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Sample records for rare-earth element doped

  1. Rare earth elements in synthetic zircon. 1. synthesis, and rare earth element and phosphorus doping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, J. M.; Finch, R. J.; Hoskin, W. O.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Mariano, A. N.; Chemical Engineering; George Washington Univ.; Univ. of Canterbury; Australian National Univ.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-05-01

    Sedimentary mineral assemblages commonly contain detrital zircon crystals as part of the heavy-mineral fraction. Age spectra determined by U-Pb isotopic analysis of single zircon crystals within a sample may directly image the age composition--but not the chemical composition--of the source region. Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured for zircons from a range of common crustal igneous rock types from different tectonic environments, as well as kimberlite, carbonatite, and high-grade metamorphic rocks, to assess the potential of using zircon REE characteristics to infer the rock types present in sediment source regions. Except for zircon with probable mantle affinities, zircon REE abundances and normalized patterns show little intersample and intrasample variation. To evaluate the actual variation in detrital zircon REE composition in a true sediment of known mixed provenance, zircons from a sandstone sample from the Statfjord Formation (North Sea) were analyzed. Despite a provenance including high-grade metasediment and granitoids and a range in zircon age of 2.82 b.y., the zircon REEs exhibit a narrow abundance range with no systematic differences in pattern shape. These evidences show zircon REE patterns and abundances are generally not useful as indicators of provenance.

  2. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of rare earth element and phosphorus-doped zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Karali, T.; Can, N.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.; Hanchar, J.M.

    2000-06-01

    The radioluminescence and thermoluminescence spectra of synthetic zircon crystals doped with individual trivalent rare earth element (REE) ions (Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb) and P are reported in the temperature range 25 to 673 K. Although there is some intrinsic UV/blue emission from the host lattice, the dominant signals are from the rare-earth sites, with signals characteristic of the REE{sup 3+} states. The shapes of the glow curves are different for each dopant, and there are distinct differences between glow peak temperatures for different rare-earth lines of the same element. Within the overall set of signals there are indications of linear trends in which some glow peak temperatures vary as a function of the ionic size of the rare earth ions. The temperature shifts of the peaks are considerable, up to 200{degree}, and much larger than those cited in other rare-earth-doped crystals of LaF{sub 3} and Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The data clearly suggest that the rare-earth ions are active both in the trapping and luminescence steps, and hence the TL occurs within localized defect complexes that include REE{sup 3+} ions.

  3. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility. PMID:24009098

  4. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Hussain, T; Ahuja, R; Kang, T W; Luo, W

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  5. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  6. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Du, Juan E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei; Law, Jiayan

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{sub C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  7. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  8. Removal of Phosphorus in Metallurgical Silicon by Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Safarian, Jafar; Ma, Xiang; Tangstad, Merete

    2014-09-01

    Removal of phosphorus in metallurgical silicon is one of the crucial steps for the production of solar grade Si feedstock. The possibility of doping rare earth elements for phosphorus removal has in this work been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Thermochemical properties of Ce, Nd, and Pr monophosphides have first been estimated by ab initio thermodynamic simulations based on density functional theory and the direct phonon method. The reliability of the first principles calculations was assessed by coupling with the phase diagram data of the Pr-P system. Equilibrium calculations confirmed the existence of stable rare earth monophosphides in solid silicon. Experimental investigations were then carried out, employing a high temperature resistance furnace. The Ce-doped silicon samples were examined by electron probe micro analyzer and inductively coupled plasma analysis. The efficiency of phosphorus removal by means of rare earth doping was discussed in detail in the paper.

  9. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  10. What about the rare-earth elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is insufficient understanding of the nutritional physiology of pecan trees and orchards; thus, affecting nutmeat yield and quality, disease resistance and alternate bearing. An analysis of the rare-earth element composition of pecan and related hickory cousins found that they hyperaccumulate ...

  11. Rare earth element systematics in hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Michard, A. )

    1989-03-01

    Rare earth element concentrations have been measured in hydrothermal solutions from geothermal fields in Italy, Dominica, Valles Caldera, Salton Sea and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The measured abundances show that hydrothermal activity is not expected to affect the REE balance of either continental or oceanic rocks. The REE enrichment of the solutions increases when the pH decreases. High-temperature solutions (> 230{degree}C) percolating through different rock types may show similar REE patterns.

  12. Anthropogenic Cycles of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Graedel, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    This research will develop quantitatively resolved anthropogenic cycles and in-use stocks for the rare earth metals specifically cerium, lanthanum and dysprosium in Japan, China, and the U.S. for the year of 2007. Rare earth elements (REE) is a group of 17 scare metals widely used in a growing number of emerging technologies and have been in high demand for emerging technologies as raw materials during past the three decades. New market participants from newly industrializing countries, primarily China, have had strong impacts on the demand of share. Consequently, the importance to sustain a reliable, steady, uninterrupted supply on global market triggered comprehensive research to recognize and understand the life cycles of rare earths. Moreover, because China plays a dominant role in mining production since 1990, it requires the assessment for the countries, which are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources. The study aims to analyze the flows and stocks of rare earth elements individually as elemental form in spite of their natural geological co-occurrence and mixed composition in applications. By applying the method of Material Flow Analysis (MFA) work has been done on evaluating current and historical flows of specific technologically significant materials, for example, copper, zinc, nickel, etc., determining the stocks available in different types of reservoirs (e.g., lithosphere, in-use) and the flows among the reservoirs, developing scenarios of possible futures of metal use, and assessing the environmental and policy implications of the results. Therefore, REE as a new target deserves inclusion because of its potential demand-supply conflict and importance to secure the competitive advantage of technical innovation in future. This work will generate a quantitatively resolved anthropogenic life cycle and in-use stocks for REE for the main target countries for a chosen year, 2007, providing flows and stocks from

  13. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  14. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  15. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-01

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera. PMID:24387481

  16. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  17. Rare earth elements materials production from apatite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufrieva, A. V.; Andrienko, O. S.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of processing apatite ores with nitric acid and extraction of the rare earth elements. The rare earth elements can be successfully separated and recovered by extraction from the nitrate- phosphate solution, being an tributyl phosphate as extraction agent. The developed scheme of the processing apatite concentrate provides obtaining rare earth concentrates with high qualitative characteristics.

  18. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  19. Rare earth elements in river waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the input to the oceans of rare earth elements (REE) in the dissolved and the suspended loads of rivers, the REE concentrations were measured in samples of Amazon, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and Ohio rivers and in samples of smaller rivers that had more distinct drainage basin lithology and water chemistry. It was found that, in the suspended loads of small rivers, the REE pattern was dependent on drainage basin geology, whereas the suspended loads in major rivers had relatively uniform REE patterns and were heavy-REE depleted relative to the North American Shale composite (NASC). The dissolved loads in the five major rivers had marked relative heavy-REE enrichments, relative to the NASC and the suspended material, with the (La/Yb)N ratio of about 0.4 (as compared with the ratio of about 1.9 in suspended loads).

  20. Development of a Rare Earth Element Paleoproxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, B. A.; Klinkhammer, G. P.; McManus, J.

    2002-12-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) have demonstrated considerable potential as paleoproxies for changes in seawater chemistry. However, their utilization in paleoceanographic investigations has been mainly limited to neodymium isotopic analyses in metalliferous deposits and fossil apatite. The goal of being able to use the entire group of elements in foraminiferal shells has proven difficult. The problem with analysis of these elements in this matrix stems mainly from: (1) the ability to clean the shells of diagenetic aberrations and (2) the paucity of REE data in the environment where forams obtain their primary signature. We recently measured pore water profiles of REEs using an interfaced Ion Chromatograph (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) in a depth transect off the Coast of California, and a profile from off the Peru-Chile margin. The pore water results are surprising and will alter our view of REE marine geochemistry. For example, they call into question the traditional method of calculating a "Ce-anomaly." The profiles also show dramatic changes in REE concentrations and patterns with depth, and demonstrate that the REE signature preserved in epifaunal benthic versus infaunal foram species and diagenetically added phases should be easily identifiable. Preliminary REE results from forams cleaned via a recently developed flow-through technique will be shown and compared to matching pore water data. We will conclude by outlining the potential of foraminiferal REE content for paleoceanography that ranges from water mass tracer to proxies for organic carbon flux and oxygen concentration.

  1. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel “magic boron” counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  2. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  3. Promising wastewater treatment using rare earth-doped nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Bishay, Samiha T.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; Saleh, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Single-phases of the spinel nanoferrites Zn0.5Co0.5Al0.5R0.04Fe1.46O4; R=Sm, Pr, Ce and La, were synthesized using the flash auto combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that doping nanoferrites with small concentrations of rare earth elements (RE) allowed their entrance to the spinel lattice. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images revealed that doping with different RE elements resulted in the formation of different nanometric shapes such as nanospheres and nanowires. Doping with Sm3+ and Ce3+ resulted in the formation of nanospheres with average diameter of 14 and 30 nm respectively. In addition to the granular nanospheres, doping with Pr3+ and La3+ resulted in the formation of some nanowires with different aspect ratios (average length of ≈100 nm and diameter of ≈9 nm) and (average length of ≈150 nm and outer diameter of ≈22 nm) respectively. At fixed temperature, the Ac conductivity (σ) increased as the RE ionic radius increases except for Ce, due to the role of valance fluctuation from Ce3+ to Ce4+ ions. La- and Pr-doped nanoferrites showed the highest ac conductivity values, which is most probably due to the presence of large numbers of nanowires in these two types of ferrites. For all entire samples, the effective magnetic moment (μeff) decreased, while the Curie temperature (TC) increased as the RE ionic radius increases. The synthesized rare earth nanoferrites showed promising results in purifying colored wastewater. La-doped ferrite was capable for up-taking 92% of the dye content, followed by Pr-doped ferrite, which adsorbed 85% of the dye, while Sm- and Ce-doped ferrites showed lower dye removal efficiency of 80% and 72% respectively. High dye uptake shown by La- and Pr-doped ferrites is most probably due to the presence of nanowires and their higher Ac conductivity values. These excellent results were not previously reported.

  4. Rare earth elements in Hamersley BIF minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Minerals from the Hamersley banded iron formation, Western Australia, were analyzed for Y and rare earth elements (YREEs) by laser ablation ICP-MS to investigate diagenetic pathways, from precursor phases to BIF minerals. One group of apatites carries the seawater REE signature, giving evidence that P and REEs, thoroughly scavenged from the water column by Si-ferrihydrite particles, were released upon microbial Fe3+ reductive dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite in pore-water and finally sequestered mainly in authigenic apatite. The absence of fractionation between apatite and seawater suggests that REE were first incorporated into an amorphous calcium phosphate as fully hydrated cations, i.e. as outer-sphere complexes. The iron oxides and carbonates carry only a small fraction of the whole-rock REE budget. Their REE patterns are distinctly enriched in Yb and show some M-type tetrad effect consistent with experimental Kd(REE) between solid and saline solution with low carbonate ion concentrations. It is deduced that hematite formed at an incipient stage of Fe2+-catalyzed dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite, via a dissolution-reprecipitation pathway. The REE pattern of greenalite, found as sub-micron particles in quartz in a chert-siderite sample, is consistent with its authigenic origin by precipitation in pore-water after dissolution of a small amount of Si-ferrihydrite. Magnetite carries very low YREEs (ppb-level), has an homogeneous pattern distinctly enriched in the mid-REEs compared to hematite, and includes a late population depleted in light-REEs, Ba and As. Magnetite forming aggregates and massive laminae is tentatively interpreted as reflecting some fluid-aided hematite-magnetite re-equilibration or transformation at low-grade metamorphic temperatures.

  5. Rare Earth Doped Magnetic Clusters of Gold for Medical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Brahm Deo; Kumar, Vijay

    2011-03-01

    In recent years gold clusters have been studied extensively due to their unusual properties and applications in cancer treatment and catalysis. Small gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar as shown in figure 1. Thereafter a transition occurs to 3D structures but the atomic structures continue to have high dispersion. Doping of these clusters could transform them in to new structures and affect the properties. Gold clusters with cage structures such as W@Au12 can be prepared with large highest occupied-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap by doping with a transition metal atom such as W. By changing the transition metal atom, cage structures of different sizes as well as different HOMO-LUMO gaps can be formed which could be useful in different optical applications. In these structures gold clusters are generally non-magnetic. However, it is also possible to form magnetic clusters of gold such as Gold clusters have been found to be good for cancer treatment. We have performed ab initio calculations on doping of rare earths in small gold clusters to obtain magnetic clusters using projector augmented wave pseudopotential method within generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. Elemental gold clusters having up to 15 atoms are planar and thereafter 3D structures become favorable. We have explored the changes in the growth behavior when a rare earth atom is doped and studied the variation in the magnetic behavior as a function of size. Our results suggest that gold clusters may have twin advantage of treating cancer as well as be helful in magnetic imaging such as by MRI.

  6. Optical properties and radiation damages of cerium fluoride crystals doped with alkali-earth and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Y.I.; Melchakov, E.N.; Mironov, I.A.; Panteleev, L.A.; Reiterov, V.M.; Rodnyi, P.A.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Shchetkowsky, A.I.; Yazikov, D.M.; Zakharov, N.G.

    1994-12-31

    The most essential contribution in the investigation of CeF{sub 3} crystals having the goal to construct high precision electromagnetic calorimeters has been done by Crystal Clear Collaboration. Study of optical properties and radiation damages of Cerium Fluoride crystals doped with Ca, Ba, Sr, La, Nd, Zr and Hf in the wide range of concentrations has been performed with the goal to obtain high optical transparency of crystals at different cumulative doses under {gamma}-irradiation. Time decay curves and relative light yields of scintillators as a function of doping level were measured using X-ray excitation of samples and single photon counting method.

  7. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  8. Rare earth elements in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, M.; Seyler, P.; Benedetti, M. F.; Alves, V. P.; Boaventura, G. R.; Sondag, F.

    2003-05-01

    The rare earth element (REE) concentrations of the dissolved and particulate fractions and bed sediment between Manaus and Santarém in the Amazon River, and in some major tributaries, were evaluated. A very important zone in the Amazon basin, the encontro das aguas area where the Rio Solimões and the Rio Negro meet, was especially sampled. Different size fractions were isolated by ultrafiltration. Water samples were collected at different stages of the mixing. Three groups of waters are distinguished: group I has a low pH (<5·5) and is represented by the Negro basin rivers; group II has alkalinity less than 0·2 meq l-1 and is represented by the Rios Tapajós and Trombetas; group III has high alkalinity (>0·2 meq l-1) and higher pH (>6·5) and is represented by the Madeira basin rivers, the Solimões and the Amazon. The highest dissolved REE concentration is in the Rio Negro and the lowest in the Rio Tapajós (dissolved REEs vary by more than a factor of ten). The solubility of REEs is pH dependent: in river waters with a pH < 6 the Ce concentration is twice that of La, whereas in rivers with a higher pH the concentrations of Ce and La are similar. Dissolved REE concentrations are positively correlated with the dissolved organic carbon. Correlations between Fe, Al, and La suggest that La is associated with Al (Fe)-rich organic matter and/or related to dissolved Fe-rich inorganic material. Dissolved REEs normalized to North American shale composite show an enrichment in intermediate/heavy REEs (from Eu to Er), except for the shields rivers (such as Rio Negro and Rio Trombetas). Both of them are depleted in heavy REEs and show a relative Ce enrichment. In contrast, for the Andeans rivers (such as Rio Solimões), light REEs are slightly depleted and a negative Ce relative anomaly occurs. The pattern of the Amazon River at Óbidos confirms the major influence of the Rios Negro and Solimões with REE fractionation. For the Rio Negro, 60 to 70% of REEs are

  9. Improving the Performance of Catalytic Combustion Type Methane Gas Sensors Using Nanostructure Elements Doped with Rare Earth Cocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Tong, Min Ming; Zhang, Dan; Gao, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Conventional methane gas sensors based on catalytic combustion have the drawbacks of high working temperature, low thermal stability and small measurement range. To improve their performance, cerium, which possesses high oxygen storage and release ability, was introduced via nanotechnology to prepare Ce-contained nanostructure elements. Three kinds of elements with different carriers: Al2O3, n-Al2O3 and n-Ce-Al2O3 were prepared and separately fabricated (Pt-Pd/Al, Pt-Pd/n-Al, Pt-Pd/n-Ce-Al). The performances of Wheatstone Bridges with three different catalytic elements were tested and compared. The results indicated that the cerium-containing element exhibited better performance than other elements regarding activity, anti-sulfur ability and thermal stability. Moreover, a constant temperature circuit was also applied in this system. The measurement range was extended from 4% to 10% by automatically decreasing the working current in a reasonable range. The maximum error for 0%–10% CH4 was controlled below 5%, which fully meets the measurement requirements. PMID:22346565

  10. Improving the performance of catalytic combustion type methane gas sensors using nanostructure elements doped with rare Earth cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tong, Min Ming; Zhang, Dan; Gao, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Conventional methane gas sensors based on catalytic combustion have the drawbacks of high working temperature, low thermal stability and small measurement range. To improve their performance, cerium, which possesses high oxygen storage and release ability, was introduced via nanotechnology to prepare Ce-contained nanostructure elements. Three kinds of elements with different carriers: Al(2)O(3), n-Al(2)O(3) and n-Ce-Al(2)O(3) were prepared and separately fabricated (Pt-Pd/Al, Pt-Pd/n-Al, Pt-Pd/n-Ce-Al). The performances of Wheatstone Bridges with three different catalytic elements were tested and compared. The results indicated that the cerium-containing element exhibited better performance than other elements regarding activity, anti-sulfur ability and thermal stability. Moreover, a constant temperature circuit was also applied in this system. The measurement range was extended from 4% to 10% by automatically decreasing the working current in a reasonable range. The maximum error for 0%-10% CH(4) was controlled below 5%, which fully meets the measurement requirements. PMID:22346565

  11. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnosis of rare earth doped optical glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Y.; Thakur, S. N.; Rai, S. B.

    2010-05-01

    In the present work, rare earth (Nd, Eu, Er, Ho) doped oxyfluoroborate glasses were studied using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. It has been observed that rare earth elements other than the doped one also reveal their presence in the spectrum. In addition the spectral lines of elements constituting the glass matrix have also been observed. Different plasma parameters such as plasma temperature and electron density have been estimated. It is concluded that the LIBS is a potential technique to identify simultaneously the light elements (B, O, F) as well as the heavy elements (Fe, Ba, Ca, Eu, Nd, Ho, Er) present in optical glasses.

  12. Fluorescent lifetime measurements of rare-earth elements in gallium arsenide. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, D.J.

    1990-12-01

    Lifetime measurements of the excited states of three GaAs semiconductors doped with the rare earth elements Erbium (Er), Praseodymium (Pr), and Thulium (Tm) has been studied using a pulsed nitrogen laser and germanium detector. The measurements were made with an experimental set up with a system response time of 0.34 microseconds. A 330 milliwatt nitrogen laser with a wavelength of 3370 angstroms was used to excite transitions of the rare earth elements.

  13. Rare earth element association with foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Natalie L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Elderfield, Henry; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2012-10-01

    Neodymium isotopes are becoming widely used as a palaeoceanographic tool for reconstructing the source and flow direction of water masses. A new method using planktonic foraminifera which have not been chemically cleaned has proven to be a promising means of avoiding contamination of the deep ocean palaeoceanographic signal by detrital material. However, the exact mechanism by which the Nd isotope signal from bottom waters becomes associated with planktonic foraminifera, the spatial distribution of rare earth element (REE) concentrations within the shell, and the possible mobility of REE ions during changing redox conditions, have not been fully investigated. Here we present REE concentration and Nd isotope data from mixed species of planktonic foraminifera taken from plankton tows, sediment traps and a sediment core from the NW Atlantic. We used multiple geochemical techniques to evaluate how, where and when REEs become associated with planktonic foraminifera as they settle through the water column, reside at the surface and are buried in the sediment. Analyses of foraminifera shells from plankton tows and sediment traps between 200 and 2938 m water depth indicate that only ˜20% of their associated Nd is biogenically incorporated into the calcite structure. The remaining 80% is associated with authigenic metal oxides and organic matter, which form in the water column, and remain extraneous to the carbonate structure. Remineralisation of these organic and authigenic phases releases ions back into solution and creates new binding sites, allowing the Nd isotope ratio to undergo partial equilibration with the ambient seawater, as the foraminifera fall through the water column. Analyses of fossil foraminifera shells from sediment cores show that their REE concentrations increase by up to 10-fold at the sediment-water interface, and acquire an isotopic signature of bottom water. Adsorption and complexation of REE3+ ions between the inner layers of calcite contributes

  14. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance. PMID:26332985

  15. Rare Earth Element Partition Coefficients from Enstatite/Melt Synthesis Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwandt, Craig S.; McKay, Gordon A.

    1997-01-01

    Enstatite (En(80)Fs(19)Wo(01)) was synthesized from a hypersthene normative basaltic melt doped at the same time with La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb and Lu. The rare earth element concentrations were measured in both the basaltic glass and the enstatite. Rare earth element concentrations in the glass were determined by electron microprobe analysis with uncertainties less than two percent relative. Rare earth element concentrations in enstatite were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry with uncertainties less than five percent relative. The resulting rare earth element partition signature for enstatite is similar to previous calculated and composite low-Ca pigeonite signatures, but is better defined and differs in several details. The partition coefficients are consistent with crystal structural constraints.

  16. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  17. Rare Earth Doped Semiconductors and Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 301

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, John

    1994-02-01

    The properties of rare earth ions in solids were studied in detail for decades, but until recently this work was restricted to dominantly ionic hosts such as fluorides and oxides, and to a lesser extent to more covalently bonded hosts, such as tetrahedral 2-6 semiconductors. The idea of rare earth elements incorporated into covalent semiconductors such as GaAs and Si may be traced to a short communication in 1963 by R.L. Bell (J. Appl. Phys. 34, 1563 (1963)) proposing a dc-pumped rare earth laser. At about the same time, three unpublished technical reports appeared as a result of U.S. Department of Defense sponsored research in rare earth doped Si, GaAs, and InP to fabricate LED's. Attempts by other researchers to identify sharp 4f specific emissions in these hosts essentially failed.

  18. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  19. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  20. The effects of rare earth doping on gallium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, Stephen R.

    The thermal neutron capture cross section of the rare earth (RE) metal isotope Gd-157 is the largest of all known natural elements, which distinguishes the material as a logical candidate for neutron detection. To address an incomplete understanding of rare earth doped Gallium Nitride (GaN) materials, investigations of the surface electronic structure and interface properties of GaN thin films doped with rare earths (Yb, Er, Gd) were undertaken. Lattice ion occupation, bonding, rare earth 4f occupation, and gold Schottky barrier formation were examined using synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy. Measured Debye temperatures indicate substitutional occupation of Ga sites by RE ions. The occupied RE 4f levels, deep within the valence band, suggest that intra-atomic f-f transitions may be more 'blue' than predicted by theoretical models. Thin layers of gold did not wet and uniformly cover the GaN surface, even with rare earth doping of the GaN. The resultant Schottky barrier heights for GaN:Yb, GaN:Er, and GaN:Gd, are 25--55% larger than those reported at the gold to undoped GaN interface. The utility of gadolinium as a neutron detection material was examined via fundamental nuclear and semiconductor physics. Low charge production and the large range of internal conversion electrons limits charge collection efficiency.

  1. Magnetic Nanofluid Rare Earth Element Extraction Process Report, Techno Economic Analysis, and Results for Geothermal Fluids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pete McGrail

    2016-03-14

    This GDR submission is an interim technical report and raw data files from the first year of testing on functionalized nanoparticles for rare earth element extraction from geothermal fluids. The report contains Rare Earth Element uptake results (percent removal, mg Rare Earth Element/gram of sorbent, distribution coefficient) for the elements of Neodymium, Europium, Yttrium, Dysprosium, and Cesium. A detailed techno economic analysis is also presented in the report for a scaled up geothermal rare earth element extraction process. All rare earth element uptake testing was done on simulated geothermal brines with one rare earth element in each brine. The rare earth element uptake testing was conducted at room temperature.

  2. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-01

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety. PMID:14582968

  3. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  4. Structure and magnetism in rare earth strontium-doped cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Michael; Morales, Liliana; Wallwork, Kia; Avdeev, Maxim; Withers, Ray; Goossens, Darren

    2006-11-01

    Substantial interest has recently been generated by rare earth cobaltate compounds as cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. We have synthesised a wide range of single-phase perovskite-based rare earth cobaltates (Ln 1-xSr xCoO 3-δ) (Ln=La 3+-Yb 3+). A combination of electron and X-ray diffraction of these phases reveals a complex family of tetragonal and orthorhombic superstructures. The nature of structural and magnetic ordering relies on both cation and oxygen vacancy distribution. Phase boundaries exists between compounds containing large, medium and small rare earths (between Nd 3+ and Sm 3+, and also between Gd 3+ and Dy 3+) and also at different Sr-doping levels. Powder neutron diffraction has been used in conjunction with the other techniques to reveal cation and oxygen vacancy ordering within these materials. These phases show mixed valence (3+/4+) cobalt oxidation states that increases with Sr content. A range of magnetic behaviours has been observed, including ordered antiferromagnetism at elevated temperatures (>300 K) in Ho 0.2Sr 0.8CoO 2.75.

  5. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. PMID:26375205

  6. Rare Earth doped nanoparticles in imaging and PDT

    PubMed Central

    Yust, Brian G.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.; Mimun, Lawrence C.; Gangadharan, Ajith K.; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles doped with rare earth ions for biomedical imaging and infrared photodynamic therapy (IRPDT) have been synthesized, characterized, and compared. Specifically, these nanoparticles utilize two primary modalities: near infrared excitation and emission for imaging, and near infrared upconversion for photodynamic therapy. These nanoparticles are optimized for both their infrared emission and upconversion energy transfer to a photoactive agent conjugated to the surface. Finally, these nanoparticles are tested for toxicity, imaged in cells using the near infrared emission pathway, and used for selective killing of cells through the upconversion driven IRPDT. PMID:25429335

  7. Method to Recover Media Ligand Losses During Sorption of Rare Earth Elements from Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    This document describes the method and results of an in-situ experiment used to confirm that ligand bleed from a sorptive media can be contained. The experiment focused on maintaining the media's sorption of rare earth elements (REE) obtained from a simulated geothermal brine doped with known mineral concentrations.

  8. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  9. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, J E

    1992-06-26

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented.

  10. Contamination in the Rare-Earth Element Orthophosphate Reference Samples

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, John J.; Hanchar, John M.; Picolli, Phillip M.; Schrier, Marc D.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Jarosewich, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Several of the fourteen rare-earth element (plus Sc and Y) orthophosphate standards grown at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 1980s and widely distributed by the Smithsonian Institution’s Department of Mineral Sciences, are significantly contaminated by Pb. The origin of this impurity is the Pb2P2O7 flux that is derived from the thermal decomposition of PbHPO4. The lead pyrophosphate flux is used to dissolve the oxide starting materials at elevated temperatures (≈1360 °C) prior to the crystal synthesis. Because these rare-earth element standards are extremely stable under the electron beam and considered homogenous, they have been of enormous value to electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The monoclinic, monazite structure, orthophosphates show a higher degree of Pb incorporation than the tetragonal xenotime structure, orthophosphates. This paper will attempt to describe and rationalize the extent of the Pb contamination in these otherwise excellent materials.

  11. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, A I; van der Laan, G; Harrison, S E; Cibin, G; Hesjedal, T

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi(3+) in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  12. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-03-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state.

  13. Oxidation Effects in Rare Earth Doped Topological Insulator Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, A. I.; van der Laan, G.; Harrison, S. E.; Cibin, G.; Hesjedal, T.

    2016-01-01

    The breaking of time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in topological insulators is a prerequisite for unlocking their exotic properties and for observing the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). The incorporation of dopants which exhibit magnetic long-range order is the most promising approach for TRS-breaking. REBiTe3, wherein 50% of the Bi is substitutionally replaced by a RE atom (RE = Gd, Dy, and Ho), is a predicted QAHE system. Despite the low solubility of REs in bulk crystals of a few %, highly doped thin films have been demonstrated, which are free of secondary phases and of high crystalline quality. Here we study the effects of exposure to atmosphere of rare earth-doped Bi2(Se, Te)3 thin films using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that these RE dopants are all trivalent and effectively substitute for Bi3+ in the Bi2(Se, Te)3 matrix. We find an unexpected high degree of sample oxidation for the most highly doped samples, which is not restricted to the surface of the films. In the low-doping limit, the RE-doped films mostly show surface oxidation, which can be prevented by surface passivation, encapsulation, or in-situ cleaving to recover the topological surface state. PMID:26956771

  14. Impurity-sensitized luminescence of rare earth-doped materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smentek, Lidia . E-mail: smentek1@aol.com

    2005-02-15

    The accuracy of the theoretical model of impurity-sensitized luminescence in rare earth-doped materials presented here is adjusted to the demands of precise modern experimental techniques. The description is formulated within the double perturbation theory, and it is based on the assumption that electrostatic interactions between the subsystems that take part in the luminescence process are the most important ones. The amplitude of the energy transfer is determined by the contributions that represent the perturbing influence of the crystal-field potential and also electron correlation effects taken into account within the rare earth ions. In this way, the model is defined beyond the standard free ionic system and single configuration approximations. The new contributions to the energy transfer amplitude are expressed in the terms of effective tensor operators, and they contain the perturbing influence of various excited configurations. In order to maintain the high accuracy of the model, the radial integrals of all effective operators are defined within the so-called perturbed function approach. This means that they are evaluated for the complete radial basis sets of one electron functions of given symmetry, including the continuum.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... earth doped (generic). 721.10423 Section 721.10423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  16. Rare earth doped upconverting particles for different photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab; Gangadharan, Ajith Kumar; Sardar, Dhiraj Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Trivalent rare earth ions especially erbium (Er3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) co-doped in various host nanoparticles are known for their extraordinary spectroscopic properties. A thorough optical characterization including the absolute upconversion quantum yield (QY) measurement is of critical importance in evaluating their potential for various photonic applications. In this paper, we will be presenting a measured absolute upconversion QYs for Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S under 980 and 1550 nm excitation at various power densities. Comparison of absolute QYs for different concentrations of Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S will be made for all the upconversion emissions with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphor NaYF4 doped with 20% Yb3+ and 2% Er3+. Furthermore, applications of these phosphors in different areas such as bio-imaging, solar cell, security, etc. will be explored depending on the measured absolute upconversion quantum yields. In addition, preliminary results on in vitro imaging using upconverting nanoparticles as a contrast agent will be reported. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM) Grant No. DMR-0934218.

  17. Thermopower studies of rare earth doped lanthanum barium manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, G. Lalitha; Lakshmi, Y. Kalyana; kumar, N. Pavan; Rao, S. Manjunath; Reddy, P. Venugopal

    2014-08-01

    Influence of rare earth doping on electrical, magnetic and thermopower studies of La0.34Re0.33Ba0.33MnO3 compound was investigated. Ferro to paramagnetic transition and metal to insulator transition temperatures decrease with decreasing ionic radius of the dopant ion. Electrical resistivity in the entire temperature range is explained by phase separation model. The magnitude of Seebeck coefficient increases with increasing dopant ionic radius. A cross over from negative to positive sign has also been observed in thermopower data with decreasing A site ionic radius (). The low temperature thermopower data has been explained using a qualitative model containing diffusion; magnon drag and phonon drag effects while the paramagnetic insulating part has been analyzed using small polaron hopping mechanism.

  18. Influence of rare earth doping on thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Wang, C. L.; Li, Y.; Su, W. B.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Mei, L. M.

    2013-12-14

    Thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics, doped with different rare earth elements, were investigated in this work. It's found that the ionic radius of doping elements plays an important role on thermoelectric properties: SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics doped with large rare earth ions (such as La, Nd, and Sm) exhibit large power factors, and those doped with small ions (such as Gd, Dy, Er, and Y) exhibit low thermal conductivities. Therefore, a simple approach for enhancing the thermoelectric performance of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics is proposed: mainly doped with large ions to obtain a large power factor and, simultaneously, slightly co-doped with small ions to obtain a low thermal conductivity. Based on this rule, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.18}Yb{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} ceramics were prepared, whose ZT value at 1 023 K reaches 0.31, increasing by a factor of 19% compared with the single-doped counterpart Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (ZT = 0.26)

  19. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials. PMID:25613802

  20. Rare earth element content of cryptocrystalline magnesites of Konya, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedef, Veysel; Russell, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We examined the rare earth element content of several cryptocrystalline magnesites as well as hydromagnesite, host rock serpentinites, lake water and hot spring water from Turkey. Southwestern Turkey hosts cryptocrystalline magnesites, sedimentary magnesites with presently forming, biologically mediated hydromagnesites and travertines. Our results show the REE content of the minerals, rocks and waters are well below detection limits. One hydromagnesite sample from Lake Salda has slightly high La (2.38ppb), Ce (3.91 ppb) and Nd (1.68 ppb) when compared to other samples, but these are also still below detection limits of the method we followed.

  1. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented that mainly treats minerals in which the rare-earth elements are essential constituents, e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite. The chemical mechanisms and limits of REE substitution in some rock-forming minerals (zircon, apatite, titanite, garnet) are also derived. Vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals is examined and some comments on REE-partitioning between minerals as related to acid-based tendencies and mineral stabilities are presented. As the same or analogous coupled substitutions involving the REE occur in a wide variety of mineral structures, they are discussed together.

  2. Rare earth element patterns in biotite, muscovite and tourmaline minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.

    1986-04-21

    Rare earth element concentrations in the minerals biotite and muscovite from the mica schist country rocks of the Etta pegmatite and tourmalines from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite have been measured by INAA and CNAA. The concentrations range from 10/sup -4/ g/g to 10/sup -10g//sub g/. The REE patterns of biotite, muscovite and tourmaline reported herein are highly fractionated from light to heavy REE. The REE concentrations in biotite and muscovite are high and indigenous. The pegmatite tourmalines contain low concentrations of REE. Variations in tourmaline REE patterns reflect the geochemical evolution of pegmatite melt/fluid system during crystallization.

  3. Performance evaluation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devangad, Praveen; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Nayak, Rajesh; Tamboli, M. M.; Muhammed Shameem, K. M.; Santhosh, C.; Kumar, G. A.; Sardar, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    In the current study, we have determined the elemental compositions of synthesized rare earth doped phosphate glasses using a laboratory Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) system. LIBS spectra of this rare earth (samarium (Sm), thulium (Tm) and ytterbium (Yb)) doped glass samples with known composition are recorded using a highly sensitive detector. Major atomic emission lines of Sm, Tm and Yb found in LIBS spectra are reported. By considering the atomic emission line of phosphorous as an internal standard, calibration curves were constructed for all the rare earth concentrations. Very good linear regression coefficient (R2) values were obtained using this technique. Analytical predictive skill of LIBS was studied further using leave-one-out method. Low values of the reported correlation uncertainty between measured LIBS concentration ratio and certified concentration ratio confirms that LIBS technique has great potential for quantitative analysis of rare earth elements in glass matrix.

  4. Assessing rare earth elements in quartz rich geological samples.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Thoss, V; Guevara, S Ribeiro; Urgast, D; Raab, A; Mastrolitti, S; Feldmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Sodium peroxide (Na2O2) fusion coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS) measurements was used to rapidly screen quartz-rich geological samples for rare earth element (REE) content. The method accuracy was checked with a geological reference material and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) measurements. The used mass-mode combinations presented accurate results (only exception being (157)Gd in He gas mode) with recovery of the geological reference material QLO-1 between 80% and 98% (lower values for Lu, Nd and Sm) and in general comparable to INAA measurements. Low limits of detection for all elements were achieved, generally below 10 pg g(-1), as well as measurement repeatability below 15%. Overall, the Na2O2/ICP-MS/MS method proved to be a suitable lab-based method to quickly and accurately screen rock samples originating from quartz-rich geological areas for rare earth element content; particularly useful if checking commercial viability. PMID:26595776

  5. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  6. Uncovering the Global Life Cycles of the Rare Earth Elements

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging, critical technologies. Knowledge of the life cycles of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in their future availability. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supplies vulnerable to short and long-term disruption. To provide an improved perspective we derived the first quantitative life cycles (for the year 2007) for ten REE: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), and yttrium (Y). Of these REE, Ce and Nd in-use stocks are highest; the in-use stocks of most REE show significant accumulation in modern society. Industrial scrap recycling occurs only from magnet manufacture. We believe there is no post-customer recycling of any of these elements. PMID:22355662

  7. Sensing Using Rare-Earth-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  8. Sensing using rare-earth-doped upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  9. Standard reference water samples for rare earth element determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Antweiler, R.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference water samples (SRWS) were collected from two mine sites, one near Ophir, CO, USA and the other near Redding, CA, USA. The samples were filtered, preserved, and analyzed for rare earth element (REE) concentrations (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two samples were acid mine waters with elevated concentrations of REEs (0.45-161 ??g/1). Seventeen international laboratories participated in a 'round-robin' chemical analysis program, which made it possible to evaluate the data by robust statistical procedures that are insensitive to outliers. The resulting most probable values are reported. Ten to 15 of the participants also reported values for Ba, Y, and Sc. Field parameters, major ion, and other trace element concentrations, not subject to statistical evaluation, are provided.

  10. Radioluminescence study of rare earth doped some yttrium based phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayvacıklı, Mehmet; Ege, Arzu; Ekdal, Elçin; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Can, Nurdoğan

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O4 activated by rare earth ions such as Eu3+ and Tb3+. The influence of these rare earth ions on the radioluminescence (RL) of yttrium niobate and tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and preliminary RL measurements to further evaluate prepared materials. The emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu3+, Tb3+) were found to contribute efficiently to the total luminescence. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing the broad band variation of visible RL from blue to red.

  11. Resonant photoemission of rare earth doped GaN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Wu, J.; Palai, R.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Dowben, P. A.

    2011-10-01

    The 4d → 4f Fano resonances for various rare earth doped GaN thin films (RE = Gd, Er, Yb) were investigated using synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy. The resonant photoemission Fano profiles show that the major Gd and Er rare earth 4f weight is at about 5-6 eV below the valence band maximum, similar to the 4f weights in the valence band of many other rare earth doped semiconductors. For Yb, there is very little resonant enhancement of the valence band of Yb doped GaN, consistent with a largely 4f14 occupancy.

  12. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  13. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  14. Rare earth elements exploitation, geopolitical implications and raw materials trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Marie-Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) correspond to seventeen elements of the periodic table. They are used in high technology, cracking, electric cars' magnet, metal alloy for batteries, and also in phone construction or ceramics for electronic card. REEs are an important resource for high technology. This project targets 16 years old students in the subject "personalized aid" and will last six weeks. The purpose of this project is to develop autonomy and research in groups for a transdisciplinary work. This project gathers knowledge in geology, geography and economics. During the first session students analyze the geology applications of the REE. They begin the analysis with learning the composition in different rocks such as basalt and diorite to make the link with crystallization. Then they compare it with adakite to understand the formation of these rocks. In the second session, they study REE exploitation. We can find them as oxides in many deposits. The principal concentrations of rare earth elements are associated with uncommon varieties of igneous rocks, such as carbonatites. They can use Qgis, to localize this high concentration. In the third session, they study the environmental costs of REE exploitation. Indeed, the exploitation produces thorium and carcinogenic toxins: sulphates, ammonia and hydrochloric acid. Processing one ton of rare earths produces 2,000 tons of toxic waste. This session focuses, first, on Baotou's region, and then on an example they are free to choose. In the fourth session, they study the geopolitical issues of REE with a focus on China. In fact this country is the largest producer of REE, and is providing 95% of the overall production. REE in China are at the center of a geopolitical strategy. In fact, China implements a sort of protectionism. Indeed, the export tax on REE is very high so, as a foreign company, it is financially attractive to establish a manufacturing subsidiary in China in order to use REE. As a matter of fact

  15. Reducing the detection limits of rare earth elements in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raskevich, V.K.; Maiboroda, I.K.; Frishberg, A.A.; Panfilova, S.Ya.

    1986-12-01

    Chemical and chemicospectral analysis methods make it possible to determine rare-earth elements (REE) reliably in steels, but they are time-consuming and laborious. X-ray fluorescence methods are also characterized by the complicated procedure of preparing standard and production specimens for analysis. In this paper, the authors attempt to develop a spectrographic method of determining the REEs in the steel using standard equipment. The authors prepare synthetic standard specimens for determining Ce, Nd, La, Pr, and Y in steels of various grades by adding titrated solutions of the salts of the determined elements to the powder of the steel without REE with subsequent evaporation, drying, and mixing. The steels were ground by the mechanical method. On the basis of the resulting detection limits and analysis accuracy, the proposed method can be recommended for inspection of the technological process in melting steels and for preparation of standard specimens in the plant. The method is 5-7 times faster than the chemicospectral method.

  16. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P.; Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2014-02-21

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R = Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  17. Rare-earth element based permanent magnets: a theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Paudyal, Durga

    Permanent magnetic materials with large magnetization and high magnetocrystalline anisotropy are important for technical applications. In this context rare-earth (R) element based materials are good candidates because of their localized 4 f electrons. The 4 f crystal field splitting provides large part of magnetic anisotropy depending upon the crystal environment. The d spin orbit coupling of alloyed transition metal component provides additional anisotropy. RCo5 and its derivative R2Co17 are known compounds for large magnetic anisotropy. Here we have performed electronic structure calculations to predict new materials in this class by employing site substitutions. In these investigations, we have performed density functional theory including on-site electron correlation (DFT +U) and L-S coupling calculations. The results show that the abundant Ce substitution in R sites and Ti/Zr substitutions in some of the Co sites help reduce criticality without substantially affecting the magnetic moment and magnetic anisotropy in these materials. This work is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  18. Size distribution of rare earth elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Clinton T.; Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Adams, Monique; Holland, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are utilized in various applications that are vital to the automotive, petrochemical, medical, and information technology industries. As world demand for REEs increases, critical shortages are expected. Due to the retention of REEs during coal combustion, coal fly ash is increasingly considered a potential resource. Previous studies have demonstrated that coal fly ash is variably enriched in REEs relative to feed coal (e.g, Seredin and Dai, 2012) and that enrichment increases with decreasing size fractions (Blissett et al., 2014). In order to further explore the REE resource potential of coal ash, and determine the partitioning behavior of REE as a function of grain size, we studied whole coal and fly ash size-fractions collected from three U.S commercial-scale coal-fired generating stations burning Appalachian or Powder River Basin coal. Whole fly ash was separated into , 5 um, to 5 to 10 um and 10 to 100 um particle size fractions by mechanical shaking using trace-metal clean procedures. In these samples REE enrichments in whole fly ash ranges 5.6 to 18.5 times that of feedcoals. Partitioning results for size separates relative to whole coal and whole fly ash will also be reported. 

  19. Rare earth element analysis indicates micropollutants in an urban estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. J.; Johannesson, K. H.; Kolker, A.; Burdige, D. J.; Chevis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Rare earth element analysis of Bayou Bienvenue waters shows anomalously high gadolinium, Gd, concentrations relative to its nearest neighbors in the REE series, europium and terbium. The anomalously high Gd concentrations indicate anthropogenic input from waste-water treatment plants in the area as anthropogenic Gd input can be traced back to its use as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging in hospitals. Others have shown that anomalously high levels of Gd in natural waters are likely to be associated with other micropollutants that also occur in hospital effluent and that are not removed in the wastewater treatment process, including pharmaceuticals in the form of steroids, antihistamines, and antibiotics. Estuaries serve as many important ecological roles and have been shown to act as a filter for pollutants. To better understand the transport, biogeochemical cycling, and ultimate fate of trace elements in estuaries, I collected surface water samples from Bayou Bienvenue, a wetland triangle that covers an area of 427 acres directly adjacent to New Orleans, Louisiana. Water samples from Bayou Bienvenue were collected along the salinity gradient and subsequently filtered through progressively smaller pore-size filters. The resulting fractions were analyzed for trace element concentions, including the REEs, by magnetic sector ICP-MS. The attached figure shows the Gd anomaly present in the particulate (>0.45μm) fraction. Upper continental crust (UCC)-normalized plots of colloidal REEs (0.02μm - 0.45μm) fraction is lacking this anomaly indicating anthropogenic Gd is found chiefly in the particulate fraction in Bayou Bienvenue. No clear relationship between Gd concentration and salinity was apparent.

  20. Isotopic fractionation of rare earth elements in geochemical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Ohno, T.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of Rare Earth Elements(REEs) can be fractionated through various physical and chemical reactions in nature [1]. The isotopic variations of REEs occurring naturally has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields. The REEs has key features that their chemical similarities and gradual changes of ionic radius, which may help us to understand the mechanisms of isotopic variations of REEs in nature. Among the REEs, geochemical and physicochemical features of Ce, which could be presence as the tetravalent state, be anomalous, and oxidation state of Ce can change by reflecting the redox conditions of the environment. Therefore, the study of the difference in the degree of isotopic fractionation between Ce and other REEs may provide information on the redox conditions. In this study, we developed a new separation method to determine the mass-dependent isotopic fractionations of REEs in geochemical samples, and examined the optimum concentration of hydrochloric acid for the separation. The samples were decomposed by a mixture of acids, then REEs were separated as a group from major elements using cation exchange resin columns and RE Spec resin. The separations within the REEs group were carried out using Ln2Spec resin. For the recovery of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, 0.1 M HCl was used, and for isolation of Sm, Eu, and Gd, 0.25 M HCl was used. Then, 0.6 M HCl was used for separation of Tb, and Dy, 1 M HCl was used for separation of Ho, Y, and Er, finally, Tm, Yb, and Lu were collected using 2 M HCl. The yields of all REEs were enough to examine isotopic fractionation in geochemical samples. [1] Ohno and Hirata,Analytical Sciences, 29, 271, 2013

  1. Rare Earth Element Partitioning in Lunar Minerals: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, E. C.; Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The partitioning behavior of rare earth elements (REE) between minerals and melts is widely used to interpret the petrogenesis and geologic context of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples. REE are important tools for modelling the evolution of the lunar interior. The ubiquitous negative Eu anomaly in lunar basalts is one of the main lines of evidence to support the lunar magma ocean (LMO) hypothesis, by which the plagioclase-rich lunar highlands were formed as a flotation crust during differentiation of a global-scale magma ocean. The separation of plagioclase from the mafic cumulates is thought to be the source of the Eu depletion, as Eu is very compatible in plagioclase. Lunar basalts and volcanic glasses are commonly depleted in light REEs (LREE), and more enriched in heavy REEs (HREE). However, there is very little experimental data available on REE partitioning between lunar minerals and melts. In order to interpret the source of these distinctive REE patterns, and to model lunar petrogenetic processes, REE partition coefficients (D) between lunar minerals and melts are needed at conditions relevant to lunar processes. New data on D(sub REE) for plagioclase, and pyroxenes are now available, but there is limited available data for olivine/melt D(sub REE), particularly at pressures higher than 1 bar, and in Fe-rich and reduced compositions - all conditions relevant to the lunar mantle. Based on terrestrial data, REE are highly incompatible in olivine (i.e. D much less than 1), however olivine is the predominant mineral in the lunar interior, so it is important to understand whether it is capable of storing even small amounts of REE, and how the REEs might be fractionatied, in order to understand the trace element budget of the lunar interior. This abstract presents results from high-pressure and temperature experiments investigating REE partitioning between olivine and melt in a composition relevant to lunar magmatism.

  2. Attenuation of rare earth elements in a boreal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, Mats E.; Österholm, Peter; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Nystrand, Miriam; Peltola, Pasi; Nordmyr, Linda; Boman, Anton

    2012-11-01

    This study focuses on attenuation of rare earth elements (REE) when a boreal creek, acidified and loaded with REE and other metals as a result of wetland drainage, empties into a brackish-water estuary (salinity < 6‰). Surface water was collected in a transect from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, and settling (particulate) material in sediment traps moored at selected locations in the estuary. Ultrafiltration, high-resolution ICP-MS and modeling were applied on the waters, and a variety of chemical reagents were used to extract metals from the settling material. Aluminium, Fe and REE transported by the acidic creek were extensively removed in the inner/central estuary where the acidic water was neutralised, whereas Mn was relatively persistent in solution and thus redistributed to particles and deposited further down the estuary. The REE removal was caused by several contemporary mechanisms: co-precipitation with oxyhydroxides (mainly Al but also Fe), complexation with flocculating humic substances and sorption to suspended particles. Down estuary the dissolved REE pool, remaining after removal, was fractionated: the <1 kDa pool became depleted in the middle REE and the colloidal (0.45 μm-1 kDa) pool depleted in the middle and heavy REE. This fractionation was controlled by the removal process, such that those REE with highest affinity for the settling particles became most depleted in the remaining dissolved pool. Modeling, based on Visual MINTEQ version 3.0 and the Stockholm Humic Model after revision and updating, predicted that the dissolved (<0.45 μm) REE pool in the estuary is bound almost entirely to humic substances. Acid sulphate soils, the source of the REE and other metals in the creek water, are widespread on coastal plains worldwide and therefore the REE attenuation patterns and mechanisms identified in the studied estuary are relevant for recognition of similar geochemical processes and conditions in a variety of coastal locations.

  3. Recovery and Separation of Rare Earth Elements Using Salmon Milt

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Miyaji, Asami; Watanabe, Yusuke; Fan, Qiaohui; Honma, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Recycling rare earth elements (REEs) used in advanced materials such as Nd magnets is important for the efficient use of REE resources when the supply of several REEs is limited. In this work, the feasibility of using salmon milt for REE recovery and separation was examined, along with the identification of the binding site of REEs in salmon milt. Results showed that (i) salmon milt has a sufficiently high affinity to adsorb REEs and (ii) the adsorption capacity of the milt is 1.04 mEq/g, which is comparable with that of commercial cation exchange resin. Heavier REEs have higher affinity for milt. A comparison of stability constants and adsorption patterns of REEs discussed in the literature suggests that the phosphate is responsible for the adsorption of REE in milt. The results were supported by dysprosium (Dy) and lutetium (Lu) LIII-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The REE-P shell was identified for the second neighboring atom, which shows the importance of the phosphate site as REE binding sites. The comparison of REE adsorption pattern and EXAFS results between the milt system and other adsorbent systems (cellulose phosphate, Ln-resin, bacteria, and DNA-filter hybrid) revealed that the coordination number of phosphate is correlated with the slope of the REE pattern. The separation column loaded with milt was tested to separate REE for the practical use of salmon milt for the recovery and separation of REE. However, water did not flow through the column possibly because of the hydrophobicity of the milt. Thus, sequential adsorption–desorption approach using a batch-type method was applied for the separation of REE. As an example of the practical applications of REE separation, Nd and Fe(III) were successfully separated from a synthetic solution of Nd magnet waste by a batch-type method using salmon milt. PMID:25490035

  4. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials. PMID:23518599

  5. Investigating Rare Earth Element Systematics in the Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Torres, M. E.; Kim, J. H.; Verba, C.

    2014-12-01

    The lanthanide series of elements (the 14 rare earth elements, REEs) have similar chemical properties and respond to different chemical and physical processes in the natural environment by developing unique patterns in their concentration distribution when normalized to an average shale REE content. The interpretation of the REE content in a gas-bearing black shale deposited in a marine environment must therefore take into account the paleoredox conditions of deposition as well as any diagenetic remobilization and authigenic mineral formation. We analyzed 15 samples from a core of the Marcellus Shale (Whipkey ST1, Greene Co., PA) for REEs, TOC, gas-producing potential, trace metal content, and carbon isotopes of organic matter in order to determine the REE systematics of a black shale currently undergoing shale gas development. We also conducted a series of sequential leaching experiments targeting the phosphatic fractions in order to evaluate the dominant host phase of REEs in a black shale. Knowledge of the REE system in the Marcellus black shale will allow us to evaluate potential REE release and behavior during hydraulic fracturing operations. Total REE content of the Whipkey ST1 core ranged from 65-185 μg/g and we observed three distinct REE shale-normalized patterns: middle-REE enrichment (MREE/MREE* ~2) with heavy-REE enrichment (HREE/LREE ~1.8-2), flat patterns, and a linear enrichment towards the heavy-REE (HREE/LREE ~1.5-2.5). The MREE enrichment occurred in the high carbonate samples of the Stafford Member overlying the Marcellus Formation. The HREE enrichment occurred in the Union Springs Member of the Marcellus Formation, corresponding to a high TOC peak (TOC ~4.6-6.2 wt%) and moderate carbonate levels (CaCO3 ~4-53 wt%). Results from the sequential leaching experiments suggest that the dominant host of the REEs is the organic fraction of the black shale and that the detrital and authigenic fractions have characteristic MREE enrichments. We present our

  6. Luminescence studies of rare-earth doped and Co-doped hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasugi, G.; Thamizhavel, A.; Girija, E. K.

    2012-06-01

    Rare-earth doped and co-doped hydroxyapatite (Eu: HA, Eu-Y: HA) were prepared by wet precipitation method by using CTAB as the organic modifier. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Photoluminescence spectra (PL). Upon excitation at 350 nm the samples Eu: HA and Eu-Y: HA shows the emission band in the visible region, which makes it suitable for potential application such as bio-imaging.

  7. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits–A deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements are not as rare in nature as their name implies, but economic deposits with these elements are not common and few deposits have been large producers. In the past 25 years, demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically because of their wide and diverse use in high-technology applications. Yet, presently the global production and supply of rare earth elements come from only a few sources. China produces more than 95 percent of the world's supply of rare earth elements. Because of China's decision to restrict exports of these elements, the price of rare earth elements has increased and industrial countries are concerned about supply shortages. As a result, understanding the distribution and origin of rare earth elements deposits, and identifying and quantifying our nation's rare earth elements resources have become priorities. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. The general mineral deposit model summarized here is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related REE deposits are discussed together because of their spatial association, common enrichment in incompatible elements, and similarities in genesis. A wide variety of commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks, such as rare earth elements, niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other enrichments include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium.

  8. Structure and optical properties of rare earth-doped zinc oxyhalide tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sidebottom, D.L.; Hruschka, M.A.; Potter, B.G.; Brow, R.K.

    1997-10-01

    Zinc tellurite glasses appear to be excellent candidates for hosting rare earth ions since they provide a low phonon energy environment to minimize non-radiative losses as well as possess good chemical durability and optical properties. The optical behavior of the rare earth ion can be manipulated by modifying its local environment in the glass host. The authors report measurements of the emission lifetime, optical absorption, and vibrational density of states of the glass system (ZnO){sub x}(ZnF{sub 2}){sub y}(TeO{sub 2}){sub 1{minus}x{minus}y}doped (0.1 mol%) with a series of rare earths. Phonon sideband spectroscopy has been successfully employed to probe vibrational structure in the immediate vicinity of the rare earth ion. The authors observe a significant increase in the emission lifetime (from approximately 150 {mu}s to 250 {mu}s) of Nd{sup 3+} with increasing fluorine substitution.

  9. Rare Earth elements as sediment tracers in Mangrove ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. L.; Swathi, S.

    2013-05-01

    Rare earth elements have been widely used as geochemical source fingerprints of rocks and sediments to study processes involving cosmo-chemistry, igneous petrology, tectonic setting and for investigations of water-rock interactions and weathering processes including transport of weathering products to the oceans.Many studies have addressed the use of REEs in investigating the environmental impact of human activity and demonstrated that the REE natural distribution in sediment from densely industrialised and populated regions can be altered by anthropogenic influences.The coastal wetlands like Mangroves are ultimate sinks for all the material derived from the terrestrial and marine environment.The high productivity and low ratio of sediment respiration to net primary production gives mangrove sediments the potential for long-term sequestration of these pollutants/metals before reaching the coastal ocean. Geochemical study of REE in these sedimentary systems is useful for determining the nature of the biogeochemical processes. In particular, REE show a great sensitivity to pH changes, redox conditions and adsorption/ desorption reactions. So, they may be used as markers of discharge provenance, weathering processes, changes in environmental conditions in the water and sediments of Mangrove/wetland systems. Our study aims to establish the abundance, distribution and enrichment of REEs to track the sediment sources and biogeochemical processes occurring in the mangrove environment.Core sediments were collected from the different environmental settings within the Pichavaram mangrove area.Higher REE concentration in Pichavaram sediments indicated greater input from sources like terrestrial weathering and anthropogenic activities which in turn are affected by saline mixing and dynamic physico-chemical processes occurring in the mangrove environment. REE enrichment order was attributed to the alkaline pH (7-8.5) and reducing conditions prevailing in the mangrove

  10. Anomalous Magneto-Optical Behavior of Rare Earth Doped Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbers, Andrew; Mitchell, Brandon; Woodward, Nathaniel; Dierolf, Volkmar

    We have observed unusual magneto-optical properties in rare earth doped gallium nitride. Specifically, the reversal of a magnetic field applied parallel to the c-axis produces unexpected, marked differences in luminescence spectra in several of our samples. Notably, relative emission strengths of Zeeman-split lines from the rare earth ions appear to change when the field is reversed. These effects were not observed in rare earth doped lithium niobate and lithium tantalate, which are also hexagonal and polar. Measurements for erbium doped gallium nitride suggest that these asymmetries seem to be linked to the degree of ferromagnetism of the samples. Results are presented showing these differences. The symmetry of the observed effects requires a perturbation of the RE states with a screw like symmetry. We explore whether this may be accomplished by defects such as threading dislocations. The work related to ferroelectric materials was supported by NSF Grant (DMR-1008075).

  11. Biogeochemistry of the rare-earth elements with particular reference to hickory trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.O.; Bastron, H.; Murata, K.J.

    1958-01-01

    Hickory trees concentrate the rare-earth elements in their leaves to a phenomenal degree and may contain as much as 2300 p.p.m. of total rare earths based on the dry weight of the leaves. The average proportions of the individual elements (atomic percent of the total rare-earth elements) in the leaves are: Y 36, La 16, Ce 14, Pr 2, Nd 20, Sm 1, Eu 0.7, Gd 3, Tb 0.6, Dy 3, Ho 0.7, Er 2, Tm 0.2, Yb 1, and Lu 0.2. The similarity in the proportions of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and in the exchange complex of the soil on which the hickory trees grow indicates that the trees do not fractionate the rare earths appreciably. The variation of the rare-earth elements in the leaves and soils can be explained generally in terms of the relative abundance of the cerium group and the yttrium group, except for the element cerium. The large fluctuations in the proportion of cerium [Ce/(La + Nd) atomic ratios of 0.16 to 0.86] correlate with oxidation-reduction conditions in the soil profile. The substitution of dilute H2SO3 for dilute HC1 in the determination of available rare-earth elements brings about a large increase in the proportion of cerium that is extracted from an oxygenated subsoil. These relationships strongly suggest that quadrivalent cerium is present in oxygenated subsoil and is less available to plants than the other rare-earth elements that do not undergo such a change in valence. A few parts per billion of rare-earth elements have been detected in two samples of ground water. ?? 1958.

  12. Miocene Coral Skeleton Rare Earth Element Patterns Reflect River Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Brachert, T. C.; Jochum, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns of modern coral skeletons usually reflect the REE composition of ambient seawater which is characterized by heavy REE enriched relative to light REE with NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized La/Lu ratios of typically <0.4. The REE concentration in coral aragonite is enriched by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude compared to ambient seawater. Here we report trace element data including REE of coral skeletons of Late Miocene age (~9 Ma, Tortonian) from Crete (Eastern Mediterranean). Analyses were done using a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser coupled to an Element2 ICP-MS along the growth axis of the coral skeletons. The profiles show that Ba/Ca ratios have a seasonally induced pattern with high values around the winter months which are identified by δ18O analyses. REE/Ca ratios co-vary with Ba/Ca ratios. Since the Ba/Ca ratio is a proxy used to monitor river discharge, the co-variation suggests the REE/Ca ratio to be a proxy of comparable quality. NASC-normalized REE patterns of the Tortonian corals have negative Ce anomalies like modern corals. However, the Tortonian corals have REE patterns highly enriched in LREE with (La/Lu)N ratios of 4 to 30 which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to modern corals. Al concentrations are low (<10 ppm) and do not correlate with REE concentrations indicating an insignificant fraction of terrigenous material included in the skeleton. Applying distribution coefficients typical for modern corals, the REE composition of the Tortonian ambient water yields (La/Lu)N of about 2 to 16. This range can be explained by binary mixing of modern Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water ((La/Lu)N=0.35, sea surface salinity (SSS) ~38 ‰) with highly LREE-enriched river water ((La/Lu)N >3, salinity ~0.5 ‰) transporting suspended and colloid phases, also highly enriched, especially in LREE, at a ratio of ~9 (seawater):1 (river water). The river water component is considered because paleoenvironmental

  13. The relationship between magnetism and magneto-optical effects in rare earth doped aluminophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeanu, M.; Sofronie, M.; Galca, A. C.; Tolea, F.; Elisa, M.; Sava, B.; Boroica, L.; Kuncser, V.

    2016-02-01

    Aluminophosphate glasses from the Li2O-BaO-Al2O3-P2O5 system with the addition of nonmagnetic and paramagnetic rare earth ions, were prepared using a wet nonconventional method to process the raw materials, followed by a melting-quenching procedure. The glasses obtained were characterized with respect to their magnetic and magneto-optical properties using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The assumption of a linear dependence of the Verdet constant on the magnetic susceptibility, with a proportionality constant dependent on the type of vitreous matrix and doping ion, is critically discussed. The diamagnetic and paramagnetic contributions to the Faraday rotation were separately analyzed and specific designs for optimal active and passive elements are proposed.

  14. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derom, S.; Berthelot, A.; Pillonnet, A.; Benamara, O.; Jurdyc, A. M.; Girard, C.; Colas des Francs, G.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion’s excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  15. Rare Earth Elements: A Tool for Understanding the Behaviour of Trivalent Actinides in the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Buil, Belen; Gomez, Paloma; Garralon, Antonio; Turrero, M. Jesus

    2007-07-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined in groundwaters, granite and fracture fillings in a restored uranium mine. The granitoids normalized REE patterns of groundwaters show heavy rare earth elements (HREE)-enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. This suggests that the REE are fractionated during leaching from the source rocks by groundwaters. Preferential leaching of HREE would be consistent with the greater stability of their aqueous complexes compared to those of the light rare earth elements (LREE), together with the dissolution of certain fracture filling minerals, dissolution/alteration of phyllosilicates and colloidal transport. (authors)

  16. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in sedimentary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freslon, Nicolas; Bayon, Germain; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Bollinger, Claire; Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Germain, Yoan; Khripounoff, Alexis; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Rouget, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    We report rare earth element (REE) and neodymium (Nd) isotope data for the organic fraction of sediments collected from various depositional environments, i.e. rivers (n = 25), estuaries (n = 18), open-ocean settings (n = 15), and cold seeps (n = 12). Sedimentary organic matter (SOM) was extracted using a mixed hydrogen peroxide/nitric acid solution (20%-H2O2-0.02 M-HNO3), after removal of carbonate and oxy-hydroxide phases with dilute hydrochloric acid (0.25 M-HCl). A series of experimental tests indicate that extraction of sedimentary organic compounds using H2O2 may be complicated occasionally by partial dissolution of sulphide minerals and residual carbonates. However, this contamination is expected to be minor for REE because measured concentrations in H2O2 leachates are about two-orders of magnitude higher than in the above mentioned phases. The mean REE concentrations determined in the H2O2 leachates for samples from rivers, estuaries, coastal seas and open-ocean settings yield relatively similar levels, with ΣREE = 109 ± 86 ppm (mean ± s; n = 58). The organic fractions leached from cold seep sediments display even higher concentration levels (285 ± 150 ppm; mean ± s; n = 12). The H2O2 leachates for most sediments exhibit remarkably similar shale-normalized REE patterns, all characterized by a mid-REE enrichment compared to the other REE. This suggests that the distribution of REE in leached sedimentary organic phases is controlled primarily by biogeochemical processes, rather than by the composition of the source from which they derive (e.g. pore, river or sea-water). The Nd isotopic compositions for organic phases leached from river sediments are very similar to those for the corresponding detrital fractions. In contrast, the SOM extracted from marine sediments display εNd values that typically range between the εNd signatures for terrestrial organic matter (inferred from the analysis of the sedimentary detrital fractions) and marine organic matter

  17. Schottky barrier formation at the Au to rare earth doped GaN thin film interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Wu, J.; Rivera, A.; Palai, R.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Dowben, P. A.

    2011-09-01

    The Schottky barriers formed at the interface between gold and various rare earth doped GaN thin films (RE = Yb, Er, Gd) were investigated in situ using synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy. The resultant Schottky barrier heights were measured as 1.68 ± 0.1 eV (Yb:GaN), 1.64 ± 0.1 eV (Er:GaN), and 1.33 ± 0.1 eV (Gd:GaN). We find compelling evidence that thin layers of gold do not wet and uniformly cover the GaN surface, even with rare earth doping of the GaN. Furthermore, the trend of the Schottky barrier heights follows the trend of the rare earth metal work function.

  18. In vivo demonstration of enhanced radiotherapy using rare earth doped titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley, Helen E.; Kim, Jeewon; Dobson, Peter J.

    2012-07-01

    Radiation therapy is often limited by damage to healthy tissue and associated side-effects; restricting radiation to ineffective doses. Preferential incorporation of materials into tumour tissue can enhance the effect of radiation. Titania has precedent for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photoexcitation, but is limited by the penetration depth of UV light. Optimization of a nanomaterial for interaction with X-rays could be used for deep tumour treatment. As such, titania nanoparticles were doped with gadolinium to optimize the localized energy absorption from a conventional medical X-ray, and further optimized by the addition of other rare earth (RE) elements. These elements were selected due to their large X-ray photon interaction cross-section, and potential for integration into the titania crystal structure. Specific activation of the nanoparticles by X-ray can result in generation of ROS leading to cell death in a tumour-localized manner. We show here that intratumoural injection of RE doped titania nanoparticles can enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo.Radiation therapy is often limited by damage to healthy tissue and associated side-effects; restricting radiation to ineffective doses. Preferential incorporation of materials into tumour tissue can enhance the effect of radiation. Titania has precedent for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photoexcitation, but is limited by the penetration depth of UV light. Optimization of a nanomaterial for interaction with X-rays could be used for deep tumour treatment. As such, titania nanoparticles were doped with gadolinium to optimize the localized energy absorption from a conventional medical X-ray, and further optimized by the addition of other rare earth (RE) elements. These elements were selected due to their large X-ray photon interaction cross-section, and potential for integration into the titania crystal

  19. Fluorescence in rare earth-doped fluorozirconate fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Saissy, A.; Ostrowsky, D.B. ); Maze, G. )

    1991-05-20

    Spontaneous fluorescence band of erbium-, holmium-, and thulium-doped fluorozirconate fibers are studied experimentally and theoretically. From experimental data and for each trivalent ion we identify the set of optical transitions that gives rise to the observed linear fluorescence and unconversion process. Fiber perturbation theory and density matrix formalism are used to model fluorescence spectra with particular attention to modal structure, loss, and mode coupling in the fiber. The relationship between the experimental emission spectrum of thulium-doped fiber and the theoretical model is discussed.

  20. Fluorescence in rare earth-doped fluorozirconate fibers.

    PubMed

    Saissy, A; Ostrowsky, D B; Maze, G

    1991-05-20

    Spontaneous fluorescence bands of erbium-, holmium-, and thulium-doped fluorozirconate fibers are studied experimentally and theoretically. From experimental data and for each trivalent ion we identify the set of optical transitions that gives rise to the observed linear fluorescence and upconversion process. Fiber perturbation theory and density matrix formalism are used to model fluorescence spectra with particular attention to modal structure, loss, and mode coupling in the fiber. The relationship between the experimental emission spectrum of thulium-doped fiber and the theoretical model is discussed. PMID:20700160

  1. Experimental Parameters Affecting Stripping of Rare Earth Elements from Loaded Sorptive Media in Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    Experimental results from several studies exploring the impact of pH and acid volume on the stripping of rare earth elements (REEs) loaded onto ligand-based media via an active column. The REEs in this experiment were loaded onto the media through exposure to a simulated geothermal brine with known mineral concentrations. The data include the experiment results, rare earth element concentrations, and the experimental parameters varied.

  2. Vanadium oxide bronzes containing rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V.L.; Zubkov, V.G.; Fedyukov, A.S.; Zainulin, Yu.G.

    1988-05-01

    We attempted to make phases having the general formula Ln/sub x/V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (Ln = La, Eu, Yb) without success; the specimens usually consisted of three phases: the rare-earth orthovanadate LnVO/sub 4/, vanadium(V) oxide, and VO/sub 2/. To shift the process to give Ln/sub x/V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, heat treatment was applied to mixtures of the initial high-purity substances. The x-ray patterns were recorded with a DRON-UM1 apparatus with Cr K..cap alpha.. radiation and were processed by the Poroshok program. The IR spectra were recorded with UR-20 spectrometer with oil mulls.

  3. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  4. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. PMID:25089667

  5. Determination of thorium and of rare earth elements in cerium earth minerals and ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carron, M.K.; Skinner, D.L.; Stevens, R.E.

    1955-01-01

    The conventional oxalate method for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements in acid solution exhibits definite solubilities of these elements. The present work was undertaken to establish conditions overcoming these solubilities and to find optimum conditions for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements as hydroxides and sebacates. The investigations resulted in a reliable procedure applicable to samples in which the cerium group elements predominate. The oxalate precipitations are made from homogeneous solution at pH 2 by adding a prepared solution of anhydrous oxalic acid in methanol instead of the more expensive crystalline methyl oxalate. Calcium is added as a carrier. Quantitative precipitation of thorium and the rare earth elements is ascertained by further small additions of calcium to the supernatant liquid, until the added calcium precipitates as oxalate within 2 minutes. Calcium is removed by precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and rare earths at room temperature by adding ammonium hydroxide to pH > 10. Thorium is separated as the sebacate at pH 2.5, and the rare earths are precipitated with ammonium sebacate at pH 9. Maximum errors for combined weights of thorium and rare earth oxides on synthetic mixtures are ??0.6 mg. Maximum error for separated thoria is ??0.5 mg.

  6. Design and refinement of rare earth doped multicore fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudenzano, F.; Mescia, L.; Di Tommaso, A.; Surico, M.; De Sario, M.

    2013-09-01

    A novel multicore ytterbium doped fiber laser is designed, with the target of maximizing both the effective mode area and the beam quality, by means of a complete home-made computer code. It can be employed to construct high power and Quasi-Gaussian beam lasers. The novel laser configuration exploits a single mode multicore fiber and does not need Talbot cavity or other in-phase mode selection mechanisms. This is an innovative solution, because to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have designed a truly single-mode multicore fiber laser. For comparison we have optimized two other laser configurations which are well known in literature, both employing a multimode multicore fiber and a Talbot cavity as a feedback for the in-phase supermode selection. All three multicore fibers, constituted by the same glass, are doped with the same ytterbium ion concentration and pumped with the same input power. Multimodal fiber lasers exhibit lower beam quality, i.e. a higher beam quality factor M2, with respect to the single mode one, even if suitable Talbot cavities are designed, but they are very competitive when a more compact laser cavity is required for the same output power. The novel single mode nineteen core laser exhibits a simulated effective mode area Aeff = 703 μm2 and a beam quality factor M2 = 1.05, showing better characteristics than the other two lasers.

  7. Molecular Polyarsenides of the Rare-Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Arleth, Nicholas; Gamer, Michael T; Köppe, Ralf; Konchenko, Sergey N; Fleischmann, Martin; Scheer, Manfred; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-01-22

    Reduction of [Cp*Fe(η(5)-As5)] with [Cp''2Sm(thf)] (Cp''=η(5)-1,3-(tBu)2C5H3) under various conditions led to [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] and [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)]. Both compounds are the first polyarsenides of the rare-earth metals. [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] is also the first d/f-triple decker sandwich complex with a purely inorganic planar middle deck. The central As4(2-) unit is isolobal with the 6π-aromatic cyclobutadiene dianion (CH)4(2-). [(Cp''2Sm)2As7(Cp*Fe)] contains an As7(3-) cage, which has a norbornadiene-like structure with two short As-As bonds in the scaffold. DFT calculations confirm all the structural observations. The As-As bond order inside the cyclo As4 ligand in [(Cp''2Sm)(μ,η(4):η(4)-As4)(Cp*Fe)] was estimated to be in between an As-As single bond and a formally aromatic As4(2-) system. PMID:26676537

  8. Spintronics: Towards room temperature ferromagnetic devices via manganese and rare earth doped gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luen, Melvyn Oliver

    . Simultaneously, post-growth diffusion of ferromagnetic, rare earth species into GaN template thin films also was investigated. Structural, electrical, optical and magnetic characterization of diffused films grown on sapphire was performed. Optimization of the conditions leading to the first successful diffusion of neodymium into GaN thin films, and the magnetic and optical studies that followed are detailed. A mechanism governing and conditions promoting ferromagnetism in rare earth (RE) doped GaN is proposed. The magnetic relationship between two similar and dissimilar rare earth elements, in a single GaN crystal are investigated. Finally, spin valve and magnetic tunnel junction devices based on the magnetic properties of RE-GaN thin films are investigated.

  9. Addressing Rare-Earth Element Criticality: An Example from the Aviation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Anthony Y.; Dosch, Christopher; Grossman, Theodore R.; Herzog, Joseph L.; Maricocchi, Antonio F.; Polli, Drew; Lipkin, Don M.

    2014-09-01

    Rare-earth (RE) elements are enablers for a wide range of technologies, including high-strength permanent magnets, energy-efficient lighting, high-temperature thermal barrier coatings, and catalysts. While direct material substitution is difficult in many of these applications because of the specific electronic, optical, or electrochemical properties imparted by the individual rare-earth elements, we describe an example from the aviation industry where supply chain optimization may be an option. Ceramic matrix composite engine components require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to protect them from extreme temperatures and adverse reactions with water vapor in the hot gas path. EBC systems based on rare-earth silicates offer a unique combination of environmental resistance, thermal expansion matching, thermal conductivity, and thermal stability across the service temperature window. Several pure rare-earth silicates and solid solutions have been demonstrated in EBC applications. However, all rely on heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) for phase stability. This article considers the possibility of using separation tailings containing a mixture of HREEs as a source material in lieu of using the high-purity HREE oxides. This option arises because the desired properties of RE-silicate EBCs derive from the average cation size rather than the electronic properties of the individual rare-earth cations. Because separation tailings have not incurred the costs associated with the final stages of separation, they offer an economical alternative to high-purity oxides for this emerging application.

  10. Addressing Rare-Earth Element Criticality: An Example from the Aviation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Anthony Y.; Dosch, Christopher; Grossman, Theodore R.; Herzog, Joseph L.; Maricocchi, Antonio F.; Polli, Drew; Lipkin, Don M.

    2014-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) elements are enablers for a wide range of technologies, including high-strength permanent magnets, energy-efficient lighting, high-temperature thermal barrier coatings, and catalysts. While direct material substitution is difficult in many of these applications because of the specific electronic, optical, or electrochemical properties imparted by the individual rare-earth elements, we describe an example from the aviation industry where supply chain optimization may be an option. Ceramic matrix composite engine components require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to protect them from extreme temperatures and adverse reactions with water vapor in the hot gas path. EBC systems based on rare-earth silicates offer a unique combination of environmental resistance, thermal expansion matching, thermal conductivity, and thermal stability across the service temperature window. Several pure rare-earth silicates and solid solutions have been demonstrated in EBC applications. However, all rely on heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs) for phase stability. This article considers the possibility of using separation tailings containing a mixture of HREEs as a source material in lieu of using the high-purity HREE oxides. This option arises because the desired properties of RE-silicate EBCs derive from the average cation size rather than the electronic properties of the individual rare-earth cations. Because separation tailings have not incurred the costs associated with the final stages of separation, they offer an economical alternative to high-purity oxides for this emerging application.

  11. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Jeynes, C; Palitsin, V; Townley, H E

    2016-07-15

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically. PMID:27255758

  12. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Townley, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically.

  13. Quantification of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi; Martin, Rodger C.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne; Wymore, Ann; Andre, Nicolas

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, a study of the optical emission as a function of concentration of laser-ablated yttrium (Y) and of six rare earth elements, europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm), has been evaluated using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. Statistical methodology using multivariate analysis has been used to obtain the sampling errors, coefficient of regression, calibration, and cross-validation of measurements as they relate to the LIBS analysis in graphite-matrix pellets that were doped with elements at several concentrations. Each element (in oxide form) was mixed in the graphite matrix in percentages ranging from 1% to 50% by weight and the LIBS spectra obtained for each composition as well as for pure oxide samples. Finally, a single pellet was mixed with all the elements in equal oxide masses to determine if we can identify the elemental peaks in a mixed pellet. This dataset is relevant for future application to studies of fission product content and distribution in irradiated nuclear fuels. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for the future challenge of in situ analysis of nuclear materials. Finally, these studies also show that LIBS spectral analysis using statistical methodology can provide quantitative results and suggest an approach in future to the far more challenging multielemental analysis of ~ 20 primary elements in high-burnup nuclear reactor fuel.

  14. Quantification of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Madhavi; Martin, Rodger C.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne; Wymore, Ann; Andre, Nicolas

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, a study of the optical emission as a function of concentration of laser-ablated yttrium (Y) and of six rare earth elements, europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm), has been evaluated using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. Statistical methodology using multivariate analysis has been used to obtain the sampling errors, coefficient of regression, calibration, and cross-validation of measurements as they relate to the LIBS analysis in graphite-matrix pellets that were doped with elements at several concentrations. Each element (in oxide form) was mixed in the graphite matrix in percentages rangingmore » from 1% to 50% by weight and the LIBS spectra obtained for each composition as well as for pure oxide samples. Finally, a single pellet was mixed with all the elements in equal oxide masses to determine if we can identify the elemental peaks in a mixed pellet. This dataset is relevant for future application to studies of fission product content and distribution in irradiated nuclear fuels. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for the future challenge of in situ analysis of nuclear materials. Finally, these studies also show that LIBS spectral analysis using statistical methodology can provide quantitative results and suggest an approach in future to the far more challenging multielemental analysis of ~ 20 primary elements in high-burnup nuclear reactor fuel.« less

  15. Quantification of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi; Martin, Rodger C.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne; Wymore, Ann; Andre, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A study of the optical emission as a function of concentration of laser-ablated yttrium (Y) and of six rare earth elements, europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), lanthanum (La), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm), has been evaluated using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. Statistical methodology using multivariate analysis has been used to obtain the sampling errors, coefficient of regression, calibration, and cross-validation of measurements as they relate to the LIBS analysis in graphite-matrix pellets that were doped with elements at several concentrations. Each element (in oxide form) was mixed in the graphite matrix in percentages ranging from 1% to 50% by weight and the LIBS spectra obtained for each composition as well as for pure oxide samples. Finally, a single pellet was mixed with all the elements in equal oxide masses to determine if we can identify the elemental peaks in a mixed pellet. This dataset is relevant for future application to studies of fission product content and distribution in irradiated nuclear fuels. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for the future challenge of in situ analysis of nuclear materials. These studies also show that LIBS spectral analysis using statistical methodology can provide quantitative results and suggest an approach in future to the far more challenging multielemental analysis of ~ 20 primary elements in high-burnup nuclear reactor fuel.

  16. [Application of ICP-MS to Detect Rare Earth Elements in Three Economic Macroalgaes in China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-fang; Shang, De-rong; Zhai, Yu-xiu; Ning, Jin-song; Ding, Hai-yan; Sheng, Xiao-feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the content and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) in main economic macroalgaes in our country, fifteen rare earth elements in three economic macroalgaes (including 30 samples of kelp, 30 samples of laver and 15 samples of Enteromorpha) were detected using ICP-MS method. Results showed that the total content of REE in different species of macroalgaes was different. The highest total content of REE was in Enteromorpha (16,012.0 ng · g⁻¹), while in kelp and laver, the total REE was similar for two macroalgaes (3887.4 and 4318.1 ng · g⁻¹ respectively). The content of fifteen rare earth elements in kelp ranged from 7.9 to 1496.4 ng · g⁻¹; in laver, it ranged from 8.2 to 1836.6 ng · g⁻¹. For Enteromorpha, the concentration of 15 rare earth elements were between 19.2 and 6014.5 ng · g⁻¹. In addition, the content and distribution of different rare earth elements in different macroalgaes was also different. For kelp, the highest content of REE was Ce (1 496.4 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (689.1 ng · g⁻¹). For laver, the highest was Y (1836.6 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was Ce (682.2 ng · g⁻¹). For Enteromorpha, the highest was Ce (6014.5 ng · g⁻¹), and the second was La (2902.9 ng · g⁻¹). Present results also showed that three macroalgaes accumulated the light rare earth elements much more than the high rare earth elements. The light rare earth elements occupied 90.9%, 87.3% and 91.1% for kelp, laver and Enteromorpha respectively. The result that the Enteromorpha had high content of rare earth elements could provide important support for opening new research directions for the utilization of Enteromorpha. PMID:26978935

  17. Ferromagnetism and Photoluminescence in Rare-Earth doped GaN via Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luen, M. Oliver; Nepal, N.; Bedair, S. M.; Zavada, J. M.; Brown, Ei Ei; Hommerich, U.; Frajtag, P.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    Rare-earth doped GaN is attracting attention both as a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material and for optical devices useful in communications and multi-color semiconductor display technology. GaN's large band gap (3.4 eV) gives rise to optical transparency over a wide spectral range, from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet. These properties make it an optimum host for the various emissions that are possible from rare-earth (RE) ions. Recently, rare-earth doped GaN also has demonstrated above room temperature ferromagnetism. In this study, we report the diffusion of RE (Nd, Sm, Gd and Er) into undoped, Mg-doped and Si-doped GaN templates. Room temperature optical and ferromagnetic properties were studied using photoluminescence (PL) and alternating gradient magnetometer, respectively. Ferromagnetic properties show a preference for undoped and n-type GaN. PL spectra exhibit RE ion inner shell transitions in the visible and infrared regions. The mechanisms for above room temperature ferromagnetism and emission intensity related to the RE concentration, is discussed.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhen; Huffman, T. J.; Xu, Peng; Qazilbash, M. M.; Saha, S. R.; Drye, Tyler; Paglione, J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, rare-earth doping in CaFe2As2 has been used to tune its electronic, magnetic, and structural properties. The substitution of rare-earth ions at the alkaline-earth sites leads to the suppression of the spin-density wave (SDW) phase transition in CaFe2As2. For example, Pr substitution results in a paramagnetic metal in the tetragonal phase that is susceptible to a low temperature structural transition to a collapsed tetragonal phase. However, La-doped CaFe2As2 remains in the uncollapsed tetragonal structure down to the lowest measured temperatures. Both the uncollapsed and collapsed tetragonal structures exhibit superconductivity with maximum Tc reaching 47 K, the highest observed in inter-metallics albeit with a small superconducting volume fraction. In this work, we perform ab-plane infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2 at different cryogenic temperatures. Our aim is to ascertain the contributions of electron doping and chemical pressure to the charge and lattice dynamics of this iron-arsenide system.

  19. Incorporation of rare earth elements in titanite: Stabilization of the A2/a dimorph by creation of antiphase boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.M.; Bloodaxe, E.S.; Hanchar, J.M.; Foord, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic arrangement of a natural rare-earth-rich titanite and two synthetic rare-earth-doped titanites have been refined in space group A2/a, and the atomic arrangement of an undoped P21/a synthetic titanite was also refined for comparison. Previous work has shown that titanite possesses a domain structure, with domains formed of like-displaced Ti atoms in the [100] octahedral chains. P21/a titanite results when the crystal is formed of a single domain, but as Ti-reversal sites occur in the octahedral chain the apparent A2/a structure results from the average of antiphase domains. Antiphase boundaries occur at O1, which is alternately overbonded or underbonded at the boundaries, depending on the displacement of the neighboring Ti atoms. Type 2 antiphase boundaries exist where two Ti atoms are displaced away from the intervening O1 atom and are energetically unfavorable because of underbonding of that O1 atom. However, substitution of a trivalent rare earth element in the adjacent Ca2+ site relieves that underbonding, favoring the creation of type 2 antiphase boundaries and stabilization of the A2/a dimorph. The results of high-precision crystal structure analyses demonstrate that rare earth substituents for Ca stabilize the A2/a dimorph at lower substitution levels than required for octahedral substitutions.

  20. Rare Earth Element Fractionation During Evaporation of Chondritic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Davis, A. M.; Clayton, R. N.

    1993-07-01

    Evaporation experiments suggest that enrichments in the heavy isotopes of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon in some CAIs are caused by kinetic effects during evaporation [1]. Volatility-fractionated REE patterns found in some CAIs have been modeled with some success using equilibrium thermodynamics [2,3], but little is known about kinetic effects on REE patterns. We have begun an investigation of REE fractionation under conditions where large isotope effects are produced by the kinetic isotope effect. We synthesized a starting material containing CI chondritic relative proportions of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and FeO, and doped it with 100 ppm each of the REE. Samples of this material were evaporated in a vacuum furnace [4] at 10^-6 torr and 1800 or 2000 degrees C for periods of a few seconds to 5 hr. The mass fraction evaporated ranged from 7.6 to 95.4%. Most residues consist of olivine and glass. Chemical compositions of the residues were determined by electron and ion microprobe. Results for selected elements are shown in Fig. 1. There is no significant evaporation of Ca, Al, and Ti up to 95% mass loss; the evaporation behavior of Mg, Si, and Fe is similar to that found by Hashimoto [5]. There is no significant evaporation of most of the REE up to 95% mass loss. Ce is much more volatile than the other REE under these conditions: a tenfold negative Ce anomaly developed between 60 and 70% mass loss and the anomaly reached 5 X 10^-4 at 95% mass loss. A small Pr anomaly (50% Pr loss) also appeared in the highest-mass-loss residue. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ce has approximately the same volatility as other LREE under solar nebular oxygen fugacity, but is much more volatile than the other REE under oxidizing conditions [6]. We suspect that conditions in the residue in our vacuum evaporation experiments became oxidizing because evaporation reactions involving most major element oxides involve release of oxygen. The four known HAL-type hibonite

  1. Research of the entry of rare earth elements Eu3+ and La3+ into plant cell.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongsheng; Zeng, Fuli; Yi, An; Ping, Shi; Jing, Lanhua

    2003-03-01

    Whether rare earth elements can enter into plant cells remains controversial. This article discusses the ultracellular structural localization of lanthanum (La(3+)) and europium (Eu(3+)) in the intact plant cells fed by rare earth elements Eu(3+) and La(3+). Eu-TTA fluorescence analysis of the plasmalemma, cytoplast, and mitochondria showed that Eu(3+) fluorescence intensities in such structures significantly increased. Eu(3+) can directly enter or be carried by the artificial ion carrier A23187 into plant cells through the calcium ion (Ca(2+)) channel and then partially resume the synthesis of amaranthin in the Amaranthus caudatus growing in the dark. Locations of rare earth elements La(3+) and Eu(3+) in all kinds of components of cytoplasmatic organelles were determined with transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The results of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis indicated that Eu(3+) and La(3+) can be absorbed into plant cells and bind to the membranes of protoplasm, chloroplast, mitochondrion, cytoplast, and karyon. These results provide experimental evidence that rare earth elements can be absorbed into plant cells, which would be the basis for interpreting physiological and biochemical effects of rare earth elements on plant cells. PMID:12663949

  2. RARE EARTH ELEMENTS: A REVIEW OF PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, RECYCLING, AND ASSOCIATED ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are a group of 15 chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the lanthanides. Two other elements, scandium and yttrium, have a similar physiochemistry to the lanthanides, are commonly found in the same mineral assemblages, and are often refe...

  3. Capillary-force-induced formation of luminescent polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticle) hybrid hollow spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Xie, Lin; Li, Fuyou; Zhou, Shuxue; Wu, Limin

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a "one-pot" procedure to synthesize polystyrene/(rare-earth-doped nanoparticles) (PS/REDNPs) hybrid hollow spheres via the in situ diffusion of organic core into inorganic shell under strong capillary force. In this approach, when carboxyl-capped PS colloids were deposited by different REDNPs in aqueous medium, such as LaF3:Eu3+, LaF3:Ce3+-Tb3+, and YVO4:Dy3+, PS/REDNPs inorganic-organic hybrid hollow spheres could be directly obtained via the in situ diffusion of core PS chains into the voids between rare-earth-doped nanoparticles through the strong capillary force. Not only is the synthetic procedure versatile and very simple, but also the obtained hybrid hollow spheres are hydrophilic and luminescent and could be directly used in chemical and biological fields. PMID:20828167

  4. PAL spectroscopy of rare-earth doped Ga-Ge-Te/Se glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Ya.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2016-04-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy was applied for the first time to study free-volume void evolution in chalcogenide glasses of Ga-Ge-Te/Se cut-section exemplified by glassy Ga10Ge15Te75 and Ga10Ge15Te72Se3 doped with 500 ppm of Tb3+ or Pr3+. The collected PAL spectra reconstructed within two-state trapping model reveal decaying tendency in positron trapping efficiency in these glasses under rare-earth doping. This effect results in unchanged or slightly increased defect-related lifetimes τ2 at the cost of more strong decrease in I2 intensities, as well as reduced positron trapping rate in defects and fraction of trapped positrons. Observed changes are ascribed to rare-earth activated elimination of intrinsic free volumes associated mainly with negatively-charged states of chalcogen atoms especially those neighboring with Ga-based polyhedrons.

  5. Preparation and up-conversion luminescence of 8 nm rare-earth doped fluoride nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirov, V K; Mortier, M; Gredin, P; Patriarche, G; Görller-Walrand, C; Moshchalkov, V V

    2008-09-15

    Free-standing, 8 nm diameter, rare-earth doped nanoparticles Re(10)Pb(25)F(65) have been prepared, where Re stands for either single rare-earth ion, such as Er(3+), Yb(3+), Eu(3+), Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Tm(3+) or combinations of those ions. The nanoparticles have been extracted by chemical etching from the oxyfluoride nano-glass-ceramics template and analyzed by transmission electron microscope with energy dispersion spectroscopy. The nanoparticles show durable up-conversion photoluminescence, which is neither concentration nor impurity quenched after 6 months ageing in ambient atmosphere. High doping levels in these nanoparticles ensure high, up to 15%, quantum yield of up-conversion luminescence. PMID:18794989

  6. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2-4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2~100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces.

  7. Nanophotonic coherent light–matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2–4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light–matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  8. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent (4)I(9/2)-(4)F(3/2) optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light-matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  9. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L.

    2013-03-18

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  10. Rare-earth-doped photonic crystals for the development of solid-state optical cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Adeva, Angel J.; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquín

    2009-02-01

    Optical cryocoolers made of luminescent solids are very promising for many applications in the fields of optical telecommunications, aerospace industry, bioimaging, and phototherapy. To the present day, researchers have employed a number of crystal and glass host materials doped with rare-earth ions (Yb3+, Tm3+, and Er3+) to yield anti-Stokes optical refrigeration. In these host materials, the attainable minimum temperature is limited by the average phonon energy of the lattice and the impurity concentration. However, recently Ruan and Kaviany have theoretically demonstrated that the cooling efficiency can be dramatically enhanced when the host material doped with rare-earth ions is ground into a powder made of sub-micron size grains. This is due to two facts: firstly, the phonon spectrum is modified due to finite size of the grains and, secondly, light localization effects increase the photon density, leading to an enhanced absorptivity. In the present work, we propose that using a photonic crystal doped with rare earth ions offers many advantages with regards to getting a larger cooling efficiency at room temperature when compared to standard bulk materials or nano-powders. Indeed, apart to analogous phenomena to the ones predicted in nano-crystalline powders, there is the possibility of directly controlling the spontaneous emission rate of the ions embedded in the structure and, also, the absorption rate in the Stokes side of the absorption band by adequately tuning the density of photonic states, thus obtaining a large improvement in the cooling efficiency.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of rare-earth-doped glasses: a step toward lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, R.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.; Gonzalo, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is used to produce Er-doped lead-niobium germanate (PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2) and fluorotellurite (TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2) thin film glasses. Films having high refractive index, low absorption and large transmission are obtained in a narrow processing window that depends on the actual PLD configuration (O2 pressure ˜a few Pa, Laser energy density ˜2-3 J cm-2 for the results presented in this work). However, Er-doped thin film glasses synthetized at room temperature using these experimental parameters show poor photoluminescence (PL) performance due to non-radiative decay channels, such as a large OH- concentration. Thermal annealing allows improving PL intensity and lifetime (τPL), the latter becoming close to that of the parent Er-doped bulk glass. In addition, the use of alternate PLD from host glass and rare-earth targets allows the synthesis of nanostructured thin film glasses with a controlled rare-earth concentration and in-depth distribution, as it is illustrated for Er-doped PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2 film glasses. In this case, PL intensity at 1.53 μm increases with the spacing between Er-doped layers to reach a maximum for a separation between Er-doped layers >= 5 nm, while τPL is close to the bulk value independently of the spacing. Finally, the comparison of these results with those obtained for films grown by standard PLD from Er-doped glass targets suggests that nanostructuration allows reducing rare-earth clustering and concentration quenching effects.

  12. Germanium and Rare Earth Element accumulation in woody bioenergy crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Germanium and REEs are strategic elements that are used for high tech devices and engineered systems, however these elements are hardly concentrated into mineable ore deposits. Since these elements occur widely dispersed in the earth crust with concentrations of several mgṡkg‑1 (Ge 1.6 mgṡkg‑1, Nd 25 mgṡkg‑1) a new possibility to gain these elements could be phytomining, a technique that uses plants to extract elements from soils via their roots. Since knowledge about accumulating plant species is quite limited we conducted research on the concentrations of strategic elements in wood and leaves of fast growing tree species (Salix spec., Populus spec., Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer pseudoplatanus). In total 35 study sites were selected in the mining affected area around Freiberg (Saxony, Germany), differing in their species composition and degree of contamination with toxic trace metals (Pb, As, Cd). On each site plant tissues (wood and leaves, respectively) of different species were sampled. In addition soil samples were taken from a soil depth of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. The aim of our work was to investigate correlations between the concentrations of the target elements in plant tissues and soil characteristics like pH, texture, nutrients and concentrations in six operationally defined soil fractions (mobile, acid soluble, oxidizable, amorphic oxides, crystalline oxides, residual or siliceous). Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and plant tissues were measured with ICP-MS. The element Nd was selected as representative for the group of REEs, since this element showed a high correlation with the concentrations of the other REE We found that the concentration of Nd in the leaves (0.31 mgṡkg‑1Nd) were several times higher than in herbaceous species (0.05 mgṡkg‑1 Nd). The concentration of Ge in leaves were ten times lower than that of Nd whereas in herbaceous species Nd and Ge were in equal magnitude. Within

  13. Numerical simulations of the optical gain of crystalline fiber doped by rare earth and transition ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoui, A. K.; Boubir, B.; Adouane, A.; Demagh, N.; Ghoumazi, M.

    2015-02-01

    A fiber laser is a laser whose gain medium is a doped fiber, although lasers whose cavity is made wholly of fibers have also been called fiber lasers. The gain media in a fiber laser is usually fiber doped with rare-earth ions, such as erbium (Er), neodymium (Nd), ytterbium (Yb), thulium (Tm), or praseodymium (Pr), which is doped into the core of the optical fiber, similar to those used to transmit telecommunications signals. Fiber lasers find many applications in materials processing, including cutting, welding, drilling, and marking metal. To maximize their market penetration, it is necessary to increase their output power. In this work, we present a detailed study based on the numerical simulation using MATLAB, of one of the principal characteristics of a fiber laser doped with rare earth ions and transition ion. The gain depends on several parameters such as the length of the doped fiber, the density, the pump power, noise, etc.). The used program resolves the state equations in this context together with those governing the light propagation phenomena. The developed code can also be used to study the dynamic operating modes of a doped fiber laser.

  14. High quality factor nanophotonic resonators in bulk rare-earth doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Tian; Rochman, Jake; Kindem, Jonathan M; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-11

    Numerous bulk crystalline materials exhibit attractive nonlinear and luminescent properties for classical and quantum optical applications. A chip-scale platform for high quality factor optical nanocavities in these materials will enable new optoelectronic devices and quantum light-matter interfaces. In this article, photonic crystal nanobeam resonators fabricated using focused ion beam milling in bulk insulators, such as rare-earth doped yttrium orthosilicate and yttrium vanadate, are demonstrated. Operation in the visible, near infrared, and telecom wavelengths with quality factors up to 27,000 and optical mode volumes close to one cubic wavelength is measured. These devices enable new nanolasers, on-chip quantum optical memories, single photon sources, and non-linear devices at low photon numbers based on rare-earth ions. The techniques are also applicable to other luminescent centers and crystal. PMID:26832284

  15. Trace elemental imaging of rare earth elements discriminates tissues at microscale in flat fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B; Cohen, Serge X; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies. PMID:24489809

  16. Trace Elemental Imaging of Rare Earth Elements Discriminates Tissues at Microscale in Flat Fossils

    PubMed Central

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B.; Cohen, Serge X.; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies. PMID:24489809

  17. Accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth elements (RE=La-Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Wentzcovitch, Renata

    2015-03-01

    We provide accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth (RE) elements with some suggested Hubbard U values allowing efficient plane-wave calculations. Solid state tests of generated datasets were performed on rare-earth nitrides. Through density of state (DOS) and equation of state (EoS) comparisons, generated datasets were shown to yield excellent results comparable to highly accurate all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local orbital (FLAPW+LO) calculations. Hubbard U values for trivalent RE ions are determined according to hybrid functional calculations. We believe that these new and open-source PAW datasets will allow further studies on rare-earth materials. NSF/EAR 1319361

  18. Preliminary study on using rare earth elements to trace non-point source phosphorous loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental fate of phosphorus (P) is of concern as P is a primary cause of freshwater eutrophication. Rare earth elements (REEs) have been successfully used in the analysis of soil erosion and pollutant sources, as well as in the analysis of mineral genesis. To better understand the potential...

  19. Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Involvement in Susceptibility of Bacillus subtilis to Rare Earth Elements

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    The rare earth element scandium has weak antibacterial potency. We identified a mutation responsible for a scandium-resistant phenotype in Bacillus subtilis. This mutation was found within the uppS gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase, and designated uppS86 (for the Thr-to-Ile amino acid substitution at residue 86 of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase). The uppS86 mutation also gave rise to increased resistance to bacitracin, which prevents cell wall synthesis by inhibiting the dephosphorylation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, in addition to enhanced amylase production. Conversely, overexpression of the wild-type uppS gene resulted in increased susceptibilities to both scandium and bacitracin. Moreover, the mutant lacking undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (BcrC) showed increased susceptibility to all rare earth elements tested. These results suggest that the accumulation of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate renders cells more susceptible to rare earth elements. The availability of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate may be an important determinant for susceptibility to rare earth elements, such as scandium. PMID:22904278

  20. Tracing sediment movement on semi-arid watershed using Rare Earth Elements 1988

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-tracer method employing rare earth elements (REE) was used to determine sediment yield and to track sediment movement in a small semiarid watershed. A 0.33 ha watershed near Tombstone, AZ was divided into five morphological units, each tagged with one of five REE oxides. Relative contributi...

  1. A LOW-COST RARE EARTH ELEMENTS RECOVERY TECHNOLOGY - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical Sciences, Inc., and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research propose to develop a unique enabling technology to significantly reduce U.S. dependency for Rare Earth Elements (REE) on foreign suppliers and our global competitors. Our innovation...

  2. Interactions between exogenous rare earth elements and phosphorus leaching in packed soil columns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rare earth elements (REEs) increasingly used in agriculture as an amendment for crop growth may help to lessen environmental losses of phosphorus (P) from heavily fertilized soils. The vertical transport characteristics of P and REEs, lanthanum (La), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), and cerium (Ce), w...

  3. SEDIMENT REWORKING AND TRANSPORT IN EASTERN LAKE SUPERIOR: IN SITU RARE EARTH ELEMENT TRACER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the prnfundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-...

  4. Catalytic Graphitization of Coal-Based Carbon Materials with Light Rare Earth Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongyan; Lu, Guimin; Qiao, Wenming; Yu, Jianguo

    2016-08-30

    The catalytic graphitization mechanism of coal-based carbon materials with light rare earth elements was investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interface between light rare earth elements and carbon materials was carefully observed, and two routes of rare earth elements catalyzing the carbon materials were found: dissolution-precipitation and carbide formation-decomposition. These two simultaneous processes certainly accelerate the catalytic graphitization of carbon materials, and light rare earth elements exert significant influence on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of graphite. Moreover, by virtue of praseodymium (Pr), it was found that a highly crystallographic orientation of graphite was induced and formed, which was reasonably attributed to the similar arrangements of the planes perpendicular to (001) in both graphite and Pr crystals. The interface between Pr and carbon was found to be an important factor for the orientation of graphite structure. PMID:27482724

  5. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-12 and RN-19, Reykjanes, Iceland

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-07-24

    Results for fluid rare earth elment analyses from Reykjanes wells RN-12 and RN-19. The data have not been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcetrated using chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using and Element magnetic sctor ICP-MS.

  6. Technical Information Resource on Rare Earth Elements Now Available to Public and Private Sector Stakeholders

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new EPA technical information resource, “Rare Earth Elements: A Review of Production, Processing, Recycling, and Associated Environmental Issues” has been produced as an introductory resource for those interested in learning more about REE mining and alternatives to meet demand...

  7. Studying the volatility of pyrazolone complexes of rare-earth elements by means of Knudsen effusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, N. M.; Petrov, B. I.; Bochkarev, L. N.; Safronova, A. V.; Abakumov, G. A.; Arapova, A. V.; Bessonova, Yu. A.

    2014-08-01

    The temperature dependences of the pressure of saturated vapor of pyrazolone complexes of rare-earth elements Ln(PMIP)3 (where Ln = Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu; PMIP = 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-isobutyryl-5-pyrazolone) are studied via Knudsen effusion, and the enthalpy of their sublimation is determined. Mass spectra and differential scanning calorimetry data are obtained.

  8. Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Vents

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-10-01

    Compilation of rare earth element and associated major and minor dissolved constituent analytical data for USA geothermal fields and global seafloor hydrothermal vents. Data is in original units. Reference to and use of this data should be attributed to the original authors and publications according to the provisions outlined therein.

  9. Evidence for interface superconductivity in rare-earth doped CaFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bing; Deng, L. Z.; Wei, F. Y.; Xue, Y. Y.; Chu, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    To unravel to the mysterious non-bulk superconductivity up to 49K observed in rare-earth (R =La, Ce, Pr and Nd) doped CaFe2As2 single-crystals whose Tc is higher than that of any known compounds consisting of one or more of its constituent elements of R, Ca, Fe, and As at ambient or under pressures, systematic magnetic, compositional and structural have carried out on different rare-earth-doped (Ca1-xRx) Fe2As2 samples. We have detected extremely large magnetic anisotropy, doping-level independent Tc, unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies and their close correlation with the superconducting volume fraction, the existence of mesoscopic-2D structures and Josephson-junction arrays in this system. These observations lead us to conjecture that the Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and thus provided evidence for the possible interface-enhanced Tc in naturally-grown single crystals of Fe-based superconductors.

  10. Experimental productivity rate optimization of rare earth element separation through preparative solid phase extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Max-Hansen, Mark; Jönsson, Christian; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2014-06-27

    Separating individual rare earth elements from a complex mixture with several elements is difficult and this is emphasized for the middle elements: Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium. In this study we have accomplished an overloaded one-step separation of these rare earth elements through preparative ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid impregnated column and nitric acid as eluent. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry unit was used for post column element detection. The main focus was to optimize the productivity rate, subject to a yield requirement of 80% and a purity requirement of 99% for each element, by varying the flow rate and batch load size. The optimal productivity rate in this study was 1.32kgSamarium/(hmcolumn(3)), 0.38kgEuropium/(hmcolumn(3)) and 0.81kgGadolinium/(hmcolumn(3)). PMID:24835593

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis, Microstructure and Photoluminescence of Eu3+-Doped Mixed Rare Earth Nano-Orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Eu3+-doped mixed rare earth orthophosphates (rare earth = La, Y, Gd) have been prepared by hydrothermal technology, whose crystal phase and microstructure both vary with the molar ratio of the mixed rare earth ions. For LaxY1–xPO4: Eu3+, the ion radius distinction between the La3+ and Y3+ is so large that only La0.9Y0.1PO4: Eu3+ shows the pure monoclinic phase. For LaxGd1–xPO4: Eu3+ system, with the increase in the La content, the crystal phase structure of the product changes from the hexagonal phase to the monoclinic phase and the microstructure of them changes from the nanorods to nanowires. Similarly, YxGd1–xPO4: Eu3+, Y0.1Gd0.9PO4: Eu3+ and Y0.5Gd0.5PO4: Eu3+ samples present the pure hexagonal phase and nanorods microstructure, while Y0.9Gd0.1PO4: Eu3+ exhibits the tetragonal phase and nanocubic micromorphology. The photoluminescence behaviors of Eu3+ in these hosts are strongly related to the nature of the host (composition, crystal phase and microstructure). PMID:21170409

  12. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  13. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1

  14. Thermoluminescence mechanism in rare-earth-doped magnesium tetra borate phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annalakshmi, O.; Jose, M. T.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Sridevi, J.; Venkatraman, B.; Amarendra, G.; Mandal, A. B.

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium tetra borate (MTB) doped with rare earths (REs) was prepared by the solid state sintering technique. Among the different RE dopants studied in this phosphor, gadolinium-doped phosphors resulted in a dosimetric peak at a relatively higher temperature. The thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra of RE-doped MTB showed characteristic RE 3+ emissions. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were carried out in these phosphors to identify the defect centers formed during gamma irradiation and to establish a mechanism for the TL process. Signals corresponding to (BO 3)2-, O v- were seen upon irradiation which vanished on annealing at 250 °C, showing the role of these centers in the TL process. The thermal activation energies calculated based on the decay of these signals matched well with those calculated on the basis of the usual conventional method showing the validity of the mechanism of TL.

  15. Modification of phonon processes in nanostructured rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Thomas; Veissier, Lucile; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Barclay, Paul E.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable or improve persistent spectral hole burning and coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and optical quantum memories. As an example, we discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the convenient telecommunication band and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y2SiO5 , a widely used material in current quantum memory research.

  16. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J., Jr.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  17. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  18. U.S. trade dispute with China over rare earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. government has brought a new trade case against China over rare earth elements (REE) as well as tungsten and molybdenum, President Barack Obama announced on 13 March. Japan and the European Union also have taken similar actions against China about REEs, which are a group of 17 chemically similar metallic elements that are used in a variety of electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic applications. REEs are plentiful in the Earth's crust, although China currently has about 37% of the world's reserves and accounts for more than 95% of the world's production of the elements, according to the British Geological Survey. The United States has requested consultations with China at the World Trade Organization (WTO) concerning "China's unfair export restraints on rare earths, as well as tungsten and molybdenum," the Office of the United States Trade Representative announced in a 13 March statement.

  19. Structure and distortion of lead fluoride nanocrystals in rare earth doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin; Zhao, Lijuan; Guo, Hui; Lan, Zijian; Chang, Lifen; Li, Yiming; Yu, Hua

    2013-10-28

    A series of rare earth (RE) doped oxyfluoride glasses with the composition of (45-x) SiO2-5Al2O3-40PbF2-10CdF2-xRe2O3 (x = 1, 5, 10, 15) (mol%) were prepared by a traditional melt-quenching method. Glass ceramics (GCs) were obtained after thermal treatment and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the nanocrystal structure and distortion. Both the dopant type and the doping level play an important role in the distortion of the PbF2-RE lattice. It is found that a cubic Pb3REF9 phase forms in low doping GCs, a tetragonal PbREF5 phase forms in middle doping GCs and cubic PbRE3F11 forms in high doping GCs. Accordingly, the site symmetry of RE(3+) dopants in β-PbF2 nanocrystal undergoes a transition of Oh···D4h···Oh with the increase of doping level. The change in the ligands coordinating the RE(3+) ions was further illustrated by the optical changes in Yb-doped GCs. This paper provides insights on the nanocrystal structure of RE at the atomic level and tries to make a complete description of the nanocrystal structure and distortion in these glass-ceramic materials, which will benefit the optimization of optical properties. PMID:24019159

  20. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2more » NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.« less

  1. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    A two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE-TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE-TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu-TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). The La(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+) and Er(3+) doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. We further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products. PMID:26400095

  2. Luminescence of Rare-Earth-Doped Nanoparticles with Aromatic Linker Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senty, Tess; Yalamanchi, Mohita; Zhang, Yanwei; Leach, Anya; Seehra, Mohindar; Shi, Xiaodong; Bristow, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Rare-earth-doped vanadate glasses retain their luminescence when formed as shells around magnetic cores [1]. This property has prompted speculation that composite magneto-photoluminescent (CMPL) structures can be used in biological applications. For example, CMPL nanoparticles can be magnetically tuned to separate cells, proteins and nucleic acids [2]. A crucial step in realizing this goal is to attach organic linkers (between the rare-earth-doped shell and bio-probes), which do not affect the luminescence. We demonstrate with IR spectroscopy that Eu:YVO4 nanoparticles treated with benzoic acid, 3-nitro 4-chloro-benzoic acid and 3,4-dimethoxy benzoic acid all result in the modification of the surface states, replacing the native metal-hydroxyl bond with a longer chain aromatic linker, which can be later functionalized. Photoluminescence spectra under UV-excitation show that the dominant ^5D0 -> ^7F2 transition at ˜620 nm is unaffected by the chemical treatment. The result provides a platform to facilitate the attachment of bio-probes to Eu:YVO4 nanoparticles and related CMPL nanostructures with Fe2O4 cores. [1] N. B. McDowell et al, J. Appl. Phys. 107, 09B327 (2010). [2] T. R. Sathe et al, Anal. Chem. 78, 5627 (2006).

  3. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium. PMID:26739864

  4. Uranium and rare earth elements in CO 2-rich waters from Vals-les-Bains (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michard, Annie; Beaucaire, Catherine; Michard, Gil

    1987-04-01

    Waters from springs at Vals-les-Bains result from the mixing of a CO 2-rich, highly mineralized water with dilute, shallow subsurface water. Total content of dissolved species vary from 5 mmol/1 to 100 mmol/1. For many elements, mixing of these waters is non-linear (non-conservative) and further water-rock reactions take place. The pH is controlled by CO 2 outgassing, redox conditions are controlled by both the iron hydroxide-siderite buffer and the introduction of oxygen with shallow subsurface waters. Among the major elements, concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, are related to mixing, CO 2 outgassing and carbonate precipitation. Uranium shows a complex behaviour controlled by carbonate complexing, redox conditions, mixing of waters and leaching from the rocks. The 234U /238U activity ratio is near secular equilibrium. In the more dilute waters, dissolved rare earth element (REE) patterns are almost flat with a slight negative Eu anomaly. In the concentrated waters, heavy rare earth elements (Gd-Yb, HREE) are strongly enriched relative to light rare earth elements (Ce-Eu, LREE). We relate the enrichment in HREE to water chemistry and to complexing with carbonate species.

  5. A Study on Removal of Rare Earth Elements from U.S. Coal Byproducts by Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelle, Peter L.; Khadilkar, Aditi B.; Pulati, Nuerxida; Soundarrajan, Nari; Klima, Mark S.; Mosser, Morgan M.; Miller, Charles E.; Pisupati, Sarma V.

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth elements are known to occur in low concentrations in U.S. coals and coal byproducts. These low concentrations may make rare earth element recovery from these materials unattractive, using only physical separation techniques. However, given the significant production of rare earths through ion exchange extraction in China, two U.S. coal byproducts were examined for ion extraction, using ammonium sulfate, an ionic liquid, and a deep eutectic solvent as lixiviants. Extraction of rare earth elements in each case produced high recoveries of rare earth elements to the solution. This suggests that in at least the cases of the materials examined, U.S. coal byproducts may be technically suitable as REE ores. More work is required to establish economic suitability.

  6. Defect association mediated ionic conductivity of rare earth doped nanoceria: Dependency on ionic radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirban, Sk.; Sinha, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Dutta, A.

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth doped nanoceria Ce0.9RE0.1O1.95 (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu and Gd) were prepared through citrate auto-ignition method. The single phase cubic fluorite structure with space group Fm3 ¯m of the compositions were confirmed from Rietveld analysis of XRD data. The particle size of the compositions were in the range 49.77 nm to 66.20 nm. An ionic radius dependent lattice parameter variation was found. The DC conductivity of each composition was evaluated using Random Barrier Model. The conductivity decreased and activation energy increased with increasing ionic radius from Gd to Pr doping due to the size mismatch with host ions and formation of stable defect associate. The formation of different defect associates and their correlation with ionic conductivity has been discussed.

  7. Crystallization studies on rare-earth co-doped fluorozirconate-based glasses

    PubMed Central

    Paßlick, C.; Johnson, J.A.; Schweizer, S.

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the structural changes of barium chloride (BaCl2) nanoparticles in fluorochlorozirconate-based glass ceramics when doped with two different luminescent activators, in this case rare-earth (RE) ions, and thermally processed using a differential scanning calorimeter. In a first step, only europium in its divalent and trivalent oxidation states, Eu2+ and Eu3+, is investigated, which shows no significant influence on the crystallization of hexagonal phase BaCl2. However, higher amounts of Eu2+ increase the activation energy of the phase transition to an orthorhombic crystal structure. In a second step, nucleation and nanocrystal growth are influenced by changing the structural environment of the glasses by co-doping with Eu2+ and trivalent Gd3+, Nd3+, Yb3+, or Tb3+, due to the different atomic radii and electro-negativity of the co-dopants. PMID:23745010

  8. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-03-15

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  9. Extraction of rare-earth elements from nitric solutions by phosphoryl-containing podands

    SciTech Connect

    Turanov, A.N.; Karandashev, V.K.; Baulin, V.E.

    1999-11-01

    The extraction of microquantities of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y from HNO{sub 3} solutions by phosphoryl-containing podands of various structures has been studied.. It has been found that the maximum extraction of rare earth elements is exhibited by reagents containing one ether oxygen atom in the molecule, bound to diphenylphosphoryl or ditolylphosphoryl groups by methylene and o-phenylene fragments. The structure of these reagents is best suited for the polydentate coordination of the ligand and the conditions of a chelate complex formation. The effect of HNO{sub 3} concentration in the aqueous phase and that of the nature of an organic diluent on the extraction of rare earth elements and Y are considered. Stoichiometric of the extracted complexes has been determined and the extraction constants calculated.

  10. Strongly luminescent rare-earth-ion-doped DNA-CTMA complex film and fiber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ishihara, Koki; Izumi, H.; Wada, M.; Zhang, Gongjian; Ishikawa, T.; Watanabe, A.; Horinouchi, Suguru; Ogata, Naoya

    2002-08-01

    A rare-earth chelate, Europium 6,6.7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5,-octanedionate, (Eu3+-FOD) doped DNACTMA complex as fiber and film materials was prepared by casting solution method and gel-spinning method. The Eu-FOD-DNA-CTMA complex was luminescent and has 750 μs of fluorescence lifetime, sharply-spiked emission spectra, excellent film and fiber formability, moderate absorption (40000M-1cm-1) at 327 nm and high quantum yield forlanthanide emission. By comparison of fluorescence lifetime of Eu-FOD doped DNA-CTMA solid matrix with that of Eu-FOD doped in PMMA, it was clear that energy transfer from DNA to FOD leads to enhancement of fluorescence emission at 613 nm. Analysis results for fluorescence spectra and fluorescence relaxation time of Eu3+ doped in the materials indicated that Eu3+-FOD is chemically bond within the DNA-CTMA matrix. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at 612 nm by pumping with UV laser (355 nm) was observed in the materials. Fluorescence lifetime of the Eu-FOD doped in the DNA-CTMA solid matrix was evaluated to be 750 μs, which is ca. 230μs longer than that of Eu-FOD doped in PMMA solid matrix. Efficient Energy transfer from base of DNA to FOD, then to Eu, occurred when irradiated by UV light or 355 laser beams.

  11. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements and other trace elements in the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael; Dantas, Elton Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Rivers transport large amounts of dissolved and suspended particulate material from the catchment area to the oceans and are a major source of trace metals to seawater. The Amazon River is the world's largest river and supplies approximately 20% of the oceans' freshwater (Molinier et al., 1997). However, the behavior of trace elements, especially particle-reactive elements such as the rare earth elements (REE), within the river as well as in the estuary is not well constrained and rather little is known about their transport mechanisms. This study aims at understanding the transport properties of particle-reactive elements in the Amazon River and some of its major tributaries, including the Rio Solimões, Rio Negro, Tapajos, Xingu and Jari Rivers. Samples were taken at 12 stations, seven of which were located in the Amazon mainstream, while the other five stations sampled its tributaries. To account for the effects of variable discharge, the samples were collected during periods of high and low discharge. We present data for major and trace elements, including REE, of the dissolved and suspended load of these samples. First results indicate that the shale-normalized REE pattern of the dissolved load (filtered through 0.2 µm membranes) of the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões confirm earlier studies (Elderfield et al., 1990; Gerard et al., 2003) and show an enrichment of the middle REE relative to the light and heavy REE (LaSN/GdSN: 0.25 - 0.32; GdSN/YbSN: 1.54 - 1.78). In contrast to the Amazon mainstream and the Rio Solimões, which are considered to be whitewater rivers, blackwater rivers, such as the Rio Negro, have a flat REE pattern with higher REE concentrations than whitewater rivers. The third water-type found in the Amazon Basin is clearwater, e.g. Rio Tapajos, with REE patterns in between those of the other two types, i.e. LaSN/GdSN: 0.55 - 0.70; GdSN/YbSN: 1.26 - 1.55. A similar behavior can be identified for other major and trace elements. While

  12. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  13. Transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles in response to thunderstorm runoff.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, G; Ketterer, M E; Wilson, C G; Layman, R; Whiting, P J

    2001-08-15

    The downslope transport of rare earth element-tagged soil particles remobilized during a spring thunderstorm was studied on both a natural prairie and an agricultural field in southwestern Iowa (U.S.A.). A technique was developed for tagging natural soils with the rare earth elements Eu, Tb, and Ho to approximately 1,000 ppm via coprecipitation with MnO2. Tagged material was replaced in target locations; surficial soil samples were collected following precipitation and runoff; and rare earth element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Diffusion and exponential models were applied to the concentration-distance data to determine particle transport distances. The results indicate that the concentration-distance data are well described by the diffusion model, butthe exponential model does not simulate the rapid drop-off in concentrations near the tagged source. Using the diffusion model, calculated particle transport distances at all hillside locations and at both the cultivated and natural prairie sites were short, ranging from 3 to 73 cm during this single runoff event. This study successfully demonstrates a new tool for studying soil erosion. PMID:11529577

  14. Evaluating rare earth element availability: a case with revolutionary demand from clean technologies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elisa; Sherman, Andrew M; Wallington, Timothy J; Everson, Mark P; Field, Frank R; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-03-20

    The future availability of rare earth elements (REEs) is of concern due to monopolistic supply conditions, environmentally unsustainable mining practices, and rapid demand growth. We present an evaluation of potential future demand scenarios for REEs with a focus on the issue of comining. Many assumptions were made to simplify the analysis, but the scenarios identify some key variables that could affect future rare earth markets and market behavior. Increased use of wind energy and electric vehicles are key elements of a more sustainable future. However, since present technologies for electric vehicles and wind turbines rely heavily on dysprosium (Dy) and neodymium (Nd), in rare-earth magnets, future adoption of these technologies may result in large and disproportionate increases in the demand for these two elements. For this study, upper and lower bound usage projections for REE in these applications were developed to evaluate the state of future REE supply availability. In the absence of efficient reuse and recycling or the development of technologies which use lower amounts of Dy and Nd, following a path consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO(2) at 450 ppm may lead to an increase of more than 700% and 2600% for Nd and Dy, respectively, over the next 25 years if the present REE needs in automotive and wind applications are representative of future needs. PMID:22304002

  15. Hydrometallurgical separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from spent nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    The separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. Analysis of the internal content of the NiMH batteries shows that nickel is the main metal present in the residue (around 50% in weight), as well as potassium (2.2-10.9%), cobalt (5.1-5.5%), rare earth elements (15.3-29.0%) and cadmium (2.8%). The presence of cadmium reveals that some Ni-Cd batteries are possibly labeled as NiMH ones. The leaching of nickel and cobalt from the NiMH battery powder with sulfuric acid is efficient; operating variables temperature and concentration of H 2O 2 has no significant effect for the conditions studied. A mixture of rare earth elements is separated by precipitation with NaOH. Finally, solvent extraction with D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) followed by Cyanex 272 (bis-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid) can separate cadmium, cobalt and nickel from the leach liquor. The effect of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps are discussed aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes.

  16. Chalcogenide glasses for infrared applications: New synthesis routes and rare earth doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Mathieu

    shift the optical band gap toward higher wavelengths. A systematic ceramization study emphasizes the difficulty of controlling the crystallization for glasses in the systems GeSe2-Ga2Se3-In2Se 3 and GeSe2-Ga2Se3-PbSe. No crystallization of the In2Se3 and PbSe crystalline phase was obtained. Finally, the possibility of producing rare-earth doped 80GeSe2 -20Ga2Se3 glass-ceramics transparent in the infrared region up to 16 microm is demonstrated. Enhanced photoluminescence intensity and reduced radiative lifetimes are observed with increased crystallinity in these materials.

  17. Electronic structures and magnetic properties of rare-earth-atom-doped BNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Juan; Zhang, Ning-Chao; Wang, Peng; Ning, Chao; Zhang, Hong; Peng, Xiao-Juan

    2016-04-01

    Stable geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties of (8,0) and (4,4) single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNTs) doped with rare-earth (RE) atoms are investigated using the first-principles pseudopotential plane wave method with density functional theory (DFT). The results show that these RE atoms can be effectively doped in BNNTs with favorable energies. Because of the curvature effect, the values of binding energy for RE-atom-doped (4,4) BNNTs are larger than those of the same atoms on (8,0) BNNTs. Electron transfer between RE-5 d, 6 s, and B-2 p, N-2 p orbitals was also observed. Furthermore, electronic structures and magnetic properties of BNNTs can be modified by such doping. The results show that the adsorption of Ce, Pm, Sm, and Eu atoms can induce magnetization, while no magnetism is observed when BNNTs are doped with La. These results are useful for spintronics applications and for developing magnetic nanostructures.

  18. An alternative experimental approach to produce rare-earth-doped SiOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped silicon-oxide (SiOx) films were prepared by sputtering a combined Si + RE2O3 target with argon ions. The study comprised the neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm) rare-earth species and the Si + RE2O3 targets were obtained by partially covering a solid disc of Si with area-defined thin layers of Nd2O3 or Sm2O3 powders. The films were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray, Raman scattering, optical transmission, and photo-luminescence measurements. According to the experimental results, in the as-deposited form, the films were amorphous and presented RE and oxygen concentrations that scaled with the RE2O3 target area. Additional compositional-structural changes were obtained by thermal annealing the films under a flow of oxygen. Within these changes, one can mention: increase of oxygen concentration, optical bandgap widening, partial Si crystallization, and the development of RE-related light emission. The main aspects associated to the production and structural-optical properties of the films, as determined either by the deposition conditions or by the annealing treatments, are presented and discussed in detail.

  19. Luminescence studies of rare earth doped yttrium gadolinium mixed oxide phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S.; Choubey, A.; Sharma, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of gamma ray induced rare earth doped yttrium gadolinium mixed oxide phosphor. The europium (Eu3+) was used as rare earth dopant. The phosphor was prepared by chemical co-precipitation method according to the formula (Y2-x-yGdx) O3: Euy3+ (x=0.5; y=0.05). The photoluminescence emission spectrum of the prepared phosphor shows intense peaks in the red region at 615 nm for 5D0→7F2 transitions and the photoluminescence excitation spectra show a broad band located around 220-270 nm for the emission wavelength fixed at 615 nm. The thermoluminescence studies were carried out after irradiating the phosphor by gamma rays in the dose range from 100 Gy to 1 KGy. In the thermoluminescence glow curves, one single peak was observed at about 300 °C of which the intensity increases linearly in the studied dose range of gamma rays. The glow peak was deconvoluted by GlowFit program and the kinetic parameters associated with the deconvoluted peaks were calculated. The kinetic parameters were also calculated by various glow curve shape and heating rate methods.

  20. Catholuminescence properties of rare earth doped CaSnO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Canimoglu, A; Garcia-Guinea, J; Karabulut, Y; Ayvacikli, M; Jorge, A; Can, N

    2015-05-01

    The present study describes cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of CaSnO3 phosphors doped with Eu(3+), Tb(3+) and Dy(3+) synthesized by a solid-state method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm that CaSnO3 sintered at 1200°C exhibits orthorhombic structure. The evidence and rationale for two strong broad emission bands appeared at 360 and 780nm for undoped CaSnO3 are presented. The CL measurements exhibit that the 4f-4f emissions from (5)D4→(7)F6 (490nm), (5)D4 →(7)F5 (544nm), (5)D4 →(7)F4 (586nm) and (5)D4 →(7)F3 (622nm), assigned to possible transitions of Tb(3+) ions are seen. The strongest one, observed at 544nm, due to its probability of both magnetic and electric transitions make the sample emission green. Emissions at 480, 574, 662 and 755nm were detected for the CaSnO3:Dy(3+) and attributed to the transitions from the (4)F9/2 to various energy levels (6)H15/2, (6)H13/2, (6)H11/2 and (6)H9/2+(6)F11/2 of Dy(3+), respectively. CL spectra of Eu doped CaSnO3 reveal that there is a strong emission peak appeared at 615nm due to the electric dipole transition (5)D0→(7)F2 (red). Finally, our results show that the rare earth doped CaSnO3 have remarkable potential for applications as optical materials since it exhibits efficient and sharp emission due to rare earth ions. PMID:25766113

  1. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Fox, Dr. Richard V; Miziolek, Andrzej W; DeLucia, Frank C; Andre, Nicolas O

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in real-world complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  2. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Madhavi Z; Fox, Dr. Richard V; Miziolek, Andrzej W; DeLucia, Frank C; Andre, Nicolas O

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  3. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 104 mg·kg-1 with an average value of 4.67 × 103 mg·kg-1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg-1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind.

  4. Spectral analysis of rare earth elements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Fox, Robert V.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.; DeLucia, Frank C.; André, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  5. Spectral Analysis of Rare Earth Elements using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavi Z. Martin; Robert V. Fox; Andrzej W. Miziolek; Frank C. DeLucia, Jr.; Nicolas Andre

    2001-05-01

    There is growing interest in rapid analysis of rare earth elements (REEs) both due to the need to find new natural sources to satisfy increased demand in their use in various electronic devices, as well as the fact that they are used to estimate actinide masses for nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) appears to be a particularly well-suited spectroscopy-based technology to rapidly and accurately analyze the REEs in various matrices at low concentration levels (parts-per-million). Although LIBS spectra of REEs have been reported for a number of years, further work is still necessary in order to be able to quantify the concentrations of various REEs in realworld complex samples. LIBS offers advantages over conventional solution-based radiochemistry in terms of cost, analytical turnaround, waste generation, personnel dose, and contamination risk. Rare earth elements of commercial interest are found in the following three matrix groups: 1) raw ores and unrefined materials, 2) as components in refined products such as magnets, lighting phosphors, consumer electronics (which are mostly magnets and phosphors), catalysts, batteries, etc., and 3) waste/recyclable materials (aka e-waste). LIBS spectra for REEs such as Gd, Nd, and Sm found in rare earth magnets are presented.

  6. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China's largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 10(4) mg·kg(-1) with an average value of 4.67 × 10(3) mg·kg(-1), which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg(-1)). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N) and Gd(N)/Yb(N)). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind. PMID:26198417

  7. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65 × 104 mg·kg−1 with an average value of 4.67 × 103 mg·kg−1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181 mg·kg−1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind. PMID:26198417

  8. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A

    2014-05-15

    This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y0.95Eu0.05)2O3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19) and the Blue phosphor (Ba0.9Eu0.1MgAl10O17) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications. PMID:24681591

  9. Influence of rare-earth elements doping on thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanhu Wang, Chunlei; Su, Wenbin; Liu, Jian; Li, Jichao; Zhang, Xinhua; Mei, Liangmo

    2015-05-15

    Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, Sm, Eu, Ho, and Yb) have been synthesized by the solid state reaction method. Samples with relative densities all over 96% have been obtained. Thermoelectric properties are evaluated between 300 and 1000 K. The electrical resistivity shows a typical metal-like conductivity behavior, and at high temperature, 973 K, decreases from 36.1 mΩ cm for Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} to 8.6 mΩ cm for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3}. Both the absolute values of Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity are reduced by the introduction of second rare-earth element. The highest power factor of 415 μW/(K{sup 2}m) is obtained for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} sample, resulting in the highest dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) 0.25 at 973 K. This value shows an improvement of 144% compared with that of Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} ceramics at the same temperature. - Graphical abstract: The Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, …, Yb) were prepared by solid state reaction. Highest ZT value obtained is 0.25 at 973 K for Re=Yb, which shows 144% improvement compared with Ca{sub 0.98}Dy{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Re{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} (Re=La, Pr, …, Yb) are produced by solid state reaction. • Lowest resistivity is obtained due to the highest carrier mobility for Re=Yb. • Highest power factor obtained is 415 μW/(K{sup 2}m) at 973 K for Re=Yb. • Highest ZT value obtained is 0.25 at 973 K for Ca{sub 0.96}Dy{sub 0.02}Yb{sub 0.02}MnO{sub 3} sample.

  10. Electronic structure of rare-earth doped SrFBiS2 superconductors from photoemission spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Jha, Rajveer; Awana, V. P. S.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure study of the Rare Earth (La, Ce) doped SrFBiS2 superconductors using valence band photoemission in conjugation with the band structure calculations have been presented. The spectral features shift towards higher binding energy, consistent with the electron doping, for the doped compounds. An enhanced metallicity in addition to the shift in the Fermi level towards the conduction band occurs for the Rare Earth (RE) doped compounds. Further, the degeneracy of bands along X-M direction at valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) is lifted due to RE doping. An enhanced spectral weight near EF accompanied by a decrease in density of states at higher binding energy occurs for the doped compounds. This unusual spectral weight shift is substantiated by the change in Fermi surface topology and reduced distortion of Bi-S plane for the doped compounds.

  11. Investigation of recovery and recycling of rare earth elements from waste fluorescent lamp phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduafo, Patrick Max

    Characterization techniques and experimental measurements were used to evaluate a process for recycling rare earth elements (REEs) from spent fluorescent lamp phosphors. QEMSCAN analysis revealed that over 60% of the rare earth bearing minerals was less than 10 microm. A representative sample of the as-received feed contained 14.59 wt% total rare earth elements (TREE) and upon sieving to below 75 microm, the grade increased to 19.60 wt% REE with 98.75% recovery. Based on experimental work, a new process for extracting the chief REEs from end of life fluorescent lamps has been developed. The proposed flowsheet employs a three-stage leaching and precipitation process for selective extraction and recovery of the REEs. Hydrochloric acid was used as lixiviant in batch leach experiments on the phosphor powder. The maximum extraction obtained was 100% for both yttrium and europium under the following leaching conditions: 2.5 M HCl, 70°C, 1 hour, 180 g/L and 600 rpm. However, the solubility of cerium, lanthanum and terbium remained low at these conditions. Kinetic data of the leaching of yttrium and europium showed best fit to the logarithmic rate expression of the empirical model of leaching. Activation energy was calculated to be 77.49 kJ/mol for Y and 72.75 kJ/mol for Eu in the temperature range of 298 to 343 K. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least 50% excess the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is needed to recover yttrium and europium efficiently to produce a pure (Y, Eu) mixed oxide. Total recovery of the REEs was achieved even at very low pH or without any base added. Over 99% pure mixed rare earth oxide at 99% recovery has been attained. An economic assessment of the developed process using operating and capital cost have be undertaken and based on the analysis of the three economic scenarios, two are economic and one is non-economic.

  12. Effect of temperature and rare-earth doping on charge-carrier mobility in indium-monoselenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdinov, A. Sh.; Babayeva, R. F.; Amirova, S. I.; Rzayev, R. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the temperature range T = 77-600 K, the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility ({mu}) on the initial dark resistivity is experimentally investigated at 77 K ({rho}d{sub 0}), as well as on the temperature and the level (N) of rare-earth doping with such elements as gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), and dysprosium (Dy) in n-type indium-monoselenide (InSe) crystals. It is established that the anomalous behavior of the dependences {mu}(T), {mu}({rho}d{sub 0}), and {mu}(N) found from the viewpoint of the theory of charge-carrier mobility in crystalline semiconductors is related, first of all, to partial disorder in indium-monoselenide crystals and can be attributed to the presence of random drift barriers in the free energy bands.

  13. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  14. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  15. Birefringence and polarization rotator induced by electromagnetically induced transparency in rare earth ion-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhixiang; Liu, Jianji; Yu, Ping; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-05-01

    The birefringence induced by the electromagnetically induced transparency effect in a {Pr}^{3+}:{Y}_2 {SiO}_5 crystal was studied by using a balanced polarimeter technique. The results show that it is possible to control the polarization state of the output probe beam by adjusting the experimental conditions. Particularly, the coherently prepared {Pr}^{3+}:{Y}_2 {SiO}_5 crystal can serve as a polarization rotator for a linearly polarized input probe beam at the two-photon resonant condition. Such coherent control on the polarization of light should be useful for polarization-based classical and quantum information processing such as all-optical switching, polarization preserving light pulse memory and polarization qubits based on rare earth ion-doped solids.

  16. Improving the intensity and efficiency of compressed echo in rare-earth-ion-doped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-Rong, Ma; Yu-Qing, Liang; Song, Wang; Shuang-Gen, Zhang; Yun-Long, Shan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the intensity and efficiency of a compressed echo, which is important in arbitrary waveform generation (AWG). A new model of compressed echo is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations, which exposes much more detailed parameters than the conventional model, such as the time delay of the chirp lasers, the nature of the rare-earth-ion-doped crystal, etc. According to the novel model of compressed echo, we find that reducing the time delay of the chirp lasers and scanning the lasers around the center frequency of the inhomogeneously broadened spectrum, while utilizing a crystal with larger coherence time and excitation lifetime can improve the compressed echo’s intensity and efficiency. The theoretical analysis is validated by numerical simulations. Project supported by Special Funds for Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Tianjin, China (Grant No. 10FDZDGX00400) and the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCQNJC01100).

  17. Measurements of defect structures by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of the tellurite glass TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 doped with ions of rare earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golis, E.; Yousef, El. S.; Reben, M.; Kotynia, K.; Filipecki, J.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was the structural analysis of the TeO2-P2O5-ZnO-LiNbO3 tellurite glasses doped with ions of the rare-earth elements: Er3+, Nd3+ and Gd3+ based on the PALS (Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy) method of measuring positron lifetimes. Values of positron lifetimes and the corresponding intensities may be connected with the sizes and number of structural defects, such as vacancies, mono-vacancies, dislocations or pores, the sizes of which range from a few angstroms to a few dozen nanometres. Experimental positron lifetime spectrum revealed existence of two positron lifetime components τ1 and τ2. Their interpretation was based on two-state positron trapping model where the physical parameters are the annihilation velocity and positron trapping rate.

  18. Energy Transfer in Rare Earth Ion Clusters and Fluorescence from Rare Earth Doped LANTHANUM(1.85)STRONTIUM(0.15)COPPER -OXYGEN(4) Superconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissue, Brian Max

    1988-12-01

    Laser spectroscopy of rare earth ions in solids was used to study mechanisms of non-resonant energy transfer within rare earth clusters, and to detect insulating, impurity phases in rare earth doped La_{1.85 }Sr_{0.15}CuO _4 superconductors. The mechanisms of phonon-assisted, non-resonant energy transfer were studied in well-defined dimer sites in Er^{3+ }:SrF_2 and Pr ^{3+}:CaF_2. Application of a magnetic field to Er^{3+} :SrF_2 greatly increased the energy transfer rate. The magnetic field dependence in Er^{3+}:SrF _2 indicates that the mechanism of non-resonant energy transfer is a two-phonon, resonant process (Orbach process). Application of a magnetic field to Pr ^{3+}:CaF_2 had no effect on the energy transfer rate because no significant Zeeman splittings occurred. The temperature dependence of the energy transfer rate in Pr^{3+ }:CaF_2 showed the mechanism to be a one-phonon-assisted process at low temperatures and predominantly an Orbach process above 10 K. In the second part of this thesis, laser spectroscopy of a Eu ^{3+} probe ion is developed to detect impurity phases in La_{1.85 }Sr_{0.15}CuO _4 superconductors. Two impurity phases were found in polycrystalline La_ {1.85}Sr_{0.15} CuO_4: unreacted La _2O_3 starting material, and a La-silicate phase, which formed from contamination during sintering. The spectroscopic technique was found to be more than 100 times more sensitive than powder x -ray diffraction to detect minor impurity phases. In preparing the superconductors, several studies were made on the effect of Pr^{3+}, Eu ^{3+}, Bi^{3+ }, and fluorine dopants on the superconducting properties of La_{1.85}Sr _{0.15}CuO_4 and La_2Cuo_4 . Pr^{3+}, Eu ^{3+}, Bi^ {3+}, and F_2 doping all decreased the superconductivity in La_ {1.85}Sr^{0.15} CuO_4. Treating semi-conducting La_2CuO_4 in F_2 gas converted it to a superconductor with an onset T_{rm c} of 30-35 K.

  19. Effects of Rare Earth Elements on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of HVOF-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Jia, Qiang; Chen, Hui; Tu, Mingjing

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nanostructured, and rare earth CeO2-doped WC-12Co powders were sprayed by using HVOF spraying technology. Microstructure, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness of the three coatings were investigated. The results showed that nanostructured WC-12Co coatings possessed the densest microstructure and excellent combination of strength and toughness. The WC particles with the size ranging from 50 to 500 nm distributed uniformly in the nanostructured WC-12Co coating. The average free path of Co matrix in rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating was shorter than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. XRD results showed no obvious decarburization in all three coatings. The addition of rare earth could improve the mechanical properties of the coating compared with that without rare earth. The hardness value of nanostructured WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa) was similar to that of rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa), which was 15.1% higher than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. The elastic modulus and fracture toughness of nanostructured WC-12Co coating were the highest, and that of conventional WC-12Co coating was the lowest.

  20. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  1. Bishop tuff revisited: new rare Earth element data consistent with crystal fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, K L

    1984-06-22

    The Bishop Tuff of eastern California is the type example of a high-silica rhyolite that, according to Hildreth, supposedly evolved by liquid-state differentiation. New analyses establish that the Bishop Tuff "earlyllate" rare earth element trend reported by Hildreth mimics the relations between groundmass glasses and whole rocks for allanite-bearing pumice. Differences in elemental concentrations between whole rock and groundmass are the result of phenocryst precipitation; thus the data of Hildreth are precisely those expected to result from crystal fractionation. PMID:17837193

  2. Magneto-Optical Studies of Rare Earth Doped III-V Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Woodward, Nathaniel; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Dierolf, Volkmar; Jiang, H. X.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the site selective optical and magneto-optical properties of Neodymium doped Gallium and Aluminum Nitride and Erbium doped Gallium Nitride. For our current study, we applied magnetic fields parallel and antiparallel to the C-axis of the crystals and observed the resulting Zeeman splitting both in excitation and emission transitions. On the basis of these measurements, we determined the effective g-factors of all the states involved in the Nd^3+ transitions. For erbium doping, we observed the Zeeman splitting of the ^4I13/2 and ^4I15/2 levels. Due to small crystal field splitting and large Zeeman splitting, the assignment of levels and corresponding g-factors is very complex. In addition, we observed unexpected asymmetries in the emission intensities when we compared the spectra obtained for fields parallel and antiparallel to the growth direction. The degree of this asymmetry depends on the substrate material and is unambiguously related to the strain and resulting internal fields that are induced by lattice mismatch. The asymmetry behavior parallels the ferromagnetic behavior that is induced by the rare earth ions in GaN and hence our observation suggests that magnetization can be controlled by strain.

  3. Rare-earth-ion-doped waveguide lasers on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollnau, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth-ion-doped materials are of high interest as amplifiers and lasers in integrated optics. Their longer excited-state lifetimes and the weaker refractive-index change accompanied with rare-earth-ion excitation compared to electron-hole pairs in III-V semiconductors provide spatially and temporally stable optical gain, allowing for high-speed amplification and narrow-linewidth lasers. Amorphous Al2O3 deposited onto thermally oxidized silicon wafers offers the advantage of integration with silicon photonics and electronics. Layer deposition by RF reactive co-sputtering and micro-structuring by chlorine-based reactive-ion etching provide low-loss channel waveguides. With erbium doping, we improved the gain to 2 dB/cm at 1533 nm and a gain bandwidth of 80 nm. The gain is limited by migration-accelerated energy-transfer upconversion and a fast quenching process. Since stimulated emission is even faster than this quenching process, lasers are only affected in terms of their threshold, allowing us to demonstrate diode-pumped micro-ring, distributed-feedback (DFB), and distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) lasers in Al2O3:Er3+ and Al2O3:Yb3+ on a silicon chip. Surface-relief Bragg gratings were patterned by laser-interference lithography. Monolithic DFB and DBR cavities with Q-factors of 1.35×106 were realized. In an Er-doped DFB laser, single-longitudinal-mode operation at 1545 nm was achieved with a linewidth of 1.7 kHz, corresponding to a laser Q-factor of 1.14×1011. Yb-doped DFB and DBR lasers were demonstrated at 1020 nm with output powers of 55 mW and a slope efficiency of 67% versus launched pump power. A dual-phaseshift, dual-wavelength laser was achieved and a stable microwave signal at ~15 GHz was created via the heterodyne photo-detection of the two laser wavelengths.

  4. Dielectric Properties of Rare-Earth-Oxide-Doped BaTiO3 Ceramics Fired in Reducing Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, Yoshikazu; Shizuno, Hisamitsu; Kusumi, Shinya; Kishi, Hiroshi

    1994-09-01

    In order to gain an understanding of highly reliable electrical characteristics for the Ho-doped multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes, dielectric properties of various rare-earth-oxide-doped BaTiO3 ceramics were studied. The smaller ionic radius rare-earth-oxide (Dy, Ho, Er)-doped samples showed lower resistivity in reducing atmosphere, but higher resistivity in oxidizing atmosphere at the cooling stage, compared with the larger-ion (La, Sm, Gd)-doped samples. Multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes using the smaller-ion-doped materials showed smaller aging rate and longer lifetime. We developed Ni-electrode MLCs with X7R specification as 1 µ F in the 2125 type.

  5. Rare earth elements geochemistry in springs from Taftan geothermal area SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Ata; Ghoreyshinia, Sayedkazem; Mehrabi, Behzad; Delavari, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) were determined in springs and andesitic-dacitic rocks of Taftan geothermal field. Hydrochemical results of major ions indicate that thermal springs are Na-SO4-Cl and Ca-SO4-Cl types. Concentrations of REEs are in ranges of 10- 4 to 1.2 and 49 to ~ 62 times of chondrite for springwater and rock samples, respectively. The thermal (STS and TTS) and the cold (APS) springs with low pH values exhibit a very high REE contents (0.64 to 3.15 mg/l). Saturation index indicates that Fe and Al phases can control dissolved REE concentration in FTS and PF cold springs. The speciation of REE complexes indicates dominant presence of LnSO4+ and free ion in the Taftan thermal springs. In APS cold spring with pH ~ 4, fluoride complexes are dominate over the free ion and sulfate species, while in PF and FTS cold springs with pH 6.4 and 7, respectively, carbonate complexes (LnCO3+) are predominant species. Chondrite-normalized pattern for the low-pH waters show very distinctive gull-wing patterns, characteristic feature of acid-sulfate geothermal systems, and are similar to those of the host rocks. Chemical characteristics of rare earth elements in spring and volcanic rock samples indicate that REEs are originated from the andesitic-dacitic host rocks. Whole-rock-normalized REE patterns and petrographic evidences show that rare earth elements leached mainly from marginal alteration of minerals and matrix decomposition in volcanic rocks. In chondrite-normalized REE patterns, significant negative Eu anomaly in the cold springs compare to the thermal and acidic springs indicates that alteration of plagioclase is more intense in the later, corresponding to increasing in temperature and acidic state of reactant water.

  6. Properties and Applications of Laser-Induced Gratings in Rare Earth Doped Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Edward Grady

    Scope and method of study. Four-wave-mixing techniques were used in an attempt to create permanent laser-induced grating in Pr^{3+}-, Nd ^{3+}-, Eu^ {3+}-, and Er^{3+ }-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity and build-up and erase times were investigated as function of the write beam crossing angle, write beam power, and temperature. Thermal lensing measurements were conducted on Eu^{3+} - and Nd^{3+}-doped glasses and room temperature Raman and resonant Raman spectra were obtained for Eu^{3+}-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity was studied in Eu^{3+} -doped alkali-metal glasses as a function of the alkali -metal network modifier ion and a model was developed by treating the sample as a two-level system. Optical device applications of the permanent laser-induced gratings were studied by creating some simple devices. Findings and conclusions. Permanent laser-induced gratings were created in the Pr^{3+ }- and Eu^{3+} -doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating is associated with a structural phase change of the glass host. The structural change is produced by high energy phonons which are emitted by radiationless relaxation processes of the rare earth ion. Nd^{3+} and Er^{3+} relax nonradiatively by the emission of phonons of much lower energy which are unable to produce the structural phase change needed to form a permanent laser-induced grating. The difference in energy of the emitted phonons is responsible for the differing characteristics of the thermal lensing experiments. The model does a good job of predicting the experimental results for the asymmetry and other parameters of the two-level system. The application of these laser -induced gratings for optical devices demonstrates their importance to optical technology.

  7. Health Sensing Functions in Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Rare-Earth-Doped Luminescent Sublayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Great effort has been directed towards developing techniques to monitor the health of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that would detect the approach of safety-threatening conditions. An unconventional approach is presented here where health sensing functionality is integrated into the TBC itself by the incorporation of rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers to monitor erosion as well as whether the TBC is maintaining the underlying substrate at a sufficiently low temperature. Erosion indication is demonstrated in electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs consisting of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with europium-doped and terbium-doped sublayers. Multiple ingot deposition produced sharp boundaries between the doped sublayers without interrupting the columnar growth of the TBC. The TBC-coated specimens were subjected to alumina particle jet erosion, and the erosion depth was then indicated under ultraviolet illumination that excited easily visible luminescence characteristic of sublayer that was exposed by erosion. In addition, temperature measurements from a bottom-lying europium-doped sublayer in a TBC produced by multiple ingot EB-PVD were accomplished by measuring the temperature-dependent decay time from the 606 nm wavelength emission excited in that sublayer with a 532 nm wavelength laser that was selected for its close match to one of the europium excitation wavelengths as well as being at a wavelength where the TBC is relatively transparent. It is proposed the low dopant levels and absence of interruption of the TBC columnar growth allow the addition of the erosion and temperature sensing functions with minimal effects on TBC performance.

  8. Determination of rare earth elements in environmental materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Panday, V.K.; Hoppstock, K.; Becker, J.S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1996-09-01

    Despite the fact that rare earth elements (REE) have found increasing use in modern technology only few data are available on their concentrations in biological and environmental samples. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been employed to study the concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in various environmental materials (e.g., pine needles, mussel tissue, apple leaves) available from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Bureau of European Communities (BCR), and the German Environmental Specimens Bank. After the decomposition of the environmental samples with HNO{sub 3}, the REE (present mostly in the ng/g-range) were separated from the matrix and simultaneously preconcentrated using liquid-liquid extraction with bis(2-ethyl hexyl)-ortho-phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in toluene as a selective reagent at pH = 2 and subsequent back extraction of the elements into the aqueous by 6M HNO{sub 3}. Recoveries of better 90% were obtained for almost all REE. A Perkin Elmer/Sciex ELAN 5000 ICP-MS and HR-ICP-MS ELEMENT from Finnigan MAT were used for quantitative analysis (by external calibration and ID-ICP-MS) of REE. The results of determination of REE concentrations agree well with the data available on some of these materials. Further supplement information on the contents of various REE in these materials.

  9. Application of solid phase extraction procedures for rare earth elements determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Pyrzynska, Krystyna; Kubiak, Anna; Wysocka, Irena

    2016-07-01

    Determination of rare earth elements in environmental samples requires often pre-concentration and separation step due to a low metal content and high concentration of the interfering matrix components. A solid phase extraction technique with different kind of solid sorbents offers a high enrichment factor, rapid phase separation and the possibility of its combination with various detection techniques used either in on-line or off-line mode. The recent developments in this area published over the last five years are presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:27154643

  10. Rare-Earth Elements in Lighting and Optical Applications and Their Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin; Chang, Moon-Hwan; Pecht, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) are used in lighting and optical applications to enable color and light adjustment, miniaturization, and energy efficiency. Common applications of REEs include phosphors for light-emitting diodes, lasers, and electronic video displays. This article reviews how REEs are widely used in these applications. However, supply constraints, including rising prices, environmental concerns over mining and refining processes, and China's control over the supply of the vast majority of REEs, are of concern for manufacturers. In view of these supply constraints, this article discusses ways for manufacturers of lighting and optical devices to identify potential substitutes and recycling methods for REEs.

  11. Influence of rare earth elements (Nd, Sm, Gd) on the physicochemical properties of ges crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madatov, R. S.; Alekperov, A. S.; Magerramova, Dzh. A.

    2015-11-01

    Layered semiconductors (including GeS), which are widely used in modern electronics, are of great interest for researchers. New GeS-based devices have been developed for holographic recording, optical processing, and storage of information. In the last few years, American scientists have developed a unique GeS-based device that makes it possible to accumulate an immense amount of solar energy. The introduction of rare earth elements (REEs) facilitates the healing of metal and chalcogenide vacancies, removes polytypism, and enhances interlayer interaction.

  12. Extraction of rare earth elements from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of apatite processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andropov, M. O.; Anufrieva, A. V.; Buynovskiy, A. S.; Makaseev, Y. N.; Mazov, I. N.; Nefedov, R. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Stepanova, O. B.; Valkov, AV

    2016-01-01

    The features of extraction of rare earth elements (REE) were considered from hydrate-phosphate precipitates of REE of apatite processing by nitric acid technology. The preliminary purification of nitrate solution of REE from impurities of titanium, aluminum, iron, uranium and thorium was suggested to obtain stable solutions not forming precipitates. Washing the extract was recommended with the evaporated reextract that allows to obtain directly on the cascade of REE extraction the concentrated solutions suitable for the separation into groups by the extraction method. Technical decisions were suggested for the separation of REE in groups without the use of salting-out agent.

  13. Rare earth element distributions in recent and fossil apatite: implications for paleoceanography and stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.

    1985-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) distributions in biogenic apatite were determined in over 200 samples from Cambrian to the Recent. Nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques were adapted for analysis of low-mass microfossil samples. Tests for chemical contamination, interspecies, interlaboratory and interexperiment variations show that there is no fractionation of REE, so that ratios of rare earths are consistent throughout the entire group of samples. The REE signature of biogenic apatite is acquired after deposition but only at the sediment-water interface and is characteristic of the redox state of the environment of deposition. This original environmental signature is retained through subsequent burial and diagenesis. Cerium has been shown to be the rare earth element that is sensitive to oxidation-reduction variations in marine waters. This cerium variation is stated mathematically and called Ce/sub anom/. Comparison of Ce/sub anom/ in fish debris from different modern redox environments shows that values > -0.10 occur in fish debris deposited under reducing conditions, whereas Ce/sub anom/ values <-0.10 are obtained under oxidizing conditions. Paleoredox studies of Ce/sub anom/ of fossil apatite of conodonts, fish debris and inarticulate brachiopods indicate that significant shifts in the overall redox balance of seawater occurred in ancient oceans. Cambrian through Silurian seas were dominated by anoxia, followed by a gradual change to oxidizing conditions in the Devonian. Oceans remained generally oxidizing throughout the Carboniferous and Lower Permian. In the Upper Permian and Lower Triassic anoxic conditions were again prevalent. This was followed by a return to an oxidizing oceanic environment in the Upper Triassic.

  14. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  15. An EDTA-β-cyclodextrin material for the adsorption of rare earth elements and its application in preconcentration of rare earth elements in seawater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feiping; Repo, Eveliina; Meng, Yong; Wang, Xueting; Yin, Dulin; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-03-01

    The separation and recovery of Rare earth elements (REEs) from diluted aqueous streams has attracted great attention in recent years because of ever-increasing REEs demand. In this study, a green synthesized EDTA-cross-linked β-cyclodextrin (EDTA-β-CD) biopolymer was prepared and employed in adsorption of aqueous REEs, such as La(III), Ce(III), and Eu(III). EDTA acts not only as cross-linker but also as coordination site for binding of REEs. The adsorption properties for the adsorption of REEs by varying experimental conditions were carried out by batch tests. The kinetics results revealed that the surface chemical sorption and the external film diffusion were the rate-determining steps of the adsorption process. The obtained maximum adsorption capacities of EDTA-β-CD were 0.343, 0.353, and 0.365mmolg(-1) for La(III), Ce(III) and Eu(III), respectively. Importantly, the isotherms fitted better to Langmuir than Freundlich and Sips models, suggesting a homogenous adsorption surface for REEs on the adsorbent. Moreover, the multi-component adsorption, which was modeled by extended Sips isotherms, revealed adsorbent's selectivity to Eu(III). More significantly, the successful recoveries of the studied ions from tap water and seawater samples makes EDTA-β-CD a promising sorbent for the preconcentration of REEs from diluted aqueous streams. PMID:26674238

  16. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days. PMID:26178829

  17. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  18. Upconversion-pumped luminescence efficiency of rare-earth-doped hosts sensitized with trivalent ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Waide, P.A.; Tassano, J.B.; Payne, S.A.; Kruplce, W.F.; Bischel, W.K.

    1997-07-26

    We discuss the upconversion luminescence efficiencies of phosphors that generate red, green, and blue light. The phosphors studied are single crystals and powders co-doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, and with Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}. The Yb ions are pumped near 980 nm; transfers of two or three quanta to the co-doped rare earth ion generate visible luminescence. The main contribution embodied in this work is the quantitative measurement of this upconversion efficiency, based on the use of a calibrated integrating sphere, determination of the fraction of pump light absorbed, and careful control of the pump laser beam profile. The green phosphors are the most efficient, yielding efficiency values as high as 4 %, with the red and blue materials giving 1 - 2 %. Saturation was observed in all cases, suggesting that populations of upconversion steps of the ions are maximized at higher power. Quasi-CW modeling of the intensity- dependent upconversion efficiency was attempted; input data included level lifetimes, transition cross sections, and cross-relaxation rate coefficients. The saturation of the Yb,Er:fluoride media is explained as the pumping of Er{sup 3+} ions into a bottleneck (long-lived state)- the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} metastable level, making them unavailable for further excitation transfer. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO₂ fiber.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Toru; Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO2 glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO2 fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO2 fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO2 fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO2 fibers are smaller than those from SiO2 fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO2 are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K. PMID:25173299

  20. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  1. Tuning electrical transport in rare-earth delta-doped SrTiO3 epitaxially grown on Si (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi Majlan, Kamyar; Jahangir Moghadam, Mohammadreza; Shen, Xuan; Hensley, Ricky; Conlin, Patrick; Lim, Zheng Hui; Su, Dong; Ngai, Joseph H.

    The monolithic integration of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to integrate new functionalities into semiconductor devices. In particular, strongly correlated oxides that exhibit metal-insulator transitions are technologically important due to their potential use in a variety of applications. Here we present transport characteristics of strongly correlated, ultra-thin layers of RexSr1-xTiO3(Re = rare earth) that have been epitaxially imbedded, or ``delta-doped'', into SrTiO3 grown on Si(100). We will discuss how the interplay of dimensionality, rare-earth composition, and strain affects the transport characteristics and metal-insulator behavior of such correlated oxides.

  2. Piezoelectric/photoluminescence effects in rare-earth doped lead-free ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qirong; Wang, Feifei; Jin, Chengchao; Tang, Yanxue; Wang, Tao; Shi, Wangzhou

    2013-10-01

    In the present work, we report the environmentally-friendly multifunctional effects—piezoelectric/photoluminescence effects, which originated from the combination of the electromechanical properties and the photoluminescence effect through introducing the rare-earth elements (Pr and Eu) into the (Bi0.5Na0.5)TiO3-BaTiO3 ceramics with the composition around the morphotropic phase boundary. Compared to the pure piezoelectric ceramic, the proposed system simultaneously exhibited enhanced ferroelectric, piezoelectric, dielectric properties along with strong photoluminescence effects, which exhibited potential applications in sensor, and electro-mechano-optical integration. In addition, the present work also provides a promising path for us to fabricate multifunctional composites.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and processing of active rare earth-doped chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debari, Roberto Mauro

    Applications for infrared-transmitting non-oxide glass fibers span a broad range of topics. They can be used in the military, the medical field, telecommunications, and even in agriculture. Rare earth ions are used as dopants in these glasses in order to stimulate emissions in the infrared spectral region. In order to extend the host glass transmission further into the infrared, selenium atoms were substituted for sulfur in the established Ge-S-I chalcohalide glass system and the fundamental properties of these latter glasses were explored. Over 30 different compositions in the Ge-Se-I glass system were investigated as to their thermal and optical properties. The resulting optimum host with a composition of Ge15Se80I5 has a broad transmission range from 0.7 mum to 17.0 mum and a high working range over 145°C. The host glass also exhibited a Tg of 125°C, making rotational casting of a cladding tube for rod-and-tube fiberization a possibility. The base glass was doped with 1000 to 4000 ppm/wt of erbium, dysprosium, or neodymium. When doped with Er3+-ions, absorptions at 1.54 mum and 3.42 mum were observed. Nd3+-doping resulted in an absorption peak near 4.24 mum and Dy3+ ions caused absorption at 1.30 mum. Fluorescence emissions were found for neodymium at 1.396 mum with a FWHM of 74 nm, and for dysprosium at 1.145 mum with a FWHM of 75 nm, at 1.360 mum with a FWHM of 98 rim and at 1.674 mum with a FWHM of 60 nm. High optical quality tubes of the host glass could be formed using rotational casting in silica ampoules. Glass tubes, 4 to 6 cm long with a 1 cm outer diameter and a tailored inner-hole diameter ranging from 0.4 to 0.6 cm could be synthesized by this process with excellent dimensional tolerances around the circumference as well as along the length. A preform of this size provided 25 continuous meters of unclad fiber with diameters ranging from 140 to 200 mum. A UV-curable acrylate cladding was applied via an external coating cup. An x-ray analysis of the

  4. Rare earth elements in soils from selected areas on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, W.M.; Halbig, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Fifty soil samples for the wet, windward (east) side and dry, leeward (west) side of the Island of Hawaii were analyzed for La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Yb, and Lu by neutron activation/gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis. Data on concentrations in each sample are listed and analyzed statistically for soil samples collected from the western slope of Kohala Mountain, the western coastal plain of Mauna Kea, and the Northeastern coastal plain of Maunal Loa. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are two to six times greater in soils from the western, dry side of the island, and good statistical correlation is exhibited among the samples for pairs of individual REEs. In the organic-rich soils of the east side, correlations are poor but are markedly improved when sample weights are adjusted for weight due to organic matter and water in soil colloids. If the mean compositions of selected rock samples from the Hawaii Reference Suite are representative of the compositions of the parent materials, REEs in the soils are moderately enriched (up to two times, based on oven-dry weights). Rare earth element concentrations in the island's western soils are as much as two times greater than the mean REE values of common sedimentary rocks worldwide; however, they are well within the concentration ranges of soils of continental origin. The eastern soils tend to have less La and Ce, but similar amounts of the middle and heavy REEs.

  5. Rare earth elements in sediments of the Vigo Ria, NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Marmolejo-Rodríguez, Judith

    2009-04-01

    The abundance and distribution of rare earth elements (REE) and their signatures in the Vigo Ria were studied from 50 samples of surface sediments and related to the geological formation in its watershed. The total amount of REE in the Ria is heterogeneous. It ranges from 220 mg kg -1 in the southern middle Ria margin in the vicinity of the Galiñeiro geological shore complex, which contains REE-enriched minerals, to 2 mg kg -1 near the Ria mouth due to dilution with high levels of carbonated biogenic particles (31% of Ca). Rare earth elements of the Ria sediments are considerably enriched in light-REE relative to heavy-REE (a LREE/HREE ratio of 9.7±1.6) and also show a slightly negative Eu-anomaly. Low European shale normalised REE patterns were distinguished in the innermost sediments of Vigo Ria, but were not correlated with Al. This suggests a minor contribution of REE from upstream freshwater inputs to the sediments in the middle Vigo Ria zone. Normalised REE ratios in the middle Ria imply that fine particles enriched in REE may be exported from the Ria to shelf mud patches and REE can be useful as sediment tracers of Ria input on the shelf.

  6. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m(3), and those for PM10 were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m(3), in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM10 and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM10 were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N), Gd(N)/Yb(N)). PMID:24657942

  7. Seawater rare-earth element patterns preserved in apatite of Pennsylvanian conodonts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Camomilia A.; Cruse, Anna M.; Lyons, Timothy W.; MacLeod, Kenneth G.; Glascock, Michael D.; Ethington, Raymond L.

    2009-03-01

    Past workers have used rare-earth element patterns recorded in biogenic apatite as proxies for original seawater chemistry. To explore the potency of this approach, we analyzed Pennsylvanian conodonts from limestones, gray shales, and black shales of the Fort Scott and Pawnee formations (Desmoinesian) and Swope and Dennis formations (Missourian) in Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa, U.S.A. Analysis of individual platform conodonts from seven taxa using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) revealed a consistent enrichment in the middle rare-earth elements (MREE). Analogous MREE enrichment has been observed in authigenic apatite and bulk samples of phosphate-rich black shales from the same formations. Importantly, however, phosphate-depleted shales intimately associated with the P-rich intervals are relatively depleted in MREE. These antithetic patterns argue convincingly for secondary migration from the bulk sediment into the phosphate, and the extent of MREE enrichment in the conodonts is correlated positively with the total REE content. MREE enrichment in conodonts does not vary systematically as a function of lithology, stratigraphic level, conodont genus, geographic location, or with independent estimates of paleoredox conditions in the bottom waters. Collectively, these results argue for postmortem (diagenetic) REE uptake resulting in a pronounced (and progressive) MREE enrichment. Any cerium anomalies, if initially present, were masked by diagenetic uptake of REE. Paleoenvironmental interpretations of conodont REE, particularly for samples exhibiting MREE enrichment, should therefore be viewed with caution.

  8. Rare-earth doped fibre optic devices and asymmetric fibre couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Farin

    The objective of the work reported in this thesis was to improve the quality and range of rare-earth doped fibre optic devices and asymmetric fibre couplers which can be fabricated for all-optical systems. This objective has been realised by improvements to the existing fibre fabrication processes and fused tapered coupler machine and by the generation of new fabrication techniques. An improved Flash-Condensation technique for the deposition of multi-layer highly-doped cladding fibre has been developed and tested. As a result a highly Yb-doped cladding fibre has been fabricated and characterised. It has been shown that up to 7wt% phosphorous pentoxide together with up to 1.4wt% lanthanide oxide can be doped into a multi-layer cladding fibre successfully. As far as it is known, no previous work on doping a thick cladding with Yb 3+ ions has been reported. We have shown experimentally that a 94% efficient superfluorescent fibre source in the 950-1150nm range using a highly doped cladding fibre can be designed and fabricated. This is the highest superfluorescent efficiency ever reported in the literature. By taking advantage of the superfluorescence of a large Yb-cladding doped fibre, we have demonstrated a singlemode fibre laser with a linewidth of 0.3nm and a slope efficiency of 79%. This means that by using a high pump power we can achieve many watts of laser power in the fibre very easily. Again, this is the highest slope efficiency ever reported. For the purpose of making application specific couplers, we have designed and improved the equipment control system for the fabrication of fused tapered fibre devices, and have developed various procedures for making better couplers. We have also successfully fabricated and analysed asymmetric fused fibre couplers, with the highest reported asymmetric coupling of 24:1. Using eight of these low loss asymmetric couplers, a prototype passive all-optical fibre data bus was constructed and analysed. Such data buses are very

  9. Thermochemistry of rare earth doped uranium oxides LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanum, yttrium, and neodymium doped uranium dioxide samples in the fluorite structure have been synthesized, characterized in terms of metal ratio and oxygen content, and their enthalpies of formation measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. For oxides doped with 10-50 mol % rare earth (Ln) cations, the formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2 and UO3 in a reaction not involving oxidation or reduction) become increasingly exothermic with increasing rare earth content, while showing no significant dependence on the varying uranium oxidation state. The oxidation enthalpy of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y is similar to that of UO2 to UO3 for all three rare earth doped systems. Though this may suggest that the oxidized uranium in these systems is energetically similar to that in the hexavalent state, thermochemical data alone can not constrain whether the uranium is present as U5+, U6+, or a mixture of oxidation states. The formation enthalpies from elements calculated from the calorimetric data are generally consistent with those from free energy measurements.

  10. Normalized rare earth elements in water, sediments, and wine: identifying sources and environmental redox conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, David Z.; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of the rare earth elements (REE) in surface waters and sediments, when normalized on an element-by-element basis to one of several rock standards and plotted versus atomic number, yield curves that reveal their partitioning between different sediment fractions and the sources of those fractions, for example, between terrestrial-derived lithogenous debris and seawater-derived biogenous detritus and hydrogenous metal oxides. The REE of ancient sediments support their partitioning into these same fractions and further contribute to the identification of the redox geochemistry of the sea water in which the sediments accumulated. The normalized curves of the REE that have been examined in several South American wine varietals can be interpreted to reflect the lithology of the bedrock on which the vines may have been grown, suggesting limited fractionation during soil development.

  11. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  12. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation. PMID:26836847

  13. Synthesis and structure of some nano-sized rare-earth metal ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Himanshu; Alemu, Hailemichael; Nketsa, Pusetso F.; Manatha, Toka J.; Madhavi Thakurdesai, And

    2015-05-01

    Rare-earth ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates (KR-HCF); with the general formula KRFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O [with, R≡Y, Gd and Yb] nanoparticles were synthesized through precipitation. Characterization was done through particle-size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data was analyzed on FullProf Software Suite program and the unit-cell structure and lattice parameters of KR-HCF samples were determined from scratch and refined further. All the three KR-HCF nanoparticles seem to crystallize in the orthorhombic primitive PMMM space-group. Reasonably good agreement was found with the previously reported lattice constants of KGd-HCF and KYb-HCF orthorhombic single-crystals, except that they assume different space-groups. The observed dissimilarity of space-groups may be attributed to the different time scales involved in the synthesis process. Moreover, the crystal structure of KYFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O nanoparticles is being reported for the very first time.

  14. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence(CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3∶Eu, Y2O3∶Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light.Y2O3∶Tb and Y2O3∶Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared,and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since theRE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL. PMID:26000793

  15. Structures, Stabilities, and Electronic Properties for Rare-Earth Lanthanum Doped Gold Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Ru

    2015-02-01

    The structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of rare-earth lanthanum doped gold La2Aun (n = 1-9) and pure gold Aun (n ≤ 11) clusters have been investigated by using density functional theory. The optimized geometries show that the lowest energy structures of La2Aun clusters favour the 3D structure at n ≥ 3. The lanthanum atoms can strongly enhance the stabilities of gold clusters and tend to occupy the most highly coordinated position. By analysing the gap, vertical ionization potential, and chemical hardness, it is found that the La2Au6 isomer possesses higher stability for small-sized La2Aun clusters (n = 1-9). The charges in the La2Aun clusters transfer from La atoms to the Aun host. In addition, Wiberg bond indices analysis reveals that the intensity of different bonds of La2Aun clusters exhibits a sequence of La-La bond > La-Au bond > Au-Au bond.

  16. Nanophotonic photon echo memory based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei; Caltech nano quantum optics Team

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth ions (REIs) are promising candidates for implementing solid-state quantum memories and quantum repeater devices. Their high spectral stability and long coherence times make REIs a good choice for integration in an on-chip quantum nano-photonic platform. We report the coupling of the 883 nm transition of Neodymium (Nd) to a Yttrium orthosilicate (YSO) photonic crystal nano-beam resonator, achieving Purcell enhanced spontaneous emission by 21 times and increased optical absorption. Photon echoes were observed in nano-beams of different doping concentrations, yielding optical coherence times T2 up to 80 μs that are comparable to unprocessed bulk samples. This indicates the remarkable coherence properties of Nd are preserved during nanofabrication, therefore opening the possibility of efficient on-chip optical quantum memories. The nano-resonator with mode volume of 1 . 6(λ / n) 3 was fabricated using focused ion beam, and a quality factor of 3200 was measured. Purcell enhanced absorption of 80% by an ensemble of ~ 1 × 106 ions in the resonator was measured, which fulfills the cavity impedance matching condition that is necessary to achieve quantum storage of photons with unity efficiency.

  17. Sol-gel derived hybrid materials doped with rare earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2011-10-01

    Sol-gel derived organic-inorganic hybrid materials doped with rare earth metal ions (Pr 3+) and small amounts of lithium ions (˜0.1-0.2 wt.%) were produced from the tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), AlCl 3·6H 2O (about 10 mol%), ethyl methacrylate, butyl methacrylate and some other organic additions (ca. 35-40 wt.% of organics in the fresh gels) to obtain hybrid organic-inorganic hosts. The gel and hybrid materials obtained were aged at room temperature for three weeks, then heated in an electric drier for 3 h at temperature of 125 °C and investigated for morphology, structure and luminescence properties by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 29Si and 27Al MAS nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. An influence of the organic additions and inorganic dopants on microstructure of the materials obtained and their luminescence properties has been examined. Under excitation with UV radiation in a range of ˜210-350 nm, the sharp and relatively intense luminescence emission lines due to 3P 0 → 3H 4 (blue) and 3P 0 → 3F 3 (red) transitions of Pr 3+ ions were observed in the luminescence spectra of gel and hybrid materials of SA-series.

  18. Structure-property-composition relationships in doped zinc oxides: enhanced photocatalytic activity with rare earth dopants.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Josephine B M; Illsley, Derek; Lines, Robert; Makwana, Neel M; Darr, Jawwad A

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis (CHFS) technology to rapidly produce a library of 56 crystalline (doped) zinc oxide nanopowders and two undoped samples, each with different particle properties. Each sample was produced in series from the mixing of an aqueous stream of basic zinc nitrate (and dopant ion or modifier) solution with a flow of superheated water (at 450 °C and 24.1 MPa), whereupon a crystalline nanoparticle slurry was rapidly formed. Each composition was collected in series, cleaned, freeze-dried, and then characterized using analytical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Photocatalytic activity of the samples toward the decolorization of methylene blue dye was assessed, and the results revealed that transition metal dopants tended to reduce the photoactivity while rare earth ions, in general, increased the photocatalytic activity. In general, low dopant concentrations were more beneficial to having greater photodecolorization in all cases. PMID:25602735

  19. Visible WGM emissions from rare earth ion doped ZnO microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Fabitha; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra

    ZnO is known to be an ideal candidate for short wavelength range opto-electronic device applications due to its wide and direct bandgap (3.37 eV) and high excitonic binding energy (60 meV). Apart from the UV emission at ~380 nm (free exciton emission) ZnO also possesses a broad emission band centered at ~530 nm which is expected to be originated from the oxygen vacancy (Vo) defects. In rare earth (RE) ion doped ZnO, emissions originate from the 4f levels of RE ions will be obtained in addition to the characteristic emissions of ZnO. Small micro/nanostructures made of ZnO with high crystalline quality show unique characteristics in light emission, especially in lasing applications. A micro/ nanostructured ZnO crystal generally has a wurtzite structure with a natural hexagonal cross section, which serves as a WGM lasing micro cavity owing to its high reflective index (~2). However, there exists a potential optical loss at corners of hexagons; therefore, an isotropic structure like spheres may be a better candidate to achieve efficient light confinement. In our work, highly smooth micro spheres with different diameters were grown. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO, SEM and AFM studies shows the smooth surfaced spheres. WGM lasing characteristics of ZnO spheres have been investigated using optical pumping with 488 nm laser in a micro-PL system. Details of the results will be presented.

  20. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3:Eu, Y2O3:Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light. Y2O3:Tb and Y2O3:Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared, and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since the RE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  1. Rare-earth doped colour tuneable up-conversion ZBLAN phosphor for enhancing photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Ramos, J.; Acosta-Mora, P.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Sierra, M.; Redondas, A.; Ruggiero, E.; Salassa, L.; Borges, M. E.; Esparza, P.

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fluoride glasses have been successfully synthesized showing outstanding UV-VIS up-conversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+, sensitized by Yb3+ ions, under near-infrared excitation at 980 nm. The ratio between blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands can be adjusted by varying the pump power density of the incident infrared radiation, resulting in a controlled tuneability of the overall emitting colour from greenish to yellowish. Additionally, the observed high energy UV intense up-conversion emissions are suitable to enhance photocatalytic activity of main water-splitting semiconductor electrodes (such as TiO2) used in sustainable production of hydrogen. Photocatalysis and photolysis degradation of methylene blue in water under sun-like irradiation using benchmark photocatalyst (TiO2 Degussa P25) have been boosted by 20% and by a factor of 2.5 respectively, due to the enhancement of UV radiation that reaches the TiO2 particles by the addition of ZBLAN powder into a slurry-type photo-reactor. Hence, up-conversion ZBLAN phosphors contribute to demonstrate the possibility of transforming the incoming infrared radiation into the UV region needed to bridge the gap of photocatalytic semiconductors.

  2. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  3. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in Permian coals from the Huaibei Coalfield, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Lingyun; Liu, Gaisheng; Chou, C.-L.; Qi, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) in coals are important because of: (a) REE patterns can be an indicator of the nature of source rocks of the mineral matter as well as sedimentary environments; (b) REEs abundance in coal may have industrial-significance. In this study, a total of thirty-four samples of Permian coal, partings, roof, and floor were collected from the Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui Province, China. Abundances of rare earth elements (REEs) and other elements in the samples were determined by inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the REEs are enriched in coals in the Huaibei Coalfield as compared with Chinese and U.S. coals and the world coal average. Coals in the Lower Shihezi Formation (No. 7, 5, and 4 Coals) and Upper Shihezi Formation (No. 3) have higher REE abundances than the coals in Shanxi Formation (No. 10). Magmatic intrusion resulted in high enrichment of REEs concentrations in No. 5 and 7 Coals. The REE abundances are positively correlated with the ash content. The mineral matter in these coals is mainly made up of clay minerals and carbonates. The REEs are positively correlated with lithophile elements including Si, Al, Ti, Fe, and Na, which are mainly distributed in clay minerals, indicating that REEs are contained mainly in clay minerals. The REE abundances in coals normalized by the ash are higher than that in partings. REEs abundances of coals cannot be accounted for by the REE content in the mineral matter, and some REEs associated with organic matter in coals. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates. PMID:25278442

  5. Rare earth element geochemistry and petrogenesis of miles (IIE) silicate inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Weibiao

    2003-12-01

    An ion probe study of rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of silicate inclusions in the Miles IIE iron meteorite was carried out. Individual mineral phases among inclusions have distinct REE patterns and abundances. Most silicate grains have homogeneous REE abundances but show considerable intergrain variations between inclusions. A few pyroxene grains display normal igneous REE zoning. Phosphates (whitlockite and apatite) are highly enriched in REEs (50 to 2000 × CI) with a relatively light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched REE pattern. They usually occurred near the interfaces between inclusions and Fe host. In Miles, albitic glasses exhibit two distinctive REE patterns: a highly fractionated LREE-enriched (CI normalized La/Sm ˜15) pattern with a large positive Eu anomaly and a relatively heavy rare earth element (HREE)-enriched pattern (CI-normalized Lu/Gd ˜4) with a positive Eu anomaly and a negative Yb anomaly. The glass is generally depleted in REEs relative to CI chondrites. The bulk REE abundances for each inclusion, calculated from modal abundances, vary widely, from relatively depleted in REEs (0.1 to 3 × CI) with a fractionated HREE-enriched pattern to highly enriched in REEs (10 to 100 × CI) with a relatively LREE-enriched pattern. The estimated whole rock REE abundances for Miles are at ˜ 10 × CI with a relatively LREE-enriched pattern. This implies that Miles silicates could represent the product of a low degree (˜10%) partial melting of a chondritic source. Phenocrysts of pyroxene in pyroxene-glassy inclusions were not in equilibrium with coexisting albitic glass and they could have crystallized from a parental melt with REEs of ˜ 10 × CI. Albitic glass appears to have formed by remelting of preexisting feldspar + pyroxene + tridymite assemblage. Yb anomaly played an important role in differentiation processes of Miles silicate inclusions; however, its origin remains unsolved. The REE data from this study suggest that Miles, like

  6. NEW RARE EARTH ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR THE SUN AND FIVE r-PROCESS-RICH VERY METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.; Ivans, Inese I. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu

    2009-05-15

    We have derived new abundances of the rare earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low-metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally consistent Ba, rare earth, and Hf (56 {<=} Z {<=} 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  7. Strontium isotopes and rare-earth element geochemistry of hydrothermal carbonate deposits from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J.A.; Boulegue, J.; Tiercelin, J.J.; Lesourd, M.

    2000-01-01

    At Cape Banza (North Tanganyika Lake), fluids and aragonite chimneys have been collected many times since the discovery of this sublacustrine field in 1987. This sampling has been investigated here for the Sr isotopic compositions and the rare-earth element features of the carbonates and a few fluid samples. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of the chimneys indicate that they have precipitated from a mixture of lake water (more than 95%) and hydrothermal fluids. No zoning in the chimneys was detected with the Sr data. For the rare-earth elements, the situation is more complex. The external walls of the chimneys are rare-earth-element-poor (La {approx} 500 ppb, Yb {approx} 200 ppb, La/Yb = 2 to 3.4). Their shale normalized rare-earth element patterns suggest that they are in equilibrium with the inferred carbonate-depositing fluids. The rare-earth element concentrations of the internal walls of the chimneys are significantly light rare earth elements (LREE)-enriched with La contents sometimes up to 5 ppm. The authors suggest that they contain more vent-fluid rare-earth elements than the external wall samples, possibly adsorbed on the surface of growing crystals or simply hosted by impurities. It was not possible to constrain the nature of these phases, but the variations of the compositions of the internal wall materials of the active chimneys with time, as well as data obtained on an inactive chimney indicate that this rare-earth element excess is mobile. Partition coefficients were calculated between the external wall aragonite and carbonate-depositing fluid. The results are strikingly similar to the values obtained by Sholkovitz and Shen (1995) on coral aragonite, and suggest that there is no significant biologic effect on the incorporation of rare-earth elements into coral aragonite and that the various carbonate complexes involved Me(CO{sub 3}{sup +}) complexes are the main LREE carriers in seawater instead of Me(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {minus}} in Banza fluids

  8. Effect of Rare Earth Elements (Er, Ho) on Semi-Metallic Materials (ScN) in an Applied Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV ( 0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5 0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a TEM

  9. Assessing the utility of trace and rare earth elements as biosignatures in microbial iron oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Christine; Simon, Klaus; Ionescu, Danny; Reimer, Andreas; De Beer, Dirk; Quéric, Nadia-Valérie; Reitner, Joachim; Thiel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Microbial iron oxyhydroxides are common deposits in natural waters, recent sediments and mine drainage systems and often contain significant accumulations of trace and rare earth elements (TREE). TREE patterns are widely used to characterize minerals and rocks, and to elucidate their evolution and origin. Whether and which characteristic TREE signatures distinguish between a biological and an abiological origin of iron minerals is still not well understood. Long-term flow reactor studies were performed in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory to investigate the development of microbial mats dominated by iron-oxidizing bacteria, namely Mariprofundus sp. and Gallionella sp. The experiments investigated the accumulation and fractionation of TREE under controlled conditions and enabled us to assess potential biosignatures evolving within the microbial iron oxyhydroxides. Concentrations of Be, Y, Zn, Zr, Hf, W, Th, Pb, and U in the microbial mats were 1e3- to 1e5-fold higher than in the feeder fluids whereas the rare earth elements and Y (REE+Y) contents were 1e4 and 1e6 fold enriched. Except for a hydrothermally induced Eu anomaly, the normalized REE+Y patterns of the microbial iron oxyhydroxides were very similar to published REE+Y distributions of Archaean Banded Iron Formations. The microbial iron oxyhydroxides from the flow reactors were compared to iron oxyhydroxides that were artificially precipitated from the same feeder fluid. These abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides show the same REE+Y distribution patterns. Our results indicate that the REE+Y mirror quite exactly the water chemistry, but they do not allow to distinguish microbially mediated from inorganic iron precipitates. All TREE studied showed an overall similar fractionation behavior in biogenic, abiotic and inorganic iron oxyhydroxides. Exceptions are Ni and Tl, which were only accumulated in the microbial iron oxyhydroxides and may point to a potential usage of these elements as microbial biosignatures.

  10. Developing alternative resources of rare earth elements in Europe - EURARE and the red mud challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, Eimear; Mouchos, Evangelos; Goodenough, Kathryn; Wall, Frances; Williamson, Ben

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are considered to be highly "critical" by the European Commission [1], owing to the concentration of global supply [2] and their use in a wide range of emerging technologies (e.g. smart phones, electric cars and wind turbines). The main source of REE is the mineral bastnäsite, which is primarily extracted from carbonatites. Alternative resources of REE have been identified in a variety of other environments such as alluvial placers, bauxites and ore tailings. The EURARE project (www.eurare.eu), funded by the European Commission, aims to improve understanding of potential REE resources in Europe with the overall objective of establishing the basis for a European REE industry. As a part of this project, alternative sources of rare earth elements in Europe are being considered. REE have been identified as being particularly enriched in karst-bauxites and hence in the red muds generated as a waste product from the processing of these bauxites to alumina through the Bayer process [3]. Karst-bauxites are widely distributed with deposits known across the Mediterranean and with intermittent exploitation occurring over many decades. REE become concentrated in the bauxite deposits by the bauxitisation process and are retained due to the geochemical barrier created by the limestone bedrock below. This can result in several processes, including the crystallisation of authigenic REE-bearing minerals, the accumulation of residual phases and the adsorption of ions onto clays and other mineral surfaces [4]. Red muds produced from alumina processing represent a potentially important concentration of REE as it has been demonstrated that the REE pass through the alumina extraction process into the waste, and the total REE concentrations are typically enriched by a factor of two compared with the original bauxite ore [5]. Bauxites and red muds from the Parnassus Ghiona region of Greece [6] and the Seydişehir-Akseki region of Turkey have been assessed as