction with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate, such as tributyl phosphate or a mixture of mono-, di- and tributyl phosphate, and fractional back-extraction with mineral acid whereby the lanthanides are taken up by the acid in the order of increasing atomic number.

  17. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  18. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

    2014-02-01

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd2O3-22.7CeO2-11.7La2O3-10.9PrO2-1.3Eu2O3-1.3Gd2O3-8.1Sm2O3-4.8Y2O3 with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO2-16.0B2O3-12.6Na2O-3.8Al2O3-5.7CaO-1.7ZrO2. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La2O3 and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO5) and oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26) were found in glasses containing La2O3, while oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26 and NaNd9Si6O26) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (TL) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La2O3 were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while TL was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients TB2O3, TSiO2, TCaO, and TRE2O3 were also evaluated using a recently published study.

  19. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  20. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  1. Anthropogenic Cycles of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Graedel, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    This research will develop quantitatively resolved anthropogenic cycles and in-use stocks for the rare earth metals specifically cerium, lanthanum and dysprosium in Japan, China, and the U.S. for the year of 2007. Rare earth elements (REE) is a group of 17 scare metals widely used in a growing number of emerging technologies and have been in high demand for emerging technologies as raw materials during past the three decades. New market participants from newly industrializing countries, primarily China, have had strong impacts on the demand of share. Consequently, the importance to sustain a reliable, steady, uninterrupted supply on global market triggered comprehensive research to recognize and understand the life cycles of rare earths. Moreover, because China plays a dominant role in mining production since 1990, it requires the assessment for the countries, which are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources. The study aims to analyze the flows and stocks of rare earth elements individually as elemental form in spite of their natural geological co-occurrence and mixed composition in applications. By applying the method of Material Flow Analysis (MFA) work has been done on evaluating current and historical flows of specific technologically significant materials, for example, copper, zinc, nickel, etc., determining the stocks available in different types of reservoirs (e.g., lithosphere, in-use) and the flows among the reservoirs, developing scenarios of possible futures of metal use, and assessing the environmental and policy implications of the results. Therefore, REE as a new target deserves inclusion because of its potential demand-supply conflict and importance to secure the competitive advantage of technical innovation in future. This work will generate a quantitatively resolved anthropogenic life cycle and in-use stocks for REE for the main target countries for a chosen year, 2007, providing flows and stocks from

  2. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  3. Rare earth deposits in a deceased movie projectionist. A new case of rare earth pneumoconiosis?

    PubMed

    Waring, P M; Watling, R J

    The subject described in this case report, a movie projectionist, had approximately 25 years of occupational exposure to carbon arc lamp fumes. The carbon arc deposits were visible in histological sections as small granules within macrophages of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and hepatic Kupffer's cells. Electron microprobe analysis by energy dispersive analysis of x-rays showed the granules to be composed of the rare earth elements cerium, lanthanum and neodymium, which are the major constituents of carbon arc rods. Tissue concentrations, as determined by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, were approximately 250-2000 times those of unexposed controls, and there was evidence of their redistribution throughout the reticuloendothelial system. There were no respiratory symptoms, or radiographic or histological pulmonary changes attributable to the progressive accumulation of the rare earth elements, and as such the patient cannot be considered to have suffered from pneumoconiosis. Twenty-one published cases of rare earth pneumoconiosis, mainly in photoengravers exposed to carbon arc fumes, are reviewed and suggest that rare earth oxides are not innocuous dusts. With the increasingly widespread use of rare earth elements there is a likelhood that further occupational groups may have significant but unrecognised exposure. PMID:2247001

  4. Biogeochemistry of the rare-earth elements with particular reference to hickory trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.O.; Bastron, H.; Murata, K.J.

    1958-01-01

    Hickory trees concentrate the rare-earth elements in their leaves to a phenomenal degree and may contain as much as 2300 p.p.m. of total rare earths based on the dry weight of the leaves. The average proportions of the individual elements (atomic percent of the total rare-earth elements) in the leaves are: Y 36, La 16, Ce 14, Pr 2, Nd 20, Sm 1, Eu 0.7, Gd 3, Tb 0.6, Dy 3, Ho 0.7, Er 2, Tm 0.2, Yb 1, and Lu 0.2. The similarity in the proportions of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and in the exchange complex of the soil on which the hickory trees grow indicates that the trees do not fractionate the rare earths appreciably. The variation of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and soils can be explained generally in terms of the relative abundance of the cerium group and the yttrium group, except for the element cerium. The large fluctuations in the proportion of cerium [Ce/(La + Nd) atomic ratios of 0.16 to 0.86] correlate with oxidation-reduction conditions in the soil profile. The substitution of dilute H2SO3 for dilute HC1 in the determination of available rare-earth elements brings about a large increase in the proportion of cerium that is extracted from an oxygenated subsoil. These relationships strongly suggest that quadrivalent cerium is present in oxygenated subsoil and is less available to plants than the other rare-earth elements that do not undergo such a change in valence. A few parts per billion of rare-earth elements have been detected in two samples of ground water. ?? 1958.

  5. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as rare earth phophate (PMNs...

  10. Rare earth elements materials production from apatite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufrieva, A. V.; Andrienko, O. S.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of processing apatite ores with nitric acid and extraction of the rare earth elements. The rare earth elements can be successfully separated and recovered by extraction from the nitrate- phosphate solution, being an tributyl phosphate as extraction agent. The developed scheme of the processing apatite concentrate provides obtaining rare earth concentrates with high qualitative characteristics.

  11. Interactions between exogenous rare earth elements and phosphorus leaching in packed soil columns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rare earth elements (REEs) increasingly used in agriculture as an amendment for crop growth may help to lessen environmental losses of phosphorus (P) from heavily fertilized soils. The vertical transport characteristics of P and REEs, lanthanum (La), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), and cerium (Ce), w...

  12. Raman investigations of rare earth orthovanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C. C.; Silva, E. N.; Ayala, A. P.; Guedes, I.; Pizani, P. S.; Loong, C.-K.; Boatner, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the room-temperature phonon spectra of the series of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals: SmVO4, HoVO4, YbVO4, and LuVO4. The observed Raman frequencies follow the overall mode distribution expected for REVO4 compounds with the tetragonal zircon structure. The variation of the mode frequency with atomic number across the lanthanide orthovanadate series was investigated, and the trend exhibited by the internal modes was explained by considering the force constants of VO4 tetrahedron.

  13. Raman Investigations of Rare-Earth Orthovanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, C. C.; Silva, E. N.; Ayala, A. P.; Guedes, I.; Pizani, P. S.; Loong, C. K.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2007-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the room-temperature phonon spectra of the series of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals: SmVO4, HoVO4, YbVO4 and LuVO4. The observed Raman frequencies follow the overall mode distribution expected for RVO4 compounds with the tetragonal zircon structure. The variation of the mode frequency with atomic number across the lanthanide orthovanadate series was investigated, and the trend exhibited by the internal modes was explained by considering the force constants of VO4 tetrahedron.

  14. Rare-earth-metal dialkynyl dimethyl aluminates.

    PubMed

    Nieland, Anja; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2013-06-17

    A new class of rare-earth-metal alkynyl complexes has been prepared. The reactions of the tris(tetramethylaluminate)s of lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, yttrium, holmium, and thulium, [Ln(AlMe₄)₃], with phenylacetylene afforded compounds [Ln{(μ-C≡CPh)₂AlMe₂}₃] (Ln=La (1), Pr (2), Sm (3), Y (4), Ho (5), Tm (6)). All of these compounds have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and by elemental analysis. NMR spectroscopic studies of the series of para- magnetic compounds [Ln(AlMe₄)₃] and [Ln{(μ-C≡CPh)₂AlMe₂}₃] have also been performed. PMID:23616205

  15. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  16. Characterization of a rare earth oxide obtained from xenotime mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Vernilli, Fernando . E-mail: fernando.vernilli@demar.faenquil.br; Camargo Vernilli, Daniela; Ferreira, Bento; Silva, Gilbert

    2007-01-15

    This paper reports on the characterization of a rare earth oxide obtained by hydrometallurgy of the mineral xenotime, an yttrium phosphate containing other rare earths, and comparison with mixtures of rare earth oxides prepared in different ways. The results indicated that hydrometallurgy from xenotime yielded a solid solution of the rare earth oxides. However, when the pure rare earth oxides were simply mixed physically then heat-treated at 1000 deg. C, a similar solid solution was not obtained. On the other hand, when the mixtures were prepared using a co-precipitation process, subsequent heat treatment did produce oxide solid solutions similar to that produced by hydrometallurgy of xenotime.

  17. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-01

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera. PMID:24387481

  18. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  19. Reflectives: Phosphors and lasers - shedding light on rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    The first powder electroluminescent phosphor was introduced in 1936. Today, phosphors, particularly those made of high-purity rare earths, have found their way into a variety of products: industrial, commercial, and consumer, alike. The fluorescent lamp industry which remains the leading market for the use of high-purity rare earths, lit the way for the future of rare earths in the optical, x-ray, and display screen applications. Light combined with rare earth materials is also a successful recipe for reflectivity needed in filtering applications such as optics, lasers, and conductors. This article discusses the applications and markets for phosphors and rare earths.

  20. Isotopic fractionation of rare earth elements in geochemical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Ohno, T.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of Rare Earth Elements(REEs) can be fractionated through various physical and chemical reactions in nature [1]. The isotopic variations of REEs occurring naturally has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields. The REEs has key features that their chemical similarities and gradual changes of ionic radius, which may help us to understand the mechanisms of isotopic variations of REEs in nature. Among the REEs, geochemical and physicochemical features of Ce, which could be presence as the tetravalent state, be anomalous, and oxidation state of Ce can change by reflecting the redox conditions of the environment. Therefore, the study of the difference in the degree of isotopic fractionation between Ce and other REEs may provide information on the redox conditions. In this study, we developed a new separation method to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionations of REEs in geochemical samples, and examined the optimum concentration of hydrochloric acid for the separation. The samples were decomposed by a mixture of acids, then REEs were separated as a group from major elements using cation exchange resin columns and RE Spec resin. The separations within the REEs group were carried out using Ln2Spec resin. For the recovery of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, 0.1 M HCl was used, and for isolation of Sm, Eu, and Gd, 0.25 M HCl was used. Then, 0.6 M HCl was used for separation of Tb, and Dy, 1 M HCl was used for separation of Ho, Y, and Er, finally, Tm, Yb, and Lu were collected using 2 M HCl. The yields of all REEs were enough to examine isotopic fractionation in geochemical samples. [1] Ohno and Hirata,Analytical Sciences, 29, 271, 2013

  1. Standard reference water samples for rare earth element determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Antweiler, R.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference water samples (SRWS) were collected from two mine sites, one near Ophir, CO, USA and the other near Redding, CA, USA. The samples were filtered, preserved, and analyzed for rare earth element (REE) concentrations (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two samples were acid mine waters with elevated concentrations of REEs (0.45-161 ??g/1). Seventeen international laboratories participated in a 'round-robin' chemical analysis program, which made it possible to evaluate the data by robust statistical procedures that are insensitive to outliers. The resulting most probable values are reported. Ten to 15 of the participants also reported values for Ba, Y, and Sc. Field parameters, major ion, and other trace element concentrations, not subject to statistical evaluation, are provided.

  2. Rare Earth Element Partition Coefficients from Enstatite/Melt Synthesis Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwandt, Craig S.; McKay, Gordon A.

    1997-01-01

    Enstatite (En(80)Fs(19)Wo(01)) was synthesized from a hypersthene normative basaltic melt doped at the same time with La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb and Lu. The rare earth element concentrations were measured in both the basaltic glass and the enstatite. Rare earth element concentrations in the glass were determined by electron microprobe analysis with uncertainties less than two percent relative. Rare earth element concentrations in enstatite were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry with uncertainties less than five percent relative. The resulting rare earth element partition signature for enstatite is similar to previous calculated and composite low-Ca pigeonite signatures, but is better defined and differs in several details. The partition coefficients are consistent with crystal structural constraints.

  3. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section.

  4. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section. PMID:27376406

  5. Ferromagnetic Ground States with High Transition Temperatures in New Tetragonal Rare-Earth Compounds CeRu2Al2B and PrRu2Al2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Eiichi; Tomiyama, Yo; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2012-04-01

    We report on the discovery of ferromagnetic ground states in the newly synthesized tetragonal compounds CeRu2Al2B and PrRu2Al2B. Polycrystalline samples of these compounds were synthesized and their magnetization M(B) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) were measured as functions of the magnetic field B and the temperature T. CeRu2Al2B is a metallic compound with trivalent Ce ions and is classified into a Kondo-lattice system: a Kondo-like -\\ln T dependence of ρ(T) is observed below 32 K. The cusp at TN{}Ce = 14.3 K and the steep increase at approximately TC{}Ce = 13 K observed in the magnetic susceptibility M/B(T) correspond to antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) transitions, respectively. TC{}Ce is the second highest transition temperature of the Ce-based ferromagnet with no other magnetic elements. PrRu2Al2B is also a metallic compound with trivalent Pr ions. The M/B(T) of PrRu2Al2B shows a cusp at TN{}Pr = 26 K and a steep increase at approximately TC{}Pr = 11 K, indicating that AFM and FM transitions occur at TN{}Pr and TC{}Pr, respectively.

  6. IMPROVED LABORATORY TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ce II, APPLICATION TO THE CERIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUN AND FIVE r-PROCESS-RICH, METAL-POOR STARS, AND RARE EARTH LAB DATA SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.; Ivans, I. I. E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu

    2009-05-15

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to {+-}5% using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 43 even-parity and 15 odd-parity levels of Ce II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 921 lines of Ce II. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Ce abundance, log {epsilon} = 1.61 {+-} 0.01 ({sigma} = 0.06 from 45 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoritic abundance, log {epsilon} = 1.61 {+-} 0.02. Revised Ce abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars BD+17{sup 0}3248, CS 22892-052, CS 31082-001, HD 115444, and HD 221170. Between 26 and 40 lines were used for determining the Ce abundance in these five stars, yielding a small statistical uncertainty of {+-}0.01 dex similar to the solar result. The relative abundances in the metal-poor stars of Ce and Eu, a nearly pure r-process element in the Sun, matches r-process-only model predictions for solar system material. This consistent match with small scatter over a wide range of stellar metallicities lends support to these predictions of elemental fractions. A companion paper includes an interpretation of these new precision abundance results for Ce as well as new abundance results and interpretation for Pr, Dy, and Tm.

  7. Global in-use stocks of the rare Earth elements: a first estimate.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T E

    2011-05-01

    Even though rare earth metals are indispensible in modern technology, very little quantitative information other than combined rare earth oxide extraction is available on their life cycles. We have drawn upon published and unpublished information from China, Japan, the United States, and elsewhere to estimate flows into use and in-use stocks for 15 of the metals: La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y. Here, we show that the combined flows into use comprised about 90 Gg in 2007; the highest for individual metals were ∼28 Gg Ce and ∼22 Gg La, the lowest were ∼0.16 Gg Tm and ∼0.15 Gg Lu. In-use stocks ranged from 144 Gg Ce to 0.2 Gg Tm; these stocks, if efficiently recycled, could provide a valuable supplement to geological stocks. PMID:21438595

  8. Rare earths exposure and male infertility: the injury mechanism study of rare earths on male mice and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xiao, Heng-Jun; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-Ling; Long, He-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2015-02-01

    The weight; testis/body coefficient; levels of LDH, SDH, SODH, G-6PD, and testosterone; cell cycle; and cell apoptosis of the male mice were influenced after being treated with 200 mg/[kg/day] of rare earths suspension for 3 weeks. The "Raman fingerprints" of the human sperm DNA exposed to 0.040 mg/ml CeCl3 were very different from those of the untreated; the Raman bands at 789 cm(-1) (backbone phosphodiester), PO4 backbone at 1,094 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,221 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,485 cm(-1), and amide II at 1,612 cm(-1), of which intensities and shifts were changed, might be the diagnostic biomarkers or potential therapeutic targets. The injury mechanism might be that the rare earths influence the oxidative stress and blood testosterone barrier, tangle the big biomolecule concurrently, which might cause the testicular cells and vascular system disorder and/or dysfunction, and at the same time change the physical and chemical properties of the sperm directly. PMID:25167826

  9. CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

    1958-11-01

    A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

  10. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  11. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  12. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  13. Rare earth elements in river waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the input to the oceans of rare earth elements (REE) in the dissolved and the suspended loads of rivers, the REE concentrations were measured in samples of Amazon, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and Ohio rivers and in samples of smaller rivers that had more distinct drainage basin lithology and water chemistry. It was found that, in the suspended loads of small rivers, the REE pattern was dependent on drainage basin geology, whereas the suspended loads in major rivers had relatively uniform REE patterns and were heavy-REE depleted relative to the North American Shale composite (NASC). The dissolved loads in the five major rivers had marked relative heavy-REE enrichments, relative to the NASC and the suspended material, with the (La/Yb)N ratio of about 0.4 (as compared with the ratio of about 1.9 in suspended loads).

  14. Gaining control over rare earth valence fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlleben, D.

    1987-05-31

    This paper briefly deals with the problem of narrow band materials. It addresses a new theoretical approach to the fluctuation of valence electrons in rare earth elements. It is believed that the phenomena of interest arize from an instability of the partially filled d or f shell of certain atoms when they are put into a metallic host. The theoretical models which dominate the scene work with two local d or f states on one hand and a structureless sea of free conduction electrons on the other. This procedure ignores at least half of the essential physics; the other held is kept alive in the term valence fluctuation. Basically, what the prevalent models ignore is that, in all these systems, the entire atoms as the source of the anomalies are being dealt with, not just their f shells. In other words, there is important structure in the sea of conduction electrons.

  15. Pt nanoparticles modified by rare earth oxides: Electronic effect and influence to catalytic hydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Zhigang; Han, Ming; Li, Gang; Du, Yukou; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Hailu; Deng, Zongwu

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The rare earths modified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by colloidal deposition method. • Modification of Pt by the rare earth enhanced catalytic hydrogenation activity. • The activity improvement is due to electron interaction between Pt and rare earth. • The hydrogenation mechanism of rare earth modified Pt catalyst was proposed. - Abstract: The rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Pr, and Gd) modified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by the colloidal deposition and chemical reduction methods, respectively. Pt nanoparticles with average size 3 ± 0.5 nm were uniformly dispersed on the surface of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the samples prepared by the colloidal deposition method, which exhibited higher activities in the hydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzadehyde than the corresponding samples prepared by chemical reduction method. Moreover, except Gd, the catalysts modified by rare earth elements showed better catalytic performance than unmodified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For Pt–Ce/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, when the weight percent of Pt and Ce was 0.5 and 0.25, respectively, the hydrogenation conversion of 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde was 97.3% after 6 h reaction. This activity improvement is due to the electronic interaction between Pt and rare earth elements, which was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  17. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  18. [Luminescence properties of rare earth ions in 2SrO.0.84 P2O5.0.16 B2O3: RE3+ (RE=Ce, Tb)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-tang; He, Da-wei; Li, Shao-xia; Liu, Duan-yang; Lu, Cheng-zhu

    2005-08-01

    The phosphors of 2SrO.0.84 P2O5.0.16 B2O3: RE3+ (RE=Ce, Tb) were synthesized by high temperature solid state reaction. The luminescence properties of Ce3+, Tb3+ and the sensitization of Ce3+ to Tb3+ were studied. In the excitation spectrum of Ce3+, there are two broad bands at 232 and 296 nm respectively. Because of the large overlap between the emission bands, the authors could not separate them from each other. The authors could get two bands at 325 and 344 nm with the Gaussian fitting method. The possible reason is that these two peaks are from two light centers. In the phosphor of 2SrO.0.84 P2O5.0.16 B2O3: Tb3+, the excitation spectrum of Tb3+ exhibits high absorption at 370 nm and emission spectrum shows the strongest emission peak at 548 nm. The emission from the levels of (5)D3 and (5)D4 of Tb3+ appear at the same time, indicating that non-radiative process between them is inefficient. In the phosphor of Ce3+ and Tb3+ co-doped 2SrO.0.84 P2.O5.0.16 B2O3, efficient energy transfer exists. PMID:16329480

  19. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Judith L.; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  20. SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, G.A.

    1959-08-25

    The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

  1. Enthalpies of Formation of Rare-Earth Orthovanadates, REVO4

    SciTech Connect

    Dorogova, M.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Boatner, Lynn A

    2007-01-01

    Rare earth orthovanadates, REVO4, having the zircon structure, form a series of materials interesting for magnetic, optical, sensor, and electronic applications. Enthalpies of formation of REVO4 compounds (RE=Sc, Y, Ce Nd, Sm Tm, Lu) were determined by oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO {center_dot} 2B2O3) solvent at 1075 K. The enthalpies of formation from oxide components become more negative with increasing RE ionic radius. This trend is similar to that obtained for the rare earth phosphates.

  2. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

    2014-02-12

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses

  3. Mechanism of Rare Earth Incorporation and Crystal Growth of Rare Earth Containing Type-I Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I clathrates possess extremely low thermal conductivities, a property that makes them promising materials for thermoelectric applications. The incorporation of cerium into one such clathrate has recently been shown to lead to a drastic enhancement of the thermopower, another property determining the thermoelectric efficiency. Here we explore the mechanism of the incorporation of rare earth elements into type-I clathrates. Our investigation of the crystal growth and the composition of the phase Ba8–xRExTMySi46–y (RE = rare earth element; TM = Au, Pd, Pt) reveals that the RE content x is mainly governed by two factors, the free cage space and the electron balance. PMID:26823658

  4. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials. PMID:23518599

  5. [Application of ICP-MS to Detect Rare Earth Elements in Three Economic Macroalgaes in China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-fang; Shang, De-rong; Zhai, Yu-xiu; Ning, Jin-song; Ding, Hai-yan; Sheng, Xiao-feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the content and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in main economic macroalgaes in our country, fifteen rare earth elements in three economic macroalgaes (including 30 samples of kelp, 30 samples of laver and 15 samples of Enteromorpha) were detected using ICP-MS method. Results showed that the total content of REE in different species of macroalgaes was different. The highest total content of REE was in Enteromorpha (16,012.0 ng · g⁻¹), while in kelp and laver, the total REE was similar for two macroalgaes (3887.4 and 4318.1 ng · g⁻¹ respectively). The content of fifteen rare earth elements in kelp ranged from 7.9 to 1496.4 ng · g⁻¹; in laver, it ranged from 8.2 to 1836.6 ng · g⁻¹. For Enteromorpha, the concentration of 15 rare earth elements were between 19.2 and 6014.5 ng · g⁻¹. In addition, the content and distribution of different rare earth elements in different macroalgaes was also different. For kelp, the highest content of REE was Ce (1 496.4 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (689.1 ng · g⁻¹). For laver, the highest was Y (1836.6 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was Ce (682.2 ng · g⁻¹). For Enteromorpha, the highest was Ce (6014.5 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (2902.9 ng · g⁻¹). Present results also showed that three macroalgaes accumulated the light rare earth elements much more than the high rare earth elements. The light rare earth elements occupied 90.9%, 87.3% and 91.1% for kelp, laver and Enteromorpha respectively. The result that the Enteromorpha had high content of rare earth elements could provide important support for opening new research directions for the utilization of Enteromorpha. PMID:26978935

  6. The Rare Earth Magnet Industry and Rare Earth Price in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kaihong

    2014-07-01

    In the past four years, the price of rare earth metal fluctuates sharply for many reasons. Currently, it has become more stable and more reasonable. This presentation is focused on the effect about the rare earth metal price. Some motor manufacturers have shifted from rare earth permanent magnet to ferrite magnet. Many motor manufacturers changed the design for the motor cooling system to make the motor function at a lower temperature. Thus the consumption of Dy can be markedly reduced. As for manufacturer of NdFeB magnet, we are also trying to optimize our process to reduce to dependence of HREE such as Dy and Tb. HS process have been introduced to solve the problem. With more and more people focusing and engaging on the REE industry, the price of REE will be more transparent without too many fluctuations. China is considering the problems of balancing the environment, energy sources, and labor sources. The application field about NdFeB such as wind turbine generator, HEV/EV, FA /OA is flourishing.

  7. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  8. China's Rare Earth Supply Chain: Illegal Production, and Response to new Cerium Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ruby Thuy; Imholte, D. Devin

    2016-03-01

    As the demand for personal electronic devices, wind turbines, and electric vehicles increases, the world becomes more dependent on rare earth elements. Given the volatile, Chinese-concentrated supply chain, global attempts have been made to diversify supply of these materials. However, the overall effect of supply diversification on the entire supply chain, including increasing low-value rare earth demand, is not fully understood. This paper is the first attempt to shed some light on China's supply chain from both demand and supply perspectives, taking into account different Chinese policies such as mining quotas, separation quotas, export quotas, and resource taxes. We constructed a simulation model using Powersim Studio that analyzes production (both legal and illegal), production costs, Chinese and rest-of-world demand, and market dynamics. We also simulated new demand of an automotive aluminum-cerium alloy in the US market starting from 2018. Results showed that market share of the illegal sector has grown since 2007-2015, ranging between 22% and 25% of China's rare earth supply, translating into 59-65% illegal heavy rare earths and 14-16% illegal light rare earths. There will be a shortage in certain light and heavy rare earths given three production quota scenarios and constant demand growth rate from 2015 to 2030. The new simulated Ce demand would require supply beyond that produced in China. Finally, we illustrate revenue streams for different ore compositions in China in 2015.

  9. China's Rare Earth Supply Chain: Illegal Production, and Response to new Cerium Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ruby Thuy; Imholte, D. Devin

    2016-07-01

    As the demand for personal electronic devices, wind turbines, and electric vehicles increases, the world becomes more dependent on rare earth elements. Given the volatile, Chinese-concentrated supply chain, global attempts have been made to diversify supply of these materials. However, the overall effect of supply diversification on the entire supply chain, including increasing low-value rare earth demand, is not fully understood. This paper is the first attempt to shed some light on China's supply chain from both demand and supply perspectives, taking into account different Chinese policies such as mining quotas, separation quotas, export quotas, and resource taxes. We constructed a simulation model using Powersim Studio that analyzes production (both legal and illegal), production costs, Chinese and rest-of-world demand, and market dynamics. We also simulated new demand of an automotive aluminum-cerium alloy in the US market starting from 2018. Results showed that market share of the illegal sector has grown since 2007-2015, ranging between 22% and 25% of China's rare earth supply, translating into 59-65% illegal heavy rare earths and 14-16% illegal light rare earths. There will be a shortage in certain light and heavy rare earths given three production quota scenarios and constant demand growth rate from 2015 to 2030. The new simulated Ce demand would require supply beyond that produced in China. Finally, we illustrate revenue streams for different ore compositions in China in 2015.

  10. China’s rare earth supply chain: Illegal production, and response to new cerium demand

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Ruby Thuy; Imholte, D. Devin

    2016-03-29

    As the demand for personal electronic devices, wind turbines, and electric vehicles increases, the world becomes more dependent on rare earth elements. Given the volatile, Chinese-concentrated supply chain, global attempts have been made to diversify supply of these materials. However, the overall effect of supply diversification on the entire supply chain, including increasing low-value rare earth demand, is not fully understood. This paper is the first attempt to shed some light on China’s supply chain from both demand and supply perspectives, taking into account different Chinese policies such as mining quotas, separation quotas, export quotas, and resource taxes. We constructedmore » a simulation model using Powersim Studio that analyzes production (both legal and illegal), production costs, Chinese and rest-of-world demand, and market dynamics. We also simulated new demand of an automotive aluminum-cerium alloy in the U.S. market starting from 2018. Results showed that market share of the illegal sector has grown since 2007 to 2015, ranging between 22% and 25% of China’s rare earth supply, translating into 59–65% illegal heavy rare earths and 14–16% illegal light rare earths. There would be a shortage in certain light and heavy rare earths given three production quota scenarios and constant demand growth rate from 2015 to 2030. The new simulated Ce demand would require supply beyond that produced in China. Lastly, we illustrated revenue streams for different ore compositions in China in 2015.« less

  11. Effect of trivalent rare earth doping on magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Pr0.5(Ce,Eu,Y)0.1Sr0.4MnO3 manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, A.; M'nassri, R.; Chniba-Boudjada, N.; Ommezzine, M.; Cheikhrouhou, A.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies of the structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of the three compounds Pr0.5X0.1Sr0.4MnO3 (X = Ce, Eu and Y) are reported. Our samples were synthesized using the Pechini sol-gel method. X-ray powder diffraction at room temperature indicates that our materials crystallize in the orthorhombic structure with Pbnm space group. The compounds undergo a second-order magnetic transition from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic state around their own Curie temperatures T C ~ 310, 270 and 230 K for X = Ce, Eu and Y, respectively. A considerable magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is observed around room temperature. The maximum values of magnetic entropy change ∆ S max are 3.54, 3.81 and 2.99 J/kgK for the samples with X = Ce, Eu and Y, respectively, when a magnetic field of 5 T was applied. The relative cooling power (RCP) values for the corresponding materials are 246.60, 261.66 and 298 J/kg. It is shown that for Pr0.5X0.1Sr0.4MnO3 the exponent n and the magnetic entropy change follow a master curve behavior. With the universal scaling curve, the experimental ∆ S at several temperatures and fields can be extrapolated.

  12. Rare-earth energy levels in Nd2CuO4, Pr2CuO4, and the electron superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, C.-K.; Soderholm, L.

    1993-11-01

    The magnetic excitation spectra of the electron superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 and related parent compounds Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4 have been determined by inelastic neutron scattering. We observe crystal-field transitions up to about 100 meV within the Pr3+ 3H4 and Nd3+ 4I9/2 Russell-Saunders ground multiplets in these materials. We find that a crystal-field treatment of the Pr3+ and Nd3+ ions can adequately explain the observed excitation spectra for both Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4. The obtained crystal-field parameters are close to values estimated from a superposition-model calculation and Mössbauer data. The Pr3+ and Nd3+ wave functions are found to have significant (~=20%) admixture of some states belonging to higher J multiplets. The calculated contributions to the susceptibility of Pr2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4 from the crystal-field states agree well with experiments. The observed crystal-field transitions in the superconductor Pr1.85Ce0.15CuO4 shift to slightly lower energies and are broadened significantly relative to the present compound due to chemical disorder from Ce doping.

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of two new rare-earth manganese germanates: CeMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} and GdMnGe{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Taviot-Gueho, C.; Leone, P.; Palvadeau, P.; Rouxel, J.

    1999-03-01

    Crystals of Ce{sup +4}Mn{sub 2}{sup +2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} and Gd{sup +3}Mn{sup +3}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7} were obtained during the exploration of the quaternary Ln-Mn-Ge-O system. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction: CeMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/nbm with a = 9.816(1) {angstrom}, c = 4.888(1) {angstrom}, Z = 2, and R = 0.026 while GdMnGe{sub 2}O{sub 7} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group A222 with a = 4.735(1) {angstrom}, b = 7.839(2) {angstrom}, c = 13.500(3) {angstrom}, Z = 4, and R = 0.048. Both frameworks are built up from the same polyhedra, i.e., LnO{sub 8} antiprisms, MnO{sub 6} octahedra, and GeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. CeMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} is isotypic with SrNa{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 12}; the GeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are linked into Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} rings located between layers of CeO{sub 8} and MnO{sub 6} polyhedra sharing edges. On the other hand, GdMnGe{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibits a novel quasi-one-dimensional lattice which might be ascribed to the Jahn-Teller nature of the Mn{sup +3} ion. The structure consists of chains of MnO{sub 6} octahedra alternating with parallel chains of GdO{sub 8} antiprisms forming layers linked together through Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7} groups. A structural comparison with fluorite-related compounds as well as CeMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} will be discussed.

  14. Correlated topological phase in rare earth Hexaboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Shi, X.; Biswas, P.; Matt, C.; Dhaka, R.; Huang, Y.; Plumb, N.; Radovic, M.; Dil, J.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Amato, A.; Salman, Z.; Paul, D.; Mesot, J.; Ding, Hong; Shi, Ming

    2014-03-01

    We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on SmB6 in order to elucidate elements of the electronic structure relevant to the possible occurrence of a topological Kondo insulator state. Our results reveal one electron-like 5d bulk band centered at the X point of the bulk Brillouin zone that is hybridized with strongly correlated f electrons, as well as the opening of a Kondo band gap (~20 meV) at low temperature. In addition, we observe electron-like bands forming three Fermi surfaces at the center Gamma-bar point and boundary X-bar point of the surface Brillouin zone. These bands are not expected from calculations of the bulk electronic structure, and their observed dispersion characteristics are consistent with surface states. Our results suggest that the unusual low-temperature transport behavior of SmB6 is likely to be related to the pronounced surface states sitting inside the band hybridization gap and the presence of a topological Kondo insulating state. Recent result on rare earth Hexboride will be shown. This work was supported by the Sino-Swiss Science and Technology Cooperation (Project No. IZLCZ2138954), the Swiss National Science Foundation (Grant No. 200021-137783), and MOST (Grant No. 2010CB923000) and NSFC.

  15. Novel rare earth boron-rich solids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuxiang; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Xu, Jun; Mori, Takao; Matsui, Yoshio, Tanaka, Takaho; Okada, Shigeru

    2001-06-01

    A new series of boron-rich solids ReB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N (Re: Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu) was synthesized by traditional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure of the representative compound YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N was solved by direct method from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The unit cell of the new structure is rhombohedral with space group R-3m (No. 166), lattice constant a = b = 5.623(0) {angstrom} and c = 44.785(3) {angstrom} with six formula units in one unit cell. The atoms of boron in the solids, like most of the boron-rich solids, exist with icosahedral and octahedral clusters, and the whole crystal shows a layered structure. The interconnected nine layers of icosahedron and three layers of octahedron in a unit cell build the whole framework of the new phase and rare earth metal atoms reside in voids of the octahedron layers. The neighboring icosahedral layers link through C-B-C chains besides the direct bonding of B-B. Both experimental and structural analysis indicated that the nitrogen atoms in the new phase can be replaced with carbon.

  16. The geochemistry of rare earth elements in the Amazon River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Shokovitz, E.R. )

    1993-05-01

    The estuarine geochemistry of rare earth elements (REEs) was studied using samples collected in the Amazon River estuary from the AmasSeds (Amazon Shelf SEDiment Study) cruise of August 1989. Extensive removal of dissolved (0.22 [mu]m filtered) trivalent REEs from river water occurs in the low (0--6) salinity region. Removal by the salt-induced coagulation of river colloids leads to fractionation among the REE(III) series; the order of removal is light REEs > middle REEs > heavy REEs. There also is the enhanced removal of Ce (relative to trivalent La and Nd) in the low salinity (0--6) zone and in the zone of high biological activity. This is the first field observation of strong Ce removal associated with coagulation of river colloids and biological productivity. The argument is made that the decrease in the Ce anomaly across a biological front is caused by biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV). Coagulation of river colloids and biologically mediated oxidation of Ce(III) lead to fractionation of REE(III) and redox modification of Ce. These processes result in the REE composition becoming fractionated relative to the Amazon River water and crust and more evolved toward the REE composition of the oceans. This study implies that reactions in estuaries play significant, yet poorly understood roles in controlling the REE composition and Ce anomaly of the oceans. 46 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations in rare earth dialuminides

    SciTech Connect

    Paudyal, Durga; Pecharsky, V K; Gschneidner, K A

    2014-05-07

    We report electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations of selected rare earth dialuminides calculated by using local spin density approximation (LSDA), including the Hubbard U parameter (LSDA + U) approach. Total energy calculations show that CeAl2 and EuAl2 adopt antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground states, while dialuminides formed by other magnetic lanthanides have ferromagnetic (FM) ground states. The comparison of theoretical and experimental magnetic moments of CeAl2 indicates that the 4f orbital moment of Ce in CeAl2 is quenched. Theoretical calculations confirm that Eu in EuAl2 and Yb in YbAl2 are divalent. PrAl2 exhibits a tetragonal distortion near FM transition. HoAl2 shows a first order magnetostructural transition while DyAl2 shows a second order transformation below magnetic transition. The dialuminides formed by Nd, Tb, and Er are simple ferromagnets without additional anomalies in the FM state.

  18. Study on a recovery of rare earth oxides from a LiCl-KCl-RECl 3 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Cho, Y. Z.; Park, H. S.; Lee, T. K.; Kim, I. T.; Park, K. I.; Lee, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive rare earth chlorides in waste LiCl-KCl molten salts have to be separated as a stable form to minimize waste volume and to achieve stable solidification. In this work, thermal behavior of rare earth chlorides (CeCl 3, GdCl 3, NdCl 3, PrCl 3) was investigated in an oxygen condition to recover rare earth oxides from a LiCl-KCl-RECl 3 system. The rare earth chlorides in the LiCl-KCl molten salts were smoothly converted to an oxychloride form at a higher temperature than 650 °C, except for CeCl 3. CeCl 3 was totally converted to an oxide from at a higher temperature than 450 °C. The rare earth oxychlorides (GdOCl, NdOCl, PrOCl) were effectively converted to oxide forms at a higher temperature than 1100 °C. It was confirmed that rare earth oxides can be recovered from a LiCl-KCl-RECl 3 system without impurity generation.

  19. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  20. Rare-earth occurrences in the Pea Ridge tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierrether, C.W.; Cornell, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    Tailings from the Pea Ridge iron mine contain significant amounts of apatite, which has rare-earth element values associated with it. In association with the recovery of rare-earth minerals as a secondary resource, the US Bureau of Mines conducted an investigation on the recoverability of the rare-earth minerals from the tailings. The mill tailings were subjected to a phosphate flotation to separate the apatite from other constituents. More than 70-pct recovery of the rare-earth values was achieved. Based on mineralogical characterization and prior analysis of rare-earth-bearing breccia pipe material at Pea Ridge, it is proposed that processing this phosphate concentrate on a vanner table would yield up to a 95-pct recovery of the rare earths in the concentrate, with the apatite reporting to the tailings. Intensive ore microscopy studies of the original tailings to the flotation products led to the identification of monazite, xenotime, and rare-earth-enriched apatite as the major rare-earth-bearing minerals in the tailings.

  1. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  2. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.; Hope, Kevin M.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

  3. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  4. Condensation and fractionation of rare earths in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, A. M.; Grossman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The condensation behavior of the rare earth elements in the solar nebula is calculated on the basis of the most recent thermodynamic data in order to construct a model explaining group II rare earth element patterns in Allende inclusions. Models considered all involve the removal of large fractions of the more refractory heavy rare earth elements in an early condensate, followed by the condensation of the remainder at a lower temperature. It is shown that the model of Boynton (1975) in which one rare earth element component is dissolved nonideally in perovskite according to relative activity coefficients can not reasonably be made to fit the observed group II patterns. A model in which two rare earth components control the patterns and dissolve ideally in perovskite is proposed and shown to be able to account for the 20 patterns by variations of the perovskite removal temperature and the relative proportions of the two components.

  5. Correlation between volatility of rare-earth metals and encapsulation of their carbides in carbon nanocapsules

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yahachi; Okuda, Mitsumasa; Yoshikawa, Tadanobu ); Kasuya, Atsuo; Nishina, Yuichiro )

    1994-07-07

    Encapsulation of metals in multilayered graphitic capsules has been studied for all the rare-earth elements (Sc, Y, and Ln = La, Ce, ..., Lu) excluding Pm by using electric arc discharge. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction of carbonaceous products revealed that most of rare-earth metals (Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Lu) were encapsulated in the form of carbides, but the others, Sm, Eu, and Yb, were not. The metals in the former group that were encapsulated had vapor pressures definitely lower than those in the latter group. In the case of thulium (Tm), whose vapor pressure is intermediate between the two groups, only a trace amount of encapsulated carbide was formed. Correlation of volatility of metals with encapsulation was clearly found, suggesting that the volatility of a metal plays an important role in a process of the metal encapsulation. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Rare earth elements in Hamersley BIF minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Minerals from the Hamersley banded iron formation, Western Australia, were analyzed for Y and rare earth elements (YREEs) by laser ablation ICP-MS to investigate diagenetic pathways, from precursor phases to BIF minerals. One group of apatites carries the seawater REE signature, giving evidence that P and REEs, thoroughly scavenged from the water column by Si-ferrihydrite particles, were released upon microbial Fe3+ reductive dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite in pore-water and finally sequestered mainly in authigenic apatite. The absence of fractionation between apatite and seawater suggests that REE were first incorporated into an amorphous calcium phosphate as fully hydrated cations, i.e. as outer-sphere complexes. The iron oxides and carbonates carry only a small fraction of the whole-rock REE budget. Their REE patterns are distinctly enriched in Yb and show some M-type tetrad effect consistent with experimental Kd(REE) between solid and saline solution with low carbonate ion concentrations. It is deduced that hematite formed at an incipient stage of Fe2+-catalyzed dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite, via a dissolution-reprecipitation pathway. The REE pattern of greenalite, found as sub-micron particles in quartz in a chert-siderite sample, is consistent with its authigenic origin by precipitation in pore-water after dissolution of a small amount of Si-ferrihydrite. Magnetite carries very low YREEs (ppb-level), has an homogeneous pattern distinctly enriched in the mid-REEs compared to hematite, and includes a late population depleted in light-REEs, Ba and As. Magnetite forming aggregates and massive laminae is tentatively interpreted as reflecting some fluid-aided hematite-magnetite re-equilibration or transformation at low-grade metamorphic temperatures.

  7. Structure and physical properties of RT{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=rare earth, T=Ni, Pd) compounds with the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}-type structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, V.W.; Yazici, D.; White, B.D.; Dilley, N.R.; Friedman, A.J.; Brandom, B.; Maple, M.B.

    2014-07-01

    Eleven new compounds, R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) and R Pd{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Ce, Pr, Sm), were grown as single crystals in high temperature cadmium-rich solutions. They crystallize in the cubic CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}-type structure (Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z=8) as characterized by measurements of powder X-ray diffraction. Electrical resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements were performed on R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) single crystals. Whereas YNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} and LaNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} exhibit unremarkable metallic behavior, when magnetic moments from localized 4f electron states (Gd{sup 3+}–Tb{sup 3+}) are embedded into this host, they exhibit ferromagnetic order with values of the Curie temperature T{sub C} for R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Gd, and Tb) which scale with the de Gennes factor. - Graphical abstract: Specific heat divided by temperature C/T vs. T for single crystals of R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Gd, and Tb). Left inset: Low temperature C/T vs. T{sup 2} for LaNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20}. The solid line represents a linear fit of the data. Right inset: Low-temperature C/T data vs. T for R=Ce–Nd, Gd, and Tb; magnetic ordering temperatures are indicated by arrows. - Highlights: • R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb) single crystals synthesized for the first time. • R Pd{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Ce, Pr, Sm) single crystals synthesized for the first time. • Single crystals are of good metallurgical quality (large RRR values). • NdNi{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}=1.5 K. • R Ni{sub 2}Cd{sub 20} (R=Sm, Gd, Tb) order ferromagnetically.

  8. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  9. Crystal growth of rare-earth orthovanadate (RVO 4) by the floating-zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Kunihiko; Unoki, Hiromi; Shibata, Hajime; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Single crystals of rare-earth orthovanadate, RVO 4 where R=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu, with the cross-sectional size of about 7×7 mm 2 and 20-50 mm length have been successfully grown by the floating-zone method. Fluorescence properties at room temperature and dielectric and elastic properties along the c-axis of some grown crystals have been reported.

  10. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  11. Reducing the detection limits of rare earth elements in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raskevich, V.K.; Maiboroda, I.K.; Frishberg, A.A.; Panfilova, S.Ya.

    1986-12-01

    Chemical and chemicospectral analysis methods make it possible to determine rare-earth elements (REE) reliably in steels, but they are time-consuming and laborious. X-ray fluorescence methods are also characterized by the complicated procedure of preparing standard and production specimens for analysis. In this paper, the authors attempt to develop a spectrographic method of determining the REEs in the steel using standard equipment. The authors prepare synthetic standard specimens for determining Ce, Nd, La, Pr, and Y in steels of various grades by adding titrated solutions of the salts of the determined elements to the powder of the steel without REE with subsequent evaporation, drying, and mixing. The steels were ground by the mechanical method. On the basis of the resulting detection limits and analysis accuracy, the proposed method can be recommended for inspection of the technological process in melting steels and for preparation of standard specimens in the plant. The method is 5-7 times faster than the chemicospectral method.

  12. Rare-earth element based permanent magnets: a theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Paudyal, Durga

    Permanent magnetic materials with large magnetization and high magnetocrystalline anisotropy are important for technical applications. In this context rare-earth (R) element based materials are good candidates because of their localized 4 f electrons. The 4 f crystal field splitting provides large part of magnetic anisotropy depending upon the crystal environment. The d spin orbit coupling of alloyed transition metal component provides additional anisotropy. RCo5 and its derivative R2Co17 are known compounds for large magnetic anisotropy. Here we have performed electronic structure calculations to predict new materials in this class by employing site substitutions. In these investigations, we have performed density functional theory including on-site electron correlation (DFT +U) and L-S coupling calculations. The results show that the abundant Ce substitution in R sites and Ti/Zr substitutions in some of the Co sites help reduce criticality without substantially affecting the magnetic moment and magnetic anisotropy in these materials. This work is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  14. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance. PMID:26332985

  15. Insensitivity of the pressure dependences of characteristic energy scales in Ce1–xRxCoIn₅ (R=Yb,Y,Gd) to the electronic configuration of the rare-earth ion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, B. D.; Hamlin, J. J.; Huang, K.; Shu, L.; Lum, I. K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Janoschek, M.; Maple, M. B.

    2012-09-11

    Cooperative Ce and Yb valence fluctuations have recently been proposed as the mechanism responsible for stabilizing correlated electron phenomena in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅ over an unexpectedly large range of concentrations. In order to better understand the origins and character of this stability, we have measured the effect of applied pressure on relevant energy scales such as the superconducting critical (Tc) and Kondo-lattice coherence (T*) temperatures of Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ with R=Yb, Y, and Gd. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed under applied pressure on samples doped with intermediate-valent Yb and stable-valent Gd and Y, and the responses of Tc and T* to increased pressure inmore » these systems are compared. The character of Tc(P) and T*(P) in Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ depends only on their respective ambient-pressure values Tc(0) and T*(0), independent of the electronic configuration of R or concentration x. The consequences of this result are discussed within the context of possible cooperative valence fluctuations in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅.« less

  16. Insensitivity of the pressure dependences of characteristic energy scales in Ce1–xRxCoIn₅ (R=Yb,Y,Gd) to the electronic configuration of the rare-earth ion

    SciTech Connect

    White, B. D.; Hamlin, J. J.; Huang, K.; Shu, L.; Lum, I. K.; Baumbach, R. E.; Janoschek, M.; Maple, M. B.

    2012-09-11

    Cooperative Ce and Yb valence fluctuations have recently been proposed as the mechanism responsible for stabilizing correlated electron phenomena in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅ over an unexpectedly large range of concentrations. In order to better understand the origins and character of this stability, we have measured the effect of applied pressure on relevant energy scales such as the superconducting critical (Tc) and Kondo-lattice coherence (T*) temperatures of Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ with R=Yb, Y, and Gd. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed under applied pressure on samples doped with intermediate-valent Yb and stable-valent Gd and Y, and the responses of Tc and T* to increased pressure in these systems are compared. The character of Tc(P) and T*(P) in Ce₁₋xRxCoIn₅ depends only on their respective ambient-pressure values Tc(0) and T*(0), independent of the electronic configuration of R or concentration x. The consequences of this result are discussed within the context of possible cooperative valence fluctuations in Ce₁₋xYbxCoIn₅.

  17. Minerals yearbook, 1988. Rare-earth minerals and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.; Templeton, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Domestic production of rare-earth concentrates decreased in 1988. Foreign sources of processed rare earths obtained a slightly larger share of the U.S. market, while domestic exports saw a marked increase compared to 1987 levels. Rare earths were used in high-technology applications such as laser crystals, high-strength permanent magnets, optical fibers, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, and high-temperature superconductors. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, environmental issues, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, world review--Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, Greenland, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Thailand--and technology.

  18. High-temperature desulfurization of gasifier effluents with rare earth and rare earth/transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, Kerry M.; Kalakota, Vikram; Adusumilli, Sumana

    2011-02-11

    We have improved the application of mixed rare-earth oxides (REOs) as hot gas desulfurization adsorbents by impregnating them on stable high surface area supports and by the inclusion of certain transition metal oxides. We report comparative desulfurization experiments at high temperature (900 K) using a synthetic biomass gasifier effluent containing 0.1 vol % H2S, along with H2, CO2, and water. More complex REO sorbents outperform the simpler CeO2/La2O3 mixtures, in some cases significantly. Supporting REOs on Al2O3 (~20 wt % REO) or ZrO2 actually increased the sulfur capacities found after several cycles on a total weight basis. Another major increase in sulfur capacity took place when MnOx or FeOx is incorporated. Apparently most of the Mn or Fe is dispersed on or near the surface of the mixed REOs because the capacities with REOs greatly exceeded those of Al2O3-supported MnOx or FeOx alone at these conditions. In contrast, incorporating Cu has little effect on sulfur adsorption capacities. Both the REO and transition metal/REO adsorbents could be regenerated completely using air for at least five repetitive cycles.

  19. High temperature rare earth compounds: Synthesis, characterization and applications in device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Joseph Reese

    As the area of nanotechnology continues to grow, the development of new nanomaterials with interesting physical and electronic properties and improved characterization techniques are several areas of research that will be remain vital for continued improvement of devices and the understanding in nanoscale phenomenon. In this dissertation, the chemical vapor deposition synthesis of rare earth (RE) compounds is described in detail. In general, the procedure involves the vaporization of a REClx (RE = Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) in the presence of hydride phase precursors such as decaborane and ammonia at high temperatures and low pressures. Unlike traditional single source precursor techniques such as metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, the materials produced are of extremely high chemical purity. The crystallographic orientation of as-synthesized rare earth hexaboride nanostructures and gadolinium nitride thin films was controlled by judicious choice of specific growth substrates and modeled by analyzing x-ray diffraction powder patterns and crystallographic models. The vapor-liquid-solid mechanism was used in combination with the chemical vapor deposition process to synthesize single crystalline rare earth hexaboride nanostructures. Unlike previously reported synthetic techniques to generate rare earth hexaborides, my synthesis provided control over the tip diameter of the nanomaterials, was applicable to all available rare earth metals and utilized a chemical scheme that was much less toxic. Furthermore, the synthesis provided the first ever doped rare earth hexaboride nanowires. The as produced materials showed excellent electronic properties and could be applicable to many different types of electronic applications. The rare earth hexaboride nanostructures were then implemented into two existing technologies to enhance their characterization capabilities. First, the rare earth hexaboride nanowires were used as a test material for the development

  20. Rare earth element association with foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Natalie L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Elderfield, Henry; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2012-10-01

    Neodymium isotopes are becoming widely used as a palaeoceanographic tool for reconstructing the source and flow direction of water masses. A new method using planktonic foraminifera which have not been chemically cleaned has proven to be a promising means of avoiding contamination of the deep ocean palaeoceanographic signal by detrital material. However, the exact mechanism by which the Nd isotope signal from bottom waters becomes associated with planktonic foraminifera, the spatial distribution of rare earth element (REE) concentrations within the shell, and the possible mobility of REE ions during changing redox conditions, have not been fully investigated. Here we present REE concentration and Nd isotope data from mixed species of planktonic foraminifera taken from plankton tows, sediment traps and a sediment core from the NW Atlantic. We used multiple geochemical techniques to evaluate how, where and when REEs become associated with planktonic foraminifera as they settle through the water column, reside at the surface and are buried in the sediment. Analyses of foraminifera shells from plankton tows and sediment traps between 200 and 2938 m water depth indicate that only ˜20% of their associated Nd is biogenically incorporated into the calcite structure. The remaining 80% is associated with authigenic metal oxides and organic matter, which form in the water column, and remain extraneous to the carbonate structure. Remineralisation of these organic and authigenic phases releases ions back into solution and creates new binding sites, allowing the Nd isotope ratio to undergo partial equilibration with the ambient seawater, as the foraminifera fall through the water column. Analyses of fossil foraminifera shells from sediment cores show that their REE concentrations increase by up to 10-fold at the sediment-water interface, and acquire an isotopic signature of bottom water. Adsorption and complexation of REE3+ ions between the inner layers of calcite contributes

  1. Decomposition of Rare Earth Loaded Resin Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Rawn, Claudia J

    2010-09-01

    resin is made of sulfonic acid functional groups attached to a styrene divinylbenzene copolymer lattice (long chained hydrocarbon). The metal cation binds to the sulfur group, then during thermal decomposition in air the hydrocarbons will form gaseous species leaving behind a spherical metal-oxide particle. Process development for resin applications with radioactive materials is typically performed using surrogates. For americium and curium, a trivalent metal like neodymium can be used. Thermal decomposition of Nd-loaded resin in air has been studied by Hale. Process conditions were established for resin decomposition and the formation of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The intermediate product compounds were described using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and wet chemistry. Leskela and Niinisto studied the decomposition of rare earth (RE) elements and found results consistent with Hale. Picart et al. demonstrated the viability of using a resin loading process for the fabrication of uranium-actinide mixed oxide microspheres for transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor. For effective transmutation of actinides, it will be desirable to extend the in-reactor burnup and minimize the number of recycles of used actinide materials. Longer burn times increases the chance of Fuel Clad Chemical or Mechanical Interaction (FCCI, FCMI). Sulfur is suspected of contributing to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) thus it is necessary to maximize the removal of sulfur during decomposition of the resin. The present effort extends the previous work by quantifying the removal of sulfur during the decomposition process. Neodymium was selected as a surrogate for trivalent actinide metal cations. As described above Nd was dissolved in nitric acid solution then contacted with the AG-50W resin column. After washing the column, the Nd-resin particles are removed and dried. The Nd-resin, seen in Figure 1 prior to decomposition, is ready to be converted to Nd oxide microspheres.

  2. Rare earths: Market disruption, innovation, and global supply chains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggert, Roderick; Wadia, Cyrus; Anderson, Corby; Bauer, Diana; Fields, Fletcher; Meinert, Lawrence D.; Taylor, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Rare earths, sometimes called the vitamins of modern materials, captured public attention when their prices increased more than ten-fold in 2010 and 2011. As prices fell between 2011 and 2016, rare earths receded from public view—but less visibly they became a major focus of innovative activity in companies, government laboratories and universities. Geoscientists worked to better understand the resource base and improve our knowledge about mineral deposits that will be mines in the future. Process engineers carried out research that is making primary production and recycling more efficient. Materials scientists and engineers searched for substitutes that will require fewer or no rare earths while providing properties comparable or superior to those of existing materials. As a result, even though global supply chains are not significantly different now than they were before the market disruption, the innovative activity motivated by the disruption likely will have far-reaching, if unpredictable, consequences for supply chains of rare earths in the future.

  3. Magneto-Optical Experiments on Rare Earth Garnet Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes experiments in which inexpensive or standard laboratory equipment is used to measure several macroscopic magnetic properties of thin rare earth garnet films used in the manufacture of magnetic bubble devices. (Author/CS)

  4. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  5. Radioluminescence study of rare earth doped some yttrium based phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayvacıklı, Mehmet; Ege, Arzu; Ekdal, Elçin; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Can, Nurdoğan

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O4 activated by rare earth ions such as Eu3+ and Tb3+. The influence of these rare earth ions on the radioluminescence (RL) of yttrium niobate and tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and preliminary RL measurements to further evaluate prepared materials. The emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu3+, Tb3+) were found to contribute efficiently to the total luminescence. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing the broad band variation of visible RL from blue to red.

  6. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  7. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  8. Rare earths: An industry review and market outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    A review of the global rare earths industry from production and trade, to the established and new applications that drive this unique market. The industry has been spurred by increased demand during the 1990`s, which is expected to continue into the twenty-first century. The forecast indicates additional growth, as well as the potential for the rare earths market to evolve slowly into one with a more fundamental structure.

  9. Magneto-structural correlations in rare-earth cobalt pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Corey Mitchell

    Magnetic materials are used in many applications such as credit cards, hard drives, electric motors, sensors, etc. Although a vast range of magnetic solids is available for these purposes, our ability to improve their efficiency and discover new materials remains paramount to the sustainable progress and economic profitability in many technological areas. The search for magnetic solids with improved performance requires fundamental understanding of correlations between the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of existing materials, as well as active exploratory synthesis that targets the development of new magnets. Some of the strongest permanent magnets, Nd 2Fe14B, SmCo5, and Sm2Co17, combine transition and rare-earth metals, benefiting from the strong exchange between the 4f and 3d magnetic sublattices. Although these materials have been studied in great detail, the development of novel magnets requires thorough investigation of other 3d-4 f intermetallics, in order to gain further insights into correlations between their crystal structures and magnetic properties. Among many types of intermetallic materials, ternary pnictides RCo 2Pn2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd; Pn = P, As) are of interest because, despite their simple crystal structures, they contain two magnetic sublattices, exchange interactions between which may lead to rich and unprecedented magnetic behavior. Nevertheless, magnetism of these materials was studied only to a limited extent, especially as compared to the extensive studies of their silicide and germanide analogues. The ThCr2Si2 structure type, to which these ternary pnictides belong, is one of the most ubiquitous atomic arrangements encountered among intermetallic compounds. It accounts for over 1000 known intermetallics and has received increased attention due to the recently discovered FeAs-based superconductors. This dissertation is devoted to the investigation of

  10. Substitution of Nd with other rare earth elements in melt spun Nd2Fe14B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. N.; Lau, D.; Chen, Z.

    2016-05-01

    This is a contemporary study of rapidly quenched Nd1.6X0.4Fe14B magnetic materials (where X= Nd, Y, Ce, La, Pr, Gd and Ho). A 20% substitution of the Nd component from Nd2Fe14B can bring about some commercial advantage. However, there will be some compromise to the magnetic performance. Light rare earth elements are definitely more abundant (Y, Ce, La) than the heavier rare earth elements, but when they are included in RE2Fe14B magnets they tend to lower magnetic performance and thermal stability. Substituting heavy rare earth elements (Gd, Ho) for Nd in Nd2Fe14B improves the thermal stability of magnets but causes a loss in magnet remanence.

  11. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Human Sperm and Association with Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Kamiński, Piotr; Łakota, Paweł; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Szymański, Marek; Wasilow, Karolina; Stuczyński, Tomasz; Buciński, Adam; Jerzak, Leszek

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), europium (Eu), and gadolinium (Gd) concentrations in human semen and correlate the results with sperm quality. The median semen content of La was 19.5 µg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) (range 2.27-269), of Ce was 41.9 µg kg(-1) dw (range 4.52 to 167), of Eu was 0.68 µg kg(-1) dw (range 0.06-1.95), of Gd was 3.19 µg kg(-1) dw (range 0.38-12.0), and of calcium (Ca) was 4063 mg kg(-1) dw (range 484-17,191). Concentrations of La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca were significantly lower in nondrinkers' semen than in semen from drinkers. Significant differences were detected between La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen from nondrinkers and moderate drinkers. Concentrations of La, Ce, and Gd in semen of short-term smokers were significantly lower than those in extremely long-term smokers. Significant differences were also detected between La concentration in semen from a group of short-term smokers and that of a group of long-term smokers. Positive correlations were found between La, Ce, Eu, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen. La, Ce, Gd, and Ca concentrations in semen were positively associated with progressive motility and percentage of normal spermatozoa. Positive correlations were found between Ca and sperm concentration. Concentrations of La, Ce, and Gd were negatively associated with sperm concentration, whilst Ca concentration was negatively associated with volume of ejaculate. At the examined level, La, Ce, Eu, and Gd did not affect sperm quality, whereas alcohol consumption and smoking might have increased the level of rare earth elements in semen. PMID:25762379

  12. Cerium redox cycles and rare earth elements in the Sargasso Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Sholkovitz, E.R.; Schneider, D.L. )

    1991-10-01

    Two profiles of the rare earth elements (REEs) are reported for the upper water column of the Sargasso Sea. The trivalent-only REEs have remarkably constant concentrations in the upper 500m of an April 1989 profile and in the upper 200m of a May 1989 profile. In contrast, Ce concentrations decrease smoothly with increasing depth. In April 1989 Ce decreases from 15.7 pmol/kg at 20 m to 5.1 pmol/kg at 750 m. Cerium, which has Redox transformations in seawater, behaves anomalously with respect to its REE(III) neighbors. While both dissolved Ce and Mn have elevated concentrations in the upper 200m, their vertical gradients are distinctly different. In contrast to Mn, which reaches a minimum dissolved concentration near the zone (150-250 m) of a particulate Mn maximum, Ce is being removed both near this zone and to depths of at least 750m. These new profiles indicate that Ce is involved in an upper ocean redox cycle. This interpretation is consistent with the MOFFETT (1990) incubation tracer experiments on the same May 1989 seawater. He showed that Ce(III) oxidation is biologically mediated, probably light inhibited, increases with depth, and 3-4 times slower than Mn(II) oxidation in the 100-200 m zone. CERoclines provide new information into the fine scale zonation of redox process operating in the upper columns of oligotrophic oceans.

  13. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Technology of the Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremers, Howard E.

    1985-01-01

    The 17 rare earth elements account for one-fifth of the 83 naturally occurring elements and collectively rank as the 22nd most abundant "element." Properties of these elements (including their chemical similarity), their extraction from the earth, and their uses are discussed. (JN)

  14. Rare earth element distributions in recent and fossil apatite: implications for paleoceanography and stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.

    1985-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) distributions in biogenic apatite were determined in over 200 samples from Cambrian to the Recent. Nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques were adapted for analysis of low-mass microfossil samples. Tests for chemical contamination, interspecies, interlaboratory and interexperiment variations show that there is no fractionation of REE, so that ratios of rare earths are consistent throughout the entire group of samples. The REE signature of biogenic apatite is acquired after deposition but only at the sediment-water interface and is characteristic of the redox state of the environment of deposition. This original environmental signature is retained through subsequent burial and diagenesis. Cerium has been shown to be the rare earth element that is sensitive to oxidation-reduction variations in marine waters. This cerium variation is stated mathematically and called Ce/sub anom/. Comparison of Ce/sub anom/ in fish debris from different modern redox environments shows that values > -0.10 occur in fish debris deposited under reducing conditions, whereas Ce/sub anom/ values <-0.10 are obtained under oxidizing conditions. Paleoredox studies of Ce/sub anom/ of fossil apatite of conodonts, fish debris and inarticulate brachiopods indicate that significant shifts in the overall redox balance of seawater occurred in ancient oceans. Cambrian through Silurian seas were dominated by anoxia, followed by a gradual change to oxidizing conditions in the Devonian. Oceans remained generally oxidizing throughout the Carboniferous and Lower Permian. In the Upper Permian and Lower Triassic anoxic conditions were again prevalent. This was followed by a return to an oxidizing oceanic environment in the Upper Triassic.

  15. Cerium-activated rare-earth orthophosphate and double-phosphate scintillators for x-and gamma-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Keefer, Lara A; Farmer, James Matthew; Wisniewski, D.; Wojtowicz, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    When activated with an appropriate rare-earth ion (e.g., Ce or Nd), rare-earth orthophosphates of the form REPO4 (where RE = a rare-earth cation) and alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form A{sub 3}RE(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (where A = K, Rb, or Cs) are characterized by light yields and decay times that make these materials of interest for radiation-detection applications. Crystals of the compound Rb{sub 3}Lu(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} when activated with {approx}0.1 mol % Ce exhibit a light yield that is {approx}250% that of BGO with a decay time on the order of {approx}40 nsec. The cerium-activated rare-earth orthophosphate LuPO{sub 4}:Ce is also characterized by a high light yield and a relatively fast decay time of {approx}25 nsec. Additionally, the rare-earth orthophosphates are extremely chemically, physically, and thermally durable hosts that recover easily from radiation damage effects. The properties of the rare-earth orthophosphates and double phosphates that pertain to their use as X- and gamma-ray detectors are reviewed. This review includes information related to the use of Nd-doped LuPO{sub 4} as a scintillator with a sufficiently energetic, short-wavelength output ({lambda} = 90 nm) so that it can be used in conjunction with appropriately activated proportional counters. Information is presented on the details of the synthesis, structure, and luminescence properties of lanthanide double phosphates that, when activated with cerium, are efficient scintillators with output wavelengths that are sufficiently long to be well matched to the response of silicon photodiode detectors.

  16. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  17. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  18. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  19. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  20. Application of far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials to liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Liang, Jinsheng; Ding, Yan; Xu, Anping

    2010-03-01

    Far infrared rare earth mineral composite materials were prepared by the coprecipitation method using tourmaline, cerium acetate, and lanthanum acetate as raw materials. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy show that tourmaline modified with the rare earths La and Ce has a better far infrared emitting performance. Through XRD analysis, we attribute the improved far infrared emission properties of the tourmaline to the unit cell shrinkage of the tourmaline arising from La enhancing the redox properties of nano-CeO2. The effect of the composite materials on the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied by the flue gas analysis and water boiling test. Based on the results, it was found that the composite materials could accelerate the combustion of LPG, and that the higher the emissivity of the rare earth mineral composite materials, the better the effects on combustion of LPG. In all activation styles, both air and LPG to be activated has a best effect, indicating the activations having a cumulative effect. PMID:20355556

  1. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A

    2014-05-15

    This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y0.95Eu0.05)2O3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19) and the Blue phosphor (Ba0.9Eu0.1MgAl10O17) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications. PMID:24681591

  2. Pyrohydrolysis of rare-earth trifluorides in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Susumu; Jae-Ho, Kim; Takashima, Masayuki

    2002-11-01

    The kinetics of pyrohydrolysis of rare-earth trifluorides, LnF 3 (Ln = Y and La-Lu) have been investigated by means of thermogravimetry. There were two definite breaks on the TG curves that correspond to the conversion of LnF 3 into LnOF and from LnOF into Ln 2O 3, except for CeF 3. The beginning temperature of pyrohydrolysis decreased gradually and the reaction rate increased with increasing the acidity of Ln 3+ due to decrease of the ionic radius. The rate equation of conversion from LnF 3 to LnOF was expressed by [1-(1- x) 1/3]= kt, where x is defined as the reaction ratio, with x=1 when LnF 3 is completely transformed into LnOF. This rate equation is derived as the tarnishing reaction (LnF 3 particle is covered with LnOF layer) in which the rate-determining step is the surface reaction. It was assumed that cracks as gas paths were formed in the LnOF layer produced from the surface of sample particles, because of the smaller molar volume of LnOF compared with LnF 3. On the reaction from LnF 3 to LnOF, Ln 4O 3F 6 was detected in the XRD pattern. From the results of the kinetic study, the activation energy of pyrohydrolysis of LnF 3 decreased with increasing Ln 3+ atomic number by the same reason as the decrease of starting temperature of pyrohydrolysis.

  3. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. PMID:23587931

  4. Uranium and rare earth partitioning in Synroc

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.L.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Blackford, M.G.

    1993-12-31

    Improved AEM techniques were used to investigate three Synrocs containing 10 wt% simulated HLW and a fourth sample with {approximately}18 wt% simulated HLW. One of the 10 wt% loaded Synrocs also contained an addition of 1.0 wt% Na{sub 2}O and another contained an addition of 2.0 wt% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This work is part of a larger study initiated with the objective of determining if the bulk composition of Synroc affects the partitioning of elements between individual phases. Results from the four samples in this study show that, as expected, elemental partitioning is mainly controlled by the ionic radius criterion, with smaller Y, Gd, and U ions having a preference for zirconolite and the larger Ce and Nd ions favouring perovskite. Additions of Na and Fe lead to the formation of CAT and loveringite at the expense of rutile or Magneli phases, but only have minor effects on partitioning coefficients. Partitioning coefficients, D{sup Z/P}, for REE, Y, and U in the four Synrocs are the same (within experimental error).

  5. Complex rare-earth aluminum hydrides: mechanochemical preparation, crystal structure and potential for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Weidenthaler, Claudia; Pommerin, André; Felderhoff, Michael; Sun, Wenhao; Wolverton, Christopher; Bogdanović, Borislav; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-11-25

    A novel type of complex rare-earth aluminum hydride was prepared by mechanochemical preparation. The crystal structure of the REAlH(6) (with RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds was calculated by DFT methods and confirmed by preliminary structure refinements. The trigonal crystal structure consists of isolated [AlH(6)](3-) octahedra bridged via [12] coordinated RE cations. The investigation of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides during thermolysis shows a decrease of thermal stability with increasing atomic number of the RE element. Rare-earth hydrides (REH(x)) are formed as primary dehydrogenation products; the final products are RE-aluminum alloys. The calculated decomposition enthalpies of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides are at the lower end for reversible hydrogenation under moderate conditions. Even though these materials may require somewhat higher pressures and/or lower temperatures for rehydrogenation, they are interesting examples of low-temperature metal hydrides for which reversibility might be reached. PMID:19886669

  6. Rare earth elements in synthetic zircon. 1. synthesis, and rare earth element and phosphorus doping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, J. M.; Finch, R. J.; Hoskin, W. O.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Mariano, A. N.; Chemical Engineering; George Washington Univ.; Univ. of Canterbury; Australian National Univ.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-05-01

    Sedimentary mineral assemblages commonly contain detrital zircon crystals as part of the heavy-mineral fraction. Age spectra determined by U-Pb isotopic analysis of single zircon crystals within a sample may directly image the age composition--but not the chemical composition--of the source region. Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured for zircons from a range of common crustal igneous rock types from different tectonic environments, as well as kimberlite, carbonatite, and high-grade metamorphic rocks, to assess the potential of using zircon REE characteristics to infer the rock types present in sediment source regions. Except for zircon with probable mantle affinities, zircon REE abundances and normalized patterns show little intersample and intrasample variation. To evaluate the actual variation in detrital zircon REE composition in a true sediment of known mixed provenance, zircons from a sandstone sample from the Statfjord Formation (North Sea) were analyzed. Despite a provenance including high-grade metasediment and granitoids and a range in zircon age of 2.82 b.y., the zircon REEs exhibit a narrow abundance range with no systematic differences in pattern shape. These evidences show zircon REE patterns and abundances are generally not useful as indicators of provenance.

  7. Rare Earth Metal Complexes of Bidentate Nitroxide Ligands: Synthesis and Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Eon; Bogart, Justin A; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-01-19

    We report rare earth metal complexes with tri- and bidentate ligands including strongly electron-donating nitroxide groups. The tridentate ligand 1,3,5-tris(2'-tert-butylhydroxylaminoaryl)benzene (H3arene-triNOx) was complexed to cerium(IV) in a 2:1 ligand-to-metal stoichiometry as Ce(Harene-triNOx)2 (1). Cyclic voltammetry of this compound showed stabilization of the tetravalent cerium cation with a Ce(IV/III) couple at E1/2 = -1.82 V versus Fc/Fc(+). On the basis of the uninvolvement of the third nitroxide group in the coordination chemistry with the cerium(IV) cation, the ligand system was redesigned toward a simpler bidentate mode, and a series of rare earth metal-arene-diNOx complexes were prepared with La(III), Ce(IV), Pr(III), Tb(III), and Y(III), [RE(arene-diNOx)2](-) ([2-RE](-), RE = La, Pr, Y, Tb) and Ce(IV)(arene-diNOx)2, where H2arene-diNOx = 1,3-bis(2'-tert-butylhydroxylaminoaryl)benzene. The core structures were isostructural throughout the series, with three nitroxide groups in η(2) binding modes and one κ(1) nitroxide group coordinated to the metal center in the solid state. In all cases except Ce(IV)(arene-diNOx)2, electrochemical analysis described two subsequent, ligand-based, quasi-reversible redox waves, indicating that a stable [N-O•] group was generated on the electrochemical time scale. Chemical oxidation of the terbium complex was performed, and isolation of the resulting complex, Tb(arene-diNOx)2·CH2Cl2 (3·CH2Cl2), confirmed the assignment of the cyclic voltammograms. Magnetic data showed no evidence of mixing between the Tb(III) states and the states of the open-shell ligand. PMID:26689656

  8. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  9. Extraction of rare-earth elements from nitric solutions by phosphoryl-containing podands

    SciTech Connect

    Turanov, A.N.; Karandashev, V.K.; Baulin, V.E.

    1999-11-01

    The extraction of microquantities of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y from HNO{sub 3} solutions by phosphoryl-containing podands of various structures has been studied.. It has been found that the maximum extraction of rare earth elements is exhibited by reagents containing one ether oxygen atom in the molecule, bound to diphenylphosphoryl or ditolylphosphoryl groups by methylene and o-phenylene fragments. The structure of these reagents is best suited for the polydentate coordination of the ligand and the conditions of a chelate complex formation. The effect of HNO{sub 3} concentration in the aqueous phase and that of the nature of an organic diluent on the extraction of rare earth elements and Y are considered. Stoichiometric of the extracted complexes has been determined and the extraction constants calculated.

  10. Capillary-force-induced formation of luminescent polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticle) hybrid hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Xie, Lin; Li, Fuyou; Zhou, Shuxue; Wu, Limin

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a "one-pot" procedure to synthesize polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticles) (PS/REDNPs) hybrid hollow spheres via the in situ diffusion of organic core into inorganic shell under strong capillary force. In this approach, when carboxyl-capped PS colloids were deposited by different REDNPs in aqueous medium, such as LaF3:Eu3+, LaF3:Ce3+-Tb3+, and YVO4:Dy3+, PS/REDNPs inorganic-organic hybrid hollow spheres could be directly obtained via the in situ diffusion of core PS chains into the voids between rare-earth-doped nanoparticles through the strong capillary force. Not only is the synthetic procedure versatile and very simple, but also the obtained hybrid hollow spheres are hydrophilic and luminescent and could be directly used in chemical and biological fields. PMID:20828167

  11. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  12. Enthalpies of formation of rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Dorogova, M.; Navrotsky, A. Boatner, L.A.

    2007-03-15

    Rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}, having the zircon structure, form a series of materials interesting for magnetic, optical, sensor, and electronic applications. Enthalpies of formation of REVO{sub 4} compounds (RE=Sc, Y, Ce-Nd, Sm-Tm, Lu) were determined by oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO.2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) solvent at 1075 K. The enthalpies of formation from oxide components become more negative with increasing RE ionic radius. This trend is similar to that obtained for the rare earth phosphates. - Graphical abstract: Comparison of enthalpies of formation from oxides at 298 K for REVO{sub 4} [this work] and REPO{sub 4} compounds [S.V. Ushakov, K.B. Helean, A. Navrotsky, L.A. Boatner, J. Mater. Res. 16(9) (2001) 2623] vs. RE{sup 3+} ionic radius. Filled symbols indicate scheelite structure, open symbols zircon structure.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Bing

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  14. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  15. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  16. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  17. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  18. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  19. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  20. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  1. Refining and Mutual Separation of Rare Earths Using Biomass Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    Two different types of adsorption gels were prepared from biomass wastes. The first gel was produced from astringent persimmon peel rich in persimmon tannin, a polyphenol compound, which was prepared by means of simple dehydration condensation reaction using concentrated sulfuric acid for crosslinking. This adsorption gel was intended to be employed for the removal of radioactive elements, uranium (U(VI)) and thorium (Th(IV)), from rare earths. The second gel was prepared from chitosan, a basic polysaccharide, produced from shells of crustaceans such as crabs, shrimps, prawns, and other biomass wastes generated in marine product industry, by immobilizing functional groups of complexanes such as ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This gel was developed for the mutual separation of rare earths. Of the two adsorption gels evaluated, the DTPA immobilized chitosan exhibited the most effective mutual separation among light rare earths.

  2. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  3. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  4. THE RARE EARTH PEAK: AN OVERLOOKED r-PROCESS DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, Matthew R.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Surman, Rebecca E-mail: gail_mclaughlin@ncsu.edu

    2012-06-20

    The astrophysical site or sites responsible for the r-process of nucleosynthesis still remains an enigma. Since the rare earth region is formed in the latter stages of the r-process, it provides a unique probe of the astrophysical conditions during which the r-process takes place. We use features of a successful rare earth region in the context of a high-entropy r-process (S {approx}> 100k{sub B} ) and discuss the types of astrophysical conditions that produce abundance patterns that best match meteoritic and observational data. Despite uncertainties in nuclear physics input, this method effectively constrains astrophysical conditions.

  5. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  6. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  7. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  8. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  9. Synthesis, structures and properties of two new chiral rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by L/D-tartaric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Gonghao; Zhang, Haitao; Miao, Hao; Wang, Jiahong; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth cerium with L- or D- tartaric acid afford a pair of novel chiral enantiomer coordination polymers, namely, [Ce(L-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (L-1) and [Ce(D-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (D-1). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, XRD, IR spectra, and TG analyses. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra and second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements proved that they are of structural chirality in the bulk samples. To the best of our knowledge, the enantiomers of L-1 and D-1 are the first 2D chiral dilayer frameworks constructed from L/D-tartrate ligands, ancillary ligand ethanediol and lanthanide ion Ce. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth cerium with L- or D- tartaric acid afford a pair of novel chiral enantiomer coordination polymers, namely, [Ce(L-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (L-1) and [Ce(D-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (D-1). Structural analysis indicates that the enantiomers of L-1 and D-1 are the first 2D chiral dilayer frameworks constructed from L/D-tartrate ligands and ancillary ligands ethanediol reacted with lanthanide ions Ce.

  10. Pressure dependence of the charge-density-wave gap in rare-earth tritellurides.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, A; Arcangeletti, E; Perucchi, A; Baldassarre, L; Postorino, P; Lupi, S; Ru, N; Fisher, I R; Degiorgi, L

    2007-01-12

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe3, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the midinfrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe3. PMID:17358625

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Rare Earth Ions Doped Bismuth-Based Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, L.; Culea, E.; Bosca, M.; Culea, M.

    2007-04-23

    The xReO(1-x)[3Bi2O3{center_dot}PbO] glass systems with diferent rare earth ions (ReO = CeO2, Tb4O7) have been prepared and examined with the aim of determining their structural characteristics. Raman sprectroscopy and density measurements were used to characterize the samples. Raman spectroscopy data permitted to identify some of the structural units that built up the lead bismuthate vitreous network. Density data were used to calculate the Poisson's ratio in terms of the Makishima-Mackenzie model.

  12. Magnetic Nanofluid Rare Earth Element Extraction Process Report, Techno Economic Analysis, and Results for Geothermal Fluids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pete McGrail

    2016-03-14

    This GDR submission is an interim technical report and raw data files from the first year of testing on functionalized nanoparticles for rare earth element extraction from geothermal fluids. The report contains Rare Earth Element uptake results (percent removal, mg Rare Earth Element/gram of sorbent, distribution coefficient) for the elements of Neodymium, Europium, Yttrium, Dysprosium, and Cesium. A detailed techno economic analysis is also presented in the report for a scaled up geothermal rare earth element extraction process. All rare earth element uptake testing was done on simulated geothermal brines with one rare earth element in each brine. The rare earth element uptake testing was conducted at room temperature.

  13. NEW RARE EARTH ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR THE SUN AND FIVE r-PROCESS-RICH VERY METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.; Ivans, Inese I. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu

    2009-05-15

    We have derived new abundances of the rare earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low-metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally consistent Ba, rare earth, and Hf (56 {<=} Z {<=} 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  14. The intersublattice exchange interactions in the R 2Co 7B 3 compounds (R = heavy rare earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, A.

    1997-07-01

    The experimental values of Curie temperatures of hexagonal R 2Co 7B 3 (R = heavy rare earth) compounds are used to calculate the effective intersublattice exchange interactions, JRCo, between R and Co sublattices. A mean field approximation is used. The compounds belong to the R n+1Co 3 n+5B 2 n family. The R 2Co 7B 3 is a combination of CaCu 5 and CeCo 3B 2-type structures. The JRCo has a tendency to decrease with increasing atomic number of the rare earth partner. A similar tendency has been found for other Fe and Co-based compounds.

  15. Low-temperature SCR of NO with NH3 over activated semi-coke composite-supported rare earth oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinping; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Yingyi; Zhang, Zuotai; Wang, Xidong

    2014-08-01

    The catalysts with different rare earth oxides (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) loaded onto activated semi-coke (ASC) via hydrothermal method are prepared for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 at low temperature (150-300 °C). It is evidenced that CeO2 loaded catalysts present the best performance, and the optimum loading amount of CeO2 is about 10 wt%. Composite catalysts by doping La, Pr and Nd into CeO2 are prepared to obtain further improved catalytic properties. The SCR mechanism is investigated through various characterizations, including XRD, Raman, XPS and FT-IR, the results of which indicate that the oxygen defect plays an important role in SCR process and the doped rare earth elements effectively serve as promoters to increase the concentration of oxygen vacancies. It is also found that the oxygen vacancies in high concentration are favored for the adsorption of O2 and further oxidation of NO, which facilitates a rapid progressing of the following reduction reactions. The SCR process of NO with NH3 at low temperature over the catalysts of ASC composite-supported rare earth oxides mainly follows the Langmuir-Hinshlwood mechanism.

  16. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  17. Determination of thorium and of rare earth elements in cerium earth minerals and ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carron, M.K.; Skinner, D.L.; Stevens, R.E.

    1955-01-01

    The conventional oxalate method for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements in acid solution exhibits definite solubilities of these elements. The present work was undertaken to establish conditions overcoming these solubilities and to find optimum conditions for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements as hydroxides and sebacates. The investigations resulted in a reliable procedure applicable to samples in which the cerium group elements predominate. The oxalate precipitations are made from homogeneous solution at pH 2 by adding a prepared solution of anhydrous oxalic acid in methanol instead of the more expensive crystalline methyl oxalate. Calcium is added as a carrier. Quantitative precipitation of thorium and the rare earth elements is ascertained by further small additions of calcium to the supernatant liquid, until the added calcium precipitates as oxalate within 2 minutes. Calcium is removed by precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and rare earths at room temperature by adding ammonium hydroxide to pH > 10. Thorium is separated as the sebacate at pH 2.5, and the rare earths are precipitated with ammonium sebacate at pH 9. Maximum errors for combined weights of thorium and rare earth oxides on synthetic mixtures are ??0.6 mg. Maximum error for separated thoria is ??0.5 mg.

  18. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S.

    2013-07-01

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  19. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. PMID:26375205

  20. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D.; Yu, S. W.; Zhou, F.

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  1. Mass extrapolations in the region of deformed rare Earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Borcea, C.; Audi, G.

    1998-12-21

    A procedure based on the regularity property of the mass surface is proposed to make predictions for the masses of neutron rich deformed nuclei in the rare earth region. Tables are given for the estimated masses; they extend up to the presumed limit of the deformation region.

  2. On sorption characteristics of some rare-earth oxyhydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, Yu.I.; Lepp, Ya.N.

    1995-12-01

    As demonstrated earlier, gadolinium oxyhydrate possesses a considerable sorption capacity for some non-rare-earth elements, as well as for anions (e.g., for sulfate ions), similar to polymer oxyhydrates such as zirconium oxyhydrate. In this paper, the authors assess the selective sorption properties of gadolinium and yttrium oxyhydrates with respect to the yttrium and gadolinium cations.

  3. Effects of Rare Earth Elements on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of HVOF-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Jia, Qiang; Chen, Hui; Tu, Mingjing

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nanostructured, and rare earth CeO2-doped WC-12Co powders were sprayed by using HVOF spraying technology. Microstructure, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness of the three coatings were investigated. The results showed that nanostructured WC-12Co coatings possessed the densest microstructure and excellent combination of strength and toughness. The WC particles with the size ranging from 50 to 500 nm distributed uniformly in the nanostructured WC-12Co coating. The average free path of Co matrix in rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating was shorter than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. XRD results showed no obvious decarburization in all three coatings. The addition of rare earth could improve the mechanical properties of the coating compared with that without rare earth. The hardness value of nanostructured WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa) was similar to that of rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa), which was 15.1% higher than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. The elastic modulus and fracture toughness of nanostructured WC-12Co coating were the highest, and that of conventional WC-12Co coating was the lowest.

  4. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; rare-earth oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, W.D.; Christiansen, Grey

    1993-01-01

    Bastnaesite, monazite, and xenotime are currently the most important rare-earth minerals. Bastnaesite occurs as a primary mineral in carbonatites. Monazite and xenotime also can be found in primary deposits but are recovered principally from heavy-mineral placers that are mined for titanium or tin. Each of these minerals has a different composition of the 15 rare-earth elements. World resources of economically exploitable rare-earth oxides (REO) are estimated at 93.4 million metric tons in place, composed of 93 percent in primary deposits and 7 percent in placers. The average mineral composition is 83 percent bastnaesite, 13 percent monazite, and 4 percent of 10 other minerals. Annual global production is about 67,000 metric tons of which 41 percent is from placers and 59 percent is from primary deposits; mining methods consist of open pits (94 percent) and dredging (6 percent). This output could be doubled if the operations that do not currently recover rare earths would do so. Resources are more than sufficient to meet the demand for the predictable future. About 52 percent of the world's REO resources are located in China. Ranking of other countries is as follows: Namibia (22 percent), the United States (15 percent), Australia (6 percent), and India (3 percent); the remainder is in several other countries. Conversely, 38 percent of the production is in China, 33 percent in the United States, 12 percent in Australia, and 5 percent each in Malaysia and India. Several other countries, including Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Thailand, make up the remainder. Markets for rare earths are mainly in the metallurgical, magnet, ceramic, electronic, chemical, and optical industries. Rare earths improve the physical and rolling properties of iron and steel and add corrosion resistance and strength to structural members at high temperatures. Samarium and neodymium are used in lightweight, powerful magnets for electric motors. Cerium and yttrium increase the

  5. Chemically Inhomogeneous RE-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with High Figure of Merit: Solution to Global Rare Earth Criticality.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiaying; Ma, Tianyu; Zhang, Yujing; Bai, Guohua; Yan, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The global rare earth (RE) criticality, especially for those closely-relied Nd/Pr/Dy/Tb in the 2:14:1-typed permanent magnets (PMs), has triggered tremendous attempts to develop new alternatives. Prospective candidates La/Ce with high abundance, however, cannot provide an equivalent performance due to inferior magnetic properties of (La/Ce)2Fe14B to Nd2Fe14B. Here we report high figure-of-merit La/Ce-rich RE-Fe-B PMs, where La/Ce are inhomogeneously distributed among the 2:14:1 phase. The resultant exchange coupling within an individual grain and magnetostatic interactions across grains ensure much superior performance to the La/Ce homogeneously distributed magnet. Maximum energy product (BH)max of 42.2 MGOe is achieved even with 36 wt. % La-Ce incorporation. The cost performance, (BH)max/cost, has been raised by 27.1% compared to a 48.9 MGOe La/Ce-free commercial magnet. The construction of chemical heterogeneity offers recipes to develop commercial-grade PMs using the less risky La/Ce, and also provides a promising solution to the REs availability constraints. PMID:27553789

  6. Chemically Inhomogeneous RE-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with High Figure of Merit: Solution to Global Rare Earth Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiaying; Ma, Tianyu; Zhang, Yujing; Bai, Guohua; Yan, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The global rare earth (RE) criticality, especially for those closely-relied Nd/Pr/Dy/Tb in the 2:14:1-typed permanent magnets (PMs), has triggered tremendous attempts to develop new alternatives. Prospective candidates La/Ce with high abundance, however, cannot provide an equivalent performance due to inferior magnetic properties of (La/Ce)2Fe14B to Nd2Fe14B. Here we report high figure-of-merit La/Ce-rich RE-Fe-B PMs, where La/Ce are inhomogeneously distributed among the 2:14:1 phase. The resultant exchange coupling within an individual grain and magnetostatic interactions across grains ensure much superior performance to the La/Ce homogeneously distributed magnet. Maximum energy product (BH)max of 42.2 MGOe is achieved even with 36 wt. % La-Ce incorporation. The cost performance, (BH)max/cost, has been raised by 27.1% compared to a 48.9 MGOe La/Ce-free commercial magnet. The construction of chemical heterogeneity offers recipes to develop commercial-grade PMs using the less risky La/Ce, and also provides a promising solution to the REs availability constraints. PMID:27553789

  7. Geochemistry of the rare earth elements in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A, northern equatorial Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, S.E.; Piper, D.Z.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in ferromanganese nodules from DOMES Site A has been determined by instrumental neutron activation methods. The concentrations of the REE vary markedly. Low concentrations characterize samples from a depression (the valley), in which Quaternary sediments are thin or absent; high concentrations are found in samples from the surrounding abyssal hills (the highlands) where the Quaternary sediment section is relatively thick. Moreover, the valley nodules are strongly depleted in the light trivalent REE (LREE) and Ce compared with nodules from the highlands, some of the former showing negative Ce anomalies. The REE abundances in the nodules are strongly influenced by the REE abundances in coexisting bottom water. Some controls on the REE chemistry of bottom waters include: a) the more effective removal of the LREE relative to the HREE from seawater because of the greater degree of complexation of the latter elements with seawater ligands, b) the very efficient oxidative scavenging of Ce on particle surfaces in seawater, and c) the strong depletion of both Ce and the LREE in, or a larger benthic flux of the HREE into, the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) which flows through the valley. The distinctive REE chemistry of valley nodules is a function of their growth from geochemically evolved AABW. In contrast, the REE chemistry of highland nodules indicates growth from a local, less evolved seawater source. ?? 1987.

  8. Electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations in rare earth dialuminides

    SciTech Connect

    Paudyal, Durga; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.

    2014-05-07

    We report electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations of selected rare earth dialuminides calculated by using local spin density approximation (LSDA), including the Hubbard U parameter (LSDA + U) approach. Total energy calculations show that CeAl{sub 2} and EuAl{sub 2} adopt antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground states, while dialuminides formed by other magnetic lanthanides have ferromagnetic (FM) ground states. The comparison of theoretical and experimental magnetic moments of CeAl{sub 2} indicates that the 4f orbital moment of Ce in CeAl{sub 2} is quenched. Theoretical calculations confirm that Eu in EuAl{sub 2} and Yb in YbAl{sub 2} are divalent. PrAl{sub 2} exhibits a tetragonal distortion near FM transition. HoAl{sub 2} shows a first order magnetostructural transition while DyAl{sub 2} shows a second order transformation below magnetic transition. The dialuminides formed by Nd, Tb, and Er are simple ferromagnets without additional anomalies in the FM state.

  9. Rare earth element systematics of fossil bone revealed by LA-ICPMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Tütken, Thomas; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-02-01

    Intra-bone rare earth element (REE) fractionation trends were studied by LA-ICPMS analysis to put constraints on (1) the mechanisms controlling REE fractionation within fossil bones; (2) the relative timing of REE uptake in various parts of fossil bone and (3) the origin of REE in fossil bones. We have evaluated REE bone profiles across 54 fossil bones from a broad range of well-characterised taphonomic settings ranging in age from Triassic to early Medieval. REE patterns and concentration gradients are highly variable and intra-bone fractionation trends in (La/Yb)N vs. (La/Sm)N space of few specimens cover almost the entire range previously observed for bulk samples. Intra-bone variability of Ce anomalies, as well as variable Y/Ho and (La/La∗)N is also observed. Sometimes, diagenetic fluids with fractionated, HREE enriched compositions have entered the bone from the marrow cavity, producing secondary REE uptake profiles. Theoretical intra-bone fractionation trends, modelled using lattice strain theory, concur with most REE data but some trends cannot be modelled using realistic boundary conditions. This fact, as well as the occurence of positive and negative Ce anomalies within the same fossil sample, hint towards changing REE compositions of diagenetic fluids over the timescales of REE uptake. Because apparent Ce anomalies frequently evolve over bone profiles and Ce anomalies can be inherited from previous fractionation events, Ce anomalies are a highly ambiguous tracer for constraining ambient redox conditions. In general, bioapatite REE signatures may not always reliably reflect ambient taphonomic or redox conditions and diagenetic fluid compositions. Therefore REE patterns and Ce anomalies of fossil bones must be interpreted cautiously as they vary spatially within skeletal remains and are affected by intra-bone fractionation processes as well as changing compositions of the diagenetic fluid.

  10. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic. PMID:23978671