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Sample records for rare missense alleles

  1. Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2006-10-24

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

  2. Carriers of rare missense variants in IFIH1 are protected from psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yonghong; Liao, Wilson; Cargill, Michele; Chang, Monica; Matsunami, Nori; Feng, Bingjian; Poon, Annie; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Catanese, Joseph J.; Bowcock, Ann M.; Leppert, Mark F.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Krueger, Gerald G.; Begovich, Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Testing of ~25,000 putative functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the human genome in a genetic association study has identified three psoriasis genes, IL12B, IL23R and IL13. We now report evidence for the association of psoriasis risk with missense SNPs in the interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 gene (IFIH1). The rare alleles of two independent SNPs were associated with decreased risk of psoriasis - rs35667974 (Ile923Val): OR=0.45, P=4.09×10-5 (2,098 cases vs. 1,748 controls) and rs10930046 (His460Arg): OR=0.52, P=5.70×10-4 (2,098 cases vs. 1,744 controls). Compared to noncarriers, carriers of the 923Val and/or 460Arg variants were protected from psoriasis (OR=0.48, P=7.31×10-8). These results suggest that IFIH1 is a novel psoriasis gene. PMID:20668468

  3. A rare missense mutation in CHRNA4 associates with smoking behavior and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Thorgeirsson, T E; Steinberg, S; Reginsson, G W; Bjornsdottir, G; Rafnar, T; Jonsdottir, I; Helgadottir, A; Gretarsdottir, S; Helgadottir, H; Jonsson, S; Matthiasson, S E; Gislason, T; Tyrfingsson, T; Gudbjartsson, T; Isaksson, H J; Hardardottir, H; Sigvaldason, A; Kiemeney, L A; Haugen, A; Zienolddiny, S; Wolf, H J; Franklin, W A; Panadero, A; Mayordomo, J I; Hall, I P; Rönmark, E; Lundbäck, B; Dirksen, A; Ashraf, H; Pedersen, J H; Masson, G; Sulem, P; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Gudbjartsson, D F; Stefansson, K

    2016-05-01

    Using Icelandic whole-genome sequence data and an imputation approach we searched for rare sequence variants in CHRNA4 and tested them for association with nicotine dependence. We show that carriers of a rare missense variant (allele frequency=0.24%) within CHRNA4, encoding an R336C substitution, have greater risk of nicotine addiction than non-carriers as assessed by the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (P=1.2 × 10(-4)). The variant also confers risk of several serious smoking-related diseases previously shown to be associated with the D398N substitution in CHRNA5. We observed odds ratios (ORs) of 1.7-2.3 for lung cancer (LC; P=4.0 × 10(-4)), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; P=9.3 × 10(-4)), peripheral artery disease (PAD; P=0.090) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs; P=0.12), and the variant associates strongly with the early-onset forms of LC (OR=4.49, P=2.2 × 10(-4)), COPD (OR=3.22, P=2.9 × 10(-4)), PAD (OR=3.47, P=9.2 × 10(-3)) and AAA (OR=6.44, P=6.3 × 10(-3)). Joint analysis of the four smoking-related diseases reveals significant association (P=6.8 × 10(-5)), particularly for early-onset cases (P=2.1 × 10(-7)). Our results are in agreement with functional studies showing that the human α4β2 isoform of the channel containing R336C has less sensitivity for its agonists than the wild-type form following nicotine incubation. PMID:26952864

  4. Rare ATAD5 missense variants in breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Bogdanova, Natalia; Schürmann, Peter; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Liebrich, Clemens; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Dörk, Thilo

    2016-06-28

    ATAD5/ELG1 is a protein crucially involved in replication and maintenance of genome stability. ATAD5 has recently been identified as a genomic risk locus for both breast and ovarian cancer through genome-wide association studies. We aimed to investigate the spectrum of coding ATAD5 germ-line mutations in hospital-based series of patients with triple-negative breast cancer or serous ovarian cancer compared with healthy controls. The ATAD5 coding and adjacent splice site regions were analyzed by targeted next-generation sequencing of DNA samples from 273 cancer patients, including 114 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 159 patients with serous epithelial ovarian cancer, and from 276 healthy females. Among 42 different variants identified, twenty-two were rare missense substitutions, of which 14 were classified as pathogenic by at least one in silico prediction tool. Three of four novel missense substitutions (p.S354I, p.H974R and p.K1466N) were predicted to be pathogenic and were all identified in ovarian cancer patients. Overall, rare missense variants with predicted pathogenicity tended to be enriched in ovarian cancer patients (14/159) versus controls (11/276) (p = 0.05, 2df). While truncating germ-line variants in ATAD5 were not detected, it remains possible that several rare missense variants contribute to genetic susceptibility toward epithelial ovarian carcinomas. PMID:27045477

  5. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  6. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  7. Rare key functional domain missense substitutions in MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN contribute to breast cancer susceptibility: results from a Breast Cancer Family Registry case-control mutation-screening study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The MRE11A-RAD50-Nibrin (MRN) complex plays several critical roles related to repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Inherited mutations in the three components predispose to genetic instability disorders and the MRN genes have been implicated in breast cancer susceptibility, but the underlying data are not entirely convincing. Here, we address two related questions: (1) are some rare MRN variants intermediate-risk breast cancer susceptibility alleles, and if so (2) do the MRN genes follow a BRCA1/BRCA2 pattern wherein most susceptibility alleles are protein-truncating variants, or do they follow an ATM/CHEK2 pattern wherein half or more of the susceptibility alleles are missense substitutions? Methods Using high-resolution melt curve analysis followed by Sanger sequencing, we mutation screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the MRN genes in 1,313 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 population controls. Rare variants in the three genes were pooled using bioinformatics methods similar to those previously applied to ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2, and then assessed by logistic regression. Results Re-analysis of our ATM, BRCA1, and BRCA2 mutation screening data revealed that these genes do not harbor pathogenic alleles (other than modest-risk SNPs) with minor allele frequencies >0.1% in Caucasian Americans, African Americans, or East Asians. Limiting our MRN analyses to variants with allele frequencies of <0.1% and combining protein-truncating variants, likely spliceogenic variants, and key functional domain rare missense substitutions, we found significant evidence that the MRN genes are indeed intermediate-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes (odds ratio (OR) = 2.88, P = 0.0090). Key domain missense substitutions were more frequent than the truncating variants (24 versus 12 observations) and conferred a slightly higher OR (3.07 versus 2.61) with a lower P value (0.029 versus 0.14). Conclusions These data establish

  8. Structural and functional analysis of rare missense mutations in human chorionic gonadotrophin β-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Venclovas, Česlovas; Rull, Kristiina; Jonas, Kim C.; Peltoketo, Hellevi; Christiansen, Ole B.; Kairys, Visvaldas; Kivi, Gaily; Steffensen, Rudi; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Laan, Maris

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of hCG by applying a combination of in silico (sequence and structure analysis, molecular dynamics) and in vitro (co-immunoprecipitation, immuno- and bioassays) approaches. The carrier status of each mutation was determined for 1086 North-Europeans [655 patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM)/431 healthy controls from Estonia, Finland and Denmark] using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The mutation CGB5 p.Val56Leu (rs72556325) was identified in a single heterozygous RM patient and caused a structural hindrance in the formation of the hCGα/β dimer. Although the amount of the mutant hCGβ assembled into secreted intact hCG was only 10% compared with the wild-type, a stronger signaling response was triggered upon binding to its receptor, thus compensating the effect of poor dimerization. The mutation CGB8 p.Pro73Arg (rs72556345) was found in five heterozygotes (three RM cases and two control individuals) and was inherited by two of seven studied live born children. The mutation caused ∼50% of secreted β-subunits to acquire an alternative conformation, but did not affect its biological activity. For the CGB8 p.Arg8Trp (rs72556341) substitution, the applied in vitro methods revealed no alterations in the assembly of intact hCG as also supported by an in silico analysis. In summary, the accumulated data indicate that only mutations with neutral or mild functional consequences might be tolerated in the major hCGβ genes CGB5 and CGB8. PMID:22554618

  9. Structural and functional analysis of rare missense mutations in human chorionic gonadotrophin β-subunit.

    PubMed

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Venclovas, Česlovas; Rull, Kristiina; Jonas, Kim C; Peltoketo, Hellevi; Christiansen, Ole B; Kairys, Visvaldas; Kivi, Gaily; Steffensen, Rudi; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Laan, Maris

    2012-08-01

    Heterodimeric hCG is one of the key hormones determining early pregnancy success. We have previously identified rare missense mutations in hCGβ genes with potential pathophysiological importance. The present study assessed the impact of these mutations on the structure and function of hCG by applying a combination of in silico (sequence and structure analysis, molecular dynamics) and in vitro (co-immunoprecipitation, immuno- and bioassays) approaches. The carrier status of each mutation was determined for 1086 North-Europeans [655 patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM)/431 healthy controls from Estonia, Finland and Denmark] using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The mutation CGB5 p.Val56Leu (rs72556325) was identified in a single heterozygous RM patient and caused a structural hindrance in the formation of the hCGα/β dimer. Although the amount of the mutant hCGβ assembled into secreted intact hCG was only 10% compared with the wild-type, a stronger signaling response was triggered upon binding to its receptor, thus compensating the effect of poor dimerization. The mutation CGB8 p.Pro73Arg (rs72556345) was found in five heterozygotes (three RM cases and two control individuals) and was inherited by two of seven studied live born children. The mutation caused ~50% of secreted β-subunits to acquire an alternative conformation, but did not affect its biological activity. For the CGB8 p.Arg8Trp (rs72556341) substitution, the applied in vitro methods revealed no alterations in the assembly of intact hCG as also supported by an in silico analysis. In summary, the accumulated data indicate that only mutations with neutral or mild functional consequences might be tolerated in the major hCGβ genes CGB5 and CGB8. PMID:22554618

  10. Confounded by sequencing depth in association studies of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Garner, Chad

    2011-05-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are facilitating large-scale association studies of rare genetic variants. The depth of the sequence read coverage is an important experimental variable in the next-generation technologies and it is a major determinant of the quality of genotype calls generated from sequence data. When case and control samples are sequenced separately or in different proportions across batches, they are unlikely to be matched on sequencing read depth and a differential misclassification of genotypes can result, causing confounding and an increased false-positive rate. Data from Pilot Study 3 of the 1000 Genomes project was used to demonstrate that a difference between the mean sequencing read depth of case and control samples can result in false-positive association for rare and uncommon variants, even when the mean coverage depth exceeds 30× in both groups. The degree of the confounding and inflation in the false-positive rate depended on the extent to which the mean depth was different in the case and control groups. A logistic regression model was used to test for association between case-control status and the cumulative number of alleles in a collapsed set of rare and uncommon variants. Including each individual's mean sequence read depth across the variant sites in the logistic regression model nearly eliminated the confounding effect and the inflated false-positive rate. Furthermore, accounting for the potential error by modeling the probability of the heterozygote genotype calls in the regression analysis had a relatively minor but beneficial effect on the statistical results. PMID:21328616

  11. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Indap, Amit R; Marth, Gabor T; Clark, Andrew G; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2011-07-19

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2-4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  12. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  13. Rare missense variants in CHRNB3 and CHRNA3 are associated with risk of alcohol and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Gabe; Kapoor, Manav; Budde, John; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard; Nurnberger, John; Kramer, John; Brooks, Andy; Tischfield, Jay; Almasy, Laura; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen; Rice, John; Saccone, Nancy; Bierut, Laura; Goate, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Previous findings have demonstrated that variants in nicotinic receptor genes are associated with nicotine, alcohol and cocaine dependence. Because of the substantial comorbidity, it has often been unclear whether a variant is associated with multiple substances or whether the association is actually with a single substance. To investigate the possible contribution of rare variants to the development of substance dependencies other than nicotine dependence, specifically alcohol and cocaine dependence, we undertook pooled sequencing of the coding regions and flanking sequence of CHRNA5, CHRNA3, CHRNB4, CHRNA6 and CHRNB3 in 287 African American and 1028 European American individuals from the Collaborative Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). All members of families for whom any individual was sequenced (2504 African Americans and 7318 European Americans) were then genotyped for all variants identified by sequencing. For each gene, we then tested for association using FamSKAT. For European Americans, we find increased DSM-IV cocaine dependence symptoms (FamSKAT P = 2 × 10−4) and increased DSM-IV alcohol dependence symptoms (FamSKAT P = 5 × 10−4) among carriers of missense variants in CHRNB3. Additionally, one variant (rs149775276; H329Y) shows association with both cocaine dependence symptoms (P = 7.4 × 10−5, β = 2.04) and alcohol dependence symptoms (P = 2.6 × 10−4, β = 2.04). For African Americans, we find decreased cocaine dependence symptoms among carriers of missense variants in CHRNA3 (FamSKAT P = 0.005). Replication in an independent sample supports the role of rare variants in CHRNB3 and alcohol dependence (P = 0.006). These are the first results to implicate rare variants in CHRNB3 or CHRNA3 in risk for alcohol dependence or cocaine dependence. PMID:24057674

  14. A Unique Missense Allele of BAF155, a Core BAF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Protein, Causes Neural Tube Closure Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L.; Pavan, William J.; Salbaum, J. Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155msp3, a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155mps3 embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development. PMID:24170322

  15. Rare HLA Drive Additional HIV Evolution Compared to More Frequent Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, David W.; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N.; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H.; Nickle, David C.; Heckerman, David E.; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Korber, Bette T.; Walker, Bruce D.; Mullins, James I.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection. PMID:19327049

  16. A viable Arabidopsis pex13 missense allele confers severe peroxisomal defects and decreases PEX5 association with peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Andrew W.; Fleming, Wendell A.; Burkhart, Sarah E.; Ratzel, Sarah E.; Bjornson, Marta; Bartel, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that catabolize fatty acids and compartmentalize other oxidative metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Using a forward-genetic screen designed to recover severe peroxisome-defective mutants, we isolated a viable allele of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX13 with striking peroxisomal defects. The pex13-4 mutant requires an exogenous source of fixed carbon for pre-photosynthetic development and is resistant to the protoauxin indole-3-butyric acid. Delivery of peroxisome-targeted matrix proteins depends on the PEX5 receptor docking with PEX13 at the peroxisomal membrane, and we found severely reduced import of matrix proteins and less organelle-associated PEX5 in pex13-4 seedlings. Moreover, pex13-4 physiological and molecular defects were partially ameliorated when PEX5 was overexpressed, suggesting that PEX5 docking is partially compromised in this mutant and can be improved by increasing PEX5 levels. Because previously described Arabidopsis pex13 alleles either are lethal or confer only subtle defects, the pex13-4 mutant provides valuable insight into plant peroxisome receptor docking and matrix protein import. PMID:25008153

  17. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-E-Huma; Smith, Joshua D; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-02-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2(-/-) mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2(-/-) mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  18. Autosomal-Recessive Hearing Impairment Due to Rare Missense Variants within S1PR2

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Faridi, Rabia; Rehman, Atteeq U.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Ansar, Muhammad; Wang, Xin; Morell, Robert J.; Isaacson, Rivka; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Dai, Hang; Acharya, Anushree; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Muhammad, Dost; Ali, Rana Amjad; Shams, Sulaiman; Hassan, Muhammad Jawad; Shahzad, Shaheen; Raza, Syed Irfan; Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Smith, Joshua D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Ahmad, Wasim; Friedman, Thomas B.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) are a well-studied class of transmembrane G protein-coupled sphingolipid receptors that mediate multiple cellular processes. However, S1PRs have not been previously reported to be involved in the genetic etiology of human traits. S1PR2 lies within the autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) locus DFNB68 on 19p13.2. From exome sequence data we identified two pathogenic S1PR2 variants, c.323G>C (p.Arg108Pro) and c.419A>G (p.Tyr140Cys). Each of these variants co-segregates with congenital profound hearing impairment in consanguineous Pakistani families with maximum LOD scores of 6.4 for family DEM4154 and 3.3 for family PKDF1400. Neither S1PR2 missense variant was reported among ∼120,000 chromosomes in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database, in 76 unrelated Pakistani exomes, or in 720 Pakistani control chromosomes. Both DNA variants affect highly conserved residues of S1PR2 and are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools. Molecular modeling predicts that these variants affect binding of sphingosine-1-phosphate (p.Arg108Pro) and G protein docking (p.Tyr140Cys). In the previously reported S1pr2−/− mice, stria vascularis abnormalities, organ of Corti degeneration, and profound hearing loss were observed. Additionally, hair cell defects were seen in both knockout mice and morphant zebrafish. Family PKDF1400 presents with ARNSHI, which is consistent with the lack of gross malformations in S1pr2−/− mice, whereas family DEM4154 has lower limb malformations in addition to hearing loss. Our findings suggest the possibility of developing therapies against hair cell damage (e.g., from ototoxic drugs) through targeted stimulation of S1PR2. PMID:26805784

  19. Rare missense variants in POT1 predispose to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Xiaohong R; Ballew, Bari; Rotunno, Melissa; Calista, Donato; Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Ghiorzo, Paola; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Nagore, Eduardo; Avril, Marie Francoise; Caporaso, Neil E; McMaster, Mary L; Cullen, Michael; Wang, Zhaoming; Zhang, Xijun; Bruno, William; Pastorino, Lorenza; Queirolo, Paola; Banuls-Roca, Jose; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Vaysse, Amaury; Mohamdi, Hamida; Riazalhosseini, Yasser; Foglio, Mario; Jouenne, Fanélie; Hua, Xing; Hyland, Paula L; Yin, Jinhu; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Chai, Weihang; Minghetti, Paola; Pellegrini, Cristina; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Eggermont, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Peris, Ketty; Scarra, Giovanna Bianchi; Landi, Giorgio; Savage, Sharon A; Sampson, Joshua N; He, Ji; Yeager, Meredith; Goldin, Lynn R; Demenais, Florence; Chanock, Stephen J; Tucker, Margaret A; Goldstein, Alisa M; Liu, Yie; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Although CDKN2A is the most frequent high-risk melanoma susceptibility gene, the underlying genetic factors for most melanoma-prone families remain unknown. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a rare variant that arose as a founder mutation in the telomere shelterin gene POT1 (chromosome 7, g.124493086C>T; p.Ser270Asn) in five unrelated melanoma-prone families from Romagna, Italy. Carriers of this variant had increased telomere lengths and numbers of fragile telomeres, suggesting that this variant perturbs telomere maintenance. Two additional rare POT1 variants were identified in all cases sequenced in two separate Italian families, one variant per family, yielding a frequency for POT1 variants comparable to that for CDKN2A mutations in this population. These variants were not found in public databases or in 2,038 genotyped Italian controls. We also identified two rare recurrent POT1 variants in US and French familial melanoma cases. Our findings suggest that POT1 is a major susceptibility gene for familial melanoma in several populations. PMID:24686846

  20. Functional Properties of Rare Missense Variants of Human CDH13 Found in Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mavroconstanti, Thegna; Johansson, Stefan; Winge, Ingeborg; Knappskog, Per M.; Haavik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The CDH13 gene codes for T-cadherin, a GPI-anchored protein with cell adhesion properties that is highly expressed in the brain and cardiovascular system. Previous studies have suggested that CDH13 may be a promising candidate gene for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aims of this study were to identify, functionally characterize, and estimate the frequency of coding CDH13 variants in adult ADHD patients and controls. We performed sequencing of the CDH13 gene in 169 Norwegian adult ADHD patients and 63 controls and genotyping of the identified variants in 641 patients and 668 controls. Native and green fluorescent protein tagged wild type and variant CDH13 proteins were expressed and studied in CHO and HEK293 cells, respectively. Sequencing identified seven rare missense CDH13 variants, one of which was novel. By genotyping, we found a cumulative frequency of these rare variants of 2.9% in controls and 3.2% in ADHD patients, implying that much larger samples are needed to obtain adequate power to study the genetic association between ADHD and rare CDH13 variants. Protein expression and localization studies in CHO cells and HEK293 cells showed that the wild type and mutant proteins were processed according to the canonical processing of GPI-anchored proteins. Although some of the mutations were predicted to severely affect protein secondary structure and stability, no significant differences were observed between the expression levels and distribution of the wild type and mutant proteins in either HEK293 or CHO cells. This is the first study where the frequency of coding CDH13 variants in patients and controls is reported and also where the functional properties of these variants are examined. Further investigations are needed to conclude whether CDH13 is involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD or other conditions. PMID:23936508

  1. Functional properties of rare missense variants of human CDH13 found in adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients.

    PubMed

    Mavroconstanti, Thegna; Johansson, Stefan; Winge, Ingeborg; Knappskog, Per M; Haavik, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The CDH13 gene codes for T-cadherin, a GPI-anchored protein with cell adhesion properties that is highly expressed in the brain and cardiovascular system. Previous studies have suggested that CDH13 may be a promising candidate gene for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aims of this study were to identify, functionally characterize, and estimate the frequency of coding CDH13 variants in adult ADHD patients and controls. We performed sequencing of the CDH13 gene in 169 Norwegian adult ADHD patients and 63 controls and genotyping of the identified variants in 641 patients and 668 controls. Native and green fluorescent protein tagged wild type and variant CDH13 proteins were expressed and studied in CHO and HEK293 cells, respectively. Sequencing identified seven rare missense CDH13 variants, one of which was novel. By genotyping, we found a cumulative frequency of these rare variants of 2.9% in controls and 3.2% in ADHD patients, implying that much larger samples are needed to obtain adequate power to study the genetic association between ADHD and rare CDH13 variants. Protein expression and localization studies in CHO cells and HEK293 cells showed that the wild type and mutant proteins were processed according to the canonical processing of GPI-anchored proteins. Although some of the mutations were predicted to severely affect protein secondary structure and stability, no significant differences were observed between the expression levels and distribution of the wild type and mutant proteins in either HEK293 or CHO cells. This is the first study where the frequency of coding CDH13 variants in patients and controls is reported and also where the functional properties of these variants are examined. Further investigations are needed to conclude whether CDH13 is involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD or other conditions. PMID:23936508

  2. Identification of rare alleles and their carriers using compressed se(que)nsing

    PubMed Central

    Shental, Noam; Amir, Amnon; Zuk, Or

    2010-01-01

    Identification of rare variants by resequencing is important both for detecting novel variations and for screening individuals for known disease alleles. New technologies enable low-cost resequencing of target regions, although it is still prohibitive to test more than a few individuals. We propose a novel pooling design that enables the recovery of novel or known rare alleles and their carriers in groups of individuals. The method is based on a Compressed Sensing (CS) approach, which is general, simple and efficient. CS allows the use of generic algorithmic tools for simultaneous identification of multiple variants and their carriers. We model the experimental procedure and show via computer simulations that it enables the recovery of rare alleles and their carriers in larger groups than were possible before. Our approach can also be combined with barcoding techniques to provide a feasible solution based on current resequencing costs. For example, when targeting a small enough genomic region (∼100 bp) and using only ∼10 sequencing lanes and ∼10 distinct barcodes per lane, one recovers the identity of 4 rare allele carriers out of a population of over 4000 individuals. We demonstrate the performance of our approach over several publicly available experimental data sets. PMID:20699269

  3. [Genetic study of the Penta E locus and identification of rare alleles].

    PubMed

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiaoli; Han, Lili; Chen, Dian; Hu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the genetic polymorphisms of Penta E locus in Fujian Han population. METHODS Polymorphisms of the Penta E locus in 851 unrelated individuals were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-short tandem repeat (PCR-STR). The mutation rate of rare alleles was analyzed in 494 paternity identification cases (in a total of 674 meiosis). RESULTS Twenty-six alleles were identified for the Penta E locus, with their frequencies ranging from 0.0006 to 0.1528. There were 7 rare alleles, among which Penta E-28.4 ([AAAGA]29) was identified for the first time. Genetic parameters of the Penta E locus in Fujian Han population were obtained, including PIC= 0.91, PE= 0.817, PD= 0.986, and mutation rate= 0.0015. CONCLUSION The Penta E locus is highly polymorphic and has a low mutation rate in Fujian Han population. It also has a good prospect in genetics applications. DNA sequencing is a good method for identifying rare alleles. PMID:26418985

  4. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our

  5. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  6. Evaluation of the colorectal cancer risk conferred by rare UNC5C alleles

    PubMed Central

    Küry, Sébastien; Garrec, Céline; Airaud, Fabrice; Breheret, Flora; Guibert, Virginie; Frenard, Cécile; Jiao, Shuo; Bonneau, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Bossard, Céline; Ingster, Olivier; Cauchin, Estelle; Bezieau, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the risk associated with variants of the UNC5C gene recently suspected to predispose to familial colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: We screened patients with familial CRC forms as well as patients with sporadic CRCs. In a first time, we analyzed exon 11 of the UNC5C gene in 120 unrelated patients with suspected hereditary CRC, 58 patients with suspected Lynch-associated cancer or polyposis, and 132 index cases of Lynch syndrome families with a characterized mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR). Next, 1023 patients with sporadic CRC and 1121 healthy individuals were screened for the variants identified in patients with familial cancer. RESULTS: Of 120 patients with familial CRC of unknown etiology, one carried the previously reported mis-sense mutation p.Arg603Cys (R603C) and another exhibited the unreported variant of unknown significance p.Thr617Ile (T617I). The p.Ala628Lys (A628K) mutation previously described as the main UNC5C risk variant for familial CRC was not detected in any cases of familial CRC of unknown etiology, but was present in a patient with familial gastric cancer and in two Lynch syndrome patients in co-occurrence with MMR mutations. A statistically non-significant increase in cancer risk was identified in familial CRC and/or other Lynch-associated cancers (1/178 patients vs 2/1121 healthy controls, OR = 3.2, 95%CI: 0.29-35.05, P = 0.348) and in sporadic CRCs (4/1023 patients vs 2/1121 healthy controls, OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 0.40-12.02, P = 0.364). CONCLUSION: We confirm that UNC5C mutations are very rare in familial and sporadic CRCs, but further investigations are needed to justify routine UNC5C testing for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24415873

  7. Exome sequencing identifies rare LDLR and APOA5 alleles conferring risk for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Angelica Merlini, Pier; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A; Peloso, Gina M; Auer, Paul L; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N; DePristo, Mark A; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F R; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M; Folsom, Aaron R; Taylor, Herman A; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E; Psaty, Bruce M; Herrington, David M; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; Bamshad, Michael J; Tracy, Russell P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Spertus, John A; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W H Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P; Carlson, Christopher S; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance. When MI occurs early in life, genetic inheritance is a major component to risk. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI risk in individual families, whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population. Here we evaluate how rare mutations contribute to early-onset MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes in which rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in MI cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 4.2-fold increased risk for MI; carriers of null alleles at LDLR were at even higher risk (13-fold difference). Approximately 2% of early MI cases harbour a rare, damaging mutation in LDLR; this estimate is similar to one made more than 40 years ago using an analysis of total cholesterol. Among controls, about 1 in 217 carried an LDLR coding-sequence mutation and had plasma LDL cholesterol > 190 mg dl(-1). At apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 2.2-fold increased risk for MI. When compared with non-carriers, LDLR mutation carriers had higher plasma LDL cholesterol, whereas APOA5 mutation carriers had higher plasma triglycerides. Recent evidence has connected MI risk with coding-sequence mutations at two genes functionally related to APOA5, namely lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein C-III (refs 18, 19). Combined, these observations suggest that, as well as LDL cholesterol, disordered metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contributes to MI risk. PMID:25487149

  8. Multiple rare alleles at LDLR and APOA5 confer risk for early-onset myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A.; Peloso, Gina M.; Auer, Paul L.; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N.; DePristo, Mark A.; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F.R.; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kastelein, John J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T.; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A.; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D.; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L.; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F.; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A.; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Herrington, David M.; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Tracy, Russell P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Spertus, John A.; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance1,2. When MI occurs early in life, the role of inheritance is substantially greater1. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI risk in individual families3–8 whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population9–15. Here, we evaluate the contribution of rare mutations to MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes where rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare, damaging mutations (3.1% of cases versus 1.3% of controls) were at 2.4-fold increased risk for MI; carriers of null alleles at LDLR were at even higher risk (13-fold difference). This sequence-based estimate of the proportion of early MI cases due to LDLR mutations is remarkably similar to an estimate made more than 40 years ago using total cholesterol16. At apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5), carriers of rare nonsynonymous mutations (1.4% of cases versus 0.6% of controls) were at 2.2-fold increased risk for MI. When compared with non-carriers, LDLR mutation carriers had higher plasma LDL cholesterol whereas APOA5 mutation carriers had higher plasma triglycerides. Recent evidence has connected MI risk with coding sequence mutations at two genes functionally related to APOA5, namely lipoprotein lipase15,17 and apolipoprotein C318,19. When combined, these observations suggest that, beyond LDL cholesterol, disordered metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contributes to MI risk. PMID:25487149

  9. A new temperature-insensitive allele of the Arabidopsis AXR6/CUL1 locus derived from a missense mutation in the C-terminal RBX1 binding region

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yukiko; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a new recessive allele at the AUXIN RESISTANT6/CULLIN1 (AXR6/CUL1) locus, axr6–101, from an EMS-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana, the Landsberg erecta ecotype. axr6–101 is auxin resistant and semi-dwarf similar to the other recessive axr6 mutants. The axr6–101 phenotype is caused by the E716K substitution of the CUL1 protein, which is likely to affect its ability to bind to the C-terminal RING domain of RING-box 1 (RBX1). The previously reported allele of AXR6, cul1–7, is caused by a substitution at T510 that binds to the N-terminal β-strand of RBX1. Although cul1–7 shows temperature-sensitive phenotype, the axr6–101 phenotype is largely unaffected by temperature. axr6–101 may provide an important genetic resource for study of the structure−function relationship of the CUL1 protein. PMID:26339842

  10. Arginine-Glycine Amidinotransferase Deficiency and Functional Characterization of Missense Variants in GATM.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Caro-Lyne; Bruun, Theodora; Wang, Peixiang; Marshall, Christian R; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2016-09-01

    Arginine-glycine amidinotransferase (GATM) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive disorder caused by pathogenic variants in GATM. Clinical features include intellectual disability, hypotonia, and myopathy. Due to normal neurodevelopment in asymptomatic individuals on creatine monotherapy, GATM deficiency is a good candidate for newborn screening. To determine the carrier frequency of GATM deficiency, we performed functional characterization of rare missense variants in GATM reported as heterozygous in the Exome Variant Server database. To assess phenotype and genotype correlation, we developed a clinical severity scoring system. Two patients with mild phenotype had a nonsense missense variant. Severe phenotype was present in patients with missense as well as truncating variants. There seems to be no phenotype and genotype correlation. We cloned a novel GATM transcript. We found seven missense variants retaining 0% of wild-type GATM activity indicating putative pathogenicity. Based on our study results, high Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling conservation score, conserved amino acid substitution in species, and low allele frequency in exome databases would be the most sensitive in silico analysis tools to predict pathogenicity of missense variants. We present first study of the functional characterization of missense variants in GATM as well as clinical severity score of patients with GATM deficiency. PMID:27233232

  11. Mining the LIPG allelic spectrum reveals the contribution of rare and common regulatory variants to HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Edmondson, Andrew C; Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L; Wolfe, Megan L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5' UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5' UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  12. Mining the LIPG Allelic Spectrum Reveals the Contribution of Rare and Common Regulatory Variants to HDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O.; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K.; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5′ UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5′ UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  13. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  14. Genome-wide assessment of worldwide chicken SNP genetic diversity indicates significant absence of rare alleles in commercial breeds

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William M.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Groenen, Martien A. M.; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Zhang, Huanmin; Okimoto, Ron; Vereijken, Addie; Jungerius, Annemieke; Albers, Gerard A. A.; Lawley, Cindy Taylor; Delany, Mary E.; MacEachern, Sean; Cheng, Hans H.

    2008-01-01

    Breed utilization, genetic improvement, and industry consolidation are predicted to have major impacts on the genetic composition of commercial chickens. Consequently, the question arises as to whether sufficient genetic diversity remains within industry stocks to address future needs. With the chicken genome sequence and more than 2.8 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is now possible to address biodiversity using a previously unattainable metric: missing alleles. To achieve this assessment, 2551 informative SNPs were genotyped on 2580 individuals, including 1440 commercial birds. The proportion of alleles lacking in commercial populations was assessed by (1) estimating the global SNP allele frequency distribution from a hypothetical ancestral population as a reference, then determining the portion of the distribution lost, and then (2) determining the relationship between allele loss and the inbreeding coefficient. The results indicate that 50% or more of the genetic diversity in ancestral breeds is absent in commercial pure lines. The missing genetic diversity resulted from the limited number of incorporated breeds. As such, hypothetically combining stocks within a company could recover only preexisting within-breed variability, but not more rare ancestral alleles. We establish that SNP weights act as sentinels of biodiversity and provide an objective assessment of the strains that are most valuable for preserving genetic diversity. This is the first experimental analysis investigating the extant genetic diversity of virtually an entire agricultural commodity. The methods presented are the first to characterize biodiversity in terms of allelic diversity and to objectively link rate of allele loss with the inbreeding coefficient. PMID:18981413

  15. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  16. Rare alleles of the HRAS polymorphism do not modify the risk of breast or ovarian cancer in BRCA1 carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, C.; Tonin, P.; Lynch, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of one of the rare alleles of a minisatellite polymorphism at the HRAS locus on chromosome 11p15 has been associated with a roughly two-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. The BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q12-21 is responsible for the majority of the families with the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. It is estimated that 87% of BRCA1 carriers will be affected with breast cancer by age 70. The relative risk for premenopausal breast cancer in carriers, compared to non-carriers, is roughly 100. Because of the wide range in ages of onset of cancer among BRCA1 carriers, it is likely that additional factors modify the risk of cancer. The role of other modifying genetic loci has not been studied. Through haplotype analysis we have identified 199 female BRCA1 carriers above the age of 20 years in 25 linked families. 127 of these women have been diagnosed with cancer and 72 are currently healthy. DNA was available on 59 carriers. Each sample was typed for the HRAS polymorphism by PCR, using primers flanking the minisatellite. Rare alleles were identified in 18 carriers. The penetrance of the BRCA1 gene was not higher among those women who carried a rare HRAS allele (mean age of onset 49 years) than among those who carried two common alleles (mean age of onset 43 years) (p= 0.59; log rank test). Similar results were obtained for ovarian cancer. These data do not support the hypothesis that the HRAS locus modified the risk of cancer among carriers of mutations in BRCA1.

  17. Insights Into the Pathogenicity of Rare Missense GCK Variants From the Identification and Functional Characterization of Compound Heterozygous and Double Mutations Inherited in Cis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Nicola L.; Osbak, Kara K.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Tribble, Nicholas D.; Steele, Anna M.; Wensley, Kirsty J.; Edghill, Emma L.; Colcough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; Valentínová, Lucia; Rundle, Jana K.; Raimondo, Anne; Grimsby, Joseph; Ellard, Sian; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the importance of using a combined genetic and functional approach to correctly interpret a genetic test for monogenic diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified three probands with a phenotype consistent with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) subtype GCK-MODY, in whom two potential pathogenic mutations were identified: [R43H/G68D], [E248 K/I225M], or [G261R/D217N]. Allele-specific PCR and cosegregation were used to determine phase. Single and double mutations were kinetically characterized. RESULTS The mutations occurred in cis (double mutants) in two probands and in trans in one proband. Functional studies of all double mutants revealed inactivating kinetics. The previously reported GCK-MODY mutations R43H and G68D were inherited from an affected father and unaffected mother, respectively. Both our functional and genetic studies support R43H as the cause of GCK-MODY and G68D as a neutral rare variant. CONCLUSIONS These data highlight the need for family/functional studies, even for previously reported pathogenic mutations. PMID:22611063

  18. Comparison of genetic association strategies in the presence of rare alleles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for the missing heritability of most complex diseases, rare variants have received increased attention. Advances in large-scale sequencing have led to a shift from the common disease/common variant hypothesis to the common disease/rare variant hypothesis or have at least reopened the debate about the relevance and importance of rare variants for gene discoveries. The investigation of modeling and testing approaches to identify significant disease/rare variant associations is in full motion. New methods to better deal with parameter estimation instabilities, convergence problems, or multiple testing corrections in the presence of rare variants or effect modifiers of rare variants are in their infancy. Using a recently developed semiparametric strategy to detect causal variants, we investigate the performance of the model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MB-MDR) technique in terms of power and family-wise error rate (FWER) control in the presence of rare variants, using population-based and family-based data (FAM-MDR). We compare family-based results obtained from MB-MDR analyses to screening findings from a quantitative trait Pedigree-based association test (PBAT). Population-based data were further examined using penalized regression models. We restrict attention to all available single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4 and consider Q1 as the outcome of interest. The considered family-based methods identified marker C4S4935 in the VEGFC gene with estimated power not exceeding 0.35 (FAM-MDR), when FWER was kept under control. The considered population-based methods gave rise to highly inflated FWERs (up to 90% for PBAT screening). PMID:22373505

  19. Comparison of genetic association strategies in the presence of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Cattaert, Tom; De Lobel, Lizzy; Van Lishout, François; Empain, Alain; Van Steen, Kristel

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for the missing heritability of most complex diseases, rare variants have received increased attention. Advances in large-scale sequencing have led to a shift from the common disease/common variant hypothesis to the common disease/rare variant hypothesis or have at least reopened the debate about the relevance and importance of rare variants for gene discoveries. The investigation of modeling and testing approaches to identify significant disease/rare variant associations is in full motion. New methods to better deal with parameter estimation instabilities, convergence problems, or multiple testing corrections in the presence of rare variants or effect modifiers of rare variants are in their infancy. Using a recently developed semiparametric strategy to detect causal variants, we investigate the performance of the model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction (MB-MDR) technique in terms of power and family-wise error rate (FWER) control in the presence of rare variants, using population-based and family-based data (FAM-MDR). We compare family-based results obtained from MB-MDR analyses to screening findings from a quantitative trait Pedigree-based association test (PBAT). Population-based data were further examined using penalized regression models. We restrict attention to all available single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 4 and consider Q1 as the outcome of interest. The considered family-based methods identified marker C4S4935 in the VEGFC gene with estimated power not exceeding 0.35 (FAM-MDR), when FWER was kept under control. The considered population-based methods gave rise to highly inflated FWERs (up to 90% for PBAT screening). PMID:22373505

  20. vidence of low genetic variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked endangered island endemic, the Lasan Teal (Anas laysanensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Peters Jeffrey L; Courtot, Karen; Seixas, Pedro P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity is assumed to reflect the evolutionary potential and adaptability of populations, and thus quantifying the genetic diversity of endangered species is useful for recovery programs. In particular, if conservation strategies include reintroductions, periodic genetic assessments are useful to evaluate whether management efforts have resulted in the maximization or loss of genetic variation within populations over generations. In this study, we collected blood, feather, and tissue samples during 1999–2009 and quantified genetic diversity for a critically endangered waterfowl species endemic to the Hawaiian archipelago, the Laysan teal or duck (Anas laysanensis; n = 239 individual birds sampled). The last extant population of this species at Laysan Island was sourced in 2004–2005 for a ‘wild to wild’ translocation of 42 individuals for an experimental reintroduction to Midway Atoll. To inform future management strategies, we compared genetic diversity sampled from the source population (n = 133 Laysan birds) including 23 of Midway’s founders and offspring of the translocated population 2–5 years post release (n = 96 Midway birds). We attempted to identify polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellite (N = 83) and intronic loci (N = 19), as well as the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA) for a subset of samples. Among 83 microsatellite loci screened, six were variable. We found low nuclear variation consistent with the species’ historical population bottlenecks and sequence variation was observed at a single intron locus. We detected no variation within the mtDNA. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within islands. Two rare alleles found in the Laysan Island source population were not present in the Midway translocated group, and a rare allele was discovered in an individual on Midway in 2008. We found similar genetic diversity and low, but statistically

  1. Genotyping of 28 blood group alleles in blood donors from Mali: Prediction of rare phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ba, Alhassane; Bagayoko, Seydou; Chiaroni, Jacques; Baiily, Pascal; Silvy, Monique

    2016-04-01

    We determined the frequencies of clinically relevant blood group alleles in 300 blood donors from Mali. Multiplex test based on xMAP technology was used to investigate six blood group systems (RH, KEL, MNS, FY, JK, DO, HPA) and complementary analysis were conducted for MNS and RH systems. Polymorphisms that affect the specificity of molecular tests leading to discrepant genotype results are discussed. Antigen expressions were predicted showing that 50% of donors expressed at least one traditional low prevalence antigen, and 11.6% lacked the ability to express at least one high prevalence antigen compatible with Dob-, HPA1a-, S-s-U-, Jsb-, RH:-31 and/or RH:-34 phenotypes. PMID:26616029

  2. Rare allele of a previously unidentified histone H4 acetyltransferase enhances grain weight, yield, and plant biomass in rice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xian Jun; Kuroha, Takeshi; Ayano, Madoka; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Komeda, Norio; Segami, Shuhei; Miura, Kotaro; Ogawa, Daisuke; Kamura, Takumi; Suzuki, Takamasa; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Masanori; Mori, Hitoshi; Inukai, Yoshiaki; Wu, Jianzhong; Kitano, Hidemi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Grain weight is an important crop yield component; however, its underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we identify a grain-weight quantitative trait locus (QTL) encoding a new-type GNAT-like protein that harbors intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity (OsglHAT1). Our genetic and molecular evidences pinpointed the QTL-OsglHAT1’s allelic variations to a 1.2-kb region upstream of the gene body, which is consistent with its function as a positive regulator of the traits. Elevated OsglHAT1 expression enhances grain weight and yield by enlarging spikelet hulls via increasing cell number and accelerating grain filling, and increases global acetylation levels of histone H4. OsglHAT1 localizes to the nucleus, where it likely functions through the regulation of transcription. Despite its positive agronomical effects on grain weight, yield, and plant biomass, the rare allele elevating OsglHAT1 expression has so far escaped human selection. Our findings reveal the first example, to our knowledge, of a QTL for a yield component trait being due to a chromatin modifier that has the potential to improve crop high-yield breeding. PMID:25535376

  3. Enhanced ratio of signals enables digital mutation scanning for rare allele detection.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2015-05-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  4. Functional Analysis of Missense Variants in the Putative Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene XRCC2.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Florentine S; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Wiegant, Wouter W; Meijers, Caro M; Völker-Albert, Moritz; Boonen, Rick A; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; van Attikum, Haico

    2016-09-01

    XRCC2 genetic variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. However, association studies have been complicated because XRCC2 variants are extremely rare and consist mainly of amino acid substitutions whose grouping is sensitive to misclassification by the predictive algorithms. We therefore functionally characterized variants in XRCC2 by testing their ability to restore XRCC2-DNA repair deficient phenotypes using a cDNA-based complementation approach. While the protein-truncating variants p.Leu117fs, p.Arg215*, and p.Cys217* were unable to restore XRCC2 deficiency, 19 out of 23 missense variants showed no or just a minor (<25%) reduction in XRCC2 function. The remaining four (p.Cys120Tyr, p.Arg91Trp, p.Leu133Pro, and p.Ile95Leu) had a moderate effect. Overall, measured functional effects correlated poorly with those predicted by in silico analysis. After regrouping variants from published case-control studies based on the functional effect found in this study and reanalysis of the prevalence data, there was no longer evidence for an association with breast cancer. This suggests that if breast cancer susceptibility alleles of XRCC2 exist, they are likely restricted to protein-truncating variants and a minority of missense changes. Our study emphasizes the use of functional analyses of missense variants to support variant classification in association studies. PMID:27233470

  5. Searching for missing heritability: designing rare variant association studies.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Lander, Eric S

    2014-01-28

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  6. Searching for missing heritability: Designing rare variant association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  7. Structural variation and missense mutation in SBDS associated with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive ribosomopathy caused mainly by compound heterozygous mutations in SBDS. Structural variation (SV) involving the SBDS locus has been rarely reported in association with the disease. We aimed to determine whether an SV contributed to the pathogenesis of a case lacking biallelic SBDS point mutations. Case presentation Whole exome sequencing was performed in a patient with SDS lacking biallelic SBDS point mutations. Array comparative genomic hybridization and Southern blotting were used to seek SVs across the SBDS locus. Locus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) encompassing flanking intronic sequence was also performed to investigate mutation within the locus. RNA expression and Western blotting were performed to analyze allele and protein expression. We found the child harbored a single missense mutation in SBDS (c.98A > C; p.K33T), inherited from the mother, and an SV in the SBDS locus, inherited from the father. The missense allele and SV segregated in accordance with Mendelian expectations for autosomal recessive SDS. Complementary DNA and western blotting analysis and locus specific PCR support the contention that the SV perturbed SBDS protein expression in the father and child. Conclusion Our findings implicate genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of some cases of SDS and support patients lacking biallelic SBDS point mutations be tested for SV within the SBDS locus. PMID:24898207

  8. MHC class II variation in a rare and ecological specialist mouse lemur reveals lower allelic richness and contrasting selection patterns compared to a generalist and widespread sympatric congener.

    PubMed

    Pechouskova, Eva; Dammhahn, Melanie; Brameier, Markus; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Huchard, Elise

    2015-04-01

    The polymorphism of immunogenes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is thought to influence the functional plasticity of immune responses and, consequently, the fitness of populations facing heterogeneous pathogenic pressures. Here, we evaluated MHC variation (allelic richness and divergence) and patterns of selection acting on the two highly polymorphic MHC class II loci (DRB and DQB) in the endangered primate Madame Berthe's mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae). Using 454 pyrosequencing, we examined MHC variation in a total of 100 individuals sampled over 9 years in Kirindy Forest, Western Madagascar, and compared our findings with data obtained previously for its sympatric congener, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). These species exhibit a contrasting ecology and demography that were expected to affect MHC variation and molecular signatures of selection. We found a lower allelic richness concordant with its low population density, but a similar level of allelic divergence and signals of historical selection in the rare feeding specialist M. berthae compared to the widespread generalist M. murinus. These findings suggest that demographic factors may exert a stronger influence than pathogen-driven selection on current levels of allelic richness in M. berthae. Despite a high sequence similarity between the two congeners, contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB suggest its potential functional divergence. This study represents a first step toward unravelling factors influencing the adaptive divergence of MHC genes between closely related but ecologically differentiated sympatric lemurs and opens new questions regarding potential functional discrepancy that would explain contrasting selection patterns detected at DQB. PMID:25687337

  9. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  10. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  11. Characterisation of novel and rare Y-chromosome short tandem repeat alleles in self-declared South Australian Aboriginal database.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tegan E; Ottens, Renee; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Nagle, Nano; Henry, Julianne; Taylor, Duncan; Gardner, Michael G; Fitch, Alison J; Goodman, Amanda; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Mitchell, R John; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are used in forensic science laboratories all over the world, as their application is wide and often vital in solving casework. Analysis of an in-house database of South Australian self-declared Aboriginal males held by Forensic Science South Australia (FSSA) using the Applied Biosystem's AmpFℓSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit revealed 43 variant Y-STR alleles at 6 of the 17 loci. All variant alleles were sequenced to determine the exact repeat structure for each. As a high level of admixture has previously been found within the SA Aboriginal database, samples were haplogrouped using Y-SNPs to determine their likely geographical origin. Although a number of variant alleles were associated with non-Aboriginal Y-haplogroups, a high frequency was observed within the Australian K-M9 lineage. Detailed knowledge of these variant alleles may have further application in the development of new DNA markers for identification purposes, and in population and evolutionary studies of Australian Aborigines. PMID:24048501

  12. Report of a patient with a constitutional missense mutation in SMARCB1, Coffin-Siris phenotype, and schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Nathan; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Berry, Susan A; Moertel, Christopher L

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with a constitutional missense mutation in SMARCB1, Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS), and schwannomatosis. CSS is a rare congenital syndrome with characteristic clinical findings. This thirty-three-year-old man was diagnosed early in life with the constellation of moderate intellectual disability, hypotonia, mild microcephaly, coarse facies, wide mouth with full lips, hypoplasia of the digits, and general hirsutism. At age 26, he was found to have schwannomatosis after presenting with acute spinal cord compression. Blood and tissue analysis of multiple subsequent schwannoma resections revealed a germline missense mutation of SMARCB1, acquired loss of 22q including SMARCB1 and NF2 and mutation of the remaining NF2 wild-type allele-thus completing the four-hit, three-event mechanism associated with schwannomatosis. Variations in five genes have been associated with the Coffin-Siris phenotype: ARID1A, ARID1B, SMARCA4, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1. Of these genes, SMARCB1 has a well-established association with schwannomatosis and malignancy. This is the first report of a patient with a constitutional missense mutation of SMARCB1 resulting in CSS and subsequent development of schwannomatosis. This finding demonstrates that a SMARCB1 mutation may be the initial "hit" (constitutional) for a genetic disorder with subsequent risk of developing schwannomas and other malignancies, and raises the possibility that other patients with switch/sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) mutations may be at increased risk for tumors. PMID:26364901

  13. Analyzing effects of naturally occurring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Miteva, Maria A; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Single-point mutation in genome, for example, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or rare genetic mutation, is the change of a single nucleotide for another in the genome sequence. Some of them will produce an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein sequence (missense mutations); others will not. This paper focuses on genetic mutations resulting in a change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein and how to assess their effects on protein wild-type characteristics. The existing methods and approaches for predicting the effects of mutation on protein stability, structure, and dynamics are outlined and discussed with respect to their underlying principles. Available resources, either as stand-alone applications or webservers, are pointed out as well. It is emphasized that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind these effects due to these missense mutations is of critical importance for detecting disease-causing mutations. The paper provides several examples of the application of 3D structure-based methods to model the effects of protein stability and protein-protein interactions caused by missense mutations as well. PMID:22577471

  14. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele: Evidence for Synthetic Association in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Edward J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F.; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10−14). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  15. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Gronberg, Henrik; Aly, Markus; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Canzian, Federico; Campa, Daniele; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-02-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10(-14)). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  16. In silico and in vitro analysis of rare germline allelic variants of RET oncogene associated with medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cosci, B; Vivaldi, A; Romei, C; Gemignani, F; Landi, S; Ciampi, R; Tacito, A; Molinaro, E; Agate, L; Bottici, V; Cappagli, V; Viola, D; Piaggi, P; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A; Elisei, R

    2011-10-01

    Germline and somatic RET oncogene mutations are found in 98% hereditary and 40% sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas. Our aim was to analyse by in silico and in vitro assays the transforming activity of six rare RET mutations (T338I, V648I, M918V, A883T, S904F and M848T). Six known RET mutations were used as controls. The in silico analysis showed the highest score value (i.e. 65) for S904F, M848T, M918T and C634R, whereas L790F, G691S, T338I and V648I had 0 score. Intermediate score values were obtained by A883T (score=55), M918V, V804M and Y791F (score=15). The in vitro focus formation assay showed that cells transfected with S904F, M918T, M848T or C634R generated the largest number of focus formation units (FFU). Intermediate numbers of FFU were observed in cells transfected with M918V, V804M, Y791F or A883T, while cells transfected with L790F, G691S, T338I or V648I showed a number of FFU similar to control cells. A positive correlation between the in silico score and in vitro FFU was found (P=0.0005). Only cells transfected with M918T or C634R grew faster and generated higher number of colonies in soft agar than control cells. However, the cells that were transfected with V804M produced an intermediate number of colonies. In conclusion, two of the six rare RET mutations, S904F and M848T possessed a relatively high transforming activity but a low aggressiveness; the other four mutations T338I, V648I, M918V and A883T were low or non-transforming, and their ability to induce tumoural transformation might be related to particular genetic conditions. PMID:21810974

  17. Homozygous missense variant in the human CNGA3 channel causes cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rehan S; Reuter, Peggy; Sisk, Robert A; Kausar, Tasleem; Shahzad, Mohsin; Maqsood, Muhammad I; Yousif, Ateeq; Ali, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Wissinger, Bernd; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-01-01

    We assessed a large consanguineous Pakistani family (PKAB157) segregating early onset low vision problems. Funduscopic and electroretinographic evaluation of affected individuals revealed juvenile cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) with maculopathy. Other clinical symptoms included loss of color discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing, segregation and haplotype analyses demonstrated that a transition variant (c.955T>C; p.(Cys319Arg)) in CNGA3 co-segregated with the CRD phenotype in family PKAB157. The ability of CNGA3 channel to influx calcium in response to agonist, when expressed either alone or together with the wild-type CNGB3 subunit in HEK293 cells, was completely abolished due to p.Cys319Arg variant. Western blotting and immunolocalization studies suggest that a decreased channel density in the HEK293 cell membrane due to impaired folding and/or trafficking of the CNGA3 protein is the main pathogenic effect of the p.Cys319Arg variant. Mutant alleles of the human cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA3) are frequently associated with achromatopsia. In rare cases, variants in CNGA3 are also associated with cone dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis and oligo cone trichromacy. The identification of predicted p.(Cys319Arg) missense variant in CNGA3 expands the repertoire of the known genetic causes of CRD and phenotypic spectrum of CNGA3 alleles. PMID:25052312

  18. Homozygous missense variant in the human CNGA3 channel causes cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rehan S; Reuter, Peggy; Sisk, Robert A; Kausar, Tasleem; Shahzad, Mohsin; Maqsood, Muhammad I; Yousif, Ateeq; Ali, Muhammad; Riazuddin, Saima; Wissinger, Bernd; Ahmed, Zubair M

    2015-04-01

    We assessed a large consanguineous Pakistani family (PKAB157) segregating early onset low vision problems. Funduscopic and electroretinographic evaluation of affected individuals revealed juvenile cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) with maculopathy. Other clinical symptoms included loss of color discrimination, photophobia and nystagmus. Whole-exome sequencing, segregation and haplotype analyses demonstrated that a transition variant (c.955T>C; p.(Cys319Arg)) in CNGA3 co-segregated with the CRD phenotype in family PKAB157. The ability of CNGA3 channel to influx calcium in response to agonist, when expressed either alone or together with the wild-type CNGB3 subunit in HEK293 cells, was completely abolished due to p.Cys319Arg variant. Western blotting and immunolocalization studies suggest that a decreased channel density in the HEK293 cell membrane due to impaired folding and/or trafficking of the CNGA3 protein is the main pathogenic effect of the p.Cys319Arg variant. Mutant alleles of the human cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA3) are frequently associated with achromatopsia. In rare cases, variants in CNGA3 are also associated with cone dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis and oligo cone trichromacy. The identification of predicted p.(Cys319Arg) missense variant in CNGA3 expands the repertoire of the known genetic causes of CRD and phenotypic spectrum of CNGA3 alleles. PMID:25052312

  19. Proteasomal Inhibition Restores Biological Function of Mis-sense Mutated Dysferlin in Patient-derived Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Azakir, Bilal A.; Di Fulvio, Sabrina; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin is a transmembrane protein implicated in surface membrane repair of muscle cells. Mutations in dysferlin cause the progressive muscular dystrophies Miyoshi myopathy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, and distal anterior compartment myopathy. Dysferlinopathies are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, and many patients with this disease harbor mis-sense mutations in at least one of their two pathogenic DYSF alleles. These patients have significantly reduced or absent dysferlin levels in skeletal muscle, suggesting that dysferlin encoded by mis-sense alleles is rapidly degraded by the cellular quality control system. We reasoned that mis-sense mutated dysferlin, if salvaged from degradation, might be biologically functional. We used a dysferlin-deficient human myoblast culture harboring the common R555W mis-sense allele and a DYSF-null allele, as well as control human myoblast cultures harboring either two wild-type or two null alleles. We measured dysferlin protein and mRNA levels, resealing kinetics of laser-induced plasmalemmal wounds, myotube formation, and cellular viability after treatment of the human myoblast cultures with the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin or bortezomib (Velcade). We show that endogenous R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin is degraded by the proteasomal system. Inhibition of the proteasome by lactacystin or Velcade increases the levels of R555W mis-sense mutated dysferlin. This salvaged protein is functional as it restores plasma membrane resealing in patient-derived myoblasts and reverses their deficit in myotube formation. Bortezomib and lactacystin did not cause cellular toxicity at the regimen used. Our results raise the possibility that inhibition of the degradation pathway of mis-sense mutated dysferlin could be used as a therapeutic strategy for patients harboring certain dysferlin mis-sense mutations. PMID:22318734

  20. A-TWinnipeg: Pathogenesis of rare ATM missense mutation c.6200C>A with decreased protein expression and downstream signaling, early-onset dystonia, cancer, and life-threatening radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kotoka; Fike, Francesca; Haghayegh, Sara; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Dawson, Angelika J; Dörk, Thilo; Gatti, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We studied 10 Mennonite patients who carry the c.6200C>A missense mutation (p.A2067D) in the ATM gene, all of whom exhibited a phenotypic variant of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is characterized by early-onset dystonia and late-onset mild ataxia, as previously described. This report provides the pathogenetic evidence for this mutation on cellular functions. Several patients have developed cancer and subsequently experienced life-threatening adverse reactions to radiation (radiotoxicity) and/or chemotherapy. As the c.6200C>A mutation is, thus far, unique to the Mennonite population and is always associated with the same haplotype or haplovariant, it was important to rule out any possible confounding DNA variant on the same haplotype. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from Mennonite patients expressed small amounts of ATM protein, which had no autophosphorylation activity at ATM Ser1981, and trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets. A-T lymphoblastoid cells stably transfected with ATM cDNA which had been mutated for c.6200C>A did not show a detectable amount of ATM protein. The same stable cell line with mutated ATM cDNA also showed a trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets SMC1pSer966 and KAP1pSer824. From these results, we conclude that c.6200A is the disease-causing ATM mutation on this haplotype. The presence of at least trace amounts of ATM kinase activity on some immunoblots may account for the late-onset, mild ataxia of these patients. The cause of the dystonia remains unclear. Because this dystonia-ataxia phenotype is often encountered in the Mennonite population in association with cancer and adverse reactions to chemotherapy, an early diagnosis is important. PMID:25077176

  1. Harderoporphyria due to homozygosity for coproporphyrinogen oxidase missense mutation H327R.

    PubMed

    Hasanoglu, Alev; Balwani, Manisha; Kasapkara, Ciğdem S; Ezgü, Fatih S; Okur, Ilyas; Tümer, Leyla; Cakmak, Alpay; Nazarenko, Irina; Yu, Chunli; Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria due to the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX). The enzyme catalyzes the step-wise oxidative decarboxylation of the heme precursor, coproporphyrinogen III, to protoporphyrinogen IX via a tricarboxylic intermediate, harderoporphyrinogen. In autosomal dominant HCP, the deficient enzymatic activity results primarily in the accumulation of coproporphyrin III. To date, only a few homozygous HCP patients have been described, most having Harderoporphyria, a rare variant due to specific CPOX mutations that alter enzyme residues D400-K404, most patients described to date having at least one K404E allele. Here, we describe a Turkish male infant, the product of a consanguineous union, who presented with the Harderoporphyria phenotype including neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hemolytic anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin lesions when exposed to UV light. He was homoallelic for the CPOX missense mutation, c.980A>G (p.H327R), and had massively increased urinary uroporphyrins I and III (9,250 and 2,910 μM, respectively) and coproporphyrins I and III (895 and 19,400 μM, respectively). The patient expired at 5 months of age from an apparent acute neurologic porphyric attack. Structural studies predicted that p.H327R interacts with residue W399 in the CPOX active site, thereby accounting for the Harderoporphyria phenotype. PMID:21103937

  2. HARDEROPORPHYRIA DUE TO HOMOZYGOSITY FOR COPROPORPHYRINOGEN OXIDASE MISSENSE MUTATION H327R

    PubMed Central

    Hasanoglu, A; Balwani, M; Kasapkara, ÇS; Ezgü, FS; Okur, I; Tümer, L; Çakmak, A; Nazarenko, I; Yu, C; Clavero, S; Bishop, DF; Desnick, RJ

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria due to the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX). The enzyme catalyzes the step-wise oxidative decarboxylation of the heme precursor, coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX via a tricarboxylic intermediate, harderoporphyrinogen. In autosomal dominant HCP, the deficient enzymatic activity results primarily in the accumulation of coproporphyrin III. To date, only a few homozygous HCP patients have been described, most having Harderoporphyria, a rare variant due to specific CPOX mutations that alter enzyme residues D400-K404, most patients described to date having at least one K404E allele. Here, we describe a Turkish male infant, the product of a consanguineous union, who presented with the Harderoporphyria phenotype including neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hemolytic anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin lesions when exposed to UV light. He was homoallelic for the CPOX missense mutation, c.980A>G (p.H327R), and had massively increased urinary uroporphyrins I and III (9250 and 2910 μM, respectively) and coproporphyrins I and III (895 and 19,400 μM, respectively). The patient expired at five months of age from an apparent acute neurologic porphyric attack. Structural studies predicted that p.H327R interacts with residue W399 in the CPOX active site, thereby accounting for the Harderoporphyria phenotype. PMID:21103937

  3. Identification of CHRNA5 rare variants in African-American heavy smokers

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Glenn A.; Chou, Andrew D.; Saung, Wint Thu; Lai, Alison T.; Lohoff, Falk W.; Berrettini, Wade H.

    2014-01-01

    The common CHRNA5 mis-sense coding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968:G>A (D398N) has been shown repeatedly to confer risk for heavy smoking in individuals who carry the ‘A’ allele (encoding the 398N amino acid). The mis-sense SNP has a minor allele frequency (MAF) of ~40% in European-Americans, but only ~7% in African-Americans (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/SNP/). We reasoned that there might be other mis-sense variants among African-Americans that could confer the heavy smoking phenotype (defined here as ≥20 cigarettes per day), perhaps in a similar manner to that of the D398N polymorphism in Europeans. As such, we re-sequenced 250 African-American heavy smokers, most of whom were homozygous ‘G’ at rs16969968:G>A (MAF of 9.6% within the population). Although many novel coding SNPs were not observed, we report an interesting, although rare (perhaps personal) variant in CHRNA5 that could result in nonsense-mediated decay of the aberrant transcript. PMID:24682045

  4. A rare allele combination of the interleukin-1 gene complex is associated with high interleukin-1 beta plasma levels in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hulkkonen, J; Laippala, P; Hurme, M

    2000-06-01

    Increases in the plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines can be detected in various infectious and inflammatory diseases, but in healthy individuals these levels are in most cases low or undetectable. There is now increasing evidence that genes of the inflammatory cytokines are polymorphic and the various alleles may differ in their capability to produce the cytokine. We have measured the plasma levels IL-1 beta of 400 healthy blood donors and correlated these to the genotype (biallelelic base exchanges at the position - 889 of the IL-1 alpha gene, and at the position - 511 of the IL-1 beta gene and the pentaallelic VNTR in the second intron of the IL-1Ra gene). The median concentration of IL-1 beta was 5.8 pg/ml (upper and lower quartiles 2.2-13.6). The polymorphisms of the IL-1 beta and IL-1 Ra genes did not have any significant influence on the IL-1 beta levels, but the IL-1 alpha 2.2 homozygotes (32/400 blood donors) had significantly elevated levels (median 7.0 pg/ml, quartiles 2.2-22.4, one-way ANOVA p < 0.008 as compared to the IL-1 alpha 1.1 homozygotes and p < 0.02 as compared to the IL-1 alpha 1.2 heterozygotes). This effect of IL-1 alpha 2.2 homozygosity was more pronounced in donors, who also were carriers of the IL-1 beta allele 2. Thus these data suggest that this allele combination has a regulatory effect on basal IL-1 beta production. PMID:10903804

  5. An association-adjusted consensus deleterious scheme to classify homozygous Mis-sense mutations for personal genome interpretation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Personal genome analysis is now being considered for evaluation of disease risk in healthy individuals, utilizing both rare and common variants. Multiple scores have been developed to predict the deleteriousness of amino acid substitutions, using information on the allele frequencies, level of evolutionary conservation, and averaged structural evidence. However, agreement among these scores is limited and they likely over-estimate the fraction of the genome that is deleterious. Method This study proposes an integrative approach to identify a subset of homozygous non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs). An 8-level classification scheme is constructed from the presence/absence of deleterious predictions combined with evidence of association with disease or complex traits. Detailed literature searches and structural validations are then performed for a subset of homozygous 826 mis-sense mutations in 575 proteins found in the genomes of 12 healthy adults. Results Implementation of the Association-Adjusted Consensus Deleterious Scheme (AACDS) classifies 11% of all predicted highly deleterious homozygous variants as most likely to influence disease risk. The number of such variants per genome ranges from 0 to 8 with no significant difference between African and Caucasian Americans. Detailed analysis of mutations affecting the APOE, MTMR2, THSB1, CHIA, αMyHC, and AMY2A proteins shows how the protein structure is likely to be disrupted, even though the associated phenotypes have not been documented in the corresponding individuals. Conclusions The classification system for homozygous nsSNPs provides an opportunity to systematically rank nsSNPs based on suggestive evidence from annotations and sequence-based predictions. The ranking scheme, in-depth literature searches, and structural validations of highly prioritized mis-sense mutations compliment traditional sequence-based approaches and should have particular utility for the development of

  6. Assessment of two missense polymorphisms (rs4762 and rs699) of the angiotensinogen gene and stroke

    PubMed Central

    PARK, HYUN-KYUNG; KIM, MYUNG-CHUN; KIM, SUNG-MIN; JO, DAE JEAN

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has an important role in the pathogenesis of stroke. We investigated whether two missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs4762, Thr207Met, T207M; and rs699, Met268Thr, M268T) of angiotensinogen (AGT; serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A, member 8) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We analyzed 197 stroke patients (120 IS and 77 ICH) and 301 control subjects. The patients were classified into subgroups in accordance to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). Multiple logistic regression models were used to analyze the genotype and allele distributions of each SNP. One of the missense SNPs, rs4762 (T207M) was associated with the development of ICH (P=0.038 in log-additive model and P=0.021 in allele distributions). The T allele frequency of T207M was higher in the ICH group (16.2%) compared with the control group (9.6%). The TC haplotype frequency differed significantly between the ICH and control groups (P=0.014). With regard to clinical features, T207M correlated with the NIHSS scores of the ICH patients (P=0.039 in codominant1, P=0.015 in dominant, P=0.011 in overdominant and P=0.039 in log-additive models). However, the two missense SNPs, rs4762 and rs699, were not associated with IS and its clinical features, including NIHSS and MBI scores. These data suggest that a missense SNP (rs4762, T207M) of the AGT gene may be associated with the development of ICH and contribute to the neurological functional levels of ICH patients. PMID:23251296

  7. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  8. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  9. Genetic characterization of Greek population isolates reveals strong genetic drift at missense and trait-associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Xifara, Dionysia Kiara; Colonna, Vincenza; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Southam, Lorraine; Gilly, Arthur; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Fatumo, Segun; Matchan, Angela; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Chen, Yuan; Kiagiadaki, Chrysoula; Zengini, Eleni; Mamakou, Vasiliki; Athanasiadis, Antonis; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kariakli, Vassiliki-Eirini; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Karabarinde, Alex; Sandhu, Manjinder; McVean, Gil; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Karaleftheri, Maria; Xue, Yali; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    Isolated populations are emerging as a powerful study design in the search for low-frequency and rare variant associations with complex phenotypes. Here we genotype 2,296 samples from two isolated Greek populations, the Pomak villages (HELIC-Pomak) in the North of Greece and the Mylopotamos villages (HELIC-MANOLIS) in Crete. We compare their genomic characteristics to the general Greek population and establish them as genetic isolates. In the MANOLIS cohort, we observe an enrichment of missense variants among the variants that have drifted up in frequency by more than fivefold. In the Pomak cohort, we find novel associations at variants on chr11p15.4 showing large allele frequency increases (from 0.2% in the general Greek population to 4.6% in the isolate) with haematological traits, for example, with mean corpuscular volume (rs7116019, P=2.3 × 10−26). We replicate this association in a second set of Pomak samples (combined P=2.0 × 10−36). We demonstrate significant power gains in detecting medical trait associations. PMID:25373335

  10. Identification of two missense mutations of ERCC6 in three Chinese sisters with Cockayne syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shanshan; Chen, Liyuan; Ye, Lili; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Tian, Yujiao; Geng, Qian; Yi, Xin; Xie, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, the primary manifestations of which are poor growth and neurologic abnormality. Mutations of the ERCC6 and ERCC8 genes are the predominant cause of Cockayne syndrome, and the ERCC6 gene mutation is present in approximately 65% of cases. The present report describes a case of Cockayne syndrome in a Chinese family, with the patients carrying two missense mutations (c.1595A>G, p.Asp532Gly and c.1607T>G, p.Leu536Trp) in the ERCC6 gene in an apparently compound heterozygote status, especially, p.Asp532Gly has never been reported. The compound heterozygote mutation was found in three patients in the family using whole exome sequencing. The patients' father and mother carried a heterozygous allele at different locations of the ERCC6 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger DNA sequencing. The two mutations are both located in the highly conserved motif I of ATP-binding helicase and are considered "Damaging," "Probably Damaging," "Disease Causing," and "Conserved", indicating the role of DNA damage in the pathogenetic process of the disease. The results not only enrich the ERCC6 mutations database, but also indicate that whole exome sequencing will be a powerful tool for discovering the disease causing mutations in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25463447

  11. Missense Variants in ATM in 26,101 Breast Cancer Cases and 29,842 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Orr, Nick; Ashworth, Alan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Burwinkel, Barbara; Bartram, Claus R.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Southey, Melissa C.; Smith, Letitia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Hopper, John L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Schürmann, Peter; Waltes, Regina; Bremer, Michael; Dörk, Thilo; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Maranian, Melanie; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Fasching, Peter A.; Strick, Reiner; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Arias, José Ignacio; Pita, Guillermo; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong Young; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang- Gohrke, Shan; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Morrison, Jonathan; Platte, Radka; Easton, Douglas F.; Peto, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Background Truncating mutations in ATM have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer but the effect of missense variants remains contentious. Methods We have genotyped five polymorphic (MAF 0.9% to 2.6%) missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ATM (S49C, S707P, F858L, P1054R, L1420F) in 26,101 breast cancer cases and 29,842 controls from 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Results Combining data from all five SNPs, the OR was 1.05 for being a heterozygote for any of the SNPs and 1.51 for being a rare homozygote for any of the SNPs with an overall trend OR=1.06 (Ptrend=0.04). The trend OR among bilateral and familial cases was 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.23; Ptrend=0.02). Conclusions In this large combined analysis, these 5 missense ATM SNPs were associated with a small increased risk of breast cancer, explaining an estimated 0.03% of the excess familial risk of breast cancer. Impact Testing the combined effects of rare missense variants in known breast cancer genes in large collaborative studies should clarify their overall contribution to breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:20826828

  12. The Rare ospC Allele L of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto, Commonly Found among Samples Collected in a Coastal Plain Area of the Southeastern United States, Is Associated with Ixodes affinis Ticks and Local Rodent Hosts Peromyscus gossypinus and Sigmodon hispidus

    PubMed Central

    Golovchenko, Maryna; Grubhoffer, Libor; Oliver, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The rare ospC allele L was detected in 30% of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strains cultured from a tick species, Ixodes affinis, and two rodent host species, Peromyscus gossypinus and Sigmodon hispidus, collected in a coastal plain area of Georgia and South Carolina, in the southeastern United States. PMID:23220965

  13. Thirteen new patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency and functional characterization of nineteen novel missense variants in the GAMT gene.

    PubMed

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ndika, Joseph; Kanhai, Warsha; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Cheillan, David; Christensen, Ernst; Dorison, Nathalie; Hannig, Vickie; Hendriks, Yvonne; Hofstede, Floris C; Lion-Francois, Laurence; Lund, Allan M; Mundy, Helen; Pitelet, Gaele; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Scott-Schwoerer, Jessica A; Szakszon, Katalin; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Williams, Monique; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-04-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT-D) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of creatine biosynthesis. Creatine deficiency on cranial proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and elevated guanidinoacetate levels in body fluids are the biomarkers of GAMT-D. In 74 patients, 50 different mutations in the GAMT gene have been identified with missense variants being the most common. Clinical and biochemical features of the patients with missense variants were obtained from their physicians using a questionnaire. In 20 patients, 17 missense variants, 25% had a severe, 55% a moderate, and 20% a mild phenotype. The effect of these variants on GAMT enzyme activity was overexpressed using primary GAMT-D fibroblasts: 17 variants retained no significant activity and are therefore considered pathogenic. Two additional variants, c.22C>A (p.Pro8Thr) and c.79T>C (p.Tyr27His) (the latter detected in control cohorts) are in fact not pathogenic as these alleles restored GAMT enzyme activity, although both were predicted to be possibly damaging by in silico analysis. We report 13 new patients with GAMT-D, six novel mutations and functional analysis of 19 missense variants, all being included in our public LOVD database. Our functional assay is important for the confirmation of the pathogenicity of identified missense variants in the GAMT gene. PMID:24415674

  14. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense ans missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    McGarth, J A; Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-05-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of a nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618058

  15. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense and missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-04-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618020

  16. Two male sibs with severe micrognathia and a missense variant in MED12.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Trine E; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Heimdal, Ketil R; Stadheim, Barbro; Hopp, Einar; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg

    2016-08-01

    Missense variants in MED12 cause three partially overlapping dysmorphic X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) syndromes: Lujan-Fryns syndrome (also known as Lujan syndrome), FG syndrome (also known as Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome) and X-linked Ohdo syndrome. We report a family with two severely micrognathic male sibs, a 10½ year old boy and a fetus, in which hemizygosity for a previously unreported missense variant in exon 13 of MED12 (NM_005120.2), c.1862G > A, p.(Arg621Gln) was detected by whole exome sequencing. The affected sibs shared no other rare variant with relevance to the phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation in blood was completely skewed (100:0) in the unaffected heterozygous mother, most likely as a result of preferential inactivation of the X-chromosome harbouring the missense variant in MED12. Neither the unaffected brother nor the unaffected maternal grandfather carried the missense variant in MED12. In the 10½ year old boy, upper airway obstruction secondary to Pierre Robin sequence necessitated a tracheostomy for the first 10 months of life. He has mild to moderate intellectual disability and some dysmorphic features seen in MED12-related syndromes. In addition, he has a horizontal gaze paresis, anomalies of the inner ear, and a cervical block vertebra. This report contributes to the expanding phenotypic range associated with MED12-mutations. PMID:27286923

  17. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole-genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta-analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60-3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26411346

  18. Multigene testing of moderate-risk genes: be mindful of the missense

    PubMed Central

    Young, E L; Feng, B J; Stark, A W; Damiola, F; Durand, G; Forey, N; Francy, T C; Gammon, A; Kohlmann, W K; Kaphingst, K A; McKay-Chopin, S; Nguyen-Dumont, T; Oliver, J; Paquette, A M; Pertesi, M; Robinot, N; Rosenthal, J S; Vallee, M; Voegele, C; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Andrulis, I L; John, E M; Hashibe, M; Gertz, J; Le Calvez-Kelm, F; Lesueur, F; Goldgar, D E; Tavtigian, S V

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderate-risk genes have not been extensively studied, and missense substitutions in them are generally returned to patients as variants of uncertain significance lacking clearly defined risk estimates. The fraction of early-onset breast cancer cases carrying moderate-risk genotypes and quantitative methods for flagging variants for further analysis have not been established. Methods We evaluated rare missense substitutions identified from a mutation screen of ATM, CHEK2, MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, RAD51, RINT1, XRCC2 and BARD1 in 1297 cases of early-onset breast cancer and 1121 controls via scores from Align-Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation (GVGD), combined annotation dependent depletion (CADD), multivariate analysis of protein polymorphism (MAPP) and PolyPhen-2. We also evaluated subjects by polygenotype from 18 breast cancer risk SNPs. From these analyses, we estimated the fraction of cases and controls that reach a breast cancer OR≥2.5 threshold. Results Analysis of mutation screening data from the nine genes revealed that 7.5% of cases and 2.4% of controls were carriers of at least one rare variant with an average OR≥2.5. 2.1% of cases and 1.2% of controls had a polygenotype with an average OR≥2.5. Conclusions Among early-onset breast cancer cases, 9.6% had a genotype associated with an increased risk sufficient to affect clinical management recommendations. Over two-thirds of variants conferring this level of risk were rare missense substitutions in moderate-risk genes. Placement in the estimated OR≥2.5 group by at least two of these missense analysis programs should be used to prioritise variants for further study. Panel testing often creates more heat than light; quantitative approaches to variant prioritisation and classification may facilitate more efficient clinical classification of variants. PMID:26787654

  19. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  20. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  1. First missense mutation outside of SERAC1 lipase domain affecting intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Martín-Hernández, Elena; de Aragón, Ana Martínez; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report the clinical and genetic findings in a Spanish boy who presented MEGDEL syndrome, a very rare inborn error of metabolism. Whole-exome sequencing uncovered a new homozygous mutation in the serine active site containing 1 (SERAC1) gene, which is essential for both mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Functional studies in patient fibroblasts showed that p.D224G mutation affects the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Only three missense mutations in this gene have been described before, being p.D224G the first missense mutation outside of the SERAC1 serine-lipase domain. Therefore, we conclude that the defect in cholesterol trafficking is not limited to alterations in this specific part of the protein. PMID:26445863

  2. Missense Variant in MAPK Inactivator PTPN5 Is Associated with Decreased Severity of Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Ravi F.; Arbabi, Saman; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) is hypothesized to have a genetic mechanism, yet its genetic determinants are largely unknown. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are important mediators of inflammatory signaling, and experimental evidence implicates MAPKs in HTS formation. We hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MAPK-pathway genes would be associated with severity of post-burn HTS. Methods We analyzed data from a prospective-cohort genome-wide association study of post-burn HTS. We included subjects with deep-partial-thickness burns admitted to our center who provided blood for genotyping and had at least one Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) assessment. After adjusting for HTS risk factors and population stratification, we tested MAPK-pathway gene SNPs for association with the four VSS variables in a joint regression model. In addition to individual-SNP analysis, we performed gene-based association testing. Results Our study population consisted of 538 adults (median age 40 years) who were predominantly White (76%) males (71%) admitted to our center from 2007–2014 with small-to-moderate-sized burns (median burn size 6% total body surface area). Of 2,146 SNPs tested, a rare missense variant in the PTPN5 gene (rs56234898; minor allele frequency 1.5%) was significantly associated with decreased severity of post-burn HTS (P = 1.3×10−6). In gene-based analysis, PTPN5 (P = 1.2×10−5) showed a significant association and BDNF (P = 9.5×10−4) a borderline-significant association with HTS severity. Conclusions We report PTPN5 as a novel genetic locus associated with HTS severity. PTPN5 is a MAPK inhibitor expressed in neurons, suggesting a potential role for neurotrophic factors and neuroinflammatory signaling in HTS pathophysiology. PMID:26872063

  3. Alpha-tubulin missense mutations correlate with antimicrotubule drug resistance in Eleusine indica.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, E; Zeng, L; Baird, W V

    1998-01-01

    Dinitroaniline herbicides are antimicrotubule drugs that bind to tubulins and inhibit polymerization. As a result of repeated application of dinitroaniline herbicides, highly resistant and intermediately resistant biotypes of goosegrass (Eleusine indica) developed in previously wild-type populations. Three alpha-tubulin cDNA classes (designated TUA1, TUA2, and TUA3) were isolated from each biotype. Nucleotide differences between the susceptible and the resistant (R) alpha-tubulins were identified in TUA1 and TUA2. The most significant differences were missense mutations that occurred in TUA1 of the R and intermediately resistant (I) biotypes. Such mutations convert Thr-239 to Ile in the R biotype and Met-268 to Thr in the I biotype. These amino acid substitutions alter hydrophobicity; therefore, they may alter the dinitroaniline binding property of the protein. These mutations were correlated with the dinitroaniline response phenotypes (Drp). Plants homozygous for susceptibility possessed the wild-type TUA1 allele; plants homozygous for resistance possessed the mutant tua1 allele; and plants heterozygous for susceptibility possessed both wild-type and mutant alleles. Thus, we conclude that TUA1 is at the Drp locus. Using polymerase chain reaction primer-introduced restriction analysis, we demonstrated that goosegrass genomic DNA can be diagnosed for Drp alleles. Although not direct proof, these results suggest that a mutation in an alpha-tubulin gene confers resistance to dinitroanilines in goosegrass. PMID:9490751

  4. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers

    PubMed Central

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10−17) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  5. Common alleles contribute to schizophrenia in CNV carriers.

    PubMed

    Tansey, K E; Rees, E; Linden, D E; Ripke, S; Chambert, K D; Moran, J L; McCarroll, S A; Holmans, P; Kirov, G; Walters, J; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-08-01

    The genetic architecture of schizophrenia is complex, involving risk alleles ranging from common alleles of weak effect to rare alleles of large effect, the best exemplar of the latter being large copy number variants (CNVs). It is currently unknown whether pathophysiology in those with defined rare mutations overlaps with that in other individuals with the disorder who do not share the same rare mutation. Under an extreme heterogeneity model, carriers of specific high-penetrance mutations form distinct subgroups. In contrast, under a polygenic threshold model, high-penetrance rare allele carriers possess many risk factors, of which the rare allele is the only one, albeit an important, factor. Under the latter model, cases with rare mutations can be expected to share some common risk alleles, and therefore pathophysiological mechanisms, with cases without the same mutation. Here we show that, compared with controls, individuals with schizophrenia who have known pathogenic CNVs carry an excess burden of common risk alleles (P=2.25 × 10(-17)) defined from a genome-wide association study largely based on individuals without known CNVs. Our finding is not consistent with an extreme heterogeneity model for CNV carriers, but does offer support for the polygenic threshold model of schizophrenia. That this is so provides support for the notion that studies aiming to model the effects of rare variation may uncover pathophysiological mechanisms of relevance to those with the disorder more widely. PMID:26390827

  6. Two novel missense mutations in nonketotic hyperglycinemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Berna Seker; Kor, Deniz; Ceylaner, Serdar; Mert, Gulen Gul; Incecik, Faruk; Kartal, Erkan; Mungan, Neslihan Onenli

    2015-05-01

    Nonketotic hyperglycinemia (OMIM no. 605899) is an autosomal recessively inherited glycine encephalopathy, caused by a deficiency in the mitochondrial glycine cleavage system. Here we report 2 neonates who were admitted to the hospital with complaints of respiratory failure and myoclonic seizures with an elevated cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glycine ratio and diagnosed as nonketotic hyperglycinemia. We report these cases as 2 novel homozygous mutations; a missense mutation c.593A>T (p.D198 V) in the glycine decarboxylase gene and a splicing mutation c.339G>A (Q113Q) in the aminomethyltransferase gene were detected. We would like to emphasize the genetic difference of our region in inherited metabolic diseases once again. PMID:24838951

  7. Ataxia-Pancytopenia Syndrome Is Caused by Missense Mutations in SAMD9L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Hui; Below, Jennifer E; Shimamura, Akiko; Keel, Sioban B; Matsushita, Mark; Wolff, John; Sul, Youngmee; Bonkowski, Emily; Castella, Maria; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Nickerson, Deborah; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Bird, Thomas D; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-06-01

    Ataxia-pancytopenia (AP) syndrome is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, variable hematologic cytopenias, and predisposition to marrow failure and myeloid leukemia, sometimes associated with monosomy 7. Here, in the four-generation family UW-AP, linkage analysis revealed four regions that provided the maximal LOD scores possible, one of which was in a commonly microdeleted chromosome 7q region. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.2640C>A, p.His880Gln) in the sterile alpha motif domain containing 9-like gene (SAMD9L) that completely cosegregated with disease. By targeted sequencing of SAMD9L, we subsequently identified a different missense mutation (c.3587G>C, p.Cys1196Ser) in affected members of the first described family with AP syndrome, Li-AP. Neither variant is reported in the public databases, both affect highly conserved amino acid residues, and both are predicted to be damaging. With time in culture, lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) from two affected individuals in family UW-AP exhibited copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity for large portions of the long arm of chromosome 7, resulting in retention of only the wild-type SAMD9L allele. Newly established LCLs from both individuals demonstrated the same phenomenon. In addition, targeted capture and sequencing of SAMD9L in uncultured blood DNA from both individuals showed bias toward the wild-type allele. These observations indicate in vivo hematopoietic mosaicism. The hematopoietic cytopenias that characterize AP syndrome and the selective advantage for clones that have lost the mutant allele support the postulated role of SAMD9L in the regulation of cell proliferation. Furthermore, we show that AP syndrome is distinct from the dyskeratoses congenita telomeropathies, with which it shares some clinical characteristics. PMID:27259050

  8. Genome-wide allelic methylation analysis reveals disease-specific susceptibility to multiple methylation defects in imprinting syndromes.

    PubMed

    Court, Franck; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Romanelli, Valeria; Garin, Intza; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Salafsky, Ira; Guitart, Miriam; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Lapunzina, Pablo; Monk, David

    2013-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is the parent-of-origin-specific allelic transcriptional silencing observed in mammals, which is governed by DNA methylation established in the gametes and maintained throughout the development. The frequency and extent of epimutations associated with the nine reported imprinting syndromes varies because it is evident that aberrant preimplantation maintenance of imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) may affect multiple loci. Using a custom Illumina GoldenGate array targeting 27 imprinted DMRs, we profiled allelic methylation in 65 imprinting defect patients. We identify multilocus hypomethylation in numerous Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), and pseudohypoparathyroidism 1B patients, and an individual with Silver-Russell syndrome. Our data reveal a broad range of epimutations exist in certain imprinting syndromes, with the exception of Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome patients that are associated with solitary SNRPN-DMR defects. A mutation analysis identified a 1 bp deletion in the ZFP57 gene in a TNDM patient with methylation defects at multiple maternal DMRs. In addition, we observe missense variants in ZFP57, NLRP2, and NLRP7 that are not consistent with maternal effect and aberrant establishment or methylation maintenance, and are likely benign. This work illustrates that further extensive molecular characterization of these rare patients is required to fully understand the mechanism underlying the etiology of imprint establishment and maintenance. PMID:23335487

  9. At least two mutant alleles of ornithine delta-aminotransferase cause gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina in Finns.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G A; Brody, L C; Sipila, I; Looney, J E; Wong, C; Engelhardt, J F; Patel, A S; Steel, G; Obie, C; Kaiser-Kupfer, M

    1989-01-01

    Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GA) is an inherited chorioretinal degeneration caused by deficiency of ornithine delta-aminotransferase (OAT; L-ornithine: 2-oxo-acid aminotransferase; EC 2.6.1.13). GA is one of the "Finnish genetic diseases," a group of several rare monogenic disorders that occur with increased frequency in the Finnish population. Using a combination of RNase A protection, genomic cloning, and polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA, we found one of two missense mutant OAT alleles to be present in each of 16 Finnish GA pedigrees. The first mutation R180T, in which arginine-180 is replaced by threonine, was present in homozygous form in patients from two pedigrees. The second mutation L402P, in which leucine-402 is replaced by proline, was present in homozygous form in patients from 14 pedigrees. Neither mutation was present in 19 Finnish controls. L402P was not present in 18 non-Finnish GA patients but R180T was found in an American GA patient. We constructed full-length mutant cDNAs by amplifying patient cDNA with the polymerase chain reaction and cloning a restriction fragment containing the mutation into an otherwise normal human OAT cDNA. These mutant cDNAs were then expressed in CHO-K1 cells, which lack endogenous OAT. Both R180T and L402P inactivate OAT. These results show molecular heterogeneity in GA alleles even in the Finnish population. PMID:2492100

  10. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C.; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Huang, Kuan-lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K.; Fulton, Robert S.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Eldred, James M.; Larson, David E.; Welch, John S.; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Dipersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  11. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Huang, Kuan-Lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K; Fulton, Robert S; McMichael, Joshua F; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C; Miller, Christopher A; Kanchi, Krishna L; Eldred, James M; Larson, David E; Welch, John S; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J; Ellis, Matthew J; Mardis, Elaine R; Graubert, Timothy A; Dipersio, John F; Ley, Timothy J; Wilson, Richard K; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  12. Novel rare variations of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene in autism spectrum disorder individuals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Kawashima, Minae; Miyagawa, Taku; Otowa, Takeshi; Latt, Khun Zaw; Thiri, Myo; Nishida, Hisami; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Mabuchi, Akihiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    The oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene has been implicated as a risk gene for autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—a neurodevelopmental disorder with essential features of impairments in social communication and reciprocal interaction. The genetic associations between common variations in OXTR and ASD have been reported in multiple ethnic populations. However, little is known about the distribution of rare variations within OXTR in ASD patients. In this study, we resequenced the full length of OXTR in 105 ASD individuals using an approach that combined the power of next-generation sequencing technology, long-range PCR and DNA pooling. We demonstrated that rare variants with minor allele frequency as low as 0.05% could be reliably detected by our method. We identified 28 novel variants including potential functional variants in the intron region and one rare missense variant (R150S). We subsequently performed Sanger sequencing and validated five novel variants located in previously suggested candidate regions in ASD individuals. Further sequencing of 312 healthy subjects showed that the burden of rare variants is significantly higher in ASDs compared with healthy individuals. Our results support that the rare variation in OXTR gene might be involved in ASD. PMID:27081536

  13. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N.; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Messiaen, Ludwine M.; Bedwell, David M.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H.; Korf, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  14. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  15. A missense mutation in melanocortin 1 receptor is associated with the red coat colour in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, M; Legrand, R; Tiret, L

    2014-12-01

    The seven donkey breeds recognised by the French studbook are characterised by few coat colours: black, bay and grey. Normand bay donkeys seldom give birth to red foals, a colour more commonly seen and recognised in American miniature donkeys. Red resembles the equine chestnut colour, previously attributed to a mutation in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R). We used a panel of 124 donkeys to identify a recessive missense c.629T>C variant in MC1R that showed a perfect association with the red coat colour. This variant leads to a methionine to threonine substitution at position 210 in the protein. We showed that methionine 210 is highly conserved among vertebrate melanocortin receptors. Previous in silico and in vitro analyses predicted this residue to lie within a functional site. Our in vivo results emphasised the pivotal role played by this residue, the alteration of which yielded a phenotype fully compatible with a loss of function of MC1R. We thus propose to name the c.629T>C allele in donkeys the e allele, which further enlarges the panel of recessive MC1R loss-of-function alleles described in animals and humans. PMID:25155046

  16. Common and Rare Variants in SCN10A Modulate the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Javad; Olesen, Morten S.; Yuan, Lei; Nielsen, Jonas B.; Liang, Bo; Macri, Vincenzo; Christophersen, Ingrid E.; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Grunnet, Morten; Haunsø, Stig; Holst, Anders G.; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that the common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6800541 located in SCN10A, encoding the voltage-gated Nav1.8 sodium channel, is associated with PR–interval prolongation and atrial fibrillation (AF). SNP rs6800541 is in high linkage disequilibrium with the non-synonymous variant in SCN10A, rs6795970 (V1073A, r2=0.933). We therefore sought to determine whether common and rare SCN10A variants are associated with early onset AF. Methods and Results SCN10A was sequenced in 225 AF patients in whom there was no evidence of other cardiovascular disease or dysfunction (lone AF). In an association study of the rs6795970 SNP variant, we included 515 AF patients, and two control cohorts of 730 individuals free of AF and 6,161 randomly sampled individuals. Functional characterization of SCN10A variants was performed by whole-cell patch-clamping. In the lone AF cohort, nine rare missense variants and one splice site donor variant were detected. Interestingly, AF patients were found to have higher G allele frequency of rs6795970 which encodes the alanine variant at position 1073 (described from here on as A1073, odds ratio = 1.35 [1.16–1.54]; p=2.3×10−05). Both of the common variants, A1073 andP1092, induced a gain-of-channel function, while the rare missense variants, V94G and R1588Q, resulted in a loss-of-channel function. Conclusions The common variant A1073 is associated with increased susceptibility to AF. Both rare and common variants have impact on the function of the channel, indicating that these variants influence susceptibility to AF. Hence, our study suggests that SCN10A variations are involved in the genesis of AF. PMID:25691686

  17. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  18. In Silico Analysis of FMR1 Gene Missense SNPs.

    PubMed

    Tekcan, Akin

    2016-06-01

    The FMR1 gene, a member of the fragile X-related gene family, is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are responsible for many complex diseases. The effect of FMR1 gene missense SNPs is unknown. The aim of this study, using in silico techniques, was to analyze all known missense mutations that can affect the functionality of the FMR1 gene, leading to mental retardation (MR) and FXS. Data on the human FMR1 gene were collected from the Ensembl database (release 81), National Centre for Biological Information dbSNP Short Genetic Variations database, 1000 Genomes Browser, and NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Exome Variant Server. In silico analysis was then performed. One hundred-twenty different missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene were determined. Of these, 11.66 % of the FMR1 gene missense SNPs were in highly conserved domains, and 83.33 % were in domains with high variety. The results of the in silico prediction analysis showed that 31.66 % of the FMR1 gene SNPs were disease related and that 50 % of SNPs had a pathogenic effect. The results of the structural and functional analysis revealed that although the R138Q mutation did not seem to have a damaging effect on the protein, the G266E and I304N SNPs appeared to disturb the interaction between the domains and affect the function of the protein. This is the first study to analyze all missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene. The results indicate the applicability of a bioinformatics approach to FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. I think that the analysis of FMR1 gene missense SNPs using bioinformatics methods would help diagnosis of FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. PMID:26880065

  19. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Harboring an Activating KRAS K117N Missense Mutation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vignesh; Margolskee, Elizabeth; Kluk, Michael; Giorgadze, Tamara; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) or sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is a rare histiocytic proliferation that is generally considered to be reactive with a benign clinical course. The etiology of RDD is very poorly understood. Recent studies have shown frequent BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, and PIK3CA activating mutations in several histiocytic neoplasms highlighting the emerging importance of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the submandibular salivary gland with a KRAS K117N missense mutation discovered by next-generation sequencing. These results suggest that at least a subset of RDD cases may be clonal processes. Further mutational studies on this rare histiocytic disease should be undertaken to better characterize its pathogenesis as well as open up potential avenues for therapy. PMID:26922062

  20. Population-Based Estimate of Prostate Cancer Risk for Carriers of the HOXB13 Missense Mutation G84E

    PubMed Central

    Baglietto, Laura; Dowty, James G.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Giles, Graham G.

    2013-01-01

    The HOXB13 missense mutation G84E (rs138213197) is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, but the current estimate of increased risk has a wide confidence interval (width of 95% confidence interval (CI) >200-fold) so the point estimate of 20-fold increased risk could be misleading. Population-based family studies can be more informative for estimating risks for rare variants, therefore, we screened for mutations in an Australian population-based series of early-onset prostate cancer cases (probands). We found that 19 of 1,384 (1.4%) probands carried the missense mutation, and of these, six (32%) had a family history of prostate cancer. We tested the 22 relatives of carriers diagnosed from 1998 to 2008 for whom we had a DNA sample, and found seven more carriers and one obligate carrier. The age-specific incidence for carriers was estimated to be, on average, 16.4 (95% CI 2.5–107.2) times that for the population over the time frame when the relatives were at risk prior to baseline. We then estimated the age and birth year- specific cumulative risk of prostate cancer (penetrance) for carriers. For example, the penetrance for an unaffected male carrier born in 1950 was 19% (95% CI 5–46%) at age 60 years, 44% (95% CI 18–74%) at age 70 years and 60% (95% CI 30–85%) at age 80 years. Our study has provided a population-based estimate of the average risk of prostate cancer for HOXB13 missense mutation G84E carriers that can be used to guide clinical practice and research. This study has also shown that the majority of hereditary prostate cancers due to the HOXB13 missense mutation are ‘sporadic’ in the sense that unselected cases with the missense mutation do not typically report having a family history of prostate cancer. PMID:23457453

  1. Homozygosity and Heterozygosity for Null Col5a2 Alleles Produce Embryonic Lethality and a Novel Classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Related Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Roenneburg, Drew A; Kernien, John F; Adams, Sheila M; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Birk, David E; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Null alleles for the COL5A1 gene and missense mutations for COL5A1 or the COL5A2 gene underlie cases of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, characterized by fragile, hyperextensible skin and hypermobile joints. However, no classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome case has yet been associated with COL5A2 null alleles, and phenotypes that might result from such alleles are unknown. We describe mice with null alleles for the Col5a2. Col5a2(-/-) homozygosity is embryonic lethal at approximately 12 days post conception. Unlike previously described mice null for Col5a1, which die at 10.5 days post conception and virtually lack collagen fibrils, Col5a2(-/-) embryos have readily detectable collagen fibrils, thicker than in wild-type controls. Differences in Col5a2(-/-) and Col5a1(-/-) fibril formation and embryonic survival suggest that α1(V)3 homotrimers, a rare collagen V isoform that occurs in the absence of sufficient levels of α2(V) chains, serve functional roles that partially compensate for loss of the most common collagen V isoform. Col5a2(+/-) adults have skin with marked hyperextensibility and reduced tensile strength at high strain but not at low strain. Col5a2(+/-) adults also have aortas with increased compliance and reduced tensile strength. Results thus suggest that COL5A2(+/-) humans, although unlikely to present with frank classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, are likely to have fragile connective tissues with increased susceptibility to trauma and certain chronic pathologic conditions. PMID:25987251

  2. Molecular mechanisms of disease-causing missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stefl, Shannon; Nishi, Hafumi; Petukh, Marharyta; Panchenko, Anna R.; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations resulting in a change of amino acid sequence can have a dramatic effect on stability, hydrogen bond network, conformational dynamics, activity and many other physiologically important properties of proteins. The substitutions of only one residue in a protein sequence, so-called missense mutations, can be related to many pathological conditions, and may influence susceptibility to disease and drug treatment. The plausible effects of missense mutations range from affecting the macromolecular stability to perturbing macromolecular interactions and cellular localization. Here we review the individual cases and genome-wide studies which illustrate the association between missense mutations and diseases. In addition we emphasize that the molecular mechanisms of effects of mutations should be revealed in order to understand the disease origin. Finally we report the current state-of-the-art methodologies which predict the effects of mutations on protein stability, the hydrogen bond network, pH-dependence, conformational dynamics and protein function. PMID:23871686

  3. KD4v: comprehensible knowledge discovery system for missense variant

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D.; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v. PMID:22641855

  4. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 missense mutations in different subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Touraine, Renaud; Baral, Viviane; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2011-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by pigmentation defects and sensorineural deafness, classified into four clinical subtypes, WS1-S4. Whereas the absence of additional features characterizes WS2, association with Hirschsprung disease defines WS4. WS is genetically heterogeneous, with six genes already identified, including SOX10. About 50 heterozygous SOX10 mutations have been described in patients presenting with WS2 or WS4, with or without myelination defects of the peripheral and central nervous system (PCWH, Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, or PCW, PCWH without HD). The majority are truncating mutations that most often remove the main functional domains of the protein. Only three missense mutations have been thus far reported. In the present study, novel SOX10 missense mutations were found in 11 patients and were examined for effects on SOX10 characteristics and functions. The mutations were associated with various phenotypes, ranging from WS2 to PCWH. All tested mutations were found to be deleterious. Some mutants presented with partial cytoplasmic redistribution, some lost their DNA-binding and/or transactivation capabilities on various tissue-specific target genes. Intriguingly, several mutants were redistributed in nuclear foci. Whether this phenomenon is a cause or a consequence of mutation-associated pathogenicity remains to be determined, but this observation could help to identify new SOX10 modes of action. PMID:21898658

  5. Novel missense mutation in the FH gene in familial renal cell cancer patients lacking cutaneous leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a rare tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cell cancer. Germline mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene is known to be associated with HLRCC. Case presentation We describe a 64-year-old father and his 39-year-old son with HLRCC who developed papillary type 2 RCCs lacking cutaneous leiomyomas at any site. A common missense mutation in the FH gene, (c.1021G > A, p.D341N) in exon 7, was detected in the 2 cases. Functional prediction with the bioinformatics programs, SIFT and Polyphen-2, reported “damaging (SIFT score 0.00)” and “probably damaging (PSIC score 1.621)” values, respectively. In 162 healthy individuals, there were no cases of a G transition to any base. Finally, (c.1021G > A) in exon 7, was identified as a point mutation. Conclusion We report a family with HLRCC in which a novel missense mutation was detected. A familial papillary type 2 renal cancer should be considered HLRCC unless typical cutaneous leiomyomas do not occur. PMID:24684806

  6. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26647311

  7. SORL1 rare variants: a major risk factor for familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Quenez, O; Bellenguez, C; Grenier-Boley, B; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Le Guennec, K; Bacq, D; Garnier, J-G; Olaso, R; Boland, A; Meyer, V; Deleuze, J-F; Amouyel, P; Munter, H M; Bourque, G; Lathrop, M; Frebourg, T; Redon, R; Letenneur, L; Dartigues, J-F; Génin, E; Lambert, J-C; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2016-06-01

    The SORL1 protein plays a protective role against the secretion of the amyloid β peptide, a key event in the pathogeny of Alzheimer's disease. We assessed the impact of SORL1 rare variants in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) in a case-control setting. We conducted a whole exome analysis among 484 French EOAD patients and 498 ethnically matched controls. After collapsing rare variants (minor allele frequency ≤1%), we detected an enrichment of disruptive and predicted damaging missense SORL1 variants in cases (odds radio (OR)=5.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(2.02-14.99), P=7.49.10(-5)). This enrichment was even stronger when restricting the analysis to the 205 cases with a positive family history (OR=8.86, 95% CI=(3.35-27.31), P=3.82.10(-7)). We conclude that predicted damaging rare SORL1 variants are a strong risk factor for EOAD and that the association signal is mainly driven by cases with positive family history. PMID:26303663

  8. In silico prediction of tumor antigens derived from functional missense mutations of the cancer gene census

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Jahan S.; Hanson, Russell W.; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-specific immune responses against peptides derived from missense gene mutations have been identified in multiple cancers. The application of personalized peptide vaccines based on the tumor mutation repertoire of each cancer patient is a near-term clinical reality. These peptides can be identified for pre-validation by leveraging the results of massive gene sequencing efforts in cancer. In this study, we utilized NetMHC 3.2 to predict nanomolar peptide binding affinity to 57 human HLA-A and B alleles. All peptides were derived from 5,685 missense mutations in 312 genes annotated as functionally relevant in the Cancer Genome Project. Of the 26,672,189 potential 8–11 mer peptide-HLA pairs evaluated, 0.4% (127,800) display binding affinities < 50 nM, predicting high affinity interactions. These peptides can be segregated into two groups based on the binding affinity to HLA proteins relative to germline-encoded sequences: peptides for which both the mutant and wild-type forms are high affinity binders, and peptides for which only the mutant form is a high affinity binder. Current evidence directs the attention to mutations that increase HLA binding affinity, as compared with cognate wild-type peptide sequences, as these potentially are more relevant for vaccine development from a clinical perspective. Our analysis generated a database including all predicted HLA binding peptides and the corresponding change in binding affinity as a result of point mutations. Our study constitutes a broad foundation for the development of personalized peptide vaccines that hone-in on functionally relevant targets in multiple cancers in individuals with diverse HLA haplotypes. PMID:23243591

  9. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  10. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Miosge, Lisa A; Field, Matthew A; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C; Andrews, T Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Each person's genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation's functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  11. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Miosge, Lisa A.; Field, Matthew A.; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M.; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Andrews, T. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Each person’s genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation’s functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  12. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a somatic missense mutation of NBN in clear cell sarcoma of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jia, Zhen; Mao, Fengbiao; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rong Fa; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare, low-grade carcinoma commonly located in the distal extremities of young adults involving tendons and aponeuroses. CCS is characterized by its poor prognosis due to late diagnosis, multiple local recurrence, propensity to late metastases, and a high rate of tumor-related mortality. The genetic cause for CCS is thought to be EWSR1 gene translocation. However, CCS lacking a translocation may have other, as yet uncharacterized, genetic mutations that can cause the same pathological effect. A combination of whole‑exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing of cancer tissue and venous blood from a patient diagnosed with CCS of the salivary gland revealed a somatic missense mutation, c.1061C>T (p.P354L), in exon 9 of the Nibrin gene (NBN). This somatic missense mutation led to the conversion of proline to leucine (p.P354L), resulting in deleterious effects for the NBN protein. Multiple-sequence alignments showed that codon 354, where the mutation (c.1061C>T) occurs, is located within a phylogenetically conserved region. In conclusion, we here report a somatic missense mutation c.1061C>T (p.P354L) in the NBN gene in a patient with CCS lacking an EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Our findings broaden the genotypic spectrum of CCS and provide new molecular insight that should prove useful in the future clinical genetic diagnosis of CCS. PMID:27109316

  13. A Novel Missense Mutation in CLCN1 Gene in a Family with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Myotonia.

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid

    2016-09-01

    Congenital recessive myotonia is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which codes for the main skeletal muscle chloride channel ClC-1. More than 120 mutations have been found in this gene. The main feature of this disorder is muscle membrane hyperexcitability. Here, we report a 59-year male patient suffering from congenital myotonia. He had transient generalized myotonia, which started in early childhood. We analyzed CLCN1 sequence in this patient and other members of his family. We found a new missense mutation in CLCN1 gene (c.1886T>C, p.Leu629Pro). Co-segregation of this mutation with the disease was demonstrated by direct sequencing of the fragment in affected as well as unaffected members of this family. In addition, in silico analyses predicted that this nucleotide change would impair the protein function. Thus, this new nucleotide variation can be used for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:27582597

  14. A Novel Missense Mutation in CLCN1 Gene in a Family with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Myotonia

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Congenital recessive myotonia is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which codes for the main skeletal muscle chloride channel ClC-1. More than 120 mutations have been found in this gene. The main feature of this disorder is muscle membrane hyperexcitability. Here, we report a 59-year male patient suffering from congenital myotonia. He had transient generalized myotonia, which started in early childhood. We analyzed CLCN1 sequence in this patient and other members of his family. We found a new missense mutation in CLCN1 gene (c.1886T>C, p.Leu629Pro). Co-segregation of this mutation with the disease was demonstrated by direct sequencing of the fragment in affected as well as unaffected members of this family. In addition, in silico analyses predicted that this nucleotide change would impair the protein function. Thus, this new nucleotide variation can be used for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:27582597

  15. Frequency and characterization of known and novel RHD variant alleles in 37 782 Dutch D-negative pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Tamara C; Veldhuisen, Barbera; Bijman, Renate; Thurik, Florentine F; Bossers, Bernadette; Cheroutre, Goedele; Jonkers, Remco; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2016-05-01

    To guide anti-D prophylaxis, Dutch D- pregnant women are offered a quantitative fetal-RHD-genotyping assay to determine the RHD status of their fetus. This allowed us to determine the frequency of different maternal RHD variants in 37 782 serologically D- pregnant women. A variant allele is present in at least 0·96% of Dutch D- pregnant women The D- serology could be confirmed after further serological testing in only 54% of these women, which emphasizes the potential relevance of genotyping of blood donors. 43 different RHD variant alleles were detected, including 15 novel alleles (11 null-, 2 partial D- and 2 DEL-alleles). Of those novel null alleles, one allele contained a single missense mutation (RHD*443C>G) and one allele had a single amino acid deletion (RHD*424_426del). The D- phenotype was confirmed by transduction of human D- erythroblasts, consolidating that, for the first time, a single amino acid change or deletion causes the D- phenotype. Transduction also confirmed the phenotypes for the two new variant DEL-alleles (RHD*721A>C and RHD*884T>C) and the novel partial RHD*492C>A allele. Notably, in three additional cases the DEL phenotype was observed but sequencing of the coding sequence, flanking introns and promoter region revealed an apparently wild-type RHD allele without mutations. PMID:27018217

  16. A missense mutation in the ZFHX1B gene associated with an atypical Mowat-Wilson syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heinritz, Wolfram; Zweier, Christiane; Froster, Ursula G; Strenge, Sibylle; Kujat, Annegret; Syrbe, Steffen; Rauch, Anita; Schuster, Volker

    2006-06-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare mental retardation-multiple congenital anomalies syndrome associated with typical facial dysmorphism. Patients can show a variety of other anomalies like short stature, microcephaly, Hirschsprung disease, malformations of the brain, seizures, congenital heart defects and urogenital anomalies. Mutations leading to haploinsufficiency of the ZFHX1B gene have been described as the underlying cause of this condition. We report on the clinical findings in a 2(1/2)-year-old boy with some aspects out of the MWS-spectrum in addition to unusual anomalies and a novel missense mutation in the ZFHX1B gene. PMID:16688751

  17. [Resistance to acenocoumarol revealing a missense mutation of the vitamin K epoxyde reductase VKORC1: a case report].

    PubMed

    Mboup, M C; Dia, K; Ba, D M; Fall, P D

    2015-02-01

    A significant proportion of the interindividual variability of the response to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment has been associated with genetic factors. Genetic variations affecting the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) are associated with hypersensitivity or rarely with resistance to VKA. We report the case of a black women patient who presents a resistance to acenocoumarol. Despite the use of high doses of acenocoumarol (114 mg/week) for the treatment of recurrent pulmonary embolism, the International Normalized Ratio was below the therapeutic target. This resistance to acenocoumarol was confirmed by the identification of a missense mutation Val66Met of the vitamin K epoxide reductase. PMID:24095214

  18. Exome sequencing reveals a novel missense mutation in the KIAA0196 gene in a Japanese patient with SPG8.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Yuta; Koh, Kishin; Fukumoto, Megumi; Yamashiro, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Fumikazu; Miwa, Michiaki; Nagasaka, Takamura; Shindo, Kazumasa; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Shoji; Takiyama, Dr Yoshihisa

    2016-05-01

    Exome sequencing revealed a novel missense mutation (c.2152G>A, p.E713K) in the KIAA0196 gene in a Japanese patient with SPG8. To date, only 10 mutations in the KIAA0196 gene have been reported in the world. We describe the clinical and genetic findings in our patient with SPG8, which is a rare dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. Notably, our patient showed mild upper limb ataxia, which is a relatively atypical symptom of SPG8. Thus, our patient showed a wide clinical spectrum of SPG8. PMID:26967522

  19. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  20. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  1. Analysis of novel sph (spherocytosis) alleles in mice reveals allele-specific loss of band 3 and adducin in α-spectrin–deficient red cells

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Raymond F.; Lambert, Amy J.; Birkenmeier, Connie S.; Cirlan, Marius V.; Cirlan, Andreea Flavia M.; Campagna, Dean R.; Lux, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Five spontaneous, allelic mutations in the α-spectrin gene, Spna1, have been identified in mice (spherocytosis [sph], sph1J, sph2J, sph2BC, sphDem). All cause severe hemolytic anemia. Here, analysis of 3 new alleles reveals previously unknown consequences of red blood cell (RBC) spectrin deficiency. In sph3J, a missense mutation (H2012Y) in repeat 19 introduces a cryptic splice site resulting in premature termination of translation. In sphIhj, a premature stop codon occurs (Q1853Stop) in repeat 18. Both mutations result in markedly reduced RBC membrane spectrin content, decreased band 3, and absent β-adducin. Reevaluation of available, previously described sph alleles reveals band 3 and adducin deficiency as well. In sph4J, a missense mutation occurs in the C-terminal EF hand domain (C2384Y). Notably, an equally severe hemolytic anemia occurs despite minimally decreased membrane spectrin with normal band 3 levels and present, although reduced, β-adducin. The severity of anemia in sph4J indicates that the highly conserved cysteine residue at the C-terminus of α-spectrin participates in interactions critical to membrane stability. The data reinforce the notion that a membrane bridge in addition to the classic protein 4.1-p55-glycophorin C linkage exists at the RBC junctional complex that involves interactions between spectrin, adducin, and band 3. PMID:20056793

  2. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  3. Allele-specific tumor spectrum in pten knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Karikomi, Matt; Naidu, Shan; Rajmohan, Ravi; Caserta, Enrico; Chen, Hui-Zi; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Moffitt, Julie; Stephens, Julie A; Fernandez, Soledad A; Weinstein, Michael; Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang; La Perle, Krista; Stromberg, Paul; Rosol, Thomas J; Eng, Charis; Ostrowski, Michael C; Leone, Gustavo

    2010-03-16

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10) cause Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba (BRR) syndromes, two dominantly inherited disorders characterized by mental retardation, multiple hamartomas, and variable cancer risk. Here, we modeled three sentinel mutant alleles of PTEN identified in patients with Cowden syndrome and show that the nonsense Pten(4-5) and missense Pten(C124R) and Pten(G129E) alleles lacking lipid phosphatase activity cause similar developmental abnormalities but distinct tumor spectra with varying severity and age of onset. Allele-specific differences may be accounted for by loss of function for Pten(4-5), hypomorphic function for Pten(C124R), and gain of function for Pten(G129E). These data demonstrate that the variable tumor phenotypes observed in patients with Cowden and BRR syndromes can be attributed to specific mutations in PTEN that alter protein function through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20194734

  4. A novel missense mutation in POMT1 modulates the severe congenital muscular dystrophy phenotype associated with POMT1 nonsense mutations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Stephanie E; Conta, Jessie H; Winder, Thomas L; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P; Moore, Steven A; Gospe, Sidney M

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  5. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  6. The Opdc missense mutation of Pax2 has a milder than loss-of-function phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Sally H.; McKie, Lisa; West, Katrine; Coghill, Emma L.; Favor, Jack; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Brown, Steve D.M.; Jackson, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Renal-coloboma syndrome, also known as papillorenal syndrome, is an autosomal dominant human disorder in which optic disc coloboma is associated with kidney abnormalities. Mutations in the paired domain transcription factor PAX2 have been found to be the underlying cause of this disease. Disease severity varies between patients, and in some cases, renal hypoplasia has been found in the absence of any retinal defects. Here we report an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutation, Opdc, which is an isoleucinetothreonine missense mutation, I40T, in the first α-helix of the Pax2 paired domain. The mutant protein binds target DNA sequences less strongly than the wild-type protein and acts poorly to transactivate target promoters in culture. The phenotypic consequence of this mutation on the development of the eye and ear is similar to that reported for null alleles of Pax2. However, in homozygotes, cerebellar development is normal on a genetic background in which loss of Pax2 results in failure of cerebellar formation. Moreover, there is a genetic background effect on the heterozygous phenotype such that on some strain backgrounds, kidney development is unaffected. Opdc is the first hypomorphic mutation reported for Pax2 that differs in phenotype from loss-of-function mutations. These results suggest that PAX2 is a strong candidate gene for cases in which human patients have optic disc coloboma not associated with renal dysplasia. PMID:20943750

  7. Missense mutations in the perforin (PRF1) gene as a cause of hereditary cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Gilmour, Kimberly C; House, Imran G; Layton, Mark; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Sohal, Mamta; Trapani, Joseph A; Voskoboinik, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Perforin, a pore-forming toxin released from secretory granules of NK cells and CTLs, is essential for their cytotoxic activity against infected or cancerous target cells. Bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in the perforin gene are invariably associated with a fatal immunoregulatory disorder, familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2), in infants. More recently, it has also been recognized that partial loss of perforin function can cause disease in later life, including delayed onset FHL2 and haematological malignancies. Herein, we report a family in which a wide range of systemic inflammatory and neoplastic manifestations have occurred across three generations. We found that disease was linked to two missense perforin gene mutations (encoding A91V, R410W) that cause protein misfolding and partial loss of activity. These cases link the partial loss of perforin function with some solid tumors that are known to be controlled by the immune system, as well as haematological cancers. Our findings also demonstrate that perforin gene mutations can contribute to hereditary cancer predisposition. PMID:27622035

  8. Dyslexia and DYX1C1: deficits in reading and spelling associated with a missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Bates, T C; Lind, P A; Luciano, M; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G; Wright, M J

    2010-12-01

    The status of DYX1C1 (C15q21.3) as a susceptibility gene for dyslexia is unclear. We report the association of this gene with reading and spelling ability in a sample of adolescent twins and their siblings. Family-based association analyses were carried out on 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DYX1C1, typed in 790 families with up to 5 offspring and tested on 6 validated measures of lexical processing (irregular word) and grapheme-phoneme decoding (pseudo-word) reading- and spelling-based measures of dyslexia, as well as a short-term memory measure. Significant association was observed at the misssense mutation rs17819126 for all reading measures and for spelling of lexical processing words, and at rs3743204 for both irregular and nonword reading. Verbal short-term memory was associated with rs685935. Support for association was not found at rs3743205 and rs61761345 as previously reported by Taipale et al., but these SNPs had very low (0.002 for rs3743205) minor allele frequencies in this sample. These results suggest that DYX1C1 influences reading and spelling ability with additional effects on short-term information storage or rehearsal. Missense mutation rs17819126 is a potential functional basis for the association of DYX1C1 with dyslexia. PMID:19901951

  9. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E.

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  10. Sequencing rare and common APOL1 coding variants to determine kidney disease risk.

    PubMed

    Limou, Sophie; Nelson, George W; Lecordier, Laurence; An, Ping; O'hUigin, Colm S; David, Victor A; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth A; Guiblet, Wilfried M; Oleksyk, Taras K; Pays, Etienne; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    A third of African Americans with sporadic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) do not carry APOL1 renal risk genotypes. This raises the possibility that other APOL1 variants may contribute to kidney disease. To address this question, we sequenced all APOL1 exons in 1437 Americans of African and European descent, including 464 patients with biopsy-proven FSGS/HIVAN. Testing for association with 33 common and rare variants with FSGS/HIVAN revealed no association independent of strong recessive G1 and G2 effects. Seeking additional variants that might have been under selection by pathogens and could represent candidates for kidney disease risk, we also sequenced an additional 1112 individuals representing 53 global populations. Except for G1 and G2, none of the 7 common codon-altering variants showed evidence of selection or could restore lysis against trypanosomes causing human African trypanosomiasis. Thus, only APOL1 G1 and G2 confer renal risk, and other common and rare APOL1 missense variants, including the archaic G3 haplotype, do not contribute to sporadic FSGS and HIVAN in the US population. Hence, in most potential clinical or screening applications, our study suggests that sequencing APOL1 exons is unlikely to bring additional information compared to genotyping only APOL1 G1 and G2 risk alleles. PMID:25993319

  11. Replication of Genome Wide Association Identified Candidate Genes Confirm the Role of Common and Rare Variants in PAX7 and VAX1 in the Etiology of Non-syndromic CL(P)

    PubMed Central

    Butali, Azeez; Suzuki, Satoshi; Cooper, Margaret E.; Mansilla, Adela M.; Cuenco, Karen; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Suzuki, Yasushi; Niimi, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Ayanga, Gongorjav; Erkhembaatar, Tudevdorj; Furukawa, Hiroo; Fujiwawa, Kumiko; Imura, Hideto; Petrin, Aline L.; Natsume, Nagato; Beaty, Terri H.; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffery C.

    2012-01-01

    Following recent genome wide association studies (GWAS), significant genetic associations have been identified for several genes with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P). To replicate two of these GWAS signals, we investigated the role of common and rare variants in the PAX7 and VAX1 genes. TaqMan genotyping was carried out for SNPs in VAX1 and PAX7 and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) was performed to test for linkage and association in each population. Direct sequencing in and around the PAX7 and VAX1 genes in 1,326 individuals of European and Asian ancestry was done. TDT analysis showed strong associations with markers in VAX1 (rs7078160, p=2.7E-06 and rs475202, p=0.0002) in a combined sample of Mongolian and Japanese CL (P) case-parent triads. Analyses using parent-of-origin effects showed significant excess transmission of the minor allele from both parents with the effect in the mothers (p=6.5E-05, OR (transmission) =1.91) more striking than in the fathers (p=0.004, OR (transmission) =1.67) for VAX1 marker rs7078160 in the combined Mongolian and Japanese samples when all cleft types were combined. The rs6659735 trinucleotide marker in PAX7 was significantly associated with all the US cleft groups combined (p=0.007 in all clefts and p=0.02 in CL(P)). Eight rare missense mutations found in PAX7 and two rare missense mutations in VAX1. Our study replicated previous GWAS findings for markers in VAX1 in the Asian population, and identified rare variants in PAX7 and VAX1 that may contribute to the etiology of CL(P). Determining the role of rare variants clearly warrants further investigation. PMID:23463464

  12. CRIPT exonic deletion and a novel missense mutation in a female with short stature, dysmorphic features, microcephaly, and pigmentary abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Niu, Zhiyv; Bi, Weimin; Zhu, Wenmiao; Miloslavskaya, Irene; Chiang, Theodore; Streff, Haley; Seavitt, John R; Murray, Stephen A; Eng, Christine; Chan, Audrey; Yang, Yaping; Lalani, Seema R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in CRIPT encoding cysteine-rich PDZ domain-binding protein are rare, and to date have been reported in only two patients with autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism and distinctive facies. Here, we describe a female with biallelic mutations in CRIPT presenting with postnatal growth retardation, global developmental delay, and dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, high forehead, and sparse hair and eyebrows. Additional clinical features included high myopia, admixed hyper- and hypopigmented macules primarily on the face, arms, and legs, and syndactyly of 4-5 toes bilaterally. Using whole exome sequencing (WES) and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), we detected a c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in exon 1 of the CRIPT gene inherited from the mother and a 1,331 bp deletion encompassing exon 1, inherited from the father. The c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in CRIPT was apparently homozygous in the proband due to the exon 1 deletion. Our findings illustrate the clinical utility of combining WES with copy number variant (CNV) analysis to provide a molecular diagnosis to patients with rare Mendelian disorders. Our findings also illustrate the clinical spectrum of CRIPT related mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250922

  13. A Heritable Missense Polymorphism in CDKN2A Confers Strong Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Is Preferentially Selected during Clonal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Hansen, Helen M; Smirnov, Ivan V; Gonseth, Semira; Endicott, Alyson A; Xiao, Jianqiao; Rice, Terri; Fu, Cecilia H; McCoy, Lucie S; Lachance, Daniel H; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R; Ma, Xiaomei; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified SNPs in six genes that are associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A lead SNP was found to occur on chromosome 9p21.3, a region that is deleted in 30% of childhood ALLs, suggesting the presence of causal polymorphisms linked to ALL risk. We used SNP genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping of a multiethnic ALL case-control population (Ncases = 1,464, Ncontrols = 3,279) to identify variants of large effect within 9p21.3. We identified a CDKN2A missense variant (rs3731249) with 2% allele frequency in controls that confers three-fold increased risk of ALL in children of European ancestry (OR, 2.99; P = 1.51 × 10(-9)) and Hispanic children (OR, 2.77; P = 3.78 × 10(-4)). Moreover, of 17 patients whose tumors displayed allelic imbalance at CDKN2A, 14 preferentially retained the risk allele and lost the protective allele (PBinomial = 0.006), suggesting that the risk allele provides a selective advantage during tumor growth. Notably, the CDKN2A variant was not significantly associated with melanoma, glioblastoma, or pancreatic cancer risk, implying that this polymorphism specifically confers ALL risk but not general cancer risk. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that coding polymorphisms of large effect can underlie GWAS "hits" and that inherited polymorphisms may undergo directional selection during clonal expansion of tumors. PMID:26527286

  14. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF <2%) with SCr effects between 0.085 and 0.129 standard deviations. These rare variants have a larger effect on SCr than previously reported common variants, explaining 0.5% of the variability of SCr in Icelanders in addition to the 1% already accounted for. We tested the five variants associating with SCr for association with CKD in an Icelandic sample of 15 594 cases and 291 428 controls. Three of the variants also associated with CKD. These variants may either affect kidney function or creatinine synthesis and excretion. Of note were four mutations in SLC6A19 that associate with reduced SCr, three of which have been shown to cause Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  15. Reconstructing the prior probabilities of allelic phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G Brian

    2002-01-01

    In general when a phylogeny is reconstructed from DNA or protein sequence data, it makes use only of the probabilities of obtaining some phylogeny given a collection of data. It is also possible to determine the prior probabilities of different phylogenies. This information can be of use in analyzing the biological causes for the observed divergence of sampled taxa. Unusually "rare" topologies for a given data set may be indicative of different biological forces acting. A recursive algorithm is presented that calculates the prior probabilities of a phylogeny for different allelic samples and for different phylogenies. This method is a straightforward extension of Ewens' sample distribution. The probability of obtaining each possible sample according to Ewens' distribution is further subdivided into each of the possible phylogenetic topologies. These probabilities depend not only on the identity of the alleles and on 4N(mu) (four times the effective population size times the neutral mutation rate) but also on the phylogenetic relationships among the alleles. Illustrations of the algorithm are given to demonstrate how different phylogenies are favored under different conditions. PMID:12072482

  16. [Recurrent European missense mutation in a Hungarian pedigree with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vályi, Péter; Farkas, Katalin; Tripolszki, Kornélia; Sulák, Adrienn; Széll, Márta; Nagy, Nikoletta; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, a rare disease with autosomal recessive inheritance, is characterized by aggressive periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. Mutations of the cathepsin C gene are responsible for the development of the disease. In this study, we aimed to describe in details the clinical symptoms and to determine the underlying genetic abnormality in two Hungarian siblings affected by Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. The siblings are under regular dental and dermatological care since their symptoms appeared, but, due to the fact that genetic analysis of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome has been available for one or two years in Hungary, their mutation screenings were just recently performed. We have identified a homozygous missense mutation on the cathepsin C gene, which is an already published mutation and was originally reported from Germany. Our investigations would like to draw attention to a rare disease, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, in which first symptom can be the aggressive periodontitis, and in which genetic testing and for helping child-bearing and family planning is now available. PMID:25509509

  17. Comprehensive assessment of cancer missense mutation clustering in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kamburov, Atanas; Lawrence, Michael S; Polak, Paz; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lage, Kasper; Golub, Todd R; Lander, Eric S; Getz, Gad

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale tumor sequencing projects enabled the identification of many new cancer gene candidates through computational approaches. Here, we describe a general method to detect cancer genes based on significant 3D clustering of mutations relative to the structure of the encoded protein products. The approach can also be used to search for proteins with an enrichment of mutations at binding interfaces with a protein, nucleic acid, or small molecule partner. We applied this approach to systematically analyze the PanCancer compendium of somatic mutations from 4,742 tumors relative to all known 3D structures of human proteins in the Protein Data Bank. We detected significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in several previously known oncoproteins including HRAS, EGFR, and PIK3CA. Although clustering of missense mutations is often regarded as a hallmark of oncoproteins, we observed that a number of tumor suppressors, including FBXW7, VHL, and STK11, also showed such clustering. Beside these known cases, we also identified significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in NUF2, which encodes a component of the kinetochore, that could affect chromosome segregation and lead to aneuploidy. Analysis of interaction interfaces revealed enrichment of mutations in the interfaces between FBXW7-CCNE1, HRAS-RASA1, CUL4B-CAND1, OGT-HCFC1, PPP2R1A-PPP2R5C/PPP2R2A, DICER1-Mg2+, MAX-DNA, SRSF2-RNA, and others. Together, our results indicate that systematic consideration of 3D structure can assist in the identification of cancer genes and in the understanding of the functional role of their mutations. PMID:26392535

  18. Comprehensive assessment of cancer missense mutation clustering in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Kamburov, Atanas; Lawrence, Michael S.; Polak, Paz; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lage, Kasper; Golub, Todd R.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale tumor sequencing projects enabled the identification of many new cancer gene candidates through computational approaches. Here, we describe a general method to detect cancer genes based on significant 3D clustering of mutations relative to the structure of the encoded protein products. The approach can also be used to search for proteins with an enrichment of mutations at binding interfaces with a protein, nucleic acid, or small molecule partner. We applied this approach to systematically analyze the PanCancer compendium of somatic mutations from 4,742 tumors relative to all known 3D structures of human proteins in the Protein Data Bank. We detected significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in several previously known oncoproteins including HRAS, EGFR, and PIK3CA. Although clustering of missense mutations is often regarded as a hallmark of oncoproteins, we observed that a number of tumor suppressors, including FBXW7, VHL, and STK11, also showed such clustering. Beside these known cases, we also identified significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in NUF2, which encodes a component of the kinetochore, that could affect chromosome segregation and lead to aneuploidy. Analysis of interaction interfaces revealed enrichment of mutations in the interfaces between FBXW7-CCNE1, HRAS-RASA1, CUL4B-CAND1, OGT-HCFC1, PPP2R1A-PPP2R5C/PPP2R2A, DICER1-Mg2+, MAX-DNA, SRSF2-RNA, and others. Together, our results indicate that systematic consideration of 3D structure can assist in the identification of cancer genes and in the understanding of the functional role of their mutations. PMID:26392535

  19. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  20. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Talsness, Dana M.; Belanto, Joseph J.; Ervasti, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  1. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Dana M; Belanto, Joseph J; Ervasti, James M

    2015-10-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  2. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  3. Physical interaction between SLX4 (FANCP) and XPF (FANCQ) proteins and biological consequences of interaction-defective missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Keiji; Wada, Kunio; Matsumoto, Kyomu; Moriya, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    SLX4 (FANCP) and XPF (FANCQ) proteins interact with each other and play a vital role in the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway. We have identified a SLX4 region and several amino acid residues that are responsible for this interaction. The study has revealed that the global minor allele, SLX4(Y546C), is defective in this interaction and cannot complement Fancp knockout mouse cells in mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity or chromosomal aberrations. These results highly suggest this allele, as well as SLX4(L530Q), to be pathogenic. The interacting partner XPF is involved in various DNA repair pathways, and certain XPF mutations cause progeria, Cockayne syndrome (CS), and/or FA phenotypes. Because several atypical xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) phenotype-causing XPF missense mutations are located in the SLX4-interacting region, we suspected the disruption of the interaction with SLX4 in these XPF mutants, thereby causing severer phenotypes. The immunoprecipitation assay of cell extracts revealed that those XPF mutations, except XPF(C236R), located in the SLX4-interacting region cause instability of XPF protein, which could be the reason for the FA, progeria and/or CS phenotypes. PMID:26453996

  4. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  5. Extending the mutation spectrum for Galloway-Mowat syndrome to include homozygous missense mutations in the WDR73 gene.

    PubMed

    Rosti, Rasim O; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J; Jones, Marilyn C; Vaux, Keith K; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway-Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway-Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway-Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway-Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  6. Extending the Mutation Spectrum for Galloway–Mowat Syndrome to Include Homozygous Missense Mutations in the WDR73 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rosti, Rasim O.; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C.; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J.; Jones, Marilyn C.; Vaux, Keith K.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Galloway–Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway–Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway–Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway–Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway–Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  7. De novo missense mutations in the NAA10 gene cause severe non-syndromic developmental delay in males and females

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Bernt; Støve, Svein I; Endele, Sabine; Myklebust, Line M; Hoyer, Juliane; Sticht, Heinrich; Azzarello-Burri, Silvia; Rauch, Anita; Arnesen, Thomas; Reis, André

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed the power of whole-exome sequencing to identify mutations in sporadic cases with non-syndromic intellectual disability. We now identified de novo missense variants in NAA10 in two unrelated individuals, a boy and a girl, with severe global developmental delay but without any major dysmorphism by trio whole-exome sequencing. Both de novo variants were predicted to be deleterious, and we excluded other variants in this gene. This X-linked gene encodes N-alpha-acetyltransferase 10, the catalytic subunit of the NatA complex involved in multiple cellular processes. A single hypomorphic missense variant p.(Ser37Pro) was previously associated with Ogden syndrome in eight affected males from two different families. This rare disorder is characterized by a highly recognizable phenotype, global developmental delay and results in death during infancy. In an attempt to explain the discrepant phenotype, we used in vitro N-terminal acetylation assays which suggested that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the remaining catalytic activity. The variant in the Ogden syndrome patients exhibited a lower activity than the one seen in the boy with intellectual disability, while the variant in the girl was the most severe exhibiting only residual activity in the acetylation assays used. We propose that N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency is clinically heterogeneous with the overall catalytic activity determining the phenotypic severity. PMID:25099252

  8. Missense Mutations Allow a Sequence-Blind Mutant of SpoIIIE to Successfully Translocate Chromosomes during Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Baundauna; Reed, Sydney E.; Besprozvannaya, Marina; Burton, Briana M.

    2016-01-01

    SpoIIIE directionally pumps DNA across membranes during Bacillus subtilis sporulation and vegetative growth. The sequence-reading domain (γ domain) is required for directional DNA transport, and its deletion severely impairs sporulation. We selected suppressors of the spoIIIEΔγ sporulation defect. Unexpectedly, many suppressors were intragenic missense mutants, and some restore sporulation to near-wild-type levels. The mutant proteins are likely not more abundant, faster at translocating DNA, or sequence-sensitive, and rescue does not involve the SpoIIIE homolog SftA. Some mutants behave differently when co-expressed with spoIIIEΔγ, consistent with the idea that some, but not all, variants may form mixed oligomers. In full-length spoIIIE, these mutations do not affect sporulation, and yet the corresponding residues are rarely found in other SpoIIIE/FtsK family members. The suppressors do not rescue chromosome translocation defects during vegetative growth, indicating that the role of the γ domain cannot be fully replaced by these mutations. We present two models consistent with our findings: that the suppressors commit to transport in one arbitrarily-determined direction or delay spore development. It is surprising that missense mutations somehow rescue loss of an entire domain with a complex function, and this raises new questions about the mechanism by which SpoIIIE pumps DNA and the roles SpoIIIE plays in vivo. PMID:26849443

  9. Missense Mutations Allow a Sequence-Blind Mutant of SpoIIIE to Successfully Translocate Chromosomes during Sporulation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Baundauna; Reed, Sydney E; Besprozvannaya, Marina; Burton, Briana M

    2016-01-01

    SpoIIIE directionally pumps DNA across membranes during Bacillus subtilis sporulation and vegetative growth. The sequence-reading domain (γ domain) is required for directional DNA transport, and its deletion severely impairs sporulation. We selected suppressors of the spoIIIEΔγ sporulation defect. Unexpectedly, many suppressors were intragenic missense mutants, and some restore sporulation to near-wild-type levels. The mutant proteins are likely not more abundant, faster at translocating DNA, or sequence-sensitive, and rescue does not involve the SpoIIIE homolog SftA. Some mutants behave differently when co-expressed with spoIIIEΔγ, consistent with the idea that some, but not all, variants may form mixed oligomers. In full-length spoIIIE, these mutations do not affect sporulation, and yet the corresponding residues are rarely found in other SpoIIIE/FtsK family members. The suppressors do not rescue chromosome translocation defects during vegetative growth, indicating that the role of the γ domain cannot be fully replaced by these mutations. We present two models consistent with our findings: that the suppressors commit to transport in one arbitrarily-determined direction or delay spore development. It is surprising that missense mutations somehow rescue loss of an entire domain with a complex function, and this raises new questions about the mechanism by which SpoIIIE pumps DNA and the roles SpoIIIE plays in vivo. PMID:26849443

  10. Recurrent CNVs and SNVs at the NPHP1 Locus Contribute Pathogenic Alleles to Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrand, Anna; Davis, Erica E.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Pehlivan, Davut; Willer, Jason R.; Tsai, I-Chun; Ramanathan, Subhadra; Zuppan, Craig; Sabo, Aniko; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Liu, Pengfei; Lewis, Richard A.; Banin, Eyal; Lupski, James R.; Clark, Robin; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Homozygosity for a recurrent 290 kb deletion of NPHP1 is the most frequent cause of isolated nephronophthisis (NPHP) in humans. A deletion of the same genomic interval has also been detected in individuals with Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and in the mouse, Nphp1 interacts genetically with Ahi1, a known JBTS locus. Given these observations, we investigated the contribution of NPHP1 in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a ciliopathy of intermediate severity. By using a combination of array-comparative genomic hybridization, TaqMan copy number assays, and sequencing, we studied 200 families affected by BBS. We report a homozygous NPHP1 deletion CNV in a family with classical BBS that is transmitted with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Further, we identified heterozygous NPHP1 deletions in two more unrelated persons with BBS who bear primary mutations at another BBS locus. In parallel, we identified five families harboring an SNV in NPHP1 resulting in a conserved missense change, c.14G>T (p.Arg5Leu), that is enriched in our Hispanic pedigrees; in each case, affected individuals carried additional bona fide pathogenic alleles in another BBS gene. In vivo functional modeling in zebrafish embryos demonstrated that c.14G>T is a loss-of-function variant, and suppression of nphp1 in concert with each of the primary BBS loci found in our NPHP1-positive pedigrees exacerbated the severity of the phenotype. These results suggest that NPHP1 mutations are probably rare primary causes of BBS that contribute to the mutational burden of the disorder. PMID:24746959

  11. Increased Missense Mutation Burden of Fatty Acid Metabolism Related Genes in Nunavik Inuit Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sirui; Xiong, Lan; Xie, Pingxing; Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Turcotte Gauthier, Maude; Henrion, Edouard; Diallo, Ousmane; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nunavik Inuit (northern Quebec, Canada) reside along the arctic coastline where for generations their daily energy intake has mainly been derived from animal fat. Given this particular diet it has been hypothesized that natural selection would lead to population specific allele frequency differences and unique variants in genes related to fatty acid metabolism. A group of genes, namely CPT1A, CPT1B, CPT1C, CPT2, CRAT and CROT, encode for three carnitine acyltransferases that are important for the oxidation of fatty acids, a critical step in their metabolism. Methods Exome sequencing and SNP array genotyping were used to examine the genetic variations in the six genes encoding for the carnitine acyltransferases in 113 Nunavik Inuit individuals. Results Altogether ten missense variants were found in genes CPT1A, CPT1B, CPT1C, CPT2 and CRAT, including three novel variants and one Inuit specific variant CPT1A p.P479L (rs80356779). The latter has the highest frequency (0.955) compared to other Inuit populations. We found that by comparison to Asians or Europeans, the Nunavik Inuit have an increased mutation burden in CPT1A, CPT2 and CRAT; there is also a high level of population differentiation based on carnitine acyltransferase gene variations between Nunavik Inuit and Asians. Conclusion The increased number and frequency of deleterious variants in these fatty acid metabolism genes in Nunavik Inuit may be the result of genetic adaptation to their diet and/or the extremely cold climate. In addition, the identification of these variants may help to understand some of the specific health risks of Nunavik Inuit. PMID:26010953

  12. Variable phenotypes are associated with PMP22 missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Russo, M; Laurá, M; Polke, J M; Davis, M B; Blake, J; Brandner, S; Hughes, R A C; Houlden, H; Bennett, D L H; Lunn, M P T; Reilly, M M

    2011-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the commonest hereditary neuropathy encompassing a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. The commonest form of CMT, CMT1A, is usually caused by a 1.4 megabase duplication of chromosome 17 containing the PMP22 gene. Mutations of PMP22 are a less common cause of CMT. We describe clinical, electrophysiological and molecular findings of 10 patients carrying PMP22 missense mutations. The phenotype varied from mild hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) to severe CMT1. We identified six different point mutations, including two novel mutations. Three families were also found to harbour a Thr118Met mutation. Although PMP22 point mutations are not common, our findings highlight the importance of sequencing the PMP22 gene in patients with variable CMT phenotypes and also confirm that the PMP22 Thr118Met mutation is associated with a neuropathy albeit with reduced penetrance. PMID:21194947

  13. Vibratory Urticaria Associated with a Missense Variant in ADGRE2.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Steven E; Desai, Avanti; Cruse, Glenn; Young, Michael L; Bolan, Hyejeong C; Scott, Linda M; Eisch, A Robin; Long, R Daniel; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Satorius, Colleen L; Pakstis, Andrew J; Olivera, Ana; Mullikin, James C; Chouery, Eliane; Mégarbané, André; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Kidd, Kenneth K; Kastner, Daniel L; Metcalfe, Dean D; Komarow, Hirsh D

    2016-02-18

    Patients with autosomal dominant vibratory urticaria have localized hives and systemic manifestations in response to dermal vibration, with coincident degranulation of mast cells and increased histamine levels in serum. We identified a previously unknown missense substitution in ADGRE2 (also known as EMR2), which was predicted to result in the replacement of cysteine with tyrosine at amino acid position 492 (p.C492Y), as the only nonsynonymous variant cosegregating with vibratory urticaria in two large kindreds. The ADGRE2 receptor undergoes autocatalytic cleavage, producing an extracellular subunit that noncovalently binds a transmembrane subunit. We showed that the variant probably destabilizes an autoinhibitory subunit interaction, sensitizing mast cells to IgE-independent vibration-induced degranulation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.). PMID:26841242

  14. Missense Mutations in CRYAB Are Liable for Recessive Congenital Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Irum, Bushra; Khan, Arif O.; Wang, Qiwei; Kabir, Firoz; Khan, Asma A.; Husnain, Tayyab; Akram, Javed; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was initiated to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous familial cases. Methods Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination, and slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals who have not yet been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. Blood samples were obtained, and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. A genome-wide scan was completed with short tandem repeat (STR) markers, and the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were calculated. Protein coding exons of CRYAB were sequenced, bi-directionally. Evolutionary conservation was investigated by aligning CRYAB orthologues, and the expression of Cryab in embryonic and postnatal mice lens was investigated with TaqMan probe. Results The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis suggested a potential region on chromosome 11q23 harboring CRYAB. DNA sequencing identified a missense variation: c.34C>T (p.R12C) in CRYAB that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequent interrogation of our entire cohort of familial cases identified a second familial case localized to chromosome 11q23 harboring a c.31C>T (p.R11C) mutation. In silico analyses suggested that the mutations identified in familial cases, p.R11C and p.R12C will not be tolerated by the three-dimensional structure of CRYAB. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of Cryab in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15) that increased significantly until postnatal day 6 (P6) with steady level of expression thereafter. Conclusion Here, we report two novel missense mutations, p.R11C and p.R12C, in CRYAB associated with autosomal recessive congenital nuclear cataracts. PMID:26402864

  15. An allelic series of Trp63 mutations defines TAp63 as a modifier of EEC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vernersson Lindahl, Emma; Garcia, Elvin L; Mills, Alea A

    2013-08-01

    Human Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, Clefting (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder defined by limb deformities, skin defects, and craniofacial clefting. Although associated with heterozygous missense mutations in TP63, the genetic basis underlying the variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance of EEC is unknown. Here, we show that mice heterozygous for an allele encoding the Trp63 p.Arg318His mutation, which corresponds to the human TP63 p.Arg279His mutation found in patients with EEC, have features of human EEC. Using an allelic series, we discovered that whereas clefting and skin defects are caused by loss of Trp63 function, limb anomalies are due to gain- and/or dominant-negative effects of Trp63. Furthermore, we identify TAp63 as a strong modifier of EEC-associated phenotypes with regard to both penetrance and expressivity. PMID:23775923

  16. Detection of a Novel Missense Mutations in Atrichia with Papular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Hyun; Chun, Ji-Sung; Joo, Myeong-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Hwang, Seon-Wook; Kang, Hyo-Joon; Park, Sung-Wook; Sung, Ho-Suk

    2011-01-01

    Background Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) is a rare inherited disease characterized by early onset of total hair loss, followed by papular lesions over the extensor areas of the body. Recently, mutations in the human hairless (HR) gene have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The identification of mutations in the HR gene is important for differentiating between APL and alopecia universalis (AU). Objective We compared the HR genes of patients with presumed AU who showed minimal or no response to treatment with the HR genes of healthy controls. Methods The subjects were 11 patients with presumed AU who had not responded to treatments. Fifty healthy people were included as controls for molecular analysis. To screen for mutations, polymerase chain reaction was performed. Results DNA analysis identified a novel heterozygous G-to-A transition at nucleotide position 191 in exon 5. The mutation was not found in the controls, other AU patients, or any unaffected family members except for the patients' mother and maternal grandfather, who were heterozygous HR gene carriers. Conclusion Our study identifies a novel missense mutation in exon 5 of the HR gene in a Korean APL patient previously diagnosed as AU. PMID:21747609

  17. First missense mutation in the SOST gene causing sclerosteosis by loss of sclerostin function.

    PubMed

    Piters, Elke; Culha, Cavit; Moester, Martiene; Van Bezooijen, Rutger; Adriaensen, Dirk; Mueller, Thomas; Weidauer, Stella; Jennes, Karen; de Freitas, Fenna; Löwik, Clemens; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Van Hul, Wim; Papapoulos, Socrates

    2010-07-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare bone dysplasia characterized by greatly increased bone mass, especially of the long bones and the skull. Patients are tall, show facial asymmetry and often have syndactyly. Clinical complications are due to entrapment of cranial nerves. The disease is thought to be due to loss-of-function mutations in the SOST gene. The SOST gene product, sclerostin, is secreted by osteocytes and transported to the bone surface where it inhibits osteoblastic bone formation by antagonizing Wnt signaling. In a small Turkish family with sclerosteosis, we identified a missense mutation (c.499T>C; p.Cys167Arg) in exon 2 of the SOST gene. This type of mutation has not been previously reported and using different functional approaches, we show that it has a devastating effect on the biological function of sclerostin. The affected cysteine is the last cysteine residue of the cystine-knot motif and loss of this residue leads to retention of the mutant protein in the ER, possibly as a consequence of impaired folding. Together with a significant reduced ability to bind to LRP5 and inhibit Wnt signaling, the p.Cys167Arg mutation leads to a complete loss of function of sclerostin and thus to the characteristic sclerosteosis phenotype. PMID:20583295

  18. Homozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinemia: A Turkish case carrying a missense mutation in apolipoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Berna Seker; Mungan, Neslihan Onenli; Di Leo, Enza; Magnolo, Lucia; Artuso, Lucia; Bernardis, Isabella; Tumgor, Gokhan; Kor, Deniz; Tarugi, Patrizia

    2016-01-15

    The autosomal co-dominant disorder familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) may be due to mutations in the APOB gene encoding apolipoprotein B (apoB), the main constituent peptide of chylomicrons, very low and low density lipoproteins. We describe an 11month-old child with failure to thrive, intestinal lipid malabsorption, hepatic steatosis and severe hypobetalipoproteinemia, suggesting the diagnosis of homozygous FHBL, abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD). The analysis of candidate genes showed that patient was homozygous for a variant (c.1594 C>T) in the APOB gene causing arginine to tryptophan conversion at position 505 of mature apoB (Arg505Trp). No mutations were found in a panel of other potential candidate genes for hypobetalipoproteinemia. In vitro studies showed a reduced secretion of mutant apoB-48 with respect to the wild-type apoB-48 in transfected McA-RH7777 cells. The Arg505Trp substitution is located in the βα1 domain of apoB involved in the lipidation of apoB mediated by microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), the first step in VLDL and chylomicron formation. The patient's condition improved in response to a low fat diet supplemented with fat-soluble vitamins. Homozygosity for a rare missense mutation in the βα1 domain of apoB may be the cause of both severe hypobetalipoproteinemia and intestinal lipid malabsorption. PMID:26612772

  19. A Novel Autosomal Recessive GJA1 Missense Mutation Linked to Craniometaphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Chen, I-Ping; de Almeida, Salome; Tiziani, Valdenize; Do Amaral, Cassio M. Raposo; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Reichenberger, Ernst J.

    2013-01-01

    Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD) is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR) form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln) in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1) coding for connexin 43 (Cx43). We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850) and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100), the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated. PMID:23951358

  20. Variants of the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor gene found in patients with schizophrenia: Identification of a nonsense mutation and multiple missense changes

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Lind, T.J.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    To determine whether mutations in the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor (D{sub 5}DR) gene are associated with schizophrenia, the gene was examined in 78 unrelated schizophrenic individuals. After amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, products were examined by dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF), a highly sensitive screening method related to single strand conformational polymorphism analysis. All samples with unusual ddF patterns were sequenced to precisely identify the sequence change. In the 156 D{sub 5}DR alleles examined, nine sequence changes were identified. Four of the nine did not affect protein structure; of these, three were silent changes and one was a transition in the 3{prime} untranslated region. The remaining five sequence changes result in protein alterations: of these, one is a missense change in a non-conserved amino acid, 3 are missense changes in amino acids that are conserved in some dopamine D{sub 5} receptors and the last is a nonsense mutation. To investigate whether the nonsense mutation was associated with schizophrenia, 400 additional schizophrenic cases of western European descent and 1914 ethnically-similar controls were screened for the change. One additional schizophrenic carrier was identified and verified by direct genomic sequencing (allele frequency: .0013), but eight carriers also were found and confirmed among the non-schizophrenics (allele frequency: .0021)(p>.25). The gene was re-examined in all newly identified carriers of the nonsense mutation by direct sequencing and/or ddF in search of additional mutations. None were identified. Family studies also were conducted to investigate possible cosegregation of the mutation with other neuropsychiatric diseases, but this was not demonstrated. Thus, the mutation does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia nor does an initial analysis suggest cosegregation with other neuropsychiatric disorders or symptom complexes.

  1. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  2. Genotype-to-phenotype analysis: Search for clinical characteristics of a missense change in the GABA{sub A}-{beta}1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Sigurdson, D.C.; Sommer, S.S.

    1996-02-16

    Genotype-to-phenotype analysis reverses the classical approach to genetic disease in which an unknown genotype is sought for a known phenotype. This paper provides an example of genotype-to-phenotype analysis for the possible psychiatric effects of a missense mutation (H396Q) at a highly conserved residue of the {Beta}1 subunit gene of the gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor. DNA samples from 1,507 Caucasians of Western European descent were screened, and 10 heterozygotes for H396Q were identified. These individuals were matched to homozygous normal individuals by age, gender, and length of available medical records. The complete medical records of these 20 individuals were reviewed blindly by two psychiatrists (D.C.S., L.L.H.) to assess psychiatric symptomatology, with an emphasis on anxiety and related disorders. However, no association was found between this missense change at a conserved amino acid and a dominant neuropsychiatric disease phenotype. Thus, this missense change may be neutral or only mildly deleterious, may only cause recessive disease in rare individuals, or may interact epistatically with some other gene(s). 17 refs.

  3. Accumulation of rare variants in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene in task-specific dystonia.

    PubMed

    Nibbeling, Esther; Schaake, Susen; Tijssen, Marina A; Weissbach, Anne; Groen, Justus L; Altenmüller, Eckart; Verbeek, Dineke S; Lohmann, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Musician's dystonia and writer's cramp are examples of task-specific dystonia. Recently, the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) locus was suggested to be associated with musician's dystonia and writer's cramp by a genome-wide association study. To test for the presence of causal variants, the entire coding region and exon-intron boundaries of ARSG were sequenced in DNA samples from 158 musician's dystonia patients which were collected at the University of Music, Drama, and Media (Hanover, Germany), and 72 patients with writer's cramp which were recruited at the Academic Medical Centers in Amsterdam and Groningen, the Netherlands. The frequency of variants within ARSG was compared to publically available data at the exome variant server (EVS) from the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project. We identified 11 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the patients including eight non-synonymous substitutions. All variants have previously been reported at EVS including two SNVs with a reported minor allele frequency <1%. One rare missense variant, rs61999318 (p.I493T), was significantly enriched in the group of writer's cramp patients compared to European Americans in EVS database (p = 0.0013). In patients with writer's cramp, there was an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants compared to controls (p < 0.01). In conclusion, we did not detect any conclusive mutation in ARSG. However, we showed an association with rs61999318 in patients with writer's cramp that contributed to an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants in these patients. Thus, our data provide further support for a role of ARSG variants in task-specific dystonia, especially writer's cramp. PMID:25825126

  4. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  5. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF≥1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  6. Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability segregating with a missense variant in RLIM.

    PubMed

    Tønne, Elin; Holdhus, Rita; Stansberg, Christine; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Petersen, Kjell; Brunner, Han G; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; Prescott, Trine; Steen, Vidar M; Fiskerstrand, Torunn

    2015-12-01

    We describe a three-generation Norwegian family with a novel X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) syndrome characterized by subtle facial dysmorphism, autism and severe feeding problems. By exome sequencing we detected a rare missense variant (c.1067A>G, p.(Tyr356Cys)) in the RLIM gene, in two affected male second cousins. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the variant in the four affected males (none of whom were siblings) and in three mothers available for testing. The variant was not present in 100 normal Norwegian controls, has not been reported in variant databases and is deleterious according to in silico prediction tools. The clinical phenotype and the variant co-segregate, yielding a LOD score of 3.0 for linkage to the shared region (36.09 Mb), which contains 242 genes. No other shared rare variants on the X chromosome were detected in the two affected exome-sequenced individuals, and all female carriers had an extremely skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern. RLIM encodes RING zinc finger protein 12 (RNF12), an ubiquitin ligase that is essential for X inactivation in mice and that acts as a co-regulator of a range of transcription factors, particularly those containing a LIM homeodomain. Tyrosine in position 356 in RNF12 is located within a highly conserved domain essential for binding such transcription factors. Expression of RNF12 is widespread during embryogenesis, and is particularly high in the outer layers of the cerebral cortex. Functional studies are needed to prove a definite causal relationship between the variant and the phenotype. Subsequent reports may confirm a role for RLIM variants in patients with XLID. PMID:25735484

  7. Identification of a De Novo Heterozygous Missense FLNB Mutation in Lethal Atelosteogenesis Type I by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ga Won; Lee, Mi-Na; Jung, Ji Mi; Hong, Seong Yeon; Kim, Young Nam; Sin, Jong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Background Atelosteogenesis type I (AO-I) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplastic disorder characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism and dislocated hips, knees, and elbows. AO-I is caused by mutations in the filamin B (FLNB) gene; however, several other genes can cause AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias. Methods In order to screen all possible genes associated with AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias simultaneously, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a female newborn having clinical features of AO-I. Results Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.517G>A; p.Ala173Thr) in exon 2 of the FLNB gene in the patient. Sanger sequencing validated this variant, and genetic analysis of the patient's parents suggested a de novo occurrence of the variant. Conclusions This study shows that exome sequencing can be a useful tool for the identification of causative mutations in lethal skeletal dysplasia patients. PMID:24624349

  8. Missense Mutations in Fumarate Hydratase in Multiple Cutaneous and Uterine Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alam, N. Afrina; Olpin, Simon; Rowan, Andrew; Kelsell, David; Leigh, Irene M.; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Weaver, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) predispose to the multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis syndrome (MCUL), which, when co-existing with renal cancer, is also known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer. Twenty-seven distinct missense mutations represent 68% of FH mutations reported in MCUL. Here we show that FH missense mutations significantly occurred in fully conserved residues and in residues functioning in the FH A-site, B-site, or subunit-interacting region. Of 24 distinct missense mutations, 13 (54%) occurred in the substrate-binding A-site, 4 (17%) in the substrate-binding B-site, and 7 (29%) in the subunit-interacting region. Clustering of missense mutations suggested the presence of possible mutational hotspots. FH functional assay of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 23 individuals with heterozygous FH missense mutations showed that A-site mutants had significantly less residual activity than B-site mutants, supporting data from Escherichia coli that the A-site is the main catalytic site. Missense FH mutations predisposing to renal cancer had no unusual features, and identical mutations were found in families without renal cancer, suggesting a role for genetic or environmental factors in renal cancer development in MCUL. That all missense FH mutations associating with MCUL/hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer showed diminished FH enzymatic activity suggests that the tumor suppressor role of fumarate hydratase may relate to its enzymatic function. PMID:16237213

  9. Trafficking defects and loss of ligand binding are the underlying causes of all reported DDR2 missense mutations found in SMED-SL patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bassam R; Xu, Huifang; Akawi, Nadia A; John, Anne; Karuvantevida, Noushad S; Langer, Ruth; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Leitinger, Birgit

    2010-06-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED) with short limbs and abnormal calcifications (SMED-SL) is a rare, autosomal recessive human growth disorder, characterized by disproportionate short stature, short limbs, short broad fingers, abnormal metaphyses and epiphyses, platyspondyly and premature calcifications. Recently, three missense mutations and one splice-site mutation in the DDR2 gene were identified as causative genetic defects for SMED-SL, but the underlying cellular and biochemical mechanisms were not explored. Here we report a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.337G>A (p.E113K), that causes SMED-SL in two siblings in the United Arab Emirates. Another DDR2 missense mutation, c.2254C>T (p.R752C), matching one of the previously reported SMED-SL mutations, was found in a second affected family. DDR2 is a plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinase that functions as a collagen receptor. We expressed DDR2 constructs with the identified point mutations in human cell lines and evaluated their localization and functional properties. We found that all SMED-SL missense mutants were defective in collagen-induced receptor activation and that the three previously reported mutants (p.T713I, p.I726R and p.R752C) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The novel mutant (p.E113K), in contrast, trafficked normally, like wild-type DDR2, but failed to bind collagen. This finding is in agreement with our recent structural data identifying Glu113 as an important amino acid in the DDR2 ligand-binding site. Our data thus demonstrate that SMED-SL can result from at least two different loss-of-function mechanisms: namely defects in DDR2 targeting to the plasma membrane or the loss of its ligand-binding activity. PMID:20223752

  10. Rare Complement Factor H Variant Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Amish

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joshua D.; CookeBailey, Jessica N.; D'Aoust, Laura; Cade, William; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Fuzzell, Denise; Laux, Renee; Adams, Larry D.; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Caywood, Laura; Whitehead-Gay, Patrice; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among the adult population in the developed world. To further the understanding of this disease, we have studied the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana. Methods. Cumulative genetic risk scores were calculated using the 19 known allelic associations. Exome sequencing was performed in three members of a small Amish family with AMD who lacked the common risk alleles in complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1. Follow-up genotyping and association analysis was performed in a cohort of 973 Amish individuals, including 95 with self-reported AMD. Results. The cumulative genetic risk score analysis generated a mean genetic risk score of 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 1.13) in the Amish controls and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.22) in the Amish cases. This mean difference in genetic risk scores is statistically significant (P = 0.0042). Exome sequencing identified a rare variant (P503A) in CFH. Association analysis in the remainder of the Amish sample revealed that the P503A variant is significantly associated with AMD (P = 9.27 × 10−13). Variant P503A was absent when evaluated in a cohort of 791 elderly non-Amish controls, and 1456 non-Amish cases. Conclusions. Data from the cumulative genetic risk score analysis suggests that the variants reported by the AMDGene consortium account for a smaller genetic burden of disease in the Amish compared with the non-Amish Caucasian population. Using exome sequencing data, we identified a novel missense mutation that is shared among a densely affected nuclear Amish family and located in a gene that has been previously implicated in AMD risk. PMID:24906858

  11. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid. PMID:26497932

  12. Molecular basis of recessive congenital methemoglobinemia, types I and II: Exon skipping and three novel missense mutations in the NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (diaphorase 1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kugler, W; Pekrun, A; Laspe, P; Erdlenbruch, B; Lakomek, M

    2001-04-01

    Hereditary methemoglobinemia due to reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase (b5r) deficiency is classified into an erythrocyte type (I) and a generalized type (II). We investigated the b5r gene of three unrelated patients with types I and II and found four novel mutations. The patient with type I was homozygous for a c.535 G-->A exchange in exon 6 (A179T). The patients with type II were found to be homozygous for a c.757 G-->A transition in exon 9 (V253M) and compound heterozygous for two mutations, respectively. One allele presented a c.379 A-->G transition (M127V). The second allele carried a sequence difference at the invariant 3' splice-acceptor dinucleotide of intron 4 (IVS4-2A-->G) resulting in skipping of exon 5. To characterize a possible effect of this mutation on RNA metabolism, poly(A)(+) RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. The results show that RNA is made from the allele harboring the 3'-splice site mutation. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a complete absence of immunologically detectable b5r in skin fibroblasts of this patient. The compound heterozygosity for the splice site and the missense mutations apparently caused hereditary methemoglobinemia type II in this patient. Hum Mutat 17:348, 2001. PMID:11295830

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Leading to the Diagnosis of Dysferlinopathy with a Novel Missense Mutation (c.959G>C)

    PubMed Central

    Swaika, Abhisek; Boczek, Nicole J.; Sood, Neha; Guthrie, Kimberly; Klee, Eric W.; Agrawal, Ankit; Dimberg, Elliot L.; Ailawadhi, Sikander

    2016-01-01

    Dysferlinopathy is an uncommon, progressive muscular dystrophy that has a wide phenotypic variability and primarily supportive management (Nguyen et al., 2007; Narayanaswami et al., 2014). Amyloid myopathy is a distinct, rare disorder that can present similarly to inflammatory myopathies and requires a high clinical suspicion for early intervention to prolong survival. Amyloid myopathy is typically associated with other systemic manifestations of amyloidosis, but rare cases of isolated amyloid myopathy have been described (Mandl et al., 2000; Hull et al., 2001). Positive Congo red stains on tissue biopsy remain the gold standard for diagnosis (Spuler et al., 1998; Karacostas et al., 2005). A high clinical suspicion and meticulous diagnostic workup that includes novel techniques are necessary for identifying these rare disorders. We report a middle-aged man with progressive leg muscle weakness who was initially treated as having amyloid myopathy but was later diagnosed as having dysferlinopathy by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) analysis. We also report a novel missense mutation (c.959G>C) to help correlate in any patient with presumed dysferlinopathy and to add to the already known genotype of this disorder. PMID:27195159

  14. Understanding missense mutations in the BRCA1 gene: An evolutionary approach

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Melissa A.; Potter, John D.; Ramirez, Christina J.; Ostrander, Gary K.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of missense changes in BRCA1 in breast cancer susceptibility has been difficult to establish. We used comparative evolutionary methods to identify potential functionally important amino acid sites in exon 11 and missense changes likely to disrupt gene function, aligning sequences from 57 eutherian mammals and categorizing amino acid sites by degree of conservation. We used Bayesian phylogenetic analyses to determine relationships among orthologs and identify codons evolving under positive selection. Most conserved residues occur in a region with the highest concentration of protein-interacting domains. Rapidly evolving residues are concentrated in the RAD51-interacting domain, suggesting that selection is acting most strongly on the role of BRCA1 in DNA repair. Investigation of the functional role of missense changes in breast-cancer susceptibility should focus on 38 missense changes in conserved and 3 in rapidly evolving regions of exon 11. PMID:12531920

  15. A novel missense mutation in CACNA1A evaluated by in silico protein modeling is associated with non-episodic spinocerebellar ataxia with slow progression.

    PubMed

    Bürk, Katrin; Kaiser, Frank J; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Schöls, Ludger; Kreuz, Friedmar R; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Büttner, Thomas; Hollstein, Ronja; Braunholz, Diana; Plaschke, Jens; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Zühlke, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) are allelic disorders of the gene CACNA1A encoding the P/Q subunit of a voltage gated calcium channel. While SCA6 is related to repeat expansions affecting the C-terminal part of the protein, EA2 and FHM phenotypes are usually associated with nonsense and missense mutations leading to impaired channel properties. In three unrelated families with dominant cerebellar ataxia, symptoms cosegregated with CACNA1A missense mutations of evolutionary highly conserved amino acids (exchanges p.E668K, p.R583Q and p.D302N). To evaluate pathogenic effects, in silico, protein modeling analyses were performed which indicate structural alterations of the novel mutation p.E668K within the homologous domain 2 affecting CACNA1A protein function. The phenotype is characterised by a very slowly progressive ataxia, while ataxic episodes or migraine are uncommon. These findings enlarge the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations. PMID:24486772

  16. Missense Mutation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Alters Neurocognitive Performance in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Ramli, Norlisah; Waran, Vicknes; Chinna, Karuthan; Bondi, Mark William; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2016-01-01

    The predictability of neurocognitive outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury is not straightforward. The extent and nature of recovery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are usually heterogeneous and not substantially explained by the commonly known demographic and injury-related prognostic factors despite having sustained similar injuries or injury severity. Hence, this study evaluated the effects and association of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) missense mutations in relation to neurocognitive performance among patients with mTBI. 48 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited and MRI scans of the brain were performed within an average 10.1 (SD 4.2) hours post trauma with assessment of their neuropsychological performance post full Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) recovery. Neurocognitive assessments were repeated again at 6 months follow-up. The paired t-test, Cohen’s d effect size and repeated measure ANOVA were performed to delineate statistically significant differences between the groups [wildtype G allele (Val homozygotes) vs. minor A allele (Met carriers)] and their neuropsychological performance across the time point (T1 = baseline/ admission vs. T2 = 6th month follow-up). Minor A allele carriers in this study generally performed more poorly on neuropsychological testing in comparison wildtype G allele group at both time points. Significant mean differences were observed among the wildtype group in the domains of memory (M = -11.44, SD = 10.0, p = .01, d = 1.22), executive function (M = -11.56, SD = 11.7, p = .02, d = 1.05) and overall performance (M = -6.89 SD = 5.3, p = .00, d = 1.39), while the minor A allele carriers showed significant mean differences in the domains of attention (M = -11.0, SD = 13.1, p = .00, d = .86) and overall cognitive performance (M = -5.25, SD = 8.1, p = .01, d = .66).The minor A allele carriers in comparison to the wildtype G allele group, showed considerably lower scores at admission and

  17. Drastic effect of germline TP53 missense mutations in Li-Fraumeni patients.

    PubMed

    Zerdoumi, Yasmine; Aury-Landas, Juliette; Bonaïti-Pellié, Catherine; Derambure, Céline; Sesboüé, Richard; Renaux-Petel, Mariette; Frebourg, Thierry; Bougeard, Gaëlle; Flaman, Jean-Michel

    2013-03-01

    In contrast to other tumor suppressor genes, the majority of TP53 alterations are missense mutations. We have previously reported that in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), germline TP53 missense mutations are associated with an earlier age of tumor onset. In a larger series, we observed that mean age of tumor onset in patients harboring dominant negative missense mutations and clearly null mutations was 22.6 and 37.5 years, respectively. To assess the impact of heterozygous germline TP53 mutations in the genetic context of the patients, we developed a new functional assay of the p53 pathway on the basis of induction of DNA damage in Epstein-Barr-virus-immortalized lymphocytes, followed by comparative gene-expression profiling. In wild-type lymphocytes, we identified a core of 173 genes whose expression was induced more than twofold, of which 46 were known p53 target genes. In LFS lymphocytes with canonical missense mutations, the number of induced genes and the level of known p53 target genes induction were strongly reduced as compared with controls and LFS lymphocytes with null mutations. These results show that certain germline missense TP53 mutations, such as those with dominant negative effect, dramatically alter the response to DNA damage. This probably explains why TP53 alterations are predominantly missense mutations. PMID:23172776

  18. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  19. Functional Evaluation of Nine Missense-Type Variants of the Human DNA Glycosylase Enzyme MUTYH in the Japanese Population.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Goto, Masanori; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tao, Hong; Nakamura, Satoki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH, the gene encoding DNA glycosylase, cause MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma(s). However, a considerable number of MUTYH variants are still functionally uncharacterized. Herein, we report the results of functional evaluation of nine missense-type MUTYH variant proteins in the Japanese population. The DNA glycosylase activity and ability to suppress mutations caused by 8-hydroxyguanine, an oxidized form of guanine, were examined for the nine variants of type 2 MUTYH, a nuclear form of the enzyme, by DNA cleavage activity assay and supF forward mutation assay, respectively. Both activities were severely defective in the p.N210S MUTYH type 2 variant corresponding to p.N238S in the reference MUTYH form and partially defective in p.R219G variant corresponding to p.R247G, but nearly fully retained in seven other variants examined. Our results suggest that p.N238S and p.R247G are likely to be pathogenic alleles for MAP. PMID:26694661

  20. Long-Term Balancing Selection in LAD1 Maintains a Missense Trans-Species Polymorphism in Humans, Chimpanzees, and Bonobos.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, João C; de Filippo, Cesare; Weihmann, Antje; Meneu, Juan R; Racimo, Fernando; Dannemann, Michael; Nickel, Birgit; Fischer, Anne; Halbwax, Michel; Andre, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Meyer, Matthias; Parra, Genís; Pääbo, Svante; Andrés, Aida M

    2015-05-01

    Balancing selection maintains advantageous genetic and phenotypic diversity in populations. When selection acts for long evolutionary periods selected polymorphisms may survive species splits and segregate in present-day populations of different species. Here, we investigate the role of long-term balancing selection in the evolution of protein-coding sequences in the Homo-Pan clade. We sequenced the exome of 20 humans, 20 chimpanzees, and 20 bonobos and detected eight coding trans-species polymorphisms (trSNPs) that are shared among the three species and have segregated for approximately 14 My of independent evolution. Although the majority of these trSNPs were found in three genes of the major histocompatibility locus cluster, we also uncovered one coding trSNP (rs12088790) in the gene LAD1. All these trSNPs show clustering of sequences by allele rather than by species and also exhibit other signatures of long-term balancing selection, such as segregating at intermediate frequency and lying in a locus with high genetic diversity. Here, we focus on the trSNP in LAD1, a gene that encodes for Ladinin-1, a collagenous anchoring filament protein of basement membrane that is responsible for maintaining cohesion at the dermal-epidermal junction; the gene is also an autoantigen responsible for linear IgA disease. This trSNP results in a missense change (Leucine257Proline) and, besides altering the protein sequence, is associated with changes in gene expression of LAD1. PMID:25605789

  1. A Missense LRRK2 Variant Is a Risk Factor for Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Vinicius M.; Manry, Jérémy; Cobat, Aurélie; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Schurr, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Depending on the epidemiological setting, a variable proportion of leprosy patients will suffer from excessive pro-inflammatory responses, termed type-1 reactions (T1R). The LRRK2 gene encodes a multi-functional protein that has been shown to modulate pro-inflammatory responses. Variants near the LRRK2 gene have been associated with leprosy in some but not in other studies. We hypothesized that LRRK2 was a T1R susceptibility gene and that inconsistent association results might reflect different proportions of patients with T1R in the different sample settings. Hence, we evaluated the association of LRRK2 variants with T1R susceptibility. Methodology An association scan of the LRRK2 locus was performed using 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Evidence of association was evaluated in two family-based samples: A set of T1R-affected and a second set of T1R-free families. Only SNPs significant for T1R-affected families with significant evidence of heterogeneity relative to T1R-free families were considered T1R-specific. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis was applied to evaluate the impact of T1R-specific SNPs on LRRK2 gene transcriptional levels. Principal Findings A total of 18 T1R-specific variants organized in four bins were detected. The core SNP capturing the T1R association was the LRRK2 missense variant M2397T (rs3761863) that affects LRRK2 protein turnover. Additionally, a bin of nine SNPs associated with T1R were eQTLs for LRRK2 in unstimulated whole blood cells but not after exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigen. Significance The results support a preferential association of LRRK2 variants with T1R. LRRK2 involvement in T1R is likely due to a pathological pro-inflammatory loop modulated by LRRK2 availability. Interestingly, the M2397T variant was reported in association with Crohn’s disease with the same risk allele as in T1R suggesting common inflammatory mechanism in these two distinct diseases. PMID:26844546

  2. Identification and functional characterization of rare SHANK2 variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peykov, S; Berkel, S; Schoen, M; Weiss, K; Degenhardt, F; Strohmaier, J; Weiss, B; Proepper, C; Schratt, G; Nöthen, M M; Boeckers, T M; Rietschel, M; Rappold, G A

    2015-12-01

    Recent genetic data on schizophrenia (SCZ) have suggested that proteins of the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses have a role in its etiology. Mutations in the three SHANK genes encoding for postsynaptic scaffolding proteins have been shown to represent risk factors for autism spectrum disorders and other neurodevelopmental disorders. To address if SHANK2 variants are associated with SCZ, we sequenced SHANK2 in 481 patients and 659 unaffected individuals. We identified a significant increase in the number of rare (minor allele frequency<1%) SHANK2 missense variants in SCZ individuals (6.9%) compared with controls (3.9%, P=0.039). Four out of fifteen non-synonymous variants identified in the SCZ cohort (S610Y, R958S, P1119T and A1731S) were selected for functional analysis. Overexpression and knockdown-rescue experiments were carried out in cultured primary hippocampal neurons with a major focus on the analysis of morphological changes. Furthermore, the effect on actin polymerization in fibroblast cell lines was investigated. All four variants revealed functional impairment to various degrees, as a consequence of alterations in spine volume and clustering at synapses and an overall loss of presynaptic contacts. The A1731S variant was identified in four unrelated SCZ patients (0.83%) but not in any of the sequenced controls and public databases (P=4.6 × 10(-5)). Patients with the A1731S variant share an early prodromal phase with an insidious onset of psychiatric symptoms. A1731S overexpression strongly decreased the SHANK2-Bassoon-positive synapse number and diminished the F/G-actin ratio. Our results strongly suggest a causative role of rare SHANK2 variants in SCZ and underline the contribution of SHANK2 gene mutations in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25560758

  3. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  4. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  5. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: expression analysis of missense mutations affecting the catalytic site of acid beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Doris; Paul, Karl; Fantur, Katrin; Beck, Michael; Bürger, Friederike; Caillaud, Catherine; Fumic, Ksenija; Ledvinova, Jana; Lugowska, Agnieszka; Michelakakis, Helen; Radeva, Briguita; Ramaswami, Uma; Plecko, Barbara; Paschke, Eduard

    2009-08-01

    Alterations in GLB1, the gene coding for acid beta-D-galactosidase (beta-Gal), can result in GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1), a neurodegenerative disorder, or in Morquio B disease (MBD), a phenotype with dysostosis multiplex and normal central nervous system (CNS) function. While most MBD patients carry a common allele, c.817TG>CT (p.W273L), only few of the >100 mutations known in GM1 can be related to a certain phenotype. In 25 multiethnic patients with GM1 or MBD, 11 missense mutations were found as well as one novel insertion and a transversion causing aberrant gene products. Except c.602G>A (p.R201H) and two novel alleles, c.592G>T (p.D198Y) and c.1189C>G (p.P397A), all mutants resulted in significantly reduced beta-Gal activities (<10% of normal) upon expression in COS-1 cells. Although c.997T>C (p.Y333H) expressed 3% of normal activity, the mutant protein was localized in the lysosomal-endosomal compartment. A homozygous case presented with late infantile GM1, while a heterozygous, juvenile case carried p.Y333H together with p.R201H. This allele, recently found in homozygous MBD, gives rise to rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-located beta-Gal precursors. Thus, unlike classical MBD, the phenotype of heterozygotes carrying p.R201H may rather be determined by poorly active, properly transported products of the counter allele than by the mislocalized p.R201H precursors. PMID:19472408

  6. A novel missense mutation in the NDP gene in a child with Norrie disease and severe neurological involvement including infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Lev, Dorit; Weigl, Yuval; Hasan, Mariana; Gak, Eva; Davidovich, Michael; Vinkler, Chana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Watemberg, Nathan

    2007-05-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness and in some cases, mental retardation and deafness. Other neurological complications, particularly epilepsy, are rare. We report on a novel mutation identified in a patient with ND and profound mental retardation. The patient was diagnosed at the age of 6 months due to congenital blindness. At the age of 8 months he developed infantile spasms, which were diagnosed at 11 months as his EEG demonstrated hypsarrhythmia. Mutation analysis of the ND gene (NDP) of the affected child and his mother revealed a novel missense mutation at position c.134T > A resulting in amino acid change at codon V45E. To the best of our knowledge, such severe neurological involvement has not been previously reported in ND patients. The severity of the phenotype may suggest the functional importance of this site of the NDP gene. PMID:17334993

  7. Cross Talk Inhibition Nullified by a Receiver Domain Missense Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Lin, Hsia-Yin; Noriega, Chris E.; Lin, Alice V.

    2015-01-01

    inhibited in part by the high interaction specificity between cognate sensor-response regulator pairs. This study shows that a relatively subtle missense change from Val to Ala nullifies cross talk inhibition, enabling at least two noncognate sensors to enforce an inappropriate output independently of the relevant input. PMID:26260457

  8. Analysis of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor polymorphism in west Africa: description of a new allele, ITI*7.

    PubMed

    Caeiro, J L; Liste, I; Vogt, U; Ribeiro, J C

    1994-01-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) phenotypes were classified in the West African population of Cabo Verde by polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing, followed by immunofixation and silver staining. Gene frequencies of the alleles ITI*1, ITI*2, ITI*3, and ITI*4 were calculated to be 0.532, 0.153, 0.307 and 0.002, respectively. A new rare allele, ITI*7, was found, providing evidence for further genetic variability of the ITI protein. The ITI*7 allele frequency has been determined to 0.006. The assumption that allele ITI*3 may be used to characterize populations of African origin is supported by our data. PMID:7532128

  9. Sequencing of SCN5A identifies rare and common variants associated with cardiac conduction

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to further characterize the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods and Results In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Targeted Sequencing Study (CHARGE), we performed targeted exonic sequencing of SCN5A (n=3699, European-ancestry individuals) and identified 4 common (minor allele frequency >1%) and 157 rare variants. Common and rare SCN5A coding variants were examined for association with PR and QRS intervals through meta-analysis of European ancestry participants from CHARGE, NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP, n=607) and the UK10K (n=1275) and by examining ESP African-ancestry participants (N=972). Rare coding SCN5A variants in aggregate were associated with PR interval in European and African-ancestry participants (P=1.3×10−3). Three common variants were associated with PR and/or QRS interval duration among European-ancestry participants and one among African-ancestry participants. These included two well-known missense variants; rs1805124 (H558R) was associated with PR and QRS shortening in European-ancestry participants (P=6.25×10−4 and P=5.2×10−3 respectively) and rs7626962 (S1102Y) was associated with PR shortening in those of African ancestry (P=2.82×10−3). Among European-ancestry participants, two novel synonymous variants, rs1805126 and rs6599230, were associated with cardiac conduction. Our top signal, rs1805126 was associated with PR and QRS lengthening (P=3.35×10−7 and P=2.69×10−4 respectively), and rs6599230 was associated with PR shortening (P=2.67×10−5). Conclusions By sequencing SCN5A, we identified novel common and rare coding variants associated with cardiac conduction. PMID:24951663

  10. Exome arrays capture polygenic rare variant contributions to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Richards, A. L.; Leonenko, G.; Walters, J. T.; Kavanagh, D. H.; Rees, E. G.; Evans, A.; Chambert, K. D.; Moran, J. L.; Goldstein, J.; Neale, B. M.; McCarroll, S. A.; Pocklington, A. J.; Holmans, P. A.; Owen, M. J.; O'Donovan, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genome-wide association studies based largely on common alleles have identified over 100 schizophrenia risk loci, but it is also evident from studies of copy number variants (CNVs) and from exome-sequencing studies that rare alleles are also involved. Full characterization of the contribution of rare alleles to the disorder awaits the deployment of sequencing technology in very large sample sizes, meanwhile, as an interim measure, exome arrays allow rare non-synonymous variants to be sampled at a fraction of the cost. In an analysis of exome array data from 13 688 individuals (5585 cases and 8103 controls) from the UK, we found that rare (minor allele frequency < 0.1%) variant association signal was enriched among genes that map to autosomal loci that are genome-wide significant (GWS) in common variant studies of schizophrenia genome-wide association study (PGWAS = 0.01) as well as gene sets known to be enriched for rare variants in sequencing studies (PRARE = 0.026). We also identified the gene-wise equivalent of GWS support for WDR88 (WD repeat-containing protein 88), a gene of unknown function (P = 6.5 × 10−7). Rare alleles represented on exome chip arrays contribute to the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, but as is the case for GWAS, very large studies are required to reveal additional susceptibility alleles for the disorder. PMID:26740555

  11. Targeted sequencing of the Paget's disease associated 14q32 locus identifies several missense coding variants in RIN3 that predispose to Paget's disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Mahéva; Soares, Dinesh C.; Wani, Sachin; Sophocleous, Antonia; Warner, Jon; Salter, Donald M.; Ralston, Stuart H.; Albagha, Omar M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a common disorder with a strong genetic component characterized by increased but disorganized bone remodelling. Previous genome-wide association studies identified a locus on chromosome 14q32 tagged by rs10498635 which was significantly associated with susceptibility to PDB in several European populations. Here we conducted fine-mapping and targeted sequencing of the candidate locus to identify possible functional variants. Imputation in 741 PDB patients and 2699 controls confirmed that the association was confined to a 60 kb region in the RIN3 gene and conditional analysis adjusting for rs10498635 identified no new independent signals. Sequencing of the RIN3 gene identified a common missense variant (p.R279C) that was strongly associated with the disease (OR = 0.64; P = 1.4 × 10−9), and was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs10498635. A further 13 rare missense variants were identified, seven of which were novel and detected only in PDB cases. When combined, these rare variants were over-represented in cases compared with controls (OR = 3.72; P = 8.9 × 10−10). Most rare variants were located in a region that encodes a proline-rich, intrinsically disordered domain of the protein and many were predicted to be pathogenic. RIN3 was expressed in bone tissue and its expression level was ∼10-fold higher in osteoclasts compared with osteoblasts. We conclude that susceptibility to PDB at the 14q32 locus is mediated by a combination of common and rare coding variants in RIN3 and suggest that RIN3 may contribute to PDB susceptibility by affecting osteoclast function. PMID:25701875

  12. Mapping rare, deleterious mutations in Factor H: Association with early onset, drusen burden, and lower antigenic levels in familial AMD

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Erin K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Villalonga, Mercedes B.; Java, Anuja; Triebwasser, Michael P.; Daly, Mark J.; Atkinson, John P.; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves numerous genetic variants, both common and rare, in the coding region of complement factor H (CFH). While these variants explain high disease burden in some families, they fail to explain the pathology in all. We selected families whose AMD was unexplained by known variants and performed whole exome sequencing to probe for other rare, highly penetrant variants. We identified four rare loss-of-function variants in CFH associated with AMD. Missense variant CFH 1:196646753 (C192F) segregated perfectly within a family characterized by advanced AMD and drusen temporal to the macula. Two families, each comprising a pair of affected siblings with extensive extramacular drusen, carried essential splice site variant CFH 1:196648924 (IVS6+1G>A) or missense variant rs139360826 (R175P). In a fourth family, missense variant rs121913058 (R127H) was associated with AMD. Most carriers had early onset bilateral advanced AMD and extramacular drusen. Carriers tended to have low serum Factor H levels, especially carriers of the splice variant. One missense variant (R127H) has been previously shown not to be secreted. The two other missense variants were produced recombinantly: compared to wild type, one (R175P) had no functional activity and the other (C192F) had decreased secretion. PMID:27572114

  13. Mapping rare, deleterious mutations in Factor H: Association with early onset, drusen burden, and lower antigenic levels in familial AMD.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Erin K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Villalonga, Mercedes B; Java, Anuja; Triebwasser, Michael P; Daly, Mark J; Atkinson, John P; Seddon, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves numerous genetic variants, both common and rare, in the coding region of complement factor H (CFH). While these variants explain high disease burden in some families, they fail to explain the pathology in all. We selected families whose AMD was unexplained by known variants and performed whole exome sequencing to probe for other rare, highly penetrant variants. We identified four rare loss-of-function variants in CFH associated with AMD. Missense variant CFH 1:196646753 (C192F) segregated perfectly within a family characterized by advanced AMD and drusen temporal to the macula. Two families, each comprising a pair of affected siblings with extensive extramacular drusen, carried essential splice site variant CFH 1:196648924 (IVS6+1G>A) or missense variant rs139360826 (R175P). In a fourth family, missense variant rs121913058 (R127H) was associated with AMD. Most carriers had early onset bilateral advanced AMD and extramacular drusen. Carriers tended to have low serum Factor H levels, especially carriers of the splice variant. One missense variant (R127H) has been previously shown not to be secreted. The two other missense variants were produced recombinantly: compared to wild type, one (R175P) had no functional activity and the other (C192F) had decreased secretion. PMID:27572114

  14. A missense mutation (1278T) in the cystathionine {beta}-synthase gene prevalent in pyridoxine-responsive homocystinuria and associated with mild clinical phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, V.E.; Fringer, J.M.; Mandell, R.

    1995-07-01

    Cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by homocystinuria and multisystem clinical disease. Patients responsive to pyridoxine usually have a milder clinical phenotype than do nonresponsive patients, and we studied the molecular pathology of this disorder in an attempt to understand the molecular basis of the clinical variation. We previously reported a T833C transition in exon 8 causing a substitution of threonine for isoleucine at codon 278 (I278T). By PCR amplification and sequencing of exon 8 from genomic DNA we have now detected the I278T mutation in 7 of 11 patients with in vivo pyridoxine responsiveness and 0 of 27 pyridoxine-nonresponsive patients. Two pyridoxine-responsive patients are homozygous and five are heterozygous for I278T. We have now observed the I278T mutation in 41% (9 of 22) of the independent alleles in pyridoxine-responsive patients of varied ethnic backgrounds. In two of the compound heterozygotes we identified a novel mutation (G139R and E144K) in the other allele. The finding that the two patients who are homozygous for I278T have only ectopia lentis and mild bone demineralization suggests that this mutation is associated with both in vivo pyridoxine responsiveness and mild clinical disease. Compound heterozygous patients who have one copy of this missense mutation are likely to retain some degree of pyridoxine responsiveness. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A link between increased transforming activity of lymphoma-derived MYC mutant alleles, their defective regulation by p107, and altered phosphorylation of the c-Myc transactivation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, A T; Lutterbach, B; Lewis, B C; Yano, T; Chou, T Y; Barrett, J F; Raffeld, M; Hann, S R; Dang, C V

    1995-01-01

    The c-Myc protein is a transcription factor with an N-terminal transcriptional regulatory domain and C-terminal oligomerization and DNA-binding motifs. Previous studies have demonstrated that p107, a protein related to the retinoblastoma protein, binds to the c-Myc transcriptional activation domain and suppresses its activity. We sought to characterize the transforming activity and transcriptional properties of lymphoma-derived mutant MYC alleles. Alleles encoding c-Myc proteins with missense mutations in the transcriptional regulatory domain were more potent than wild-type c-Myc in transforming rodent fibroblasts. Although the mutant c-Myc proteins retained their binding to p107 in in vitro and in vivo assays, p107 failed to suppress their transcriptional activation activities. Many of the lymphoma-derived MYC alleles contain missense mutations that result in substitution for the threonine at codon 58 or affect sequences flanking this amino acid. We observed that in vivo phosphorylation of Thr-58 was absent in a lymphoma cell line with a mutant MYC allele containing a missense mutation flanking codon 58. Our in vitro studies suggest that phosphorylation of Thr-58 in wild-type c-Myc was dependent on cyclin A and required prior phosphorylation of Ser-62 by a p107-cyclin A-CDK complex. In contrast, Thr-58 remained unphosphorylated in two representative mutant c-Myc transactivation domains in vitro. Our studies suggest that missense mutations in MYC may be selected for during lymphomagenesis, because the mutant MYC proteins have altered functional interactions with p107 protein complexes and fail to be phosphorylated at Thr-58. PMID:7623799

  16. Investigation of the role of rare TREM2 variants in frontotemporal dementia subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Mathias; Razquin, Cristina; Hernández, Isabel; Gorostidi, Ana; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Drichel, Dmitriy; Fliessbach, Klaus; Duenkel, Tanja; Damian, Marinella; Heilmann, Stefanie; Slotosch, Anja; Lennarz, Martina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramón; Kornhuber, Johannes; Peters, Oliver; Luckhaus, Christian; Jahn, Holger; Hüll, Michael; Rüther, Eckart; Wiltfang, Jens; Lorenzo, Elena; Gascon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Lladó, Albert; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Moreno, Fermin; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Fortea, Juan; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Heneka, Michael T; Wetter, Axel; Pastor, Maria A; Riverol, Mario; Becker, Tim; Frölich, Lutz; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Wagner, Michael; Jessen, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Clarimón, Jordi; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz, Agustín; Pastor, Pau; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Rare TREM2 variants have been recently identified in families affected by FTD-like phenotype. However, genetic studies of the role of rare TREM2 variants in FTD have generated conflicting results possibly because of difficulties on diagnostic accuracy. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between rare TREM2 variants and specific FTD subtypes (FTD-S). The entire coding sequence of TREM2 was sequenced in FTD-S patients of Spanish (n = 539) and German (n = 63) origin. Genetic association was calculated using Fisher exact test. The minor allele frequency for controls was derived from in-house genotyping data and publicly available databases. Seven previously reported rare coding variants (p.A28V, p.W44X, p.R47H, p.R62H, p.T66M, p.T96K, and p.L211P) and 1 novel missense variant (p.A105T) were identified. The p.R47H variant was found in 4 patients with FTD-S. Two of these patients showed cerebrospinal fluid pattern of amyloid beta, tau, and phosphorylated-tau suggesting underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. No association was found between p.R47H and FTD-S. A genetic association was found between p.T96K and FTD-S (p = 0.013, odds ratio = 4.23, 95% Confidence Interval [1.17-14.77]). All 6 p.T96K patients also carried the TREM2 variant p.L211P, suggesting linkage disequilibrium. The remaining TREM2 variants were found in 1 patient, respectively, and were absent in controls. The present findings provide evidence that p.T96K is associated with FTD-S and that p.L211P may contribute to its pathogenic effect. The data also suggest that p.R47H is associated with an FTD phenotype that is characterized by the presence of underlying AD pathology. PMID:25042114

  17. Gain-of-Function Alleles in Caenorhabditis elegans Nuclear Hormone Receptor nhr-49 Are Functionally Distinct.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayoung; Goh, Grace Ying Shyen; Wong, Marcus Andrew; Klassen, Tara Leah; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors that regulate numerous physiological and developmental processes and represent important drug targets. NHR-49, an ortholog of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4), has emerged as a key regulator of lipid metabolism and life span in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. However, many aspects of NHR-49 function remain poorly understood, including whether and how it regulates individual sets of target genes and whether its activity is modulated by a ligand. A recent study identified three gain-of-function (gof) missense mutations in nhr-49 (nhr-49(et7), nhr-49(et8), and nhr-49(et13), respectively). These substitutions all affect the ligand-binding domain (LBD), which is critical for ligand binding and protein interactions. Thus, these alleles provide an opportunity to test how three specific residues contribute to NHR-49 dependent gene regulation. We used computational and molecular methods to delineate how these mutations alter NHR-49 activity. We find that despite originating from a screen favoring the activation of specific NHR-49 targets, all three gof alleles cause broad upregulation of NHR-49 regulated genes. Interestingly, nhr-49(et7) and nhr-49(et8) exclusively affect nhr-49 dependent activation, whereas the nhr-49(et13) surprisingly affects both nhr-49 mediated activation and repression, implicating the affected residue as dually important. We also observed phenotypic non-equivalence of these alleles, as they unexpectedly caused a long, short, and normal life span, respectively. Mechanistically, the gof substitutions altered neither protein interactions with the repressive partner NHR-66 and the coactivator MDT-15 nor the subcellular localization or expression of NHR-49. However, in silico structural modeling revealed that NHR-49 likely interacts with small molecule ligands and that the missense mutations might alter ligand binding, providing a possible explanation for increased NHR-49 activity. In

  18. Uncommon HLA alleles identified by hemizygous ultra-high Sanger sequencing: haplotype associations and reconsideration of their assignment in the Common and Well-Documented catalogue.

    PubMed

    Voorter, Christina E M; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Groeneveld, Lisette; Tilanus, Marcel G J

    2016-02-01

    Although the number of HLA alleles still increases, many of them have been reported being uncommon. This is partly due to lack of full length gene sequencing, especially for those alleles belonging to an allele ambiguity in which the first discovered allele has been assigned as the most frequent one. As members of the working group on Common and Well Documented (CWD) alleles and since we implemented full length group-specific sequencing as standard method routinely, we have investigated the presence of presumably rare alleles in our collection of HLA typing data. We identified 50 alleles, that were not previously encountered as Common or Well Documented. Sixteen of them should be added to the CWD catalogue, since we encountered them in 5 or more unrelated individuals. Another 11 could be added, based upon our results and the data present in the IMGT database and the rare allele section of the allele frequencies database. Furthermore, tight associations were observed between several different alleles even at the level of synonymous and non-coding sequences. In addition, in several cases the uncommon allele was found to be more frequent than its common counterpart. PMID:26610902

  19. Pathogenicity of the BRCA1 Missense Variant M1775K is Determined by the Disruption of the BRCT Phosphopeptide-Binding Pocket: a Multi-Modal Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tischkowitz,M.; Hamel, N.; Carvalho, M.; Birrane, G.; Soni, A.; van Beers, E.; Joosse, S.; Wong, N.; Novak, D.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A number of germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, it remains difficult to determine whether many single amino-acid (missense) changes in the BRCA1 protein that are frequently detected in the clinical setting are pathologic or not. Here, we used a combination of functional, crystallographic, biophysical, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis to demonstrate that the BRCA1 missense variant M1775K is pathogenic. Functional assays in yeast and mammalian cells showed that the BRCA1 BRCT domains carrying the amino-acid change M1775K displayed markedly reduced transcriptional activity, indicating that this variant represents a deleterious mutation. Importantly, the M1775K mutation disrupted the phosphopeptide-binding pocket of the BRCA1 BRCT domains, thereby inhibiting the BRCA1 interaction with the proteins BRIP1 and CtIP, which are involved in DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. These results indicate that the integrity of the BRCT phosphopeptide-binding pocket is critical for the tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Moreover, this study demonstrates that multiple lines of evidence obtained from a combination of functional, structural, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis are required to confirm the pathogenicity of rare variants of disease-susceptibility genes and obtain important insights into the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  20. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring 'allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable 'allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  1. A uniform survey of allele-specific binding and expression over 1000-Genomes-Project individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieming; Rozowsky, Joel; Galeev, Timur R.; Harmanci, Arif; Kitchen, Robert; Bedford, Jason; Abyzov, Alexej; Kong, Yong; Regan, Lynne; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing in the 1000 Genomes Project has revealed multitudes of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Here, we provide insights into the functional effect of these variants using allele-specific behaviour. This can be assessed for an individual by mapping ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reads to a personal genome, and then measuring ‘allelic imbalances' between the numbers of reads mapped to the paternal and maternal chromosomes. We annotate variants associated with allele-specific binding and expression in 382 individuals by uniformly processing 1,263 functional genomics data sets, developing approaches to reduce the heterogeneity between data sets due to overdispersion and mapping bias. Since many allelic variants are rare, aggregation across multiple individuals is necessary to identify broadly applicable ‘allelic elements'. We also found SNVs for which we can anticipate allelic imbalance from the disruption of a binding motif. Our results serve as an allele-specific annotation for the 1000 Genomes variant catalogue and are distributed as an online resource (alleledb.gersteinlab.org). PMID:27089393

  2. A missense variant in GLP1R gene is associated with the glycaemic response to treatment with gliptins.

    PubMed

    Javorský, M; Gotthardová, I; Klimčáková, L; Kvapil, M; Židzik, J; Schroner, Z; Doubravová, P; Gala, I; Dravecká, I; Tkáč, I

    2016-09-01

    Gliptins act by increasing endogenous incretin levels. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide receptor (GIPR) are their indirect drug targets. Variants of GLP1R and GIPR have previously been associated with the incretin effect. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine associations of the GLP1R and GIPR gene variants with the glycaemic response to gliptins. A total of 140 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes were followed-up 6 months after initiation of gliptin treatment. GLP1R rs6923761 (Gly168Ser) and GIPR rs10423928 genotyping was performed using real-time PCR, with subsequent high-resolution melting analysis. The main study outcome was reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) after treatment. GLP1R Gly168Ser variant was significantly associated with reduction in HbA1c in an additive model (β = -0.33, p = 0.011). The mean reduction in HbA1c in Ser/Ser homozygotes was significantly lower compared with Gly-allele carriers [0.12 ± 0.23% vs. 0.80 ± 0.09% (1.3 ± 2.5 mmol/mol vs. 8.7 ± 1.0 mmol/mol); p = 0.008]. In conclusion, GLP1R missense variant was associated with a reduced response to gliptin treatment. The genotype-related effect size of ∼0.7% (8 mmol/mol) is equal to an average effect of gliptin treatment and makes this variant a candidate for use in precision medicine. PMID:27160388

  3. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the Soe1 Gene: A Trna(3)(glu) Missense Suppressor of Yeast Cdc8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Su, J. Y.; Belmont, L.; Sclafani, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The CDC8 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes deoxythymidylate (dTMP) kinase and is required for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication in both the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles. All cdc8 temperature-sensitive mutants are partially defective in meiotic and mitochondrial functions at the permissive temperature. In a study of revertants of temperature-sensitive cdc8 mutants, the SOE201 and SOE1 mutants were isolated. The SOE201 mutant is a disome of chromosome X to which the cdc8 gene maps. Using the chromosome X aneuploids to vary cdc8 gene dosage, we demonstrate that different levels of dTMP kinase activity are required for mitotic, meiotic or mitochondrial DNA replication. The SOE1 mutant contains a dominant suppressor that suppresses five different cdc8 alleles but does not suppress a complete cdc8 deletion. The SOE1 gene is located <1.5 cM from the CYH2 gene on chromosome VII and is adjacent to the TSM437-CYH2 region, with the gene order being SOE1-TSM437-CYH2. SOE1 is an inefficient suppressor that can neither suppress the cdc8 hypomorphic phenotype nor restore dTMP kinase activity in vitro. SOE1 is a single C to T mutation in the anticodon of a tRNA(3)(Glu) gene and thereby, produces a missense suppressor tRNA capable of recognizing AAA lysine codons. We propose that the resultant lysine to glutamate change stabilizes thermo-labile dTMP kinase molecules in the cell. PMID:2155851

  4. DNA analysis of an uncommon missense mutation in a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Wei, C.; Applegarth, D.A.; McGillivray, B.C.

    1994-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal lipid storage disease. It results from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity and is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1, non-neuronopathic; type 2, acute neuronopathic; and type 3, subacute neuronopathic. We have sequenced the full length cDNA of the glucocerebrosidase gene and identified an uncommon mutation in nucleotide position 1604 (genoma DNA nucleotide position 6683) from a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent with type 1 Gaucher disease. It is a G{yields}A transition in exon 11 that results in {sup 496}Arg{yields}{sup 496}His of glucocerebrosidase. This missense mutation is present in the heterozygous form and creates a new cleavage site for the endonuclease HphI. We have developed a simple method to detect the presence of this mutation by using HphI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA or cDNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele of this patient is an A{yields}G transition at cDNA nucleotide position 1226 which creates an XhoI cleavage site after PCR mismatch amplification. The presence of this mutation was also confirmed by sequence analysis. Based on previous reports that mutation 1226 is present only in type 1 Gaucher disease and the observation that there is no neurological involvement in this patient, we conclude that our patient with the 1226/1604 genotype is diagnosed as having type 1 Gaucher disease. Since it was also postulated that mutation 1226 in the homozygous form will usually result in a good prognosis, we speculate that the orthopedic complications and the unusual presence of glomerulosclerosis in this patient may be attributable to the mutation at nucleotide 1604. This speculation will require a description of more patients with this mutation for confirmation. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Functional Characterization and Categorization of Missense Mutations that Cause Methylmalonyl‐CoA Mutase (MUT) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forny, Patrick; Froese, D. Sean; Suormala, Terttu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methylmalonyl‐CoA mutase (MUT) is an essential enzyme in propionate catabolism that requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Almost 250 inherited mutations in the MUT gene are known to cause the devastating disorder methylmalonic aciduria; however, the mechanism of dysfunction of these mutations, more than half of which are missense changes, has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we examined 23 patient missense mutations covering a spectrum of exonic/structural regions, clinical phenotypes, and ethnic populations in order to determine their influence on protein stability, using two recombinant expression systems and a thermostability assay, and enzymatic function by measuring MUT activity and affinity for its cofactor and substrate. Our data stratify MUT missense mutations into categories of biochemical defects, including (1) reduced protein level due to misfolding, (2) increased thermolability, (3) impaired enzyme activity, and (4) reduced cofactor response in substrate turnover. We further demonstrate the stabilization of wild‐type and thermolabile mutants by chemical chaperones in vitro and in bacterial cells. This in‐depth mutation study illustrates the tools available for MUT enzyme characterization, guides future categorization of further missense mutations, and supports the development of alternative, chaperone‐based therapy for patients not responding to current treatment. PMID:25125334

  6. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration

    PubMed Central

    Zabransky, Daniel J.; Yankaskas, Christopher L.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D. Marc; Dalton, W. Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A.; Manto, Kristen M.; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as “negative” by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them. PMID:26508629

  7. Distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene.

    PubMed

    Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Nuutinen, Elina; Hackman, Peter; Sewry, Caroline; Pelin, Katarina; Udd, Bjarne

    2007-06-01

    We describe a novel, recessively inherited distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB), in which other combinations of mutations are known to cause nemaline (rod) myopathy (NM). Two different missense mutations were identified in homozygous form in seven Finnish patients from four unrelated families with childhood or adult-onset foot drop. Both mutations, when combined in compound heterozygous form with more disruptive mutations in NEB, are known to cause NM. Hitherto, no patients with NM have been found to have two missense mutations in NEB. Muscle weakness predominantly affected ankle dorsiflexors, finger extensors and neck flexors, a distribution different both from the patterns of weakness seen in NM caused by NEB mutations, and those of the known recessively inherited distal myopathies. Singleton cases need to be distinguished from the Laing type of distal myopathy. Histologically, this myopathy differs from NM in that nemaline bodies were not detectable with routine light microscopy, and they were inconspicuous or absent even with electron microscopy. Rimmed vacuoles, commonly seen in other distal myopathies, were not a feature. We conclude that homozygous missense mutations in NEB cause a novel distal myopathy, predominantly involving lower leg extensor muscles, finger extensors and neck flexors. PMID:17525139

  8. CanDrA: cancer-specific driver missense mutation annotation with optimized features.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yong; Chen, Han; Liang, Han; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mills, Gordon B; Chen, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Driver mutations are somatic mutations that provide growth advantage to tumor cells, while passenger mutations are those not functionally related to oncogenesis. Distinguishing drivers from passengers is challenging because drivers occur much less frequently than passengers, they tend to have low prevalence, their functions are multifactorial and not intuitively obvious. Missense mutations are excellent candidates as drivers, as they occur more frequently and are potentially easier to identify than other types of mutations. Although several methods have been developed for predicting the functional impact of missense mutations, only a few have been specifically designed for identifying driver mutations. As more mutations are being discovered, more accurate predictive models can be developed using machine learning approaches that systematically characterize the commonality and peculiarity of missense mutations under the background of specific cancer types. Here, we present a cancer driver annotation (CanDrA) tool that predicts missense driver mutations based on a set of 95 structural and evolutionary features computed by over 10 functional prediction algorithms such as CHASM, SIFT, and MutationAssessor. Through feature optimization and supervised training, CanDrA outperforms existing tools in analyzing the glioblastoma multiforme and ovarian carcinoma data sets in The Cancer Genome Atlas and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project. PMID:24205039

  9. Classification of Missense Substitutions in the BRCA Genes: a Database Dedicated to Ex-UVs

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Maxime P.; Francy, Tiana C.; Judkins, Megan K.; Babikyan, Davit; Lesueur, Fabienne; Gammon, Amanda; Goldgar, David E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Tavtigian, Sean V.

    2012-01-01

    Unclassified sequence variants (UV) arising from clinical mutation screening of cancer susceptibility genes present a frustrating issue to clinical genetics services and the patients that they serve. We created an open-access database holding missense substitutions from the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. The main inclusion criterion is that each variant should have been assessed in a published work that used the Bayesian integrated evaluation of unclassified BRCA gene variants. Transfer of data on these substitutions from the original publications to our database afforded an opportunity to analyze the missense substitutions under a single model and to remove inconsistencies that arose during the evolution of the integrated evaluation over the last decade. This analysis also afforded the opportunity to re-classify these missense substitutions according to the recently published IARC 5-Class system. From an initial set of 248 missense substitutions, 31 were set aside due to non-negligible probability to interfere with splicing. Of the remaining substitutions, 28 fell into one of the two pathogenic classes (IARC Classes 4 or 5), 174 fell into one of the two non-pathogenic classes (IARC Classes 1 or 2), and 15 remain in IARC Class 3, “Uncertain”. The database is available at . PMID:21990165

  10. Distinct phospholipase C-gamma-dependent signaling pathways in the Drosophila eye and wing are revealed by a new small wing allele.

    PubMed Central

    Mankidy, Rishikesh; Hastings, Jeremy; Thackeray, Justin R

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila genome contains a single phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) homolog, encoded by small wing (sl), that acts as an inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling during photoreceptor R7 development. Although the existing sl alleles behave genetically as nulls, they may still produce truncated Sl products that could in theory still provide limited PLC-gamma function. Both to identify a true null allele and to probe structure-function relationships in Sl, we carried out an F(1) screen for new sl mutations and identified seven new alleles. Flies homozygous for any of these alleles are viable, with the same short-wing phenotype described previously; however, two of the alleles differ from any of those previously isolated in the severity of the eye phenotype: sl(9) homozygotes have a slightly more extreme extra-R7 phenotype, whereas sl(7) homozygotes have an almost wild-type eye. We determined the mutant defect in all seven alleles, revealing that sl(9) is a molecular null due to a very early stop codon, while sl(7) has a missense mutation in the highly conserved Y catalytic domain. Together with in vitro mutagenesis of the residue affected by the sl(7) mutation, these results confirm the role of Sl in RTK signaling and provide evidence for two genetically separable PLC-gamma-dependent pathways affecting the development of the eye and the wing. PMID:12807776

  11. The retarded hair growth (rhg) mutation in mice is an allele of ornithine aminotransferase (Oat)

    PubMed Central

    Bisaillon, Jason J.; Radden, Legairre A.; Szabo, Eric T.; Hughes, Samantha R.; Feliciano, Aaron M.; Nesta, Alex V.; Petrovic, Belinda; Palanza, Kenneth M.; Lancinskas, Dainius; Szmurlo, Theodore A.; Artus, David C.; Kapper, Martin A.; Mulrooney, James P.; King, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the similar phenotypes they generate and their proximate reported locations on Chromosome 7, we tested the recessive retarded hair growth (rhg) and frizzy (fr) mouse mutations for allelism, but found instead that these defects complement. To discover the molecular basis of rhg, we analyzed a large intraspecific backcross panel that segregated for rhg and restricted this locus to a 0.9 Mb region that includes fewer than ten genes, only five of which have been reported to be expressed in skin. Complementation testing between rhg and a recessive null allele of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 eliminated Fgfr2 as the possible basis of the retarded hair growth phenotype, but DNA sequencing of another of these candidates, ornithine aminotransferase (Oat), revealed a G to C transversion specifically associated with the rhg allele that would result in a glycine to alanine substitution at residue 353 of the gene product. To test whether this missense mutation might cause the mutant phenotype, we crossed rhg/rhg mice with mice that carried a recessive, perinatal-lethal, null mutation in Oat (designated OatΔ herein). Hybrid offspring that inherited both rhg and OatΔ displayed markedly delayed postnatal growth and hair development, indicating that these two mutations are allelic, and suggesting strongly that the G to C mutation in Oat is responsible for the retarded hair growth phenotype. Comparisons among +/+, rhg/+, rhg/rhg and rhg/OatΔ mice showed plasma ornithine levels and ornithine aminotransferase activities (in liver lysates) consistent with this assignment. Because histology of 7- and 12-month-old rhg/rhg and rhg/OatΔ retinas revealed chorioretinal degeneration similar to that described previously for OatΔ/OatΔ mice, we suggest that the rhg mutant may offer an ideal model for gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GACR) in humans, which is also caused by the substitution of glycine 353 in some families. PMID:25264521

  12. Dominant missense mutations in a novel yeast protein related to mammalian phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and VPS34 abrogate rapamycin cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Cafferkey, R; Young, P R; McLaughlin, M M; Bergsma, D J; Koltin, Y; Sathe, G M; Faucette, L; Eng, W K; Johnson, R K; Livi, G P

    1993-01-01

    Rapamycin is a macrolide antifungal agent that exhibits potent immunosuppressive properties. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, rapamycin sensitivity is mediated by a specific cytoplasmic receptor which is a homolog of human FKBP12 (hFKBP12). Deletion of the gene for yeast FKBP12 (RBP1) results in recessive drug resistance, and expression of hFKBP12 restores rapamycin sensitivity. These data support the idea that FKBP12 and rapamycin form a toxic complex that corrupts the function of other cellular proteins. To identify such proteins, we isolated dominant rapamycin-resistant mutants both in wild-type haploid and diploid cells and in haploid rbp1::URA3 cells engineered to express hFKBP12. Genetic analysis indicated that the dominant mutations are nonallelic to mutations in RBP1 and define two genes, designated DRR1 and DRR2 (for dominant rapamycin resistance). Mutant copies of DRR1 and DRR2 were cloned from genomic YCp50 libraries by their ability to confer drug resistance in wild-type cells. DNA sequence analysis of a mutant drr1 allele revealed a long open reading frame predicting a novel 2470-amino-acid protein with several motifs suggesting an involvement in intracellular signal transduction, including a leucine zipper near the N terminus, two putative DNA-binding sequences, and a domain that exhibits significant sequence similarity to the 110-kDa catalytic subunit of both yeast (VPS34) and bovine phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases. Genomic disruption of DRR1 in a mutant haploid strain restored drug sensitivity and demonstrated that the gene encodes a nonessential function. DNA sequence comparison of seven independent drr1dom alleles identified single base pair substitutions in the same codon within the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain, resulting in a change of Ser-1972 to Arg or Asn. We conclude either that DRR1 (alone or in combination with DRR2) acts as a target of FKBP12-rapamycin complexes or that a missense mutation in DRR1 allows it to compensate for the

  13. Association of missense mutations in epoxyalkane coenzyme M transferase with adaptation of Mycobacterium sp. strain JS623 to growth on vinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang Oh; Cheung, Samantha; Coleman, Nicholas V; Mattes, Timothy E

    2010-06-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a toxic groundwater pollutant associated with plastic manufacture and chlorinated solvent use. Aerobic bacteria that grow on VC as a carbon and energy source can evolve in the laboratory from bacteria that grow on ethene, but the genetic changes involved are unknown. We investigated VC adaptation in two variants (JS623-E and JS623-T) of the ethene-oxidizing Mycobacterium strain JS623. Missense mutations in the EtnE gene developed at two positions (W243 and R257) in cultures exposed to VC but not in cultures maintained on ethene. Epoxyalkane-coenzyme M transferase (EaCoMT) activities in cell extracts of JS623-E and JS623-T (150 and 645 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively) were higher than that of wild-type JS623 (74 nmol/min/mg protein), and in both variant cultures epoxyethane no longer accumulated during growth on ethene. The heterologous expression of two variant etnE alleles (W243G [etnE1] and R257L [etnE2]) from strain JS623 in Mycobacterium smegmatis showed that they had 42 to 59% higher activities than the wild type. Recombinant JS623 cultures containing mutant EtnE genes cloned in the vector pMV261 adapted to growth on VC more rapidly than the wild-type JS623 strain, with incubation times of 60 days (wild type), 1 day (pMVetnE1), and 35 days (pMVetnE2). The JS623(pMVetnE) culture did not adapt to VC after more than 60 days of incubation. Adaptation to VC in strain JS623 is consistently associated with two particular missense mutations in the etnE gene that lead to higher EaCoMT activity. This is the first report to pinpoint a genetic change associated with the transition from cometabolic to growth-linked VC oxidation in bacteria. PMID:20363787

  14. Missense mutation in the ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter protein ATP8A2 is associated with cerebellar atrophy and quadrupedal locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Emre Onat, Onur; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Bilguvar, Kaya; Nazli Basak, Ayse; Topaloglu, Haluk; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation and dysequilibrium syndrome is a rare and heterogeneous condition. We investigated a consanguineous family from Turkey with four affected individuals exhibiting the condition. Homozygosity mapping revealed that several shared homozygous regions, including chromosome 13q12. Targeted next-generation sequencing of an affected individual followed by segregation analysis, population screening and prediction approaches revealed a novel missense variant, p.I376M, in ATP8A2. The mutation lies in a highly conserved C-terminal transmembrane region of E1 E2 ATPase domain. The ATP8A2 gene is mainly expressed in brain and development, in particular cerebellum. Interestingly, an unrelated individual has been identified, in whom mental retardation and severe hypotonia is associated with a de novo t(10;13) balanced translocation resulting with the disruption of ATP8A2. These findings suggest that ATP8A2 is involved in the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans. PMID:22892528

  15. Proxy Molecular Diagnosis from Whole-Exome Sequencing Reveals Papillon-Lefevre Syndrome Caused by a Missense Mutation in CTSC

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Alsaadi, Muslim M.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Alotaibi, Tahani S.; Guthrie, Philip A. I.; Lewis, Sian; Ginwalla, Aasiya; Gaunt, Tom R.; Alharbi, Khalid K.; Alsaif, Fahad M.; Alsaadi, Basma M.; Day, Ian N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe early onset periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. A previously reported missense mutation in the CTSC gene (NM_001814.4:c.899G>A:p.(G300D)) was identified in a homozygous state in two siblings diagnosed with PLS in a consanguineous family of Arabic ancestry. The variant was initially identified in a heterozygous state in a PLS unaffected sibling whose whole exome had been sequenced as part of a previous Primary ciliary dyskinesia study. Using this information, a proxy molecular diagnosis was made on the PLS affected siblings after consent was given to study this second disorder found to be segregating within the family. The prevalence of the mutation was then assayed in the local population using a representative sample of 256 unrelated individuals. The variant was absent in all subjects indicating that the variant is rare in Saudi Arabia. This family study illustrates how whole-exome sequencing can generate findings and inferences beyond its primary goal. PMID:25799584

  16. In silico analysis of missense mutations in LPAR6 reveals abnormal phospholipid signaling pathway leading to hypotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Raza, Syed Irfan; Muhammad, Dost; Jan, Abid; Ali, Raja Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Ahmad, Wasim; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a rare genetic irreversible hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, and sparse axillary and body hair. The study, presented here, established genetic linkage in four families showing similar phenotypes to lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32. Subsequently, sequence analysis of the gene revealed two previously reported missense mutations including p.D63V in affected members of one and p.I188F in three other families. Molecular modeling and docking analysis was performed to investigate binding of a ligand oleoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to modeled protein structures of normal and mutated (D63V, G146R, I188F, N248Y, S3T, L277P) LPAR6 receptors. The mutant receptors showed a complete shift in orientation of LPA at the binding site. In addition, hydropathy analysis revealed a significant change in the membrane spanning topology of LPAR6 helical segments. The present study further substantiated involvement of LPAR6-LPA signaling in the pathogenesis of hypotrichosis/woolly hair and provided additional insight into the molecular mechanism of hair development. PMID:25119526

  17. In Silico Analysis of Missense Mutations in LPAR6 Reveals Abnormal Phospholipid Signaling Pathway Leading to Hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Syed Irfan; Muhammad, Dost; Jan, Abid; Ali, Raja Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Ahmad, Wasim; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a rare genetic irreversible hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, and sparse axillary and body hair. The study, presented here, established genetic linkage in four families showing similar phenotypes to lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32. Subsequently, sequence analysis of the gene revealed two previously reported missense mutations including p.D63V in affected members of one and p.I188F in three other families. Molecular modeling and docking analysis was performed to investigate binding of a ligand oleoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to modeled protein structures of normal and mutated (D63V, G146R, I188F, N248Y, S3T, L277P) LPAR6 receptors. The mutant receptors showed a complete shift in orientation of LPA at the binding site. In addition, hydropathy analysis revealed a significant change in the membrane spanning topology of LPAR6 helical segments. The present study further substantiated involvement of LPAR6-LPA signaling in the pathogenesis of hypotrichosis/woolly hair and provided additional insight into the molecular mechanism of hair development. PMID:25119526

  18. Neonatal diabetes in an infant of diabetic mother: same novel INS missense mutation in the mother and her offspring.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet Adnan; Kurtoglu, Selim; Bastug, Osman; Korkmaz, Levent; Daar, Ghaniya; Memur, Seyma; Halis, Hulya; Günes, Tamer; Hussain, Khalid; Ellard, Sian

    2014-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes is defined as an uncontrolled hyperglycemic state occurring within the first 6 months of life. It is a rare disease with an incidence of 1 to 90,000-250,000. It is usually a disease of genetic origin in which insulin gene mutations play the main role in the disease process. A baby, born to a mother who had previously been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at 14 months of age, had a high blood sugar level within the first few hours after birth and was subsequently diagnosed as having neonatal diabetes mellitus. Baby and mother were identified as having a novel heterozygous insulin missense mutation, p.C109R. Difficulties occurred in both follow-up and feeding of the baby. Without the addition of the mother's milk, an appropriate calorie milk formula and isophane insulin were used for the baby during follow-up. Multiple mechanisms are responsible in the pathogenesis of neonatal diabetes mellitus. Insulin gene mutations are one of the factors in the development of neonatal diabetes mellitus. If a resistant hyperglycemic state persists for a long time among babies, especially in those with intrauterine growth retardation whose mothers are diabetic, the baby concerned should be followed-up carefully for the development of neonatal diabetes mellitus. PMID:24566359

  19. A Rare Coincidence of Sitosterolemia and Familial Mediterranean Fever Identified by Whole Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Okada, Hirofumi; Endo, Saori; Toyoshima, Yuka; Konno, Tetsuo; Nohara, Atsushi; Inazu, Akihiro; Takao, Akira; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-07-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) technologies have accelerated genetic studies of Mendelian disorders, yielding approximately 30% diagnostic success. We encountered a 13-year-old Japanese female initially diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia on the basis of clinical manifestations of severe hypercholesterolemia (initial LDL cholesterol=609 mg/dl at the age of one) and systemic intertriginous xanthomas with histories of recurrent self-limiting episodes of fever and arthritis. Both her phenotypes seemed to co-segregate in a recessive manner. We performed WES on this patient, who was considered a proband. Among 206,430 variants found in this individual, we found 18,220 nonsense, missense, or splice site variants, of which 3,087 were rare (minor allele frequency ≤ 0.01 or not reported) in 1000 Genome (Asian population). Filtering by assuming a recessive pattern of inheritance with the use of an in silico annotation prediction tool, we successfully narrowed down the candidates to the compound heterozygous mutations in the ABCG5 gene (c.1256G>A or p.Arg419His/c.1763-1G>A [splice acceptor site]) and to the double-compound heterozygous mutations in the MEFV gene (c.329T>C/C or p.Leu110Pro/c.442G>C/C or p.Glu148Val). The patient was genetically diagnosed with sitosterolemia and familial Mediterranean fever using WES for the first time. Such a comprehensive approach is useful for identifying causative mutations for multiple unrelated inheritable diseases. PMID:27170062

  20. Missense Polymorphisms in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Gene and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Croitoru, Marina E.; Redston, Mark; Knight, Julia A.; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Whereas truncating germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene give rise to familial adenomatous polyposis, missense polymorphisms of APC may confer a weaker risk for colorectal cancer. METHODS We sequenced the entire open reading frame of the APC gene and tested for two common MYH mutations in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and 5 to 99 adenomas. Missense adenomatous polyposis coli alterations identified in this colorectal cancer multiple-polyp population were analyzed in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy control subjects. RESULTS Germline APC or mutY human homologue (MYH) alterations were identified in 16 of 39 colorectal cancer-multiple polyp patients. Four missense APC gene alterations (S130G, E1317Q, Dl822V, G2502S) were observed in 13 individuals and 3 additional patients carried presumed pathogenic (APC Y94X, biallelic MYH Y165C and heterozygous MYH G382D) mutations. When independently assessed in 971 patients with colorectal cancer and 954 healthy control subjects, none of the identified missense APC alterations conferred a significantly increased risk for colorectal cancer, odds ratio (95 percent confidence intervals): S130G=3.1 (0.29–32.25), E1317Q= 1.08 (0.59–2.74), G2502S= 1 (0.65–1.63), D1822V (heterozygous)=0.79 (0.64–0.98), D1822V (homozygous) =0.82 (0.63–1.27). CONCLUSIONS Germline missense APC alterations observed in 33 percent of patients with multiple colorectal neoplasms seemed to play a limited role in colorectal cancer risk when independently assessed by a population-based, case-control analysis. PMID:18612690

  1. Complex allele [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] is associated with milder forms of cystic fibrosis than allele S549R(T>G) alone.

    PubMed

    Romey, M C; Guittard, C; Chazalette, J P; Frossard, P; Dawson, K P; Patton, M A; Casals, T; Bazarbachi, T; Girodon, E; Rault, G; Bozon, D; Seguret, F; Demaille, J; Claustres, M

    1999-01-01

    We recently reported a novel complex allele in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, combining a sequence change in the minimal CFTR promoter (-102T>A) and a missense mutation in exon 11 [S549R(T>G)]. Here we compare the main clinical features of six patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying the complex allele [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] with those of 16 CF patients homozygous for mutation S549R(T>G) alone. Age at diagnosis was higher, and current age was significantly higher (P=0.0032) in the group with the complex allele, compared with the S549R/S549R group. Although the proportion of patients with lung colonization was similar in both groups, the age at onset was significantly higher in the group with the complex allele (P=0.0022). Patients with the complex allele also had significantly lower sweat test chloride values (P=0.0028) and better overall clinical scores (P=0.004). None of the 22 patients reported in this study had meconium ileus. All 16 patients homozygous for S549R(T>G), however, were pancreatic insufficient, as compared with 50% of patients carrying the complex allele (P=0.013). Moreover, the unique patient homozygous for [-102T>A+S549R(T>G)] presented with a mild disease at 34 years of age. These observations strongly suggest that the sequence change (-102T>A) in the CFTR minimal promoter could attenuate the severe clinical phenotype associated with mutation S549R(T>G). PMID:10480369

  2. RARE VARIANTS IN TENASCIN GENES IN A COHORT OF CHILDREN WITH PRIMARY VESICOURETERIC REFLUX

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Shan; Homstad, Alison; Vaidya, Himani; Stout, Jennifer; Hall, Gentzon; Wu, Guanghong; Conlon, Peter; Routh, Jonathan C.; Wiener, John S.; Ross, Sherry S.; Nagaraj, Shashi; Wigfall, Delbert; Foreman, John; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Gupta, Indra R.; Brophy, Patrick D.; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary vesicoureteral reflux (PVUR) is the most common malformation of the kidney and urinary tract and reflux nephropathy is a major cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Recently, we reported mutations in tenascin XB (TNXB) as a cause of PVUR with joint hypermobility. Methods To define the role of rare variants in tenascin genes in the etiology of PVUR, we screened a cohort of patients with familial PVUR (FPVUR) and non-familial PVUR (NFPVUR) for rare missense variants in TNXB and tenascin C (TNC) genes after excluding mutations in ROBO2 and SOX17. Results We identified 134 individuals from 112 families with PVUR, we excluded two families with mutations in ROBO2. We found rare missense variants in TNXB in the remaining 110 families comprising of 5/55 (9%) of families with FPVUR and 2/55 (4%) of NFPVUR. There were no differences in high-grade reflux, or renal parenchymal scarring between patients with and without TNXB variants. All patients with TNXB rare variants that were tested exhibited joint hypermobility. Overall we were able to identify causes of FPVUR in 7/57 (12%) families (9% in TNXB and 3% in ROBO2). Conclusions In conclusion, a rare missense variant in TNXB in combination with a positive family history of VUR and joint hypermobility may represent a non-invasive method to diagnose PVUR and warrants further evaluation in other cohorts. PMID:26408188

  3. Lack of Association between Missense Variants in GRHL3 (rs2486668 and rs545809) and Susceptibility to Non-Syndromic Orofacial Clefts in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    He, Miao; Bian, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Grainyhead-like-3 (GRHL3) was recently identified as the second gene that, when mutated, can leads to Van der Woude syndrome, which is characterized by orofacial clefts (OFC) and lower lip pits. In addition, a missense variant (rs41268753) in GRHL3 confers risk for non-syndromic cleft palate cases of European ancestry. Together with interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6), GRHL3 may be associated with the risk of NSOFC which awaits for being verified across different ethnic populations. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between common functional variants in GRHL3 and susceptibility to NSOFC, especially cleft palate cases, in a Han Chinese population, one of the ethnic groups with the highest birth prevalence of orofacial clefting. Methods Because the allele frequency for rs41268753 minor alleles was zero in our Chinese population, we selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning GRHL3 with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) > 5% in the Han Chinese population. Two SNPs which meet the above criteria were then genotyped in a case-control cohort comprising 1145 individuals using the TaqMan 5′-exonuclease allelic discrimination assay. Results SNPs rs2486668 and rs545809 were used in this study. Overall genotype and allele distributions of both SNPs in general and stratified genotyping analyses revealed no statistically significant differences between cases and controls. Further logistic regression analyses using different genetic models failed to reveal any evidence that these markers influence risk to NSOFC. Conclusions The variant rs41268753 in GRHL3 increases the risk for cleft palate in European population, but our findings failed to detect the link between two GRHL3 SNPs (rs2486668 and rs545809) and risk to NSOFC in the Han Chinese cohort. Although the present study did not provide any evidence that common functional variants in GRHL3 may contribute to NSOFC etiology in this Chinese population

  4. Hepatic Fibrinogen Storage Disease in a Patient with Hypofibrinogenemia: Report of a Case with a Missense Mutation of the FGA Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Venick, Robert; Bhuta, Sunita; Li, Xinmin; Wang, Hanlin L

    2015-11-01

    We report a 9-year-old patient with abnormal liver tests found incidentally during routine bloodwork as part of a preoperative evaluation for excision of a benign cyst. A liver biopsy demonstrated hepatocytes to have pale and expanded cytoplasm that contained multiple vague globular eosinophilic inclusions. Electron microscopy showed fingerprint-like structures in the dilated cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, characteristic of fibrinogen. Whole exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation at codon 35 of the fibrinogen α (FGA) gene. No mutation was identified in the β or γ chains. His plasma fibrinogen levels were found to be decreased to 85 mg/dL (normal range 215-464). His family history was pertinent for his mother and maternal grandfather with hypofibrinogenemia. He had not had any significant bleeding episodes except for minor bruising over the shins. This case illustrates a rare etiology of storage disease that causes abnormal liver function tests. PMID:26676819

  5. Compound heterozygous hemophilia A in a female patient and the identification of a novel missense mutation, p.Met1093Ile.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shu-Kai; Ren, Han-Yun; Ren, Jin-Hai; Guo, Xiao-Nan

    2014-02-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) in females is rare. Female HA cases are often misdiagnosed as acquired HA (AHA) or as von Willebrand disease type 2N (vWD-2N). Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female HA patient with a moderate factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The patient had no personal or family history of bleeding disorders, but presented with heavy uterine bleeding following surgery to remove an intrauterine device. IgG inhibitory antibodies against FVIII were undetected. A compound heterozygote mutation of the FVIII gene (F8) was found in this patient. The p.Val502Asp mutation, which has been reported previously, affects A2 domain function. A novel missense point mutation, p.Met1093Ile, was identified in the B domain. The compound heterozygote mutations in F8, p.Val502Asp and p.Met1093Ile, caused HA in this female patient, with a moderate phenotype. PMID:24317041

  6. Compound heterozygous hemophilia A in a female patient and the identification of a novel missense mutation, p.Met1093Ile

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, SHU-KAI; REN, HAN-YUN; REN, JIN-HAI; GUO, XIAO-NAN

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) in females is rare. Female HA cases are often misdiagnosed as acquired HA (AHA) or as von Willebrand disease type 2N (vWD-2N). Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female HA patient with a moderate factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. The patient had no personal or family history of bleeding disorders, but presented with heavy uterine bleeding following surgery to remove an intrauterine device. IgG inhibitory antibodies against FVIII were undetected. A compound heterozygote mutation of the FVIII gene (F8) was found in this patient. The p.Val502Asp mutation, which has been reported previously, affects A2 domain function. A novel missense point mutation, p.Met1093Ile, was identified in the B domain. The compound heterozygote mutations in F8, p.Val502Asp and p.Met1093Ile, caused HA in this female patient, with a moderate phenotype. PMID:24317041

  7. Role of Survivin in cytokinesis revealed by a separation-of-function allele

    PubMed Central

    Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Fuller, Margaret T.; Giansanti, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), containing Aurora B kinase, Inner Centromere Protein, Survivin, and Borealin, regulates chromosome condensation and interaction between kinetochores and microtubules at metaphase, then relocalizes to midzone microtubules at anaphase and regulates central spindle organization and cytokinesis. However, the precise role(s) played by the CPC in anaphase have been obscured by its prior functions in metaphase. Here we identify a missense allele of Drosophila Survivin that allows CPC localization and function during metaphase but not cytokinesis. Analysis of mutant cells showed that Survivin is essential to target the CPC and the mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 orthologue Pavarotti (Pav) to the central spindle and equatorial cell cortex during anaphase in both larval neuroblasts and spermatocytes. Survivin also enabled localization of Polo kinase and Rho at the equatorial cortex in spermatocytes, critical for contractile ring assembly. In neuroblasts, in contrast, Survivin function was not required for localization of Rho, Polo, or Myosin II to a broad equatorial cortical band but was required for Myosin II to transition to a compact, fully constricted ring. Analysis of this “separation-of-function” allele demonstrates the direct role of Survivin and the CPC in cytokinesis and highlights striking differences in regulation of cytokinesis in different cell systems. PMID:21865602

  8. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  9. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Isoelectric focusing of superoxide dismutase: report of the unique SOD A*2 allele in a US white population.

    PubMed

    DeCroo, S; Kamboh, M I; Leppert, M; Ferrell, R E

    1988-01-01

    An isoelectric focusing procedure in an ultranarrow pH range (5.0-5.5) polyacrylamide gel is described for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) phenotypes. The occurrence of the rare SOD A*2 allele in the Caucasian population of Utah is also reported at a polymorphic frequency (0.011). The presence of the SOD A 2 unique allele in the Mormons of Utah is compatible with their historical affinity with Scandinavians. PMID:3350528

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class II DAB alleles associated with intestinal parasite load in the vulnerable Chinese egret (Egretta eulophotes).

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoping; Fang, Wenzhen; Lin, Qingxian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism has been hypothesized to result from many mechanisms such as rare-allele advantage, heterozygote advantage, and allele counting. In the study reported herein, 224 vulnerable Chinese egrets (Egretta eulophotes) were used to examine these hypotheses as empirical results derived from bird studies are rare. Parasite survey showed that 147 (65.63%) individuals were infected with 1-3 helminths, and 82.31% of these infected individuals carried Ascaridia sp. Using asymmetric polymerase chain reaction technique, 10 DAB1, twelve DAB2, and three DAB3 exon 2 alleles were identified at each single locus. A significant association of the rare allele Egeu-DAB2*05 (allele frequency: 0.022) with helminth resistance was found for all helminths, as well as for the most abundant morphotype Ascaridia sp. in the separate analyses. Egeu-DAB2*05 occurred frequently in uninfected individuals, and individuals carrying Egeu-DAB2*05 had significantly lower helminth morphotypes per individual (HMI) (the number of HMI) and the fecal egg count values. Further, the parasite infection measurements were consistently lower in individuals with an intermediate number of different alleles in the duplicated DAB loci. Significantly, heterozygosity within each DAB locus was not correlated with any parasite infection measurements. These results indicate that the diversity in MHC Egeu-DAB gene is associated with intestinal parasite load and maintained by pathogen-driven selection that probably operate through both the rare-allele advantage and the allele counting strategy, and suggest that Egeu-DAB2*05 might be a valuable indicator of better resistance to helminth diseases in the vulnerable Chinese egret. PMID:27386085

  12. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  13. Carriage of One or Two FMR1 Premutation Alleles Seems to Have No Effect on Illness Severity in a FXTAS Female with an Autozygous FMR1 Premutation Allele.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; López-Mourelo, Olga; Izquierdo, Silvia; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Granell, Esther; Madrigal, Irene; Milà, Montserrat

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that occurs in FMR1 premutation carriers. The prevalence of FMR1 premutation carriers in the general population is relatively high, and although rare, a premutation in both X chromosomes may occur in females inheriting a premutation allele from each of both parent carriers. Here, we report the first female with an autozygous (homozygous by descendent) FMR1 premutation allele, who fulfills neurological and radiological FXTAS findings/criteria. Molecular characterization included CGG repeat length, AGG interruption pattern, FMR1 messenger RNA (mRNA), fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) level quantification, and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Neuroradiological assessment of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and neurological and cognitive/neuropsychological evaluations were performed. Neurological and neuroradiological examination of the female with the same FMR1 allele in the premutation range (77 CGGs) demonstrated FXTAS features. Further familial evaluation showed a similar neuropsychiatric profile, with impairments in cognitive flexibility and visuospatial function, mainly. A unique family with an autozygous FMR1 premutation female is presented. Neurological/cognitive and neuroradiological examinations revealed FXTAS-specific findings in the female with the autozygous FMR1 premutation allele. The consistent molecular and cognitive/psychiatric phenotype in family members suggests that carrying one or two FMR1 premutation alleles has no effect on illness severity. PMID:27315125

  14. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  15. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jason A.; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Quillen, Ellen E.; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D.; Perry, George H.

    2014-01-01

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  16. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  17. Very mild features of dysequilibrium syndrome associated with a novel VLDLR missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Micalizzi, Alessia; Moroni, Isabella; Ginevrino, Monia; Biagini, Tommaso; Mazza, Tommaso; Romani, Marta; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-07-01

    Dysequilibrium syndrome (DES) is a non-progressive congenital ataxia characterized by severe intellectual deficit, truncal ataxia and markedly delayed, quadrupedal or absent ambulation. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene represent the most common cause of DES. Only two families have been reported harbouring homozygous missense mutations, both with a similarly severe phenotype. We report an Italian girl with very mild DES caused by the novel homozygous VLDLR missense mutation p.(C419Y). This unusually benign phenotype possibly relates to a less disruptive effect of the mutation, falling within a domain (EGF-B) not predicted as crucial for the protein function. PMID:27251579

  18. HMG CoA Lyase (HL): Mutation detection and development of a bacterial expression system for screening the activity of mutant alleles from HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, M.F.; Ashmarina, L.; Poitier, E.

    1994-09-01

    HL catalyzes the last step of ketogenesis, and autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans can cause episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. Structurally, HL is a dimer of identical 325-residue peptides which requires a reducing environment to maintain activity. We cloned the human and mouse HL cDNAs and genes and have performed mutation analysis on cells from 30 HL-deficient probands. Using SSCP and also genomic Southern analysis we have identified putative mutations on 53/60 alleles of these patients (88%). To date, we have found 20 mutations: 3 large deletions, 4 termination mutations, 5 frameshift mutations, and 8 missense mutations which we suspect to be pathogenic based on evolutionary conservation and/or our previous studies on purified HL protein. We have also identified 3 polymorphic variants. In order to directly test the activity of the missense mutations, we established a pGEX-based system, using a glutathione S transferase (GST)-HL fusion protein. Expressed wild-type GST-HL was insoluble. We previously located a reactive Cys at the C-terminus of chicken HL which is conserved in human HL. We produced a mutant HL peptide, C323S, which replaced Cys323 with Ser. Purified C323S is soluble and has similar kinetics to wild-type HL. C323S-containing GST-HL is soluble and enzymatically active. We are cloning and expressing the 8 missense mutations.

  19. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  20. Dyskeratosis congenita--two siblings with a new missense mutation in the DKC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Joana Dias; Lestre, Sara; Kay, Teresa; Lopes, Maria João Paiva; Fiadeiro, Teresa; Apetato, Margarida

    2011-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenital is reported in two siblings. They presented with the classic triad of mucocutaneous features: leukoplakia of the tongue, dystrophic nails, and a widespread reticulate pigmentation on the neck and upper chest. A genetic analysis was performed and a new missense mutation S356P, hemizygous, was identified in the DKC1 gene in both patients. Acitretin was started at a low-dose in both patients, resulting in clinical improvement and important, positive psychosocial effects. PMID:21736606

  1. Reduced secretion and altered proteolytic processing caused by missense mutations in progranulin.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Gernot; Capell, Anja; Brouwers, Nathalie; Fellerer, Katrin; Sleegers, Kristel; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Haass, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Progranulin (GRN) is a secreted growth factor involved in various cellular functions, and loss-of-function mutations are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 positive pathology. Most FTLD-related GRN mutations are nonsense mutations resulting in reduced GRN expression. Nonsynonymous GRN missense mutations have been described as risk factor for neurodegenerative brain diseases, but their pathogenic nature remains largely elusive. We identified a double missense mutation in GRN leading to amino acid changes p.D33E and p.G35R in an FTLD patient from Turkish origin. Biochemical and cell biological analysis of the double-mutation together with 2 so-far uncharacterized GRN missense mutations (p.C105R and p.V514M) revealed a reduced secretion efficiency of the GRN p.D33E/p.G35R and p.C105R proteins. Furthermore, loss of the conserved cysteine residue affects protein folding and altered proteolytic processing by neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3. Our data indicate that the described variants may cause a loss-of-function, albeit to a lesser extent than GRN null mutations, and hence could be considered as low-penetrant risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26811050

  2. MECP2 missense mutations outside the canonical MBD and TRD domains in males with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Laura; Fichera, Marco; Failla, Pinella; Di Marco, Chiara; Grozeva, Detelina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Spiga, Ottavia; Mari, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Raymond, Lucy; Renieri, Alessandra; Romano, Corrado; Ariani, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein highly expressed in neurons that is involved in transcriptional modulation and chromatin remodeling. Mutations in MECP2 in females are associated with Rett syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by a normal neonatal period, followed by the arrest of development and regression of acquired skills. Although it was initially thought that MECP2 pathogenic mutations in males were not compatible with life, starting from 1999 about 60 male patients have been identified and their phenotype varies from severe neonatal encephalopathy to mild intellectual disability. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a panel of intellectual disability related genes was performed on two unrelated male patients, and two missense variants in MECP2 were identified (p.Gly185Val and p.Arg167Trp). These variants lie outside the canonical methyl-CpG-binding domain and transcription repression domain domains, where the pathogenicity of missense variants is more difficult to establish. In both families, variants were found in all affected siblings and were inherited from the asymptomatic mother, showing skewed X-chromosome inactivation. We report here the first missense variant located in AT-hook domain 1 and we underline the importance of MECP2 substitutions outside the canonical MeCP2 domains in X-linked intellectual disability. PMID:26490184

  3. Characterization of a Spontaneous, Recessive, Missense Mutation Arising in the Tecta Gene

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Richard J.; Mencía, Angeles; Modamio-Høybjør, Silvia; Legan, P. Kevin; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Moreno, Felipe; Richardson, Guy P.

    2008-01-01

    The TECTA gene encodes alpha-tectorin (TECTA), a major noncollagenous component of the tectorial membrane (TM). In humans, mutations in TECTA lead to either dominant (DFNA8/A12) or recessive (DFNB21) forms of nonsyndromic hearing loss. All missense mutations in TECTA that have been reported thus far are associated with the dominant subtype, whereas those leading to recessive deafness are all inactivating mutations. In this paper, we characterize a spontaneous missense mutation (c.1046C > A, p.A349D) arising in the mouse Tecta gene that is, unlike all previously reported missense mutations in TECTA, recessive. The morphological phenotype of the TectaA349D/A349D mouse resembles but is not identical to that previously described for the \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$Tecta^{{{\\Delta {\\text{ENT}}} \\mathord{\\left/ {\\vphantom {{\\Delta {\\text{ENT}}} {\\Delta {\\text{ENT}}}}} \\right. \\kern-\

  4. MECP2 missense mutations outside the canonical MBD and TRD domains in males with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Pinella; Di Marco, Chiara; Grozeva, Detelina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Spiga, Ottavia; Mari, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Raymond, Lucy; Renieri, Alessandra; Romano, Corrado; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein highly expressed in neurons that is involved in transcriptional modulation and chromatin remodeling. Mutations in MECP2 in females are associated with Rett syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by a normal neonatal period, followed by the arrest of development and regression of acquired skills. Although it was initially thought that MECP2 pathogenic mutations in males were not compatible with life, starting from 1999 about 60 male patients have been identified and their phenotype varies from severe neonatal encephalopathy to mild intellectual disability. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing of a panel of intellectual disability related genes was performed on two unrelated male patients, and two missense variants in MECP2 were identified (p.Gly185Val and p.Arg167Trp). These variants lie outside the canonical MBD and TRD domains, where the pathogenicity of missense variants is more difficult to establish. In both families, variants were found in all affected siblings and were inherited from the asymptomatic mother, showing skewed X-chromosome inactivation. We report here the first missense variant located in AT-hook domain 1 and we underline the importance of MECP2 substitutions outside the canonical MeCP2 domains in X-linked intellectual disability. PMID:26490184

  5. Cancer Missense Mutations Alter Binding Properties of Proteins and Their Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Tyagi, Manoj; Teng, Shaolei; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Alexov, Emil; Wuchty, Stefan; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that missense mutations might play an important role in carcinogenesis. However, the extent to which cancer mutations might affect biomolecular interactions remains unclear. Here, we map glioblastoma missense mutations on the human protein interactome, model the structures of affected protein complexes and decipher the effect of mutations on protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ion binding interfaces. Although some missense mutations over-stabilize protein complexes, we found that the overall effect of mutations is destabilizing, mostly affecting the electrostatic component of binding energy. We also showed that mutations on interfaces resulted in more drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties than mutations occurring outside the interfaces. Analysis of glioblastoma mutations on interfaces allowed us to stratify cancer-related interactions, identify potential driver genes, and propose two dozen additional cancer biomarkers, including those specific to functions of the nervous system. Such an analysis also offered insight into the molecular mechanism of the phenotypic outcomes of mutations, including effects on complex stability, activity, binding and turnover rate. As a result of mutated protein and gene network analysis, we observed that interactions of proteins with mutations mapped on interfaces had higher bottleneck properties compared to interactions with mutations elsewhere on the protein or unaffected interactions. Such observations suggest that genes with mutations directly affecting protein binding properties are preferably located in central network positions and may influence critical nodes and edges in signal transduction networks. PMID:23799087

  6. In silico investigation of molecular effects caused by missense mutations in creatine transporter protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Schwatz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Creatine transporter (CT) protein, which is encoded by SLC6A8 gene, is essential for taking up the creatine in the cell, which in turn plays a key role in the spatial and temporal maintenance of energy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. It was shown that some missense mutations in CT cause mental retardation, while others are harmless non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphism (nsSNP). Currently fifteen missense mutations in CT are known, among which twelve are disease-causing. Sequence analysis reveals that there is no clear trend distinguishing disease-causing from harmless missense mutations. Because of that, we built 3D model of the CT using highly homologous template and use the model to investigate the effects of mutations of CT stability and hydrogen bond network. It is demonstrated that disease-causing mutations affect the folding free energy and ionization states of titratable group in much greater extend as compared with harmless mutations. Supported by grants from NLM, NIH, grant numbers 1R03LM009748 and 1R03LM009748-S1.

  7. Rare UNC13B variations and risk of schizophrenia: Whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family and follow-up resequencing and a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Jun; Hoya, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Nunokawa, Ayako; Shibuya, Masako; Ikeda, Masashi; Inoue, Emiko; Okuda, Shujiro; Kondo, Kenji; Saito, Takeo; Kaneko, Naoshi; Muratake, Tatsuyuki; Igeta, Hirofumi; Iwata, Nakao; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    Rare genomic variations inherited in multiplex schizophrenia families are suggested to play a role in the genetic etiology of the disease. To identify rare variations with large effects on the risk of developing schizophrenia, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two affected and one unaffected individual of a multiplex family with 10 affected individuals. We also performed follow-up resequencing of the unc-13 homolog B (Caenorhabditis elegans) (UNC13B) gene, a potential risk gene identified by WES, in the multiplex family and undertook a case-control study to investigate association between UNC13B and schizophrenia. UNC13B coding regions (39 exons) from 15 individuals of the multiplex family and 111 affected offspring for whom parental DNA samples were available were resequenced. Rare missense UNC13B variations identified by resequencing were further tested for association with schizophrenia in two independent case-control populations comprising a total of 1,753 patients and 1,602 controls. A rare missense variation (V1525M) in UNC13B was identified by WES in the multiplex family; this variation was present in five of six affected individuals, but not in eight unaffected individuals or one individual of unknown disease status. Resequencing UNC13B coding regions identified five rare missense variations (T103M, M813T, P1349T, I1362T, and V1525M). In the case-control study, there was no significant association between rare missense UNC13B variations and schizophrenia, although single-variant meta-analysis indicated that M813T was nominally associated with schizophrenia. These results do not support a contribution of rare missense UNC13B variations to the genetic etiology of schizophrenia in the Japanese population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990377

  8. CNVs: Harbinger of a Rare Variant Revolution in Psychiatric Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Dheeraj; Sebat, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The genetic bases of neuropsychiatric disorders are beginning to yield to scientific inquiry. Genome-wide studies of copy number variation (CNV) have given rise to a new understanding of disease etiology, bringing rare variants to the forefront. A proportion of risk for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Autism can be explained by rare mutations. Such alleles arise by de novo mutation in the individual or in recent ancestry. Alleles can have specific effects on behavioral and neuroanatomical traits; however expressivity is variable, particularly for neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Knowledge from CNV studies reflects the nature of rare alleles in general and will serve as a guide as we move forward into a new era of whole genome sequencing. PMID:22424231

  9. Theoretical prediction of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis missense mutation effects on Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase structural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Potier, M.; Tu, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) deficiency is associated with the progressive paralytic disorder familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Fifteen missense mutations in the SOD gene were identified in several patients. These mutations may prevent correct promoter folding or hamper homodimer formation necessary for SOD activity. To understand the effect of the missense mutations on SOD structure and function, we used a theoretical analysis of structural effects based on two predictive methods using the modeled tertiary structure of human SOD. The first method uses the TORSO program which optimizes amino acid side-chains repacking in both wild-type and mutant SODs and calculates protein internal packing energy. The second method uses a hydrophobicity scale of the amino acid residues and considers both solvent accessibility and hydrophobic nature of residue substitutions to compute a stabilization energy change ({delta}E). These predictive methods have been tested in 187 single and multiple missense mutants of 8 proteins (T4 lysozyme, human carbonic anhydrase II, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, f1 gene V protein, barnase, {lambda}-repressor, chicken and human lysozymes) with experimentally determined thermostability. The overall prediction accuracy with these proteins was 88%. Analysis of FALS missense mutations {delta}E predicts that 14 of 15 mutations destabilize the SOD structure. The other missense mutation is located at the homodimer interface and may hinder dimer formation. This approach is applicable to any protein with known tertiary structure to predict missense mutation effects on protein stability.

  10. Dominant Red Coat Color in Holstein Cattle Is Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Coatomer Protein Complex, Subunit Alpha (COPA) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dorshorst, Ben; Henegar, Corneliu; Liao, Xiaoping; Sällman Almén, Markus; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Stothard, Paul; Van Doormaal, Brian; Plastow, Graham; Barsh, Gregory S.; Andersson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Coat color in Holstein dairy cattle is primarily controlled by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a central determinant of black (eumelanin) vs. red/brown pheomelanin synthesis across animal species. The major MC1R alleles in Holsteins are Dominant Black (MC1RD) and Recessive Red (MC1Re). A novel form of dominant red coat color was first observed in an animal born in 1980. The mutation underlying this phenotype was named Dominant Red and is epistatic to the constitutively activated MC1RD. Here we show that a missense mutation in the coatomer protein complex, subunit alpha (COPA), a gene with previously no known role in pigmentation synthesis, is completely associated with Dominant Red in Holstein dairy cattle. The mutation results in an arginine to cysteine substitution at an amino acid residue completely conserved across eukaryotes. Despite this high level of conservation we show that both heterozygotes and homozygotes are healthy and viable. Analysis of hair pigment composition shows that the Dominant Red phenotype is similar to the MC1R Recessive Red phenotype, although less effective at reducing eumelanin synthesis. RNA-seq data similarly show that Dominant Red animals achieve predominantly pheomelanin synthesis by downregulating genes normally required for eumelanin synthesis. COPA is a component of the coat protein I seven subunit complex that is involved with retrograde and cis-Golgi intracellular coated vesicle transport of both protein and RNA cargo. This suggests that Dominant Red may be caused by aberrant MC1R protein or mRNA trafficking within the highly compartmentalized melanocyte, mimicking the effect of the Recessive Red loss of function MC1R allele. PMID:26042826

  11. Dominant Red Coat Color in Holstein Cattle Is Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Coatomer Protein Complex, Subunit Alpha (COPA) Gene.

    PubMed

    Dorshorst, Ben; Henegar, Corneliu; Liao, Xiaoping; Sällman Almén, Markus; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Stothard, Paul; Van Doormaal, Brian; Plastow, Graham; Barsh, Gregory S; Andersson, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Coat color in Holstein dairy cattle is primarily controlled by the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a central determinant of black (eumelanin) vs. red/brown pheomelanin synthesis across animal species. The major MC1R alleles in Holsteins are Dominant Black (MC1RD) and Recessive Red (MC1Re). A novel form of dominant red coat color was first observed in an animal born in 1980. The mutation underlying this phenotype was named Dominant Red and is epistatic to the constitutively activated MC1RD. Here we show that a missense mutation in the coatomer protein complex, subunit alpha (COPA), a gene with previously no known role in pigmentation synthesis, is completely associated with Dominant Red in Holstein dairy cattle. The mutation results in an arginine to cysteine substitution at an amino acid residue completely conserved across eukaryotes. Despite this high level of conservation we show that both heterozygotes and homozygotes are healthy and viable. Analysis of hair pigment composition shows that the Dominant Red phenotype is similar to the MC1R Recessive Red phenotype, although less effective at reducing eumelanin synthesis. RNA-seq data similarly show that Dominant Red animals achieve predominantly pheomelanin synthesis by downregulating genes normally required for eumelanin synthesis. COPA is a component of the coat protein I seven subunit complex that is involved with retrograde and cis-Golgi intracellular coated vesicle transport of both protein and RNA cargo. This suggests that Dominant Red may be caused by aberrant MC1R protein or mRNA trafficking within the highly compartmentalized melanocyte, mimicking the effect of the Recessive Red loss of function MC1R allele. PMID:26042826

  12. CLAVATA1 Dominant-Negative Alleles Reveal Functional Overlap between Multiple Receptor Kinases That Regulate Meristem and Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Diévart, Anne; Dalal, Monica; Tax, Frans E.; Lacey, Alexzandria D.; Huttly, Alison; Li, Jianming; Clark, Steven E.

    2003-01-01

    The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) receptor kinase controls stem cell number and differentiation at the Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. Other components of the CLV1 signaling pathway include the secreted putative ligand CLV3 and the receptor-like protein CLV2. We report evidence indicating that all intermediate and strong clv1 alleles are dominant negative and likely interfere with the activity of unknown receptor kinase(s) that have functional overlap with CLV1. clv1 dominant-negative alleles show major differences from dominant-negative alleles characterized to date in animal receptor kinase signaling systems, including the lack of a dominant-negative effect of kinase domain truncation and the ability of missense mutations in the extracellular domain to act in a dominant-negative manner. We analyzed chimeric receptor kinases by fusing CLV1 and BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) coding sequences and expressing these in clv1 null backgrounds. Constructs containing the CLV1 extracellular domain and the BRI1 kinase domain were strongly dominant negative in the regulation of meristem development. Furthermore, we show that CLV1 expressed within the pedicel can partially replace the function of the ERECTA receptor kinase. We propose the presence of multiple receptors that regulate meristem development in a functionally related manner whose interactions are driven by the extracellular domains and whose activation requires the kinase domain. PMID:12724544

  13. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Levine, Jonathan; Minor, Katie M; Humphries, Hammon D; Lara, Renee; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Guo, Ling T; Williams, D Colette; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD). Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C) that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T) within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T) provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations. PMID:25166616

  14. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Labrador Retrievers Having Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rinz, Caitlin J.; Levine, Jonathan; Minor, Katie M.; Humphries, Hammon D.; Lara, Renee; Starr-Moss, Alison N.; Guo, Ling T.; Williams, D. Colette; Shelton, G. Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD). Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C) that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T) within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T) provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations. PMID:25166616

  15. Novel splicing, missense, and deletion mutations in seven adenosine deaminase-deficient patients with late/delayed onset of combined immunodeficiency disease. Contribution of genotype to phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Kelly, S; Mary, A; Fischer, A; Hummell, D S; Lawton, A; Sorensen, R U; Stiehm, E R; Uribe, L

    1993-01-01

    We examined the genetic basis for adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency in seven patients with late/delayed onset of immunodeficiency, an underdiagnosed and relatively unstudied condition. Deoxyadenosine-mediated metabolic abnormalities were less severe than in the usual, early-onset disorder. Six patients were compound heterozygotes; 7 of 10 mutations found were novel, including one deletion (delta 1019-1020), three missense (Arg156 > His, Arg101 > Leu, Val177 > Met), and three splicing defects (IVS 5, 5'ss T+6 > A; IVS 10, 5'ss G+1 > A; IVS 10, 3'ss G-34 > A). Four of the mutations generated stop signals at codons 131, 321, 334, and 348; transcripts of all but the last, due to delta 1019-1020, were severely reduced. delta 1019-1020 (like delta 955-959, found in one patient and apparently recurrent) is at a short deletional hot spot. Arg156 > His, the product of which had detectable activity, was found in three patients whose second alleles were unlikely to yield active ADA. The oldest patient diagnosed was homozygous for a single base change in intron 10, which activates a cryptic splice acceptor, resulting in a protein with 100 extra amino acids. We speculate that this "macro ADA," as well as the Arg156 > His, Arg101 > Leu, Ser291 > Leu, and delta 1019-1020 products, may contribute to mild phenotype. Tissue-specific variation in splicing efficiency may also ameliorate disease severity in patients with splicing mutations. Images PMID:8227344

  16. A novel missense mutation in the mouse hairless gene causes irreversible hair loss: genetic and molecular analyses of Hr m1Enu.

    PubMed

    Nam, YoonYi; Kim, Jeong Ki; Cha, Dal-Sun; Cho, Jae-Woo; Cho, Kyu-Hyuk; Yoon, SeokJoo; Yoon, Jong-Bok; Oh, Yang-Seok; Suh, Jun-Gyo; Han, Sang-Seop; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, SungJoo Kim

    2006-04-01

    A novel autosomal recessive mutant was produced using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis. The characteristics of the mutant mice included progressive irreversible hair loss within a month of birth, wrinkled skin, and long curved nails. Linkage analysis revealed that the causative gene is linked to D14Mit193 on chromosome 14. Sequence analysis of the complete cDNA of the candidate gene, hairless (Hr), identified a homozygous G-to-T transition at nucleotide 3572, leading to the substitution of glycine by tryptophan, designated Gly960Trp. This missense mutation occurs in the vicinity of repression domain 3 of the hairless protein (HR). This allele was named Hr(m1Enu). The relative amounts of Hr mRNA and HR protein determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analyses, respectively, were slightly elevated in the mutant mice. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed the increased expression of Kc1 and Vdr in the mutant mice, whereas the expression of Nrs1 and Krtap16-6 was decreased. These results suggest that the Gly960Trp substitution in HR protein in Hr(m1Enu) mice may alter the function of HR as a transcriptional corepressor. PMID:16455232

  17. Genomic analysis of hybrid rice varieties reveals numerous superior alleles that contribute to heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Yan; Feng, Qi; Gong, Hao; Li, Wenjun; Zhan, Qilin; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Hao, Zhongna; Liu, Kunyan; Zhu, Chuanrang; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Jiayang; Han, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation of heterosis is one of the most important applications of genetics in agriculture. However, the genetic mechanisms of heterosis are only partly understood, and a global view of heterosis from a representative number of hybrid combinations is lacking. Here we develop an integrated genomic approach to construct a genome map for 1,495 elite hybrid rice varieties and their inbred parental lines. We investigate 38 agronomic traits and identify 130 associated loci. In-depth analyses of the effects of heterozygous genotypes reveal that there are only a few loci with strong overdominance effects in hybrids, but a strong correlation is observed between the yield and the number of superior alleles. While most parental inbred lines have only a small number of superior alleles, high-yielding hybrid varieties have several. We conclude that the accumulation of numerous rare superior alleles with positive dominance is an important contributor to the heterotic phenomena. PMID:25651972

  18. Specific HLA-DQB and HLA-DRB1 alleles confer susceptibility to pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Freidmann, A; Steinman, L; Brautbar, C; Erlich, H A

    1989-01-01

    The autoimmune dermatologic disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is associated with the serotypes HLA-DR4 and HLA-DRw6. Based on nucleotide sequence and oligonucleotide probe analysis of enzymatically amplified DNA encoding HLA-DR beta chain (HLA-DRB) and HLA-DQ beta chain (HLA-DQB; henceforth HLA is omitted from designations), we showed previously that the DR4 susceptibility was associated with the Dw10 DRB1 allele [encoding the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-defined Dw10 specificity]. The DRw6 susceptibility similarly was shown to be associated with a rare DQB allele (DQB1.3), which differed from another nonsusceptible allele by only a valine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 57. Given the linkage disequilibrium that characterizes HLA haplotypes, it is difficult to assign disease susceptibility to a specific locus rather than to a closely linked gene(s) on the same haplotype. To address this problem, we have analyzed all of the polymorphic loci of the class II HLA region (DRB1, DRB3, DQA, DQB, and DPB) on the DRw6 haplotypes in patients and controls. In 22 PV patients, 4 different DRw6 haplotypes were found that encode the same DQ beta chain (DQB1.3) but contained silent nucleotide differences at the DQB locus as well as coding sequence differences in the DQA and DRB loci. These results, obtained by using a method for allele-specific polymerase chain reaction amplification, strongly support the hypothesis that the allele DQB1.3 confers susceptibility. This DQB allele is correlated with the MLC-defined Dw9 specificity and is associated with two different DRB1 alleles (the common "6A" associated with DRw13 and the rare "6B" associated with DRw14). Since 86% (19 of 22) of DRw6+ patients contain the DQB1.3 allele (vs. 3% of controls), whereas 64% (14 of 22) contain the DRB1 allele 6B (vs. 6% of the controls), we conclude that most of the DRw6 susceptibility to PV can be accounted for by the DQ beta chain. Images PMID:2503828

  19. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: Multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, G. ); Moskowitz, S.M.; Tieu, P.T.; Matynia, A.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1993-08-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg in exon 9 and Ter[yields]Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter), exon 7 (Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter), or exon 8 (Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr[sub 366][yields]Pro and Ter[yields]Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of [alpha]-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly[sub 409][yields]Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr[sub 64][yields]Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln[sub 310][yields]Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Molecular analysis of Hurler syndrome in Druze and Muslim Arab patients in Israel: multiple allelic mutations of the IDUA gene in a small geographic area.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, G; Moskowitz, S M; Tieu, P T; Matynia, A; Neufeld, E F

    1993-01-01

    The mutations underlying Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IH) in Druze and Muslim Israeli Arab patients have been characterized. Four alleles were identified, using a combination of (a) PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed RNA or genomic DNA segments, (b) cycle sequencing of PCR products, and (c) restriction-enzyme analysis. One allele has two amino acid substitutions, Gly409-->Arg in exon 9 and Ter-->Cys in exon 14. The other three alleles have mutations in exon 2 (Tyr64-->Ter), exon 7 (Gln310-->Ter), or exon 8 (Thr366-->Pro). Transfection of mutagenized cDNAs into Cos-1 cells showed that two missense mutations, Thr366-->Pro and Ter-->Cys, permitted the expression of only trace amounts of alpha-L-iduronidase activity, whereas Gly409-->Arg permitted the expression of 60% as much enzyme as did the normal cDNA. The nonsense mutations were associated with abnormalities of RNA processing: (1) both a very low level of mRNA and skipping of exon 2 for Tyr64-->Ter and (2) utilization of a cryptic splice site for Gln310-->Ter. In all instances, the probands were found homozygous, and the parents heterozygous, for the mutant alleles, as anticipated from the consanguinity in each family. The two-mutation allele was identified in a family from Gaza; the other three alleles were found in seven families, five of them Druze, residing in a very small area of northern Israel. Since such clustering suggests a classic founder effect, the presence of three mutant alleles of the IDUA gene was unexpected. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8328452

  1. Targeted deep resequencing of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP in patients with diabetes and association of rare variants with leukotriene pathways

    PubMed Central

    POSTULA, MAREK; JANICKI, PIOTR KAZIMIERZ; ROSIAK, MAREK; EYILETEN, CEREN; ZAREMBA, MAŁGORZATA; KAPLON-CIESLICKA, AGNIESZKA; SUGINO, SHIGEKAZU; KOSIOR, DARIUSZ ARTUR; OPOLSKI, GRZEGORZ; FILIPIAK, KRZYSZTOF JERZY; MIROWSKA-GUZEL, DAGMARA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate a possible association between the accumulation of rare coding variants in the genes for arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) and ALOX5-activating protein (ALOX5AP), and corresponding production of leukotrienes (LTs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) receiving acetylsalicylic therapy. Twenty exons and corresponding introns of the selected genes were resequenced in 303 DNA samples from patients with T2DM using pooled polymerase chain reaction amplification and next-generation sequencing, using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The observed non-synonymous variants were further confirmed by individual genotyping of DNA samples comprising of all individuals from the original discovery pools. The association between the investigated phenotypes was based on LTB4 and LTE4 concentrations, and the accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was evaluated using statistical collapsing tests. A total of 10 exonic variants were identified for each resequenced gene, including 5 missense and 5 synonymous variants. The rare missense variants did not exhibit statistically significant differences in the accumulation pattern between the patients with low and high LTs concentrations. As the present study only included patients with T2DM, it is unclear whether the absence of observed association between the accumulation of rare missense variants in investigated genes and LT production is associated with diabetic populations only or may also be applied to other populations. PMID:27347071

  2. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  3. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Development and Validation of a Computational Method for Assessment of Missense Variants in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Daniel M.; Kiezun, Adam; Baxter, Samantha M.; Agarwala, Vineeta; Green, Robert C.; Murray, Michael F.; Pugh, Trevor; Lebo, Matthew S.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Funke, Birgit H.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the significance of novel genetic variants revealed by DNA sequencing is a major challenge to the integration of genomic techniques with medical practice. Many variants remain difficult to classify by traditional genetic methods. Computational methods have been developed that could contribute to classifying these variants, but they have not been properly validated and are generally not considered mature enough to be used effectively in a clinical setting. We developed a computational method for predicting the effects of missense variants detected in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We used a curated clinical data set of 74 missense variants in six genes associated with HCM to train and validate an automated predictor. The predictor is based on support vector regression and uses phylogenetic and structural features specific to genes involved in HCM. Ten-fold cross validation estimated our predictor's sensitivity at 94% (95% confidence interval: 83%–98%) and specificity at 89% (95% confidence interval: 72%–100%). This corresponds to an odds ratio of 10 for a prediction of pathogenic (95% confidence interval: 4.0–infinity), or an odds ratio of 9.9 for a prediction of benign (95% confidence interval: 4.6–21). Coverage (proportion of variants for which a prediction was made) was 57% (95% confidence interval: 49%–64%). This performance exceeds that of existing methods that are not specifically designed for HCM. The accuracy of this predictor provides support for the clinical use of automated predictions alongside family segregation and population frequency data in the interpretation of new missense variants and suggests future development of similar tools for other diseases. PMID:21310275

  5. Genetic and structure-function studies of missense mutations in human endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Haubold, Kurt; Santorico, Stephanie A; Shokati, Touraj; Christians, Uwe; Churchill, Mair E A

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism. We sought to characterize EL and its interaction with HDL as well as its natural variants genetically, functionally and structurally. We screened our biethnic population sample (n = 802) for selected missense mutations (n = 5) and identified T111I as the only common variant. Multiple linear regression analyses in Hispanic subjects revealed an unexpected association between T111I and elevated LDL-C (p-value = 0.012) and total cholesterol (p-value = 0.004). We examined lipase activity of selected missense mutants (n = 10) and found different impacts on EL function, ranging from normal to complete loss of activity. EL-HDL lipidomic analyses indicated that EL has a defined remodeling of HDL without exhaustion of the substrate and a distinct and preference for several fatty acids that are lipid mediators and known for their potent pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Structural studies using homology modeling revealed a novel α/β motif in the C-domain, unique to EL. The EL dimer was found to have the flexibility to expand and to bind various sizes of HDL particles. The likely impact of the all known missense mutations (n = 18) on the structure of EL was examined using molecular modeling and the impact they may have on EL lipase activity using a novel structure-function slope based on their structural free energy differences. The results of this multidisciplinary approach delineated the impact of EL and its variants on HDL. Moreover, the results suggested EL to have the capacity to modulate vascular health through its role in fatty acid-based signaling pathways. PMID:23536757

  6. A novel AMH missense mutation in a patient with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Y G; Brüggenwirth, H T; Drop, S L S; Wolffenbuttel, K P; Madern, G C; Looijenga, L H J; Visser, J A

    2012-01-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is characterized by the presence of a uterus, fallopian tubes, and the upper part of the vagina in phenotypic normal male patients. Here, we report a patient diagnosed with PMDS with a novel homozygous missense mutation in the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) gene (single nucleotide insertion (C) at position 208 (c.208dup, p.Leu70fs)) leading to a frameshift and the introduction of a premature stop codon. Biopsy of both gonads revealed that germ cells were present in an irregular distribution. However, the absence of OCT3/4, PLAP and c-KIT expression indicated physiological maturation. PMID:22797409

  7. Population Bottlenecks and Nonequilibrium Models in Population Genetics. I. Allele Numbers When Populations Evolve from Zero Variability

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takeo; Fuerst, Paul A.

    1984-01-01

    A simple numerical method was developed for the mean number and average age of alleles in a population that was initiated with no genetic variation following a sudden population expansion. The methods are used to examine the question of whether allele numbers are elevated compared with values seen in equilibrium populations having equivalent gene diversity. Excess allele numbers in expanding populations were found to be the rule. This was true whether the population began with zero variation or with low levels of variation in either of two initial distributions (initially an equilibrium allele frequency distribution or initially with loci occurring in only two classes of variation). Although the increase of alleles may persist for only a short time, when compared with the time which is required for approach to final equilibrium, the increase may be long when measured in absolute generation numbers. The pattern of increase in very rare alleles (those present only once in a sample) and the persistence of the original allele were also investigated. PMID:6500263

  8. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  9. A variational Bayes discrete mixture test for rare variant association.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Benjamin A; Dai, James Y; Auer, Paul L; Johnsen, Jill M; Ganesh, Santhi K; Smith, Nicholas L; Wilson, James G; Tracy, Russell P; Lange, Leslie A; Jiao, Shuo; Rich, Stephen S; Lettre, Guillaume; Carlson, Christopher S; Jackson, Rebecca D; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Wurfel, Mark M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Tang, Hua; Reiner, Alexander P; Kooperberg, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many statistical methods have been proposed to test for associations between rare genetic variants and complex traits. Most of these methods test for association by aggregating genetic variations within a predefined region, such as a gene. Although there is evidence that "aggregate" tests are more powerful than the single marker test, these tests generally ignore neutral variants and therefore are unable to identify specific variants driving the association with phenotype. We propose a novel aggregate rare-variant test that explicitly models a fraction of variants as neutral, tests associations at the gene-level, and infers the rare-variants driving the association. Simulations show that in the practical scenario where there are many variants within a given region of the genome with only a fraction causal our approach has greater power compared to other popular tests such as the Sequence Kernel Association Test (SKAT), the Weighted Sum Statistic (WSS), and the collapsing method of Morris and Zeggini (MZ). Our algorithm leverages a fast variational Bayes approximate inference methodology to scale to exome-wide analyses, a significant computational advantage over exact inference model selection methodologies. To demonstrate the efficacy of our methodology we test for associations between von Willebrand Factor (VWF) levels and VWF missense rare-variants imputed from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Exome Sequencing project into 2,487 African Americans within the VWF gene. Our method suggests that a relatively small fraction (~10%) of the imputed rare missense variants within VWF are strongly associated with lower VWF levels in African Americans. PMID:24482836

  10. A new glucocerebrosidase-gene missense mutation responsible for neuronopathic Gaucher disease in Japanese patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kawame, H; Eto, Y

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a new T-to-A single-base substitution at nucleotide 3548 (in the genomic sequence) in exon 6 in the glucocerebrosidase gene from a patient with Gaucher disease type 3. This mutation caused a substitution of isoleucine for phenylalanine at amino acid residue 213 (of 497 residues in the mature protein). By in vitro expression study in cultured mammalian cells, this mutation resulted in deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase. By allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of selectively PCR-amplified DNA from eight unrelated Japanese Gaucher disease patients, this mutant allele was observed in other neuronopathic Japanese Gaucher disease patients, in moderately frequent occurrence (three of six neuronopathic patients). This observation suggests that this allele was one of severe [corrected] alleles which were related to the development of neurological manifestations of Gaucher disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1840477

  11. Robust and powerful affected sibpairtest for rare variant association

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Keng-Han; Zöllner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology facilitate investigating the impact of rare variants on complex diseases. However, using a conventional case-control design, large samples are needed to capture enough rare variants to achieve sufficient power for testing the association between suspected loci and complex diseases. In such large samples, population stratification may easily cause spurious signals. One approach to overcome stratification is to use a family-based design. For rare variants, this strategy is especially appropriate, as power can be increased considerably by analyzing cases with affected relatives. We propose a novel framework for association testing in affected sibpairs by comparing the allele count of rare variants on chromosome regions shared identical by descent to the allele count of rare variants on non-shared chromosome regions, referred to as test for rare-variant association with family-based internal control (TRAFIC). This design is generally robust to population stratification as cases and controls are matched within each sibpair. We evaluate the power analytically using general model for effect size of rare variants. For the same number of genotyped people, TRAFIC shows superior power over the conventional case-control study for variants with summed risk allele frequency f < 0.05; this power advantage is even more substantial when considering allelic heterogeneity. For complex models of gene-gene interaction, this power advantage depends on the direction of interaction and overall heritability. In sum, we introduce a new method for analyzing rare variants in affected sibpairs that is robust to population stratification, and provide freely available software. PMID:25966809

  12. Phenotypically distinct subtypes of psychosis accompany novel or rare variants in four different signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Thorsten M.; Berns, Adam; Shields, Jerry; Rothman, Karen; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Goetz, Raymond R.; Chao, Moses V.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare gene variants are important sources of schizophrenia vulnerability that likely interact with polygenic susceptibility loci. This study examined if novel or rare missense coding variants in any of four different signaling genes in sporadic schizophrenia cases were associated with clinical phenotypes in an exceptionally well-characterized sample. Method Structured interviews, cognition, symptoms and life course features were assessed in 48 ethnically-diverse cases with psychosis who underwent targeted exome sequencing of PTPRG (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Receptor Type G), SLC39A13 (Solute Carrier Family 39 (Zinc Transporter) Member 13), TGM5 (transglutaminase 5) and ARMS/KIDINS220 (Ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning protein or Kinase D-Interacting Substrate of 220 kDa). Cases harboring rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in one or more of these genes were compared to other cases not carrying any rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in these genes and healthy controls. Findings Fifteen of 48 cases (31.25%) carried rare or novel missense coding variants in one or more of these genes. The subgroups significantly differed in important features, including specific working memory deficits for PTPRG (n = 5); severe negative symptoms, global cognitive deficits and poor educational attainment, suggesting a developmental disorder, for SLC39A13 (n = 4); slow processing speed, childhood attention deficit disorder and milder symptoms for TGM5 (n = 4); and global cognitive deficits with good educational attainment suggesting neurodegeneration for ARMS/KIDINS220 (n = 5). Case vignettes are included in the appendix. Interpretation Genes prone to missense coding polymorphisms and/or mutations in sporadic cases may highlight influential genes for psychosis and illuminate heterogeneous pathways to schizophrenia. Ethnicity appears less important at the level of genetic variability. The sequence variations that potentially

  13. Predicting the Impact of Missense Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-04-01

    The crucial prerequisite for proper biological function is the protein's ability to establish highly selective interactions with macromolecular partners. A missense mutation that alters the protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of the function, potentially leading to diseases. The availability of computational methods to evaluate the impact of mutations on protein-protein binding is critical for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report an efficient computational approach for predicting the effect of single and multiple missense mutations on protein-protein binding affinity. It is based on a well-tested simulation protocol for structure minimization, modified MM-PBSA and statistical scoring energy functions with parameters optimized on experimental sets of several thousands of mutations. Our simulation protocol yields very good agreement between predicted and experimental values with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.69 and 0.63 and root-mean-square errors of 1.20 and 1.90 kcal mol(-1) for single and multiple mutations, respectively. Compared with other available methods, our approach achieves high speed and prediction accuracy and can be applied to large datasets generated by modern genomics initiatives. In addition, we report a crucial role of water model and the polar solvation energy in estimating the changes in binding affinity. Our analysis also reveals that prediction accuracy and effect of mutations on binding strongly depends on the type of mutation and its location in a protein complex. PMID:24803870

  14. The ZZ domain of dystrophin in DMD: making sense of missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Strandjord, Dana M; Johnson, Eric K; Findlay, Andrew R; Maiti, Baijayanta; Howard, Michael T; Kaminoh, Yuuki J; Taylor, Laura E; Simmons, Tabatha R; Ray, Will C; Montanaro, Federica; Ervasti, Jim M; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with the loss of dystrophin, which plays an important role in myofiber integrity via interactions with β-dystroglycan and other members of the transmembrane dystrophin-associated protein complex. The ZZ domain, a cysteine-rich zinc-finger domain near the dystrophin C-terminus, is implicated in forming a stable interaction between dystrophin and β-dystroglycan, but the mechanism of pathogenesis of ZZ missense mutations has remained unclear because not all such mutations have been shown to alter β-dystroglycan binding in previous experimental systems. We engineered three ZZ mutations (p.Cys3313Phe, p.Asp3335His, and p.Cys3340Tyr) into a short construct similar to the Dp71 dystrophin isoform for in vitro and in vivo studies and delineated their effect on protein expression, folding properties, and binding partners. Our results demonstrate two distinct pathogenic mechanisms for ZZ missense mutations. The cysteine mutations result in diminished or absent subsarcolemmal expression because of protein instability, likely due to misfolding. In contrast, the aspartic acid mutation disrupts binding with β-dystroglycan despite an almost normal expression at the membrane, confirming a role for the ZZ domain in β-dystroglycan binding but surprisingly demonstrating that such binding is not required for subsarcolemmal localization of dystrophin, even in the absence of actin binding domains. PMID:24302611

  15. Effects of mutations at position 36 of tRNA(Glu) on missense and nonsense suppression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S T; Dahlberg, A E

    1995-03-13

    Mutations in the anticodon of tRNA(Glu) (UUC) were isolated or constructed and characterized for their ability to suppress cognate nonsense or missense mutations in vivo. The C36-to-A36 transversion mutation was isolated as an ochre and an amber suppressor, while the G36 transversion was selected as a CAG missense suppressor. tRNA(Glu) suppressors of an AAG missense mutation could not be isolated, and a U36 transition mutation introduced into tRNA(Glu) in vitro conferred no suppressor phenotype. Over-expression of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase did not increase the activity of the U36 mutant tRNA(Glu), suggesting a defect at the level of translation rather than at the level of synthetase recognition. PMID:7890035

  16. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  18. Rational Manual and Automated Scoring Thresholds for the Immunohistochemical Detection of TP53 Missense Mutations in Human Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R; Conway, Kathleen; Millikan, Robert C; Geradts, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Missense mutations in TP53 are common in human breast cancer, have been associated with worse prognosis, and may predict therapy effect. TP53 missense mutations are associated with aberrant accumulation of p53 protein in tumor cell nuclei. Previous studies have used relatively arbitrary cutoffs to characterize breast tumors as positive for p53 staining by immunohistochemical assays. This study aimed to objectively determine optimal thresholds for p53 positivity by manual and automated scoring methods using whole tissue sections from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. p53-immunostained slides were available for 564 breast tumors previously assayed for TP53 mutations. Average nuclear p53 staining intensity was manually scored as negative, borderline, weak, moderate, or strong and percentage of positive tumor cells was estimated. Automated p53 signal intensity was measured using the Aperio nuclear v9 algorithm combined with the Genie histology pattern recognition tool and tuned to achieve optimal nuclear segmentation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoffs for average staining intensity and percent cells positive to distinguish between tumors with and without a missense mutation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated a threshold of moderate average nuclear staining intensity as a good surrogate for TP53 missense mutations in both manual (area under the curve=0.87) and automated (area under the curve=0.84) scoring systems. Both manual and automated immunohistochemical scoring methods predicted missense mutations in breast carcinomas with high accuracy. Validation of the automated intensity scoring threshold suggests a role for such algorithms in detecting TP53 missense mutations in high throughput studies. PMID:26200835

  19. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. PMID:25732248

  20. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami; Kaneda, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Saiki, Yuriko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Gondo, Yoichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1-4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14-17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. PMID:27131742

  1. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  2. Breed Distribution of SOD1 Alleles Previously Associated with Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, R; Coates, JR; Johnson, GC; Hansen, L; Awano, T; Kolicheski, A; Ivansson, E; Perloski, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; O'Brien, DP; Guo, J; Katz, ML; Johnson, GS

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports associated 2 mutant SOD1 alleles (SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T) with degenerative myelopathy in 6 canine breeds. The distribution of these alleles in other breeds has not been reported. Objective To describe the distribution of SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T in 222 breeds. Animals DNA from 33,747 dogs was genotyped at SOD1:c.118, SOD1:c.52, or both. Spinal cord sections from 249 of these dogs were examined. Methods Retrospective analysis of 35,359 previously determined genotypes at SOD1:c.118G>A or SOD1:c.52A>T and prospective survey to update the clinical status of a subset of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias. Results The SOD1:c.118A allele was found in cross-bred dogs and in 124 different canine breeds whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele was only found in Bernese Mountain Dogs. Most of the dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A homozygotes, but 8 dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes and had no other sequence variants in their SOD1 amino acid coding regions. The updated clinical conditions of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias suggest that SOD1:c.118A homozygotes are at a much higher risk of developing degenerative myelopathy than are SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes. Conclusions and Clinical Importance We conclude that the SOD1:c.118A allele is widespread and common among privately owned dogs whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele is rare and appears to be limited to Bernese Mountain Dogs. We also conclude that breeding to avoid the production of SOD1:c.118A homozygotes is a rational strategy. PMID:24524809

  3. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  5. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  6. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  7. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  8. The impact of low-frequency and rare variants on lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    Surakka, Ida; Horikoshi, Momoko; Mägi, Reedik; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Lagou, Vasiliki; Marullo, Letizia; Ferreira, Teresa; Miraglio, Benjamin; Timonen, Sanna; Kettunen, Johannes; Pirinen, Matti; Karjalainen, Juha; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hägg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Isaacs, Aaron; Ladenvall, Claes; Beekman, Marian; Esko, Tõnu; Ried, Janina S; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Gustafsson, Stefan; Westra, Harm-Jan; Blades, Matthew; de Craen, Anton JM; de Geus, Eco J; Deelen, Joris; Grallert, Harald; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Hyppönen, Elina; Karssen, Lennart C; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mihailov, Evelin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Pedersen, Nancy L; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Perola, Markus; Pers, Tune H; Peters, Annette; Rung, Johan; Smit, Johannes H; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tobin, Martin D; Tsernikova, Natalia; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Viikari, Jorma S; Willems, Sara M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lind, Lars; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Slagboom, P Eline; Groop, Leif; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Boomsma, Dorret I; Power, Christine; Raitakari, Olli T; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Stefansson, Kari; Franke, Lude; Ikonen, Elina; Kallioniemi, Olli; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Palotie, Aarno; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P; Prokopenko, Inga; Ripatti, Samuli

    2016-01-01

    Using a genome-wide screen of 9.6 million genetic variants achieved through 1000 Genomes imputation in 62,166 samples, we identify association to lipids in 93 loci including 79 previously identified loci with new lead-SNPs, 10 new loci, 15 loci with a low-frequency and 10 loci with missense lead-SNPs, and, 2 loci with an accumulation of rare variants. In six loci, SNPs with established function in lipid genetics (CELSR2, GCKR, LIPC, and APOE), or candidate missense mutations with predicted damaging function (CD300LG and TM6SF2), explained the locus associations. The low-frequency variants increased the proportion of variance explained, particularly for LDL-C and TC. Altogether, our results highlight the impact of low-frequency variants in complex traits and show that imputation offers a cost-effective alternative to re-sequencing. PMID:25961943

  9. Effect of liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP) T94A missense mutation on plasma lipoprotein responsiveness to treatment with fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Charles; Bossé, Yohan; Pérusse, Louis; Gaudet, Daniel; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2004-01-01

    conserved among species. We subsequently screened another sample of 130 French Canadian subjects treated with fenofibrate for the presence of the LFABP T94A mutation. Carriers of the A94 allele were at increased risk to exhibit plasma TG levels above 2.00 mmol/l after treatment with fenofibrate [2.75 (1.03-7.34); OR 95% confidence interval (CI)]. In addition, carriers of the A94 allele were characterized by higher baseline plasma-free fatty acid levels (FFA) ( p=0.01) and by a lower body mass index (BMI) ( p=0.05) and waist circumference ( p=0.005) than T94 homozygotes. Moreover, PPARalpha L162V and LFABP T94A showed to have a synergistic effect on BMI ( p interaction = 0.03). These results suggest that the LFABP T94A missense mutation could influence obesity indices as well as the risk to exhibit residual hypertriglyceridmia following a lipid-lowering therapy with fenofibrate. PMID:15249972

  10. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  11. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  12. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  13. Molecular analysis of human leukocyte antigen class I and class II allele frequencies and haplotype distribution in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Moatter, T.; Aban, M.; Tabassum, S.; Shaikh, U.; Pervez, S.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Distribution of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotype was studied in Pakistani population and compared with the data reported for Caucasoid, Africans, Orientals and Arab populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA class I and II polymorphisms in 1000 unrelated Pakistani individuals was studied using sequence-specific primers and polymerase chain reaction and assay. RESULTS: The most frequent class I alleles observed were A*02, B*35 and CW*07, with frequencies of 19.2, 13.7 and 20%, respectively. Fifteen distinct HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight HLA-DQB1 alleles were recognized. The most frequently observed DRB1 alleles which represented more than 60% of the subjects were DRB1 *03, *07, *11 and *15. The rare DRB1 alleles detected in this study were HLADRB1 *08 and *09, having frequencies of 0.9 and 1.7%, respectively. In addition, at DRB1-DQB1 loci there were 179 different haplotypes and 285 unique genotypes and the most common haplotype was DRB1*15-DQB1*06 which represented 17% of the total DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes. In our population, haplotype A*33-B*58-Cw*03 comprised 2.8% of the total class I haplotypes observed. This haplotype was seen only in the oriental populations and has not been reported in the African or European Caucasoid. CONCLUSION: Our study showed a close similarity of HLA class I and II alleles with that of European Caucasoid and Orientals. In Pakistani population, two rare loci and three haplotypes were identified, whereas haplotypes characteristic of Caucasians, Africans and Orientals were also found, suggesting an admixture of different races due to migration to and from this region. PMID:21206703

  14. Human-specific derived alleles of CD33 and other genes protect against postreproductive cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Flavio; Springer, Stevan A.; Altheide, Tasha K.; Varki, Nissi M.; Gagneux, Pascal; Varki, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    The individuals of most vertebrate species die when they can no longer reproduce. Humans are a rare exception, having evolved a prolonged postreproductive lifespan. Elders contribute to cooperative offspring care, assist in foraging, and communicate important ecological and cultural knowledge, increasing the survival of younger individuals. Age-related deterioration of cognitive capacity in humans compromises these benefits and also burdens the group with socially costly members. We investigated the contribution of the immunoregulatory receptor CD33 to a uniquely human postreproductive disease, Alzheimer’s dementia. Surprisingly, even though selection at advanced age is expected to be weak, a CD33 allele protective against Alzheimer’s disease is derived and unique to humans and favors a functional molecular state of CD33 resembling that of the chimpanzee. Thus, derived alleles may be compensatory and restore interactions altered as a consequence of human-specific brain evolution. We found several other examples of derived alleles at other human loci that protect against age-related cognitive deterioration arising from neurodegenerative disease or cerebrovascular insufficiency. Selection by inclusive fitness may be strong enough to favor alleles protecting specifically against cognitive decline in postreproductive humans. Such selection would operate by maximizing the contributions of postreproductive individuals to the fitness of younger kin. PMID:26621708

  15. Human-specific derived alleles of CD33 and other genes protect against postreproductive cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Flavio; Springer, Stevan A; Altheide, Tasha K; Varki, Nissi M; Gagneux, Pascal; Varki, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    The individuals of most vertebrate species die when they can no longer reproduce. Humans are a rare exception, having evolved a prolonged postreproductive lifespan. Elders contribute to cooperative offspring care, assist in foraging, and communicate important ecological and cultural knowledge, increasing the survival of younger individuals. Age-related deterioration of cognitive capacity in humans compromises these benefits and also burdens the group with socially costly members. We investigated the contribution of the immunoregulatory receptor CD33 to a uniquely human postreproductive disease, Alzheimer's dementia. Surprisingly, even though selection at advanced age is expected to be weak, a CD33 allele protective against Alzheimer's disease is derived and unique to humans and favors a functional molecular state of CD33 resembling that of the chimpanzee. Thus, derived alleles may be compensatory and restore interactions altered as a consequence of human-specific brain evolution. We found several other examples of derived alleles at other human loci that protect against age-related cognitive deterioration arising from neurodegenerative disease or cerebrovascular insufficiency. Selection by inclusive fitness may be strong enough to favor alleles protecting specifically against cognitive decline in postreproductive humans. Such selection would operate by maximizing the contributions of postreproductive individuals to the fitness of younger kin. PMID:26621708

  16. Distribution of CGG repeats and FRAXAC1/DXS548 alleles in South American populations.

    PubMed

    Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Angeli, Claudia B; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Leal-Mesquita, Emygdia R; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K C; Ferrari, Iris; Hutz, Mara H; Salzano, Francisco M; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M

    2002-08-15

    In order to assess the molecular variability related to fragile X (FMR1 locus), we investigated the distribution of CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes in normal South American populations of different ethnic backgrounds. Special attention was given to Amerindian Wai-Wai (Northern Brazil) and Ache (Paraguay), as well as to Brazilian isolated communities of African ancestry, the remnants of quilombos. Comparison of samples from quilombos, Amerindians, and the ethnically mixed, but mainly European-derived population of São Paulo revealed that the 30-copy allele of the fragile X gene is the most frequent in all groups. A second peak at 20 repeats was present in the population of São Paulo only, confirming this as a European peculiarity. The distribution of DXS548 and FRAXAC1 alleles led to a high expected heterozygosity in African Brazilians, followed by that observed in the population of São Paulo. Amerindians showed the lowest diversity in CGG repeats and DXS548/FRAXAC1 haplotypes. Some rare alleles, for example, the 148-bp (FRAXAC1) or 200-bp (DXS548) variants, which seem to be almost absent in Europe, occurred in higher frequencies among African Brazilians. This suggests a general trend for higher genetic diversity among Africans; these rarer alleles could be African in origin and would have been lost or possibly were not present in the groups that gave rise to the Europeans. PMID:12210320

  17. Association between AgI-CA alleles and severity of autosomal recessive proximal spina lmuscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.D.; Fuerst, P.; Ingraham, S.E.; Mendell, J.R.; Burghes, A.H.M.; Morgan, K.; Prescott, G.; Simard, L.R.; McPherson, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been mapped to an 850-kb interval on 5q11.2-q13.3, between the centromeric D5S823 and telomeric D5S557 markers. We report a new complex marker, Ag1-CA, that lies in this interval, whose primers produce one, two, or rarely three amplification-fragment-length variants (AFLVs) per allele. Class I chromosomes are those which amplify a single AFLV allele, and class II chromosomes are those which amplify an allele with two or three AFLVs. Ag1-CA shows highly significant allelic association with type I SMA in both the French Canadian (Hopital Sainte-Justine (HSJ)) and American (Ohio State University (OSU)) populations (P < .0001). Significant association between the Ag1-CA genotype and disease severity was also observed. Type I patients were predominantly homozygous for class I chromosomes (P = .0003 OSU; P = 0.0012 HSJ), whereas the majority of type II patients were heterozygous for class I and II chromosomes (P = .0014 OSU; P = .001 HSJ). There was no significant difference in Ag1-CA genotype frequencies between type III patients (P = .5 OSU; P = .25 HSJ) and the paired normal chromosomes from both carrier parents. Our results indicate that Ag1-CA is the most closely linked marker to SMA and defines the critical candidate-gene region. Finally, we have proposed a model that should be taken into consideration when screening candidates SMA genes.

  18. Functional and Structural Consequence of Rare Exonic Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms: One Story, Two Tales

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wanjun; Gurguis, Christopher I.; Zhou, Jin J.; Zhu, Yihua; Ko, Eun-A.; Ko, Jae-Hong; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation arising from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is ubiquitously found among human populations. While disease-causing variants are known in some cases, identifying functional or causative variants for most human diseases remains a challenging task. Rare SNPs, rather than common ones, are thought to be more important in the pathology of most human diseases. We propose that rare SNPs should be divided into two categories dependent on whether the minor alleles are derived or ancestral. Derived alleles are less likely to have been purified by evolutionary processes and may be more likely to induce deleterious effects. We therefore hypothesized that the rare SNPs with derived minor alleles would be more important for human diseases and predicted that these variants would have larger functional or structural consequences relative to the rare variants for which the minor alleles are ancestral. We systematically investigated the consequences of the exonic SNPs on protein function, mRNA structure, and translation. We found that the functional and structural consequences are more significant for the rare exonic variants for which the minor alleles are derived. However, this pattern is reversed when the minor alleles are ancestral. Thus, the rare exonic SNPs with derived minor alleles are more likely to be deleterious. Age estimation of rare SNPs confirms that these potentially deleterious SNPs are recently evolved in the human population. These results have important implications for understanding the function of genetic variations in human exonic regions and for prioritizing functional SNPs in genome-wide association studies of human diseases. PMID:26454016

  19. Variant Alleles, Triallelic Patterns, and Point Mutations Observed in Nuclear Short Tandem Repeat Typing of Populations in Bosnia and Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Huel, René L. M.; Bašić, Lara; Madacki-Todorović, Kamelija; Smajlović, Lejla; Eminović, Izet; Berbić, Irfan; Miloš, Ana; Parsons, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To present a compendium of off-ladder alleles and other genotyping irregularities relating to rare/unexpected population genetic variation, observed in a large short tandem repeat (STR) database from Bosnia and Serbia. Methods DNA was extracted from blood stain cards relating to reference samples from a population of 32 800 individuals from Bosnia and Serbia, and typed using Promega’s PowerPlex®16 STR kit. Results There were 31 distinct off-ladder alleles were observed in 10 of the 15 STR loci amplified from the PowerPlex®16 STR kit. Of these 31 alleles, 3 have not been previously reported. Furthermore, 16 instances of triallelic patterns were observed in 9 of the 15 loci. Primer binding site mismatches that affected amplification were observed in two loci, D5S818 and D8S1179. Conclusion Instances of deviations from manufacturer’s allelic ladders should be expected and caution taken to properly designate the correct alleles in large DNA databases. Particular care should be taken in kinship matching or paternity cases as incorrect designation of any of these deviations from allelic ladders could lead to false exclusions. PMID:17696304

  20. Genetic instability of the lozenge locus in Drosophila melanogaster: Characterization of the lz{sup 75V} allele

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshina, M.A.; Golubovskii, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    Genetic properties of lz{sup 75V}, an unstable allele of the lozenge locus, are described. The lz{sup 75V} allele appeared in progeny of a male from a Far East natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. Mutation of this allele produces a broad spectrum of mutant derivatives with phenotypes varying from normal to extreme. The arising alleles can be stable or unstable. Some lz{sup 75V} derivatives continuously preserve their spontaneous mutability in laboratory conditions, whereas other alleles of the same family show progressive stabilization at the intralocus or intrachromosome level. Instability of the lz{sup 75V}-bearing X chromosome is locus-specific: only the lozenge gene mutates with high frequency, while visible mutations at other loci rarely occur. As shown previously, the lz{sup 75V} allele appears to be caused by a P-element insertion. The appearance of spontaneous instability is discussed with regard to the general problem of transposition regulation in mobile elements. Different systems of hybrid dysgenesis, and, in particular, P elements are assumed to play an important role in induction of unstable mutations in nature. 24 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource. PMID:26763160

  2. Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency in Sub-Saharan Africa: Identification of a Highly Frequent Missense Mutation (G829A;Glu277Lys) and Association with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Patrícia; Manco, Licínio; Gomes, Cláudia; Mendes, Cristina; Fernandes, Natércia; Salomé, Graça; Sitoe, Luis; Chibute, Sérgio; Langa, José; Ribeiro, Letícia; Miranda, Juliana; Cano, Jorge; Pinto, João; Amorim, António; do Rosário, Virgílio E.; Arez, Ana Paula

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, causing hemolytic anemia, has been associated to malaria protection and its prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa is not known so far. This work shows the results of a study undertaken to determine PK deficiency occurrence in some sub-Saharan African countries, as well as finding a prevalent PK variant underlying this deficiency. Materials and Methods Blood samples of individuals from four malaria endemic countries (Mozambique, Angola, Equatorial Guinea and Sao Tome and Principe) were analyzed in order to determine PK deficiency occurrence and detect any possible high frequent PK variant mutation. The association between this mutation and malaria was ascertained through association studies involving sample groups from individuals showing different malaria infection and outcome status. Results The percentage of individuals showing a reduced PK activity in Maputo was 4.1% and the missense mutation G829A (Glu277Lys) in the PKLR gene (only identified in three individuals worldwide to date) was identified in a high frequency. Heterozygous carrier frequency was between 6.7% and 2.6%. A significant association was not detected between either PK reduced activity or allele 829A frequency and malaria infection and outcome, although the variant was more frequent among individuals with uncomplicated malaria. Conclusions This was the first study on the occurrence of PK deficiency in several areas of Africa. A common PKLR mutation G829A (Glu277Lys) was identified. A global geographical co-distribution between malaria and high frequency of PK deficiency seems to occur suggesting that malaria may be a selective force raising the frequency of this 277Lys variant. PMID:23082140

  3. A novel missense mutation in the NSDHL gene identified in a Lithuanian family by targeted next-generation sequencing causes CK syndrome.

    PubMed

    Preiksaitiene, Egle; Caro, Alfonso; Benušienė, Eglė; Oltra, Silvestre; Orellana, Carmen; Morkūnienė, Aušra; Roselló, Mónica Pilar; Kasnauskiene, Jurate; Monfort, Sandra; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Mayo, Sonia; Martinez, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The NSDHL gene encodes 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase involved in one of the later steps of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. Mutations in this gene can cause CHILD syndrome (OMIM 308050) and CK syndrome (OMIM 300831). CHILD syndrome is an X-linked dominant, male lethal disorder caused by mutations in the NSDHL gene that result in the loss of the function of the NSDHL protein. CK syndrome is an allelic X-linked recessive disorder. So far, 13 patients with CK syndrome from two families have been reported on. We present a new five-generation family with affected males manifesting clinical features of CK syndrome. Next generation sequencing was targeted to a custom panel of 542 genes with known or putative implication on intellectual disability. Missense mutation p.Gly152Asp was identified in the NSDHL gene in the DNA sample of the affected male. Mutation carrier status was confirmed for all the obligate carriers in the family. The clinical features of the affected males in the family manifested as weak fetal movements, severe intellectual disability, seizures, spasticity, atrophy of optic discs, microcephaly, plagiocephaly, skeletal abnormalities, and minor facial anomalies, including a high nasal bridge, strabismus, and micrognathia. A highly significant preferential transmission of the mutation was observed in this and previous families segregating CK syndrome. Our report expands the clinical spectrum of this syndrome to include weak fetal movements, spasticity, and plagiocephaly, and transmission ratio distortion. The various findings in these patients increase our understanding of the diversity of the clinical presentation of cholesterol biosynthesis disorders. PMID:25900314

  4. Functional analysis of missense variants in the TRESK (KCNK18) K channel.

    PubMed

    Andres-Enguix, Isabelle; Shang, Lijun; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Morahan, Julia M; Sansom, Mark S P; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Roy, Bishakha; Griffiths, Lyn R; Rouleau, Guy A; Ebers, George C; Cader, Zameel M; Tucker, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    A loss of function mutation in the TRESK K2P potassium channel (KCNK18), has recently been linked with typical familial migraine with aura. We now report the functional characterisation of additional TRESK channel missense variants identified in unrelated patients. Several variants either had no apparent functional effect, or they caused a reduction in channel activity. However, the C110R variant was found to cause a complete loss of TRESK function, yet is present in both sporadic migraine and control cohorts, and no variation in KCNK18 copy number was found. Thus despite the previously identified association between loss of TRESK channel activity and migraine in a large multigenerational pedigree, this finding indicates that a single non-functional TRESK variant is not alone sufficient to cause typical migraine and highlights the genetic complexity of this disorder. PMID:22355750

  5. A novel COL11A1 missense mutation in siblings with non-ocular Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Atsumi; Morita, Kei-ichi; Naruto, Takuya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kashimada, Kenichi; Enomoto, Keisuke; Morio, Tomohiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (STL) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by ocular, auditory, orofacial and skeletal abnormalities. We conducted targeted resequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 2-year-old girl who was clinically suspected of having STL with Pierre Robin sequence. We detected a novel heterozygous missense mutation, NM_001854.3:n.4838G>A [NM_001854.3 (COL11A1_v001):c.4520G>A], in COL11A1, resulting in a Gly to Asp substitution at position 1507 [NM_001854.3(COL11A1_i001)] within one of the collagen-like domains of the triple helical region. The same mutation was detected in her 4-year-old brother with cleft palate and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:27081569

  6. Intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity of epidermolytic ichthyosis associated with a new missense mutation in keratin 10.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, A; Takeichi, T; Liu, L; Stephens, C; Akiyama, M; McGrath, J A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the keratin 10 gene (KRT10) have been shown to underlie several forms of epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI), including generalized, annular and naevoid variants. We investigated an autosomal dominant pedigree with ichthyosis in which there was intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity, with the affected individual family members presenting with features of either erythrokeratoderma progressiva, annular EI, localized or superficial EI, or more generalized EI. Sanger sequencing identified a new heterozygous missense mutation (c.457C>A; p.Leu153Met) in KRT10 in all affected individuals. No additional mutations were identified in the genes for keratin 1 (KRT1) keratin 2 (KRT2), connexin 31 (GJB3) or connexin 30.3 (GJB4) that might account for the clinical heterogeneity seen in this family. Our findings illustrate the intrafamilial variability in phenotype and diverse clinical presentations that can occur in EI resulting from a single mutation in KRT10. PMID:26338057

  7. Integrating population variation and protein structural analysis to improve clinical interpretation of missense variation: application to the WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Tyagi, Nidhi; Johnson, Diana; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; McWilliam, Catherine; Splitt, Miranda; Thornton, Janet M; Firth, Helen V; Wright, Caroline F

    2016-03-01

    We present a generic, multidisciplinary approach for improving our understanding of novel missense variants in recently discovered disease genes exhibiting genetic heterogeneity, by combining clinical and population genetics with protein structural analysis. Using six new de novo missense diagnoses in TBL1XR1 from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study, together with population variation data, we show that the β-propeller structure of the ubiquitous WD40 domain provides a convincing way to discriminate between pathogenic and benign variation. Children with likely pathogenic mutations in this gene have severely delayed language development, often accompanied by intellectual disability, autism, dysmorphology and gastrointestinal problems. Amino acids affected by likely pathogenic missense mutations are either crucial for the stability of the fold, forming part of a highly conserved symmetrically repeating hydrogen-bonded tetrad, or located at the top face of the β-propeller, where 'hotspot' residues affect the binding of β-catenin to the TBLR1 protein. In contrast, those altered by population variation are significantly less likely to be spatially clustered towards the top face or to be at buried or highly conserved residues. This result is useful not only for interpreting benign and pathogenic missense variants in this gene, but also in other WD40 domains, many of which are associated with disease. PMID:26740553

  8. In silico analyses of missense mutations in coagulation factor VIII: identification of severity determinants of haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, M; Sarkar, D; Ganguly, K; Sengupta, D; Bhaskar, S; Ray, K

    2015-09-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) mutations cause haemophilia A (HA), an X-linked recessive coagulation disorder. Over 1000 missense mutations in FVIII are known and they lead to variable clinical phenotypes (severe, moderate and mild). The exact molecular basis of this phenotypic heterogeneity by FVIII missense mutations is elusive to date. In this study, we aimed to identify the severity determinants that cause phenotypic heterogeneity of HA. We compiled and curated a data set of 766 missense mutations from the repertoire of missense mutations in FVIII. We analysed these mutations by computational programs (e.g. Swiss-PdbViewer) and different mutation analysis servers (e.g. SIFT, PROVEAN, CUPSAT, PolyPhen2, MutPred); and various sequence- and structure-based parameters were assessed for any significant distribution bias among different HA phenotypes. Our analyses suggest that 'mutations in evolutionary conserved residues', 'mutations in buried residues', mutation-induced 'steric clash' and 'surface electrostatic potential alteration' act as risk factors towards severe HA. We have developed a grading system for FVIII mutations combining the severity determinants, and the grading pattern correlates with HA phenotype. This study will help to correctly associate the HA phenotype with a mutation and aid early characterization of novel variants. PMID:25854144

  9. Use of missense proteasome subunits for conditional lethality in the tephritid fruit flies Anastrepha suspensa and Ceratitis capitata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteasomes play a critical role in eukaryote development by regulating protein degradation. In Drosophila, mis-sense mutations in the 20S proteasome subunit lead to the production of dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) "poison subunits" or antimorphs that disrupt proteasome function. DTS5 and DTS...

  10. Carrier frequency of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency in the general population by functional characterization of missense variants in the GAMT gene.

    PubMed

    Desroches, Caro-Lyne; Patel, Jaina; Wang, Peixiang; Minassian, Berge; Marshall, Christian R; Salomons, Gajja S; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-12-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a neurodegenerative disease. Although no symptomatic patients on treatment achieved normal neurodevelopment, three asymptomatic newborns were reported with normal neurodevelopmental outcome on neonatal treatment. GAMT deficiency is therefore a candidate for newborn screening programs, but there are no studies for the carrier frequency of this disease in the general population. To determine carrier frequency of GAMT deficiency, we studied the variants in the GAMT gene reported in the Exome Variant Server database and performed functional characterization of missense variants. We used previously cloned GAMT transcript variant 1 (7 missense variants) and cloned a novel GAMT transcript variant 2 (5 missense variants). The latter was used in Exome Variant Server database according to recommendations of the Human Genome Variation Society. There were 4 missense variants (1 previously reported and 3 novel) with low GAMT enzyme activity indicating pathogenicity. Additionally, there was one novel frameshift and one novel nonsense variant likely pathogenic. There was no measurable GAMT enzyme activity in the wild type of GAMT transcript variant 2. We concluded that GAMT transcript variant 2 is not involved in GAMT protein synthesis. For this reason, Human Genome Variation Society should use mutation nomenclature according to the coding region of the GAMT transcript variant 1. The carrier frequency of GAMT deficiency was 0.123 % in the general population. As early diagnosis results in normal neurodevelopmental outcome, GAMT deficiency should be included in newborn screening programs to diagnose individuals at the asymptomatic stage of the disease to prevent permanent neurodevelopmental disability. PMID:26003046

  11. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J.; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  12. Molecular and functional consequences of Smad4 C-terminal missense mutations in colorectal tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bosscher, Karolien; Hill, Caroline S; Nicolás, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Smad4 is an essential signal transducer of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathway and has been identified as a tumour suppressor, being mutated in approx. 50% of pancreatic cancers and approx. 15% of colorectal cancers. Two missense mutations in the C-terminal domain of Smad4, D351H (Asp351-->His) and D537Y (Asp537-->Tyr), have been described recently in the human colorectal cancer cell lines CACO-2 and SW948 respectively [Woodford-Richens, Rowan, Gorman, Halford, Bicknell, Wasan, Roylance, Bodmer and Tomlinson (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 9719-9723]. Previous work in vitro suggested that only Asp-351 was required for interaction with Smad2 [Wu, Fairman, Penry and Shi (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 20688-20694]. In the present study, we investigate the functional consequences of these point mutations in vivo. We demonstrate that neither of these colorectal cancer cells undergo growth arrest in response to TGF-beta, which can be explained, at least in part, by their inability to up-regulate cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 (CIP1 ) or p15 ( INK4b) after TGF-beta stimulation. Although the point-mutated Smad4s are expressed at normal levels in these colorectal cancer cells, they cannot interact with either TGF-beta-induced phosphorylated Smad2 or Smad3. As a result, these Smad4 mutants do not accumulate in the nucleus after TGF-beta stimulation, are not recruited to DNA by relevant Smad-binding transcription factors and cannot generate transcriptionally active DNA-bound complexes. Therefore both these colorectal tumour cells completely lack functional Smad4 activity owing to the missense mutations. Given the location of these mutations in the three-dimensional structure of the Smad4 C-terminal domain, the results also give us significant insights into Smad complex formation. PMID:14715079

  13. Molecular modeling indicates distinct classes of missense variants with mild and severe XLRS phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Yuri V.; Vitale, Susan; Sieving, Paul A.; Vincent, Ajoy; Robson, Anthony G.; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Holder, Graham E.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a vitreo-retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the RS1 gene which encodes the protein retinoschisin (RS1), required for the structural and functional integrity of the retina. Data are presented from a group of 38 XLRS patients from Moorfields Eye Hospital (London, UK) who had one of 18 missense mutations in RS1. Patients were grouped based on mutation severity predicted by molecular modeling: mild (class I), moderate (intermediate) and severe (class II). Most patients had an electronegative scotopic bright flash electroretinogram  (ERG) (reduced b/a-wave ratio) in keeping with predominant inner retinal dysfunction. An association between the type of structural RS1 alterations and the severity of b/a-wave reduction was found in all but the oldest group of patients, significant in patients aged 15–30 years. Severe RS1 missense changes were associated with a lower ERG b/a ratio than were mild changes, suggesting that the extent of inner retinal dysfunction is influenced by the effect of the mutations on protein structure. The majority of class I mutations showed no changes involving cysteine residues. Class II mutations caused severe perturbations due to the removal or insertion of cysteine residues or due to changes in the hydrophobic core. The ERG b/a ratio in intermediate cases was abnormal but showed significant variability, possibly related to the role of proline or arginine residues. We also conducted a second study, using a completely independent cohort, to indicate a genotype–ERG phenotype correlation. PMID:23847049

  14. A Missense Mutation in CASK Causes FG Syndrome in an Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, Giulio; D'Amico, Francesca; Saccone, Valentina; Bismuto, Ettore; Rotundo, Ida Luisa; Di Domenico, Marina; Aurino, Stefania; Schwartz, Charles E.; Neri, Giovanni; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    First described in 1974, FG syndrome (FGS) is an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation (MCA/MR) disorder, characterized by high clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity. Five loci (FGS1-5) have so far been linked to this phenotype on the X chromosome, but only one gene, MED12, has been identified to date. Mutations in this gene account for a restricted number of FGS patients with a more distinctive phenotype, referred to as the Opitz-Kaveggia phenotype. We report here that a p.R28L (c.83G→T) missense mutation in CASK causes FGS phenotype in an Italian family previously mapped to Xp11.4-p11.3 (FGS4). The identified missense mutation cosegregates with the phenotype in this family and is absent in 1000 control X chromosomes of the same ethnic origin. An extensive analysis of CASK protein functions as well as structural and dynamic studies performed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation did not reveal significant alterations induced by the p.R28L substitution. However, we observed a partial skipping of the exon 2 of CASK, presumably a consequence of improper recognition of exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) induced by the c.83G→T transversion. CASK is a multidomain scaffold protein highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with specific localization to the synapses, where it forms large signaling complexes regulating neurotransmission. We suggest that the observed phenotype is most likely a consequence of an altered CASK expression profile during embryogenesis, brain development, and differentiation. PMID:19200522

  15. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  16. RARE DISEASES LIST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rare disease list includes rare diseases and conditions for which information requests have been made to the Office of Rare Diseases. A rare disease is defined as a disease or condition for which there are fewer than 200,000 affected persons alive in the United States. The Of...

  17. A novel missense KIT mutation causing piebaldism in one Chinese family associated with café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei-Xue; Xiao, Xue-Min; Wu, Jian-Bing; Ma, Yi-Ping; Ge, Yi-Ping; Li, Qi; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Li, Cheng-Rang

    2015-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis, manifesting as congenital and stable depigmentation of the skin and white forelock. It has been found to be associated with mutations in the KIT or SLUG genes. We report a Chinese piebaldism family including a 28-year-old woman and her 3-year-old son with characteristics of white patches and forelock associated with numerous brown macules and patches. Genomic DNA samples of the proband and her son were extracted from their peripheral blood. One hundred unrelated healthy individuals were used as controls. All coding regions of KIT, SLUG, and NF1 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using exon flanking intronic primers and Sanger sequencings were performed. DNA sequencing revealed heterozygous missense c.2431T>G mutation in exon 17 of the KIT gene in the proband and the affected son. No potentially pathogenic variant was identified in SLUG or NF1 genes. The nucleotide substitution was not found in 100 unrelated control individuals. This study reveals a novel KIT mutation in piebaldism, and it further supports that café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling of piebaldism are parts of pigmented anomaly in piebaldism, which does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). PMID:25960657

  18. HDR syndrome: a follow-up genotype-phenotype analysis of a de novo missense Thr272Ile mutation in exon 4 of GATA3.

    PubMed

    Gomes, T S; Gortner, L; Dockter, G; Leitner, D; Thakker, R V; Rohrer, T

    2012-11-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome (MIM 146255) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding GATA3, a dual zinc-finger transcription factor involved in vertebrate embryonic development. In this clinical case study we report on a follow-up of a phenotype associated with a GATA3 mutation. HDR syndrome was clinically diagnosed at age of 1.5 years in a boy with a de novo heterozygous missense (c.815C→T) mutation, Thr272Ile, in exon 4 of the GATA3 gene. Both parents were negative for Thr272Ile.At age of 17 months, the patient had a weight of 10.7, a body length of 78 cm, and a head circumference of 47.5 cm. By the age of 7 years, growth is age-appropriate, severe bilateral hearing loss (dB 60) was corrected by hearing aids. However, cognitive development (auditory sensory me-mory and language abilities) is at the lower ends of the test scores.In conclusion, a mildly impaired clinical course was achieved by the age of 7 years in a patient with HDR syndrome; this report adds to the body of data on genotype-phenotype analysis in HDR syndrome. · PMID:23203342

  19. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  20. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  1. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  2. A dosage-sensitive modifier of retrotransposon-induced alleles of the Drosophila white locus.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinow, L; Birchler, J A

    1989-01-01

    The apricot allele of the white locus results from the insertion of the retrotransposon copia. Mutations in a newly discovered locus, the Darkener-of-apricot (Doa), suppress wa and some of its revertants. Of 44 other white alleles tested, only wsp55 is affected by Doa, although, in contrast, it is enhanced by Doa mutations. The Doa locus modulates wa and wsp55 expression as a function of its own dosage. Mutations in Doa are dominant suppressors or enhancers and are recessive lethals. Rare Doa mutant homozygotes escaping lethality demonstrate extreme phenotypic suppression of wa and enhancement of wsp55. RNA from wa is substantially wild-type in structure in escapers, although reduced in quantity. Images PMID:2542025

  3. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Mahon, R J; Olsen, K M; Downes, S; Addison, S

    2007-12-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important lepidopteran pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in Australia and the Old World. From 2002, F2 screens were used to examine the frequency of resistance alleles in Australian populations of H. armigera to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAc and Cry2Ab, the two insecticidal proteins present in the transgenic cotton Bollgard II. At that time, Ingard (expressing Cry1Ac) cotton had been grown in Australia for seven seasons, and Bollgard II was about to be commercially released. The principal objective of our study was to determine whether sustained exposure caused an elevated frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac in a species with a track record of evolving resistance to conventional insecticides. No major alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac were found. The frequency of resistance alleles for Cry1Ac was <0.0003, with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0009. In contrast, alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab were found at a frequency of 0.0033 (0.0017, 0.0055). The first isolation of this allele was found before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. For both toxins the experiment-wise detection probability was 94.4%. Our results suggest that alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac are rare and that a relatively high baseline frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab existed before the introduction of Bt cotton containing this toxin. PMID:18232402

  4. Negative Selection on BRCA1 Susceptibility Alleles Sheds Light on the Population Genetics of Late-Onset Diseases and Aging Theory

    PubMed Central

    Pavard, Samuel; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of negative selection on alleles involved in age-specific mortality decreases with age. This is the foundation of the evolutionary theory of senescence. Because of this decrease in negative selection with age, and because of the absence of reproduction after menopause, alleles involved in women's late-onset diseases are generally considered evolutionarily neutral. Recently, genetic and epidemiological data on alleles involved in late onset-diseases have become available. It is therefore timely to estimate selection on these alleles. Here, we estimate selection on BRCA1 alleles leading to susceptibility to late-onset breast and ovarian cancer. For this, we integrate estimates of the risk of developing a cancer for BRCA1-carriers into population genetics frameworks, and calculate selection coefficients on BRCA1 alleles for different demographic scenarios varying across the extent of human demography. We then explore the magnitude of negative selection on alleles leading to a diverse range of risk patterns, to capture a variety of late-onset diseases. We show that BRCA1 alleles may have been under significant negative selection during human history. Although the mean age of onset of the disease is long after menopause, variance in age of onset means that there are always enough cases occurring before the end of reproductive life to compromise the selective value of women carrying a susceptibility allele in BRCA1. This seems to be the case for an extended range of risk of onset functions varying both in mean and variance. This finding may explain the distribution of BRCA1 alleles' frequency, and also why alleles for many late-onset diseases, like certain familial forms of cancer, coronary artery diseases and Alzheimer dementia, are typically recent and rare. Finally, we discuss why the two most popular evolutionary theories of aging, mutation accumulation and antagonistic pleiotropy, may underestimate the effect of selection on survival at old ages. PMID

  5. Impaired riboflavin transport due to missense mutations in SLC52A2 causes Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haack, Tobias B; Makowski, Christine; Yao, Yoshiaki; Graf, Elisabeth; Hempel, Maja; Wieland, Thomas; Tauer, Ulrike; Ahting, Uwe; Mayr, Johannes A; Freisinger, Peter; Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Inui, Ken; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Prokisch, Holger

    2012-11-01

    Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVLS [MIM 211530]) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by infancy onset sensorineural deafness and ponto-bulbar palsy. Mutations in SLC52A3 (formerly C20orf54), coding for riboflavin transporter 2 (hRFT2), have been identified as the molecular genetic correlate in several individuals with BVVLS. Exome sequencing of just one single case revealed that compound heterozygosity for two pathogenic mutations in the SLC52A2 gene coding for riboflavin transporter 3 (hRFT3), another member of the riboflavin transporter family, is also associated with BVVLS. Overexpression studies confirmed that the gene products of both mutant alleles have reduced riboflavin transport activities. While mutations in SLC52A3 cause decreased plasma riboflavin levels, concordant with a role of SLC52A3 in riboflavin uptake from food, the SLC52A2-mutant individual had normal plasma riboflavin concentrations, a finding in line with a postulated function of SLC52A2 in riboflavin uptake from blood into target cells. Our results contribute to the understanding of human riboflavin metabolism and underscore its role in the pathogenesis of BVVLS, thereby providing a rational basis for a high-dose riboflavin treatment. PMID:22864630

  6. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  7. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  8. Allelic Interactions Heritably Alter the Activity of a Metastable Maize Pl Allele

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J. B.; Patterson, G. I.; Coe-Jr., E. H.; Cone, K. C.; Chandler, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    The maize pl locus encodes a transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele confers robust purple anthocyanin pigment in several tissues. Spontaneous derivatives of Pl-Rh, termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), arise that confer reduced pigment and are meiotically heritable. These derivatives influence other Pl-Rh alleles such that only Pl'-mah alleles are transmitted from a Pl-Rh/Pl'-mah heterozygote. Genetic crosses establish that chromosomal segregation distortion does not explain this exclusive transmission and suggest that Pl-Rh invariably changes to Pl'-mah when exposed to Pl'-mah. Such behavior is a hallmark of paramutation. Cosegregation experiments demonstrate that this paramutagenic activity is genetically linked to the pl locus. By visually quantifying pl action through successive crosses, we find that phenotypic expression is inversely related to paramutagenic strength. In addition, the paramutagenic state is metastable; reversion to a nonparamutagenic Pl-Rh state can occur. The behavior of Pl-Rh is unique, yet it shares characteristics with paramutation at two other maize loci, b and r. Previous analysis of b and r paramutation revealed extensive differences and led to suggestions of distinct molecular mechanisms. Consideration of the common features of all three systems reinvigorates the interpretation that the mechanistic processes of these three allelic interactions are similar. PMID:8647404

  9. CHEK2 c.1100delC allele is rarely identified in Greek breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, Paraskevi; Fostira, Florentia; Papamentzelopoulou, Myrto; Michelli, Maria; Panopoulos, Christos; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis

    2015-04-01

    The CHEK2 gene encodes a protein kinase that plays a crucial role in maintenance of genomic integrity and the DNA repair mechanism. CHEK2 germline mutations are associated with increased risk of breast cancer and other malignancies. From a clinical perspective, the most significant mutation identified is the c.1100delC mutation, which is associated with an approximately 25% lifetime breast cancer risk. The distribution of this mutation shows wide geographical variation; it is more prevalent in the Northern European countries and less common, or even absent, in Southern Europe. In order to estimate the frequency of the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation in Greek breast cancer patients, we genotyped 2,449 patients (2,408 females and 41 males), which was the largest series ever tested for c.1100delC. The mean age of female and male breast cancer diagnosis was 49 and 59 years, respectively. All patients had previously tested negative for the Greek BRCA1 founder and recurrent mutations. The CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation was detected in 0.16% (4 of 2,408) of females, all of whom were diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50 years. Only one c.1100delC carrier was reported with breast cancer family history. The present study indicates that the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation does not contribute substantially to hereditary breast cancer in patients of Greek descent. PMID:25835597

  10. Allele-specific disparity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a cancer cell the number of copies of a locus may vary due to amplification and deletion and these variations are denoted as copy number alterations (CNAs). We focus on the disparity of CNAs in tumour samples, which were compared to those in blood in order to identify the directional loss of heterozygosity. Methods We propose a numerical algorithm and apply it to data from the Illumina 109K-SNP array on 112 samples from breast cancer patients. B-allele frequency (BAF) and log R ratio (LRR) of Illumina were used to estimate Euclidian distances. For each locus, we compared genotypes in blood and tumour for subset of samples being heterozygous in blood. We identified loci showing preferential disparity from heterozygous toward either the A/B-allele homozygous (allelic disparity). The chi-squared and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used to examine whether there is an association between high levels of disparity in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and molecular, clinical and tumour-related parameters. To identify pathways and network functions over-represented within the resulting gene sets, we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results To identify loci with a high level of disparity, we selected SNPs 1) with a substantial degree of disparity and 2) with substantial frequency (at least 50% of the samples heterozygous for the respective locus). We report the overall difference in disparity in high-grade tumours compared to low-grade tumours (p-value < 0.001) and significant associations between disparity in multiple single loci and clinical parameters. The most significantly associated network functions within the genes represented in the loci of disparity were identified, including lipid metabolism, small-molecule biochemistry, and nervous system development and function. No evidence for over-representation of directional disparity in a list of stem cell genes was obtained, however genes appeared to be more often altered by deletion than by

  11. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Sphynx and Devon Rex Cats with Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Hitte, Christophe; Bossé, Philippe; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Thomas, Anne; Martignat, Lionel; Blot, Stéphane; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, fatigability and variable electromyographic or muscular histopathological features has been described in the two related Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds (Felis catus). Collection of data from two affected Sphynx cats and their relatives pointed out a single disease candidate region on feline chromosome C2, identified following a genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity mapping strategy. In that region, we further identified COLQ (collagen-like tail subunit of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase) as a good candidate gene, since COLQ mutations were identified in affected humans and dogs with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency leading to a synaptic form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A homozygous c.1190G>A missense variant located in exon 15 of COLQ, leading to a C397Y substitution, was identified in the two affected cats. C397 is a highly-conserved residue from the C-terminal domain of the protein; its mutation was previously shown to produce CMS in humans, and here we confirmed in an affected Sphynx cat that it induces a loss of acetylcholinesterase clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Segregation of the c.1190G>A variant was 100% consistent with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of the disorder in our cat pedigree; in addition, an affected, unrelated Devon Rex cat recruited thereafter was also homozygous for the variant. Genotyping of a panel of 333 cats from 14 breeds failed to identify a single carrier in non-Sphynx and non-Devon Rex cats. Finally, the percentage of healthy carriers in a European subpanel of 81 genotyped Sphynx cats was estimated to be low (3.7%) and 14 control Devon Rex cats were genotyped as wild-type individuals. Altogether, these results strongly support that the neuromuscular disorder reported in Sphynx and Devon Rex breeds is a CMS caused by a unique c.1190G>A missense mutation, presumably transmitted through a founder effect, which

  12. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in a 175-allele specific mutant p53 dependent manner. This activity depends upon the zinc ion chelating properties of the compound as well as redox changes. These data identify NSC319726 as a p53R175 mutant reactivator and as a lead compound for p53 targeted drug development. PMID:22624712

  13. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  14. A new missense mutation in the BCKDHB gene causes the classic form of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD).

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Goodarzi, Hamedreza; Fardaei, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT and DLD genes, which encode the E1α, E1β, E2 and E3 subunits of the branched chain α ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, respectively. This complex is involved in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids. In this study, we analyzed the DNA sequences of BCKDHA and BCKDHB genes in an infant who suffered from MSUD and died at the age of 6 months. We found a new missense mutation in exon 5 of BCKDHB gene (c.508C>T). The heterozygosity of the parents for the mentioned nucleotide change was confirmed by direct sequence analysis of the corresponding segment. Another missense mutation has been found in the same codon previously and shown by in silico analyses to be deleterious. This report provides further evidence that this amino acid change can cause classic MSUD. PMID:25381949

  15. RHCE variant allele: RHCE*ce254G,733G.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jessica A; Horn, Trina; Chiappa, Colleen; Melland, Camilla; Vietz, Christine; Castilho, Lilian; Keller, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    A novel RHCE allele was identified in a 53-year-old African American female blood donor with an Rh phenotype of D+ CE-c+ e+ and a negative antibody screen. The donor's cells typed e+ with all antisera tested. By gel-based genotyping and Edna analysis, the two RHCE alleles in this donor were characterized.One allele was found to be the known allele RHCE*Ol.20.01(RHCE*ce733G) and the second was novel: RHCE*Ol.06.02(RHCE*ce254G,733G). PMID:25695437

  16. Nomenclature for human CYP2D6 alleles.

    PubMed

    Daly, A K; Brockmöller, J; Broly, F; Eichelbaum, M; Evans, W E; Gonzalez, F J; Huang, J D; Idle, J R; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Ishizaki, T; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Meyer, U A; Nebert, D W; Steen, V M; Wolf, C R; Zanger, U M

    1996-06-01

    To standardize CYP2D6 allele nomenclature, and to conform with international human gene nomenclature guidelines, an alternative to the current arbitrary system is described. Based on recommendations for human genome nomenclature, we propose that alleles be designated by CYP2D6 followed by an asterisk and a combination of roman letters and arabic numerals distinct for each allele with the number specifying the key mutation and, where appropriate, a letter specifying additional mutations. Criteria for classification as a separate allele and protein nomenclature are also presented. PMID:8807658

  17. The effect of deleterious alleles on adaptation in asexual populations.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the fixation probability of a beneficial allele that arises as the result of a unique mutation in an asexual population that is subject to recurrent deleterious mutation at rate U. Our analysis is an extension of previous works, which make a biologically restrictive assumption that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than that on the beneficial allele of interest. We show that when selection against deleterious alleles is weak, beneficial alleles that confer a selective advantage that is small relative to U have greatly reduced probabilities of fixation. We discuss the consequences of this effect for the distribution of effects of alleles fixed during adaptation. We show that a selective sweep will increase the fixation probabilities of other beneficial mutations arising during some short interval afterward. We use the calculated fixation probabilities to estimate the expected rate of fitness improvement in an asexual population when beneficial alleles arise continually at some low rate proportional to U. We estimate the rate of mutation that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes this rate of fitness improvement. Again, this analysis relaxes the assumption made previously that selection against deleterious alleles is stronger than on beneficial alleles. PMID:12242249

  18. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  19. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  20. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. Results In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. Conclusion GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of

  1. Effect of BET Missense Mutations on Bromodomain Function, Inhibitor Binding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Petrosino, Maria; Chiaraluce, Roberta; Tallant, Cynthia; Knapp, Stefan; Consalvi, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important epigenetic mark regulating gene transcription and chromatin structure. Acetylated lysine residues are specifically recognized by bromodomains, small protein interaction modules that read these modification in a sequence and acetylation dependent way regulating the recruitment of transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelling enzymes to acetylated sites in chromatin. Recent studies revealed that bromodomains are highly druggable protein interaction domains resulting in the development of a large number of bromodomain inhibitors. BET bromodomain inhibitors received a lot of attention in the oncology field resulting in the rapid translation of early BET bromodomain inhibitors into clinical studies. Here we investigated the effects of mutations present as polymorphism or found in cancer on BET bromodomain function and stability and the influence of these mutants on inhibitor binding. We found that most BET missense mutations localize to peripheral residues in the two terminal helices. Crystal structures showed that the three dimensional structure is not compromised by these mutations but mutations located in close proximity to the acetyl-lysine binding site modulate acetyl-lysine and inhibitor binding. Most mutations affect significantly protein stability and tertiary structure in solution, suggesting new interactions and an alternative network of protein-protein interconnection as a consequence of single amino acid substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report studying the effect of mutations on bromodomain function and inhibitor binding. PMID:27403962

  2. A patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and concomitant nonsense mutation in CETP

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Coşkun, Süleyman; Quon, Jennifer; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Baran, Burçin; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Mane, Shrikant M.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has previously been associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, notably obesity, acute coronary syndrome and metabolic syndrome. Reports describing mutations in FTO as well as FTO animal models have further demonstrated a role for FTO in the development of the brain and other organs. Here, we describe a patient born of consanguineous union who presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, and other various phenotypic abnormalities. Whole exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and a nonsense mutation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Exome CNV analysis revealed no disease causing large duplications or deletions within coding regions. Patient’s, her parents’ and non-related control’ fibroblasts were analyzed for morphologic defects, abnormal proliferation, apoptosis and transcriptome profile. We have shown that FTO is located in nucleus of cells from each tested samples. Western blot analysis demonstrated no changes in patient FTO. Q-PCR analysis revealed slightly decreased levels of FTO expression in patient cells compared to controls. No morphological or proliferation differences between the patient and control fibroblasts were observed. There is still much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in FTO contribute to such severe phenotypes. PMID:26740239

  3. A germline missense mutation in COQ6 is associated with susceptibility to familial schwannomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keqiang; Lin, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Gao, Hanlin; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Hwu, Peter; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Leila; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Wang, Daidong; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Yen, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Schwannomatosis, a subtype of neurofibromatosis, is characterized by multiple benign, nonvestibular, nonintradermal schwannomas. Although the tumor suppressor SMARCB1 gene has been frequently identified as the underlying genetic cause of half of familial and ~10% of sporadic schwannomatosis, for most other cases, further causative genes remain to be discovered. Herein, we characterize the genome of a schwannomatosis family without constitutional inactivation of the SMARCB1 gene to explore novel genomic alterations predisposing individuals to the familial disease. Methods: We performed whole-genome/exome sequencing on genomic DNA of both schwannomatosis-affected and normal members of the family. Results: We identified a novel missense mutation (p.Asp208His; c.622G>C) in the coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis monooxygenase 6 gene (COQ6) in schwannomatosis-affected members. The deleterious effects of the COQ6 mutations were validated by their lack of complementation in a coq6-deficient yeast mutant. Our study further indicated that the resultant haploinsufficiency of COQ6 might lead to CoQ10 deficiency and chronic overproduction of reactive oxygen species in Schwann cells. Conclusion: Although the exact oncogenetic mechanisms in this schwannomatosis family remain to be elucidated, our data strongly indicate a probable role of COQ6 mutation and CoQ10 deficiency in the development of familial schwannomatosis. PMID:24763291

  4. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  5. Missense mutations in the growth hormone receptor dimerization region in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. |; Geffner, M.E.; Bersch, N.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition characterized by insensitivity to endogenous and exogenous GH. Affected individuals have severe episodes and other characteristic features. GH receptor gene mutations are present in all affected individuals in whom molecular studies have been reported. The GH receptor is a plasma membrane-spanning protein in which the extracellular domain binds circulating GH and the intracellular domain interacts with the JAK-2 kinase and possibly other intracellular signaling molecules. GH receptor dimerization occurs on GH binding and is thought to be required for normal signal transduction. We have studied the GH receptor genes of four unrelated individuals affected with LS from the United States, Italy, Saudi Arabia, and India. We have identified four different missense mutations that alter consecutive amino acids 152 to 155 in or near the dimerization domain of the GH receptor. One of these mutations, D152H, has been reported previously in Asian LS patients and, in in vitro studies, the mutant receptor was unable to dimerize. This report increases to over 20 the number of different GH receptor gene mutations that have been reported in LS patients and defines the first apparent mutational {open_quotes}hotspot{close_quotes} region in this gene. This cluster of mutations in patients with classic LS phenotype provides additional in vivo evidence that receptor dimerization plays an important role in signaling GH`s growth promoting and metabolic effects. Further in vitro studies of the mutations in this region are in progress.

  6. Two novel heterozygous missense variations within the GLI2 gene in two unrelated Argentine patients.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Matías; Di Palma, Isabel; Ciaccio, Marta; Marino, Roxana; Ramírez, Pablo C; Pérez Garrid, Natalia; Maceiras, Mercedes; Lazzati, Juan M; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Several heterozygous GLI2 gene mutations have been reported in patients with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) with or without other malformations. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the presence of GLI2 gene alterations in a cohort of patients with IGHD or MPHD and ectopic/absent posterior pituitary. The coding sequence and flanking intronic regions of GLI2 gene were amplified and directly sequenced from gDNA of 18 affected subjects and relatives. In silico tools were applied to identify the functional impact of newly found variants (Polyphen2, SIFT, Mutation Taster). We identified two novel heterozygous missense variations in two unrelated patients, p.Arg231Gln and p.Arg226Leu, located in the repressor domain of the protein. Both variations affect highly conserved amino acids of the Gli2 protein and were not found in the available databases. In silico tools suggest that these variations might be disease causing. Our study suggests that the GLI2 gene may be one of the candidate genes to analyze when an association of pituitary hormone deficiency and developmental defects in posterior pituitary gland. The highly variable phenotype found suggests the presence of additional unknown factors that could contribute to the phenotype observed in these patients. PMID:27576279

  7. A novel missense mutation in oncostatin M receptor beta causing primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Marjan; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Haghighi, Alireza; Zarrabi, Fariba; Amoli, Mahsa M; Robati, Reza M

    2014-01-01

    Primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA) is a chronic skin disorder, caused by amyloid material deposition in the upper dermis. Autosomal dominant PLCA has been mapped earlier to pathogenic missense mutations in the OSMR gene, which encodes the oncostatin M receptor ß subunit (OSMRß). OSMRß is interleukin-6 family cytokine receptors and possesses two ligands, oncostatin M and interleukin-31, which both have biologic roles in inflammation and keratinocyte cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we identified a new OSMR mutation in a Kurdish family for the first time. Blood samples were taken from all the affected individuals in the family. DNA extraction was performed using salting out technique. Primers were designed for intron flanking individual exons of OSMR gene which were subjected to direct sequencing after PCR amplification for each sample. Sequencing showed a C/T substitution at position 613 in the proband. This mutation results in an L613S (leucine 613 to serine) amino acid change. The identified mutation was observed in all affected family members but not in 100 ethnically matched healthy controls. Elucidating the molecular basis of familial PLCA provides new insight into mechanisms of itch in human skin and may lead to new therapeutic targets for pruritus. PMID:25054142

  8. Missense tau mutations identified in FTDP-17 have a small effect on tau-microtubule interactions.

    PubMed

    DeTure, M; Ko, L W; Yen, S; Nacharaju, P; Easson, C; Lewis, J; van Slegtenhorst, M; Hutton, M; Yen, S H

    2000-01-17

    Frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is a group of related disorders frequently characterized by the formation of tau inclusions in neurons and glial cells. To determine whether the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17 results from an alteration in the ability of mutant tau to maintain the microtubule (MT) system, we compared wild type four-repeat tau with three FTDP-17 mutants (P301L, V337M and R406W) for their ability to bind MT, promote MT assembly and bundling. According to in vitro binding and assembly assays, P301L is the only mutant that demonstrates a small, yet significant reduction, in its affinity for MT while both P301L and R406W have a small reduction in their ability to promote tubulin assembly. Based on studies of neuroblastoma and CHO cells transfected with GFP-tagged tau DNA constructs, both mutant and wild type tau transfectants were indistinguishable in the distribution pattern of tau in terms of co-localization with MT and generation of MT bundles. These results suggest that missense mutation of tau gene do not have an immediate impact on the integrity of MT system, and that exposure of affected neurons to additional insults or factors (e.g., aging) may be needed to initiate the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17. PMID:10627302

  9. Truncating and missense mutations in IGHMBP2 cause Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2.

    PubMed

    Cottenie, Ellen; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Bansagi, Boglarka; Zimon, Magdalena; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Saveri, Paola; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Baets, Jonathan; Bartsakoulia, Marina; Ploski, Rafal; Teterycz, Pawel; Nikolic, Milos; Quinlivan, Ros; Laura, Matilde; Sweeney, Mary G; Taroni, Franco; Lunn, Michael P; Moroni, Isabella; Gonzalez, Michael; Hanna, Michael G; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chabrol, Elodie; Franke, Andre; von Au, Katja; Schilhabel, Markus; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Brandner, Sebastian; Lim, Siew Choo; Song, Haiwei; Choi, Byung-Ok; Horvath, Rita; Chung, Ki-Wha; Zuchner, Stephan; Pareyson, Davide; Harms, Matthew; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-11-01

    Using a combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we investigated an English family with two affected siblings in their 40s with recessive Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Compound heterozygous mutations in the immunoglobulin-helicase-μ-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene were identified. Further sequencing revealed a total of 11 CMT2 families with recessively inherited IGHMBP2 gene mutations. IGHMBP2 mutations usually lead to spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), where most infants die before 1 year of age. The individuals with CMT2 described here, have slowly progressive weakness, wasting and sensory loss, with an axonal neuropathy typical of CMT2, but no significant respiratory compromise. Segregating IGHMBP2 mutations in CMT2 were mainly loss-of-function nonsense in the 5' region of the gene in combination with a truncating frameshift, missense, or homozygous frameshift mutations in the last exon. Mutations in CMT2 were predicted to be less aggressive as compared to those in SMARD1, and fibroblast and lymphoblast studies indicate that the IGHMBP2 protein levels are significantly higher in CMT2 than SMARD1, but lower than controls, suggesting that the clinical phenotype differences are related to the IGHMBP2 protein levels. PMID:25439726

  10. A Novel Functional Missense Mutation p.T219A in Type 1 Gaucher's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Yu; Liu, Fei; Du, Si-Chen; Jiang, Sha-Yi; Wang, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Duan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gaucher's disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase [GBA]) that results in the accumulation of glucocerebroside within macrophages. Many mutations have been reported to be associated with this disorder. This study aimed to discover more mutations and provide data for the genetic pattern of the gene, which will help the development of quick and accurate genetic diagnostic tools for this disease. Methods: Genomic DNA was obtained from peripheral blood leukocytes of the patient and Sanger sequencing is used to sequence GBA gene. Sequence alignments of mammalian β-GBA (GCase) and three-dimensional protein structure prediction of the mutation were made. A construct of this mutant and its compound heterozygous counterpart were used to measure GCase in vitro. Results: GCase is relatively conserved at p.T219A. This novel mutation differs from its wild-type in structure. Moreover, it also causes a reduction in GCase enzyme activity. Conclusion: This novel mutation (c.655A>G, p.T219A) is a pathogenic missense mutation, which contributes to GD. PMID:27098793

  11. Missense mutation in the PTEN promoter of a patient with hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyomi; Eng, Charis; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Reinisch, John; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke; Walker, John; Cheung, Craig; Robey, Pamela G; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in the asymmetric facial overgrowth syndrome, hemifacial hyperplasia (HFH), are not well understood. This study was conducted to compare primary cell cultures from hyperplastic and normal HFH bone for cellular and molecular differences. Primary cultures developed from biopsies of a patient with isolated HFH showed a twofold difference in cell size and cell number between hyperplastic and normal bone. Microarray data suggested a 40% suppression of PTEN (phosphatase-tensin homolog) transcripts. Sequencing of the PTEN gene and promoter identified novel C/G missense mutation (position −1053) in the regulatory region of the PTEN promoter. Western blots of downstream pathway components showed an increase in PKBa/Akt1 phosphorylation and TOR (target of rapamcyin) signal. Sirolimus, an inhibitor of TOR, when added to overgrowth cells reversed the cell size, cell number and total protein differences between hyperplastic and normal cells. In cases of facial overgrowth, which involve PTEN/Akt/TOR dysregulation, sirolimus could be used for limiting cell overgrowth. PMID:26229595

  12. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Udhaya H.; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein. PMID:25222778

  13. A novel MVK missense mutation in one Chinese family with disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen-sheng; Zheng, Xiao-dong; Yao, Xiu-hua; Zhang, Lan-fang; Wang, Mu-Qiu; Jiang, Fa-Xing; Zhang, Si-Ping; Hu, Bai

    2014-11-01

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is a severe chronic autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder with high genetic heterogeneity. mevalonate kinase, (MVK) a gene know to play an important role in regulation of calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation, has recently been suggested as the disease-causing gene for DSAP. Here we report a direct sequencing analysis of this gene in 3 DSAP families, 6 sporadic cases, and 100 unrelated healthy controls. We detected a heterozygous T to A transition at nucleotide 205 in exon 3 of MVK gene in one familial case. This mutation will result in an amino acid change at codon 69 (P.Ser69Thr), which is from a serine codon (TCA) to a threonine codon (ACA). No such mutation was detected in the unaffected family members or the 100 unrelated healthy controls. Our results demonstrated a novel missense mutation in MVK gene. This will be valuable for the diagnosis of DSAP as well as for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of affected families. PMID:25059119

  14. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes are associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin levels

    PubMed Central

    Setoh, Kazuya; Terao, Chikashi; Muro, Shigeo; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Meiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) encoded by SERPINA1 is an acute-phase inflammation marker, and AAT deficiency (AATD) is known as one of the common genetic disorders in European populations. However, no genetic determinants to AAT levels apart from the SERPINA gene clusters have been identified to date. Here we perform a genome-wide association study of serum AAT levels followed by a two-staged replication study recruiting a total of 9,359 Japanese community-dwelling population. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes, namely, rs671 in ALDH2, rs1169288 in HNF1A and rs1260326 in GCKR, significantly associate with AAT levels (P≤1.5 × 10−12). Previous reports have shown the functional relevance of ALDH2 and HNF1A to AAT. We observe a significant interaction of rs671 and alcohol consumption on AAT levels. We confirm the association between AAT and rs2896268 in SERPINA1, which is independent of known causative variants of AATD. These findings would support various AAT functions including metabolic processes. PMID:26174136

  15. Establishing Precise Evolutionary History of a Gene Improves Predicting Disease Causing Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are likely benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, while inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and moreover are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism’s fitness. Results Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. Conclusion The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well. PMID:26890452

  16. A missense mutation in the beta-2 integrin gene (ITGB2) causes canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kijas, J M; Bauer, T R; Gäfvert, S; Marklund, S; Trowald-Wigh, G; Johannisson, A; Hedhammar, A; Binns, M; Juneja, R K; Hickstein, D D; Andersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is a fatal immunodeficiency disease found in Irish setters. The clinical manifestations of CLAD are very similar to LAD in humans and BLAD in cattle, which are both caused by mutations in ITGB2 encoding the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit (CD18). Sequence analysis of the ITGB2 coding sequence from a CLAD dog and a healthy control revealed a single missense mutation, Cys36Ser. This cysteine residue is conserved among all beta integrins, and the mutation most likely disrupts a disulfide bond. The mutation showed a complete association with CLAD in Irish setters and was not found in a sample of dogs from other breeds. The causative nature of this mutation was confirmed by transduction experiments using retroviral vectors and human LAD EBV B-cells. The normal canine CD18 formed heterodimers with the human CD11 subunit, whereas gene transfer of the mutant CD18 resulted in very low levels of CD11/CD18 expression. The identification of the causative mutation for CLAD now makes it possible to identify carrier animals with a simple diagnostic DNA test, and it forms the basis for using CLAD as a large animal model for the development and evaluation of clinical treatments for human LAD. PMID:10512685

  17. A homozygous missense mutation in HERC2 associated with global developmental delay and autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Puffenberger, Erik G; Jinks, Robert N; Wang, Heng; Xin, Baozhong; Fiorentini, Christopher; Sherman, Eric A; Degrazio, Dominick; Shaw, Calvin; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Gabriel, Stacey; Kelley, Richard I; Morton, D Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A

    2012-12-01

    We studied a unique phenotype of cognitive delay, autistic behavior, and gait instability segregating in three separate sibships. We initiated genome-wide mapping in two sibships using Affymetrix 10K SNP Mapping Arrays and identified a homozygous 8.2 Mb region on chromosome 15 common to five affected children. We used exome sequencing of two affected children to assess coding sequence variants within the mapped interval. Four novel homozygous exome variants were shared between the two patients; however, only two variants localized to the mapped interval on chromosome 15. A third sibship in an Ohio Amish deme narrowed the mapped interval to 2.6 Mb and excluded one of the two novel homozygous exome variants. The remaining variant, a missense change in HERC2 (c.1781C>T, p.Pro594Leu), occurs in a highly conserved proline residue within an RCC1-like functional domain. Functional studies of truncated HERC2 in adherent retinal pigment epithelium cells suggest that the p.Pro594Leu variant induces protein aggregation and leads to decreased HERC2 abundance. The phenotypic correlation with the mouse Herc1 and Herc2 mutants as well as the phenotypic overlap with Angelman syndrome provide further evidence that pathogenic changes in HERC2 are associated with nonsyndromic intellectual disability, autism, and gait disturbance. Hum Mutat 33:1639-1646, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23065719

  18. TULP1 Missense Mutations Induces the Endoplasmic Reticulum Unfolded Protein Response Stress Complex (ER-UPR).

    PubMed

    Lobo, Glenn P; Ebke, Lindsey A; Au, Adrian; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the TULP1 gene are associated with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the molecular mechanisms related to the deleterious effects of TULP1 mutations remains unknown. Several studies have shown that misfolded proteins secondary to genetic mutations can accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) complex followed by cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that TULP1 mutations produce misfolded protein products that accumulate in the ER and induce cellular apoptosis via the UPR. To test our hypothesis, we first performed three in-silico analyses of TULP1 missense mutations (I459K, R420P and F491L), which predicted misfolded protein products. Subsequently, the three mutant TULP1-GFP constructs and wild-type (wt) TULP1-GFP were transiently transfected into hTERT-RPE-1 cells. Staining of cells using ER tracker followed by confocal microscopy showed wt-TULP1 localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. In contrast, all three mutant TULP1 proteins revealed cytoplasmic punctate staining which co-localized with the ER. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cells expressing mutant TULP1 proteins revealed induction of downstream targets of the ER-UPR complex, including BiP/GPR-78, phosphorylated-PERK (Thr980) and CHOP. Our in-vitro analyses suggest that mutant TULP1 proteins are misfolded and accumulate within the ER leading to induction of the UPR stress response complex. PMID:26427415

  19. Effect of BET Missense Mutations on Bromodomain Function, Inhibitor Binding and Stability.

    PubMed

    Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Petrosino, Maria; Chiaraluce, Roberta; Tallant, Cynthia; Knapp, Stefan; Consalvi, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important epigenetic mark regulating gene transcription and chromatin structure. Acetylated lysine residues are specifically recognized by bromodomains, small protein interaction modules that read these modification in a sequence and acetylation dependent way regulating the recruitment of transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelling enzymes to acetylated sites in chromatin. Recent studies revealed that bromodomains are highly druggable protein interaction domains resulting in the development of a large number of bromodomain inhibitors. BET bromodomain inhibitors received a lot of attention in the oncology field resulting in the rapid translation of early BET bromodomain inhibitors into clinical studies. Here we investigated the effects of mutations present as polymorphism or found in cancer on BET bromodomain function and stability and the influence of these mutants on inhibitor binding. We found that most BET missense mutations localize to peripheral residues in the two terminal helices. Crystal structures showed that the three dimensional structure is not compromised by these mutations but mutations located in close proximity to the acetyl-lysine binding site modulate acetyl-lysine and inhibitor binding. Most mutations affect significantly protein stability and tertiary structure in solution, suggesting new interactions and an alternative network of protein-protein interconnection as a consequence of single amino acid substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report studying the effect of mutations on bromodomain function and inhibitor binding. PMID:27403962

  20. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  1. Missense variations in the cystic fibrosis gene: Heteroduplex formation in the F508C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Jr.; Ladanyi, L.; Buerger, J.; Reis, A. )

    1992-11-01

    Kobayashi et al. (1990) have described missense variations in the conserved region of exon 10 of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator gene. In their paper, two [Delta]F508/F508C compound heterozygous individuals were reported. Clinical and epithelial physiological studies in both cases were normal, suggesting that the substitution of cysteine for phenylalanine at position 508, the F508C mutation, is benign. However, Kerem et al. reported a patient with this substitution who had typical symptoms of CF. In routine [Delta]F508 mutation screening by visualization of the 3-bp deletion on a 12% polyacrylamide gel the authors detected an abnormal heteroduplex in the father of a CF patient of German origin. Subsequent direct sequencing of the PCR product confirmed that this clinically normal father is a compound heterozygote for the [Delta]F508/F508C mutations. This heteroduplex is slightly different from the usual heteroduplex in [Delta]F508/F508C heteroduplex was not published, it is likely that similar cases can be overseen during the widely performed [Delta]F508 mutation screening by PAGE. Detection of more cases, such as the one presented here, together with careful, standardized clinical examination of the proband, would be valuable to verify the nature of this mutation. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  3. Compromised Catalysis and Potential Folding Defects in in Vitro Studies of Missense Mutants Associated with Hereditary Phosphoglucomutase 1 Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yingying; Stiers, Kyle M.; Kain, Bailee N.; Beamer, Lesa J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1) deficiency as an inherited metabolic disorder in humans. Affected patients show multiple disease phenotypes, including dilated cardiomyopathy, exercise intolerance, and hepatopathy, reflecting the central role of the enzyme in glucose metabolism. We present here the first in vitro biochemical characterization of 13 missense mutations involved in PGM1 deficiency. The biochemical phenotypes of the PGM1 mutants cluster into two groups: those with compromised catalysis and those with possible folding defects. Relative to the recombinant wild-type enzyme, certain missense mutants show greatly decreased expression of soluble protein and/or increased aggregation. In contrast, other missense variants are well behaved in solution, but show dramatic reductions in enzyme activity, with kcat/Km often <1.5% of wild-type. Modest changes in protein conformation and flexibility are also apparent in some of the catalytically impaired variants. In the case of the G291R mutant, severely compromised activity is linked to the inability of a key active site serine to be phosphorylated, a prerequisite for catalysis. Our results complement previous in vivo studies, which suggest that both protein misfolding and catalytic impairment may play a role in PGM1 deficiency. PMID:25288802

  4. Proteasome machinery is instrumental in a common gain-of-function program of the p53 missense mutants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Dalla, Emiliano; Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Ingallina, Eleonora; Tonelli, Claudia; Morelli, Marco J; Amato, Angela; Eterno, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alberto; Rosato, Antonio; Amati, Bruno; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Del Sal, Giannino

    2016-08-01

    In cancer, the tumour suppressor gene TP53 undergoes frequent missense mutations that endow mutant p53 proteins with oncogenic properties. Until now, a universal mutant p53 gain-of-function program has not been defined. By means of multi-omics: proteome, DNA interactome (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing) and transcriptome (RNA sequencing/microarray) analyses, we identified the proteasome machinery as a common target of p53 missense mutants. The mutant p53-proteasome axis globally affects protein homeostasis, inhibiting multiple tumour-suppressive pathways, including the anti-oncogenic KSRP-microRNA pathway. In cancer cells, p53 missense mutants cooperate with Nrf2 (NFE2L2) to activate proteasome gene transcription, resulting in resistance to the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Combining the mutant p53-inactivating agent APR-246 (PRIMA-1MET) with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib is effective in overcoming chemoresistance in triple-negative breast cancer cells, creating a therapeutic opportunity for treatment of solid tumours and metastasis with mutant p53. PMID:27347849

  5. Characterisation of variant alleles at the HumD21S11 locus implies unique Australasian genotypes and re-classification of nomenclature guidelines.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon J; Robinson, Sarah L; Turbett, Gavin R; Davies, Neil P; Wilton, Alan N

    2003-07-29

    Several variant alleles of the HumD21S11 locus have only been reported in Australasian population samples. Fifteen such alleles were observed in Caucasian and Australian Aborigine sub-population databases compiled from residents of the state of Western Australia. Each variant was sequenced to authenticate the allelic designation and determine the structural conformation. Nine novel structural variants are described. The structure of the repeat region of these rare alleles combined with the STR designation brings aspects of the HumD21S11 nomenclature guidelines into question, in particular the designation of common incomplete repeats (or "0.2's"). The conformation of the sequences provides evidence in support of a genetic relationship between the Australian Aborigine and the Papuan people. PMID:12893133

  6. Natural merodiploidy involving duplicated rpoB alleles affects secondary metabolism in a producer actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Vigliotta, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Damiano, Fabrizio; Montinaro, Maria Rosa; Pulimeno, Rita; di Summa, Roberta; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Alifano, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    Actinomadura sp. ATCC 39727 produces the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926, structurally similar to teicoplanin. Production of A40926 is governed by the stringent response at the transcriptional level. In fact, addition of an amino acid pool prevented the transcription of dbv cluster genes involved in the A40926 biosynthesis and the antibiotic production in chemically defined media, and a thiostrepton-resistant relaxed mutant was severely impaired in its ability to produce the antibiotic. The derivative strain rif19, highly resistant to rifampicin (minimal inhibitory concentration, MIC > 200 microg ml(-1)), was isolated from the wild type strain that exhibited low resistance to rifampicin (MIC < 25 microg ml(-1)). In this strain A40926 production started earlier than in the wild type, and reached higher final levels. Moreover, the antibiotic production was not subjected to the stringent control. Molecular analysis led to the identification of two distinct rpoB alleles, rpoBS and rpoBR, in both the wild type and the rif19. rpoBR harboured the H426N missense which is responsible for rifampicin-resistance in bacteria, in addition to other nucleotide substitutions affecting the primary structure of the RNA polymerase beta-chain. Transcript analysis revealed that rpoBR was expressed at a very low level in the wild type strain during the pseudo-exponential growth phase, and that the amount of rpoBR mRNA increased during the transition to the stationary phase. In contrast, expression of rpoBR was constitutive in the rif19. The results of mRNA half-life analysis did not support the hypothesis that post-transcriptional events are responsible for the different rpoB expression patterns in the two strains, suggesting a role of transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:15659159

  7. Missense mutations and evolutionary conservation of amino acids: evidence that many of the amino acids in factor IX function as "spacer" elements.

    PubMed Central

    Bottema, C D; Ketterling, R P; Ii, S; Yoon, H S; Phillips, J A; Sommer, S S

    1991-01-01

    We report 31 point mutations in the factor IX gene and explore the relationship between the level of evolutionary conservation of an amino acid and the probability of a mutation causing hemophilia B. From our total sample of 125 hemophiliacs and from those reported by others, we identify 95 independent missense mutations, 94 of which occur at amino acids that are evolutionarily conserved in the available mammalian factor IX sequences. The likelihood of a missense mutation causing hemophilia B depends on whether the residue is also conserved in the factor IX-related proteases: factor VII, factor X, and protein C. Most of the possible missense mutations in generically conserved residues (i.e., those conserved in factor IX and in all the related proteases) should cause disease. In contrast, missense mutations in factor IX-specific residues (i.e., those conserved in human, cow, dog, and mouse factor IX but not in the related proteases) are sixfold less likely to cause disease. Missense mutations at nonconserved residues are 33-fold less likely to cause disease. At least three models are compatible with these observations. A comparison of sequence alignments from four and nine species of factor IX and an examination of the missense mutations occurring at CpG residues suggest a model in which most residues fall on opposite ends of a spectrum. In about 40% of residues, virtually any missense mutation in a minority of the residues will cause disease, while virtually no missense mutations will cause disease in most of the remaining residues. Thus, many of the residues in factor IX are spacers; that is, the main chains are presumably necessary to keep other amino acid interactions in register, but the nature of the side chain is unimportant. PMID:1680287

  8. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    PubMed

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. PMID:25549886

  9. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  10. Effect of the hope FT-B1 allele on wheat heading time and yield components.

    PubMed

    Nitcher, Rebecca; Pearce, Stephen; Tranquilli, Gabriela; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Precise regulation of flowering time is critical for plant reproductive success and, in cereals, to maximize grain yields. Seasonal cues including temperature and day length are integrated to regulate the timing of flowering. In temperate cereals, extended periods of cold (vernalization) release the repression of FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1), which is upregulated in the leaves in response to inductive long-day photoperiods. FT1 is a homolog of rice HD3a, which encodes a protein transported from leaves to the shoot apical meristem to induce flowering. A rare FT-B1 allele from the wheat variety "Hope" has been previously shown to be associated with an early flowering phenotype under long-day photoperiods. Here, we demonstrate that the Hope FT-B1 allele accelerates flowering even under short days, and that it is epistatic to the VERNALIZATION 1 (VRN1) gene. On average, the introgression of Hope FT-B1 into 6 genetic backgrounds resulted in 2.6 days acceleration of flowering (P<0.0001) and 4.1% increase in spike weight (P=0.0093), although in one variety, it was associated with a decrease in spike weight. These results suggest that the Hope FT-B1 allele could be useful in wheat breeding programs to subtly accelerate floral development and increase adaptation to changing environments. PMID:25063863

  11. Progress in methods for rare variant association.

    PubMed

    Santorico, Stephanie A; Hendricks, Audrey E

    2016-01-01

    Empirical studies and evolutionary theory support a role for rare variants in the etiology of complex traits. Given this motivation and increasing affordability of whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, methods for rare variant association have been an active area of research for the past decade. Here, we provide a survey of the current literature and developments from the Genetics Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) Collapsing Rare Variants working group. In particular, we present the generalized linear regression framework and associated score statistic for the 2 major types of methods: burden and variance components methods. We further show that by simply modifying weights within these frameworks we arrive at many of the popular existing methods, for example, the cohort allelic sums test and sequence kernel association test. Meta-analysis techniques are also described. Next, we describe the 6 contributions from the GAW19 Collapsing Rare Variants working group. These included development of new methods, such as a retrospective likelihood for family data, a method using genomic structure to compare cases and controls, a haplotype-based meta-analysis, and a permutation-based method for combining different statistical tests. In addition, one contribution compared a mega-analysis of family-based and population-based data to meta-analysis. Finally, the power of existing family-based methods for binary traits was compared. We conclude with suggestions for open research questions. PMID:26866487

  12. High incidence of functional ion-channel abnormalities in a consecutive Long QT cohort with novel missense genetic variants of unknown significance

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, Annette Buur; Refaat, Marwan M.; David, Jens-Peter; Mujezinovic, Amer; Calloe, Kirstine; Wojciak, Julianne; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Schmitt, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a disorder characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval and a propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest, or sudden death. Our objective was to (1) determine the incidence of variants with unknown significance (VUS) in a cohort of consecutive LQTS patients and (2) to determine the percentage of those with novel missense VUS that have demonstrable functional channel abnormalities from a single referral center. We performed genetic screening of candidate genes in 39 probands with a diagnosis of LQTS to identify mutations and variants. Seven variants of unknown significance were identified, six were missense variants and one was a splice site variant. We investigated the six novel missense VUS in five patients; three missense variants in KCNQ1 (L236R, W379R, Y522S) and three missense variants in KCNH2 (R35W, S620G, V491I). We employed two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments in Xenopus laevis oocytes and confocal imaging to characterize the novel missense mutations functionally. We revealed electrophysiological and trafficking loss-of-function phenotypes. This report emphasizes the frequency of adverse channel function in patients with LQTS and the importance of heterologous studies to define channel function. PMID:26066609

  13. Compound heterozygosity for a novel hemizygous missense mutation and a partial deletion affecting the catalytic core of the H2O2-generating enzyme DUOX2 associated with transient congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hoste, Candice; Rigutto, Sabrina; Van Vliet, Guy; Miot, Françoise; De Deken, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    Dual oxidases (DUOX) 1 and 2 are components of the thyroid H(2)O(2)-generating system. H(2)O(2) is used by thyroperoxidase to oxidize iodide for thyroid hormonogenesis. Mutations in the DUOX2 gene have been described in transient and permanent congenital thyroid dyshormonogenesis. We report here a novel genetic defect causing congenital hypothyroidism in a French-Canadian patient. At neonatal screening, the patient had high TSH and low total T(4) levels. (99m)Tc scan showed a normally shaped orthotopic but mildly enlarged thyroid gland, suggesting dyshormonogenesis. Thyroxine treatment was given from 1 month to 17 years, after which it was stopped for re-evaluation and the patient remained euthyroid. The transient congenital hypothyroidism phenotype prompted us to screen for mutations in DUOX2 and DUOXA2 genes using the PCR-amplified direct sequencing method. We found complete inactivation of DUOX2 caused by a partial genomic deletion of one allele inherited from the mother associated with a paternally inherited missense mutation (c.4552G>A, p.Gly1518Ser). The deleted fragment encompasses the entire COOH-terminal end which is responsible for the NADPH-oxidase activity. The Gly1518Ser DUOX2 protein is expressed at the cell surface of transfected cells albeit at low level, but it is non-functional. This study provides further evidence that the permanent or transient nature of congenital hypothyroidism is not directly related to the number of inactivated DUOX2 alleles, suggesting the existence of other pathophysiological factors. PMID:20187165

  14. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences. PMID:26416087

  15. The frequency of HLA alleles in the Romanian population.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Ileana; Boșcaiu, Voicu; Cianga, Petru; Dinu, Andrei-Antoniu; Gai, Elena; Melinte, Mihaela; Moise, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequencies is essential for bone marrow and kidney donor searches. The Romanian Caucasian population is heterogeneous and information on HLA polymorphism has not been well studied. We characterized the HLA genetic profile and allele frequencies of regional populations in Romania. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles were examined in 8252 individuals, belonging to the four main regions of Romania. The most common alleles found in the Romanian population are the following: HLA-A*01, A*02, A*03, A*11, A*24; HLA-B*18, B*35, B*44, B*51 and HLA-DRB1*01, DRB1*03, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*13, DRB1*15, DRB1*16. More than half of the alleles are non-homogeneously spread in Romania. These results provide a starting point for future analyses of genetic heterogeneity in Romania. PMID:26711124

  16. TBX6 Null Variants and a Common Hypomorphic Allele in Congenital Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N.; Ming, X.; Xiao, J.; Wu, Z.; Chen, X.; Shinawi, M.; Shen, Y.; Yu, G.; Liu, J.; Xie, H.; Gucev, Z.S.; Liu, S.; Yang, N.; Al-Kateb, H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, Jian; Hauser, N.; Zhang, T.; Tasic, V.; Liu, P.; Su, X.; Pan, X.; Liu, C.; Wang, L.; Shen, Joseph; Shen, Jianxiong; Chen, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Jianguo; Choy, K.W.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Q.; Li, S.; Zhou, W.; Guo, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, H.; An, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, Jiucun; Liu, Z.; Zuo, Y.; Tian, Y.; Weng, X.; Sutton, V.R.; Wang, H.; Ming, Y.; Kulkarni, S.; Zhong, T.P.; Giampietro, P.F.; Dunwoodie, S.L.; Cheung, S.W.; Zhang, X.; Jin, L.; Lupski, J.R.; Qiu, G.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital scoliosis is a common type of vertebral malformation. Genetic susceptibility has been implicated in congenital scoliosis. METHODS We evaluated 161 Han Chinese persons with sporadic congenital scoliosis, 166 Han Chinese controls, and 2 pedigrees, family members of which had a 16p11.2 deletion, using comparative genomic hybridization, quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction analysis, and DNA sequencing. We carried out tests of replication using an additional series of 76 Han Chinese persons with congenital scoliosis and a multi-center series of 42 persons with 16p11.2 deletions. RESULTS We identified a total of 17 heterozygous TBX6 null mutations in the 161 persons with sporadic congenital scoliosis (11%); we did not observe any null mutations in TBX6 in 166 controls (P<3.8×10−6). These null alleles include copy-number variants (12 instances of a 16p11.2 deletion affecting TBX6) and single-nucleotide variants (1 nonsense and 4 frame-shift mutations). However, the discordant intrafamilial phenotypes of 16p11.2 deletion carriers suggest that heterozygous TBX6 null mutation is insufficient to cause congenital scoliosis. We went on to identify a common TBX6 haplotype as the second risk allele in all 17 carriers of TBX6 null mutations (P<1.1×10−6). Replication studies involving additional persons with congenital scoliosis who carried a deletion affecting TBX6 confirmed this compound inheritance model. In vitro functional assays suggested that the risk haplotype is a hypomorphic allele. Hemivertebrae are characteristic of TBX6-associated congenital scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS Compound inheritance of a rare null mutation and a hypomorphic allele of TBX6 accounted for up to 11% of congenital scoliosis cases in the series that we analyzed. PMID:25564734

  17. MHC allele frequency distributions under parasite-driven selection: A simulation model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The extreme polymorphism that is observed in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which code for proteins involved in recognition of non-self oligopeptides, is thought to result from a pressure exerted by parasites because parasite antigens are more likely to be recognized by MHC heterozygotes (heterozygote advantage) and/or by rare MHC alleles (negative frequency-dependent selection). The Ewens-Watterson test (EW) is often used to detect selection acting on MHC genes over the recent history of a population. EW is based on the expectation that allele frequencies under balancing selection should be more even than under neutrality. We used computer simulations to investigate whether this expectation holds for selection exerted by parasites on host MHC genes under conditions of heterozygote advantage and negative frequency-dependent selection acting either simultaneously or separately. Results In agreement with simple models of symmetrical overdominance, we found that heterozygote advantage acting alone in populations does, indeed, result in more even allele frequency distributions than expected under neutrality, and this is easily detectable by EW. However, under negative frequency-dependent selection, or under the joint action of negative frequency-dependent selection and heterozygote advantage, distributions of allele frequencies were less predictable: the majority of distributions were indistinguishable from neutral expectations, while the remaining runs resulted in either more even or more skewed distributions than under neutrality. Conclusions Our results indicate that, as long as negative frequency-dependent selection is an important force maintaining MHC variation, the EW test has limited utility in detecting selection acting on these genes. PMID:20979635

  18. The Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR): Allelic Variation and Links with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Noreen; Glei, Dana A.; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Weinstein, Maxine

    2009-01-01

    Background We compare the genotype distribution for the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in a sample of older Taiwanese adults with samples of various racial and ethnic groups collected in other studies. We also explore interactions among sex, stressors, and 5-HTTLPR genotype on depressive symptoms in our sample. Methods Using a nationally-representative sample of 984 Taiwanese aged 53 and older, we model depressive symptoms as a function of 5-HTTLPR genotype and two classes of stressors: lifetime trauma and recent major life events. We test two- and three-way interactions among stressors, 5 HTTLPR, and sex. Results This sample exhibits higher frequency of S/S and lower frequency of L/L genotype than Western samples, but the distribution is comparable to those in East Asian populations. Nearly 9% carry an allele (XL) that has rarely been reported in the literature. Although the gene-environment (GxE) interaction with recent major life events is not significant, our results suggest that trauma has a worse effect on depressive symptoms for those with S/S or S/L genotype than for those who do not carry the S allele (p<0.05). We find no evidence that this GxE interaction varies by sex. Conclusions Previous studies of this GxE interaction have been inconclusive, perhaps because interactions between genotype and stressful events are more prominent under extreme stressors. Our findings underscore the need to move beyond a bi-allelic parameterization of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and raise questions about why East Asian populations exhibit low rates of depression despite a high frequency of the S allele. PMID:20196101

  19. No Evidence for Enrichment in Schizophrenia for Common Allelic Associations at Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Kirov, George; Rees, Elliott; Isles, Anthony R.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Most genetic studies assume that the function of a genetic variant is independent of the parent from which it is inherited, but this is not always true. The best known example of parent-of-origin effects arises with respect to alleles at imprinted loci. In classical imprinting, characteristically, either the maternal or paternal copy is expressed, but not both. Only alleles present in one of the parental copies of the gene, the expressed copy, is likely to contribute to disease. It has been postulated that imprinting is important in central nervous system development, and that consequently, imprinted loci may be involved in schizophrenia. If this is true, allowing for parent-of-origin effects might be important in genetic studies of schizophrenia. Here, we use genome-wide association data from one of the world’s largest samples (N = 695) of parent schizophrenia-offspring trios to test for parent-of-origin effects. To maximise power, we restricted our analyses to test two main hypotheses. If imprinting plays a disproportionate role in schizophrenia susceptibility, we postulated a) that alleles showing robust evidence for association to schizophrenia from previous genome-wide association studies should be enriched for parent-of-origin effects and b) that genes at loci imprinted in humans or mice should be enriched both for genome-wide significant associations, and in our sample, for parent-of-origin effects. Neither prediction was supported in the present study. We have shown, that it is unlikely that parent-of-origin effects or imprinting play particularly important roles in schizophrenia, although our findings do not exclude such effects at specific loci nor do they exclude such effects among rare alleles. PMID:26633303

  20. Versatile Dual-Technology System for Markerless Allele Replacement in Burkholderia pseudomallei▿ †

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina M.; Rholl, Drew A.; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a rare but serious tropical disease. In the United States, genetic research with this select agent bacterium is strictly regulated. Although several select agent compliant methods have been developed for allelic replacement, all of them suffer from some drawbacks, such as a need for specific host backgrounds or use of minimal media. Here we describe a versatile select agent compliant allele replacement system for B. pseudomallei based on a mobilizable vector, pEXKm5, which contains (i) a multiple cloning site within a lacZα gene for facile cloning of recombinant DNA fragments, (ii) a constitutively expressed gusA indicator gene for visual detection of merodiploid formation and resolution, and (iii) elements required for resolution of merodiploids using either I-SceI homing endonuclease-stimulated recombination or sacB-based counterselection. The homing endonuclease-based allele replacement system is completed by pBADSce, which contains an araC-PBAD-I-sceI expression cassette for arabinose-inducible I-SceI expression and a temperature-sensitive pRO1600 replicon for facile plasmid curing. Complementing these systems is the improved Δasd Escherichia coli mobilizer strain RHO3. This strain is susceptible to commonly used antibiotics and allows nutritional counterselection on rich media because of its diaminopimelic acid auxotrophy. The versatility of the I-SceI- and sacB-based methods afforded by pEXKm5 in conjunction with E. coli RHO3 was demonstrated by isolation of diverse deletion mutants in several clinical, environmental, and laboratory B. pseudomallei strains. Finally, sacB-based counterselection was employed to isolate a defined chromosomal fabD(Ts) allele that causes synthesis of a temperature-sensitive FabD, an essential fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme. PMID:19700544

  1. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  2. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  3. Laminin β2 gene missense mutation produces endoplasmic reticulum stress in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying Maggie; Zhou, Yuefang; Go, Gloriosa; Marmerstein, Joseph T; Kikkawa, Yamato; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the laminin β2 gene (LAMB2) cause Pierson syndrome, a severe congenital nephrotic syndrome with ocular and neurologic defects. LAMB2 is a component of the laminin-521 (α5β2γ1) trimer, an important constituent of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The C321R-LAMB2 missense mutation leads to congenital nephrotic syndrome but only mild extrarenal symptoms; the mechanisms underlying the development of proteinuria with this mutation are unclear. We generated three transgenic mouse lines, in which rat C321R-LAMB2 replaced mouse LAMB2 in the GBM. During the first postnatal month, expression of C321R-LAMB2 attenuated the severe proteinuria exhibited by Lamb2(-/-) mice in a dose-dependent fashion; proteinuria eventually increased, however, leading to renal failure. The C321R mutation caused defective secretion of laminin-521 from podocytes to the GBM accompanied by podocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, likely resulting from protein misfolding. Moreover, ER stress preceded the onset of significant proteinuria and was manifested by induction of the ER-initiated apoptotic signal C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), ER distention, and podocyte injury. Treatment of cells expressing C321R-LAMB2 with the chemical chaperone taurodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), which can facilitate protein folding and trafficking, greatly increased the secretion of the mutant LAMB2. Taken together, these results suggest that the mild variant of Pierson syndrome caused by the C321R-LAMB2 mutation may be a prototypical ER storage disease, which may benefit from treatment approaches that target the handling of misfolded proteins. PMID:23723427

  4. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

    PubMed Central

    Preeprem, Thanawadee; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS) is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites. The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation. PMID:24795746

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis of Pathogenic Missense Mutations of Activin Receptor Like Kinase 1 Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Claudia; Olivieri, Carla; Boeri, Laura; Canzonieri, Cecilia; Ornati, Federica; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Pagella, Fabio; Danesino, Cesare

    2011-01-01

    Activin A receptor, type II-like kinase 1 (also called ALK1), is a serine-threonine kinase predominantly expressed on endothelial cells surface. Mutations in its ACVRL1 encoding gene (12q11-14) cause type 2 Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT2), an autosomal dominant multisystem vascular dysplasia. The study of the structural effects of mutations is crucial to understand their pathogenic mechanism. However, while an X-ray structure of ALK1 intracellular domain has recently become available (PDB ID: 3MY0), structure determination of ALK1 ectodomain (ALK1EC) has been elusive so far. We here describe the building of a homology model for ALK1EC, followed by an extensive bioinformatic analysis, based on a set of 38 methods, of the effect of missense mutations at the sequence and structural level. ALK1EC potential interaction mode with its ligand BMP9 was then predicted combining modelling and docking data. The calculated model of the ALK1EC allowed mapping and a preliminary characterization of HHT2 associated mutations. Major structural changes and loss of stability of the protein were predicted for several mutations, while others were found to interfere mainly with binding to BMP9 or other interactors, like Endoglin (CD105), whose encoding ENG gene (9q34) mutations are known to cause type 1 HHT. This study gives a preliminary insight into the potential structure of ALK1EC and into the structural effects of HHT2 associated mutations, which can be useful to predict the potential effect of each single mutation, to devise new biological experiments and to interpret the biological significance of new mutations, private mutations, or non-synonymous polymorphisms. PMID:22028876

  6. A Novel Missense Mutation in ADAMTS10 in Norwegian Elkhound Primary Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Saija J.; Kaukonen, Maria; Nussdorfer, Forrest D.; Harman, Christine D.; Komáromy, András M.; Lohi, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Primary glaucoma is one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness both in humans and in dogs. Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting the retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve, and elevated intraocular pressure is commonly associated with the disease. Glaucoma is broadly classified into primary open angle (POAG), primary closed angle (PCAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Human glaucomas are genetically heterogeneous and multiple loci have been identified. Glaucoma affects several dog breeds but only three loci and one gene have been implicated so far. We have investigated the genetics of primary glaucoma in the Norwegian Elkhound (NE). We established a small pedigree around the affected NEs collected from Finland, US and UK and performed a genome-wide association study with 9 cases and 8 controls to map the glaucoma gene to 750 kb region on canine chromosome 20 (praw = 4.93×10−6, pgenome = 0.025). The associated region contains a previously identified glaucoma gene, ADAMTS10, which was subjected to mutation screening in the coding regions. A fully segregating missense mutation (p.A387T) in exon 9 was found in 14 cases and 572 unaffected NEs (pFisher = 3.5×10−27) with a high carrier frequency (25.3%). The mutation interrupts a highly conserved residue in the metalloprotease domain of ADAMTS10, likely affecting its functional capacity. Our study identifies the genetic cause of primary glaucoma in NEs and enables the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes. This study establishes also a new spontaneous canine model for glaucoma research to study the ADAMTS10 biology in optical neuropathy. PMID:25372548

  7. Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-associated missense mutation in HSPD1 blunts mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Eguchi, Takahiro; Kawahara, Kazuko; Hasegawa, Nanami; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tanoue, Akito; Tamura, Hiroomi; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-07-03

    Myelin-forming glial cells undergo dynamic morphological changes in order to produce mature myelin sheaths with multiple layers. In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths. Myelin sheaths play a key role in homeostasis of the nervous system, but their related disorders lead not only to dismyelination and repeated demyelination but also to severe neuropathies. Hereditary hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HLDs) are a group of such diseases affecting oligodendrocytes and are often caused by missense mutations of the respective responsible genes. Despite increasing identification of gene mutations through advanced nucleotide sequencing technology, studies on the relationships between gene mutations and their effects on cellular and subcellular aberrance have not followed at the same rapid pace. In this study, we report that an HLD4-associated (Asp-29-to-Gly) mutant of mitochondrial heat shock 60-kDa protein 1 (HSPD1) causes short-length morphologies and increases the numbers of mitochondria due to their aberrant fission and fusion cycles. In experiments using a fluorescent dye probe, this mutation decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential. Also, mitochondria accumulate in perinuclear regions. HLD4-associated HSPD1 mutant blunts mitochondrial dynamics, probably resulting in oligodendrocyte malfunction. This study constitutes a first finding concerning the relationship between disease-associated HSPD1 mutation and mitochondrial dynamics, which may be similar to the relationship between another disease-associated HSPD1 mutation (MitCHAP-60 disease) and aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial fission frequency. • The HLD4 mutant decreases mitochondrial fusion frequency. • Mitochondria harboring the HLD4 mutant exhibit slow motility. • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial membrane potential. • HLD4-related diseases may

  8. Novel WT1 Missense Mutations in Han Chinese Women with Premature Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huidan; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Fei; Li, Weiping; Qin, Yingying; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease. Though dozens of candidate genes have been identified for the genetic etiology of POF, it is largely unexplained in majority of patients. Recently, Wt1(+/R394W) mice was found to present POF-like phenotype, which indicates that WT1 might be a plausible candidate gene for non-syndromic POF. The coding region of WT1 gene was screened in 384 patients with POF and 6 novel variations were identified, including two missense mutations (p. Pro126Ser in exon1 and p. Arg370His in exon7) and four intronic variants (c.647-27C > T, c.647-13G > C, c.647-13G > A in intron1 and c.950 + 14T > C in intron 4). In vitro experiments showed that both mutant p. Pro126Ser and p. Arg370His repressed the expression of Amh and Cdh1, and induced the expression of Fshr and Cyp19 in mRNA level (P < 0.05). The expression changes of AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1 were confirmed by western blot. These genes (AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1) are required for granular cells (GCs) proliferation, differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction. The novel mutant p. P126S and p. R370H in the WT1 gene potentially impaired GCs differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction, which might result in loss of follicles prematurely. Therefore, WT1 is a plausible causal gene for POF. PMID:26358501

  9. Novel WT1 Missense Mutations in Han Chinese Women with Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huidan; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Fei; Li, Weiping; Qin, Yingying; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease. Though dozens of candidate genes have been identified for the genetic etiology of POF, it is largely unexplained in majority of patients. Recently, Wt1+/R394W mice was found to present POF-like phenotype, which indicates that WT1 might be a plausible candidate gene for non-syndromic POF. The coding region of WT1 gene was screened in 384 patients with POF and 6 novel variations were identified, including two missense mutations (p. Pro126Ser in exon1 and p. Arg370His in exon7) and four intronic variants (c.647-27C > T, c.647-13G > C, c.647-13G > A in intron1 and c.950 + 14T > C in intron 4). In vitro experiments showed that both mutant p. Pro126Ser and p. Arg370His repressed the expression of Amh and Cdh1, and induced the expression of Fshr and Cyp19 in mRNA level (P < 0.05). The expression changes of AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1 were confirmed by western blot. These genes (AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1) are required for granular cells (GCs) proliferation, differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction. The novel mutant p. P126S and p. R370H in the WT1 gene potentially impaired GCs differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction, which might result in loss of follicles prematurely. Therefore, WT1 is a plausible causal gene for POF. PMID:26358501

  10. A Missense Mutation in PPARD Causes a Major QTL Effect on Ear Size in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Duan, Yanyu; Qiao, Ruimin; Yao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyan; Yang, Bin; Guo, Yuanmei; Xiao, Shijun; Wei, Rongxin; Ouyang, Zixuan; Ding, Nengshui; Ai, Huashui; Huang, Lusheng

    2011-01-01

    Chinese Erhualian is the most prolific pig breed in the world. The breed exhibits exceptionally large and floppy ears. To identify genes underlying this typical feature, we previously performed a genome scan in a large scale White Duroc × Erhualian cross and mapped a major QTL for ear size to a 2-cM region on chromosome 7. We herein performed an identical-by-descent analysis that defined the QTL within a 750-kb region. Historically, the large-ear feature has been selected for the ancient sacrificial culture in Erhualian pigs. By using a selective sweep analysis, we then refined the critical region to a 630-kb interval containing 9 annotated genes. Four of the 9 genes are expressed in ear tissues of piglets. Of the 4 genes, PPARD stood out as the strongest candidate gene for its established role in skin homeostasis, cartilage development, and fat metabolism. No differential expression of PPARD was found in ear tissues at different growth stages between large-eared Erhualian and small-eared Duroc pigs. We further screened coding sequence variants in the PPARD gene and identified only one missense mutation (G32E) in a conserved functionally important domain. The protein-altering mutation showed perfect concordance (100%) with the QTL genotypes of all 19 founder animals segregating in the White Duroc × Erhualian cross and occurred at high frequencies exclusively in Chinese large-eared breeds. Moreover, the mutation is of functional significance; it mediates down-regulation of β-catenin and its target gene expression that is crucial for fat deposition in skin. Furthermore, the mutation was significantly associated with ear size across the experimental cross and diverse outbred populations. A worldwide survey of haplotype diversity revealed that the mutation event is of Chinese origin, likely after domestication. Taken together, we provide evidence that PPARD G32E is the variation underlying this major QTL. PMID:21573137

  11. Missense variant in CCDC22 causes X-linked recessive intellectual disability with features of Ritscher-Schinzel/3C syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolanczyk, Mateusz; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Jochen; Hupalowska, Anna; Miaczynska, Marta; Marschner, Katrin; Schlack, Claire; Emmerich, Denise; Kobus, Karolina; Kornak, Uwe; Robinson, Peter N; Plecko, Barbara; Grangl, Gernot; Uhrig, Sabine; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (RSS)/3C (cranio-cerebro-cardiac) syndrome (OMIM#220210) is a rare and clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, cerebellar brain malformations, congenital heart defects, and craniofacial abnormalities. A recent study of a Canadian cohort identified homozygous sequence variants in the KIAA0196 gene, which encodes the WASH complex subunit strumpellin, as a cause for a form of RSS/3C syndrome. We have searched for genetic causes of a phenotype similar to RSS/3C syndrome in an Austrian family with two affected sons. To search for disease-causing variants, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on samples from two affected male children and their parents. Before WES, CGH array comparative genomic hybridization was applied. Validation of WES and segregation studies was done using routine Sanger sequencing. Exome sequencing detected a missense variant (c.1670A>G; p.(Tyr557Cys)) in exon 15 of the CCDC22 gene, which maps to chromosome Xp11.23. Western blots of immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the affected individual showed decreased expression of CCDC22 and an increased expression of WASH1 but a normal expression of strumpellin and FAM21 in the patients cells. We identified a variant in CCDC22 gene as the cause of an X-linked phenotype similar to RSS/3C syndrome in the family described here. A hypomorphic variant in CCDC22 was previously reported in association with a familial case of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability, which shows phenotypic overlap with RSS/3C syndrome. Thus, different inactivating variants affecting CCDC22 are associated with a phenotype similar to RSS/3C syndrome. PMID:24916641

  12. Quantifying rare, deleterious variation in 12 human cytochrome P450 drug-metabolism genes in a large-scale exome dataset

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Adam S.; Tabor, Holly K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Snively, Beverly M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Peters, Ulrike; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Sucheston, Lara E.; Wang, Danxin; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Herrington, David M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of genetic influences on drug response and efficacy (‘pharmacogenetics’) has existed for over 50 years. Yet, we still lack a complete picture of how genetic variation, both common and rare, affects each individual's responses to medications. Exome sequencing is a promising alternative method for pharmacogenetic discovery as it provides information on both common and rare variation in large numbers of individuals. Using exome data from 2203 AA and 4300 Caucasian individuals through the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project, we conducted a survey of coding variation within 12 Cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes that are collectively responsible for catalyzing nearly 75% of all known Phase I drug oxidation reactions. In addition to identifying many polymorphisms with known pharmacogenetic effects, we discovered over 730 novel nonsynonymous alleles across the 12 CYP genes of interest. These alleles include many with diverse functional effects such as premature stop codons, aberrant splicesites and mutations at conserved active site residues. Our analysis considering both novel, predicted functional alleles as well as known, actionable CYP alleles reveals that rare, deleterious variation contributes markedly to the overall burden of pharmacogenetic alleles within the populations considered, and that the contribution of rare variation to this burden is over three times greater in AA individuals as compared with Caucasians. While most of these impactful alleles are individually rare, 7.6–11.7% of individuals interrogated in the study carry at least one newly described potentially deleterious alleles in a major drug-metabolizing CYP. PMID:24282029

  13. Population Dynamics of Sex-Determining Alleles in Honey Bees and Self-Incompatibility Alleles in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Nei, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical theories of the population dynamics of sex-determining alleles in honey bees are developed. It is shown that in an infinitely large population the equilibrium frequency of a sex allele is 1/n, where n is the number of alleles in the population, and the asymptotic rate of approach to this equilibrium is 2/(3n) per generation. Formulae for the distribution of allele frequencies and the effective and actual numbers of alleles that can be maintained in a finite population are derived by taking into account the population size and mutation rate. It is shown that the allele frequencies in a finite population may deviate considerably from 1/n. Using these results, available data on the number of sex alleles in honey bee populations are discussed. It is also shown that the number of self-incompatibility alleles in plants can be studied in a much simpler way by the method used in this paper. A brief discussion about general overdominant selection is presented. PMID:17248901

  14. Identification of rare DNA sequence variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large case/control population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics clearly plays a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but studies to date are only beginning to characterize the causal genetic variants responsible. Until recently, studies using multiple extended multi-generation families to identify ASD risk genes had not been undertaken. Methods We identified haplotypes shared among individuals with ASDs in large multiplex families, followed by targeted DNA capture and sequencing to identify potential causal variants. We also assayed the prevalence of the identified variants in a large ASD case/control population. Results We identified 584 non-conservative missense, nonsense, frameshift and splice site variants that might predispose to autism in our high-risk families. Eleven of these variants were observed to have odds ratios greater than 1.5 in a set of 1,541 unrelated children with autism and 5,785 controls. Three variants, in the RAB11FIP5, ABP1, and JMJD7-PLA2G4B genes, each were observed in a single case and not in any controls. These variants also were not seen in public sequence databases, suggesting that they may be rare causal ASD variants. Twenty-eight additional rare variants were observed only in high-risk ASD families. Collectively, these 39 variants identify 36 genes as ASD risk genes. Segregation of sequence variants and of copy number variants previously detected in these families reveals a complex pattern, with only a RAB11FIP5 variant segregating to all affected individuals in one two-generation pedigree. Some affected individuals were found to have multiple potential risk alleles, including sequence variants and copy number variants (CNVs), suggesting that the high incidence of autism in these families could be best explained by variants at multiple loci. Conclusions Our study is the first to use haplotype sharing to identify familial ASD risk loci. In total, we identified 39 variants in 36 genes that may confer a genetic risk of developing autism. The

  15. Analysis of HLA class II haplotypes in the Cayapa indians of ecuador: A novel DRBI allele reveals evidence for convergent evolution and balancing selection at position 86

    SciTech Connect

    Titus-Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H. ); Rickards, O.; De Stefano, G.F. )

    1994-07-01

    PCR amplification, oligonucleotide probe typing, and sequencing were used to analyze the HLA class II loci (DRB1, DQA1, DAB1, and DPB1) of an isolated South Amerindian tribe. Here the authors report HLA class II variation, including the identification of a new DRB1 allele, several novel DR/DQ haplotypes, and an unusual distribution of DPB1 alleles, among the Cayapa Indians (N=100) of Ecuador. A general reduction of HLA class II allelic variation in the Cayapa is consistent with a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americas. The new Cayapa DRB1 allele, DRB1[sup *]08042, which arose by a G[yields]T point mutation in the parental DRB1[sup *]0802, contains a novel Val codon (GTT) at position 86. The generation of DRB1[sup *]08042 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 (Gly-86) in the Cayapa, by a different mechanism than the (GT[yields]TG) change in the creation of DRB1[sub *]08041 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 in Africa, implicates selection in the convergent evolution of position 86 DR[beta] variants. The DRB1[sup *]08042 allele has not been found in >1,800 Amerindian haplotypes and thus presumably arose after the Cayapa separated from other South American Amerindians. Selection pressure for increased haplotype diversity can be inferred in the generation and maintenance of three new DRB1[sup *]08042 haplotypes and several novel DR/DQ haplotypes in this population. The DPB1 allelic distribution in the Cayapa is also extraordinary, with two alleles, DPB1[sup *]1401, a very rare allele in North American Amerindian populations, and DPB1[sup *]0402, the most common Amerindian DPB1 allele, constituting 89% of the Cayapa DPB1. These data are consistent with the postulated rapid rate of evolution as noted for the class I HLA-B locus of other South American Indians. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. An additional defective allele, CYP2C19*5, contributes to the S-mephenytoin poor metabolizer phenotype in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Ibeanu, G C; Blaisdell, J; Ghanayem, B I; Beyeler, C; Benhamou, S; Bouchardy, C; Wilkinson, G R; Dayer, P; Daly, A K; Goldstein, J A

    1998-04-01

    The metabolism of the anticonvulsant drug mephenytoin exhibits a genetic polymorphism in humans. This polymorphism exhibits marked racial heterogeneity, with the poor metabolizer PM phenotype representing 13-23% of oriental populations, but only 2-5% of Caucasian populations. Two defective CYP2C19 alleles (CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3) have been described, which account for more than 99% of Oriental poor metabolizer alleles but only approximately 87% of Caucasian poor metabolizer alleles. Therefore, additional defects presumably contribute to the poor metabolizer in Caucasians. Recent studies have found a third mutation CYP2C19*4, which accounts for approximately 3% of Caucasian poor metabolizer alleles. A fourth rare mutation (CYP2C19*5A) (C99,A991,Ile331;C1297T,Arg433-->Trp) resulting in an Arg433 to Trp substitution in the heme-binding region has been reported in a single Chinese poor metaboliser outlier belonging to the Bai ethnic group. The present study identifies a second variant allele CYP2C19*5B (C99-->T; A991-->G, Ile331-->Val; C1297-T, Arg433-->Trp in one of 37 Caucasian poor metabolizers. The frequency of the CYP2C19*5 alleles is low in Chinese (approximately 0.25% in the Bai ethnic group) and Caucasians (< 0.9%). However, these alleles contribute to the poor metabolizer phenotype in both ethnic groups and increases the sensitivity of the genetic tests for identifying defective alleles to approximately 100% in Chinese poor metabolizers and 92% in Caucasian poor metabolizers genotyped in our laboratory. The Arg433 to Trp mutation in the heme-binding region essentially abolishes activity of recombinant CYP2C19*5A toward S-mephenytoin and tolbutamide, which is consistent with the conclusion that CYP2C19*5 represents poor metabolizer alleles. PMID:10022751

  17. Rare deficiency {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin variants; current status and SSCP analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, G.D.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The serine protease inhibitor {alpha}{sub 1} Antitrypsin ({alpha}{sub 1}AT) is an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. A deficiency of {alpha}{sub 1}AT (< 20% of the normal amount of {alpha}{sub 1}AT) is associated with early-onset emphysema and childhood liver disease. The most common deficiency allele, PI{sup *}Z, has a frequency of 1-2% in the North American white population. Several rare deficiency alleles (including null (QO) alleles; < 1% of normal) with a combined frequency of approximately 10{sup -4}, have been reported. Of 24 sequenced deficiency variants, the defect in 15 has been proven to be due to gene deletion (2), mRNA degradation (2), error in mRNA processing (1), intracellular protein accumulation (5) and intracellular protein degradation (5). We have determined conditions for detection of new mutations. We have screened DNA from 20 individuals carrying rare deficiency alleles. In some individuals, RFLP haplotype analysis suggested the presence of a new variant. The root alleles, M1 (Ala 213) or M1 (Val 213), and the presence of variants whose mutant sequence alters a restriction endonuclease site were determined by digestion of the amplified exon. Mutation detection was performed by SSCP analysis of each of the four coding exons followed by direct sequencing of the amplified exon. 12 of 14 known mutations (85%) were detected by SSCP analysis. We detected a new null allele in a patient that also carries the QO{sup *}hongkong allele. C to A transversion at the third nucleotide of codon 38 creates a stop codon on the M1(Val 213) root allele. This new variant allele has been named PI{sup *}QOkowloon. Characterization of the mutations leading to {alpha}{sub 1}AT deficiency allows delineation of amino acids critical for stability, for normal secretion and for normal function.

  18. One missense mutation in exon 2 of the PAX5 gene in Iran.

    PubMed

    Yazdanparast, S; Khatami, S R; Galehdari, H; Jaseb, K

    2015-01-01

    The PAX5 gene, which encodes the B-cell specific activator protein, is one of the most important factors in determination of B-cell development. This gene is the main target of somatic mutations in acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). For example, point mutations, deletions, as well as other gene rearrangements may lead to several forms of B-cell malignancy. In this study, we obtained 50 blood samples from patients diagnosed with ALL, and screened for PAX5 mutations using sequencing in exons 1, 2 and 3. We found a heterozygous germline variant, c.113G>A (p.Arg38His), which affects the paired domain of PAX5. It seems that this mutation is pathogenic, but is recessive. Our findings suggest that this mutation in a single allele of the PAX5 gene is not sufficient to cause disease, and it is possible that other alleles are also involved in the onset of B-ALL. PMID:26782422

  19. P-Element Insertion Alleles of Essential Genes on the Third Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster: Mutations Affecting Embryonic Pns Development

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, A.; Prokopenko, S. N.; He, Y.; Tsai, P.; Pal, M.; Maroy, P.; Glover, D. M.; Deak, P.; Bellen, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    To identify novel genes and to isolate tagged mutations in known genes that are required for the development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), we have screened a novel collection of 2460 strains carrying lethal or semilethal P-element insertions on the third chromosome. Monoclonal antibody 22C10 was used as a marker to visualize the embryonic PNS. We identified 109 mutant strains that exhibited reproducible phenotypes in the PNS. Cytological and genetic analyses of these strains indicated that 87 mutations affect previously identified genes: tramtrack (n = 18 alleles), string (n = 15), cyclin A (n = 13), single-minded (n = 13), Delta (n = 9), neuralized (n = 4), pointed (n = 4), extra macrochaetae (n = 4), prospero (n = 3), tartan (n = 2), and pebble (n = 2). In addition, 13 mutations affect genes that we identified recently in a chemical mutagenesis screen designed to isolate similar mutants: hearty (n = 3), dorsotonals (n = 2), pavarotti (n = 2), sanpodo (n = 2), dalmatian (n = 1), missensed (n = 1), senseless (n = 1), and sticky ch1 (n = 1). The remaining nine mutations define seven novel complementation groups. The data presented here demonstrate that this collection of P elements will be useful for the identification and cloning of novel genes on the third chromosome, since >70% of mutations identified in the screen are caused by the insertion of a P element. A comparison between this screen and a chemical mutagenesis screen undertaken earlier highlights the complementarity of the two types of genetic screens. PMID:9409832

  20. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah A.; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  1. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants.

    PubMed

    Uricchio, Lawrence H; Zaitlen, Noah A; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2016-07-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  2. Rare Parotid Gland Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanan, Akshay; Cognetti, David M

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis for "rare" parotid gland diseases is broad and encompasses infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, metabolic, and iatrogenic etiologies. The body of knowledge of parotid gland diseases has grown owing to advances in imaging and pathologic analysis and molecular technology. This article reviews rare parotid diseases, discussing the respective disease's clinical presentation, diagnosis, imaging, pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26902981

  3. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  4. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons. PMID:22866951

  5. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  7. Fabry disease: characterization of alpha-galactosidase A double mutations and the D313Y plasma enzyme pseudodeficiency allele.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Shabbeer, Junaid; Benson, Stacy D; Maire, Irene; Burnett, Roger M; Desnick, Robert J

    2003-12-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal exoglycohydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A; GLA). In two unrelated classically affected males, two alpha-Gal A missense mutations were identified: R112C + D313Y (c.334C>T + c.937G>T) and C172G + D313Y (c.514T>G + c.937G>T). The D313Y lesion was previously identified in classically affected males as the single mutation [Eng et al., 1993] or in cis with another missense mutation, D313Y + G411D (c.937G>T + c.1232G>A) [Guffon et al., 1998]. To determine whether the D313Y mutation was a deleterious mutation or a coding region sequence variant, the frequency of D313Y in normal X-chromosomes, as well as its enzymatic activity and subcellular localization in COS-7 cells was determined. D313Y occurred in 0.45% of 883 normal X-chromosomes, while the R112C, C172G, and G411D missense mutations were not detected in over 500 normal X-chromosomes. Expression of D313Y in COS-7 cells resulted in approximately 60% of wild-type enzymatic activity and showed lysosomal localization, while R112C, C172G, G411D, and the double-mutated constructs had markedly reduced or no detectable activity and were all retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The expressed D313Y enzyme was stable at lysosomal pH (pH 4.6), while at neutral pH (pH 7.4), it had decreased activity. A molecular homology model of human alpha-Gal A, based on the X-ray crystal structure of chicken alpha-galactosidase B (alpha-Gal B; alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) was generated [Garman et al., 2002], which provided evidence that D313Y did not markedly disrupt the alpha-Gal A enzyme structure. Thus, D313Y is a rare exonic variant with about 60% of wild-type activity in vitro and reduced activity at neutral pH, resulting in low plasma alpha-Gal A activity. PMID:14635108

  8. Allelic imbalance at the LKB1 (STK11) locus in tumours from patients with Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome provides evidence for a hamartoma-(adenoma)-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; Ellis, I; Zauber, P; Iwama, T; Marchese, C; Talbot, I; Xue, W H; Yan, Z Y; Tomlinson, I

    1999-05-01

    Patients with Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome (PJS) develop hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and characteristic pigmentation, as a result of germline mutations in the LKB1 gene. The hamartomas in PJS were long considered to be without malignant potential. There is, however, accumulating epidemiological evidence to suggest that PJS predisposes to cancers at several different sites (colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, testis, and cervix), although large enough patient samples are rarely available to prove this. Allelic imbalance [allele loss, loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] has previously been reported in a small number of PJS polyps, suggesting that LKB1 acts as a tumour suppressor in these tumours. This study confirms allelic loss at LKB1 in PJS polyps and shows that LOH also occurs in cancers of the colon, breast, and cervix in PJS patients. Allele loss was additionally found in a colonic adenoma from a PJS patient, strongly suggesting the existence of a hamartoma-(adenoma)-carcinoma sequence in tumourigenesis. These results provide molecular evidence that PJS patients are predisposed to cancers at several sites, as a direct result of selection for loss of the 'wild-type' LKB1 allele in tumours. Given the rare involvement of LKB1 in sporadic cancers, these data also suggest that the indirect effect on cancer risk (or 'bystander effect') proposed for hamartomas in juvenile polyposis does not apply to carcinomas in PJS. PMID:10398133

  9. Identifying rare events in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M

    2015-04-15

    Utilizing genomic signatures from diagnostic tumor samples to forecast clinical behavior and response to therapy has long been a goal, and we are now poised to further refine how we can identify the relatively rare patients with aggressive neuroblastoma masquerading as patients with a more benign form of the disease. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1782-5. ©2014 AACR. See related article by Oberthuer et al., p. 1904. PMID:25424848

  10. In Silico and In Vitro Investigations of the Mutability of Disease-Causing Missense Mutation Sites in Spermine Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Norris, Joy; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermine synthase (SMS) is a key enzyme controlling the concentration of spermidine and spermine in the cell. The importance of SMS is manifested by the fact that single missense mutations were found to cause Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS). At the same time, currently there are no non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphisms, nsSNPs (harmless mutations), found in SMS, which may imply that the SMS does not tolerate amino acid substitutions, i.e. is not mutable. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the mutability of the SMS, we carried out in silico analysis and in vitro experiments of the effects of amino acid substitutions at the missense mutation sites (G56, V132 and I150) that have been shown to cause SRS. Our investigation showed that the mutation sites have different degree of mutability depending on their structural micro-environment and involvement in the function and structural integrity of the SMS. It was found that the I150 site does not tolerate any mutation, while V132, despite its key position at the interface of SMS dimer, is quite mutable. The G56 site is in the middle of the spectra, but still quite sensitive to charge residue replacement. Conclusions/Significance The performed analysis showed that mutability depends on the detail of the structural and functional factors and cannot be predicted based on conservation of wild type properties alone. Also, harmless nsSNPs can be expected to occur even at sites at which missense mutations were found to cause diseases. PMID:21647366

  11. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  12. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  13. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  14. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10-4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10-3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10-8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer genes

  15. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  16. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  17. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Md. Zahidus; Salam, Md. Abdus; Haque, Md. Zahirul; Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh. PMID:24581105

  18. Severe G6PD Deficiency Due to a New Missense Mutation in an Infant of Northern European Descent.

    PubMed

    Warny, Marie; Lausen, Birgitte; Birgens, Henrik; Knabe, Niels; Petersen, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We report a term male infant born to parents of Danish descent, who on the second day of life developed jaundice peaking at 67 hours and decreasing on applied double-sided phototherapy. In the weeks following, the infant showed signs of ongoing hemolysis. Laboratory tests showed very low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzymatic activity, and sequencing of the G6PD gene revealed a previously uncharacterized missense mutation c. 592 C>A (Arg198Ser). Oral DNA from the infant had the same G6PD mutation, suggesting a spontaneous maternal germline mutation as the mutation was not observed in leukocytes from the mother. PMID:26479991

  19. Repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 alleles of the TATA-box binding protein gene: an evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Tomiuk, Jürgen; Bachmann, Lutz; Bauer, Claudia; Rolfs, Arndt; Schöls, Ludger; Roos, Christian; Zischler, Hans; Schuler, Mathias M; Bruntner, Silke; Riess, Olaf; Bauer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The variability and mutational changes of the CAG microsatellite in the TATA-box binding protein gene (TBP) were studied. We sequenced the microsatellite of the TBP gene of 25 unrelated individuals from northern Germany (10 SCA17 patients and 15 unaffected control individuals). In addition, the microsatellites were sequenced from individuals of 10 northern German families with at least one family member affected by SCA17. To study also the evolutionary history of this CAG/CAA microsatellite in nonhuman primates, the homologous regions were analysed from Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, P. abellii, Hylobates lar, Nomascus leucogenys, Symphalangus syndactylus, Macaca mulatta, Papio hamadryas, Colobus polykomos and Callithrix jacchus. Three major conclusions were drawn: (i) Patterns of synonymous CAA interruptions in the microsatellite are characteristic and likely to result from selection for stabilizing the repetitive region; (ii) Interspecific comparisons indicate that SCA17 is likely to be a human trait. The most common allele in humans (37 repeats) is close to the threshold value upon which neurodegenerative changes can occur and may act as a repository for expanded, pathogenic alleles; (iii) The cassette-like structure of five out of 17 expanded alleles can be attributed to unequal crossing over. This can explain the rare and sporadic de novo generation of SCA17 alleles. PMID:17033685

  20. Variant mapping of the Apo(B) AT rich minisatellite. Dependence on nucleotide sequence of the copy number variations. Instability of the non-canonical alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, E; Vigneron, S; Buresi, C; Cambien, F; Cambou, J P; Roizes, G

    1993-01-01

    Because of its variations in length, the AT rich Hyper-Variable Region (HVR) of the 3' end of the Apolipoprotein B gene is used as a polymorphic maker in genetic studies. It contains a SspI site in its repeated motif and we used this feature to precisely analyse the internal structure of the different alleles found at this locus in a Caucasian population. We performed total digestion on 194 alleles as well as Minisatellite Variant Repeat mapping (MVR mapping: partial digestion) on 54. The results show that the level of length variability (in copy number) of the 5' end of this locus is at least two times higher than that of the 3' end. This could be correlated with the difference in nucleotide sequence between the two parts of the HVR and suggests the dependence on the primary structure of the mechanism that produces length variability. A molecular model is proposed to explain this result. Moreover, the sharp analysis of the minisatellite structure by the distribution of SspI sites reveals differences between long and short alleles, indicating that in most cases, no recombination occurs between alleles of different sizes. Finally the rare alleles exhibit a non-canonical structure. These important points could explain the bimodal distribution of the frequencies of the alleles in the population. Images PMID:8502559

  1. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  2. A rare opportunity beckons

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the military and energy security of the US

  3. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  4. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  5. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  6. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Naim U.; Sperling, Adam S.; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K.; Richardson, Paul G.; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P. Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  7. Differential and limited expression of mutant alleles in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Naim U; Sperling, Adam S; Bolli, Niccolo; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Samur, Mehmet K; Richardson, Paul G; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Futreal, P Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Campbell, Peter J; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2014-11-13

    Recent work has delineated mutational profiles in multiple myeloma and reported a median of 52 mutations per patient, as well as a set of commonly mutated genes across multiple patients. In this study, we have used deep sequencing of RNA from a subset of these patients to evaluate the proportion of expressed mutations. We find that the majority of previously identified mutations occur within genes with very low or no detectable expression. On average, 27% (range, 11% to 47%) of mutated alleles are found to be expressed, and among mutated genes that are expressed, there often is allele-specific expression where either the mutant or wild-type allele is suppressed. Even in the absence of an overall change in gene expression, the presence of differential allelic expression within malignant cells highlights the important contribution of RNA-sequencing in identifying clinically significant mutational changes relevant to our understanding of myeloma biology and also for therapeutic applications. PMID:25237203

  8. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D.; O`Brien, S.

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  9. Identifying rare variants associated with complex traits via sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingshan; Liu, Dajiang J.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have been successful in detecting associations with common variants, there is currently an increasing interest in identifying low frequency and rare variants associated with complex traits. Next-generation sequencing technologies make it feasible to survey the full spectrum of genetic variation in coding regions or the entire genome. Due to the low frequency of rare variants, coupled with allelic heterogeneity, however, the association analysis for rare variants is challenging and traditional methods are ineffective. Recently a battery of new statistical methods has been proposed for identifying rare variants associated with complex traits. These methods test for associations by aggregating multiple rare variants across a gene or a genomic region, or a group of variants in the genome. In this Unit, we describe key concepts for rare variant association for complex traits, survey some of the recent methods and discuss their statistical power under various scenarios, and provide practical guidance on analyzing next-generation sequencing data for identifying rare variants associated with complex traits. PMID:23853079

  10. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Chaoyong; Odeberg, Jacob; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per . E-mail: Per.Eriksson@ki.se

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  11. Collecting rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    This editorial introduces the F1000Research rare disease collection. It is common knowledge that for new treatments to be successful there has to be a partnership between the many interested parties such as the patient, advocate, disease foundations, the academic scientists, venture funding organizations, biotech companies, pharmaceutical companies, NIH, and the FDA. Our intention is to provide a forum for discussion and dissemination of any rare disease related topics that will advance scientific understanding and progress to treatments. PMID:25580231

  12. Medical rare book provenance.

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J A; Sentz, L

    1987-01-01

    Provenance is defined as the record of a book's ownership history. Its value and uses are explored. A survey of provenance practices in medical school rare book libraries found that only 21% of the reporting libraries maintain this important file. Examples of the uses and value of a provenance file in a medical rare book collection are presented. Decisions necessary to institute and maintain such a file are outlined and discussed. PMID:3828606

  13. Results of Expedicion Humana. I. Analysis of HLA class II (DRB1-DQA1-DPB1) alleles and DR-DQ haplotypes in nine Amerindian populations from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, E A; Keyeux, G; Bernal, J E; Rhodas, M C; Erlich, H A

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II variation was analyzed in nine Native American populations of Colombia using PCR/SSOP typing methods. Under the auspices of the Expedition Humana, approximately 30 unrelated native Colombia Indian samples each from the Tule (NW Pacific Coast), Kogui (Sierra Nevada). Ijka (Sierra Nevada), Ingano (Amazonas), Coreguaje (Amazonas), Nukak (Amazonas), Waunana (Pacific), Embera (Pacific) and Sikuani (Northeastern Plains) were collected and analyzed at the DRBI, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci. The number of different DRB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 alleles in the Colombian Indians is markedly reduced in comparison with neighboring African Colombian populations, which exhibit a very high degree of class II variability, as discussed in an accompanying paper. In the Colombian Amerindian groups, DR2 (DRB1*1602), DR4 (DRB1*0407, *0404, *0403 AND *0411), DR6 (DRB1*1402) and DR8 (DRB1*0802) comprise > 95% of all DRB1 alleles. We also found an absence of DR3 in all populations, and DR1, DR7 and DR9 allelic groups were either very rare or absent. Each Colombian Amerindian population has a predominant DRB1 allele (f = approximately 0.22-0.65) and DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype. Several novel DR-DQ haplotypes were also found. At the DPB1 locus, DPB1*0402 (f = 0.28-0.82), *1401 (f = 0.03-0.45), and *3501 (f = 0.03-0.27), were the three most prevalent alleles, each population maintaining one of these three alleles as the predominant (f > 0.26) DPB1 allele. The reduction of diversity for the HLA class II alleles in the Colombian Indians is suggestive of a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americans, with little to no subsequent admixture with neighboring African Colombian populations in the last approximately 300 years. PMID:8896175

  14. Identification of I411K, a novel missense EYA4 mutation causing autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    TAN, MINXING; SHEN, XIAOFEI; YAO, JUN; WEI, QINJUN; LU, YAJIE; CAO, XIN; XING, GUANGQIAN

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans and gaining a better understanding of the underlying causes is necessary to improve counseling and rehabilitation. In the present study, a genetic analysis of a Chinese family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic progressive hearing impairment was conducted and assessed. Whole-exome sequencing in combination with a co-segregation analysis identified a novel missense mutation in EYA4 exon 15 (c.T1301A; p.I411K). The mutation segregated with the hearing loss of the family. This mutation was not identified in the databases of 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP 130, HapMap and YH project or in matched controls. Bioinformatic analysis confirmed the pathogenic effects of this mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to provide a description of a missense mutation in the EYA4 gene resulting in non-syndromic hearing loss. Our results provide additional molecular and clinical information in order to gain improved understanding of the pathogenesis of EYA4 mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlations of DFNA10 hearing loss. PMID:25242383

  15. Identification of I411K, a novel missense EYA4 mutation causing autosomal dominant non‑syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Tan, Minxing; Shen, Xiaofei; Yao, Jun; Wei, Qinjun; Lu, Yajie; Cao, Xin; Xing, Guangqian

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans and gaining a better understanding of the underlying causes is necessary to improve counseling and rehabilitation. In the present study, a genetic analysis of a Chinese family with autosomal dominant non‑syndromic progressive hearing impairment was conducted and assessed. Whole‑exome sequencing in combination with a co‑segregation analysis identified a novel missense mutation in EYA4 exon 15 (c.T1301A; p.I411K). The mutation segregated with the hearing loss of the family. This mutation was not identified in the databases of 1000 genome Project, dbSNP 130, HapMap and YH project or in matched controls. Bioinformatic analysis confirmed the pathogenic effects of this mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to provide a description of a missense mutation in the EYA4 gene resulting in non‑syndromic hearing loss. Our results provide additional molecular and clinical information in order to gain improved understanding of the pathogenesis of EYA4 mutations and the genotype‑phenotype correlations of DFNA10 hearing loss. PMID:25242383

  16. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  17. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  18. Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood-Related Neural and Behavioural Phenotypes in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 Missense Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S.; Dawson, Neil; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; Johnston, Tom H.; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Edwards, Ian J.; Fox, Susan H.; Pratt, Judith A.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Roder, John C.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na+,K+-ATPase α3 have been identified as the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), a motor disorder with onset typically before the age of 6 months. Affected children tend to be of short stature and can also have epilepsy, ataxia and learning disability. The Na+,K+-ATPase has a well-known role in maintaining electrochemical gradients across cell membranes, but our understanding of how the mutations cause AHC is limited. Myshkin mutant mice carry an amino acid change (I810N) that affects the same position in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 as I810S found in AHC. Using molecular modelling, we show that the Myshkin and AHC mutations display similarly severe structural impacts on Na+,K+-ATPase α3, including upon the K+ pore and predicted K+ binding sites. Behavioural analysis of Myshkin mice revealed phenotypic abnormalities similar to symptoms of AHC, including motor dysfunction and cognitive impairment. 2-DG imaging of Myshkin mice identified compromised thalamocortical functioning that includes a deficit in frontal cortex functioning (hypofrontality), directly mirroring that reported in AHC, along with reduced thalamocortical functional connectivity. Our results thus provide validation for missense mutations in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 as a cause of AHC, and highlight Myshkin mice as a starting point for the exploration of disease mechanisms and novel treatments in AHC. PMID:23527305

  19. Parkinson-causing α-synuclein missense mutations shift native tetramers to monomers as a mechanism for disease initiation

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Ulf; Newman, Andrew J.; Soldner, Frank; Luth, Eric S.; Kim, Nora C.; von Saucken, Victoria E.; Sanderson, John B.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Bartels, Tim; Selkoe, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    β-Sheet-rich α-synuclein (αS) aggregates characterize Parkinson's disease (PD). αS was long believed to be a natively unfolded monomer, but recent work suggests it also occurs in α-helix-rich tetramers. Crosslinking traps principally tetrameric αS in intact normal neurons, but not after cell lysis, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium. Here we show that freshly biopsied normal human brain contains abundant αS tetramers. The PD-causing mutation A53T decreases tetramers in mouse brain. Neurons derived from an A53T patient have decreased tetramers. Neurons expressing E46K do also, and adding 1-2 E46K-like mutations into the canonical αS repeat motifs (KTKEGV) further reduces tetramers, decreases αS solubility and induces neurotoxicity and round inclusions. The other three fPD missense mutations likewise decrease tetramer:monomer ratios. The destabilization of physiological tetramers by PD-causing missense mutations and the neurotoxicity and inclusions induced by markedly decreasing tetramers suggest that decreased α-helical tetramers and increased unfolded monomers initiate pathogenesis. Tetramer-stabilizing compounds should prevent this. PMID:26076669

  20. The contribution of rare variation to prostate cancer heritability.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Nicholas; Rohland, Nadin; Rand, Kristin A; Tandon, Arti; Allen, Alexander; Quinque, Dominique; Mallick, Swapan; Li, Heng; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Le Marchand, Loic; Lubwama, Alex; Stram, Daniel; Watya, Stephen; Conti, David V; Henderson, Brian; Haiman, Christopher A; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    We report targeted sequencing of 63 known prostate cancer risk regions in a multi-ancestry study of 9,237 men and use the data to explore the contribution of low-frequency variation to disease risk. We show that SNPs with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) of 0.1-1% explain a substantial fraction of prostate cancer risk in men of African ancestry. We estimate that these SNPs account for 0.12 (standard error (s.e.) = 0.05) of variance in risk (∼42% of the variance contributed by SNPs with MAF of 0.1-50%). This contribution is much larger than the fraction of neutral variation due to SNPs in this class, implying that natural selection has driven down the frequency of many prostate cancer risk alleles; we estimate the coupling between selection and allelic effects at 0.48 (95% confidence interval [0.19, 0.78]) under the Eyre-Walker model. Our results indicate that rare variants make a disproportionate contribution to genetic risk for prostate cancer and suggest the possibility that rare variants may also have an outsize effect on other common traits. PMID:26569126

  1. Isolated 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA Carboxylase Deficiency: Evidence for an Allele-Specific Dominant Negative Effect and Responsiveness to Biotin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Dantas, M. Fernanda; Suormala, Terttu; Almashanu, Shlomo; Giunta, Cecilia; Friebel, Dolores; Gebhardt, Boris; Fowler, Brian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Baumgartner, E. Regula; Valle, David

    2004-01-01

    Deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) results in elevated excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3-MCG) and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIVA). MCC is a heteromeric mitochondrial enzyme comprising biotin-containing α subunits and smaller β subunits, encoded by MCCA and MCCB, respectively. Mutations in these genes cause isolated MCC deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder with a variable phenotype that ranges from severe neonatal to asymptomatic adult forms. No reported patients have responded to biotin therapy. Here, we describe two patients with a biochemical and, in one case, clinical phenotype of MCC deficiency, both of whom were responsive to biotin. The first patient presented at 3 months with seizures and progressive psychomotor retardation. Metabolic investigation at 2 years revealed elevated excretion of 3-MCG and 3-HIVA, suggesting MCC deficiency. High-dose biotin therapy was associated with a dramatic reduction in seizures, normalization of the electroencephalogram, and correction of the organic aciduria, within 4 weeks. MCC activity in fibroblasts was 25% of normal levels. The second patient, a newborn detected by tandem-mass-spectrometry newborn screening, displayed the same biochemical phenotype and remained asymptomatic with biotin up to the age of 18 months. In both patients, sequence analysis of the complete open reading frames of MCCA and MCCB revealed heterozygosity for MCCA-R385S and for the known polymorphic variant MCCA-P464H but revealed no other coding alterations. MCCA-R385S is unusual, in that it has a normal amount of MCCα protein but confers no MCC activity. We show that MCCA-R385S, but not other MCCA missense alleles, reduces the MCC activity of cotransfected MCCA–wild-type allele. Our results suggest that MCCA-R385S is a dominant negative allele and is biotin responsive in vivo. PMID:15359379

  2. Evolution of Functionally Diverse Alleles Associated with PTC Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril; Omar, Sabah; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Nyambo, Thomas; Lema, Godfrey; Zinshteyn, Daniel; Drayna, Dennis; Breslin, Paul A. S.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    indicate that novel rare mutations contribute to the phenotypic variance of PTC sensitivity, illustrating the influence of rare variation on a common trait, as well as the relatively recent evolution of functionally diverse alleles at this locus. PMID:22130969

  3. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time. PMID:26392055

  4. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  6. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency in south Italy: Genotype-phenotype correlations, identification of a novel mutant PAH allele and prediction of BH4 responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Trunzo, Roberta; Santacroce, Rosa; D'Andrea, Giovanna; Longo, Vittoria; De Girolamo, Giuseppe; Dimatteo, Claudia; Leccese, Angelica; Bafunno, Valeria; Lillo, Vincenza; Papadia, Francesco; Margaglione, Maurizio

    2015-10-23

    We investigated the mutation spectrum of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (PAH) in a cohort of patients from 33 Italian PKU families. Mutational screening of the known coding region, including conventional intron splice sites, was performed by direct sequencing of the patients' genomic DNA. Thirty-three different disease causing mutations were identified in our patient group, including 19 missense, 6 splicing, 3 nonsense, 5 deletions, with a detection rate of 100%. The most prevalent mutation was the IVS10-11G>A, accounting for 12.1% of PKU alleles studied. Other frequent mutations were: p.R261Q (9.1%), p.P281L (7.6%), and p.R408W (6.1%). We also identified one novel missense mutation, p.H290Q. A spectrum of 31 different genotypes was observed and a genotype based predictions of BH4-responsiveness were assessed. Among all genotypes, 13 were predicted to be BH4-responsive represented by thirteen PKU families. In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations were performed. This study reveals the importance of a full genotyping of PKU patients and the prediction of BH4-responsiveness, not only because of the definitive diagnosis and prediction of the optimal diet, but also to point out those patients that could benefit from new therapeutic approach. They may potentially benefit from BH4 therapy which, combined with a less strict diet, or eventually in special cases as monotherapy, may contribute to reduce nutritional deficiencies and minimize neurological and psychological dysfunctions. PMID:26210745

  7. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  8. Common and Rare Gene Variants Affecting Plasma LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, John R; Hooper, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    The plasma level of LDL cholesterol is clinically important and genetically complex. LDL cholesterol levels are in large part determined by the activity of LDL receptors (LDLR) in the liver. Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) – with its high LDL cholesterol levels, xanthomas, and premature atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in either the LDLR or in APOB – the protein in LDL recognised by the LDLR. A third, rare form – autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia – arises from mutations in the gene encoding an adaptor protein involved in the internalisation of the LDLR. A fourth variant of inherited hypercholesterolaemia was recently found to be associated with missense mutations in PCSK9, which encodes a serine protease that degrades LDLR. Whereas the gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are rare, a spectrum of more frequent loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 associated with low LDL cholesterol levels has been identified in selected populations and could protect against coronary heart disease. Heterozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) – with its low LDL cholesterol levels and resistance to atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in APOB. In contrast to other inherited forms of severe hypocholesterolaemia such as abetalipoproteinaemia - caused by mutations in MTP - and homozygous FHBL, a deficiency of PCSK9 appears to be benign. Rare variants of NPC1L1, the gene encoding the putative intestinal cholesterol receptor, have shown more modest effects on plasma LDL cholesterol than PCSK9 variants, similar in magnitude to the effect of common APOE variants. Taken together, these findings indicate that heritable variation in plasma LDL cholesterol is conferred by sequence variation in various loci, with a small number of common and multiple rare gene variants contributing to the phenotype. PMID:18566665

  9. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  10. Functional and structural impact of the most prevalent missense mutations in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Trabuco, Matilde; Ramos, Ruben; Silva, Maria João; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Leandro, Paula; Rivera, Isabel; Vicente, João B

    2014-11-01

    Galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) is a key enzyme in galactose metabolism, particularly important in the neonatal period due to ingestion of galactose-containing milk. GALT deficiency results in the genetic disorder classic galactosemia, whose pathophysiology is still not fully elucidated. Whereas classic galactosemia has been hypothesized to result from GALT misfolding, a thorough functional-structural characterization of GALT most prevalent variants was still lacking, hampering the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural-functional effects of nine GALT mutations, four of which account for the vast majority of the mutations identified in galactosemic patients. Several methodologies were employed to evaluate the mutations' impact on GALT function, on the protein secondary and tertiary structures, and on the aggregation propensity. The major structural effect concerns disturbed propensity for aggregation, particularly striking for the p.Q188R variant, resulting from the most frequent (∼60%) allele at a worldwide scale. The absence of major effects at the secondary and tertiary structure levels suggests that the disturbed aggregation results from subtle perturbations causing a higher and/or longer exposure of hydrophobic residues in the variants as compared to WT GALT. The results herein described indicate a possible benefit from introducing proteostasis regulators and/or chemical/pharmacological chaperones to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates, in new avenues of therapeutic research for classic galactosemia.