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Sample records for rat basilar artery

  1. Propranolol-induced relaxation in the rat basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Cekic, Edip G; Soydan, Guray; Guler, Sebile; Babaoglu, Melih O; Tuncer, Meral

    2013-04-01

    Propranolol is a non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and migraine prophylaxis. Although it has been shown that propranolol dilates the peripheral arteries of rat, its action in the central nervous system vasculature has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of propranolol in rat basilar artery were investigated. Basilar arteries from male Wistar rats were examined in a myograph system. The relaxant effects of propranolol, pindolol, atenolol, pizotifen and methysergide were examined in basilar arteries precontracted by serotonin or PGF2α. Only propranolol and pizotifen induced vasorelaxations; the pD2 values were 5.23±0.13 and 5.94±0.03; respectively. The vasorelaxation induced by propranolol and pizotifen was not affected by endothelium or the presence of l-NOARG and/or indomethacin. The calcium channel blocking activity of propranolol and pizotifen was compared with that of nifedipine in a calcium free solution with high K(+) (60mM) concentration. These drugs shifted the concentration-response curves of calcium induced contractions with pA2 values of 5.45±0.04; 7.14±0.09; and 9.22±0.06 respectively. The P2Y receptor agonist UTP was used to induce sustained and stable contractions in basilar artery segments. Nifedipine caused a marked, but an incomplete relaxation. Cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium channels, but not propranolol or pizotifen abolished the remaining tonus after partial relaxations obtained with nifedipine. These results suggest that propranolol causes vasorelaxation by blocking the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the rat basilar artery. PMID:23295260

  2. The role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the hypoxic vasoconstriction in isolated rat basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Liang, Peng; Qiu, Suhua; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yongli; Lv, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is a key factor in the occurrence and the development of cerebral ischemia. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase affects the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and plays an important role in vascular smooth muscle function. However, the potential role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is unknown. In this study, we found that the KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia in rat endothelium-intact basilar arteries is similar to that of denuded arteries, suggesting that hypoxia may cause smooth muscle cell (SMC)-dependent vasoconstriction in the basilar artery. The Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity of the isolated basilar artery with or without endothelium significantly reduced with prolonged hypoxia. Blocking the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger with Ni(2+) (10(-3)M) or the L-type Ca(2+) channel with nimodipine (10(-8)M) dramatically attenuated KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia significantly reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and increased [Ca(2+)]i in cultured rat basilar artery SMCs. Hypoxia reduced the protein and mRNA expression of the α2 isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in SMCs in vitro. We used a low concentration of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain, which possesses a high affinity for the α2 isoform. The contractile response in the rat basilar artery under hypoxia was partly inhibited by ouabain pretreatment. The decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated basilar artery and the increased [Ca(2+)]i in SMCs induced by hypoxia were partly inhibited by pretreatment with a low concentration of ouabain. These results suggest that hypoxia may educe Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in SMCs through the α2 isoform contributing to vasoconstriction in the rat basilar artery. PMID:26924456

  3. Assessment of Vascular Geometry for Bilateral Carotid Artery Ligation to Induce Early Basilar Terminus Aneurysmal Remodeling in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tutino, Vincent Matthew; Liaw, Nicholas; Spernyak, Joseph Andrew; Ionita, Ciprian Nicolae; Siddiqui, Adnan Hussain; Kolega, John; Meng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) ligation in rabbits is a model for basilar terminus (BT) aneurysm formation. We asked if this model could be replicated in rats. Fourteen female Sprague Dawley rats underwent bilateral CCA ligation (n=8) or sham surgery (n=6). After 7 days, 5 ligated and 3 sham rats were euthanized for histological evaluation of BT aneurysm formation, while the remaining rats were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography, euthanized, and subjected to corrosion casting of the Circle of Willis (CoW). 3D micro computed tomography images of CoW casts were used for flow simulations at the rat BT, and electron micrographs of the casts were analyzed for aneurysmal and morphological changes. Results from these analyses were compared to rabbit model data (n=10 ligated and n=6 sham). Bilateral CCA ligation did not produce aneurysmal damage at the rat BT. While the surgical manipulation increased rat basilar artery flow, fluid dynamics simulations showed that the initial hemodynamic stress at the rat BT was significantly less than in rabbits. Rats also exhibited fewer morphological and pathological changes (minor changes only occurred in the posterior CoW) than rabbits, which had drastic changes throughout the CoW. A comparison of CoW anatomies demonstrated a greater number of branching arteries at the BT, larger CoW arteries in relation to basilar artery, and a steeper BT bifurcation angle in the rat. These differences could account for the lower hemodynamic stress at the BT and in the cerebrovasculature of the rat. In conclusion, bilateral CCA ligation in rats does not recapitulate the rabbit model of early flow-induced BT aneurysm. We suspect that the different CoW morphology of the rat lessens hemodynamic insults, thereby diminishing flow-induced aneurysmal remodeling. PMID:26503026

  4. Hyperdensity of the Basilar Artery on Postmortem CT: A Potential Indicator for Basilar Artery Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jack; Tse, Rexson; Beh, Raymond J; Lyons, Timothy J; Cala, Allan D

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery thrombosis constitutes 1% of all types of stroke, carries a mortality rate of up to 90%, and is one of the rarer causes of sudden death. It leads to brain stem ischemia and commonly presents with impaired consciousness, cranial nerve palsy, hemiplegia or quadriplegia, and sudden collapse. Clinically, the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis is made on clinical symptoms, along with a hyperdense basilar artery in antemortem computed tomography (CT) scan. To our knowledge, whether a hyperdense basilar artery indicates basilar artery thrombosis on postmortem CT scan is not documented in the literature. We present a case report of a 55-year-old man who on postmortem CT scan showed a hyperdense basilar artery and was subsequently confirmed to be a fatal basilar artery thrombosis. We suggest that a hyperdense basilar artery on postmortem CT should prompt the pathologist to consider basilar artery thrombosis. PMID:27049662

  5. Differential effect of calcium-activated potassium and chloride channels on rat basilar artery vasomotion.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Rui; Ma, Ke-tao; Li, Xin-zhi; Zhang, Chuan-lin; Liu, Wei-dong; Zhao, Lei; Si, Jun-qiang

    2014-08-01

    Spontaneous, rhythmical contractions, or vasomotion, can be recorded from cerebral vessels under both normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying vasomotion in the cerebral basilar artery (BA) of Wistar rats. Pressure myograph video microscopy was used to study the changes in cerebral artery vessel diameter. The main results of this study were as follows: (1) The diameters of BA and middle cerebral artery (MCA) were 314.5±15.7 μm (n=15) and 233.3±10.1 μm (n=12) at 10 mmHg working pressure (P<0.05), respectively. Pressure-induced vasomotion occurred in BA (22/28, 78.6%), but not in MCA (4/31, 12.9%) from 0 to 70 mmHg working pressure. As is typical for vasomotion, the contractile phase of the response was more rapid than the relaxation phase; (2) The frequency of vasomotion response and the diameter were gradually increased in BA from 0 to 70 mmHg working pressure. The amplitude of the rhythmic contractions was relatively constant once stable conditions were achieved. The frequency of contractions was variable and the highest value was 16.7±4.7 (n=13) per 10 min at 60 mmHg working pressure; (3) The pressure-induced vasomotion of the isolated BA was attenuated by nifedipine, NFA, 18β-GA, TEA or in Ca(2+)-free medium. Nifedipine, NFA, 18β-GA or Ca(2+)-free medium not only dampened vasomotion, but also kept BA in relaxation state. In contrasts, TEA kept BA in contraction state. These results suggest that the pressure-induced vasomotion of the isolated BA results from an interaction between Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) currents and K(Ca) currents. We hypothesize that vasomotion of BA depends on the depolarizing of the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to activate CaCCs. Depolarization in turn activates voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, synchronizing contractions of adjacent cells through influx of extracellular calcium and the flow of calcium through gap junctions. Subsequent calcium

  6. The symptomatology of megadolicho basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Herpers, M; Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1983-01-01

    Cranial nerve dysfunction, obstruction hydrocephalus, signs of brain stem dysfunction, and signs of a space-occupying lesion in the posterior fossa are presumed to be related to a megadolicho basilar artery, if present. Since there are no large series of patients with such vascular anomaly, a bias in relating symptoms with the presence of a megadolicho basilar artery is not excluded. We therefore studied retrospectively the incidence of megadolicho and dolicho basilar artery on cranial CT-scan of 3332 patients of 50 years and older. Patient records were reviewed for the above mentioned symptoms. 12 out of 22 patients with a megadolicho basilar artery and 2 patients out of 40 with a dolicho basilar artery had one or two of these symptoms. It is concluded that a megadolicho basilar artery can cause cranial nerve dysfunction, obstruction hydrocephalus, signs of brain stem dysfunction, and signs of a space-occupying lesion in the posterior fossa. PMID:6317247

  7. Alterations in the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the basilar artery of rats following a subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WANG, QING-SONG; LIN, TING-TING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm (CVS). The rat models were established by twice injecting blood into the cisterna magna, after which the following experimental groups were established: The normal group, the SAH3d group, the SAH5d group and the SAH7d group. The rats were perfused and the basilar artery was removed for histological examination. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery lumen was measured using computer software; and the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was detected by immunohistochemistry. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery of the rats in the SAH model groups was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner, as compared with the normal group. The protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α in the SAH3d, SAH5d and SAH7d groups was significantly increased over time (P<0.05), as compared with the normal group. CVS was detected in the basilar artery, and was associated with wall thickening and significant narrowing of the lumen, thus suggesting that the present model may be used for investigating cerebrovascular disease following SAH. The immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was significantly increased in the basilar artery of the SAH model rats, and were positively correlated with the degree of CVS. PMID:26997984

  8. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor released by 5-HT: distinct from nitric oxide in basilar arteries of normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Y; Imaizumi, Y; Asano, M; Matsuda, T; Watanabe, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The role of the endothelium in cerebrovascular responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) in vitro. 2. Cumulative addition of 5-HT caused concentration-dependent contractions in ring preparations of SHR basilar arteries; the contractile response was smaller in WKY basilar arteries. 3. Removal of the endothelium enhanced markedly the contractile responses to 5-HT in WKY arteries but had only a slight effect in SHR arteries. The responsiveness to 5-HT in WKY arteries after removal of endothelium was comparable to that in SHR arteries. 4. The endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine in WKY basilar arteries was almost abolished by treatment with 10 microM methylene blue or 10 microM NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG). However, the response to 5-HT was not affected by treatment with methylene blue, L-NOARG or indomethacin. 5. Application of 10-20 mM K+ or 3.2 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) did not change significantly, or only increased slightly, the resting tension, but markedly enhanced the contractile response to 5-HT in WKY arteries with endothelium. In contrast, the submaximal response to 5-HT in SHR arteries with endothelium was significantly enhanced by 0.3 mM TEA. 6. In the presence of 1 mM TEA, the application of 10 microM L-NOARG further enhanced the responses of 5-HT in WKY arteries with endothelium. In SHR arteries with endothelium, 10 microM L-NOARG per se enhanced slightly but significantly the responses to 5-HT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7812628

  9. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  10. Arterial remodeling of basilar atherosclerosis in isolated pontine infarction.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Hua, Ting; Xu, Yu; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Huang, Jing

    2015-04-01

    Isolated pontine infarctions are usually classified as paramedian pontine infarction (PPI) and lacunar pontine infarction (LPI). Although they have different shapes and locations, some recent studies proved that they might both be associated with basilar artery atherosclerosis in pathogenesis. This study aimed to explore the difference of basilar artery remodeling between two subtypes of pontine infarctions. Patients with PPI or LPI were scanned by High-resolution MRI (HR-MRI). The MR images of patients with basilar artery atherosclerosis were further analyzed to measure the vessel, lumen and wall areas at different segments of basilar arteries. Stenosis rate and remodeling index were calculated according to which arterial remodeling was divided into positive, intermediate and negative remodeling. Vascular risk factors and remodeling-related features were compared between PPI and LPI, and also between patients with and without positive remodeling. 34 patients with PPI and 21 patients with LPI had basilar artery atherosclerosis identified by HR-MRI. Positive remodeling was dominant in LPI group while in PPI group, three subtypes of remodeling were equal. Patients with positive remodeling had higher levels of low-density lipoprotein and homocysteine. Positive remodeling of basilar artery might reflect the low stability of basilar atherosclerotic plaques, which was more closely associated with LPI than PPI. PMID:25367406

  11. Basilar artery aneurysm at a persistent trigeminal artery junction. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, G B; Conti, M L M; Veiga, J C E; Jory, M; Souza, R B

    2011-09-01

    The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  12. Characterization of the relaxant action of urocortin, a new peptide related to corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat isolated basilar artery

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, L; Kanzler, Ch; Schmiedek, P; Ehrenreich, H

    1998-01-01

    In addition to its well established neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter effects, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts a potent vasorelaxant action. Recently, a CRF-related peptide, urocortin, has been identified in the mammalian brain. In the present study, the cerebral vasomotor action of this peptide and the mechanism underlying its relaxant effect are characterized.Ring segments obtained from the rat basilar artery were used for measurement of isometric force. The relaxant action of urocortin, CRF and sauvagine was studied in segments with a functionally intact endothelium.In segments precontracted with prostaglandin F2α, urocortin, CRF and sauvagine induced concentration-related relaxation. The order of potency was as follows (pD2±s.e.m. given in brackets): urocortin (9.32±0.07) > sauvagine (9.08±0.08) > CRF (7.50±0.07). Complete relaxation was achieved with each agonist. Relaxation was not affected by removal of the endothelium but was markedly attenuated in segments precontracted with 50 mM K+ Krebs solution. The relaxant effect of urocortin was inhibited by astressin in an apparently competitive manner. A pA2 value of 7.52 was estimated for astressin. Inhibition of urocortin-induced relaxation was also observed in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 (pD2 in the presence of 300 μM SQ22536, 9.36±0.05) and the K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (10 mM; pD2, 8.65±0.07), iberiotoxin (100 nM; pD2, 8.88±0.08) and apamin (10 nM; pD2, 8.94±0.07). However, the inhibitory actions of SQ22536 and apamin or iberiotoxin were not additive.The results suggest that urocortin induces relaxation of cerebral arteries by activating CRF-R2 receptors present in the vascular wall. Relaxation appears to be mediated by adenylate cyclase stimulation and activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels. PMID:9863643

  13. Wall thickening pattern in atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianjin; Liu, Lei; He, Xinxin; Zhang, Xuebin; Hu, Libin; Du, Bin; Wang, Wu; Jiang, Weijian; Liu, Zunjing

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate wall thickening (WT) pattern of atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis with three-dimensional volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (3D VISTA), and the relationship with clinical characteristics. Twenty consecutive patients with atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis were prospectively enrolled. All cross-sectional slices on VISTA images of basilar arteries were assessed, and classified as eccentric or concentric WT. Clinical characteristics and degree of stenosis were compared between the patients with different wall WT pattern. Wall abnormalities were identified in 568 cross-sectional slices in basilar arteries of 20 patients including eccentric WT in 497 (87.5 %) slices, and concentric WT in 71 (12.5 %) slices. In 11 of 20 patients, all the cross-sectional slices (293 slices) showed eccentric WT. In 9 of 20 patients, the cross-sectional slices (275 slices) showed both eccentric WT (204 slices, 74.2 %) and concentric WT (71 slices, 25.8 %). No lesion showed only concentric WT. At the slices of maximum luminal narrowing sites, only one patient showed concentric WT. Symptomatic stenosis was more common in the patients with mixed WT (eccentric and concentric), compared to patients with only eccentric WT (100 vs 54.5 %, p = 0.038). Atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis could show both eccentric and concentric WT based on each slice analysis. Concentric WT was found in near half of the patients, but tended to locate in minimal slices. No lesion was entirely concentric. Lesions with mixed WT (concentric and eccentric) might represent advanced atherosclerosis with high risk of ischemic event. PMID:26520844

  14. Impaired vasodilator response to organic nitrates in isolated basilar arteries

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Dorothee; Kojda, Georg

    2001-01-01

    The differential responsiveness of various sections and regions in the vascular system to the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates is important for the beneficial antiischaemic effects of these drugs. In this study we examined the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates in cerebral arteries, where vasodilation causes substantial nitrate induced headache. Isolated porcine basilar and coronary arteries were subjected to increasing concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), isosorbide-5-nitrate (ISMN) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and endothelium-dependent vasodilation was investigated for comparison purpose. The vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.33±0.1, n=8), ISMN (1.61±0.07, n=7) and PETN (>10 μM, n=7) in basilar arteries was more than 100 fold lower than that of GTN (6.52±0.06, n=12), ISMN (3.66±0.08, n=10) and PETN (6.3±0.13, n=8) observed in coronary arteries. In striking contrast, the vasodilator potency of SNAP (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) was almost similar in basilar (7.76±0.05, n=7) and coronary arteries (7.59±0.05, n=9). Likewise, no difference in endothelium dependent relaxation was observed. Denudation of the endothelium resulted in a small increase of the vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.84±0.09, n=7, P<0.03) in basilar arteries and similar results were obtained in the presence of the NO-synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (4.59±0.05, n=9, P<0.03). These results suggest that cerebral conductance blood vessels such as porcine basilar arteries seems to have a reduced expression and/or activity of certain cellular enzymatic electron transport systems such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are necessary to bioconvert organic nitrates to NO. PMID:11156558

  15. Double Stent Assist Coiling of Ruptured Large Saccular Aneurysm in Proximal Basilar Artery Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Huh, Joon; Cho, Chul Bum; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, Il Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Lee, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Basilar artery fenestration is infrequent and even rarer in association with a large aneurysm. With proximity to brain stem and vital perforators, endovascular coiling can be considered first. If the large ruptured aneurysm with a wide neck originated from fenestra of the proximal basilar artery and the fenestration loop has branches of posterior circulation, therapeutic consideration should be thorough and fractionized. We report endovascular therapeutic details for a case of a ruptured large saccular aneurysm in proximal basilar artery fenestration. PMID:26523257

  16. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  17. A vertebral artery dissection with basilar artery occlusion in a child.

    PubMed

    Devue, Katleen; Van Ingelgem, Annemie; De Keukeleire, Katrien; De Leeuw, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the case report of an 11-year-old boy with an acute dissection with thrombosis of the left vertebral artery and thrombosis of the basilar artery. The patient was treated with acute systemic thrombolysis, followed by intra-arterial thrombolysis, without any clinical improvement, showing left hemiplegia, bilateral clonus, hyperreflexia, and impaired consciousness. MRI indicated persistent thrombosis of the arteria basilaris with edema and ischemia of the right brainstem. Heparinization for 72 hours, followed by a two-week LMWH treatment and subsequent oral warfarin therapy, resulted in a lasting improvement of the symptoms. Vertebral artery dissection after minor trauma is rare in children. While acute basilar artery occlusion as a complication is even more infrequent, it is potentially fatal, which means that prompt diagnosis and treatment are imperative. The lack of class I recommendation guidelines for children regarding treatment of vertebral artery dissection and basilar artery occlusion means that initial and follow-up management both require a multidisciplinary approach to coordinate emergency, critical care, interventional radiology, and child neurology services. PMID:25587466

  18. Different Imaging Strategies in Patients With Possible Basilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Sebastian E.; Hunink, Myriam G.; Schöberl, Florian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Petersen, Steffen E.; Dichgans, Martin; Janssen, Hendrik; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different noninvasive imaging strategies in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion. Methods— A Markov decision analytic model was used to evaluate long-term outcomes resulting from strategies using computed tomographic angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance imaging, nonenhanced CT, or duplex ultrasound with intravenous (IV) thrombolysis being administered after positive findings. The analysis was performed from the societal perspective based on US recommendations. Input parameters were derived from the literature. Costs were obtained from United States costing sources and published literature. Outcomes were lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and net monetary benefits, with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per QALY. The strategy with the highest net monetary benefit was considered the most cost-effective. Extensive deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the effect of varying parameter values. Results— In the reference case analysis, CTA dominated all other imaging strategies. CTA yielded 0.02 QALYs more than magnetic resonance imaging and 0.04 QALYs more than duplex ultrasound followed by CTA. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per QALY, CTA yielded the highest net monetary benefits. The probability that CTA is cost-effective was 96% at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed that duplex ultrasound was cost-effective only for a prior probability of ≤0.02 and that these results were only minimally influenced by duplex ultrasound sensitivity and specificity. Nonenhanced CT and magnetic resonance imaging never became the most cost-effective strategy. Conclusions— Our results suggest that CTA in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion is cost-effective. PMID:26022634

  19. High dietary fructose does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of high fat diet on basilar artery function.

    PubMed

    Toklu, H Z; Muller-Delp, J; Sakaraya, Y; Oktay, S; Kirichenko, N; Matheny, M; Carter, C S; Morgan, D; Strehler, K Y E; Tumer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a high fat (HF) diet alone or with high fructose (HF/F) on functional and structural changes in the basilar arteries and cardiovascular health parameters in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a HF (30%) or HF/F (30/40%) diet for 12 weeks. The basilar artery was cannulated in a pressurized system (90 cm H2O) and vascular responses to KCl (30 - 120 mM), endothelin (10(-11) - 10(-7) M), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), diethylamine (DEA)-NONO-ate (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), and papaverine (10(-10) - 10(-4) M) were evaluated. Rats were also monitored for food intake, body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and heart rate. At death, asymmetrical dimethyl arginine level (ADMA) and leptin were assayed in serum. Although there was no significant difference in weight gain and food intake, HF and HF/F diets increased body fat composition and decreased the lean mass. HF/F diet accelerated the development of dyslipidemia. Although resting blood pressure remained unchanged, stress caused a significant elevation in blood pressure and a modest increase in heart rate in HF fed rats. Both HF and HF/F diet resulted in decreased response to endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation, whereas increased basilar artery wall thickness was observed only in HF group. Serum leptin levels positively correlated with wall thickness. Moreover serum ADMA was increased and eNOS immunofluorescence was significantly decreased with both diets. These data suggest that the presence of high fructose in a HF diet does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of a HF diet on basilar artery function. PMID:27226180

  20. Model studies of blood flow in basilar artery with 3D laser Doppler anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. V.; Sindeev, S. V.; Liepsch, D.; Balasso, A.; Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    It is proposed an integrated approach to the study of basilar artery blood flow using 3D laser Doppler anemometer for identifying the causes of the formation and development of cerebral aneurysms. Feature of the work is the combined usage of both mathematical modeling and experimental methods. Described the experimental setup and the method of measurement of basilar artery blood flow, carried out in an interdisciplinary laboratory of Hospital Rechts der Isar of Technical University of Munich. The experimental setup used to simulate the blood flow in the basilar artery and to measure blood flow characteristics using 3D laser Doppler anemometer (3D LDA). Described a method of numerical studies carried out in Tambov State Technical University and the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery. Proposed an approach for sharing experimental and numerical methods of research to identify the causes of the basilar artery aneurysms.

  1. Chronic supplementation of paeonol combined with danshensu for the improvement of vascular reactivity in the cerebral basilar artery of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Li, Ya-Ling; Li, Zi-Lin; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuan-Xuan; Qiu, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Qian; Wang, Si-Wang

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading causes of death in the world is cerebrovascular disease. Numerous Chinese traditional medicines, such as Cortex Moutan (root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andrew) and Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae (root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge), protect against cerebrovascular diseases and exhibit anti-atherosclerotic effects. Traditional medicines have been routinely used for a long time in China. In addition, these two herbs are prescribed together in clinical practice. Therefore, the pharmacodynamic interactions between the active constituents of these two herbs, which are paeonol (Pae) and danshensu (DSS), should be particularly studied. The study of Pae and DSS can provide substantial foundations in understanding their mechanisms and empirical evidence to support clinical practice. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of the pharmacodynamic interaction between Pae and DSS on cerebrovascular malfunctioning in diabetes. Experimental diabetes was induced in rats, which was then treated with Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS for eight weeks. Afterward, cerebral arteries from all groups were isolated and equilibrated in an organ bath with Krebs buffer and ring tension. Effects of Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS were observed on vessel relaxation with or without endothelium as well as on the basal tonus of vessels from normal and diabetic rats. Indexes about oxidative stress were also determined. We report that the cerebral arteries from diabetic rats show decreased vascular reactivity to acetylcholine (ACh) which was corrected in Pae, DSS, and Pae + DSS treated groups. Furthermore, phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction response decreased in the treated groups. Phenylephrine and CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstrictions are partially inhibited in the three treated groups under Ca2+-free medium. Pre-incubated with tetraethylammonium, a non-selective K+ channel blocker, the antagonized relaxation responses increased in DSS and Pae + DSS treated diabetic

  2. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin KW; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10−12 to 10−7 mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ETA) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  3. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin K W; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10(-12) to 10(-7) mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ET(A)) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  4. [Intra-arterial thrombolysis of a basilar vascular accident during coronary angiography].

    PubMed

    Battikh, K; Rihani, R; Lemahieu, J M; Mokahal, M; Houchaymi, Z; Cornaert, P; Dutoit, A

    2001-09-01

    The authors report the case of a 67 year old man with a previous history of aortobifemoral arterial graft who had unstable angina after carotid endarterectomy. Coronary angiography by the right brachial artery was complicated by a cerebrovascular accident with a reactive coma, convulsions and respiratory problems. Selective angiography of the right vertebral artery showed an image of occlusive thrombosis of the basilar artery. In view of the clinical state and angiographic appearances, the authors decided on immediate intra-arterial thrombolysis with Urokinase which dissolved the clot and reestablished flow in the basilar artery, the cerebellar and posterior cerebral arteries. The outcome was favourable with immediate and good recovery of consciousness and hospital discharge on the sixth day without neurological or radiological sequellae. Cerebrovascular accident is a rare and potentially serious complication of left heart catheterisation which requires immediate cerebral angiography to determine the mechanism and propose an appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:11603067

  5. Role of L-type Ca(2+) channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum and Rho kinase in rat basilar artery contractile properties in a new model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Muñoz-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Vilches-Arenas, Angel; Porras-González, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Ureña, Juan; González-Montelongo, María del Carmen

    2015-09-01

    We have previously described that L-type Ca(2+) channels' (LTCCs) activation and metabotropic Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and sustained arterial contraction. We have investigated whether this signaling pathway can be altered in a new experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For this purpose, arterial reactivity was evaluated on days 1 to 5 after surgery. A significant increase of basal tone, measured 4 and 60min after normalization, was observed on day 5 after SAH and at 60min on days 2 and 3 after SAH. This phenomenon was suppressed with LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors. We have also studied arterial rings vasoreactivity in response to high K(+) solutions. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the phasic component of the high K(+)-induced contraction between sham and SAH groups, whereas a significant increase in the sustained contraction was observed on day 5 after SAH. This latter component was sensitive to fasudil, and selectively reduced by low nifedipine concentration, and phospholipase C and SR-ATPase inhibitors. Therefore, our data suggest that the metabotropic function of LTCCs is potentiated in SAH. Our results could provide a new strategy to optimize the pharmacological treatment of this pathological process. PMID:25937251

  6. Rapid ventricular pacing for a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm in a pediatric patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Smith, Tony P; Kanter, Ronald J; Ames, Warwick; Machovec, Kelly A; Grant, Gerald A; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2015-06-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms of the basilar apex are difficult to treat. Recently, endovascular treatment has mitigated much of the morbidity associated with treating these lesions. However, the morphology of aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system can preclude endovascular treatment. Rapid ventricular pacing (RVP) facilitates open surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. It can assist in reducing the pressure of the neck of the aneurysm, allowing safe application of a clip. The authors present a case of a pediatric patient who developed a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm that required surgery. Given the large size of the aneurysm, RVP was performed, allowing the surgeons to dissect the dome of the aneurysm from the surrounding tissue and pontine perforating branches away from the lesion to safely clip the lesion. The patient had an uneventful recovery. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first known case of RVP to aid in basilar artery clip occlusion in a pediatric patient. PMID:25745950

  7. Numerical simulations of post-surgical flow and thrombosis in basilar artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadhri, Santhosh; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    Surgical treatment of basilar artery aneurysms presents a major challenge since it is crucial to preserve the flow to the vital brainstem perforators branching of the basilar artery. In some cases, basilar aneurysms can be treated by clipping vessels in order to induce flow reduction and aneurysm thrombosis. Patient-specific CFD models can provide guidance to clinicians by simulating postoperative flows resulting from alternative surgeries. Several surgical options were evaluated for four basilar aneurysm patients. Patient-specific models were generated from preoperative MR angiography and MR velocimetry data and modified to simulate different procedures. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite-volume solver Fluent. Virtual contrast injections were simulated by solving the advection-diffusion equation in order to estimate the flow residence time and determine thrombus-prone regions. The results indicated on procedures that reduce intra-aneurysmal velocities and flow regions which are likely to become thrombosed. Thus CFD modeling can help improve the outcome of surgeries altering the flow in basilar aneurysms.

  8. Unusual persistent primitive trigeminal artery with a superior duplicated basilar system.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Laila Malani; Carlson, Andrew Phillip

    2016-07-01

    A 67-year-old patient who presented with a right cerebellar hemorrhage underwent vascular workup for suspicion of underlying vascular anomalies. A diagnostic cerebral angiogram demonstrated a duplicated basilar system fed solely by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. The findings proved to be incidental and unrelated to the patient's hemorrhage. These developmental abnormalities are consistent with embryological development. PMID:26404778

  9. Expression of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the basilar artery after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu Dong; Mao, Hai Yan; Lv, Jing; Lu, Xiao Jie

    2016-05-01

    It has been suggested that inflammatory damage may be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been identified as a potent proinflammatory mediator, and may trigger increases in other inflammatory cytokines. However, little is known about the role of HMGB1 in SAH-induced cerebrovascular inflammation. In this study, 48 male rats were assigned randomly to four groups: a control group, or SAH day 3, day 5, or day 7 groups. The animals in SAH day 3, day 5, and day 7 groups were subjected to injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna twice, on day 0 and day 2, and were killed on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively. Cross-sectional area of the basilar artery was measured and the HMGB1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The mRNA level of HMGB1 was also determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The basilar arteries exhibited vasospasm after SAH which was most severe on day 3 and 5. Elevated expression of HMGB1 was detected after SAH and was highest on day 3 and 5. HMGB1 is increasingly expressed in parallel to the development of CVS in this rat experimental model of SAH. These results suggest that HMGB1 may be related to the CVS observed after SAH and HMGB1 may play a key role in the inflammatory response in CVS after SAH. PMID:26765765

  10. Study on the correlation of vertebral artery dominance, basilar artery curvature and posterior circulation infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ya-Fang; Dong, Xiao-Feng; Feng, Hong-Xuan; Zhao, He-Qing; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Vertebral artery dominance (VAD), which is a common congenital variation of vertebral artery, may be associated with an increased risk of cerebral posterior circulation infarction (PCI). The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation of VAD with incidence and laterality of PCI, and oblige the correlation of VAD and basilar artery (BA) curvature. Incidence of separate territory infarction in posterior circulation and incidence of BA curvature were compared between 78 VAD patients and 68 controls. VA dominance, laterality of BA curvature and separate territory infarction, and their directional relationships were observed in VAD group. The incidence of BA curvature in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.000). 89.7 % (35/39) of patients had an opposite directional relationship between dominant VA and BA curvature. The total incidence of PCI in VAD group was significantly higher than that in controls (P = 0.001). The incidences of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and BA territory infarction were both significantly higher than those in controls [11.5 % (9/78) vs. 1.5 % (1/68), P = 0.016; 20.5 % (16/78) vs. 7.4 % (5/68), P = 0.024]. No differences were found in superior cerebellar artery and posterior cerebral artery territory infarction between two groups. 77.8 % (7/9) of PICA infarction were on the opposite side of dominant VA. 75.0 % (12/16) of BA infarction were on the side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI in BA curvature patients was significantly higher than that in BA straight patients. The incidence of BA curvature is higher in VAD patients, and BA usually bends to the opposite side of dominant VA. The incidence of PCI is higher in VAD patients, especially in PICA infarction and BA infarction patients. PMID:26615535

  11. Neurogenically mediated contractions of dog basilar artery involve the release of a thromboxane-like substance.

    PubMed

    Connor, H E; Edwards, L A; Feniuk, W

    1989-12-19

    Electrical field stimulation of dog isolated basilar artery produced neurogenically mediated contractions which were unaffected by phentolamine (1 microM), atropine (1 microM), ketanserin (1 microM) or methiothepin (0.1 microM). Responses were abolished by GR32191 (1-10 nM), BM 13.177 (0.1-10 microM) or flurbiprofen (0.5 microM) and markedly attenuated by dazoxiben (1-10 microM). Removal of the endothelium by Triton X-100-perfusion did not modify the magnitude of contractions to electrical stimulation and GR32191 still abolished the responses. GR32191 (1-10 nM) did not modify neurogenically mediated contraction of rabbit ear artery or potassium chloride-induced contraction of dog basilar artery. The results suggest that electrical field stimulation of dog basilar artery causes contractions which are mediated via a cyclo-oxygenase product with characteristics similar to thromboxane. This thromboxane-like substance is not endothelial in origin, nor released by contraction of the cerebrovascular smooth muscle per se and is therefore derived from a subendothelial, possibly neuronal, source. PMID:2483549

  12. The challenge of basilar artery occlusion wake-up stroke: too late for intravenous thrombolysis?

    PubMed

    Caliandro, Pietro; Reale, Giuseppe; Tartaglione, Tommaso; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2016-07-01

    We describe the case of a patient carried to our emergency department, with the wake-up finding of dysarthria, right hemiplegia and worsening consciousness impairment (NIHSS 12). After performing a CT angiography, which showed complete basilar occlusion, we determined the MR DWI-FLAIR mismatch to estimate the stroke onset time. Because of the favorable mismatch (DWI hyperintensity in the left pons, no FLAIR hyperintensity in the same region), the patient underwent thrombolysis with sudden neurological improvement. In addition, the DWI hyperintensity first observed in the left pons totally regressed after thrombolysis. Wake-up stroke constitutes about 14 % of all strokes, while the percentage of basilar artery occlusion wake-up strokes is still unknown. Although thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset time is still an off-label therapy, basilar artery occlusion is a potentially fatal event. In our case we used RM DWI-FLAIR mismatch to rapidly estimate the stroke onset time and to treat the patient with an off-label but potentially effective and safe therapy. PMID:26960980

  13. Multiple brainstem infarctions in a boy caused by angiitis of the basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masahiro; Tamura, Takuya; Yoshida, Takeshi; Haruta, Tsunekazu

    2011-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with altered states of consciousness coupled with a headache and nausea. Upon admission, the patient was afebrile and comatose with a decorticated posture and was subsequently intubated. All routine laboratory tests and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were normal. Brain T2-weighted MRI (figure 1A) revealed multiple hyperintense signals in the brainstem and cerebellum. A single gadolinium-enhanced lesion was observed in the left occipital lobe. These observations were indicative of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and we subsequently started methylprednisolone pulse therapy. In the follow-up MRI study, the lesions were necrotic, suggesting changes after a stroke rather than ADEM. The MR angiography (figure 1B) and the conventional cerebral angiography (figure 1C,D) performed on days 25 and 28, respectively, revealed segmental stenoses ("beading") of the basilar artery and the left middle cerebral artery and the near occlusions of both posterior cerebral arteries with thrombus adjacent to the basilar artery bifurcation. No angiographic abnormalities were observed in the extracranial carotid and renal arteries. We diagnosed the lesions as angiitic infarctions and started plasma exchange and antiplatelet therapy. PMID:20530143

  14. Vasoconstrictive effects of levobupivacaine on the basilar artery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ergil, Julide; Kertmen, Hayri; Sayın, Murat; Yılmaz, Erdal Reşit; Özkan, Derya; Arıkök, Ata Türker; Kanat, Mehmet Ali; Şekerci, Zeki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used technique of the modern practice of anesthesia. Spinal cord ischemia is a rare but catastrophic complication of spinal anesthesia which may be caused by a direct vasoconstrictive effect of the local anesthetic. Although the vasoconstrictive effects of levobupivacaine have been widely studied, the vasoconstrictive effects of this drug on the intradural arteries have never been studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether levobupivacaine has vasoconstrictive effects on the basilar artery in rabbits. Material and methods Thirty male New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly into three groups of ten rabbits each: group 1 (control); group 2 (0.125% levobupivacaine); group 3 (0.25% levobupivacaine). The cisterna magna was punctured as described below, then 1 ml of saline or 0.125% or 0.25% levobupivacaine was injected into the cisterna magna in 10 min by an infusion pump in groups 1, 2 and 3 respectively. All animals were euthanized by perfusion-fixation 30 min after the procedure. The luminal area and the size of the cross-sectional area for each basilar artery were measured. Results Both 0.125% and 0.25% levobupivacaine infusion caused significant vasoconstriction. Vasoconstriction was more significant for the 0.125% concentration. Conclusions The results of this study indicated that both 0.125% and 0.25% concentrations of levobupivacaine caused significant vasoconstriction of the basilar artery when administered into the subarachnoid space. This may constitute proof that subarachnoid administration of levobupivacaine may diminish the spinal cord blood flow, causing ischemia. PMID:26170861

  15. Multiple vertebro-basilar infarctions from fibromuscular dysplasia related dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery in a child.

    PubMed

    Vles, J S; Hendriks, J J; Lodder, J; Janevski, B

    1990-05-01

    A 9-year-old boy with paroxysmal headache suffered persistent, focal neurologic deficit in the vertebral-basilar artery territory. Angiography showed dissecting aneurysm and "a string of beads" lesion in the third segment of the left vertebral artery compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia. PMID:2359482

  16. Stent treatment for basilar artery dissection: A single-center experience of 21 patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Tianxiao; Xue, Jiangyu; Wang, Ziliang; Bai, Weixing; Zhu, Liangfu; Feng, Guang; Xu, Gangqin; Yang, Bowen

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery dissection is a rare disease with high morbidity and mortality. No well-established management strategy exists for this lesion. Endovascular reconstructive therapy using stents (with or without coiling) may be the optimum strategy.We describe our center's experience for this treatment strategy in 21 patients with basilar artery dissection from January 2009 to July 2014 (17 men, four women; age range, 18-70 years; median age, 56 years). We divided patients into two groups: Group 1 patients received stent-assisted coiling treatment, and Group 2 patients received stent-only treatment. Pre-treatment, peri-operation and follow-up evaluation were investigated for complications, clinical outcome and angiographic results. The median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-67 months).All patients were treated endovascularly by stent-assisted coiling (14 patients) or stent only (seven patients). Immediate angiography showed: in Group 1, five of 14 lesions were completely occluded, five were partially occluded, four revealed retention of contrast media; in Group 2, all patients (seven of seven) had contrast retention. At the follow-up visit (median seven months, 3-29 months), the aneurysms were angiographically improved in five of 13 patients in Group 1 compared with immediately post-operation, while six of sevenimproved in Group 2. Five patients (all in Group 1) had ischemic or hemorrhage peri-operation complications. Long-term good clinical outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score (mRS) ≤ 2) were achieved in all patients except three death cases (two in Group1, one in Group 2).In our experience, endovascular reconstructive therapy using stents (with or without coiling) for basilar artery dissection is effective and safe. Stent-only treatment seems have a better safety profile during the peri-operation period. PMID:26842610

  17. Effects of flunarizine on electrical and mechanical responses of smooth muscle cells in basilar and ear arteries of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nagao, T; Suzuki, H; Kuriyama, H

    1986-08-01

    The effects of flunarizine on electrical and mechanical responses of smooth muscle tissues of the rabbit basilar and ear arteries to transmural stimulation, high-potassium solution (high-K), 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline were studied. In the basilar artery, 10(-6) M flunarizine (69 min application) blocked spike potentials generated by outward current stimuli or transmural stimulation without change in the resting-membrane potential or membrane resistance. The spike potentials generated in the ear artery were attenuated by a long exposure (up to 2 h) to a high concentration of flunarizine (10(-6) M). Membrane depolarizations produced by high-K, noradrenaline or 5-hydroxytryptamine were not blocked by flunarizine. Flunarizine inhibited smooth muscle contractions produced by transmural stimuli, high-K, noradrenaline or 5-hydroxytryptamine in both arteries, however the inhibition developed slowly, and the ear artery required a longer period of incubation with flunarizine than the basilar artery. The inhibitory effects of flunarizine on basilar artery were more marked against transmural stimulation or high-K induced contractions than against agonist-induced contractions. PMID:3774021

  18. Very late in-stent thrombosis 9 years after double stent treatment of fusiform basilar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Stanislawska, Katarzyna; Jankowski, Roman; Liebert, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular treatment seems to be the best approach to posterior circulation fusiform aneurysms. Double stent techniques are frequently used to occlude basilar artery dilations. Unfortunately, there is a limited number of studies that have followed up with patients over prolonged periods of time in order to evaluate delayed complications, such as stenosis, thrombosis or migration of stents. We present an unusual case of in-stent thrombosis 9 years after basilar artery aneurysm treatment to caution about complications associated with double stent implantation. PMID:25964437

  19. A novel trigger for cholesterol-dependent smooth muscle contraction mediated by the sphingosylphosphorylcholine-Rho-kinase pathway in the rat basilar artery: a mechanistic role for lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Shirao, Satoshi; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Shinoyama, Mizuya; Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Tamechika, Masakatsu; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Owada, Yuji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for abnormal cerebrovascular events. Rafts are cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains that influence signal transduction. We previously showed that Rho-kinase-mediated Ca2+ sensitization of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) induced by sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) has a pivotal role in cerebral vasospasm. The goals of the study were to show SPC-Rho-kinase-mediated VSM contraction in vivo and to link this effect to cholesterol and rafts. The SPC-induced VSM contraction measured using a cranial window model was reversed by Y-27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, in rats fed a control diet. The extent of SPC-induced contraction correlated with serum total cholesterol. Total cholesterol levels in the internal carotid artery (ICA) were significantly higher in rats fed a cholesterol diet compared with a control diet or a β-cyclodextrin diet, which depletes VSM cholesterol. Western blotting and real-time PCR revealed increases in flotillin-1, a raft marker, and flotillin-1 mRNA in the ICA in rats fed a cholesterol diet, but not in rats fed the β-cyclodextrin diet. Depletion of cholesterol decreased rafts in VSM cells, and prevention of an increase in cholesterol by β-cyclodextrin inhibited SPC-induced contraction in a cranial window model. These results indicate that cholesterol potentiates SPC-Rho-kinase-mediated contractions of importance in cerebral vasospasm and are compatible with a role for rafts in this process. PMID:25605290

  20. Assessment of Basilar Artery Reactivity in Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Wire Myograph.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Crystal M; Azrak, Zeina; Rahman, Farah Abdel; Itani, Hana A; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulation of normal cerebral arteries is a critical and important factor to supply the brain tissue with nutrients and oxygen. Stroke insult results in a disruption or reduction in cerebral arteries' blood flow with subsequent brain tissue damage. Hemorrhagic stroke is one type of stroke and accounts for about 13 % of all of stroke insults. In this type of stroke, the cerebral artery breaks open and causes bleeding in or surrounding the brain. Subsequently, this bleeding causes blood vessels to constrict in a process called vasospasm, in which the vessels narrow and impede the blood flow to brain tissue. Hemorrhagic stroke is the major cause of prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries. This leads to partial brain damage and sometimes death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the key delicate techniques to assess small blood vessel functionality is the wire myograph, which can be utilized in several cerebral injury models including stroke. The wire myograph is a device that provides information about the reactivity, stiffness, and elasticity of small blood vessels under isometric conditions. In this book chapter, we describe the techniques involved in wire myography assessment and the different measures and parameters recorded; we describe the utility of this technique in evaluating the effects of subarachnoid hemorrhage on basilar artery sensitivity to different agonists. PMID:27604742

  1. Successful coil embolization of a ruptured basilar artery aneurysm in a child with leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shihori; Maehara, Taketoshi; Mukawa, Maki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Nemoto, Shigeru; Ono, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kikuo

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population compared to adults. This has incited considerable discussion on how to treat children with this condition. Here, we report a child with a ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 12-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and accompanying abdominal candidiasis after chemotherapy suddenly complained of a severe headache and suffered consciousness disturbance moments later. Computed tomography scans and cerebral angiography demonstrated acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by saccular basilar artery aneurysm rupture. External ventricular drainage was performed immediately. Because the patient was in severe condition and did not show remarkable signs of central nervous system infection in cerebrospinal fluid studies, we applied endovascular treatment for the ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm, which was successfully occluded with coils. The patient recovered without new neurological deficits after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Recent reports indicate that both endovascular and microsurgical techniques can be used to effectively treat ruptured cerebral aneurysms in pediatric patients. A minimally invasive endovascular treatment was effective in the present case, but long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm the efficiency of endovascular treatment for children with ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysms. PMID:24257487

  2. Successful Coil Embolization of a Ruptured Basilar Artery Aneurysm in a Child with Leukemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Shihori; MAEHARA, Taketoshi; MUKAWA, Maki; AOYAGI, Masaru; YOSHINO, Yoshikazu; NEMOTO, Shigeru; ONO, Toshiaki; OHNO, Kikuo

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population compared to adults. This has incited considerable discussion on how to treat children with this condition. Here, we report a child with a ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 12-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and accompanying abdominal candidiasis after chemotherapy suddenly complained of a severe headache and suffered consciousness disturbance moments later. Computed tomography scans and cerebral angiography demonstrated acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by saccular basilar artery aneurysm rupture. External ventricular drainage was performed immediately. Because the patient was in severe condition and did not show remarkable signs of central nervous system infection in cerebrospinal fluid studies, we applied endovascular treatment for the ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm, which was successfully occluded with coils. The patient recovered without new neurological deficits after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Recent reports indicate that both endovascular and microsurgical techniques can be used to effectively treat ruptured cerebral aneurysms in pediatric patients. A minimally invasive endovascular treatment was effective in the present case, but long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm the efficiency of endovascular treatment for children with ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysms. PMID:24257487

  3. [Multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic arch graft].

    PubMed

    Otani, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoshi; Uneda, Atsuhito; Kajitani, Takumi; Watanabe, Kyoichi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Kiriyama, Hideki; Tokunaga, Koji; Matsumoto, Kengo

    2015-03-01

    A 62-year-old man with high fever and in a state of disorientation was transferred to our hospital. One year before this transfer, he had undergone total arch replacement surgery for thoracic aortic dissection. On admission to our hospital, head MRI revealed multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery, and chest CT showed gas around the aortic graft, in particular, at the origin of the left subclavian artery. We diagnosed him with brain abscesses in the left vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic graft. We immediately began administration of intravenous antibiotics. Although his blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were negative, fortunately, the brain abscesses and ectopic gas disappeared. Since reports of only antibiotic use for treating brain abscesses due to aortic graft infection are rare, the appropriate duration of antibiotic administration has not been established yet. Therefore, careful observation is required in this case. PMID:25748809

  4. Chronic basilar artery dissection with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Rajz, Gustavo; Vargas, Andres; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Basilar artery dissection (BAD) is a rare condition with a worse prognosis than a dissection limited to the vertebral artery. We report a rare case of chronic BAD with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 54-year-old woman. The diagnosis of acute BAD could only be made retrospectively, based on clinical and neuroradiological studies from a hospital admission 10months earlier. Angiography performed after her SAH showed unequivocal signs of imperfect healing; she was either post-recanalization of a complete occlusion or post-dissection. Residual multi-channel intraluminal defects led to the development of a small aneurysm, which was responsible for the massive hemorrhage. The occurrence of an associated aneurysm, and wall disease, but not an intraluminal process, reinforces the diagnosis of dissection. The patient was fully recovered at 90day follow-up. This case reinforces the need for long-term neuroradiological surveillance after non-hemorrhagic intracranial dissections to detect the development of de novo aneurysms. PMID:26960262

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Basilar Artery Thrombosis Secondary to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection with Symptom Onset Following Cervical Spine Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Ronni; Dalby, Rikke Beese; Hjort, Niels; Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Karabegovic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 37 Final Diagnosis: Vertebral artery dissection Symptoms: Neck pain and focal neurological deficits Medication: No previous Clinical Procedure: Endovascular thrombectomy Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Vertebral artery (VA) dissection (VAD) has been described following neck injury and can be associated with stroke, but the causal association with cervical spine manipulation therapy (cSMT) is controversial. The standard treatment for VAD is antithrombotic medical therapy. To highlight the considerations of an endovascular approach to VAD, we present a critical case of bilateral VAD causing embolic occlusion of the basilar artery (BA) in a patient with symptom debut following cSMT. Case Report: A 37-year-old woman presented with acute onset of neurological symptoms immediately following cSMT in a chiropractic facility. Acute magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed ischemic lesions in the right cerebellar hemisphere and occlusion of the cranial part of the BA. Angiography depicted bilateral VAD. Symptoms remitted after endovascular therapy, which included dilatation of the left VA and extraction of thrombus from the BA. After 6 months, the patient had minor sensory and cognitive deficits. Conclusions: In severe cases, VAD may be complicated by BA thrombosis, and this case highlights the importance of a fast diagnostic approach and advanced intravascular procedure to obtain good long-term neurological outcome. Furthermore, this case underlines the need to suspect VAD in patients presenting with neurological symptoms following cSMT. PMID:26647210

  6. Characterization of histamine receptors in isolated pig basilar artery by functional and radioligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Nishio, Akira )

    1993-01-01

    Histamine receptors in pig basilar arteries were investigated in vitro by radioligand binding assays and by measuring the contractile and relaxant responses to histamine. Histamine and 2-pyridyethylamine (H[sub 1]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent contractions, whereas impromidine (H[sub 2]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent relaxations. These responses were independent of the presence of endothelial cells. Diphenhydramine (H[sub 1]-antagonist) partially reversed the histamine-induced contractions to relaxations. Cimetidine (H[alpha][sub 2]-antagonist) potentiated the contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of cimetidine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the contraction was 6.30, and diphenhydramine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced contractions (pA[sub 2], 7.77). In the presence of diphenhydramine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the relaxation was 5.93, and cimetidine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced relaxations (pA[sub 2], 6.62). In the binding studies, the K[sub d] value of [[sup 3]H]mepyramine was 2.1 nM and the B[sub max] value was 95.6 fmol/mg protein. A competition experiment with diphenhydramine showed that the pK[sub i] value (7.51) was similar to the pA[sub 2] value. The K[sub d] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was 126.0 nM and the B[sub max] value was 459.8 fmol/mg protein. The pK[sub d] (6.90) for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was similar to the pA[sub 2] for cimetidine. The Hill coefficients for these experiments were not significantly different from unity. The present findings indicate that the number of H[sub 1]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]mepyramine, is smaller than that of H[sub 2]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine. However, the contractile response to histamine is predominantly mediated through stimulation of H[sub 1]-receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells in pig basilar artery.

  7. The transclival artery: a variant persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis not previously reported.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Jared D; Dahlin, Brian C; O'Brien, William T

    2016-01-01

    During embryological development, primitive anastomoses exist between the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries. These anastomoses typically regress or are incorporated into the developing vasculature. Persistence beyond fetal development, however, results in vascular anomalies that alter haemodynamic flow with a predisposition for aneurysm formation. The carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses mirror the primitive communications and include (from most to least common) the trigeminal, hypoglossal, proatlantal and otic arteries. The hypoglossal and proatlantal variants extend through the hypoglossal canal or foramen magnum, respectively. We present a previously undescribed variant of these persistent fetal anastomoses, the 'transclival artery', which courses through its own transclival skull base canal/foramen. PMID:27413022

  8. A Comparison between Mechanical Thrombectomy and Intra-arterial Fibrinolysis in Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion: Single Center Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seunguk; Jung, Cheolkyu; Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Chang, Jun Young; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, Bae Ju; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent advances in intra-arterial techniques and thrombectomy devices lead to high rate of recanalization. However, little is known regarding the effect of the evolvement of endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) in acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO). We compared the outcome of endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) versus intra-arterial fibrinolysis (IAF)-based ERT in patients with acute BAO. Methods After retrospectively reviewed a registry of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent ERT from September 2003 to February 2015, 57 patients with acute BAO within 12 hours from stroke onset were enrolled. They were categorized as an IAF group (n=24) and EMT group (n=33) according to the primary technical option. We compared the procedural and clinical outcomes between the groups. Results The time from groin puncture to recanalization was significantly shorter in the EMT group than in the IAF group (48.5 [25.3 to 87.8] vs. 92 [44 to 179] minutes; P=0.02) The rate of complete recanalization was significantly higher in the EMT group than in the IAF group (87.9% vs 41.7%; P<0.01). The good outcome of the modified Rankin Scale score≤2 at 3 months was more frequent in the EMT group than in the IAF group, but it was not statistically significant (39.4% vs 16.7%; P=0.06). Conclusions EMT-based ERT in patients with acute BAO is superior to IAF-based ERT in terms of the reduction of time from groin puncture to recanalization and the improvement of the rate of complete recanalization. PMID:27283281

  9. Basilar artery dissection: A rare complication of posterior fossa epidermoid cyst resection, and evaluation of the possible effects of cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Margolin, Emil

    2016-10-01

    We report a rare case of a 45-year-old female with an unruptured basilar artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with locked-in syndrome due to brainstem ischemia eleven months following resection of a giant cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst and three months after insertion of ventriculo peritoneal shunt due to hydrocephalus. The etiology of basilar artery dissection and the effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression in this patient are unclear. Our report suggests a possible effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on intracranial arterial dissection progression. PMID:27344090

  10. Acute ischemic stroke in a child due to basilar artery occlusion treated successfully with a stent retriever.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Roark, Christopher; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic strokes in childhood are rare. Thrombolytic therapy with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the main intervention for the management of pediatric stroke patients, but safety data are lacking and efficacy has been questioned. Recently, successful endovascular treatments for acute ischemic stroke in children have been reported with increasing frequency, suggesting that mechanical thrombectomy can be a safe and effective treatment. We present the case of a 22-month-old child with acute ischemic stroke due to basilar artery occlusion that was successfully treated with a stent retriever. PMID:26156170

  11. Basilar Artery Territory Stroke Secondary to Invasive Fungal Sphenoid Sinusitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Katherine A.; Nguyen, Peggy L.; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucormycosis is a fungal infection with the following 5 classic forms: cutaneous, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, disseminated, and rhinocerebral. The rhinocerebral form can be rapidly progressive and invasive with a high mortality rate. We present a case of a 38-year-old man with invasive mucormycosis that led to a basilar artery territory stroke. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is an unusual cause of stroke. Case Report A 38-year-old man with a past medical history of diabetes mellitus presented with altered mental status. A lumbar puncture revealed eosinophilic pleocytosis with a mildly elevated total protein and borderline low glucose level. CT revealed a left medullary and cerebellar infarct confirmed by MRI. MRI also displayed a diffuse marrow signal abnormality in the clivus with contiguous sinus disease. Endoscopic sinus surgery confirmed that the fungal sinusitis was mucormycosis of the Rhizopus genus, which had affected the left sphenoid sinus, invaded through the skull base, and involved the basilar artery. He was given liposomal amphotericin (500 mg i.v.) with posaconazole (400 mg i.v. twice daily). Due to the severity of the invasion and poor prognosis, the patient was discharged with comfort care measures. Discussion Clinicians should be aware of invasive sinusitis as a rare cause of stroke in diabetics. Once the subarachnoid space and basal arteries of the brain have been invaded, the prognosis is very poor. The key to improvement of outcomes is early recognition and treatment, and examination of the sinuses on neuroimaging in all cases of stroke is vital. PMID:25873889

  12. Contrast Extravasation on Computed Tomography Angiography Imitating a Basilar Artery Trunk Aneurysm in Subsequent Conventional Angiogram-Negative Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Courses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Ho; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Nam, Kyoung Hyup

    2015-01-01

    Contrast extravasation on computed tomography angiography (CTA) is rare but becoming more common, with increasing use of CTA for various cerebral vascular diseases. We report on two cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in which the CTA showed an upper basilar trunk saccular lesion suggesting ruptured aneurysm. However, immediate subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) failed to show a vascular lesion. In one case, repeated follow up DSA was also negative. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged without any neurologic deficit. In the other case, the patient showed sudden mental deterioration on the third hospital day and her brain CT showed rebleeding. The immediate follow up DSA showed contrast stagnation in the vicinity of the upper basilar artery, suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Double stents deployment at the disease segment was performed. Due to the frequent use of CTA, contrast extravasation is an increasingly common observation. Physicians should be aware that basilar artery extravasation can mimic the appearance of an aneurysm. PMID:27066442

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Sildenafil Citrate (Viagra) on Vertebral Artery Blood Flow in Patients with Vertebro-Basilar Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Berilgen, Sait; Ozdemir, Huseyin; Tekatas, Aslan; Ogur, Erkin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on the vertebral artery blood flow of patients with vertebro-basilar insufficiency (VBI) using color duplex sonography (CDS). Materials and Methods The study included 21 patients with VBI (aged 31-76; mean 61.0 ± 10.5 yrs). We administered a 50 mg oral dose of sildenafil citrate to all patients. Next, we measured the peak systolic velocity (Vmax), end diastolic velocity (Vmin), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), diameter, area, and flow volume (FV) of vertebral arteries using CDS before the administration of sildenafil citrate; 45 minutes after, and 75 minutes after administration. Statistical testing was performed using SPSS for windows version 11.0. The statistical test used to determine the outcome of the analysis was the repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results Compared to the baseline values, the vertebral artery diameter, area, and FV increased significantly following the administration of sildenafil citrate. The diameter, area and FV increased from 3.39 mm at 45 minutes to 3.64 mm at 75 minutes, 9.43 cm2 to 10.80 cm2 at 45 minutes and 10.81 cm2 at 75 minutes, as well as from 0.07 L/min at baseline to 0.09 L/min at 45 minutes and unchanged at 75 minutes, respectively. Conclusion Sildenafil citrate elicited a significant effect on vertebral artery diameter, area and FVs. PMID:19039262

  14. Endovascular treatment of basilar aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Ikeda, Daniel S; Shaw, Andrew; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Basilar artery aneurysms account for a small percentage of intracranial aneurysms; however, they are a diverse group of lesions necessitating different treatment techniques for those that are ruptured and unruptured. Basilar apex aneurysms are the most common type and are frequently wide-necked, necessitating stent-assisted coiling or balloon remodeling. Other techniques have evolved to forego stenting in acutely ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. The prevention of delayed thromboembolic complications with dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with stents is critical. After treatment, basilar aneurysms require close follow-up to ensure complete occlusion. Basilar apex aneurysms often require delayed re-treatment, especially when previously ruptured. PMID:24994086

  15. Vanillin and vanillin analogs relax porcine coronary and basilar arteries by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Raffai, Gábor; Khang, Gilson; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin (VA) and vanillyl alcohol (VAA), components of natural vanilla, and ethyl vanillin (EtVA; synthetic analog) are used as flavoring agents and/or as additives by the food, cosmetic, or pharmaceutic industries. VA, VAA, and EtVA possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but their vascular effects have not been determined. Therefore, we compared in isolated porcine coronary and basilar arteries the changes in isometric tension caused by VA, VAA, and EtVA. VA and its analogs caused concentration-dependent relaxations of both preparations during contractions from U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-11α,9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α, a thromboxane A2 receptor agonist), and of coronary arteries contracted with KCl or endothelin-1. The order of potency was VAA < VA < EtVA. The relaxations were not inhibited by endothelium removal, by inhibitors of NO synthases (N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride), cyclooxygenases (indomethacin), soluble guanylyl cyclase (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one [ODQ]), KCa (1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole [TRAM-34], 6,12,19,20,25,26-hexahydro-5,27:13,18:21,24-trietheno-11,7-metheno-7H-dibenzo[b,n][1,5,12,16]tetraazacyclotricosine-5,13-diium ditrifluoroacetate hydrate [UCL-1684], or iberiotoxin), by KATP (glibenclamide), by Kir (BaCl2), by transient receptor potential receptor vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) channels (ruthenium red), or by antioxidants (catalase, apocynin, tempol, N-acetylcysteine, tiron). VA and its analogs inhibited contractions induced by Ca(2+) reintroduction in coronary arteries, and by an opener of L-type Ca(2+)-channels (methyl 2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1,4-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylate [Bay K8644]) in coronary and basilar arteries. They inhibited contractions of coronary rings induced by the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate to the same extent as the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or incubation with nifedipine. Thus, in porcine arteries

  16. Nuclear factor-κB is involved in oxyhemoglobin-induced endothelin-1 expression in cerebrovascular muscle cells of the rabbit basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gao; Yu, Wei H; Yan, Cong; Liu, Yao; Li, Wei J; Zhang, Dong D; Liu, Nan

    2016-08-17

    The present research was designed to investigate whether endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion can be induced by oxyhemoglobin and whether nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is involved in the regulation of ET-1 transcription in cerebrovascular muscle cells. Cerebrovascular muscle cells isolated from a rabbit basilar artery were stimulated by oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and ET-1 production was increased significantly in the supernatant. Inhibition of NF-κB with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and small interfering RNA decreased the expression of ET-1. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the degradation of IkB-α was observed with the stimulation of OxyHb. The supernatant obtained from cerebrovascular muscle cells stimulated by OxyHb produced contractions in arterial rings and was blocked by the ET-1 receptor antagonist (BQ-123). The time course of the OxyHb-induced contractions of the basilar artery rings correlated with the time course of the OxyHb-induced ET-1 secretion. The contraction of the basilar artery rings induced by OxyHb was attenuated when the artery rings were preincubated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and SN50 (20 and 10 µM, respectively). These results indicate that cerebrovascular muscle cells may be an important source of ET-1 production after subarachnoid hemorrhage. NF-κB was involved in the expression of ET-1 and the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway may be beneficial for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. PMID:27391329

  17. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  18. Acute Ischemic Stroke Involving Both Anterior and Posterior Circulation Treated by Endovascular Revascularization for Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion via Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery.

    PubMed

    Imahori, Taichiro; Fujita, Atsushi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of acute ischemic stroke involving both the anterior and posterior circulation associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA), treated by endovascular revascularization for acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion via the PPTA. An otherwise healthy 67-year-old man experienced sudden loss of consciousness and quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive acute infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and BA. Because the volume of infarction in the territory of the right MCA was extensive, we judged the use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator to be contraindicated. Cerebral angiography revealed hypoplasia of both vertebral arteries and the presence of a PPTA from the right internal carotid artery. A microcatheter was introduced into the BA via the PPTA and revascularization was successfully performed using a Merci Retriever with adjuvant low-dose intraarterial urokinase. After treatment, his consciousness level and right motor weakness improved. Although persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses such as a PPTA are relatively rare vascular anomalies, if the persistent primitive artery is present, it can be an access route for mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27446523

  19. Increased Superoxide Anions Level may be Related with Impaired Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Cerebral and Carotid Arteries in Simulated Microgravity Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin; Zhang, Ran; Ren, Xin-Ling

    2008-06-01

    Our previous works showed that there is a significant increase in nitrite and nitrate content of cerebral and carotid arteries of hindlimb unweighting rats, and this result suggests that NOS activity or NO production may be increased by HU in the cerebral and carotid arteries ,and this may result in a enhanced endothelium-dependent dilatory responses in these artery of hindlimb unweighting rats. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of hindlimb unweighting on endothelium mediated relaxation and find the possible mechanisms which may result in the alteration. Twenty male healthy SD rats, which body weight ranged from 250g to 280g, were divided into control and hindlimb unweighting simulated microgravity groups randomly. After three weeks, the basilar artery and carotid artery were isolated and arterial dilatory responsiveness were examined in vitro using isolated arterial rings from rats. And the Superoxide Anions Levels were detected by oxidation-sensitive dye dihydroethidium and laser scanning confocal microscope. The data showed: Dilatory responses of both basilar and carotid arterial rings to Acetylcholine(10-10~10-4 mol/L ) was decreased in simulated microgravity rats as compared with that of controls, but dilatory responses of isolated arterial rings to Sodium Nitroprussid (10-10~10-4 mol/L ) was similar in both simulated Microgravity rats and control rats, and stronger superoxide anions signals were detected in basilar and carotid arteries from HU rats, while compared with that of control rats. These results indicate that endothelium-dependent relaxation of both basilar artery and carotid artery have been diminished by 3-week hindlimb unweighting, and increased superoxide anions levels may contribute to this alteration.

  20. A new simplified methodology for studying the coupled fluid-structure interaction in a weakened basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Montanino, A; Fortunato, A; Angelillo, M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the fluid-structure interaction in a weakened basilar artery. The aim is to study how the wall shear stress changes in space and time because of the weakening, because spatial and temporal changes are thought to be possible causes of aneurysm and vascular deseases. The arterial wall, in its natural configuration, is modeled as a hyperelastic cylinder, inhomogeneous along its axis, in order to simulate the axis-symmetric weakening. The fluid is studied exploiting a recent approach for quasi-one-dimensional flows in slowly varying ducts, which allows to write the averaged equations of mass and energy balance on the basis of the velocity profile in a straight duct. The unknowns are the wall pressure, the average velocity, and the wall radial displacement. The problem is solved in two parts: first, the stationary non-linear coupled problem is solved, and an intermediate configuration is obtained. Then, we study the variation of the basic unknowns about the intermediate configuration, considering time dependence over the cardiac cycles. The results suggest that, with a 10% reduction of the main elastic modulus, the shear stress in the weakened zone changes its sign and doubles the maximum stress value detected in the healthy zone. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26446301

  1. Posterior Circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early Computed Tomography Score Using Hypointense Vessels on Susceptibility Weighted Imaging Independently Predicts Outcome in Patients with Basilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Mundiyanapurath, S.; Möhlenbruch, M.; Ringleb, P. A.; Bösel, J.; Wick, W.; Bendszus, M.; Radbruch, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Appearance of hypointense vessels on susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) has been reported to correlate with outcome in patients with ischemia of the anterior circulation. This study investigates the correlation between the appearance of hypointense vessels on SWI after recanalization therapy and outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Methods Patients with basilar artery occlusion who were treated with endovascular recanalization or intravenous alteplase and received an MRI including SWI after therapy were retrieved from the hospital database for retrospective analysis. Posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early Computed Tomography Score (pcASPECTS) was calculated based on regions displaying hypointense vessels on SWI and compared to lesions on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Subsequently, SWI based pcASPECTS was correlated with outcome determined with modified Rankin Scale (mRS), categorized as favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) or unfavorable outcome (3-6). Results Twenty-two MRI of patients with basilar artery occlusion were analyzed. In seven out of eight areas of the pcASPECTS hypointense vessels on SWI were significantly correlated to areas of restricted diffusion on DWI. In univariate analysis median pcASPECTS on SWI was significantly higher in patients with favorable outcome (7.5 vs. 5, p=0.02). In a multivariate analysis pcASPECTS on SWI was an independent predictor of favorable outcome (OR 2.02; CI [1.02;3,99]; p=0.04). Conclusion pcASPECTS based on hypointense vessels on SWI after therapy predicts outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion and might potentially be used as an additional imaging biomarker in the management of patients with stroke in the posterior circulation. This needs to be confirmed in larger prospective clinical trials. PMID:26176682

  2. Ibuprofen or ozagrel increases NO release and l-nitro arginine induces TXA(2) release from cultured porcine basilar arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Yoriko; Obi, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Shigeru; Nishio, Akira

    2007-02-01

    The vascular resting tone of the porcine basilar artery appears to be mostly maintained by a balance between spontaneously released nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial cells and thromboxane (TX) A(2) from endothelial and smooth muscle cells. However the precise role of the interaction between the above two substances in the control of vascular tone is unclear. We attempted to clarify the interaction between NO and TXA(2) using cultured porcine basilar arterial endothelial cells. The cultured endothelial cells produced NO spontaneously, while TXB(2) (a stable metabolite of TXA(2)) production remained below the detection limit. Ibuprofen (a COX inhibitor) and ozagrel (a TXA(2) synthetase inhibitor) significantly increased the spontaneous production of NO, which was not affected by 1400W (an iNOS inhibitor). l-Nitro arginine (a NOS inhibitor) significantly induced TXB(2) production. These results suggest that NO may inhibit COX or TXA(2) synthetase, and that therefore inhibition of NOS might disinhibit COX or TXA(2) synthetase, subsequently inducing TXA(2) production. On the other hand, as TXA(2) and other contractility-related prostaglandin(s) may inhibit NOS, therefore the inhibition of COX or TXA(2) synthetase might disinhibit NOS, and then increase the spontaneous production of NO in porcine basilar arterial endothelial cells. PMID:17113355

  3. Pharmacological characterization of the mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxation induced by progesterone and 17β-estradiol on isolated canine basilar and internal carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rosas, Martha B; Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Sánchez-López, Araceli; Gutiérrez-Lara, Erika J; Centurión, David

    2014-11-01

    Progesterone and 17β-estradiol induce vasorelaxation through non-genomic mechanisms in several isolated blood vessels; however, no study has systematically evaluated the mechanisms involved in the relaxation induced by 17β-estradiol and progesterone in the canine basilar and internal carotid arteries that play a key role in cerebral circulation. Thus, relaxant effects of progesterone and 17β-estradiol on KCl- and/or PGF2α-pre-contracted arterial rings were investigated in absence or presence of several antagonists/inhibitors/blockers; the effect on the contractile responses to CaCl2 was also determined. In both arteries progesterone (5.6-180 μM) and 17β-estradiol (1.8-180 μM): (1) produced concentration-dependent relaxations of KCl- or PGF2α-pre-contracted arterial rings; (2) the relaxations were unaffected by actinomycin D (10 μM), cycloheximide (10 μM), SQ 22,536 (100 μM) or ODQ (30 μM), potassium channel blockers and ICI 182,780 (only for 17β-estradiol). In the basilar artery the vasorelaxation induced by 17β-estradiol was slightly blocked by tetraethylammonium (10mM) and glibenclamide (KATP; 10 μM). In both arteries, progesterone (10-100 μM), 17β-estradiol (3.1-31 μM) and nifedipine (0.01-1 μM) produced a concentration-dependent blockade of the contraction to CaCl2 (10 μM-10mM). These results suggest that progesterone and 17β-estradiol produced relaxation in the basilar and internal carotid arteries by blockade of L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel but not by genomic mechanisms or production of cAMP/cGMP. Potassium channels did not play a role in the relaxation to progesterone in both arteries or in the effect of 17β-estradiol in the internal carotid artery; meanwhile KATP channels play a minor role on the effect of 17β-estradiol in the basilar artery. PMID:25072792

  4. Brain Stem Infarction Due to Basilar Artery Dissection in a Patient with Moyamoya Disease Four Years after Successful Bilateral Revascularization Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takatsugu; Fujimura, Miki; Mugikura, Shunji; Endo, Hidenori; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-06-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease with an unknown etiology and is characterized by intrinsic fragility in the intracranial vascular walls such as the affected internal elastic lamina and thinning medial layer. The association of MMD with intracranial arterial dissection is extremely rare, whereas that with basilar artery dissection (BAD) has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old woman developed brain stem infarction due to BAD 4 years after successful bilateral superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for ischemic-onset MMD. She presented with sudden occipitalgia and subsequently developed transient dysarthria and mild hemiparesis. Although a transient ischemic attack was initially suspected, her condition deteriorated in a manner that was consistent with left hemiplegia with severe dysarthria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed brain stem infarction, and MR angiography delineated a double-lumen sign in the basilar artery, indicating BAD. She was treated conservatively and brain stem infarction did not expand. One year after the onset of brain stem infarction, her activity of daily living is still dependent (modified Rankin Scale of 4), and there were no morphological changes associated with BAD or recurrent cerebrovascular events during the follow-up period. The association of MMD with BAD is extremely rare. While considering the common underlying pathology such as an affected internal elastic lamina and fragile medial layer, the occurrence of BAD in a patient with MMD in a stable hemodynamic state is apparently unique. PMID:27068774

  5. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO 2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sang-Ho; Im, Jin-Wook; Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Ki-Ho; Kim, Young-Suk; Ko, Chang-Nam; Park, Jung-Mi; Park, Seong-Uk; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years) using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect. PMID:25132861

  6. Effect of ST36 Acupuncture on Hyperventilation-Induced CO2 Reactivity of the Basilar and Middle Cerebral Arteries and Heart Rate Variability in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Ki-Ho; Kim, Young-Suk; Ko, Chang-Nam; Park, Jung-Mi; Moon, Sang-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to verify the effect of acupuncture on cerebral haemodynamics to provide evidence for the use of acupuncture treatment as a complementary therapy for the high-risk stroke population. The effect of ST36 acupuncture treatment on the hyperventilation-induced CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries was studied in 10 healthy male volunteers (mean age, 25.2 ± 1.5 years) using a transcranial Doppler sonography with an interval of 1 week between measurements, and a portable ECG monitoring system was used to obtain ECG data simultaneously. The CO2 reactivity of the basilar and middle cerebral arteries increased significantly after ST36 acupuncture treatment, whereas the mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate did not change significantly. The high-frequency power significantly increased after ST36 acupuncture treatment, and the percentage increase of high-frequency power correlated significantly with the percentage increase in the CO2 reactivity of the contralateral middle cerebral artery. These data suggest that ST36 acupuncture treatment increases CO2 reactivity, indicating improvement of vasodilatory potential of the cerebral vasculature to compensate for fluctuations caused by changes in external conditions. The increase in parasympathetic tone by ST36 acupuncture treatment is responsible for this therapeutic effect. PMID:25132861

  7. Resection of large epidermoid tumors ventral to the brainstem: techniques to expand the operative corridor across the basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-01-01

    Epidermoid tumors comprise about 1% of all intracranial tumors. They are congenital lesions that arise from paramedian cisterns within the posterior fossa. These tumors present as heterogeneous hyperintense lesions on FLAIR and homogenous hyperintense lesions on DWI. Surgical resection remains the most accepted form of therapy, but epidermoid tumors may recur. These tumors are well exposed through a traditional retrosigmoid approach. The tumor can be removed relatively easily as it is avascular. However, the propensity of this tumor type to fill the small spaces within basal cisterns and attach to cranial nerves may make its complete resection challenging. Tumors resection has to preserve the surrounding arachnoid membranes encasing the cranial nerves. The author presents the case of a 42-year-old woman with a 1-year history of imbalance and nystagmus. An MRI revealed a large right-sided CP angle epidermoid tumor filling the ventral brainstem cistern and extending to the contralateral side, compressing the brainstem. The accompanying video illustrates resection of this mass through an extended (exposing the sigmoid sinus) retrosigmoid approach. The author removed the tumor piecemeal while protecting the cranial nerves. Small pieces of affected arachnoid covering the cranial nerves were not significantly manipulated. To excise the tumor along the contralateral paramedian cistern, the author used the space between the V and VII/VII cranial nerves to expose the space contralateral to the basilar artery and remove additional tumor. This maneuver allowed gross total resection of the tumor without a need to employ a more elaborate skull base approach such as petrosectomy. At 3-month follow-up visit after surgery, the patient's neurological exam returned to normal. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/CzRb-GUvhog . PMID:24380510

  8. Surgical treatment for combined hemifacial spasm and atypical trigeminal neuralgia caused by a tortuous basilar artery. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gressot, L V; Hassaneen, W; Fox, B D; Mitchell, B D; Tatsui, C E; Ehni, B L; Omeis, I

    2012-06-01

    Simultaneous hemifacial spasm (HFS) and trigeminal neuralgia caused by cranial nerve (CN) compression from a tortuous basilar artery (BA) is very rare. We report a case of a 66-year-old man who presented with both HFS and "atypical" trigeminal neuralgia. The patient had a tortuous BA compressing both CN V and VII. The patient underwent microvascular decompression after failing conservative medical management. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of both HFS and "atypical" trigeminal neuralgia that were both successfully treated by surgical intervention. We report the management of this rare combination and review the literature. PMID:22617178

  9. Mechanical Thrombectomy Using the Solitaire FR system for Occlusion of the Top of the Basilar Artery: Intentional Detachment of the Device after Partial Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Kwong Lok; Lee, Dong-Geun; Shim, Jae Ho; Suh, Dae Chul

    2014-01-01

    Acute, distal, basilar artery occlusion is a challenging neurovascular emergency. There have been several reports regarding the successful application of the Solitaire FR device for treating this lesion. However, due to the lack of a suitable, balloon-tipped, guiding catheter for the vertebral artery, during this procedure we frequently experience the occurrence of clot fragmentation and distal migration. There may be some technical solutions to solve this problem. The purpose of this report is to present a technical variation of using the Solitaire FR, and which is referred to as the 'intentional device detachment technique.' As a clot tends to re-embolize during its passage through the tortuous cranio-cervical junction level of the vertebral artery or its passage through the tip of the guiding catheter, due to the lack of proximal flow arrest, we thought that not removing the stent segment of the device which is capturing the clot could avoid this problem. We were able to successfully apply this technique in two cases. We believe that this technique can be a possible technical option for using the Solitaire FR device when a patient has little concern regarding the subsequent use of antiplatelets. PMID:24642915

  10. Basilar Occlusion Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Basilar artery occlusions (BAOs) are a subset of posterior circulation strokes. Particular issues relevant to BAOs include variable and stuttering symptoms at onset resulting in delays in diagnosis, high morbidity and mortality, and uncertain best management. Despite better imaging techniques, diagnosis, and therefore treatment, is often delayed. We will present the most common signs and symptoms of posterior circulation strokes. Data on optimal treatment strategies are gathered from multiple case series, registries, and one randomized trial, which was stopped early. Possible etiologies of BAOs, acute, and subacute treatment strategies and special topics in neuroimaging of the posterior fossa are discussed. This review may be helpful to neurohospitalists who are managing patients with acute stroke as well as emergency room physicians and neurologists. PMID:26288672

  11. Balloon embolization in the treatment of basilar aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Zeumer, H; Brückmann, H; Adelt, D; Hacke, W; Ringelstein, E B

    1985-01-01

    Some vertebro-basilar aneurysm may not be treatable at a reasonable risk by direct clipping. A possible alternative is transvascular obliteration, using the means of modern interventional neuroradiology in combination with neurophysiological monitoring. These possibilities and related difficulties are outlined and discussed and the example of two cases with different types of vertebrobasilar aneurysms (top of the basilar artery and basilar trunk aneurysm) which have been treated by balloon embolization. PMID:4091053

  12. Protein kinase C requirement of Ca2+ channel stimulation by intracellular ATP in guinea-pig basilar artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, D; Beech, D J

    1997-01-01

    1. Smooth muscle cells were isolated from guinea-pig basilar artery and conventional whole-cell recordings of Ca2+ channel activity were made at room temperature within 7 h of the isolation procedure. The purpose of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the stimulatory action of intracellular ATP on Ca2+ channels. 2. High (millimolar) concentrations of ATP were needed to produce stimulation of Ca2+ channels, and neither ADP nor AMP mimicked the action of ATP. 3.The ATP effect was not mimicked by stable ATP derivatives (AMP-PNP or AMP-PCP) and was abolished by incubation of cells in non-specific protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or H-7) or specific protein kinase C inhibitors (GF109203x, calphostin C or chelerythrine) but not by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostin B42 and genistein). 4. The data suggest that ATP-induced stimulation of L-type Ca2+ channels requires functional activity of a protein kinase C isozyme. PMID:9147319

  13. Geometrical characteristics after Y-stenting of the basilar bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Sağlam, Muzaffer; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Anagnostakou, Vania; Yıldız, Bülent; Koçer, Naci; Işlak, Civan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the angular changes after Y-stenting of the basilar bifurcation aneurysms. METHODS A total of 19 patients (age range, 27–80 years; mean age, 52.5 years) underwent Y-stent coiling for basilar bifurcation aneurysm. Three vascular angles (α, β1, β2) were measured in the anteroposterior plane. β1 and β2 represented the angles between the basilar artery and the proximal P1 segments of the right and left posterior cerebral arteries, respectively. α represented the complementary angle between the β1 and β2 angles. Angles were measured before and after stent deployment. Diameters of the basilar artery and P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery were measured at both sides. Correlation between vascular diameter and angular change of the basilar bifurcation was investigated. RESULTS Statistically significant α, β1, and β2 angle changes were found after stent deployment (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant relationship between the diameter of the basilar artery and the α, β1, β2 angle changes (P > 0.05). There was no statistically significant relationship between the diameter of the posterior cerebral artery and the β angle change (P > 0.05). We found a statistically significant inverse correlation between pre-stent β angle and post-stent angle change (right side, P = 0.008; left side, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Y-stenting narrows the effective neck and straightens the vascular bifurcation angle. Most of the angular remodeling occurs on the side that had a more acute angle before stent deployment. PMID:26359879

  14. Catheterization of the Hepatic Artery Via the Left Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiao; Wang Yixiang, J.; Zhou Xiangping Guan Yongsong; Tang Chengwei

    2006-12-15

    The commonly used approach for rat hepatic artery catheterization is via the gastroduodenal artery, which is ligated after the procedure. A new method of rat hepatic artery catheterization via the left common carotid artery (LCCA) is described. The LCCA is repaired after catheterization. The catheterization procedures included the following: (1) opening the rat's abdominal cavity and exposing the portion of abdominal aorta at the level of the celiac trunk; (2) separating and exposing the LCCA; inserting a microguidewire and microcatheter set into the LCCA via an incision; after placement into the descending aorta, the microguidewire and microcatheter are maneuvered into the hepatic artery under direct vision; (3) after transcatheter therapy, the catheter is withdrawn and the incision at the LCCA is repaired. This technique was employed on 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats with diethylnitrosamine-induced liver cancer, using a 3F microguidewire and microcatheter set. Selective hepatic artery catheterization was successfully performed in 57 rats. One rat died during the operation and five rats died within 7 days after the procedure. It is envisaged that as experience increases, the catheterization success rate will increase and the death rate will decrease. A new approach for selective hepatic artery catheterization via the LCCA in rats is introduced, which makes repeat catheterization of this artery possible and allows large embolization particles to be delivered by using a 3F catheter.

  15. Acid-sensing ion channel 1 and nitric oxide synthase are in adjacent layers in the wall of rat and human cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Hsien; Jin, Jingwen; Nashelsky, Marcus B.; Talman, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification activates a family of proteins known as acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). One ASIC subtype, ASIC type 1 (ASIC1), may play an important role in synaptic plasticity, memory, fear conditioning and ischemic brain injury. ASIC1 is found primarily in neurons, but one report showed its expression in isolated mouse cerebrovascular cells. In this study, we sought to determine if ASIC1 is present in intact rat and human major cerebral arteries. A potential physiological significance of such a finding is suggested by studies showing that nitric oxide (NO), which acts as a powerful vasodilator, may modulate proton-gated currents in cultured cells expressing ASIC1s. Because both constitutive NO synthesizing enzymes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS), are expressed in cerebral arteries we also studied the anatomical relationship between ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS in both rat and human cerebral arteries. Western blot analysis demonstrated ASIC1 in cerebral arteries from both species. Immunofluorescent histochemistry and confocal microscopy also showed that ASIC1-immunoreactivity (IR), colocalized with the smooth muscle marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), was present in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), posterior cerebral artery (PCA) and basilar artery (BA) of rat and human. Expression of ASIC1 in cerebral arteries is consistent with a role for ASIC1 in modulating cerebrovascular tone both in rat and human. Potential interactions between smooth muscle ASIC1 and nNOS or eNOS were supported by the presence of nNOS-IR in the neighboring adventitial layer and the presence of nNOS-IR and eNOS-IR in the adjacent endothelial layer of the cerebral arteries. PMID:25462386

  16. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  17. Basilar vascular system supplied by only right proatlantal intersegmentary artery type 1 with aneurysm and left internal carotid occlusion: a case report and review from the literature.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Alessandro; Brogna, Barbara; Giliberti, Raffaele; Vassallo, Pasquale; De Magistris, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Persistence of proatlantal artery (PA) is a rare condition. More than 40 cases were described in the literature. Aneurysm may involve the PA itself in approximately 2% of cases, most arising from the internal carotid artery (ICA) side of PA. This case was particular because the PA showed a saccular aneurysm on the posterior wall, probably due to atherosclerosis disease and other alterations: plaque ulcerative of ICA, occlusion of left ICA, and aberrant right VA. PMID:27594943

  18. Association between changes in weight and cerebral arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Patel, Ankur; Fredrickson, Vance L; Siljander, Blake; Vazquez, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the study was to gain a better understanding of brain artery diameters and anatomical variations for precise modification of cerebral blood supply in ischemic stroke models. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 35) were used for the experiment. Rats were perfused and resin replicas of cerebral arteries were created using a corrosion casting technique. Resin replicas were measured and analyzed for correlation of vessel lumen with animal sex and weight. A strong correlation between root of aorta diameter and weight was observed (p < 0.0001). We also observed a significant correlation between weight, internal carotid arteries, right external carotid artery, and pterygopalatine arteries. For the common carotid artery, a significant difference between the left and right branches was observed even though there was no association with weight. There was no significant association observed between animal sex and vessel size independent of weight. A better knowledge of vessel lumen in relation to animal sex and weight is essential for adequate blockage of an intracranial artery to induce cerebral ischemia in a rat model of stroke. This study provides a viable reference for choice of rat size in relation to the size of embolic agents such as filaments, microwires, or in vitro thrombus used in ischemic stroke experiments. PMID:24323492

  19. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data. PMID:27344347

  20. Urantide alleviates monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yifang; Jin, Hong; Tian, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Han; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Zhiyi; Meng, Fanchao

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder with poor prognosis. Urotensin II (UII) has been confirmed to be powerful vasoconstrictor than endothelin-1, which may play an important role in PAH development. The aim of this study is to observe the effects of urantide, a UII receptor antagonist, on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. 60 male Wistar rats were divided into six groups. For early treatment experiment, rats were divided into normal control group, MCT(4w) model group (MCT + saline × 3 wks from the 8th day of MCT injection) and urantide early treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 3 wks, 1 week after MCT injection once). For late treatment experiment, rats were divided as controls, MCT(6w) model group (MCT + saline × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once) and urantide late treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once). At the end of experiments, mean pulmonary arterial pressures (mPAP) and mean blood pressure (MBP) of rats in each group were measured by catheterization. Right ventricular weight ratio was also weighed. Relaxation effects of urantide on intralobar pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats were investigated. Pulmonary artery remodeling was detected by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry analysis. Serum nitric oxide (NO) levels in all six groups were assayed by ELISA kits. Urantide markedly reduced the mPAP levels of MCT induced PAH in both early and late treatment groups. It didn't change the MBP. Urantide dose-dependently relaxed the pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats. Moreover, N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine Methyl Ester (l-NAME) blocked the dilation response induced by urantide. In addition, urantide inhibited the pulmonary vascular remodeling remarkably. Serum NO level elevated in both early and late treatment rats with urantide infusion. These results suggest that urantide effectively alleviated

  1. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  2. Computational Modeling of Flow-Altering Surgeries in Basilar Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V. L.; Abla, A.; Boussel, L.; Leach, J. R.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Saloner, D.; Lawton, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgeons consider different interventional options for flow alterations in the setting of pathological basilar artery hemodynamics, a virtual model demonstrating the flow fields resulting from each of these options can assist in making clinical decisions. In this study, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were used to simulate the flow in four basilar artery aneurysms in order to evaluate postoperative hemodynamics that would result from flow-altering interventions. Patient-specific geometries were constructed using MR angiography and velocimetry data. CFD simulations carried out for the preoperative flow conditions were compared to in vivo phase-contrast MRI measurements (4DFlowMRI) acquired prior to the interventions. The models were then modified according to the procedures considered for each patient. Numerical simulations of the flow and virtual contrast transport were carried out in each case in order to assess postoperative flow fields and estimate the likelihood of intra-aneurysmal thrombus deposition following the procedures. Postoperative imaging data, when available, were used to validate computational predictions. In two cases, where the aneurysms involved vital pontine perforator arteries branching from the basilar artery, idealized geometries of these vessels were incorporated into the CFD models. The effect of interventions on the flow through the perforators was evaluated by simulating the transport of contrast in these vessels. The computational results were in close agreement with the MR imaging data. In some cases, CFD simulations could help determine which of the surgical options was likely to reduce the flow into the aneurysm while preserving the flow through the basilar trunk. The study demonstrated that image-based computational modeling can provide guidance to clinicians by indicating possible outcome complications and indicating expected success potential for ameliorating pathological aneurysmal flow, prior

  3. Decreased femoral arterial flow during simulated microgravity in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roer, Robert D.; Dillaman, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    To determine whether the blood supply to the hindlimbs of rats is altered by the tail-suspension model of weightlessness, rats were chronically instrumented for the measurement of femoral artery flow. Ultrasonic transit-time flow probes were implanted into 8-wk-old Wistar-Furth rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia, and, after 24 h of recovery, flow was measured in the normal ambulatory posture. Next, rats were suspended and flow was measured immediately and then daily over the next 4-7 days. Rats were subsequently returned to normal posture, and flow was monitored daily for 1-3 days. Mean arterial flow decreased immediately on the rats being suspensed and continued to decrease until a new steady state of approximately 60% of control values was attained at 5 days. On the rats returning to normal posture, flow increased to levels observed before suspension. Quantile-quantile plots of blood flow data revealed a decrease in flow during both systole and diastole. The observed decrease in hindlimb blood flow during suspension suggests a possible role in the etiology of muscular atrophy and bone loss in microgravity.

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Takahashi, Masafumi . E-mail: masafumi@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Morimoto, Hajime; Izawa, Atsushi; Ise, Hirohiko; Hongo, Minoru; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ito, Takayuki; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Uichi

    2006-10-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and death. We investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a potent immunosuppresssant, prevents the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH in rats. MMF effectively decreased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, and reduced the medial thickness of pulmonary arteries. MMF significantly inhibited the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, infiltration of macrophages, and expression of P-selectin and interleukin-6 on the endothelium of pulmonary arteries. The infiltration of T cells and mast cells was not affected by MMF. In vitro experiments revealed that mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active metabolite of MMF, dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of human pulmonary arterial SMCs. MMF attenuated the development of PAH through its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. These findings provide new insight into the potential role of immunosuppressants in the treatment of PAH.

  5. [Arterial and venous microanastomoses in the rat].

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Bufferli, M; Livani, M F

    1980-11-15

    Arterial and venous microvascular surgery for diameters smaller than 2 mm are shown with particular care. Some technical devices are put in evidence. Besides their statistical data the Authors present immediate and long term post-operative controls which are usually applied. The most frequent causes of failure are discussed. PMID:7213480

  6. Vascular balloon injury and intraluminal administration in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The carotid artery balloon injury model in rats has been well established for over two decades. It remains an important method to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation, neointima formation and vascular remodeling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are the most frequently employed animals for this model. Female rats are not preferred as female hormones are protective against vascular diseases and thus introduce a variation into this procedure. The left carotid is typically injured with the right carotid serving as a negative control. Left carotid injury is caused by the inflated balloon that denudes the endothelium and distends the vessel wall. Following injury, potential therapeutic strategies such as the use of pharmacological compounds and either gene or shRNA transfer can be evaluated. Typically for gene or shRNA transfer, the injured section of the vessel lumen is locally transduced for 30 min with viral particles encoding either a protein or shRNA for delivery and expression in the injured vessel wall. Neointimal thickening representing proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells usually peaks at 2 weeks after injury. Vessels are mostly harvested at this time point for cellular and molecular analysis of cell signaling pathways as well as gene and protein expression. Vessels can also be harvested at earlier time points to determine the onset of expression and/or activation of a specific protein or pathway, depending on the experimental aims intended. Vessels can be characterized and evaluated using histological staining, immunohistochemistry, protein/mRNA assays, and activity assays. The intact right carotid artery from the same animal is an ideal internal control. Injury-induced changes in molecular and cellular parameters can be evaluated by comparing the injured artery to the internal right control artery. Likewise, therapeutic modalities can be evaluated by comparing the injured and treated artery to the

  7. Experimental study of physiological flow in a cerebral saccular basilar tip aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, William; Savas, Omer; Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan; Saloner, David

    2008-11-01

    The subject matter of the research is the flow within cerebral saccular basilar tip aneurysms and exploring correlations with their growth and rupture. The flow phantom consists of an inlet pipe branching out 90^o into two outlets, simulating the basilar artery bifurcation and a nearly spherical dome at the flow divider simulating the aneurysm. Input flow is a physiological waveform for the basilar artery. Flow outlet branching ratios are controlled at will. Experiments are done at Reynolds numbers 221-376 and Sexl-Wormersley number 4.46. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study velocity, vorticity, and wall shear stress. All flows can be characterized by an off-center inlet jet and a circulation region, whose transient strength and behavior depends on the outflow ratios.

  8. Oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Myers, J H; Hamlin, M N; Webb, R C

    1985-01-01

    This study characterizes a cellular mechanism for oscillatory contractions induced by norepinephrine in vascular smooth muscle from spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHRSP). Helically cut strips of tail arteries from SHRSP and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were mounted in a muscle bath for measurement of isometric force generation. Norepinephrine-induced responses of arteries from SHRSP were characterized by fluctuations in contractile activity, whereas those in arteries from WKY remained constant with time. The magnitude of the oscillatory contractile activity (frequency X mean amplitude) varied directly with norepinephrine concentration (5.9 X 10(-9) to 1.8 X 10(-7) M). The oscillatory contractile activity varied inversely with the potassium concentration (3-20 mM) of the buffer solution and directly with the calcium concentration (0.1-5.0 mM) of the buffer solution. The oscillatory activity was converted to maintained contraction by barium (10(-4) M), quinidine (3 X 10(-6) M), sparteine (10(-3) M), D-600 (10(-7) M), and nifedipine (10(-8) M). Tetraethylammonium and 3,4-diaminopyridine, inhibitors of voltage-dependent potassium channels, did not alter the oscillatory contractile activity induced by norepinephrine. These observations suggest that oscillatory contractile activity in tail arteries from SHRSP is caused by an abnormal variation in potassium efflux during stimulation with norepinephrine. The altered potassium efflux appears to be related to calcium entry, which is sensitive to inhibition by channel blockers. This altered membrane property may contribute to changes in vascular sensitivity in hypertension. PMID:3997233

  9. BET Bromodomain Blockade Mitigates Intimal Hyperplasia in Rat Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bowen; Zhang, Mengxue; Takayama, Toshio; Shi, Xudong; Roenneburg, Drew Alan; Craig Kent, K.; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background Intimal hyperplasia is a common cause of many vasculopathies. There has been a recent surge of interest in the bromo and extra-terminal (BET) epigenetic “readers” including BRD4 since the serendipitous discovery of JQ1(+), an inhibitor specific to the seemingly undruggable BET bromodomains. The role of the BET family in the development of intimal hyperplasia is not known. Methods We investigated the effect of BET inhibition on intimal hyperplasia using a rat balloon angioplasty model. Results While BRD4 was dramatically up-regulated in the rat and human hyperplastic neointima, blocking BET bromodomains with JQ1(+) diminished neointima in rats. Knocking down BRD4 with siRNA, or treatment with JQ1(+) but not the inactive enantiomer JQ1(−), abrogated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB)-stimulated proliferation and migration of primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells. This inhibitory effect of JQ1(+) was reproducible in primary human aortic smooth muscle cells. In human aortic endothelial cells, JQ1(+) prevented cytokine-induced apoptosis and impairment of cell migration. Furthermore, either BRD4 siRNA or JQ1(+) but not JQ1(−), substantially down-regulated PDGF receptor-α which, in JQ1(+)-treated arteries versus vehicle control, was also reduced. Conclusions Blocking BET bromodomains mitigates neointima formation, suggesting an epigenetic approach for effective prevention of intimal hyperplasia and associated vascular diseases. PMID:26870791

  10. Ultrastructure of an arterial lesion induced in rats by fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Bugelski, P. J.; Vockley, C. M.; Sowinski, J. M.; Arena, E.; Berkowitz, B. A.; Morgan, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate (FM) is a dopaminergic vasodilator with demonstrated efficacy and a favourable safety profile in hypertensive and congestive heart failure patients. FM produced a novel arterial lesion in renal and splanchnic arteries of rats, but not dogs or monkeys. The studies reported here were undertaken to investigate the ultrastructure of the arterial lesion induced in rats by FM in an attempt to shed light on its pathogenesis. Rats were infused intravenously with FM, either 50 micrograms/kg/min for 1 or 4 h, or 5 or 100 micrograms/kg/min for 24 h. Control rats were infused for 4 or 24 h with vehicle alone. Perfusion-fixed tissue from the stomach and pancreas of control and drug-treated rats was examined by transmission electron microscopy. No arterial lesions were seen in rats infused with the drug for 1 or 4 h, or in control rats. All drug-treated rats infused with 5 or 100 micrograms/kg/min of FM for 24 h had lesions in subserosal gastric arteries and interlobular pancreatic arteries. In areas of mild arterial damage, medial smooth muscle cells contained intracytoplasmic pseudovacuoles, autophagic vacuoles, and electron-dense, myofilamentous inclusions. More severe lesions were characterized by overt medial necrosis and haemorrhage. The endothelium of affected arteries was invariably intact, except in areas of severe medial damage. The internal elastic lamina and connective tissue elements within the arterial wall were unaffected. These findings suggest that medial smooth muscle cells are the primary site of damage caused by fenoldopam mesylate in splanchnic arteries of the rat. This iatrogenic arterial lesion could provide an interesting model to study the response of medial smooth muscle to pharmacologically mediated injury. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 5 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:2567179

  11. Basilar invagination, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia: a review.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Institute and personal experience (over 25 years) of basilar invagination was reviewed. The database of the department included 3300 patients with craniovertebral junction pathology from the year 1951 till date. Patients with basilar invagination were categorized into two groups based on the presence (Group A) or absence (Group B) of clinical and radiological evidence of instability of the craniovertebral junction. Standard radiological parameters described by Chamberlain were used to assess the instability of the craniovertebral junction. The pathogenesis and clinical features in patients with Group A basilar invagination appeared to be related to mechanical instability, whereas it appeared to be secondary to embryonic dysgenesis in patients with Group B basilar invagination. Treatment by facetal distraction and direct lateral mass fixation can result in restoration of craniovertebral and cervical alignment in patients with Group A basilar invagination. Such a treatment can circumvent the need for transoral or posterior fossa decompression surgery. Foramen magnum bone decompression appears to be a rational surgical treatment for patients having Group B basilar invagination. The division of patients with basilar invagination on the basis of presence or absence of instability provides insight into the pathogenesis of the anomaly and a basis for rational surgical treatment. PMID:19587461

  12. Effect of chlorpromazine on rat arterial lipid synthesis, in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, F.P.; Hubert, E.V.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of chlorpromazine, a major tranquilizer, on arterial lipid metabolism was studied in vitro in rat aortas incubated with (/sup 14/C)acetate and (/sup 14/C)mevalonate as lipid precursors. Chlorpromazine at a level of 0.25 mM in the incubation medium significantly reduced the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)acetate into free fatty acids (p less than 0.01) and total phospholipids (p less than 0.001) but not triglycerides. Chlorpromazine also altered the pattern of arterial phospholipids synthesized from (/sup 14/C)acetate by significantly increasing the relative proportion of phosphatidylinositol plus phosphatidylserine (p less than 0.02) and reducing the relative proportion of sphingomyelin (p less than 0.001). (/sup 14/C) Acetate incorporation into the combined fractions of steryl esters plus hydrocarbons and sterols plus diglycerides was also significantly reduced (p less than 0.001) by 0.25 mM chlorpromazine. Studies with (/sup 14/C)mevalonate showed that chlorpromazine is also an inhibitor of sterol biosynthesis in arterial tissues as evidenced by 35-40% reductions (p less than 0.05) in the formation of /sup 14/C-labeled squalene and C27 sterols.

  13. Middle cerebral artery alterations in a rat chronic hypoperfusion model

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Martín, Ana; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Dantas, Ana P.; Caracuel, Laura; Planas, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CHP) induces microvascular changes that could contribute to the progression of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging brain. This study aimed to analyze the effects of CHP on structural, mechanical, and myogenic properties of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in adult male Wistar rats. Sham animals underwent a similar surgical procedure without carotid artery (CA) ligation. After 15 days of occlusion, MCA and CA were dissected and MCA structural, mechanical, and myogenic properties were assessed by pressure myography. Collagen I/III expression was determined by immunofluorescence in MCA and CA and by Western blot in CA. mRNA levels for 1A1, 1A2, and 3A1 collagen subunits were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR in CA. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein expression were determined in CA by Western blot. BCCAO diminished cross-sectional area, wall thickness, and wall-to-lumen ratio. Nevertheless, whereas wall stress was increased, stiffness was not modified and myogenic response was diminished. Hypoperfusion triggered HIF-1α expression. Collagen I/III protein expression diminished in MCA and CA after BCCAO, despite increased mRNA levels for 1A1 and 3A1 collagen subunits. Therefore, the reduced collagen expression might be due to proteolytic degradation, since the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9 increased in the CA. These data suggest that BCCAO induces hypotrophic remodeling by a mechanism that involves a reduction of collagen I/III in association with increased MMP-1 and MMP-9 and that decreases myogenic tone in major arteries supplying the brain. PMID:22096118

  14. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    PubMed

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process. PMID:27412937

  15. Severe pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats are tolerant to mild exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Lauren J.; Scruggs, April K.; McLendon, Jared M.; Haven, April K.; Bauer, Natalie N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A frequently used end point of clinical outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the 6-minute walk distance. Furthermore, some data suggest that mild to moderate exercise as an intervention in stable PAH is beneficial. Some of these questions have been recapitulated in the monocrotaline and hypoxia animal models of pulmonary hypertension. However, mild exercise and walk distance as end points have not been rigorously examined in the severe progressive Sugen 5416/hypoxia/normoxia (Su/Hx/Nx) animal model of PAH at each stage of worsening disease. Our hypothesis was that animals that were preselected as runners would have increased walk times and improved right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) ratios, echocardiography, and histology compared with nonexercised Su/Hx/Nx animals. We examined four groups of rats: Su/Hx/Nx sedentary, Su/Hx/Nx exercised, control sedentary, and control exercised. Echocardiography was performed at 5, 8, and 13 weeks to assess right ventricular inner diameter in diastole and left ventricular eccentricity index. We found no difference between exercised and sedentary Su/Hx/Nx rats, and both were worsened compared with controls. Rats were euthanized at 13 weeks, and we found that neither RV/LV+S nor the occurrence of occlusive lesions were influenced by exercise. Most interesting, however, was that despite progressive PAH development, exercised Su/Hx/Nx rats showed no decrease in time or distance for treadmill exercise. In all, our data suggest that, despite severe PAH development, Su/Hx/Nx rats retain the same treadmill exercise capacity as control animals. PMID:26064461

  16. Management of basilar invagination: A historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Serchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    For a long time the terms basilar invagination and platybasia were used interchangeably. Basilar invagination has been defined as a prolapse of the vertebral column into the spinal cord. Platybasia is defined as an abnormal obtuse angle between the anterior skull base and the clivus. The authors review the existing literature and summarize the historical and modern perspectives in the management of basilar invagination. From radiological curiosities, the subject of basilar invagination is now viewed as eminently treatable. The more pronounced understanding of the subject has taken place in the last three decades when on the basis of understanding of the biomechanical subtleties the treatment paradigm has remarkably altered. From surgery that involved decompression of the region, stabilization and realignment now form the basis of treatment.

  17. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway. PMID:26524654

  18. Modification of sympathetic neuronal function in the rat tail artery by dietary lipid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, R.L.; Dixon, W.R.; Rutledge, C.O.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dietary lipid treatment on sympathetic neuronal function was examined in isolated perfused tail arteries of adult rats. The hypothesis that dietary manipulations alter the lipid environment of receptor proteins which may result in the perturbation of specific membrane-associated processes that regulate peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission in the vasculature was the basis for this investigation. In the present study, rats were fed semisynthetic diets enriched in either 16% coconut oil (saturated fat) or 16% sunflower oil (unsaturated fat). The field stimulation-evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine and total /sup 3/H was decreased significantly in rats receiving the coconut oil diet when compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Norepinephrine content in artery segments from coconut oil-treated rats was significantly higher compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Tail arteries from rats receiving the coconut oil diet displayed significantly lower perfusion pressure responses to nerve stimulation at all frequencies tested when compared to the sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Vasoconstrictor responses of perfused tail arteries exposed to exogenous norepinephrine resulted in an EC50 for norepinephrine that was not changed by the dietary treatment, but adult rats receiving the sunflower oil diet displayed a significantly greater maximum response to exogenous norepinephrine (10(-5) M) compared to arteries from either coconut oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats.

  19. Differential effects of Selexipag [corrected] and prostacyclin analogs in rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Keith; Studer, Rolf; Ernst, Roland; Haag, Franck; Kauser, Katalin; Clozel, Martine

    2012-12-01

    {4-[(5,6-Diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (ACT-333679) is the main metabolite of the selective prostacyclin (PGI(2)) receptor (IP receptor) agonist selexipag. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of IP receptor selectivity on the vasorelaxant efficacy of ACT-333679 and the PGI(2) analog treprostinil in pulmonary artery under conditions associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Selexipag and ACT-333679 evoked full relaxation of pulmonary artery from control and monocrotaline (MCT)-PAH rats, and ACT-333679 relaxed normal pulmonary artery contracted with either endothelin-1 (ET-1) or phenylephrine. In contrast, treprostinil evoked weaker relaxation than ACT-333679 of control pulmonary artery and failed to induce relaxation of pulmonary artery from MCT-PAH rats. Treprostinil did not evoke relaxation of normal pulmonary artery contracted with either ET-1 or phenylephrine. Expression of prostaglandin E(3) (EP(3)) receptor mRNA was increased in pulmonary artery from MCT-PAH rats. In contraction experiments, the selective EP(3) receptor agonist sulprostone evoked significantly greater contraction of pulmonary artery from MCT-PAH rats compared with control rats. The presence of a threshold concentration of ET-1 significantly augmented the contractile response to sulprostone in normal pulmonary artery. ACT-333679 did not evoke direct contraction of rat pulmonary artery, whereas treprostinil evoked concentration-dependent contraction that was inhibited by the EP(3) receptor antagonist (2E)-3-(3',4'-dichlorobiphenyl-2-yl)-N-(2-thienylsulfonyl)acrylamide. Antagonism of EP(3) receptors also revealed a relaxant response to treprostinil in normal pulmonary artery contracted with ET-1. These data demonstrate that the relaxant efficacy of the selective IP receptor agonist selexipag and its metabolite ACT-333679 is not modified under conditions associated with PAH, whereas relaxation to treprostinil may be limited in the presence

  20. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Production of Prostacyclin in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R.; Smith, Leslie A.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), in control of cerebral circulation is poorly understood. The present study was designed to investigate the cerebral vascular effects of BDNF in vivo. Methods Replication incompetent adenovirus encoding either rat BDNF (AdBDNF) or green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) was injected intracisternally into rabbits. Forty eight hours later, animals were euthanized. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA, vasomotor function of isolated basilar arteries was studied in organ chambers, protein expression in the basilar arteries was studied by Western blotting, prostanoid levels measured by ELISA and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results The levels of BDNF in the CSF were significantly elevated in AdBDNF-treated rabbits as compared to AdGFP-treated rabbits (37 ± 5 ng/ml vs. 0.006 ± 0.003 ng/ml, respectively, P<0.05, n=14). Western blotting studies revealed that in basilar arteries AdBDNF increased protein expression of prostacyclin (PGI2) synthase, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated (Ser 1177) eNOS remained unchanged. During incubation with arachidonic acid (1 μmol/L), PGI2 production and levels of cyclic AMP were significantly elevated only in AdBDNF-treated rabbit basilar arteries (P<0.05, n=6). Relaxations to acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) and arachidonic acid (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) were significantly potentiated in basilar arteries from rabbits injected with AdBDNF. Potentiation of relaxations to acetylcholine in AdBDNF-treated basilar arteries was inhibited by the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10−5 mol/l, P<0.05, n=6) and constitutive phospholipase A2 inhibitor, AACOCF3 (2 × 10−5 mol/L, P<0.05, n=5). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that in cerebral arteries, BDNF

  1. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  2. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  3. Persistent trigeminal artery: in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction.

    PubMed

    Gaughen, John R; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Evans, Avery J; Jensen, Mary E

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with progressive brainstem infarction despite medical therapy. The patient was transferred to our institution for potential angioplasty of basilar stenosis. Imaging review demonstrated persistent trigeminal artery in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction. Persistent trigeminal arteries are commonly associated with an atretic basilar artery and interventional treatment can result in significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:24351576

  4. Changes in the structure and mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries of rats exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Fung, Y C

    1993-09-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke on the structure and mechanical properties of pulmonary arteries was studied in 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats. The animals were exposed to cigarette smoke in a smoke-generating system 10 times per day with one cigarette each time. The smoke density and the puffing duration and frequency of the system were regulated in accordance with reference values measured from human smokers. The volume fractions of the cells, including smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, and extracellular matrix components, including collagen, elastin, and remainder (components not specified in this study), of the pulmonary arteries of approximately 450 microns in external diameter (at zero pressure) were determined in smoke-exposed and control rats by using an electron microscopic method. It was found that the volume fractions of the fibroblasts, the collagenous bundles, and the elastic laminae of the pulmonary arteries were increased significantly, whereas those of the smooth muscle cells and the remainder were decreased significantly in both the 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats in comparison with those of the corresponding control rats. The mechanical properties of the pulmonary arteries were determined based on the in vitro dimensional measurement of the vessels at various inflation pressures and zero-stress state. An increase in the stiffness of the pulmonary arteries was found in both the 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats. We conclude that cigarette smoke can induce structural and mechanical remodeling in the pulmonary arteries of rats. PMID:8368648

  5. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  6. Ouabain–digoxin antagonism in rat arteries and neurones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Karashima, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Key points ‘Classic’ cardiotonic steroids (CTSs) all inhibit Na+,K+‐ATPase (Na+ pumps) and exert cardiotonic and vasotonic effects. Nevertheless, prolonged ouabain, but not digoxin, administration induces hypertension; moreover, digoxin antagonizes the hypertensinogenic effect of ouabain.To examine acute ouabain–digoxin interactions, we tested these and related CTSs on myogenic tone (MT) in pressurized rat mesenteric small arteries and glutamate‐evoked Ca2+ transients in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurones.The CTSs (0.3–10 nm) all augmented MT at 70 mmHg and Ca2+ signals, but separated into two functional groups according to whether they were ouabain‐ or digoxin‐like. CTSs within each group were synergistic, but between groups, were antagonistic to one another in both assays.Na+ pump αβ protomers may function as tetraprotomers ((αβ)4) with quarter‐site reactivity; simultaneous ouabain‐ and digoxin‐like molecule binding promotes tetraprotomer disaggregation, enabling partial protomer reactivation.These results may reveal why some patients respond poorly to digoxin therapy, and why Na+ pumps may be a novel target for therapeutic development. Abstract ‘Classic’ cardiotonic steroids (CTSs) such as digoxin and ouabain selectively inhibit Na+,K+‐ATPase (the Na+ pump) and, via Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX), exert cardiotonic and vasotonic effects. CTS action is more complex than previously thought: prolonged subcutaneous administration of ouabain, but not digoxin, induces hypertension, and digoxin antagonizes ouabain's hypertensinogenic effect. We studied the acute interactions between CTSs in two indirect assays of Na+ pump function: myogenic tone (MT) in isolated, pressurized rat mesenteric small arteries, and Ca2+ signalling in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurones. The ‘classic’ CTSs (0.3–10 nm) behaved as ‘agonists’: all increased MT70 (MT at 70 mmHg) and augmented glutamate‐evoked Ca2+ (Fura‐2) signals. We then

  7. Regional arterial stress-strain distributions referenced to the zero-stress state in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Day, Judd; Yuan, Zhuang Feng; Gregersen, Hans

    2002-02-01

    Morphometric and stress-strain properties were studied in isolated segments of the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, left common carotid artery, left femoral artery, and the left pulmonary artery in 16 male Wistar rats. The mechanical test was performed as a distension experiment where the proximal end of the arterial segment was connected via a tube to the container used for applying pressures to the segment and the distal end was left free. Outer wall dimensions were obtained from digitized images of the arterial segments at different pressures as well as at no-load and zero-stress states. The results showed that the morphometric data, such as inner and outer circumference, wall and lumen area, wall thickness, wall thickness-to-inner radius ratio, and normalized outer diameter, as a function of the applied pressures, differed between the five arteries (P < 0.01). The opening angle was largest in the pulmonary artery and smallest in thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). The absolute value of both the inner and outer residual strain and the residual strain gradient were largest in the femoral artery and smallest in the thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). In the circumferential and longitudinal direction, the arterial wall was stiffest in the femoral artery and in the thoracic aorta, respectively, and most compliant in the pulmonary artery. These results show that the morphometric and biomechanical properties referenced to the zero-stress state differed between the five arterial segments. PMID:11788411

  8. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  9. Identification of the angiotensin II receptor in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, J; Murray, G D; Semple, P F

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding sites of high affinity and low capacity for 125I-angiotensin II have been identified in a membrane fraction derived from arterial arcades of the rat mesentery. Heterogeneity of binding sites and extensive tracer degradation necessitated the use of nonlinear regression methods for the analysis of radioligand binding data. Forward and reverse rate constants for the high affinity sites obtained by three experimental approaches were in good agreement and gave a dissociation equilibrium constant (Kd) of 19-74 pM (95% confidence interval). Affinities for a number of angiotensin-related peptides calculated from competitive binding curves were in the order 125I-angiotensin II = angiotensin II greater than angiotensin III greater than [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II greater than [Sar1,Gly8]angiotensin II. Angiotensin I and biochemically unrelated peptides had virtually no effect on binding of tracer angiotensin II. The divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ stimulated 125I-angiotensin II binding at concentrations of 2-10 mM, as did Na+ at 50-100 mM. In the presence of Na+ or Li+, K+ had a biphasic effect. The chelating agents EDTA and EGTA were inhibitory, as were the thiol reagents dithiothreitol and cysteine. This study defined angiotensin II binding sites in a vascular target tissue of sufficiently high affinity to interact rapidly with plasma angiotensin II at physiological concentrations. PMID:6095806

  10. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells of small intramyocardial arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Amann, K; Gharehbaghi, H; Stephen, S; Mall, G

    1995-01-01

    Hearts of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated by means of stereology and were compared with those of normotensive. Wistar-Kyoto controls. At the age of 9 months, hypertensive rats showed cardiac hypertrophy, marked myocardial fibrosis, activation of nonvascular interstitium, focal myocytial degeneration, reduction of capillarization, and microarteriopathy of small intramyocardial arteries. Stereologically, a significant increase in the total left ventricular arterial wall volume (+180% versus controls) was found in SHR hearts. By using new stereological techniques, the orientator and the nucleator, we investigated whether this significant increase in total left ventricular arterial wall volume was due to hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells in addition to the process of vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy that is common in SHR. Additionally, the nuclear size and ratio of cell volume to nuclear volume were determined using another new stereological technique, the selector. The stereological data indicate a significant increase in mean cell and nuclear volumes as well as in the total number of left ventricular arterial smooth muscle cells of SHR. Additionally, the total length of intramyocardial arteries was also significantly increased in hypertensive rats. The volume and number of arterial smooth muscle cells per arterial length were significantly (P < .001 and P < .05, respectively) higher in SHR than in normotensive controls. Thus, we conclude that hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells are involved in intramyocardial arterial growth processes in hypertensive heart remodeling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843743

  11. Persistent trigeminal artery feeding a hemispheric branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery: a rare anatomic variant.

    PubMed

    Perot, G; Clarençon, F; Di Maria, F; Sourour, N; Biondi, A; Cornu, P; Chiras, J

    2011-10-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery is a rare persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis that usually connect the infracavernous segment of the ICA with the basilar artery. Rarely, PTA may feed cerebellar artery. We describe an exceptional case of PTA terminating in postero-inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) hemispheric branch. Angiographic and CTA features are presented and hypotheses regarding developmental origin of this variation are discussed. PMID:21492937

  12. Dynamics of change in rat arterial pressure under conditions of immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yumatov, Y. A.; Skotselyas, Y. G.; Ivanona, L. I.

    1980-01-01

    Emotional stress developed in immobilized rats was shown to be accompanied by changes in the regulation of arterial pressure and the frequency of cardiac contractions. A group of adapting rats displayed definite resistance to emotional stress, while a group of rats incapable of adapting to acute emotional stress died with characteristics of cardiovascular insufficiency. The mechanisms providing resistance to emotional stress in numerous conflict situations were analyzed.

  13. Ouabain–digoxin antagonism in rat arteries and neurones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Karashima, Eiji; Hamlyn, John M; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2014-01-01

    ‘Classic’ cardiotonic steroids (CTSs) such as digoxin and ouabain selectively inhibit Na+,K+-ATPase (the Na+ pump) and, via Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX), exert cardiotonic and vasotonic effects. CTS action is more complex than previously thought: prolonged subcutaneous administration of ouabain, but not digoxin, induces hypertension, and digoxin antagonizes ouabain's hypertensinogenic effect. We studied the acute interactions between CTSs in two indirect assays of Na+ pump function: myogenic tone (MT) in isolated, pressurized rat mesenteric small arteries, and Ca2+ signalling in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurones. The ‘classic’ CTSs (0.3–10 nm) behaved as ‘agonists’: all increased MT70 (MT at 70 mmHg) and augmented glutamate-evoked Ca2+ (Fura-2) signals. We then tested one CTS in the presence of another. Most CTSs could be divided into ouabain-like (ouabagenin, dihydroouabain (DHO), strophanthidin) or digoxin-like CTS (digoxigenin, digitoxin, bufalin). Within each group, the CTSs were synergistic, but ouabain-like and digoxin-like CTSs antagonized one another in both assays: For example, the ouabain-evoked (3 nm) increases in MT70 and neuronal Ca2+ signals were both greatly attenuated by the addition of 10 nm digoxin or 10 nm bufalin, and vice versa. Rostafuroxin (PST2238), a digoxigenin derivative that displaces 3H-ouabain from Na+,K+-ATPase, and attenuates some forms of hypertension, antagonized the effects of ouabain, but not digoxin. SEA0400, a Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) blocker, antagonized the effects of both ouabain and digoxin. CTSs bind to the α subunit of pump αβ protomers. Analysis of potential models suggests that, in vivo, Na+ pumps function as tetraprotomers ((αβ)4) in which the binding of a single CTS to one protomer blocks all pumping activity. The paradoxical ability of digoxin-like CTSs to reactivate the ouabain-inhibited complex can be explained by de-oligomerization of the tetrameric state. The interactions between these

  14. Chlorogenic Acid Enhances Abdominal Skin Flap Survival Based on Epigastric Artery in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Etoz, Betul Cam; Gul, Zulfiye; Ozyigit, Musa Ozgur; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Inan, Sevda; Buyukcoskun, Naciye Isbil; Ozluk, Kasim; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that chlorogenic acid (CGA) accelerates wound healing via its antioxidant activity. We aimed to investigate the effect of CGA in an experimental epigastric abdominal skin flap model in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Rats were firstly divided into 2 groups: nondiabetic and diabetic. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. Then, 4 subgroups were created for each group: vehicle as well as 0.2 mg/0.5 mL, 1 mg/0.5 mL, and 5 mg/0.5 mL CGA treatments. Right epigastric artery-based abdominal skin flaps were elevated and sutured back into their original position. Chlorogenic acid or vehicle was injected once into the femoral arteries by leaving the epigastric artery as the single artery feeding the flaps during the injection. On postoperative day 7, flap survivals were evaluated, and the rats were killed. Distal flap tissues were collected for histopathological and biochemical assays. Chlorogenic acid showed greater flap survival in both nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Capillary density was increased, and necrosis was reduced in the CGA-treated rats. Chlorogenic acid decreased malondialdehyde levels as well as increased reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in the flap tissues. This study showed that CGA significantly improved flap survival by its antioxidant activities with intra-arterial local injections. PMID:25356637

  15. Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Murakami, Taro; Okamura, Akitake; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2012-09-01

    Y-configured double stent technique is useful for coil embolization of a bifurcation wide neck aneurysm while preserving the patency of the two important vessels. However, if the important vessels emanating directly from the aneurysm comprised four vessels, two vessels not deployed, Y-stents might not be preserved with the Y-stent technique by itself. We report a case treated with Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm. A 78-year-old woman presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of poor grade. CT-angiography showed a wide neck and shallow aneurysm of complex basilar bifurcation involving both posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs). In the chronic stage of SAH, Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique was performed. After Y-stent (two Enterprise) deployment from both the PCAs to the basilar artery, coil embolization of a basilar bifurcation aneurysm was performed using a double microcatheter technique to preserve both SCAs. PMID:23077865

  16. Barium responsiveness of the rat aorta and femoral artery during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hart, J L

    1982-01-11

    The barium responses of isolated aortic strips and femoral arteries from non-pregnant and pregnant rats were investigated. Barium caused concentration-related increases in tension of vessels from both pregnant and non-pregnant rats. The concentration-response curves of femoral arteries from non-pregnant and 3 week pregnant rats were not different; however contractility and slopes of concentration-response lines for thoracic aortas from 1, 2 and 3 week pregnant rats were significantly less than those of aortas from non-pregnant rats. In addition, barium caused rhythmic contractions to develop in both femoral arteries and aortas of 3 week pregnant rats more frequently than vessels from non-pregnant rats. Rhythmic contractions did not develop in aortas from 3 week pregnant rats in calcium-free Krebs. Since the effects of barium on the electrical and mechanical activity of various muscles have been postulated to be similar to and/or dependent on calcium, these results may indicate that changes in calcium sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle occur during pregnancy. Such changes may contribute to the blood flow redistribution and other cardiovascular adaptations of pregnancy. PMID:7054642

  17. Effect of alveolar pressure on pulmonary artery pressure in chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Wach, R; Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1987-02-01

    The effect on pulmonary artery pressure of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic rats (10% O2 for 3-5 weeks) compared with control rats. Chronically hypoxic rats have newly muscularised walls in arterioles in the alveolar region. Isolated lungs of chronically hypoxic and control rats were perfused with blood under conditions in which alveolar pressure was greater than left atrial pressure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Alveolar pressure was the effective downstream pressure. Pressure-flow lines were measured at low and high alveolar pressure (5 and 15 mmHg). During normoxia pressure-flow lines of chronically hypoxic rats had a steeper slope (higher resistance) and greater extrapolated intercept on the pressure axis (effective downstream pressure) than control rats. In both groups of rats the change from low to high alveolar pressure during normoxia caused an approximately parallel shift in the pressure-flow line similar to the change in alveolar pressure. During hypoxia, which led to an increase in slope and intercept in both groups of rats, the effect of a rise in alveolar pressure differed in chronically hypoxic from control rats. In control rats there was a small parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was much less than the increase in alveolar pressure; in chronically hypoxic rats there was a large parallel shift in the pressure-flow line that was greater than the increase in alveolar pressure. Thus in chronically hypoxic rats hypoxic vasoconstriction probably occurred mainly in muscular alveolar vessels, whereas in control rats it probably occurred upstream in extra-alveolar vessels. At constant blood flow the relation between pulmonary artery pressure and alveolar pressure was measured while alveolar pressure was reduced from approximately 15 mmHg to zero during both normoxia and hypoxia. In control and chronically hypoxic rats the slope of this line was less than 1. At an alveolar pressure of 2-3 mmHg there was an inflection

  18. Involvement of vasodilator mechanisms in arterial pressure lability after sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z Q; Barrès, C; Julien, C

    1995-01-01

    1. To examine the regional haemodynamic basis of arterial pressure lability seen after sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD), simultaneous beat-to-beat recordings of arterial pressure and indices of regional blood flows (Doppler probes around the subdiaphragmatic and lower abdominal aortae and the superior mesenteric artery) were performed in the same conscious rats (n = 7) before, 1 and 14 days after SAD. 2. Acute SAD increased arterial pressure, decreased regional blood flows and vascular conductances, and potentiated the depressor and vasodilator effects of ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan, suggesting sympathetic overactivity. All parameters chronically returned to or near normal. 3. Both acute and chronic SAD increased the variability of arterial pressure and of regional conductances. Arterial pressure lability was characterized by a mixture of depressor and pressor events which were associated with regional vasodilatations and vasoconstrictions, respectively. This haemodynamic pattern was not affected by acute beta-adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol. 4. In conscious rats, the baroreceptor reflex acts to buffer the spontaneous variability of regional vascular conductances and thereby stabilizes arterial pressure. Sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation-induced arterial pressure lability does not depend on the level of sympathetic activation, and is determined by the relative contribution of depressor and pressor events accompanied by extensive vasodilatations and vasoconstrictions, respectively. Vasodilatations are not caused by the stimulation of vascular beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:7714834

  19. The GPR55 agonist lysophosphatidylinositol relaxes rat mesenteric resistance artery and induces Ca2+ release in rat mesenteric artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    AlSuleimani, Y M; Hiley, C R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), a lipid signalling molecule, activates GPR55 and elevates intracellular Ca2+. Here, we examine the actions of LPI in the rat resistance mesenteric artery and Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells isolated from the artery. Experimental Approach Vascular responses were studied using wire myographs. Single-cell fluorescence imaging was performed using a MetaFluor system. Hypotensive effects of LPI were assessed using a Biopac system. Key Results In isolated arteries, LPI-induced vasorelaxation was concentration- and endothelium-dependent and inhibited by CID 16020046, a GPR55 antagonist. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 had no effect, whereas rimonabant and O-1918 significantly potentiated LPI responses. Vasorelaxation was reduced by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, alone or combined. LPI decreased systemic arterial pressure. GPR55 is expressed in rat mesenteric artery. LPI caused biphasic elevations of endothelial cell intracellular Ca2+. Pretreatment with thapsigargin or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate abolished both phases. The PLC inhibitor U73122 attenuated the initial phase and enhanced the second phase, whereas the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 abolished the late phase but not the early phase. Conclusions and Implications LPI is an endothelium-dependent vasodilator in the rat small mesenteric artery and a hypotensive agent. The vascular response involves activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and is not mediated by CB1 receptors, but unexpectedly enhanced by antagonists of the ‘endothelial anandamide’ receptor. In endothelial cells, LPI utilizes PLC-IP3 and perhaps ROCK-RhoA pathways to elevate intracellular Ca2+. Overall, these findings support an endothelial site of action for LPI and suggest a possible role for GPR55 in vasculature. PMID:25652040

  20. Effects of portal hypertension on responsiveness of rat mesenteric artery and aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T; Geraghty, J; Osborne, H; Docherty, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of pre-hepatic portal hypertension on the responsiveness of rat small mesenteric arteries and aorta. Rats were made portal hypertensive by creating a calibrated portal vein stenosis, or sham-operated. 2. In rat mesenteric arteries, there was no significant difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile potency of noradrenaline (NA), but the maximum contractile responses to NA, U46619 and KCl were significantly increased in vessels from portal hypertensive animals. This altered maximum contractile response was not due to alterations in smooth muscle mass. 3. In rat mesenteric arteries, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). The difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated rats in the maximum response to U46619 was maintained following a combination of methylene blue (1 microM) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (100 microM), suggesting that any differences in endothelial function do not explain differences in the response to vasoconstrictors. 4. In rat aorta, there were no significant differences between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the contractile response to NA or KCl or in the endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh. 5. In pithed rats, there was no difference between portal hypertensive and sham-operated animals in the pressor potency of NA. 6. It is concluded that portal hypertension produces an increase in the contractile response to the vasoconstrictors NA, U46619 and KCl in rat mesenteric arteries but not in the aorta. This suggests that the diminished responsiveness to vasoconstrictors reported in portal hypertensive rats in vivo is not due to a diminished responsiveness at the level of the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:7773539

  1. Histomorphometric Evaluation of the Small Coronary Arteries in Rats Exposed to Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Lousinha, Ana; Antunes, Eduardo; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Brito, José; Martins dos Santos, José

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes induced by industrial noise (IN) have been experimentally observed in several organs. Histological observations of the coronary arteries showed prominent perivascular tissue and fibrosis among IN-exposed rats. The effects on the small arteries are unknown. Objective: To evaluate the histomorphometric changes induced by IN on rat heart small arteries. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats exposed to IN during a maximum period of seven months and 20 age-matched controls were studied. Hearts were transversely sectioned from ventricular apex to atria and a mid-ventricular fragment was selected for analysis. The histological images were obtained with an optical microscope using 400× magnifications. A total of 634 arterial vessels (298 IN-exposed and 336 controls) were selected. The mean lumen-to-vessel wall (L/W) and mean vessel wall-to-perivascular tissue (W/P) ratios were calculated using image J software. Results: There were no differences between exposed and control animals in their L/W ratios (p = 0.687) and time variations in this ratio were non-significant (p = 0.110). In contrast, exposed animals showed lower W/P ratios than control animals (p < 0.001), with significant time variations (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Industrial noise induced an increase in the perivascular tissue of rat small coronary arteries, with significant development of periarterial fibrosis. PMID:25946344

  2. Resveratrol Improved Flow-Mediated Outward Arterial Remodeling in Ovariectomized Rats with Hypertrophic Effect at High Dose

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marie; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Grimaud, Linda; Vessieres, Emilie; Toutain, Bertrand; Menet, Marie-Claude; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Arnal, Jean-François; Loufrani, Laurent; Procaccio, Vincent; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic increases in blood flow in resistance arteries induce outward remodeling associated with increased wall thickness and endothelium-mediated dilatation. This remodeling is essential for collateral arteries growth following occlusion of a large artery. As estrogens have a major role in this remodeling, we hypothesized that resveratrol, described as possessing phytoestrogen properties, could improve remodeling in ovariectomized rats. Methods Blood flow was increased in vivo in mesenteric arteries after ligation of adjacent arteries in 3-month old ovariectomized rats treated with resveratrol (5 or 37.5 mg/kg per day: RESV5 or RESV37.5) or vehicle. After 2 weeks arterial structure and function were measured in vitro in high flow (HF) and normal flow (NF) arteries isolated from each rat. Results Arterial diameter was greater in HF than in NF arteries in ovariectomized rats treated with RESV5 or RESV37.5, not in vehicle-treated rats. In mice lacking estrogen receptor alpha diameter was equivalent in HF and NF arteries whereas in mice treated with RESV5 diameter was greater in HF than in NF vessels. A compensatory increase in wall thickness and a greater phenylephrine-mediated contraction were observed in HF arteries. This was more pronounced in HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats. ERK1/2 phosphorylation, involved in hypertrophy and contraction, were higher in RESV37.5-treated rats than in RESV5- and vehicle-treated rats. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was greater in HF than in NF arteries in RESV5-treated rats only. In HF arteries from RESV37.5-treated rats relaxation was increased by superoxide reduction and markers of oxidative stress (p67phox, GP91phox) were higher than in the 2 other groups. Conclusion Resveratrol improved flow-mediated outward remodeling in ovariectomized rats thus providing a potential therapeutic tool in menopause-associated ischemic disorders. This effect seems independent of the estrogen receptor alpha. Nevertheless

  3. Contribution of the vertebral artery to cerebral circulation in the rat snake Elaphe obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zippel, K. C.; Lillywhite, H. B.; Mladinich, C. R.; Hargens, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Blood supplying the brain in vertebrates is carried primarily by the carotid vasculature. In most mammals, cerebral blood flow is supplemented by the vertebral arteries, which anastomose with the carotids at the base of the brain. In other tetrapods, cerebral blood is generally believed to be supplied exclusively by the carotid vasculature, and the vertebral arteries are usually described as disappearing into the dorsal musculature between the heart and head. There have been several reports of a vertebral artery connection with the cephalic vasculature in snakes. We measured regional blood flows using fluorescently labeled microspheres and demonstrated that the vertebral artery contributes a small but significant fraction of cerebral blood flow (approximately 13% of total) in the rat snake Elaphe obsoleta. Vascular casts of the anterior vessels revealed that the vertebral artery connection is indirect, through multiple anastomoses with the inferior spinal artery, which connects with the carotid vasculature near the base of the skull. Using digital subtraction angiography, fluoroscopy, and direct observations of flow in isolated vessels, we confirmed that blood in the inferior spinal artery flows craniad from a point anterior to the vertebral artery connections. Such collateral blood supply could potentially contribute to the maintenance of cerebral circulation during circumstances when craniad blood flow is compromised, e.g., during the gravitational stress of climbing.

  4. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. PMID:26276815

  5. The vasodilatory action of telmisartan on isolated mesenteric artery rings from rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-ping; Qian, Li-ren

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) represent one of the widely used antihypertensive agents. In addition to anti-hypertension effect, some ARBs also show other molecular effects such as activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and so on. Here we studied the effects of telmisartan on the rat isolated mesenteric artery rings pre-contracted by phenylephrine (PE). Materials and Methods: Rat mesenteric artery rings were pre-contracted with 10 μM PE, and cumulative concentration-response curves to telmisartan were obtained. The endothelium-dependent mechanisms were investigated by mechanical removal of the endothelium. K+ channels were investigated by pretreatment of the artery rings with various K+ channel blockers. Results: Telmisartan produced concentration-dependent relaxation of the artery rings pre-contracted by 10 μM PE. Denudation of the endothelium did not affect the relaxant effect of telmisartan. Pretreatment with BaCl2 nearly inhibited the relaxation induced by the 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 μM telmisartan, but did not affect the relaxation induced by the 50 and 100 μM telmisartan. While the relaxation induced by telmisartan was not affected by pretreatment with TEA, 4-AP and glibenclamide. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated that telmisartan produces concentration dependent vasodilation in isolated rat mesenteric artery rings with or without endothelium pre-contracted by PE. KIR channel may be involved in such a relaxant effect of telmisartan. PMID:26730331

  6. Developmental changes in the umbilical arteries with observation of the effects of indomethacin in fetal rats.

    PubMed

    Arishima, K; Yamamoto, M; Ueda, Y; Kusanagi, M; Eguchi, Y

    1990-08-01

    The caliber of the umbilical arteries was measured in fetal rats on day 14 to 21 of gestation. The fetuses were rapidly frozen in an acetone-dry ice mixture. The caudal half of each whole-body frozen fetus was gradually shaved with a knife from the ventral side to expose the umbilical arteries for measurement of their calibers. Observation reveals that, on day 15 of gestation, the umbilical arteries are asymmetrical in that the right artery is more dilated than the left. It is further seen that the left umbilical artery is closed on day 17 in contrast to the right which is increasingly more dilated toward term. When indomethacin, a synthetic compound having an action similar to that of glucocorticoids, was administered to pregnant rats 3 hr prior to sacrifice on day 21 of gestation, the right fetal umbilical artery was significantly constricted. The reason for this phenomenon is unknown, but is discussed in association with the manner of closure of the ductus arteriosus. PMID:2391780

  7. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  8. The stress of maternal separation causes misprogramming in the postnatal maturation of rat resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Reho, John J; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    We examined the effect of stress in the first 2 wk of life induced by brief periods of daily maternal separation on developmental programming of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries (MAs). In MAs of littermate controls, mRNAs encoding mediators of vasoconstriction, including the α1a-adrenergic receptor, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and CPI-17, the inhibitory subunit of myosin phosphatase, increased from after birth through sexual [postnatal day (PND) 35] and full maturity, up to ∼80-fold, as measured by quantitative PCR. This was commensurate with two- to fivefold increases in maximum force production to KCl depolarization, calcium, and the α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, and increasing systolic blood pressure. Rats exposed to maternal separation stress as neonates had markedly accelerated trajectories of maturation of arterial contractile gene expression and function measured at PND14 or PND21 (weaning), 1 wk after the end of the stress protocol. This was suppressed by the α-adrenergic receptor blocker terazosin (0.5 mg·kg ip(-1)·day(-1)), indicating dependence on stress activation of sympathetic signaling. Due to the continued maturation of MAs in control rats, by sexual maturity (PND35) and into adulthood, no differences were observed in arterial function or response to a second stressor in rats stressed as neonates. Thus early life stress misprograms resistance artery smooth muscle, increasing vasoconstrictor function and blood pressure. This effect wanes in later stages, suggesting plasticity during arterial maturation. Further studies are indicated to determine whether stress in different periods of arterial maturation may cause misprogramming persisting through maturity and the potential salutary effect of α-adrenergic blockade in suppression of this response. PMID:26371173

  9. Role of female sex hormones in neuronal nitric oxide release and metabolism in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Minoves, Nuria; Balfagón, Gloria; Ferrer, Mercedes

    2002-09-01

    This study examines the effects of female sex hormones on the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS), as well as the modulation of this response by neuronal NO. For this purpose, segments of denuded superior mesenteric artery from ovariectomized (OvX) female Sprague-Dawley rats and from control rats (in oestrus phase) were used. EFS induced frequency-dependent contractions, which were greater in segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester strengthened EFS-elicited contractions to a greater extent in arteries from OvX rats than in those from control rats. Similar results were observed with the preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole. The sensorial neurotoxin capsaicin did not modify EFS-induced contractions in segments from either group. In noradrenaline-precontracted segments, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced concentration-dependent relaxation, which was greater in segments from control rats than in those from OvX rats. 8-Bromo-cGMP induced similar concentration-dependent relaxation in noradrenaline-precontracted segments from both OvX and control rats. Diethyldithiocarbamate, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor, reduced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from both groups of rats. SOD, a superoxide anion scavenger, enhanced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from OvX rats, but did not modify it in segments from control rats. EFS induced NO(-)(2) formation, which was greater in segments from OvX than in those from control rats, and pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, a blocker of nerve impulse propagation, abolished release in both cases. These results suggest that EFS induces greater neuronal NO release in mesenteric segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats and, although NO metabolism is also higher, the contribution of net neuronal NO in the vasomotor response to EFS is greater in segments from OvX rats than in those

  10. Mechanisms of vascular preservation by a novel NO donor following rat carotid artery intimal injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, J P; Panday, M M; Consigny, P M; Lefer, A M

    1995-09-01

    We studied the effects of a novel organic nitric oxide (NO) donor, 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid-2-oxide (CAS-1609), in a rat carotid artery intimal injury model. The NO donor, CAS-1609, or its non-NO-donating control compound, 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid (C-93-4845), was infused intravenously at 30 micrograms/day. Seven days after injury, carotid artery rings contracted only 56 +/- 6 mg to NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in C-93-4845-treated rats, compared with 120 +/- 17 mg in CAS-1609-treated rats (P < 0.02), indicating a preservation of endogenous NO release. Improved responses to the endothelium-dependent dilator, acetylcholine, also occurred in injured arteries treated with CAS-1609. Morphometric analysis of injured carotid arteries given the inactive compound showed marked intimal thickening with an intimal-to-medial ratio (I/M) of 0.76 +/- 0.02, compared with a significantly lower I/M of 0.32 +/- 0.04 (P < 0.01) in injured carotid arteries given CAS-1609. Additionally, CAS-1609 was found to have a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on cultured rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (P < 0.01) but and inhibitory effect on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (10 ng/ml)-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate that NO plays a dual role in vascular cell proliferation, stimulating endothelial cells but inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation. This dual effect of NO on cell proliferation is associated with an in vivo reduction in neointimal thickening and an acceleration of endothelial recovery determined by both anatomic and functional methods. PMID:7573510

  11. [CHANGES IN THE METABOLISM IN THE MYOCARDIUM OF RATS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Dovgan, R S; Zagorodnyi, M I

    2015-01-01

    In the myocardium of the rats with arterial hypertension marked increase in the amount of unsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Reducing the concentration of palmitic acid and increased levels of arachidonic acid is considered as one of the factors that lead to the development of energy deficit and oxidative stress. In rats, with hypertension myocardial lactate concentration increases in the cytoplasmic fraction and reducing the amount of ATP. The level in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial fractions above benchmarks, indicating about the change of antioxidant systems of the body In the cytoplasm and mitochondria of cardiomyocytes of the rats with arterial hypertension marked decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes: NO-synthase, catalase, glutathione reductase, which causes metabolic changes of the myocardium. PMID:27491168

  12. The influence of aging on poststroke depression using a rat model via middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kutz, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is the most frequent psychological sequela following stroke. While previous studies describe the impact of age on brain infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown following ischemia, the role of age on PSD has yet to be described. Here, we examine the influence of age on PSD progression in a rat model of PSD by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One hundred forty-three rats were divided into three groups. 48 rats 20 weeks of age underwent a sham procedure, 51 rats 20 weeks of age had MCAO, and 44 rats 22-26 months of age had MCAO. Groups were further divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup was used to measure infarct lesion volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown at 24 h. In the second subgroup at 3 weeks after MCAO, rats were subjected to a sucrose preference test, two-way shuttle avoidance task, forced swimming test, and a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein level measurement. Total and striatal infarct volume, brain edema, and BBB breakdown in the striatum were increased in older rats, as compared with younger rats. While both old and young rats exhibited depressive-like behaviors on each of the behavioral tests and lower BDNF levels post-MCAO, as compared with control rats, there were no differences between old and young rats. Although older rats suffered from larger infarct volumes, increased brain edema and more BBB disruption following MCAO, the lack of behavioral differences between young and old rats suggests that there was no effect of rat age on the incidence of PSD. PMID:23761136

  13. Effects of physical training on pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise under hypobaric hypoxia in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, Osamu; Sakai, Akio

    1991-12-01

    In this investigation, we assessed the effects of physical training on exercise-induced systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic changes under hypobaric hypoxia in catheter-implanted rats. We made continuous measurements of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures during progressive treadmill exercises under hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to altitudes of 2500 and 5500 m) in 46 control and 41 trained rats. Trained rats were exercised on two running schedules: 4 weeks (4-trained) and 6 weeks (6-trained). Both these groups of trained rats were exercised for the same length of running time each day. The increase in resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure(overline {P_{pa} } ) with increasing equivalent altitude was lower in the two trained groups than in the control group. The increase in(overline {P_{pa} } ) with progressive intensity of exercise was lower in the 6-trained than in the 4-trained and control groups at 610 and 2500 m. The 6-trained rats showed higher pH, P a CO 2 and O2 saturation in their blood than did the control group, whereas the P a O 2 was less. Lung tissue cyclic AMP concentration at rest was higher in the 6-trained than in the control group. Finally, it may be noted that exercise-induced lung tissue vasodilator responses seem to be enhanced in well-trained rats under both normobaric normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia. This study indicates that exercise training may be useful in preventing pulmonary hypertension resulting from both hypoxia and exercise.

  14. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Induces Protection against Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mei; Wang, Jie; Liu, Fen; Gai, Min-Tao; Aierken, Alidan; Li, Ming-Yuan; Li, Qian; Wu, Lei-Qi; Ma, Yi-Tong; Hujiaaihemaiti, Minawaer

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various pulmonary diseases via the activation of the unfolded protein response. However, the role of ER stress in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. The well-known chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) inhibits ER stress signaling. We hypothesized that known chemical chaperones, including 4-PBA, would inhibit the activation of ER stress and prevent and/or reverse PAH. Methods and Results Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: a normal control group (NORMAL group), a PAH group, and two PAH model plus 4-PBA treatment groups. The latter two groups included rats receiving 4-PBA by gavage each day as a preventive measure (the PRE group, with PBA starting on the day of PAH induction and continuing for 4 weeks) or as a reversal measure (the REV group, with PBA starting on the third week of PAH induction and continuing for 2 weeks). The PAH model was induced by intraperitoneally administering monocrotaline. The mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure were lower in the REV and PRE groups than in the NORMAL group. Furthermore, 4-PBA improved pulmonary arterial remodeling and suppressed the expression of ER stress indicators. Conclusion Our findings indicate that PAH induces ER stress and provokes pulmonary arterial and right ventricular remodeling. Additionally, we show that attenuation of ER stress has the potential to be an effective therapeutic strategy for protecting pulmonary arteries. PMID:27304885

  15. An evaluation of vardenafil as a calcium channel blocker in pulmonary artery in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Vardenafil was reported to relax rat pulmonary artery through endothelium-dependent mechanisms. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate other related mechanisms for this effect. Materials and Methods: Endothelium-intact and denuded artery rings were suspended in order to record isometric tension. In the rings with or without endothelium, the concentration-response curves for vardenafil were generated. In the rings without endothelium the contractile response induced by phenylephrine (Phe) or KCl was assessed in the presence or absence of vardenafil. In the last set of experiments, pulmonary artery rings were exposed to calcium-free isotonic depolarizing solution and the contractile response induced by the addition of calcium was evaluated in the presence or absence of vardenafil, nifedipine, verapamil or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). Results: Vardenafil attenuated pulmonary artery contraction induced by phenylephrine in the presence and absence of endothelium. In addition, vardenafil attenuated both Phe or KCl-induced contraction but, it's effect on the KCl dose-response curve was more significant. Vardenafil also inhibited the contractile response induced by calcium in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of nifedipine or verapamil did not significantly alter this effect while ODQ incubation significantly inhibited vardenafil-induced relaxation. Conclusion: From these findings, it was proposed that vardenafil relaxed rat pulmonary artery through inhibiting calcium influx. PMID:24741191

  16. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  17. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. I. Impact of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the influence of obesity on global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries. Transcriptional profiles of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle feed arteries (GFA and SFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and lean Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were examined. Obesity produced 282 upregulated and 133 downregulated genes in SFA and 163 upregulated and 77 downregulated genes in GFA [false discovery rate (FDR) < 10%] with an overlap of 93 genes between the arteries. In LETO rats, there were 89 upregulated and 114 downregulated genes in the GFA compared with the SFA. There were 244 upregulated and 275 downregulated genes in OLETF rats (FDR < 10%) in the GFA compared with the SFA, with an overlap of 76 differentially expressed genes common to both LETO and OLETF rats in both the GFA and SFA. A total of 396 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed between LETO and OLETF in aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples. Overall, we found 1) the existence of heterogeneity in the transcriptional profile of the SFA and GFA within healthy LETO rats, 2) that this between-vessel heterogeneity was markedly exacerbated in the hyperphagic, obese OLETF rat, and 3) a greater number of genes whose expression was altered by obesity in the SFA compared with the GFA. Also, results indicate that in OLETF rats the GFA takes on a relatively more proatherogenic phenotype compared with the SFA. PMID:24436298

  18. Basilar Fracture Due to Frozen Corpse: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Yan, Yibo; Chen, Yiqun; Huang, Sizhe; Liu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Basilar fractures are one of the consequences of craniocerebral injury, which is serious enough to cause death. Legal examiners often pay attention to basilar fractures at autopsy and analyze the relationship between them and death. It is noteworthy whether the fracture is premortem or postmortem. Here, we describe a rarely reported case of basilar fracture due to freezing. In this case, a 30-year-old man was frozen (-18°C) for 6 months after death. At autopsy, external examination showed no trauma. However, on internal examination, there was a basilar fracture which caused controversy but turned out to be a postmortem injury. We provide the case description and discussion on antemortem or postmortem basilar fractures as a differential for these cases. PMID:27400253

  19. Effect of angiotensin-induced hypertension on rat coronary arteries and myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, F.; Anversa, P.; Wiener, J.

    1976-01-01

    Acute hypertension has been produced in rats by the intravenous infusion of angiotensin amide for 4 hours. Both control and hypertensive animals were injected intravenously prior to sacrifice with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or colloidal carbon. Epicardial arteries and blocks of ventricular myocardium containing intramyocardial arteries and arterioles have been processed for electron microscopy. HRP appears to penetrate the endoethelium of epicardial arteries from control animals within vesicles that bypass endothelial junctions and empty into interendoethelial clefts. Peroxidase does not traverse the endothelium of intramural arteries and arterioles of controls over the 10-minute period of observation. There is acceleration of lateral vesicular transport in the endothelium of epicardial arteries after angiotensin infusion and direct permeation of interendothelial clefts of intramural arterial vessels. Medial fragmentation and more extensive necrosis are observed in intramyocardial but not in epicardial arterial vessels. Foci of myocardial damage resembling irreversible ischemic or anoxic injury followed by reflow are described. It is suggested that the increased permeability of epicardial arteries may be due to elevated pressure, while the altered permeability and vascular lesions of intramural arteries and arterioles are more readily attributable to the vasoconstriction produced by angiotension. The vascular and myocardial lesions are also discussed in relation to the regional actions of angiotensin on the coronary circulation and known effects of this vasoactive peptide on myocardium. Images Figure 19 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 20 and 21 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figures 5-8 Figure 9 Figure 22 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:937512

  20. Tail arteries from chronically spinalized rats have potentiated responses to nerve stimulation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Melanie; McLachlan, Elspeth M; Brock, James A

    2004-01-01

    Patients with severe spinal cord lesions that damage descending autonomic pathways generally have low resting arterial pressure but bladder or colon distension or unheeded injuries may elicit a life-threatening hypertensive episode. Such episodes (known as autonomic dysreflexia) are thought to result from the loss of descending baroreflex inhibition and/or plasticity within the spinal cord. However, it is not clear whether changes in the periphery contribute to the exaggerated reflex vasoconstriction. The effects of spinal transection at T7–8 on nerve- and agonist-evoked contractions of the rat tail artery were investigated in vitro. Isometric contractions of arterial segments were recorded and responses of arteries from spinalized animals (‘spinalized arteries’) and age-matched and sham-operated controls were compared. Two and eight weeks after transection, nerve stimulation at 0.1–10 Hz produced contractions of greater force and duration in spinalized arteries. At both stages, the α-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin (10 nm) and idazoxan (0.1 μm) produced less blockade of nerve-evoked contraction in spinalized arteries. Two weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive to the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, and the α2-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine, but 8 weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive only to clonidine. Contractions of spinalized arteries elicited by 60 mm K+ were larger and decayed more slowly at both stages. These findings demonstrate that spinal transection markedly increases nerve-evoked contractions and this can, in part, be accounted for by increased reactivity of the vascular smooth muscle to vasoconstrictor agents. This hyper-reactivity may contribute to the genesis of autonomic dysreflexia in patients. PMID:14766944

  1. An Experimental Method for Measuring Mechanical Properties of Rat Pulmonary Arteries Verified With Latex

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, E. S.; Slifka, A. J.; Wright, J. E.; McCowan, C. N.; Finch, D. S.; Quinn, T. P.; McColskey, J. D.; Ivy, D. D.; Shandas, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a test method for measuring the mechanical properties of small, nonlinear membrane samples from a rat model for pulmonary hypertension. The size and nonlinearity of the pulmonary artery samples poses a challenge for developing a test method that will generate quality, reproducible data in the pressure range experienced by the hypertensive pulmonary artery. The experimental method described here has sufficient precision to yield a combined relative standard uncertainty of 4 %. The method is calibrated against 75 µm thick latex and the data agree well with the neo-Hookian model.

  2. Responses of mean arterial pressure to pressor agents and diuretics in renal hypertensive and salt hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, T. E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The responses of the mean arterial pressure to (—)-noradrenaline, tyramine, angiotensin II-val5-amide, vasopressin and rat renin have been contrasted in renal hypertensive and in salt plus desoxycorticosterone hypertensive rats. The responses were measured in rats both unanaesthetized and rats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. 2. Responses of unanaesthetized, ganglion blocked renal hypertensive rats to noradrenaline, tyramine and vasopressin markedly exceeded, and to angiotensin II and renin were markedly smaller than, those of unanaesthetized ganglion blocked salt + DOC hypertensive animals. Responses to angiotensin and to renin were apparently enhanced in the latter animals. 3. Hydrochlorothiazide and frusemide markedly reduced mean arterial pressure in salt + DOC hypertensive rats before and after ganglionic blockade. 4. Neither diuretic caused significant reduction in the mean arterial pressures of unanaesthetized, renal hypertensive rats in the absence of ganglionic blockade: frusemide did so in anaesthetized and unanaesthetized rats after ganglionic blockade. 5. Whereas the diuretics did not affect the responses of the renal hypertensive rats to pressor agents, frusemide and to a lesser extent hydrochlorothiazide tended to depress the responses to pressor agents in salt induced hypertension. 6. Hydrochlorothiazide did not influence mean arterial pressure in unanaesthetized rats with neurogenic hypertension. PMID:4326321

  3. Effects of Cyclic Intermittent Hypoxia on ET-1 Responsiveness and Endothelial Dysfunction of Pulmonary Arteries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Jian-Ping; An, Qi; Guo, Ya-jing; Chu, Li; Weiss, J. Woodrow; Ji, En-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and in some cases is complication of pulmonary hypertension. We simulated OSA by exposing rats to cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) to investigate its effect on pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction. Sprague-Dawley Rats were exposed to CIH (FiO2 9% for 1 min, repeated every 2 min for 8 h/day, 7 days/wk for 3 wk), and the pulmonary arteries of normoxia and CIH treated rats were analyzed for expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET receptors by histological, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR and Western Blot analyses, as well as for contractility in response to ET-1. In the pulmonary arteries, ET-1 expression was increased, and ET-1 more potently elicited constriction of the pulmonary artery in CIH rats than in normoxic rats. Exposure to CIH induced marked endothelial cell damage associated with a functional decrease of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the pulmonary artery. Compared with normoxic rats, ETA receptor expression was increased in smooth muscle cells of the CIH rats, while the expression of ETB receptors was decreased in endothelial cells. These results demonstrated endothelium-dependent vasodilation was impaired and the vasoconstrictor responsiveness increased by CIH. The increased responsiveness to ET-1 induced by intermittent hypoxia in pulmonary arteries of rats was due to increased expression of ETA receptors predominantly, meanwhile, decreased expression of ETB receptors in the endothelium may also participate in it. PMID:23555567

  4. Histopathological findings following pipeline embolization in a human cerebral aneurysm at the basilar tip.

    PubMed

    Dai, Daying; Ding, Yong-Hong; Kelly, Michael; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Kallmes, David

    2016-04-01

    We report histopathological findings from a human cerebral aneurysm following treatment with a flow diverter. A 75-year-old male underwent flow diversion treatment (Pipeline Embolization Device (PED)) and coil embolization for treatment of an aneurysm at the basilar tip. At four months, angiography showed complete aneurysm occlusion; at 12 months angiography demonstrated that the aneurysm had reopened. The patient expired from brainstem compression. The aneurysm cavity was primarily filled with unorganized thrombus. Thick, interrupted neointima crossed the neck interface indicating blood flow into aneurysm through small channels. Along the parent artery the PED was covered by neointima having a measured thickness of 0.19 ± 0.01 mm; the maximal stenosis of the proximal parent artery was 27%. The perforating arteries that were crossed by the PED remained patent. Findings in this human case are similar to those in the elastase-induced aneurysms in rabbits. PMID:26842611

  5. Stiffening of the Extrapulmonary Arteries From Rats in Chronic Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Drexler, E S; Bischoff, J E; Slifka, A J; McCowan, C N; Quinn, T P; Shandas, R; Ivy, D D; Stenmark, K R

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the compliance properties of large blood vessels are critical determinants of ventricular afterload and ultimately dysfunction. Little is known of the mechanical properties of large vessels exhibiting pulmonary hypertension, particularly the trunk and right main artery. We initiated a study to investigate the influence of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension on the mechanical properties of the extrapulmonary arteries of rats. One group of animals was housed at the equivalent of 5000 m elevation for three weeks and the other held at ambient conditions of ~1600 m. The two groups were matched in age and gender. The animals exposed to hypobaric hypoxia exhibited signs of pulmonary hypertension, as evidenced by an increase in the RV/(LV+S) heart weight ratio. The extrapulmonary arteries of the hypoxic animals were also thicker than those of the control population. Histological examination revealed increased thickness of the media and additional deposits of collagen in the adventitia. The mechanical properties of the trunk, and the right and left main pulmonary arteries were assessed; at a representative pressure (7 kPa), the two populations exhibited different quantities of stretch for each section. At higher pressures we noted less deformation among the arteries from hypoxic animals as compared with controls. A four-parameter constitutive model was employed to fit and analyze the data. We conclude that chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is associated with a stiffening of all the extrapulmonary arteries. PMID:27096124

  6. Stiffening of the Extrapulmonary Arteries From Rats in Chronic Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, E. S; Bischoff, J. E; Slifka, A. J; McCowan, C. N; Quinn, T. P; Shandas, R; Ivy, D. D; Stenmark, K. R

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the compliance properties of large blood vessels are critical determinants of ventricular afterload and ultimately dysfunction. Little is known of the mechanical properties of large vessels exhibiting pulmonary hypertension, particularly the trunk and right main artery. We initiated a study to investigate the influence of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension on the mechanical properties of the extrapulmonary arteries of rats. One group of animals was housed at the equivalent of 5000 m elevation for three weeks and the other held at ambient conditions of ~1600 m. The two groups were matched in age and gender. The animals exposed to hypobaric hypoxia exhibited signs of pulmonary hypertension, as evidenced by an increase in the RV/(LV+S) heart weight ratio. The extrapulmonary arteries of the hypoxic animals were also thicker than those of the control population. Histological examination revealed increased thickness of the media and additional deposits of collagen in the adventitia. The mechanical properties of the trunk, and the right and left main pulmonary arteries were assessed; at a representative pressure (7 kPa), the two populations exhibited different quantities of stretch for each section. At higher pressures we noted less deformation among the arteries from hypoxic animals as compared with controls. A four-parameter constitutive model was employed to fit and analyze the data. We conclude that chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is associated with a stiffening of all the extrapulmonary arteries. PMID:27096124

  7. Effects of melatonin and Pycnogenol on small artery structure and function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Porteri, Enzo; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Bonomini, Francesca; Rodella, Luigi F; Paiardi, Silvia; Boari, Gianluca E M; Platto, Caterina; Pilu, Annamaria; Avanzi, Daniele; Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    It was suggested that oxidative stress has a key role in the development of endothelial dysfunction, as well as microvascular structural alterations. Therefore, we have investigated 2 substances with antioxidant properties: melatonin and Pycnogenol. We treated 7 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with melatonin and 7 with Pycnogenol for 6 weeks. We compared results obtained with those observed in 7 SHRs and 7 Wistar-Kyoto normotensive control rats kept untreated. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were dissected and mounted on a wire myograph, and a concentration-response curve to acetylcholine was performed. Aortic contents of metalloproteinase 2, Bax, inducible NO synthase, and cyclooxygenase 2 were evaluated, together with the aortic content of total collagen and collagen subtypes and apoptosis rate. A small reduction in systolic blood pressure was observed. A significant improvement in mesenteric small resistance artery structure and endothelial function was observed in rats treated with Pycnogenol and melatonin. Total aortic collagen content was significantly greater in untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats, whereas a full normalization was observed in treated rats. Apoptosis rate was increased in the aortas of untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats; an even more pronounced increase was observed in treated rats. Bax and metalloproteinase 2 expressions changed accordingly. Cyclooxygenase 2 and inducible NO synthase were more expressed in the aortas of untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats; this pattern was normalized by both treatments. In conclusion, our data suggest that treatment with Pycnogenol and melatonin may protect the vasculature, partly independent of blood pressure reduction, probably through their antioxidant effects. PMID:20421515

  8. Quinapril decreases antifibrinolytic and prooxidative potential of propofol in arterial thrombosis in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Marzena; Kisiel, Wioleta; Kramkowski, Karol; Gromotowicz-Poplawska, Anna; Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Stankiewicz, Adrian; Kolodziejczyk, Patrycjusz; Szemraj, Janusz; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Chabielska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and propofol both exert hypotensive action and may affect hemostasis. We investigated the influence of quinapril and propofol on hemodynamics and hemostasis in renal-hypertensive rats with induced arterial thrombosis. Two-kidney, one clip hypertensive rats were treated with quinapril (3.0 mg/kg for 10 days), and then received propofol infusion (15 mg/kg/h) during ongoing arterial thrombosis. The hemodynamic and hemostatic parameters were assayed. Quinapril exerted a hypotensive effect increasing after propofol infusion. Quinapril showed an antithrombotic effect with the platelet adhesion reduction, fibrinolysis enhancement and oxidative stress reduction. Propofol did not influence thrombosis; however, it inhibited fibrinolysis and showed prooxidative action. The effect of propofol on fibrinolysis and oxidative stress was significantly lower in quinapril-pretreated rats. Mortality was increased among rats treated with both drugs together. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment with quinapril reduced the adverse effects of propofol on hemostasis. Unfortunately, co-administration of both drugs potentiated hypotension in rats, which corresponds to higher mortality. PMID:27169890

  9. A new rat model of auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation with liver dual arterial blood supply

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, JIANLIANG; HAN, CHUNLEI; ZHANG, JUNJING; WANG, ZHIYONG; MENG, XINGKAI

    2015-01-01

    Auxiliary partial heterotopic liver transplantation (APHLT) with portal vein arterialization is a valuable procedure to be considered in the treatment of patients with acute liver failure and metabolic liver diseases. The aim of this study was to develop a new rat model of APHLT with liver dual arterial blood supply (LDABS). A total of 20 rats were used. The donor liver was resected, and the celiac trunk was reserved. Left and medial hepatic lobes accounting for 70% of the liver mass were removed en bloc and the suprahepatic caval vein was ligated simultaneously. Thus, 30% of the donor liver was obtained as the graft. Sleeve anastomosis of the graft portal vein and splenic artery were performed after narrowing the portal vein lumen through suturing. The right kidney of the recipient was removed, and sleeve anastomosis was performed between the celiac trunk of the graft and the right renal artery of the recipient. In addition, end-to-end anastomosis was performed between the infrahepatic caval vein of the graft and the right renal vein of the recipient. Following the reperfusion of the graft, the blood flow of the arterialized portal vein was controlled within the physiological range through suturing and narrowing under monitoring with an ultrasonic flowmeter. The bile duct of the graft was implanted into the duodenum of the recipient through an internal stent catheter. A 70% section of the native liver (left and medial hepatic lobes) was resected using bloodless hepatectomy. The mean operative duration was 154.5±16.4 min, and the warm and cold ischemia times of the graft were 8.1±1.1 min and 64.5±6.6 min, respectively. The blood flow of the arterialized portal vein to the graft was 1.8±0.3 ml/min/g liver weight. The success rate of model establishment (waking with post-surgical survival of >24 h) was 70% (7/10). Following successful model establishment, all rats survived 7 days post-surgery (100%; 7/7). The graft was found to be soft in texture and bright red

  10. Spreading dilatation to luminal perfusion of ATP and UTP in rat isolated small mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Polly; Dora, Kim A

    2007-01-01

    Levels of ATP achieved within the lumen of vessels suggest a key autacoid role. P2Y receptors on the endothelium may represent the target for ATP, leading to hyperpolarization and associated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle through the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathway. EDHF signals radially from the endothelium to cause dilatation, and appears mechanistically distinct from the axial spread of dilatation, which we showed occurs independently of a change in endothelial cell Ca2+ in rat mesenteric arteries. Here we have investigated the potential of P2Y receptor stimulation to evoke spreading dilatation in rat resistance small arteries under physiological pressure and flow. Triple cannulation of isolated arteries enables focal application of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides to the endothelium, avoiding potential complicating actions of these agents on the smooth muscle. Nucleotides were locally infused through one branch of a bifurcation, causing near maximal local dilatation attributable to EDHF. Dilatation then spread rapidly into the adjacent feed artery and upstream against the direction of luminal flow, sufficient to increase flow into the feed artery. The rate of decay of this spreading dilatation was identical between nucleotides, and matched that to ACh, which acts only on the endothelium. In contrast, focal abluminal application of either ATP or UTP at the downstream end of cannulated arteries evoked constriction, which only in the case of ATP was also associated with modest spread of dilatation. The non-hydrolysable ADP analogue, ADPβS, acting at P2Y1 receptors, caused robust local and spreading dilatation responses whether applied to the luminal or abluminal surface of pressurized arteries. Dilatation to nucleotides was sensitive to inhibition with apamin and TRAM-34, selective blockers of small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively. These data demonstrate that direct luminal stimulation of P

  11. Reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations in living mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Kemp, David

    2016-08-30

    It is commonly believed that the exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing depends on outer hair cells which generate forces for amplifying sound-induced basilar membrane vibrations, yet how cellular forces amplify vibrations is poorly understood. In this study, by measuring subnanometer vibrations directly from the reticular lamina at the apical ends of outer hair cells and from the basilar membrane using a custom-built heterodyne low-coherence interferometer, we demonstrate in living mouse cochleae that the sound-induced reticular lamina vibration is substantially larger than the basilar membrane vibration not only at the best frequency but surprisingly also at low frequencies. The phase relation of reticular lamina to basilar membrane vibration changes with frequency by up to 180 degrees from ∼135 degrees at low frequencies to ∼-45 degrees at the best frequency. The magnitude and phase differences between reticular lamina and basilar membrane vibrations are absent in postmortem cochleae. These results indicate that outer hair cells do not amplify the basilar membrane vibration directly through a local feedback as commonly expected; instead, they actively vibrate the reticular lamina over a broad frequency range. The outer hair cell-driven reticular lamina vibration collaboratively interacts with the basilar membrane traveling wave primarily through the cochlear fluid, which boosts peak responses at the best-frequency location and consequently enhances hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. PMID:27516544

  12. Salvianolic acid A attenuates vascular remodeling in a pulmonary arterial hypertension rat model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-cai; Yuan, Tian-yi; Zhang, Hui-fang; Wang, Dan-shu; Yan, Yu; Niu, Zi-ran; Lin, Yi-huang; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The current therapeutic approaches have a limited effect on the dysregulated pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study we examined whether salvianolic acid A (SAA) extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine 'Dan Shen' attenuated vascular remodeling in a PAH rat model, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Methods: PAH was induced in rats by injecting a single dose of monocrotaline (MCT 60 mg/kg, sc). The rats were orally treated with either SAA (0.3, 1, 3 mg·kg−1·d−1) or a positive control bosentan (30 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements were performed on d 28. Then the hearts and lungs were harvested, the organ indices and pulmonary artery wall thickness were calculated, and biochemical and histochemical analysis were conducted. The levels of apoptotic and signaling proteins in the lungs were measured using immunoblotting. Results: Treatment with SAA or bosentan effectively ameliorated MCT-induced pulmonary artery remodeling, pulmonary hemodynamic abnormalities and the subsequent increases of right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP). Furthermore, the treatments significantly attenuated MCT-induced hypertrophic damage of myocardium, parenchymal injury and collagen deposition in the lungs. Moreover, the treatments attenuated MCT-induced apoptosis and fibrosis in the lungs. The treatments partially restored MCT-induced reductions of bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPRII) and phosphorylated Smad1/5 in the lungs. Conclusion: SAA ameliorates the pulmonary arterial remodeling in MCT-induced PAH rats most likely via activating the BMPRII-Smad pathway and inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, SAA may have therapeutic potential for the patients at high risk of PAH. PMID:27180980

  13. Arterial medial necrosis and hemorrhage induced in rats by intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, E. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Arena, E.; Kupp, R. P.; Saunders, L. Z.; Lewis, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective, postsynaptic, dopaminergic vasodilator, was administered to rats for assessment of its clinical, toxicologic, and pathologic effects. Groups of 8 male and 8 female rats received 5, 25, 50, or 100 micrograms/kg/min by intravenous infusion for 24 hours. Groups of 12 male and 12 female rats received 2, 8, 16, or 20 mg/kg/day by intravenous injection once daily for 12 days. Tissues were examined by light microscopy. Rats infused for 24-hours with 5-100 micrograms/kg/min of fenoldopam had lesions of renal and splanchnic arteries characterized by medial necrosis and hemorrhage. None were seen in control rats or those administered the compound by intravenous injection. Arteries with four to five layers of medial smooth-muscle cells were most severely and frequently affected. Lesions were particularly severe in interlobular pancreatic arteries and subserosal gastric arteries. They occurred first at 4 hours, were present at low incidence at 8 hours, were induced in unrestrained rats, and were not caused by the experimental procedures employed. The nature and disposition of this novel arterial lesion in the rat suggests that its pathogenesis may be related to the pharmacologic activity of fenoldopam mesylate at the dopamine receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2858975

  14. Ambrisentan and tadalafil synergistically relax endothelin-induced contraction of rat pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Faquan; Yang, Suya; Yao, Lina; Belardinelli, Luiz; Shryock, John

    2012-03-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that a selective endothelin type A receptor antagonist (ambrisentan) and a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (tadalafil) may act synergistically to relax endothelin-constricted pulmonary arteries. Rat isolated intrapulmonary arterial rings contracted with 8 nmol/L endothelin-1 were relaxed by 10 nmol/L ambrisentan and 30 nmol/L tadalafil alone by 26±3% and 21±1%, respectively, whereas both drugs in combination acted synergistically to relax arterial rings by 83±6%. The nonselective endothelin type A and B receptor antagonists bosentan (100 nmol/L) and macitentan (30 nmol/L) alone relaxed endothelin-contracted rings by 30±5% and 24±3%, respectively. Combinations of 30 nmol/L tadalafil with 100 nmol/L bosentan or 30 nmol/L macitentan relaxed endothelin-contracted rings by 53±5% or 46±7%, respectively; these values are similar to the calculated sums of the individual effects of these compounds. Denudation of endothelium from pulmonary arterial rings abolished the vasodilator response to 30 nmol/L tadalafil and the synergistic vasorelaxant effect of tadalafil with ambrisentan. In the presence of 1 μmol/L BQ-788, a selective endothelin type B receptor antagonist, the vasorelaxant effects of 10 nmol/L ambrisentan and 30 nmol/L tadalafil were additive but not synergistic. These data can be interpreted to suggest that ambrisentan and tadalafil synergistically inhibit endothelin-1-induced constriction of rat intrapulmonary arteries and that endothelin type B receptors in endothelium are necessary to enable a synergistic vasorelaxant effect of the drug combination. PMID:22311911

  15. Calorie Restriction Attenuates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingge; Lei, Jingyi; Qu, Yinxian; Zhang, Huan; Xin, Weichuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective nonpharmacological interventions protecting against cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension in the systemic circulation. However, whether CR could attenuate pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is largely unknown. The PAH model was developed by subjecting the rats to a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. CR lowered mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and reduced vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in PAH rats. Meanwhile, CR attenuated endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine. The beneficial effects of CR were associated with restored sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) expression and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. To further clarify the role of SIRT1 in the protective effects of CR, adenoviral vectors for overexpression of SIRT1 were administered intratracheally at 1 day before monocrotaline injection. Overexpression of SIRT1 exhibited similar beneficial effects on mPAP and endothelial function, and increased eNOS phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in the absence of CR. Moreover, SIRT1 overexpression attenuated the increase in mPAP in hypoxia-induced PAH animals. Overall, the present data demonstrate that CR may serve as an effective treatment of PAH, and targeting the SIRT1/eNOS pathway may improve treatment of PAH. PMID:25636073

  16. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Stimulates Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression and Inhibits Neointima Formation in Rat Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Azam, Mohammed A.; Peyton, Kelly J.; Ensenat, Diana; Keswani, Amit N.; Wang, Hong; Durante, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound that is a potent inducer of phase II genes. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a vasoprotective protein that is upregulated by phase II inducers, the present study examined the effects of BHA on HO-1 gene expression and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Methods The regulation of HO-1 gene expression and vascular cell growth by BHA was studied in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and in balloon injured rat carotid arteries. Results Treatment of cultured smooth muscle cells with BHA stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein, mRNA and promoter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. BHA-mediated HO-1 expression was dependent on the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. BHA also inhibited cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis in a HO-1-dependent manner. In addition, the local perivascular delivery of BHA immediately after arterial injury of rat carotid arteries induced HO-1 protein expression and markedly attenuated neointima formation. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that BHA stimulates HO-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that the induction of HO-1 contributes to the antiproliferative actions of this phenolic antioxidant. BHA represents a potentially novel therapeutic agent in treating or preventing vasculoproliferative disease. PMID:17320844

  17. Protective Effect of a Fish Egg Homogenate Marine Compound on Arterial Ultrastructure in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zerbinati, Nicola; Nagpal, Ravinder; Singh, Birbal; Mohania, Dheeraj; Milazzo, Michele; Italia, Angelo; Tomella, Claudio; Catanzaro, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We assessed the effect of a sturgeon eggs–based nutraceutical (LD-1227) versus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the ultrastructure of spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aortas. Sixty SHR were randomly divided into three groups that were fed (1) rat chow, (2) rat chow plus 10 mg of EPA/DHA, or (3) rat chow plus 10 mg of LD-1227, for 18 weeks. Afterward, aortas of these rats were used for blind measurements of the thickened intima area and examination by electron microscopy. Control SHR showed an expanded subendothelial space and leukocyte infiltration of the intima that were reduced in LD-1227–fed rats (p<0.05) and less in EPA/DHA group. Transmission electron microscopy showed endothelial alteration with severe subcellular injury and, unlike the EPA/DHA-group, LD-1227–treated rats displayed a significant reduction in endothelial alteration with severe subcellular injury (p<0.05). These data suggest that LD-1227 has stronger arterial protective properties and deserves further investigation in view of a preventive medicine strategy. PMID:24050389

  18. Stretch-activated channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from normoxic and chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Thomas; El Arrouchi, Jalila; Courtois, Arnaud; Quignard, Jean-François; Marthan, Roger; Savineau, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Stretch-activated channels (SACs) act as membrane mechanotransducers since they convert physical forces into biological signals and hence into a cell response. Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) are continuously exposed to mechanical stimulations e.g., compression and stretch, that are enhanced under conditions of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Using the patch-clamp technique (cell-attached configuration) in PASMCs, we showed that applying graded negative pressures (from 0 to -60 mmHg) to the back end of the patch pipette increases occurrence and activity of SACs. The current-voltage relationship (from -80 to +40 mV) was almost linear with a reversal potential of 1 mV and a slope conductance of 34 pS. SACs were inhibited in the presence of GsMTx-4, a specific SACs blocker. Using microspectrofluorimetry (indo-1), we found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly inhibited in the absence of external Ca(2+) or in the presence of the following blockers of SACs: gadolinium, streptomycin, and GsMTx-4. Interestingly, in chronically hypoxic rats, an animal model of PAH, SACs were more active and hypotonic-induced calcium response in PASMCs was significantly higher (nearly a two-fold increase). Moreover, unlike in normoxic rats, intrapulmonary artery rings from hypoxic rats mounted in a Mulvany myograph, exhibited a myogenic tone sensitive to SAC blockers. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that SACs in rat PASMCs can be activated by membrane stretch as well as hypotonic stimulation and are responsible for [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The link between SACs activation-induced calcium response and myogenic tone in chronically hypoxic rats suggests that SACs are an important element for the increased pulmonary vascular tone in PAH and that they may represent a molecular target for PAH treatment. PMID:21035852

  19. Flavonoid metabolite 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid formed by human microflora decreases arterial blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Najmanová, Iveta; Pourová, Jana; Vopršalová, Marie; Pilařová, Veronika; Semecký, Vladimír; Nováková, Lucie; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-05-01

    There are reports of positive effects of quercetin on cardiovascular pathologies, however, mainly due to its low biovailability, the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report that one metabolite formed by human microflora (3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid)relaxed isolated rat aorta and decreased arterial blood pressure in rats. PMID:26790841

  20. TRPV3 expression and vasodilator function in isolated uterine radial arteries from non-pregnant and pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy V; Kanagarajah, Arjna; Toemoe, Sianne; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Britton, Fiona C; Leader, Leo; Senadheera, Sevvandi; Sandow, Shaun L

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-3 ion channels (TRPV3) in uterine radial arteries isolated from non-pregnant and twenty-day pregnant rats. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) suggested TRPV3 is primarily localized to the smooth muscle in arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats. IHC using C' targeted antibody, and qPCR of TRPV3 mRNA, suggested pregnancy increased arterial TRPV3 expression. The TRPV3 activator carvacrol caused endothelium-independent dilation of phenylephrine-constricted radial arteries, with no difference between vessels from non-pregnant and pregnant animals. Carvacrol-induced dilation was reduced by the TRPV3-blockers isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ruthenium red, but not by the TRPA1 or TRPV4 inhibitors HC-030031 or HC-067047, respectively. In radial arteries from non-pregnant rats only, inhibition of NOS and sGC, or PKG, enhanced carvacrol-mediated vasodilation. Carvacrol-induced dilation of arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats was prevented by the IKCa blocker TRAM-34. TRPV3 caused an endothelium-independent, IKCa-mediated dilation of the uterine radial artery. NO-PKG-mediated modulation of TRPV3 activity is lost in pregnancy, but this did not alter the response to carvacrol. PMID:27073026

  1. Effect of transient carotid artery compression during transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Duque, F J; Barrera-Chacon, R; Ruiz, P; Casamian-Sorrosal, D; Zaragoza, C; Dominguez-Roldan, J M

    2010-09-25

    Changes in blood flow in the arteries of the canine skull base following compression of the ipsilateral carotid artery were evaluated. Forty healthy conscious dogs were evaluated during examination in lateral recumbency. Using the temporal window, the rostral, middle and caudal cerebral arteries were evaluated. The basilar artery was studied through the suboccipital window. Following compression, the pulse Doppler signal was reduced or inverted when interrogating the rostral or middle cerebral artery, and no change was observed when the caudal cerebral artery or basilar artery was evaluated. PMID:20871081

  2. Chemical sympathectomy induces arterial accumulation of native and oxidized LDL in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Rafik; Dab, Houcine; Sakly, Mohsen; Vicaut, Eric; Callebert, Jacques; Sercombe, Richard; Kacem, Kamel

    2012-01-26

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of sympathectomy on plasmatic and arterial native and oxLDL levels, as well as arterial LDL receptors (LDLR) and scavenger receptors in hypercholesterolemic rats, which are normally protected against atherosclerosis. Neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of either guanethidine for sympathectomy (Gua+HC) or vehicle (HC), then were fed 1% cholesterol for three months. Intact normocholesterolemic rats were used as control of the HC group. Total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-cholesterol were evaluated in the plasma and the abdominal aorta by an auto-analyzer. Plasmatic and aortic oxLDL and native LDL-apo B100 were assessed by a sandwich ELISA. Aortic and hepatic native LDLR and aortic scavenger receptors (CD36 and SR-A) were quantified at mRNA and protein levels by real time PCR and western immunoblot. The effect of hypercholesterolemia was limited to an increase in plasmatic TC and LDL-cholesterol and a decrease in aortic apoB100 and aortic and hepatic LDLR. Hypercholesterolemia and sympathectomy in combination increased markedly plasmatic and aortic TC, LDL-cholesterol, apo B100 and oxLDL together with aortic scavenger receptors, but reduced markedly aortic and hepatic LDLR. Sympathectomy broke down the rat's protection against hypercholesterolemia by promoting accumulation of native and oxLDL in the aorta via scavenger receptors. PMID:21917529

  3. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  4. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  5. Analysis of relaxation and repolarization mechanisms of nicorandil in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, T.; Angus, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanisms by which nicorandil causes relaxation of rat isolated small mesenteric arteries mounted on a Mulvany myograph was investigated by use of a combination of putatively mechanism-specific antagonists. 2. In arteries precontracted by the thromboxane-mimetic, U46619, the EC50 for cromakalim and levcromakalim-induced relaxation curves were raised by 36 and 17 fold by glibenclamide (3 microM) while the EC50 for nicorandil-induced relaxation was unaffected by either glibenclamide or methylene blue (10 microM). A combination of these antagonists raised the EC50 for nicorandil by 8 fold. 3. In U46619-contracted arteries, nifedipine (100 nM) did not affect the cromakalim relaxation curve but it raised the EC50 for nicorandil by 5 fold. The combination of methylene blue, glibenclamide and nifedipine further inhibited the maximum relaxation to nicorandil. 4. In separate experiments, membrane potential (Em) and force responses were measured simultaneously. In arteries depolarized and contracted by U46619 both nicorandil and cromakalim repolarized (delta Em, 35 mV) and relaxed (100%) the vessels. Glibenclamide (3 microM) did not alter the relaxation-concentration curve to nicorandil but reduced the maximum repolarization to delta 10.8 mV. In contrast to Em and relaxation-response curves to cromakalim were shifted to the right by glibenclamide by 30-100 fold. 5. In unstimulated arteries, nicorandil (but not cromakalim) -induced hyperpolarization was significantly antagonized by methylene blue (10 microM) (6.6 fold rightward shift) or nifedipine (100 nM) (2.6 fold). In depolarized arteries (U46619), nifedipine but not methylene blue inhibited the nicorandil-induced hyperpolarization. 6. In arteries precontracted to 50% tissue maximum by either KCl or U46619, nifedipine (100 nM) relaxed the artery but failed to repolarize the Em. Presumably voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCC) were blocked preventing contraction but the artery remained depolarized, presumably

  6. Autonomic and myocardial changes in middle cerebral artery occlusion: stroke models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cechetto, D F; Wilson, J X; Smith, K E; Wolski, D; Silver, M D; Hachinski, V C

    1989-11-20

    Stroke models in larger animals such as the cat, dog and monkey are becoming increasingly more expensive and less readily available. However, the rat is an excellent model for focal cerebral ischemia. Rats are readily available, inexpensive and their neuroanatomy and brain function have been studied extensively. Increases in plasma catecholamines and myocardial damage have been observed in clinical stroke. We examined autonomic and myocardial changes in two rat stroke models. In one model only the middle cerebral artery was occluded (MCAO) while the other model involved occlusion of both the MCA and the common carotid artery (MCAO/CCAO). Arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously in 25 male rats (326-430 g) that underwent one of the following procedures: (1) MCAO only; (2) MCAO/CCAO; (3) CCAO only; and (4) sham occlusions (SHAM). Arterial blood samples (0.5 ml) for radioenzymatic assay of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) were taken twice before the occlusions and at 90 and 180 min after the occlusions. The animals were perfused at the end of the experiment and the heart removed and examined histologically. Tetrazolium salts were reacted with oxidative enzymes to delineate the region of inadequate perfusion. The mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the SHAM, MCAO/CCAO and CCAO groups significantly declined from initial values (from an average of 78 to 53 mm Hg) during the course of the experiment. However, the mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the MCAO rats did not change during the experiment, so that the final mean blood pressure and pulse pressure were significantly higher than in the other 3 groups. The levels of both NE and E increased significantly (NE, 1443 +/- 285.9 to 4095 +/- 929 pg/ml; E, 2402 +/- 623 to 3741 +/- 1166 pg/ml) following occlusion in the MCAO group only while the other 3 groups did not change. Four of 6 hearts in the MCAO group were abnormal, showing evidence of subendocardial hemorrhage, ischemic

  7. Plasma hyperosmolality and arterial pressure regulation during heating in dehydrated and awake rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Nose, H; Takamata, A

    1998-11-01

    To gain better insights into the effect of dehydration on thermal and cardiovascular regulation during hyperthermia, we examined these regulatory responses during body heating in rats under isosmotic hypovolemia and hyperosmotic hypovolemia. Rats were divided into four groups: normovolemic and isosmotic (C), hypovolemic and isosmotic [L, plasma volume loss (DeltaPV) = -20% of control], hypovolemic and less hyperosmotic [HL1, increase in plasma osmolality (DeltaPosm) = 23 mosmol/kgH2O, DeltaPV = -16%], and hypovolemic and more hyperosmotic (HL2, DeltaPosm = 52 mosmol/kgH2O, DeltaPV = -17%). Hyperosmolality was attained by subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline and hypovolemia by intra-arterial injection of furosemide before heating. Then rats were placed in a thermocontrolled box (35 degreesC air temperature, approximately 20% relative humidity) for 1-2 h until rectal temperatures (Tre) reached 40.0 degreesC. Mean arterial pressure in L decreased with rise in Tre (P < 0.001), whereas mean arterial pressure remained constant in the other groups. Maximal tail skin blood flow in L, HL1, and HL2 was decreased to approximately 30% of that in C (P < 0. 001). Tre threshold for tail skin vasodilation (TVD) was not changed in L, whereas the threshold shifted higher in the HL groups. Tre threshold for TVD was highly correlated with Posm (r = 0.94, P < 0. 001). Heart rate in the HL groups increased with rise in Tre (P < 0. 001), whereas it remained unchanged in C and L. Cardiovascular responses to heating were not influenced by V1 antagonist in C, L, and HL2. Thus isotonic hypovolemia attenuates maximal tail skin blood flow, whereas hypertonic hypovolemia causes an upward shift of Tre threshold for TVD and an increase in heart rate during hyperthermia. These results suggest that plasma hyperosmolality stimulates pressor responses in the hypovolemic condition that subsequently contribute to arterial pressure regulation during heat stress. PMID:9791093

  8. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  9. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P.; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  10. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  11. Alterations in Vasoreactivity of Femoral Artery Induced by Hindlimb Unweighting are Related to the Changes of Contractile Protein in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jin; Ren, Xinling; Meng, Qinjun; Zhang, Lifan; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2005-01-01

    Responses of endothelium removed femoral arterial rings to vasoactive compounds were examined in vitro, and the expression of Myosin and Actin of femoral artery were observed by Western Blotting and Immunohistochemistry in hndlimb unweighting rats and control rats. The results showed that contractile responses of femoral arterial rings evoked by Phenylephrine, Endothelin-1, Vasopressin, KCl, Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 were decreased in hindlimb unweighting rats as compared with that of controls. But vasoddatory responses induced by SNPand cGMP were not different between groups. No significant differences have been found in expressions of Calponin, Myosin, Actin, and the ratio of MHC SM1/SM2 between the two groups, but expression of alpha-SM-Actin decreased in hindlimb unweighting rats. The data indicated that the diminished contractile responsiveness probably result from altered contractile apparatus, especially the contractile proteins.

  12. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  13. Mechanical Response of the Basilar Membrane to Lateral Micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburg, S. O.; Zosuls, A.; Barbone, P. E.; Mountain, D. C.

    2009-02-01

    The role of wave propagation in the cochlea can be founded on detailed knowledge of the mechanical properties of the basilar membrane. In this study, measurements of lateral point stiffness and longitudinal coupling were made on gerbil basilar membranes in vitro. We designed an integrated optical imaging system and basilar membrane manipulator, in which a calibrated glass micropipette is used to displace the basilar membrane laterally. Because the tissue deformations occur in the optical plane of the microscope objective, detailed images of the movement of the basilar membrane ultrastructure are obtained. The motion is measured by matching features in successive images. It was found that the lateral point stiffness in the arcuate zone is 0.2-0.5 N/m, in the pectinate zone is 2-3 N/m, and increases to over 10 N/m near the spiral ligament. To compute the longitudinal coupling, the displacement field was measured quantitatively using image registration. It was found that the tissue in compression has a space constant of 7.6 μm and the tissue in tension has a longer space constant of 10.5 μm. The correlation of mechanical properties to anatomically distinct regions of the basilar membrane supports the conclusion that these regions serve different functional roles.

  14. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang; Choe, Soo Young; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  15. Robustness of arterial blood gas analysis for assessment of respiratory safety pharmacology in rats.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Garth T; Hummel, Michele; Boulet, Jamie; Beyenhof, Jessica D; Strenkowski, Bryan; John, Janet Dell; Knappenberger, Terri; Maselli, Harry; Koetzner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Whole body plethysmography using unrestrained animals is a common technique for assessing the respiratory risk of new drugs in safety pharmacology studies in rats. However, wide variations in experimental technique make cross laboratory comparison of data difficult and raise concerns that non-appropriate conditions may mask the deleterious effects of test compounds - in particular with suspected respiratory depressants. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the robustness of arterial blood gas analysis as an alternative to plethysmography in rats. We sought to do this by assessing the effect of different vehicles and times post-surgical catheterization on blood gas measurements, in addition to determining sensitivity to multiple opioids. Furthermore, we determined intra-lab variability from multiple datasets utilizing morphine and generated within a single lab and lastly, inter-lab variability was measured by comparing datasets generated in two separate labs. Overall, our data show that arterial blood gas analysis is a measure that is both flexible in terms of experimental conditions and highly sensitive to respiratory depressants, two key limitations when using plethysmography. As such, our data strongly advocate the adoption of arterial blood gas analysis as an investigative approach to reliably examine the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. PMID:26589431

  16. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  17. The effects of cadmium on the structure and elastic properties of carotid arteries from rats.

    PubMed

    Terpin, T; Roach, M R

    1980-01-01

    Cadmium chloride (0.6 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into seventy-five rats to determine if this material altered the static elastic properties of the carotid arteries. Control rats were either injected with saline or left untreated. The elastic properties were determined from cylindrical segments of artery which were distended with water of known volume. The pressure and length were measured. Experiments were done either at constant in vivo length or with the artery untethered so the length altered with pressure. Comparison of the methods allowed analysis of the role of elastin and collagen oriented circumferentially, longitudinally, of helically. The major changes occurred in the longitudinal direction. The initial part of the curve has previously been shown to be due to elastin, and the final part to collagen. Collagen increased more than elastin and muscle (as determined from point counting of trichrome-stained sections), but appeared to have the same elastic modulus as normal collagen. The major change was in the "cross-linking" between collagen fibres. This increased with time on the CdCl2 in a manner comparable to that seen with age in humans. Many of the changes were biphasic, and changes that occurred between one and four weeks on the CdCl2 were often recovered with continued treatment. The reason for this is obscure. PMID:7441096

  18. Effect of quercetin-rich onion peel extracts on arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Moon, Jiyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Cha, Yong-Jun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether oral supplementation of quercetin-rich onion peel extract (OPE) influences blood coagulation and arterial thrombosis in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. 24 male rats, 5 weeks old, were divided into three groups with different diets (C: control, 2mg OPE: chow diet with 2mg OPE supplementation, 10mg OPE: chow diet with 10mg OPE supplementation) for 6 weeks. Blood coagulation parameters including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelet aggregation were examined. The OPE did not affect blood cholesterol levels but significantly decreased blood triglyceride and glucose levels. PT, aPTT and platelet aggregation were not significantly different among all tested groups. However, in vivo arterial thrombosis was significantly delayed in groups that were fed 2mg and 10mg OPE diets compared to the control group. In addition, the OPE greatly diminished thrombin-induced expression of tissue factor in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a coagulation initiator. In addition, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways activated by thrombin treatment were prevented by the OPE pre-treatment. These results indicate that OPE may have anti-thrombotic effects through restricting the induced expression of tissue factor via down-regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation upon coagulation stimulus, leading to the prolongation of time for arterial thrombosis. PMID:23524316

  19. Effects of β-adrenergic receptor agonists on drinking and arterial blood pressure in young and old rats

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Connie L.; Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined water-drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to β-adrenergic receptor activation in young (4 mo), “middle-aged” adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male rats of the Brown-Norway strain. We used isoproterenol to simultaneously activate β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, salbutamol to selectively activate β2-adrenergic receptors, and the combination of isoproterenol and the β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist ICI 118,551 to stimulate only β1-adrenergic receptors. Animals received one of the drug treatments, and water drinking was measured for 90 min. About 1 wk later, animals received the same drug treatment for measurement of arterial blood pressure responses for 90 min. In some rats, levels of renin and aldosterone secretion in response to isoproterenol or salbutamol were measured in additional tests. Old and middle-aged rats drank significantly less after isoproterenol than did young rats and also had greater reductions in arterial blood pressure. Old and middle-aged rats drank significantly less after salbutamol than did young rats, although reductions in arterial blood pressure were equivalent across the ages. The β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551 abolished drinking after isoproterenol and prevented most of the observed hypotension. Renin secretion after isoproterenol and salbutamol was greater in young rats than in middle-aged rats, and wholly absent in old rats. Aldosterone secretion was reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged rats after treatment with isoproterenol, but not after treatment with salbutamol. In conclusion, there are age-related differences in β-adrenergic receptor-mediated drinking that can be explained only in part by age-related differences in renin secretion after β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. PMID:21307363

  20. Caveolae regulate vasoconstriction of conduit arteries to angiotensin II in hindlimb unweighted rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Bai, Yungang; Yu, Jinwen; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Yaoping; Liu, Yonghong; Xie, Xiaoping; Ma, Jin; Bao, Junxiang

    2015-10-15

    Weightlessness induces the functional remodelling of arteries, but the changes to angiotensin II (Ang II)-elicited vasoconstriction and the underlying mechanism have never been reported. Caveolae are invaginations of the cell membrane crucial for the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells, so we investigated the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to simulated weightlessness and the role of caveolae in it. The 4 week hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness. Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was measured by isometric force recording. The morphology of caveolae was examined by transmission electron microscope. The binding of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 ) and caveolin-1 (cav-1) was examined by coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot. We found that the maximal developing force (E(max)) of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was decreased in abdominal aorta by 30.6%, unchanged in thoracic aorta and increased in carotid artery by 17.9% after HU, while EC50 of the response was increased in all three arteries (P < 0.05). AT1 desensitization upon activation was significantly reduced by HU in all three arteries, as was the number of caveolae (P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ang II promoted the binding of AT1 and cav-1 significantly in control but not HU arteries. Both the number of caveolae and the binding of AT1 and cav-1 in HU arteries were restored by cholesterol pretreatment which also reinstated the change in EC50 as well as the level of AT1 desensitization. These results indicate that modified caveolae in vascular smooth muscle cells could interfere with the binding of AT1 and cav-1 mediating the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to HU. PMID:26260249

  1. Photodynamic therapy of normal rat arteries after photosensitisation using disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine and 5-aminolaevulinic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, W. E.; Speight, P. M.; MacRobert, A. J.; Hopper, C.; Bown, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy of cancer exposes adjacent arteries to the risk of injury and the possibility of haemorrhage and thrombosis. The nature of photodynamic injury to normal arteries has not been satisfactorily defined, and the ability of arteries to recover with time is unclear. To clarify these issues, we have investigated the effects of PDT on rat femoral arteries, using a second-generation photosensitiser, disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine, and a new method of photosensitisation, using endogenous synthesis of protoporphyrin IX following systemic administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). Pharmacokinetic studies of sensitiser fluorescence were carried out to determine peak levels of sensitiser. Subsequently photodynamic therapy at times corresponding to maximal fluorescence was performed using two light doses, 100 and 250 J cm-2. The nature of injury sustained and recovery over a 6 month period was investigated. Three days following PDT, all vessels treated showed complete loss of endothelium, with death of all medial smooth muscle cells, leaving an acellular flaccid artery wall. No vascular occlusion, haemorrhage or thrombosis was found. A striking feature was the lack of inflammatory response in the vessel wall at any time studied. Re-endothelialisation occurred in all vessels by 2 weeks. The phthalocyanine group showed repopulation of the media with smooth muscle cells to be almost complete by 3 months. However, the ALA group failed to redevelop a muscular wall and remained dilated at 6 months. Luminal cross-sectional area of the ALA-treated group was significantly greater than both control and phthalocyanine groups at 6 months. All vessels remained patent. This study indicates that arteries exposed to PDT are not at risk of catastrophic haemorrhage or occlusion, a finding that is of significance for both the local treatment of tumours and the use of PDT as an intraoperative adjunct to surgery for the ablation of microscopic residual malignant

  2. High-fat diet increases O-GlcNAc levels in cerebral arteries: a link to vascular dysfunction associated with hyperlipidaemia/obesity?

    PubMed

    Lima, Victor V; Giachini, Fernanda R; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Li, Weiguo; Bressan, Alecsander F M; Chawla, Dhruv; Webb, R Clinton; Ergul, Adviye; Tostes, Rita C

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and high fat intake induce alterations in vascular function and structure. Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) of vascular proteins has been implicated in vascular dysfunction associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that high-fat diet (HFD)-mediated increases in O-GlcNAc-modified proteins contribute to cerebrovascular dysfunction. O-GlcNAc-protein content was increased in arteries from male Wistar rats treated with a HFD (45% fat) for 12 weeks compared with arteries from rats on control diet (CD). HFD augmented body weight [(g) 550±10 compared with 502±10 CD], increased plasma triacylglycerols [(mg/dl) 160±20 compared with 95±15 CD] and increased contractile responses of basilar arteries to serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] [(pD2) 7.0±0.1 compared with 6.7±0.09 CD] and the thromboxane analogue 9,11-dideoxy-9α,11α-methanoepoxy prostaglandin F2α (U-46619) [(pD2) 7.2±0.1 compared with 6.8±0.09 CD]. Of importance, increased levels of O-GlcNAc [induced by 24 h-incubation of vessels with a potent inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA), O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PugNAc)] increased basilar artery contractions in response to U-46619 [(pD2) 7.4±0.07 compared with 6.8±0.08 CD] and 5-HT [(pD2) 7.5±0.06 compared with 7.1±0.1 CD]. Vessels from rats on the HFD for 12 weeks and vessels treated with PugNAc displayed increased phosphorylation of p38 (Thr(180/182)) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) (Ser(180/221)). Increased 5HT-induced contractions in arteries from rats on the HFD or in arteries incubated with PugNAc were abrogated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. Our data show that HFD augments cerebrovascular O-GlcNAc and this modification contributes to increased contractile responses and to the activation of the MAPK pathway in the rat basilar artery. PMID:26929437

  3. [Effect of paeonol on blood pressure and blood flow in artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats and its mechanisms related on vasomotion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-yan; Zhao, Le; Li, Yi-kui; Weng, Wei-liang

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that paeonol can antagonize acute myocardial ischemia and infarction in rat. This study further researched the effects of paeonol on blood pressure and blood flow in the artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats and its mechanisms related on vasomotion. Firstly, thirty spontaneously hypertensive rats were randomly divided into spontaneously hypertensive control group and paeonol-treating groups of high dose and low dose, and also, the other ten Wistar rats as healthy control group. Before and after the intraduodenal administration of the drug, arterial blood pressure was measured by carotid artery and blood flow through the renal artery and carotid artery in vivo were measured by animal flowmeter. The same volume of solvent was given to the spontaneously hypertensive control group and the healthy control group, and the other operations were same. In order to further study the effect of paeonol on vasomotor function, the superior mesenteric artery, renal artery and coronary artery of the spontaneously hypertensive rat were removed and separated, precontracted by a certain concentration of potassium chloride (KCl) and 5-serotonin (5-HT) respectively, and dilatory responses were assessed by cumulative addition of paeonol. Results showed that after duodenal one-time delivery of paeonol, the blood pressure significantly lowered, the renal arterial blood flow and the carotid arterial blood flow significantly increased in spontaneously hypertensive rat. And also, paeonol relaxed the mesenteric artery, renal artery and the coronary artery of spontaneously hypertensive rat in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicated that the effect of paeonol on decreasing arterial blood pressure and increasing the arterial blood flow was related to its vasodilative effect. PMID:27245041

  4. Nicotine facilitates reinnervation of phenol-injured perivascular adrenergic nerves in the rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Shingo; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi; Hagimori, Kenta; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Yokomizo, Ayako; Takayama, Fusako; Tangsucharit, Panot; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicotine has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions in the central nervous system. To elucidate the peripheral neurotrophic effects of nicotine, we determined whether nicotine affected the reinnervation of mesenteric perivascular nerves following a topical phenol treatment. A topical phenol treatment was applied to the superior mesenteric artery proximal to the abdominal aorta in Wistar rats. We examined the immunohistochemistry of the distal small arteries 7 days after the treatment. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-LI and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI fibers in these arteries. The administration of nicotine at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day (1.5 mg/kg/injection, twice a day), but not once a day or its continuous infusion using a mini-pump significantly increased the density of TH-LI nerves without affecting CGRP-LI nerves. A pretreatment with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium, mecamylamine, and methyllycaconitine, but not dextrometorphan, canceled the TH-LI nerve reinnervation induced by nicotine. Nicotine significantly increased NGF levels in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) and mesenteric arteries, but not in the dorsal root ganglia, and also up-regulated the expression of NGF receptors (TrkA) in the SCG, which were canceled by hexamethonium. These results suggested that nicotine exhibited neurotrophic effects that facilitated the reinnervation of adrenergic TH-LI nerves by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and NGF in the SCG. PMID:25514605

  5. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jen; Cherng, Juin-Hong; Wang, Ding-Han; Yu, Shu-Ping; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  6. Transneuronal Degeneration of Thalamic Nuclei following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Postinfarction transneuronal degeneration refers to secondary neuronal death that occurs within a few days to weeks following the disruption of input or output to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. The thalamus receives its blood supply from the posterior circulation; however, infarctions of the middle cerebral arterial may cause secondary transneuronal degeneration in the thalamus. In this study, we presented the areas of ischemia and associated transneuronal degeneration following MCAo in a rat model. Materials and Methods. Eighteen 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery for 1, 7, and 14 days. Cerebral atrophy was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. Postural reflex and open field tests were performed prior to animal sacrifice to assess the effects of occlusion on behavior. Results. Myelin loss was observed at the lesion site following ischemia. Gliosis was also observed in thalamic regions 14 days following occlusion. Differential degrees of increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression were observed at each stage of infarction. Increases in myelin basic protein levels were also observed in the 14-day group. Conclusion. The present rat model of ischemia provides evidence of transneuronal degeneration within the first 14 days of occlusion. The observed changes in protein expression may be associated with self-repair mechanisms in the damaged brain. PMID:27597962

  7. Adequately-Sized Nanocarriers Allow Sustained Targeted Drug Delivery to Neointimal Lesions in Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ryosuke; Miura, Yutaka; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Chida, Tsukasa; Anraku, Yasutaka; Kishimura, Akihiro; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-06-01

    In atherosclerotic lesions, the endothelial barrier against the bloodstream can become compromised, resulting in the exposure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and intimal cells beneath. In theory, this allows adequately sized nanocarriers in circulation to infiltrate into the intimal lesion intravascularly. We sought to evaluate this possibility using rat carotid arteries with induced neointima. Cy5-labeled polyethylene glycol-conjugated polyion complex (PIC) micelles and vesicles, with diameters of 40, 100, or 200 nm (PICs-40, PICs-100, and PICs-200, respectively) were intravenously administered to rats after injury to the carotid artery using a balloon catheter. High accumulation and long retention of PICs-40 in the induced neointima was confirmed by in vivo imaging, while the accumulation of PICs-100 and PICs-200 was limited, indicating that the size of nanocarriers is a crucial factor for efficient delivery. Furthermore, epirubicin-incorporated polymeric micelles with a diameter similar to that of PICs-40 showed significant curative effects in rats with induced neointima, in terms of lesion size and cell number. Specific and effective drug delivery to pre-existing neointimal lesions was demonstrated with adequate size control of the nanocarriers. We consider that this nanocarrier-based drug delivery system could be utilized for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27183493

  8. Bilateral common carotid artery stenosis in normotensive rats impairs endothelium-dependent dilation of parenchymal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Matin, Nusrat; Fisher, Courtney; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2016-05-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Reduced blood flow through the common carotid arteries induced by bilateral carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) is a physiologically relevant model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. We hypothesized that BCAS in 20-wk-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats would impair cognitive function and lead to reduced endothelium-dependent dilation and outward remodeling in the parenchymal arterioles (PAs). After 8 wk of BCAS, both short-term memory and spatial discrimination abilities were impaired. In vivo assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity showed a severe impairment after BCAS. PA endothelial function and structure were assessed by pressure myography. BCAS impaired endothelial function in PAs, as evidenced by reduced dilation to carbachol. Addition of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not change carbachol-mediated dilation in either group. Inhibiting CYP epoxygenase, the enzyme that produces epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EETs), a key determinant of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-mediated dilation, abolished dilation in PAs from Sham rats, but had no effect in PAs from BCAS rats. Expression of TRPV4 channels, a target for EETs, was decreased and maximal dilation to a TRPV4 agonist was attenuated after BCAS. Together these data suggest that EET-mediated dilation is impaired in PAs after BCAS. Thus impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in the PAs may be one of the contributing factors to the cognitive impairment observed after BCAS. PMID:26968546

  9. Interleukin-17A Exacerbates Ferric Chloride-Induced Arterial Thrombosis in Rat Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Francesco; Parisi, Antonio; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Morello, Silvana; Mascolo, Nicola; Cicala, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A), the most widely studied member of the IL-17 cytokine family, is a cytokine which emerged to be critical for host defense as well as in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Moreover, IL-17A is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome and in the cardiovascular risk associated with systemic immunological disorders. Consistent with this, we have recently shown that IL-17A increases human and murine platelet response to ADP. In this study we expanded our previous observation and we describe for the first time an in vivo prothrombotic effect of the cytokine. Our results show that IL-17A is synergic with a low FeCl3 concentration in inducing carotid thrombus in rats and suggest that the effect is likely related to a downregulation of CD39 vascular expression and hydrolyzing activity. Our findings indicate that IL-17A might be an important molecule at the interface between hemostasis and inflammation. “This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Alfredo Colonna” PMID:24940514

  10. Alpha 1D- and alpha 1A-adrenoceptors mediate contraction in rat renal artery.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Ibarra, M

    1997-03-19

    To investigate the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype(s) mediating contraction in rat renal artery, we have compared the effect of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists, 5-methylurapidil, BMY 7378 (8-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethyl) 8-azaspiro (4.5) decane-7,9-dione 2HCl) and chloroethylclonidine on functional responses to noradrenaline. A clear blockade by chloroethylclonidine (10(-4) M) of noradrenaline-induced contraction was observed and, along with this effect. pKB values of 9.12 and 8.40 for BMY 7378 and 9.75 and 10.06 for 5-methylurapidil were obtained, indicating that the renal artery expresses the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype as the one involved in contraction and not only the alpha 1A subtype as has been reported. PMID:9098691

  11. Vasorelaxant activities of Danhong injection and their differential effects on the rat abdominal aorta and mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianming; Zhi, Xiaowen; Cui, Ting; Zheng, Qiaowei; Wang, Shixiang; Cao, Yongxiao; Cui, Changcong; Feng, Weiyi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have found that Danhong injection (DHI), an extensively used herbal extract preparation in China, might be a powerful vasodilator. The aims of this study were to determine the vascular activity of DHI and its effects on arteries of different sizes. The results showed that DHI significantly inhibited rat-hindquarters and rabbit-ear vasoconstriction elicited by norepinephrine (NE) perfusion and markedly relaxed KCl-contracted and NE-contracted rat abdominal aortic and mesenteric artery rings. The endothelium made only a minor contribution to the vasorelaxant effect of DHI on artery segments. The vasorelaxant effect of DHI varied with the artery size, with larger arteries exhibiting a more sensitive and potent vasodilator response. DHI relaxed NE-induced vasoconstriction probably through inhibition of the intracellular Ca2+ release through the inositol triphosphate receptor system in the abdominal aorta and mesenteric artery, along with blockage of extracellular Ca2+ influx through the receptor-linked Ca2+ channels in the mesenteric artery. In addition, DHI completely relaxed KCl-induced contraction in both of the arteries, suggesting that inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels is involved in the vasorelaxant effect of DHI. This elucidation of the vascular effects of DHI and the underlying mechanisms could lead to improved clinical applications. PMID:25264751

  12. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy. PMID:26982248

  13. Effect of tromethamine (THAM) on infarct volume following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiening, K L; Schneider, G H; Unterberg, A W; Lanksch, W R

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the influence on tromethamine (THAM) on ischemic volume induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. 14 male Sprague Dawley rats underwent left sided permanent MCAO by electro coagulation. Animals were treated either by 3-M THAM given intravenously in a single dosage of 0.6 mmol/kg body weight (THAM group: n = 7) 10 min following MCAO and again 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours later or by NaCl 0.9% (placebo group: n = 7) in the same mode. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was monitored for 30 min post MCAO and arterial blood gases were taken 10 min after the first injection. The extent of ischemia volume was assessed by planimetry of coronal sections stained with triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) and with hematoxilin/eosin (HE). Tests for significance were accomplished by ANOVA on ranks. A difference of p < 0.05 was considered significant. The THAM group showed an insignificant decrease in MABP 1 min after injection (THAM: 75 +/- 11 mmHg, placebo: 86 +/- 10 mmHg). Arterial pH was significantly different (THAM: 7.46 +/- 0.04; placebo: 7.32 +/- 0.03). In TTC staining, the ischemia volume--given in absolute values and percentage of the total left volume--was significantly reduced in the THAM group (THAM: 43.9 +/- 8.3 mm3/7.0 +/- 1.3%; placebo: 95.2 +/- 13.8 mm3/14.2 +/- 2.0%). In HE staining, the reduction of ischemia, volume did not reach statistical significance (THAM: 49.1 +/- 9.9 mm3/9.6 +/- 1.8%; placebo: 66.3 +/- 14.5 mm3/13.1 +/- 2.8%). Based on these results, a moderate neuroprotective effect of THAM in experimental cerebral infarction could be demonstrated. PMID:9416318

  14. Functional comparison of endothelin receptors in human and rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bialecki, R A; Fisher, C S; Murdoch, W W; Barthlow, H G; Bertelsen, D L

    1997-02-01

    The receptors mediating arterial smooth muscle contraction to endothelins (ET) differ among species and origin of vascular bed. We characterized ET receptors mediating contraction of endothelium-denuded human intralobar pulmonary artery (hIPA) and rat intralobar (rIPA) and extralobar left branch (rLPA) pulmonary artery with ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, sarafotoxin S6c, sarafotoxin S6b, and ET receptor antagonists in vitro. Rat aorta was studied for comparison. Each vascular segment showed concentration-dependent contraction with a rank order sensitivity (pD2) profile of ET-1 > or = ET-2 = sarafotoxin S6b > ET-3. Maximum contraction to ET-1 was greater than to sarafotoxin S6c in all preparations. Responses of rIPA and rLPA to sarafotoxin S6c were conspicuous when compared with hIPA or aorta. The ET(A) receptor blockers BQ-123 and BMS-182874 competitively antagonized ET-1 responses of hIPA and aorta, but not rLPA. The ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ-788 attenuated contractions of rIPA and rLPA to ET-3 and sarafotoxin S6c, respectively. In conclusion, ET(B)-mediated contraction of endothelium-denuded conduit pulmonary arteries varies among species and may contribute more to contraction of rIPA and rLPA than of hIPA and aorta, although maximum ET(B)-mediated contraction is smaller than that mediated by the ET(A) receptor. PMID:9124371

  15. Dietary calcium and magnesium supplements in spontaneously hypertensive rats and isolated arterial reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkynen, H.; Kähönen, M.; Arvola, P.; Wuorela, H.; Vapaatalo, H.; Pörsti, I.

    1995-01-01

    1. High calcium diet attenuates the development of hypertension but an associated undesirable effect is that Mg2+ loss to the urine is enhanced. Therefore, we studied the effects of high calcium diet alone and in combination with increased magnesium intake on blood pressure and arterial function. 2. Forty-eight young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were allocated into four groups, the dietary contents of Ca2+ and Mg2+ being: 1.1%, 0.2% (SHR); 2.5%, 0.2% (Ca-SHR); 2.5%, 0.8% (CaMg-SHR); and 1.1%, 0.8% (Mg-SHR), respectively. Development of hypertension was followed for 13 weeks, whereafter electrolyte balance, lymphocyte intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i), and mesenteric arterial responses in vitro were examined. Forty normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were investigated in a similar manner. 3. Calcium supplementation comparably attenuated the development of Lypertension during normal and high magnesium intake in SHR, with an associated reduced lymphocyte [Ca2+]i and increased Mg2+ loss to the urine. 4. Endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation to acetylcholine was augmented in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR, while the relaxations to isoprenaline and the nitric oxide donor SIN-1 were similar in all SHR groups. Relaxation responses induced by the return of K+ to the organ bath upon precontractions in K(+)-free solution were used to evaluate the function of arterial Na+, K(+)-ATPase. The rate of potassium relaxation was similar in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR and faster than in untreated SHR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564205

  16. Basilar membrane vibration in the gerbil hemicochlea.

    PubMed

    Richter, C P; Evans, B N; Edge, R; Dallos, P

    1998-05-01

    Excised gerbil cochleae were cut along the mid-modiolar plane (hemicochlea). Along one-half turn of this preparation, fluorescent microbeads were placed on the basilar membrane (BM). The BM was vibrated with click stimuli (50 micros) produced mechanically by a piezo pusher. The stimulus delivery probe could be positioned either more apical or more basal from the beads. Vibration patterns were measured with a wide bandwidth photomultiplier from the movements of the beads. When the probe was positioned more basal, the responses to click stimuli were brief, damped sinusoids. According to the fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of the averaged time wave forms, the best frequency between successive beads decreased toward the apex (0.8 octave/mm). Sharpness of tuning of the normalized FFT spectra (NQ10dB) on average was 1.5. Response amplitude at a fixed input level, measured at different beads away from the stimulation site, dropped exponentially (58 dB/mm). In addition, for each individual bead, amplitude dropped linearly with decreasing stimulus intensity. In experiments where the stimulating probe was placed more apical, two major properties were observed: first, beads revealed only the spectral components present in the motion of the probe. Second, magnitude reduction of the displacement of the cochlear partition was greater, on average 155 dB/mm, indicating a lack of significant propagation in the reverse direction. PMID:9582202

  17. The Arteries of the Brain in Hare (Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778).

    PubMed

    Brudnicki, Witold; Kirkiłło-Stacewicz, Krzysztof; Skoczylas, Benedykt; Nowicki, Włodzimierz; Jabłoński, Ryszard; Brudnicki, Adam; Wach, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Research into course and variability of brain arteries in hare were performed on 38 adult hares of both sexes (males 23 and females 15). The arteries were filled with a synthetic latex at a constant pressure introduced with a medical syringe to the left ventricle. The source of blood supply to the brain was internal carotid arteries, whose branches formed an arterial circle of the brain, vertebral arteries, and basilar artery as the result of its anastomosis. Variability focused on a method of departure of middle cerebral arteries, which were multiple vessels in 39.5% of cases and rostral cerebellar arteries. Caudal communicating arteries in hare comprised bilateral anastomosis of internal carotid arteries and final branches of the basilar artery. It stabilized the steady flow of blood to all parts of the brain. Caudal cerebral arteries comprised final branches of the basilar artery. The largest capacity of all the arteries of the brain was observed in the main trunk of the basilar artery. The capacity of these vessels was 4.53 mm(3) on average. The factor of capacity of cerebral arteries in relation to weight of the brain reaches a high value in hare. PMID:25988288

  18. Barium and strontium as calcium substitutes for contractile responses in the rat tail artery.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, A B; Aloamaka, C P

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Ba2+ and Sr2+ to substitute for Ca2+ in contractile responses of the rat tail artery has been examined. Both Ba2+ and Sr2+ caused comparable contractions in Ca-depleted NA-stimulated, or K+-depolarized strips. Ba2+ and Sr2+ substitute poorly for Ca2+ at noradrenaline-sensitive membrane sites. At high concentrations, the three divalent cations stabilize the membrane in the order: Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Ba2+. The relaxation rates following high-K+ contractions were similar for all three divalent cations, suggesting a common mechanism for sequestration/extrusion. PMID:2414057

  19. Capacitative calcium entry and TRPC channel proteins are expressed in rat distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Shimoda, L A; Sylvester, J T

    2004-04-01

    Mammalian homologs of transient receptor potential (TRP) genes in Drosophila encode TRPC proteins, which make up cation channels that play several putative roles, including Ca2+ entry triggered by depletion of Ca2+ stores in endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This capacitative calcium entry (CCE) is thought to replenish Ca2+ stores and contribute to signaling in many tissues, including smooth muscle cells from main pulmonary artery (PASMCs); however, the roles of CCE and TRPC proteins in PASMCs from distal pulmonary arteries, which are thought to be the major site of pulmonary vasoreactivity, remain uncertain. As an initial test of the possibility that TRPC channels contribute to CCE and Ca2+ signaling in distal PASMCs, we measured [Ca2+]i by fura-2 fluorescence in primary cultures of myocytes isolated from rat intrapulmonary arteries (>4th generation). In cells perfused with Ca2+-free media containing cyclopiazonic acid (10 microM) and nifedipine (5 microM) to deplete ER Ca2+ stores and block voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, restoration of extracellular Ca2+ (2.5 mM) caused marked increases in [Ca2+]i whereas MnCl2 (200 microM) quenched fura-2 fluorescence, indicating CCE. SKF-96365, LaCl3, and NiCl2, blocked CCE at concentrations that did not alter Ca2+ responses to 60 mM KCl (IC50 6.3, 40.4, and 191 microM, respectively). RT-PCR and Western blotting performed on RNA and protein isolated from distal intrapulmonary arteries and PASMCs revealed mRNA and protein expression for TRPC1, -4, and -6, but not TRPC2, -3, -5, or -7. Our results suggest that CCE through TRPC-encoded Ca2+ channels could contribute to Ca2+ signaling in myocytes from distal intrapulmonary arteries. PMID:14672922

  20. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the contractility of rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, C; Jensen, P E; Prieto, D; Hughes, A; Mulvany, M J; Aalkjaer, C

    1995-01-01

    1. A pharmacological characterization of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) belonging to two distinct groups (competitors at the ATP-binding site and the substrate-binding site, respectively) was performed, based on their effects on the contractility of rat mesenteric arteries. 2. Both the ATP-site competitors (genistein and its inactive analogue, daidzein) and the substrate-site competitors (tyrphostins A-23, A-47 and the inactive analogue, A-1) reversibly inhibited noradrenaline (NA, (10 microM)) and KCl (125 mM) induced contractions, concentration-dependently. Genistein was slightly but significantly more potent than daidzein; the tyrphostins were all less potent than genistein, and there were no significant differences between the individual potencies. The tyrosine kinase substrate-site inhibitor bis-tyrphostin had no inhibitory effect. 3. Genistein, daidzein, A-23 and A-47 each suppressed the contraction induced by Ca2+ (1 microM) in alpha-toxin permeabilized arteries. A-1 and bis-tyrphostin had little or no effect on contraction of the permeabilized arteries. 4. Genistein was significantly more potent than daidzein with respect to inhibition of the contraction induced by 200 nM Ca2+ in the presence of NA (100 microM) and GTP (3 microM). The effect of A-23, A-47, A-1 and bis-tyrphostin was similar in permeabilized arteries activated with Ca2+ (200 nM) + NA (100 microM) + GTP (3 microM) and permeabilized arteries activated with 1 microM Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620718

  1. Effects of skeletal unloading on the vasomotor properties of the rat femur principal nutrient artery

    PubMed Central

    Prisby, Rhonda D.; Behnke, Bradley J.; Allen, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Spaceflight and prolonged bed rest induce deconditioning of the cardiovascular system and bone loss. Previous research has shown declines in femoral bone and marrow perfusion during unloading and with subsequent reloading in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats, an animal model of chronic disuse. We hypothesized that the attenuated bone and marrow perfusion may result from altered vasomotor properties of the bone resistance vasculature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of unloading on the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator properties of the femoral principal nutrient artery (PNA), the main conduit for blood flow to the femur, in 2 wk HU and control (CON) rats. Vasoconstriction of the femoral PNA was assessed in vitro using norepinephrine, phenylephrine, clonidine, KCl, endothelin-1, arginine vasopressin, and myogenic responsiveness. Vasodilation through endothelium-dependent [acetylcholine, bradykinin, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] and endothelium-independent mechanisms [sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and adenosine] were also determined. Vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the PNA from HU rats was not enhanced through any of the mechanisms tested. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine (CON, 86 ± 3%; HU, 48 ± 7% vasodilation) and FMD (CON, 61 ± 9%; HU, 11 ± 11% vasodilation) were attenuated in PNAs from HU rats, while responses to bradykinin were not different between groups. Endothelium-independent vasodilation to SNP and adenosine were not different between groups. These data indicate that unloading-induced decrements in bone and marrow perfusion and increases in vascular resistance are not the result of enhanced vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the bone resistance arteries but are associated with reductions in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. PMID:25635000

  2. Voluntary exercise delays heart failure onset in rats with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Natali, Antonio J; Fowler, Ewan D; Calaghan, Sarah C; White, Ed

    2015-08-01

    Increased physical activity is recommended for the general population and for patients with many diseases because of its health benefits but can be contraindicated if it is thought to be a risk for serious cardiovascular events. One such condition is pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). PAH and right ventricular failure was induced in rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT). MCT rats with voluntary access to a running wheel ran on average 2 km/day. The time for half the animals to develop heart failure signs (median survival time) was 28 days (exercise failure group), significantly longer than sedentary animals (sedentary failure group, 23 days). The contractility of single failing myocytes in response to increasing demand (stimulation frequency) was significantly impaired compared with that in both sedentary control and exercising control myocytes. However, myocytes from exercising MCT rats, tested at 23 days (exercise + MCT group), showed responses intermediate to the control (sedentary control and exercising control) and failing (sedentary failure and exercise failure) groups. We conclude that voluntary exercise is beneficial to rats with heart failure induced by PAH, and this is evidence to support the consideration of appropriate exercise regimes for potentially vulnerable groups. PMID:26001413

  3. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  4. Endoperoxide 4 receptors play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in rats with simulated peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce S; Stone, Audrey J; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-06-01

    Ligating the femoral artery for 72 h in decerebrated rats exaggerates the exercise pressor reflex. The sensory arm of this reflex is comprised of group III and IV afferents, which can be either sensitized or stimulated by PGE2. In vitro studies showed that endoperoxide (EP) 3 and 4 receptors were responsible for the PGE2-induced sensitization of rat dorsal root ganglion cells. This in vitro finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that blockade of EP3 and/or EP4 receptors attenuated the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries. We measured the cardiovascular responses to static hindlimb contraction or tendon stretch before and after femoral arterial injection of L798106 (an EP3 antagonist) or L161982 (an EP4 antagonist). The pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to either contraction or tendon stretch were not attenuated by L798106 in either the ligated or freely perfused rats. Likewise in five rats whose hindlimb muscles were freely perfused, the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to either contraction or tendon stretch were not attenuated by L161982. In the six ligated rats, however, the pressor response to contraction was attenuated by L161982, averaging 37 ± 3 mmHg before, 18 ± 2 mmHg afterward (P < 0.05). Western blotting analysis revealed that ligation of the femoral artery for 72 h increased the EP4 receptor protein in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia over their freely perfused counterparts by 24% (P < 0.05). We conclude that EP4 receptors, but not EP3 receptors, play an important role in the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex found in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:23568893

  5. Metabolic syndrome impairs reactivity and wall mechanics of cerebral resistance arteries in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven D; DeVallance, Evan; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E; Shrader, Carl D; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Chantler, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in the North American population and is associated with increased risk for development of cerebrovascular disease. This study determined the structural and functional changes in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) during the progression of MetS and the effects of chronic pharmacological interventions on mitigating vascular alterations in obese Zucker rats (OZR), a translationally relevant model of MetS. The reactivity and wall mechanics of ex vivo pressurized MCA from lean Zucker rats (LZR) and OZR were determined at 7-8, 12-13, and 16-17 wk of age under control conditions and following chronic treatment with pharmacological agents targeting specific systemic pathologies. With increasing age, control OZR demonstrated reduced nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired dilator (acetylcholine) reactivity, elevated myogenic properties, structural narrowing, and wall stiffening compared with LZR. Antihypertensive therapy (e.g., captopril or hydralazine) starting at 7-8 wk of age blunted the progression of arterial stiffening compared with OZR controls, while treatments that reduced inflammation and oxidative stress (e.g., atorvastatin, rosiglitazone, and captopril) improved NO bioavailability and vascular reactivity compared with OZR controls and had mixed effects on structural remodeling. These data identify specific functional and structural cerebral adaptations that limit cerebrovascular blood flow in MetS patients, contributing to increased risk of cognitive decline, cerebral hypoperfusion, and ischemic stroke; however, these pathological adaptations could potentially be blunted if treated early in the progression of MetS. PMID:26475592

  6. Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: A Feasible Animal Model for Ocular Ischemic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yacong; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Qi, Wei; Liang, Willmann; Wang, Chunmei; T W Yew, David; Ye, Cunxi; Sha, Ou

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing ocular ischemic syndrome in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats had bilateral occlusion or sham surgery. They were divided into 4 groups: (1) hypertensive-ischemia, (2) hypertensive-sham, (3) normotensive-ischemia, and (4) normotensive-sham. Four months after the operation, the global changes of the eye and pupillary light reflex were assessed. Then each rat was perfused, and randomly one of the bulbuses oculi was prepared as retinal flat mounts for investigation of vascular changes. The opposite eyeball was prepared as a paraffin section for observation of the linear density of retinal ganglion cells and for thickness measurement. One hypertensive-ischemia rat had a cataract in one eye and another rat in the same group had bulbus oculi collapse in one eye. The light reflex disappeared in 13.33% of hypertensive-ischemia rats, and the rest of the hypertensive-ischemia rats and normotensive-ischemia rats had slow reflex. Compared with the respective controls, the peripheral retinal vascular network in hypertensive-ischemia and normotensive-ischemia rats was sparse; linear density of the retinal ganglion cells was significantly reduced; and the retinal thickness was reduced. Compared with normotensive-ischemia rats, the hypertensive-ischemia rats demonstrated more severe changes. After bilateral common carotic artery occlusion, the eyes of hypertensive rats developed various pathological changes similar to those of ocular ischemic syndrome. In conclusion, an animal model for ocular ischemic syndrome can be created by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Anat Rec, 299:806-814, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917224

  7. Physiological growth of arteries in the rat heart parallels the growth of capillaries, but not of myocytes.

    PubMed

    Wiest, G; Gharehbaghi, H; Amann, K; Simon, T; Mattfeldt, T; Mall, G

    1992-12-01

    Maladaption to hemodynamic overload, especially to arterial hypertension, has important clinical implications, and it is necessary to obtain criteria in order to discriminate physiological and pathological growth processes. We investigated the physiological growth of intramyocardial arteries in the rat heart. A new stereological method was introduced to determine the length of intramyocardial arteries from counts on histological sections. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages were investigated. The growth rate of arteries was characterized by the growth coefficient b according to the exponential function y = axb (allometric growth function). Analysis of left ventricular weights (LVW) and total lengths of left ventricular intramyocardial arteries (L) revealed Lv = constant.LVW0.71 (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). The growth coefficient b < 1 indicates that the arterial supply of the heart, i.e. the length density of arteries Lv (length per unit myocardial volume), decreases during normal growth. Empirically, we found L = constant.LVW-0.28 (r = 0.43, P < 0.01). Previously, we estimated growth rates of b = 0.33 for the total length of left ventricular myocytes and b = 0.71 for the total length of capillaries. Thus, growth of intramyocardial arteries considerably exceeds the length increase of myocytes, but is proportional to the length increase of capillaries. Growth analysis of total mitochondrial volume using historical data of our group revealed proportionality to arteries, as well (b = 0.76). This indicates that growth of arteries and capillaries may be determined by oxygen consumption. PMID:1293316

  8. Gastric damage following local intra-arterial administration of reactive oxygen metabolites in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J. V.; Whittle, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of reactive oxygen metabolites on the rat gastric mucosa following close-arterial infusion into the left gastric artery have been determined by macroscopic and histological assessment. 2. Local intra-arterial infusion of hydrogen peroxide (0.6-1.3 mumol kg-1 min-1) induced mucosal injury, characterised by areas of pronounced disruption and haemorrhage, which was prevented by concurrent intravenous administration of catalase. 3. Local infusion of the superoxide generating system xanthine-oxidase and hypoxanthine likewise induced extensive haemorrhagic damage and necrosis of the mucosa. Prolonged incubation of this mixture (10 min) before administration, significantly reduced the degree of injury, indicating the lability of the products so formed. 4. The gastric mucosal injury induced by the superoxide generating system was inhibited by concurrent local infusion of superoxide dismutase (96 u kg-1 min-1), as was the associated increase in mucosal permeability to radiolabelled albumin. 5. Administration of catalase did not inhibit the gastric mucosal damage induced by infusion of xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine, yet augmented the protective effects of a low dose of superoxide dismutase (46 u kg-1 min-1 i.a.). 6. These findings directly confirm that reactive oxygen metabolites can induce extensive gastric mucosal injury, supporting their role in the pathogenesis of gastric damage following ischaemia and hypotensive shock. Images Figure 2 PMID:2551438

  9. Chronic nonocclusive coronary artery constriction in rats. Beta-adrenoceptor signal transduction and ventricular failure.

    PubMed Central

    Meggs, L G; Huang, H; Li, P; Capasso, J M; Anversa, P

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effects of chronic coronary artery constriction on the relationship between cardiac function and regulation of beta-adrenoceptor signal transduction, the left main coronary artery was narrowed in rats and the animals were killed 5 mo later. An average reduction in coronary luminal diameter of 44% was obtained and this change resulted in an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and a decrease in positive and negative dP/dt. Significant increases in left and right ventricular weights indicative of global cardiac hypertrophy were observed. Radioligand binding studies of beta-adrenoreceptors, agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and ADP ribosylation of 45-kD substrate by cholera toxin were all depressed in the failing left ventricle. In contrast, in the hypertrophic non-failing right ventricle, beta-adrenoreceptor density was preserved and receptor antagonist affinity was increased. In spite of these findings at the receptor level, agonist stimulated cyclic AMP generation was reduced in the right ventricular myocardium. The quantity of the 45-kD substrate was also decreased. In conclusion, longterm nonocclusive coronary artery stenosis of moderate degree has profound detrimental effects on the contractile performance of the heart in association with marked attenuation of adrenergic support mechanisms. Images PMID:1661293

  10. Increased endothelin-1 reactivity and endothelial dysfunction in carotid arteries from rats with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, CR; Leite, PF; Montezano, AC; Casolari, DA; Yogi, A; Tostes, RC; Haddad, R; Eberlin, MN; Laurindo, FRM; de Souza, HP; Corrêa, FMA; de Oliveira, AM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: There are interactions between endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial vascular injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we evaluated the effects of HHcy on the endothelin system in rat carotid arteries. Experimental approach: Vascular reactivity to ET-1 and ETA and ETB receptor antagonists was assessed in rings of carotid arteries from normal rats and those with HHcy. ETA and ETB receptor expression was assessed by mRNA (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and binding of [125I]-ET-1. Key results: HHcy enhanced ET-1-induced contractions of carotid rings with intact endothelium. Selective antagonism of ETA or ETB receptors produced concentration-dependent rightward displacements of ET-1 concentration response curves. Antagonism of ETA but not of ETB receptors abolished enhancement in HHcy tissues. ETA and ETB receptor gene expressions were not up-regulated. ETA receptor expression in the arterial media was higher in HHcy arteries. Contractions to big ET-1 served as indicators of endothelin-converting enzyme activity, which was decreased by HHcy, without reduction of ET-1 levels. ET-1-induced Rho-kinase activity, calcium release and influx were increased by HHcy. Pre-treatment with indomethacin reversed enhanced responses to ET-1 in HHcy tissues, which were reduced also by a thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist. Induced relaxation was reduced by BQ788, absent in endothelium-denuded arteries and was decreased in HHcy due to reduced bioavailability of NO. Conclusions and implications: Increased ETA receptor density plays a fundamental role in endothelial injury induced by HHcy. ET-1 activation of ETA receptors in HHcy changed the balance between endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors, favouring enhanced contractility. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) 157, 568–580; doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00165.x; published online 9 April 2009 This article is part of a themed section on

  11. Potassium conductance and oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Webb, R C

    1989-06-01

    Tail arteries isolated from the stroke-prone substrain of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-SP) exhibit oscillatory contractile responses to norepinephrine. Simultaneous recording of force generation and membrane potential (Em) has previously demonstrated that the contractile phase of these oscillations is associated with bursts of calcium-dependent action potentials. The smooth muscle cells are electrically quiescent during the relaxation phase of the oscillations. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that this quiescent period results from the stimulation of a calcium-activated potassium conductance (gKCa) in the cells responsible for triggering the bursting activity. Isolated tail artery strips from SHR-SP and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were prepared for measurement of isometric force generation or for simultaneous recording of force and Em. The channel-specific toxins apamin (4 x 10(-7) mol/l) and charybdotoxin (4.7 x 10(-8) did not alter the oscillatory pattern of contraction in response to norepinephrine. Oscillations were converted to sustained contraction by barium (10(-4) mmol), quinidine (5.8 x 10(-5) mmol) and elevation of extracellular potassium (20 mmol/l). Em recordings show that both potassium and barium convert bursting activity into tonic firing. Only 20 mmol/k+ caused significant depolarization in addition to that produced by norepinephrine. In contrast, quinidine appears to alter oscillatory behavior by interfering with calcium-spike generation. Norepinephrine-induced electrical activity is diminished in the presence of quinidine. These results suggest that potassium conductance plays an important role in controlling Em, electrical spiking and therefore oscillatory contractile activity in response to norepinephrine in the tail arteries of SHR-SP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2778313

  12. Effects of Venous Superdrainage and Arterial Supercharging on Dorsal Perforator Flap in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Xi, Shanshan; Ding, Maochao; Li, Hong; Xu, Wei; Tang, Maolin; Chen, Shixin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comparatively assess the effects of venous superdrainage and arterial supercharging on dorsal perforator flap survival. Materials and Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (450–550g) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20), including control group (Control) and experimental groups A (venous superdrainage, Exp. A) and B (arterial supercharging, Exp. B). At postoperative day 7, survival areas of the flaps were evaluated and all animals underwent angiography. Laser Doppler was used to evaluate flap perfusion from 0h to 7days after surgery. Histology with hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to count microvessels. Tissue of “Choke vessels”was excised for quantification of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by western blot assay at 6h and 7days after surgery. Results In the Exp. A group, almost all flaps survived (98.2±1.6%); in the Exp. B and control group, survival areas accounted for 78.8±8.5% and 60.3±7.8%, respectively (P <0.001). In addition, Exp. A animals showed improved anastomosis of choke vessels 2 compared with the Exp. B and Control groups. Furthermore, flap blood flow and partial pressure of oxygen in the Exp. A group were significantly higher compared with values obtained for the Exp. B and Control groups, from 6 hours to 7 days after surgery. More microvessels were found in the Exp. A group (11.65±1.33) than in Exp. B (9.25±0.34) and control (7.25±0.91) animals on POD 7. The relative expression level of HIF-1α and VEGF were significant at 6h and 7days after surgery. Conclusions Venous superdrainage in rat dorsal perforator flap is more effective than arterial supercharging in promoting flap survival, and could effectively alter hemodynamics in the microcirculation and stimulate blood vessel formation. PMID:27513520

  13. Histological and Morphometric Analyses for Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Experiments aimed at analyzing the response of blood vessels to mechanical injury and ensuing remodeling responses often employ the highly characterized carotid artery balloon injury model in laboratory rats. This approach utilizes luminal insertion of a balloon embolectomy catheter into the common carotid artery with inflation and withdrawal resulting in an injury characterized by vascular endothelial cell (EC) denudation and medial wall distension. The adaptive response to this injury is typified by robust vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) replication and migration, SMC apoptosis and necrosis, enhanced synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, partial vascular EC regeneration from the border zones, luminal narrowing and establishment of a neointima in time-dependent fashion. Evaluation of these adaptive responses to blood vessel injury can include acute and longer-term qualitative and quantitative measures including expression analyses, activity assays, immunostaining for a plethora of factors and signals, and morphometry of neointima formation and gross mural remodeling. This chapter presents a logical continuation of Chapter    in this series that offers details for performing the rat carotid artery balloon injury model in a standard laboratory setting by providing commonly used protocols for performing histological and morphometric analyses in such studies. Moreover, procedures, caveats, and considerations included in this chapter are highly relevant for alternative animal vascular physiology/pathophysiology studies and in particular those related to mechanisms of vascular injury and repair. Included in this chapter are specifics for in situ perfusion-fixation, tissue harvesting and processing for both snap-frozen and paraffin-embedded protocols, specimen embedding and sectioning, slide preparation, several standard histological staining steps, and routine morphological assessment. Included in Notes are important caveats

  14. Molecular basis for impaired collateral artery growth in the spontaneously hypertensive rat: insight from microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Unthank, Joseph L; McClintick, Jeanette N; Labarrere, Carlos A; Li, Lang; DiStasi, Matthew R; Miller, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of global gene expression in mesenteric control and collateral arteries was used to investigate potential molecules, pathways, and mechanisms responsible for impaired collateral growth in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR). A fundamental difference was observed in overall gene expression pattern in SHR versus Wistar Kyoto (WKY) collaterals; only 6% of genes altered in collaterals were similar between rat strains. Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified major differences between WKY and SHR in networks and biological functions related to cell growth and proliferation and gene expression. In SHR control arteries, several mechano-sensitive and redox-dependent transcription regulators were downregulated including JUN (−5.2×, P = 0.02), EGR1 (−4.1×, P = 0.01), and NFĸB1 (−1.95×, P = 0.04). Predicted binding sites for NFĸB and AP-1 were present in genes altered in WKY but not SHR collaterals. Immunostaining showed increased NFĸB nuclear translocation in collateral arteries of WKY and apocynin-treated SHR, but not in untreated SHR. siRNA for the p65 subunit suppressed collateral growth in WKY, confirming a functional role of NFkB. Canonical pathways identified by IPA in WKY but not SHR included nitric oxide and renin–angiotensin system signaling. The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AGTR1) exhibited upregulation in WKY collaterals, but downregulation in SHR; pharmacological blockade of AGTR1 with losartan prevented collateral luminal expansion in WKY. Together, these results suggest that collateral growth impairment results from an abnormality in a fundamental regulatory mechanism that occurs at a level between signal transduction and gene transcription and implicate redox-dependent modulation of mechano-sensitive transcription factors such as NFĸB as a potential mechanism. PMID:24303120

  15. Antithrombotic effect of a novel recombinant hirudin analogue, CX-397, in a rat arterial thrombosis model.

    PubMed Central

    Takiguchi, Y.; Asai, F.; Wada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Nakashima, M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The antithrombotic effect of a new specific thrombin inhibitor, CX-397, was examined in a photochemically-induced arterial thrombosis model in the rat femoral artery and compared with that of heparin. 2. Pretreatment with CX-397 (10, 20 and 40 micrograms kg-1 min-1, i.v.) from 15 min before the experiment prolonged the time required for thrombotic occlusion of the artery in a dose-dependent manner. The antithrombotic efficacy of CX-397 was associated with modest increases in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and template bleeding time. 3. On the other hand, heparin at a dose of 450 micrograms kg-1 markedly prolonged APTT and the bleeding time, but did not inhibit thrombo-occlusion. 4. CX-397 selectively inhibited platelet aggregation and concurrent secretion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) production from platelets in response to thrombin, but not to collagen and ADP, in a dose-dependent manner (5-100 ng ml-1). 5. CX-397 at 10 micrograms kg-1 combined with vapiprost, a TXA2 receptor antagonist, at 0.1 mg kg-1 significantly prevented occlusion, whereas, at these doses, neither drug alone had much effect. 6. These results demonstrate that CX-397 may prove to be more efficient for preventing platelet-rich thrombosis than heparin. Thrombin may play an important role in the rat thrombosis model. 7. The additive antithrombotic effect of the combination of thrombin inhibitor and TXA2 receptor antagonist at low doses suggests that thrombin and TXA2 may work in concert to produce thrombosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:8680743

  16. Material coefficients of the strain energy function of pulmonary arteries in normal and cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Fung, Y C

    1993-11-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke on the stress-strain relationship of pulmonary arteries was studied in 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats. The animals were exposed to cigarette smoke in a smoke-generating system 10 times daily with one cigarette each time. The smoke density and the puffing duration and frequency of the system were regulated in accordance with reference values measured from human smokers. The mechanical properties of the pulmonary arteries about 450 microns in external diameter (at zero pressure) were determined in vitro by inflation and deflation tests. The average stress and middle-wall strain of the selected pulmonary arteries were determined on the basis of experimental data including inflation and deflation pressures during loading and unloading processes, respectively, and vessel diameter and length at various pressure levels, and vessel circumferential and longitudinal lengths at zero-stress state. A constitutive equation for the pulmonary arteries was derived from an energy function depending on circumferential and longitudinal Green's strains. The coefficients of the strain energy function of the pulmonary arteries were determined in both the smoke-exposed and control rats by fitting the experimental stress-strain data with the constitutive equation. It was found that the wall stress of the pulmonary arteries at a given strain and most of the coefficients of the strain energy function were increased in both the 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats in comparison with those in the corresponding controls. These results indicated that cigarette smoke induced an increase in the wall stiffness of the pulmonary arteries in the rats. PMID:8262988

  17. Endothelial nitric oxide modulates perivascular sensory neurotransmission in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed

    PubMed Central

    Ralevic, Vera

    2002-01-01

    A possible role of nitric oxide (NO) as a modulator of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurotransmission in blood vessels was investigated in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of methoxamine-preconstricted mesenteric beds elicited frequency-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 and 300 μM) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, 100 μM), inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation. D-NAME (300 μM), 6-aminoindazole (100 μM) and Nω-propyl-L-arginine (50 nM), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS, were without effect. The effect of 10 μM L-NAME was reversed by L-arginine (1 mM), the substrate for NOS. L-NAME (300 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) had no significant effect on vasorelaxations to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), the principal motor neurotransmitter of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in rat mesenteric arteries, or to capsaicin, indicating a prejunctional action. The inhibitors of NOS had no effect on vasorelaxation to forskolin, but augmented vasorelaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Removal of the endothelium augmented sensory neurogenic vasorelaxation, but did not affect vasorelaxation to CGRP, indicating a prejunctional action of endothelial NO. In the absence of endothelium, L-NAME (300 μM) inhibited, and 7-NI (100 μM) caused no further augmentation of sensory neurotransmission. SNP (100 nM), a nitric oxide donor, attenuated sensory neurogenic relaxations to EFS. In rat isolated thoracic aortic rings, L-NAME (100 μM) and 7-NI (100 μM) attenuated concentration-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine. These data show that NO modulates sensory neurotransmission evoked by EFS of the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed, and that when NO synthesis is blocked sensory neurogenic relaxation is augmented. The source of NO is the vascular endothelium. PMID:12183327

  18. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing.

    PubMed

    Warren, Rebecca L; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K; Jacques, Steven L; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-07-26

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  19. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Rebecca L.; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M.; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K.; Jacques, Steven L.; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  20. Effect of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses in rat intrapulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, Arnaud; Andujar, Pascal; Ladeiro, Yannick; Ducret, Thomas; Rogerieux, Francoise; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Guibert, Christelle; Roux, Etienne; Canal-Raffin, Mireille; Brochard, Patrick; Marano, Francelyne; Marthan, Roger; Muller, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary circulation could be one of the primary vascular targets of finest particles that can deeply penetrate into the lungs after inhalation. We investigated the effects of engineered nanoparticles on vasomotor responses of small intrapulmonary arteries using isometric tension measurements. Acute in vitro exposure to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) decreased, and in some case abolished, the vasomotor responses induced by several vasoactive agents, whereas acute exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}NP) did not. This could be attributed to a decrease in the activity of those vasoactive agents (including PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, serotonin, endothelin-1 and acetylcholine), as suggested when they were exposed to CNP before being applied to arteries. Also, CNP decreased the contraction induced by 30 mM KCl, without decreasing its activity. After endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores depletion (by caffeine and thapsigargin), CaCl{sub 2} addition induced a contraction, dependent on Store-Operated Calcium Channels that was not modified by acute CNP exposure. Further addition of 30 mM KCl elicited a contraction, originating from activation of Voltage-Operated Calcium Channels that was diminished by CNP. Contractile responses to PGF{sub 2{alpha}} or KCl, and relaxation to acetylcholine were modified neither in pulmonary arteries exposed in vitro for prolonged time to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP, nor in those removed from rats intratracheally instilled with CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP. In conclusion, prolonged in vitro or in vivo exposure to CNP or TiO{sub 2}NP does not affect vasomotor responses of pulmonary arteries. However, acute exposure to CNP decreases contraction mediated by activation of Voltage-Operated, but not Store-Operated, Calcium Channels. Moreover, interaction of some vasoactive agents with CNP decreases their biological activity that might lead to misinterpretation of experimental data.

  1. Unique gene program of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries as revealed by deep RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Reho, John J; Shetty, Amol; Dippold, Rachael P; Mahurkar, Anup; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of RNA samples from rat small mesenteric arteries (MA) and aorta (AO) identified common and unique features of their gene programs. ∼5% of mRNAs were quantitatively differentially expressed in MA versus AO. Unique transcriptional control in MA smooth muscle is suggested by the selective or enriched expression of transcription factors Nkx2-3, HAND2, and Tcf21 (Capsulin). Enrichment in AO of PPAR transcription factors and their target genes of mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation is consistent with slow (oxidative) tonic smooth muscle. In contrast MA was enriched in contractile and calcium channel mRNAs suggestive of components of fast (glycolytic) phasic smooth muscle. Myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit paralogs Mypt1 and p85 were expressed at similar levels, while smooth muscle MLCK was the only such kinase expressed, suggesting functional redundancy of the former but not the latter in accordance with mouse knockout studies. With regard to vaso-regulatory signals, purinergic receptors P2rx1 and P2rx5 were reciprocally expressed in MA versus AO, while the olfactory receptor Olr59 was enriched in MA. Alox15, which generates the EDHF HPETE, was enriched in MA while eNOS was equally expressed, consistent with the greater role of EDHF in the smaller arteries. mRNAs that were not expressed at a level consistent with impugned function include skeletal myogenic factors, IKK2, nonmuscle myosin, and Gnb3. This screening analysis of gene expression in the small mesenteric resistance arteries suggests testable hypotheses regarding unique aspects of small artery function in the regional control of blood flow. PMID:26156969

  2. Simultaneous measurement of arterial and left ventricular pressure in conscious freely moving rats by telemetry.

    PubMed

    Segreti, Jason A; Polakowski, James S; Blomme, Eric A; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive cardiovascular assessment in conscious rodents by utilizing telemetry has been limited by the restriction of current devices to one pressure channel. The purpose of this study was to test and validate a dual pressure transmitter that allows the simultaneous measurement of arterial pressure (AP) and left ventricular pressure (LVP) in conscious freely moving rats. Six rats were surgically implanted with dual pressure transmitters. Baseline hemodynamics and circadian rhythm were observed to return within 7days. AP, heart rate (HR), LVP and indices of left ventricular contractility were stable and demonstrated a prominent circadian rhythm over a two-week period of uninterrupted recordings. Administration of the vasodilator nifedipine produced the anticipated dose-dependent decrease in AP which was accompanied by a baroreflex mediated increase in HR and cardiac contractility. The negative inotrope verapamil produced the expected dose-dependent decreases in AP and cardiac contractility. Finally, a terminal validation of the dual pressure transmitter was performed under anesthesia by measuring AP and LVP simultaneously via telemetry and from a fluid filled arterial catheter and an intraventricular Millar catheter, respectively. A range of pressures and cardiac contractility were studied by administering sequential intravenous infusions of the positive inotrope dobutamine followed by verapamil. Linear regression analysis revealed a high level of agreement between pressures measured by the dual pressure transmitter and the exteriorized catheters. Histopathologic analysis of the heart revealed mild peri-catheter fibrosis. In conclusion, the simultaneous measurement of AP and LVP offers the potential for more detailed cardiovascular assessment in conscious rats. PMID:26778372

  3. Stable EET urea agonist and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor regulate rat pulmonary arteries through TRPCs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Ruifang; Li, Jing; Rao, Jingjing; Li, Weiyang; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijay L; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Zhu, Daling

    2011-05-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), cytochrome P450-derived metabolites of arachidonic acid, have been reported to increase intracellular calcium concentration in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). As EETs are labile, we synthesized a new stable urea EET analog with agonist and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor properties. We refer to this analog, 12-(3-hexylureido)dodec-8-enoic acid, as 8-HUDE. Measuring tension of vascular rings, intracellular calcium signaling by confocal laser scanning microscopy and gene expression by reverse-transcription-PCR and western blots, we examined the effects of 8-HUDE on pulmonary vascular tone and calcium signaling in rat pulmonary artery (PA) SMCs (PASMCs). 8-HUDE increased the tension of rat PAs to 145% baseline, whereas it had no effect on the tension of mesenteric arteries (MAs). The 8-HUDE-induced increase in vascular tone was abolished by removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or by pretreatment with either La(3+) or SKF96365, which are inhibitors of canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs). Furthermore, 8-HUDE-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs could be blunted by inhibition of TRPC with SKF96365, removal of extracellular calcium or depletion of intracellular calcium stores with caffeine, cyclopiazonic acid or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, but not by the voltage-activated calcium channel blocker nifedipine. In addition to immediate effects on calcium signaling, 8-HUDE upregulated the expression of TRPC1 and TRPC6 at both mRNA and protein levels in rat PASMCs, whereas it suppressed the expression of sEH. Our observations suggest that 8-HUDE increases PA vascular tone through increased release of calcium from intracellular stores, enhanced [Ca(2+)](i) influx in PASMCs through store-operated Ca(2+) channels and modulated the expression of TRPC and sEH proteins in a proconstrictive manner. PMID:21307870

  4. Effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolong; Lu, Yan; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective is to explore the effect of curcumin on permeability of coronary artery and expression of related proteins in rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. Methods: 45 healthy male Wistar rats of clean grade were selected and divided into treatment group, model control group and blank control group. The rats in the treatment group and model control group received high-fat diet for 12 weeks and intraperitoneal injection of VD3 to establish rat coronary atherosclerosis heart disease model. After modeling, the rats in the treatment group received gavage of 100 mg/(kg·d) curcimin, and the rats in the model control group and blank control group received gavage of 5 ml/(kg·d) distilled water, the intervention time was 4 weeks. After intervention, the rats were killed, and the hearts were dissected to obtain the samples of coronary artery. After embedding and frozen section, immunofluorescence method was used to detect the change of endarterium permeability in 3 groups, Western blot was used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and CD40L in coronary artery tissue, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and C reaction protein (CRP). Results: After modeling, compared with the blank control group, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-c) in the treatment group and model control group were significantly higher (P<0.05), however, high density lipoprotein cholesterin (HDL-c) was significantly lower. The pathological sections showed that there was lipidosis in rat coronary artery in treatment group and model control group, indicating that the modeling was successful. Immunofluorescence showed that there was only a little fluorochrome permeability in artery in blank control group, there was some fluorochrome permeability in artery in the treatment group and there was a lot of fluorochrome permeability in artery in the model

  5. Emergency Use of Stent and rtPA with Mechanical Cloth Defragmentation for a Thromboembolic Complication during GDC Coil Treatment of an Acutely Ruptured Basilar Tip Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, W; Falkowski, A; Kojder, I; Sagan, L

    2006-11-30

    Thrombotic occlusion of both posterior cerebral arteries occurred during embolization of an acutely ruptured basilar tip aneurysm. Intracranial stenting and continuous superselective infusion of rtPA was administered combined with mechanical clot fragmentation to reestablish normal vessel flow. DSA disclosed that normal vessel patency was achieved within 30 min. There were no adverse events related to rtPA administration and the patient recovered from the embolization with minor neurologic deficit as present before the procedure. PMID:24351269

  6. Activation of Central Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors by Compound 21 Improves Arterial Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Juan; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In a previous study we demonstrated that central administration of compound 21 (C21), a nonpeptide AT2R agonist, inhibited sympathetic tone in normal rats. In this study, we hypothesized that C21 exerts a similar effect in rats with coronary ligation–induced heart failure (HF). METHODS C21 was intracerebroventricularly infused for 7 days by osmotic mini pump. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by radiotelemetry in the conscious state to measure spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Urine was collected for measurement of norepinephrine excretion. On the last day of C21 treatment, renal sympathetic nerve activity, BP, and HR were directly recorded under anesthesia, and the induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated. Protein expressions of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, rostral ventrolateral medulla, and nucleus tractus solitarius were determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS C21-treated HF rats displayed significantly less norepinephrine excretion (2,385.6±121.1 vs. 3,677.3±147.6ng/24 hours; P < 0.05) and lower renal sympathetic nerve activity (50.2±1.9% of max vs. 70.9±8.2% of max; P < 0.05) than vehicle-treated HF rats. C21-treated rats also exhibited improved spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity and induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Bolus intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II–evoked pressor and sympatho-excitatory responses were attenuated in the C21-treated HF rats, which displayed upregulated nNOS and downregulated AT1R expression in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Activation of central angiotensin II type 2 receptor AT2R by C21 suppresses sympathetic outflow in rats with HF by improving baroreflex sensitivity and may provide important benefit in the HF syndrome. PMID:24687998

  7. Panax notoginseng saponins ameliorate impaired arterial vasodilation in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa) /lzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Sun, Jianning; Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) are major components of Panax notoginseng, a herb with established clinical efficacy against vascular diseases. SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa) /IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats, a new animal model for metabolic syndrome, display an impaired vasorelaxation response in aortas and mesenteric arteries that is mediated by nitric oxide (NO). This study investigated whether PNS and its components can ameliorate this vascular dysfunction in SHRSP.ZF rats. In an in vitro study, in the presence or absence of PNS and its components, vasodilation in response to nitroprusside was determined from myographs under isometric tension conditions in aortas and mesenteric arteries from male SHRSP.ZF rats at 18-20 weeks of age. In an in vivo study, PNS (30 mg/kg per day) was orally administered to SHRSP.ZF rats from 8 to 20 weeks of age. In vitro treatment with PNS and Ginsenoside Rb1 increased nitroprusside-induced relaxation of aortas and mesenteric arteries in SHRSP.ZF rats. The PNS-induced increase was not affected by a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor or endothelium denudation. Relaxation in response to a cell-permeable cGMP analogue was increased by PNS, but cGMP accumulation by nitroprusside was not altered. In vivo treatment with PNS in SHRSP.ZF rats lowered blood pressure and increased relaxation and the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase protein in arteries, without affecting metabolic abnormalities. These results indicate that PNS causes an increase in vasodilation in response to NO and a decrease in blood pressure, resulting in protection against vascular dysfunction in SHRSP.ZF rats. PNS might be beneficial in alleviating impaired vasodilation in metabolic syndrome. PMID:26784885

  8. Protective effects of allicin against ischemic stroke in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benping; Li, Feng; Zhao, Weijiang; Li, Jiebing; Li, Qingsong; Wang, Weizhi

    2015-09-01

    Allicin, a molecule predominantly responsible for the pungent odor and the antibiotic function of garlic, exhibits various pharmacological activities and has been suggested to be beneficial in the treatment of various disorders. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of allicin in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Rats were subjected to 1.5 h of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were randomly assigned to the sham surgery group, the MCAO group and the MCAO + allicin group. Neurological score, cerebral infarct size, brain water content, neuronal apoptosis, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were measured. The results suggested that allicin reduced cerebral infarction area, brain water content, neuronal apoptosis, TNF‑α levels and MPO activity in the serum. The results of the present study indicated that allicin protects the brain from cerebral I/R injury, which may be ascribed to its anti‑apoptotic and anti‑inflammatory effects. PMID:26045182

  9. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lisa A.; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S.; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet’s equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  10. Performing Permanent Distal Middle Cerebral with Common Carotid Artery Occlusion in Aged Rats to Study Cortical Ischemia with Sustained Disability.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Christina; Duricki, Denise A; Roy, Lisa A; Haenzi, Barbara; Tsai, Shi-Yen; Kartje, Gwendolyn; Beech, John S; Cash, Diana; Moon, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Stroke typically occurs in elderly people with a range of comorbidities including carotid (or other arterial) atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Accordingly, when evaluating therapies for stroke in animals, it is important to select a model with excellent face validity. Ischemic stroke accounts for 80% of all strokes, and the majority of these occur in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), often inducing infarcts that affect the sensorimotor cortex, causing persistent plegia or paresis on the contralateral side of the body. We demonstrate in this video a method for producing ischemic stroke in elderly rats, which causes sustained sensorimotor disability and substantial cortical infarcts. Specifically, we induce permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in elderly female rats by using diathermy forceps to occlude a short segment of this artery. The carotid artery on the ipsilateral side to the lesion was then permanently occluded and the contralateral carotid artery was transiently occluded for 60 min. We measure the infarct size using structural T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24 hr and 8 weeks after stroke. In this study, the mean infarct volume was 4.5% ± 2.0% (standard deviation) of the ipsilateral hemisphere at 24 hr (corrected for brain swelling using Gerriet's equation, n = 5). This model is feasible and clinically relevant as it permits the induction of sustained sensorimotor deficits, which is important for the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms and novel treatments. PMID:26967269

  11. Congenital Absence of Posterior Elements of C2 Vertebra with Atlanto-Axial Dislocation and Basilar Invagination: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Nemade, Pradip Sharad; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Bhoale, Sunil Krishna

    2016-02-01

    Developmental anomalies of the axis are commonly encountered, especially anomalies involving the odontoid process. Anomalies of the posterior elements are uncommon. We describe a unique case of agenesis of posterior elements of C2 with basilar invagination and atlanto-axial dislocation. An obese 8-year-old boy presented with symptoms of cervical myelopathy. Radiological workup revealed a craniovertebral junction anomaly with occipitalised atlas, absent posterior elements of axis, and hypertrophied C3 spinous process. Atlanto-axial instability and basilar invagination was present. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed hypoplastic left vertebral artery. Traction with cervical tongs failed to improve the alignment and symptoms. Anterior trans-oral release, followed by posterior decompression and custom-made instrumentation, was done. The patient recovered completely and was asymptomatic at the end of two years. X-ray and computed tomography scan demonstrated reduction of basilar invagination and maintenance of alignment. This is the first case to be reported of agenesis of posterior elements of axis associated with basilar invagination. One should look for this condition in patients with hypertrophied spinous process of C3. Utilization of hypoplastic pedicle of axis serves as an additional fixation point to increase the stability of the construct. PMID:26949474

  12. Congenital Absence of Posterior Elements of C2 Vertebra with Atlanto-Axial Dislocation and Basilar Invagination: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Nemade, Pradip Sharad; Bhoale, Sunil Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the axis are commonly encountered, especially anomalies involving the odontoid process. Anomalies of the posterior elements are uncommon. We describe a unique case of agenesis of posterior elements of C2 with basilar invagination and atlanto-axial dislocation. An obese 8-year-old boy presented with symptoms of cervical myelopathy. Radiological workup revealed a craniovertebral junction anomaly with occipitalised atlas, absent posterior elements of axis, and hypertrophied C3 spinous process. Atlanto-axial instability and basilar invagination was present. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed hypoplastic left vertebral artery. Traction with cervical tongs failed to improve the alignment and symptoms. Anterior trans-oral release, followed by posterior decompression and custom-made instrumentation, was done. The patient recovered completely and was asymptomatic at the end of two years. X-ray and computed tomography scan demonstrated reduction of basilar invagination and maintenance of alignment. This is the first case to be reported of agenesis of posterior elements of axis associated with basilar invagination. One should look for this condition in patients with hypertrophied spinous process of C3. Utilization of hypoplastic pedicle of axis serves as an additional fixation point to increase the stability of the construct. PMID:26949474

  13. A rare variant of persistent trigeminal artery: cavernous carotid-cerebellar artery anastomosis--a case report and a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Raphaeli, Guy; Bandeira, Alexandra; Mine, Benjamin; Brisbois, Denis; Lubicz, Boris

    2009-12-01

    We report a very rare anomalous anatomic variant of the cavernous internal carotid artery supplying directly the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, with no basilar artery opacification. A systematic review as well as a description of other variants of trigeminal-cerebellar anastomosis is given. PMID:19517204

  14. Thyroid hormone affects both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells in rat arteries.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yin; Manio, Michael M; Leung, George P H; Xu, Aimin; Tang, Eva H C; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-01-15

    Hypothyroidism impairs endothelium-dependent dilatations, while hyperthyroidism augments the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Thus, experiments were designed to determine if thyroid hormone causes endothelium-dependent responses, or alleviates diabetic endothelial dysfunction. Isometric tension was measured in rings with or without endothelium of arteries from normal and diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Release of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and protein levels [endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclooxygenases (COX)] by immunoblotting. Triiodothyronine (T3) caused concentration-dependent (3×10(-6)-3×10(-5)M) relaxations in mesenteric (pEC50, 4.96±0.19) and femoral (pEC50, 4.57±0.35) arteries without endothelium. In femoral arteries of rats with diabetes, 5-methylamino-2-[[(2S,3R,5R,8S,9S)-3,5,9-trimethyl-2-(1-oxo-(1H-pyrrol-2- -yl)propan-2-yl)-1,7-dioxaspiro-(5,5)undecan-8-yl]methyl]benzooxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187, 3×10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused partly endothelium-dependent contractions. After chronic T3-treatment with (10μg/kg/day; four weeks), the contractions to A23187 of preparations with and without endothelium were comparable, the thromboxane B2-release was reduced (by 38.1±9.2%). The pEC50 of 9, 11-dideoxy-11α, 9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, TP-receptor agonist) was increased in T3-treated diabetic rats compared with controls (8.53±0.06 vs 7.94±0.09). The protein expression of eNOS increased (by 228%) but that of COX-1 decreased (by 35%) after chronic T3 treatment. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells incubated for one week with T3 (10(-10)-10(-7)M) in the presence but not in the absence of interleukin-1β (1ng/ml), the expression of eNOS was increased compared to control. In conclusion, thyroid hormone acutely relaxes mesenteric and femoral vascular smooth muscle, but given chronically reduces the release of endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor

  15. Vinpocetine Attenuates Neointimal Hyperplasia in Diabetic Rat Carotid Arteries after Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wenhui; Li, Hailing; Zhuang, Jianhui; Lu, Yuyan; Liu, Baoxin; Li, Xiankai; Li, Weiming; Xu, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes exacerbates abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) accumulation in response to arterial wall injury. Vinpocetine has been shown to improve vascular remolding; however, little is known about the direct effects of vinpocetine on vascular complications mediated by diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of vinpocetine on hyperglycemia-facilitated neointimal hyperplasia and explore its possible mechanism. Materials and Methods Nondiabetic and diabetic rats were subjected to balloon injury of the carotid artery followed by 3-week treatment with either vinpocetine (10 mg/kg/day) or saline. Morphological analysis and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunostaining were performed on day 21. Rat VSMCs proliferation was determined with 5-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine cell proliferation assays. Chemokinesis was monitored with scratch assays, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed using a 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) flow cytometric assay. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometric assay. Cell signaling was assessed by immunblotting. Results Vinpocetine prevented intimal hyperplasia in carotid arteries in both normal (I/M ratio: 93.83 ± 26.45% versus 143.2 ± 38.18%, P<0.05) and diabetic animals (I/M ratio: 120.5 ± 42.55% versus 233.46 ± 33.98%, P<0.05) when compared to saline. The in vitro study demonstrated that vinpocetine significantly inhibited VSMCs proliferation and chemokinesis as well as ROS generation and apoptotic resistance, which was induced by high glucose (HG) treatment. Vinpocetine significantly abolished HG-induced phosphorylation of Akt and JNK1/2 without affecting their total levels. For downstream targets, HG-induced phosphorylation of IκBα was significantly inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine also attenuated HG-enhanced expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Conclusions Vinpocetine attenuated neointimal formation in diabetic

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells suppress CaN/NFAT expression in the pulmonary arteries of rats with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JUNFENG; HAN, ZHIBO; HAN, ZHONGCHAO; HE, ZHIXU

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and hyperproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is considered the primary pathological feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The present study determined that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) suppress the expression of calcineurin (CaN) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in the pulmonary arteries of rats, and this may exert a therapeutic effect on PH. The potential therapeutic effects of MSCs on PH were assessed via the transplantation of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs, which were cultured in serum-free medium, into a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rat model. Subsequently, the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lung tissue and plasma, and of CaN and NFATc2 in pulmonary arteries were assessed. In the rat model of MCT-induced PH, investigated in the present study, TNF-α expression levels were detected in the lung tissue, and the levels of TNF-α in the plasma were increased. Furthermore, in addition to hemodynamic changes and the evident medial hypertrophy of the pulmonary muscular arterioles, CaN and NFATc2 expression levels were significantly upregulated in the pulmonary arteries. In the present study, the transplantation of MSCs, cultured in serum-free medium, decreased the levels of TNF-α in the lung tissue and plasma of rats, and downregulated CaN and NFATc2 expression in the pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, hemodynamic abnormalities and medial hypertrophy of the pulmonary muscular arterioles were notably improved. Therefore, the results of the present study may suggest that the administration of MSCs in PH may suppress the production of TNF-α, and downregulate the expression of CaN and NFATc2 in pulmonary arteries, which may provide an effective treatment for PH by suppressing the pathological proliferation of PASMCs. PMID:26640533

  17. Impairment of intradimensional shift in an attentional set-shifting task in rats with chronic bilateral common carotid artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Choi, Bo-Ryoung; Jeon, Won Kyung; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of rats with chronic bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAo), an animal model for vascular dementia (VaD), have reported hippocampus-dependent memory impairment and associated neuropathologies. Patients with VaD also experience attentional shifting dysfunction. However, animal models of VaD have not been used to study attentional function. Therefore, the present study examined attentional function in rats with BCCAo, using attentional set-shifting task (ASST) that required rats to choose a food-baited pot from 2 possible pots. ASST included 6 consecutive sessions including simple discrimination, compound discrimination, intradimensional shifting, extradimensional shifting, and reversals. The BCCAo rats were significantly slower at learning the intradimensional set-shifting task compared to control rats. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex are critical to intradimensional and extradimensional set-shifting, respectively. Additionally, inflammatory responses and neuronal dysfunction were observed in rats with chronic BCCAo. In addition, OX-6 positive microglia significantly increased in the forceps minor white matter of BCCAo rats, and glutamate decarboxylase signals co-localized with NeuN were reduced in the anterior cingulate cortex of BCCAo rats, compared to control rats. Impaired neuronal and GABAergic neuronal integrity in the anterior cingulate cortex, damage to white matter, and attentional impairments observed in BCCAo rats suggest dysfunction of brain structures that are associated with attentional impairments observed in patients with VaD. PMID:26365458

  18. Interlobular arteries from two-kidney, one-clip Goldblatt hypertensive rats exhibit impaired vasodilator response to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Sporková, Alexandra; Reddy, N. Rami; Falck, John R.; Imig, John D.; Kopkan, Libor; Sadowski, Janusz; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Background Small renal arteries have a significant role in regulation of renal hemodynamics and blood pressure (BP). To study potential changes in regulation of vascular function in hypertension, we examined renal vasodilatory responses of small arteries from nonclipped kidneys of the two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) Goldblatt hypertensive rats to native epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which are believed to be involved in regulation of renal vascular function and BP. Two newly synthesized EET analogs were also examined. Methods Renal interlobular arteries isolated from the nonclipped kidneys on day 28 after clipping were preconstricted with phenylephrine (PE), pressurized, and the effects of a 14,15-EET analog, native 14,15-EET, and 11,12-ether-EET-8ZE, an analog of 11,12-EET, on the vascular diameter were determined and compared to the responses of arteries from the kidneys of sham-operated rats. Results In the arteries from non-clipped kidneys isolated in the maintenance phase of Goldblatt hypertension the maximal vasodilatory response to 14,15-EET analog was 30.1 ± 2.8% versus 49.8 ± 7.2% in sham-operated rats; the respective values for 11,12-ther-EET-8ZE were 31.4± 6.4% versus 80.4±6%, and for native EETs they were 41.7 ± 6.6 % versus 62.8 ± 4.4 % (P ≤ 0.05 for each difference). Conclusions We propose that reduced vasodilatory action and decreased intrarenal bioavailability of EETs combined with intrarenal ANG II levels that are inappropriately high for hypertensive rats underlie functional derangements of the nonclipped kidneys of 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats. These derangements could play an important role in pathophysiology of sustained BP elevation observed in this animal model of human renovascular hypertension. PMID:27140711

  19. Alterations in structure of elastic laminae of rat pulmonary arteries in hypoxic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q

    1996-11-01

    The effect of hypoxic hypertension on the remodeling process of the elastic laminae of the rat hilar pulmonary arteries (PAs) was studied by electron microscopy. Rats were exposed to hypoxia (10% O2) for periods of 0.5, 2,6,12,48,96,144, and 240 h. Changes in the structure of the PA elastic laminae were examined and analyzed with respect to changes in the PA wall tensile stress. The PA blood pressure increased rapidly within the first several hours of hypoxia and reached a stable level within 2 days, whereas the PA wall tensile stress increased initially due to elevated blood pressure and then decreased after 48 h due to vessel wall thickening and returned to the control level after 4 days. In association with these changes, the elastic laminae, which appeared homogeneous in normal control rats, changed into structures composed of randomly oriented filaments and edematous contents with an increase in the volume during the early period of hypoxia and regained their homogeneous appearance and normal volume after 4 days. The changes in the elastic laminae were correlated with changes in the tensile stress. These changes were associated with a transient decrease in the stiffness of the PAs. In hypoxic rats given nifedipine, no change was found in the blood pressure, the tensile stress, or the structure of the elastic laminae of the PAs despite continuous exposure to hypoxia. These results suggested that altered tensile stress in the PA wall played a critical role in the initiation and regulation of structural changes in the elastic laminae and that these changes might contribute to alterations in the mechanical properties of the PA in hypoxic hypertension. PMID:8941540

  20. Local and cellular Ca2+ transients in smooth muscle of pressurized rat resistance arteries during myogenic and agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miriel, V A; Mauban, J R; Blaustein, M P; Wier, W G

    1999-08-01

    1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize Ca2+ transients in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of intact, pressurized rat mesenteric resistance arteries loaded with fluorescent calcium indicators. Vasoconstriction was assessed by measuring inner arterial diameter. All arteries were studied at 70 mmHg intralumenal pressure and 37 C. 2. In the control condition of myogenic tone the arteries were constricted to 62 % (n = 10) of their passive diameter (p.d.). The [Ca2+]i in most VSMC of these arteries was constant over time. In a small percentage (< 10 %) of cells in each artery, [Ca2+]i oscillated regularly. Local calcium transients (Ca2+ sparks) were observed in five arteries studied with confocal linescan imaging. 3. Activation of alpha-adrenoceptors by phenylephrine (PE, 1.0 microM) induced further vasoconstriction of pressurized arteries (to 27 % of p.d.). In this condition, [Ca2+]i oscillations were prominent in a large percentage (83 %) of the VSMC. The Ca2+ oscillations ranged in frequency from 4 to 22 min-1, and were usually asynchronous between cells. 4. High [KCl]o (65 mM) induced nearly comparable vasoconstriction to PE (37 % of p.d.) but [Ca2+]i oscillated in only about 13 % of cells in each artery. 5. Block of L-type Ca2+ channels (with nifedipine) in arteries activated by PE caused nearly full vasodilatation, but did not abolish the Ca2+ oscillations. Subsequent block of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (with cyclopiazonic acid) abolished Ca2+ oscillations in all cells. 6. We conclude that Ca2+ entering VSMC via L-type Ca2+ channels has an obligatory role in force development, both in myogenic tone and during alpha1-adrenoceptor activation. The oscillatory pattern of [Ca2+]i that persists in the absence of Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca2+ channels is ineffective in activating contraction. PMID:10420017

  1. Local arterial nanoparticle delivery of siRNA for NOX2 knockdown to prevent restenosis in an atherosclerotic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ming; Newburger, Peter E.; Gounis, Matthew; Dargon, Phong; Zhang, Xueqing; Messina, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Both atherosclerosis and arterial interventions induce oxidative stress mediated in part by NADPH oxidases that play a pivotal role in the development of neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis. For siRNA targeting of the NOX2 (Cybb) component of NADPH oxidase to prevent restenosis, gene transfer with viral vectors is effective, but raises safety issues in humans. We have developed a new approach using the amino-acid-based nanoparticle HB-OLD7 for local delivery of siRNA targeting NOX2 to the arterial wall. siRNA-nanoparticle complexes were transferred into regional carotid artery walls after angioplasty in an atherosclerotic rat model. Compared to angioplasty controls, Cybb gene expression (measured by quantitative RT-PCR) in the experimental arterial wall 2 weeks after siRNA was reduced >87%. The neointima to media area ratio was decreased >83% and lumen to whole artery area ratio was increased >89%. Vital organs showed no abnormalities and splenic Cybb gene expression showed no detectable change. Thus, local arterial wall gene transfer with HB-OLD7 nanoparticles provides an effective, non-viral system for efficient and safe local gene transfer in a clinically applicable approach to knockdown an NADPH oxidase gene. Local arterial knockdown of the Cybb gene significantly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia and preserved the vessel lumen without systemic toxicity. PMID:20485380

  2. Abnormal expression of vesicular transport proteins in pulmonary arterial hypertension in monocrotaline-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular vesicular transport is shown to be dysfunctional in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of intracellular vesicular transport proteins in PAH remains unclear. To elucidate the possible role of these proteins in the development of PAH, the changes in the expressions of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP), synaptosome-associated membrane protein 23 (SNAP23), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2), caveolin-1 (cav-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were examined in lung tissues of monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, caspase-3, also examined by western blot analysis, was used as an indicator of apoptosis. Our data showed that during the development of PAH, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 were significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase and then significantly decreased after PAH was established. The expressions of BMPR2 and eNOS were similar to those of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23; however, the expression of cav-1 was down-regulated after MCT treatment. Caspase-3 expression was increased after exposure to MCT. In conclusion, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNPA23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH, which was accompanied by abnormal expressions of BMPR2, cav-1, and eNOS, as well as an increase in apoptosis. Thus, changes in NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 expressions appear to be mechanistically associated with the development of PAH in MCT-treated rats. PMID:25630652

  3. The actions of some cannabinoid receptor ligands in the rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard; Robin Hiley, C

    1998-01-01

    The actions of a number of cannabinoid receptor ligands were investigated using the myograph-mounted rat isolated mesenteric artery. Anandamide, CP 55,940, HU-210, palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2 all caused concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine-precontracted vessels which were not affected by removal of the endothelium.Precontracting vessels with 60 mM KCl instead of methoxamine greatly reduced the vasorelaxant effects of anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide. High K+ solution caused a modest decrease in the relaxant potency of CP 55,940 and HU-210, and had no effect on relaxations induced by WIN 55,212-2.Relaxations of methoxamine-induced tone by anandamide, CP 55,940 and HU-210, but not palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2, were attenuated by the cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR 141716A. Relaxation of vessels contracted with 60 mM KCl by CP 55,940 was also sensitive to SR 141716A.Anandamide and CP 55,940 caused small but concentration-dependent contractions in resting vessels in the absence of extracellular calcium. These were not sensitive to SR 141716A. Palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2 produced smaller contractions only at higher concentrations.Anandamide and CP 55,940, but not palmitoylethanolamide and WIN 55,212-2, caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the phasic contractions induced by methoxamine in calcium-free conditions, but only anandamide caused inhibition of contractions to caffeine under such conditions. These inhibitory effects were not antagonised by SR 141716A.The present study provides the first detailed investigation of the actions of cannabinoid agonists on vascular smooth muscle. Our results show that these compounds exert both receptor-dependent and -independent effects on agonist-induced calcium mobilization in the rat isolated mesenteric artery. PMID:9806337

  4. Vasopressin-induced constriction of the isolated rat occipital artery is segment-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Chelko, Stephen P.; Schmiedt, Chad W.; Lewis, Tristan H.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Robertson, Tom P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulating factors delivered to the nodose ganglion (NG) by the occipital artery (OA) have shown to affect vagal afferent activity, and thus the contractile state of the OA may influence blood flow to the NG. Methods OA were isolated and bisected into proximal and distal segments, relative to the external carotid artery. Results Bisection, highlighted stark differences between maximal contractile responses and OA sensitivity. Specifically, maximum responses to vasopressin and the V1 receptor agonist, were significantly higher in distal than proximal segments. Distal segments were significantly more sensitive to 5-HT and the 5-HT2 receptor agonist than proximal segments. AT2, V2 and 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists did not elicit vascular responses. Additionally, AT1 receptor agonists elicited mild, yet not significantly different maximal responses between segments. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with contractile properties of rat OA being mediated via AT1, V1 and 5-HT2 receptors, and are dependent upon the OA segment. Furthermore, vasopressin-induced constriction of the OA, regardless of a bolus dose or a first and second concentration response curve retained this unique segmental difference and therefore we hypothesize this may be a pathophysiological response in the regulation of blood flow through the OA. PMID:24192548

  5. Heparin regulates smooth muscle S phase entry in the injured rat carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Majesky, M.W.; Schwartz, S.M.; Clowes, M.M.; Clowes, A.W.

    1987-08-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation in injured arteries is inhibited by heparin, but the mechanism of inhibition is unknown. In particular, it is not clear whether heparin prevents exit of quiescent SMC from the resting state, inhibits progression through the prereplicative (G1) sequence, or acts during DNA synthesis itself. In this study, induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was used as a marker of SMC entry into the cell cycle in an attempt to localize the site of heparin action during the initial hours after rat carotid injury. Rapid and transient induction of ODC activity was observed that reached a maximum (twenty-three-fold) 6 hours after wounding. Heparin failed to prevent ODC induction but greatly reduced frequencies of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labelled SMC nuclei 33 hours after injury. Moreover, heparin infusion could be delayed for up to 18 hours after the injury event with no significant loss of antiproliferative effect. Further delays resulted in marked loss of growth inhibition. The results of these studies show that SMC rapidly and synchronously leave the resting state after injury and suggest that heparin acts late in the prereplicative (G1) sequence or early in S phase to inhibit SMC proliferation in damaged arteries.

  6. Reduced NOS3 phosphorylation mediates reduced NO/cGMP signaling in mesenteric arteries of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Jennifer C; Elmarakby, Ahmed A; Kemp, Bruce E; Pollock, David M; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2004-05-01

    Salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with impaired NO/cGMP signaling. We hypothesized that increased superoxide production by NADPH oxidase and altered endothelial NO synthase (NOS3) phosphorylation determine endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. Experiments tested if NO/cGMP signaling and NOS3 serine phosphorylation are decreased and NADPH oxidase activity is increased in mesenteric arteries from deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rats compared with arteries from placebo rats. Concentration response curves to phenylephrine were performed in mesenteric arteries in the presence and absence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (LNA) and antioxidants to determine the influence of basal NO and superoxide production on vascular tone. LNA increased phenylephrine sensitivity in arteries from placebo, but not DOCA-salt rats, regardless of antioxidant treatment. To determine basal cGMP production, mesenteric arteries were incubated with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in the presence or absence of LNA, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), antioxidants, or tetrahydrobiopterin. NOS-dependent cGMP production was reduced in arteries from DOCA-salt rats compared with arteries from placebo rats and was not restored by acute treatment with antioxidants or tetrahydrobiopterin. SNP-induced cGMP production was similar between groups as was NADPH oxidase activity, measured by lucigenin chemiluminescence, in mesenteric arteries. Expression and phosphorylation of NOS3 were examined by Western blotting. Phosphorylation of NOS3 was decreased in arteries from DOCA-salt rats compared with placebo at serine residues 1179 and 635. These findings indicate that diminished NO/cGMP signaling in mesenteric arteries from DOCA-salt rats is caused by reduced phosphorylation of NOS3 at serine 1179 and serine 635, rather than NO scavenging by superoxide. PMID:14993198

  7. The mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising from contracting muscles evoke the exercise pressor reflex. This reflex is greater in a rat model of simulated peripheral arterial disease in which a femoral artery is chronically ligated than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The role played by the mechanically sensitive component of the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in ligated rats is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4, a relatively selective inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the pressor response to Achilles tendon stretch (a purely mechanical stimulus) but had no effect on the pressor responses to intra-arterial injection of α,β-methylene ATP or lactic acid (purely metabolic stimuli). Moreover, injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced both the integrated pressor area (control 535 ± 21, GsMTx4 218 ± 24 mmHg·s; P < 0.01), peak pressor (control 29 ± 2, GsMTx4 14 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.01), and renal sympathetic nerve responses to electrically induced intermittent hindlimb muscle contraction (a mixed mechanical and metabolic stimulus). The reduction of the integrated pressor area during contraction caused by GsMTx4 was greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it was in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that the mechanically sensitive component of the reflex contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex during intermittent hindlimb muscle contractions in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:26921442

  8. Osthole relaxes pulmonary arteries through endothelial phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-eNOS-NO signaling pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Lu, Ping; Li, Yumei; Yang, Lijing; Feng, Hongxuan; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Dandan; Chen, Jianguo; Zhu, Daling

    2013-01-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a life-threatening disease lacking effective therapies. Osthole is a natural coumarin compound isolated from Angelica pubescens Maxim., which possesses hypotensive effect. Although its effects on isolated thoracic aorta (systemic circulating system) are clarified, it remains unclear whether Osthole relaxes isolated pulmonary arteries (PAs) (pulmonary circulating system). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Osthole on isolated PAs and the underlying mechanisms. We examined PA relaxation induced by Osthole in isolated human and rat PA rings with force-electricity transducers, the expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and protein kinase B (Akt) with western blot, and nitric oxide (NO) production using DAF-FM DA fluorescent indicator. The results showed that Osthole elicited a dose-dependent vasorelaxation activity with phenylephrine-precontracted human and rat PA rings, which can be diminished by endothelium denudation and inhibition of eNOS, while having no effect on rat mesenteric arteries. Osthole increased NO release as well as activation of Akt and eNOS, indicated with increased phosphorylations of Akt at Ser-473 and eNOS at Ser-1177 in endothelial cells. PI3K inhibitor LY294002 also blocked Osthole induced vasodilation. In summary, dilative effect of Osthole was dependent on endothelial integrity and NO production, and was mediated by endothelial PI3K/Akt-eNOS-NO pathway. These may provide a new pulmonary vasodilator for the therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:23220709

  9. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries. PMID:26987272

  10. Abnormal uterine artery remodelling in the stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rat

    PubMed Central

    Small, Heather Y.; Morgan, Hannah; Beattie, Elisabeth; Griffin, Sinead; Indahl, Marie; Delles, Christian; Graham, Delyth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) is an established model of human cardiovascular risk. We sought to characterise the uteroplacental vascular response to pregnancy in this model and determine whether this is affected by the pre-existing maternal hypertension. Methods Doppler ultrasound and myography were utilised to assess uterine artery functional and structural changes pre-pregnancy and at gestational day 18 in SHRSP (untreated and nifedipine treated) and in the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. Maternal adaptations to pregnancy were also assessed along with histology and expression of genes involved in oxidative stress in the placenta. Results SHRSP uterine arteries had a pulsatile blood flow and were significantly smaller (70906 ± 3903 μm2 vs. 95656 ± 8524 μm2 cross-sectional area; p < 0.01), had a significant increase in contractile response (57.3 ± 10.5 kPa vs 27.7 ± 1.9 kPa; p < 0.01) and exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation (58.0 ± 5.9% vs 13.9 ± 4.6%; p < 0.01) compared to WKY. Despite significant blood pressure lowering, nifedipine did not improve uterine artery remodelling, function or blood flow in SHRSP. Maternal plasma sFLT-1/PlGF ratio (5.3 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.1; p < 0.01) and the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (1.9 ± 0.2 vs 0.6 ± 0.1; p < 0.01) was increased in SHRSP vs WKY. The SHRSP placenta had a significant reduction in glycogen cell content and an increase in Hif1α, Sod1 and Vegf. Discussion We conclude that the SHRSP exhibits a number of promising characteristics as a model of spontaneous deficient uteroplacental remodelling that adversely affect pregnancy outcome, independent of pre-existing hypertension. PMID:26612342

  11. Effect of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha on the newborn rat pulmonary arterial muscle and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Belik, J; Jankov, R P; Pan, J; Yi, M; Pace-Asciak, C R; Tanswell, A K

    2003-11-01

    8-Isoprostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha) is a bioactive lipid peroxidation product that is a vasoconstrictor at high concentrations. Paradoxically, at lower, and possibly physiological, concentrations, it is a pulmonary vascular muscle's relaxant. Its effects on newborn pulmonary vasculature are unknown. We hypothesized that the pulmonary arterial 8-iso-PGF2alpha responses may be developmentally regulated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare 8-iso-PGF2alpha effects between 1- and 2-wk-old newborn and adult rat isolated intrapulmonary arteries (100 microm) mounted on a myograph. Force after 8-iso-PGF2alpha stimulation was greatest in the adult (P < 0.01). In newborns, force was significantly increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) (P < 0.01) and was suppressed by blockade of the thromboxane (Tx) A2 receptor. Whereas 8-iso-PGF2alpha induced a significant dose-dependent relaxation of adult precontracted vessels in the presence of a TxA2 mimetic (U-46619; 1 microM), contraction was observed in the 1-wk-old rat. This 8-iso-PGF2alpha-induced contraction was abolished by endothelium removal and l-NAME and was attenuated by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen. In the presence of a TxA2/prostaglandin H2 receptor blocker, 8-iso-PGF2alpha induced NO-mediated relaxation, the magnitude of which was greater in the newborn, compared with the adult (P < 0.01). When exposed to 8-iso-PGF2alpha in vitro, only the newborn lung secreted TxB2. We conclude that, in contrast to its relaxant effect in the adult, 8-iso-PGF2alpha induces contraction of the pulmonary arteries in the early postnatal period, which is likely to be mediated by endothelium-derived TxA2. This phenomenon may contribute to the maintenance of a higher pulmonary vascular resistance in the early postnatal period. PMID:12857766

  12. NCX 4016, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin, modulates adrenergic vasoconstriction in the perfused rat tail artery

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Giuseppe; Manfredi, Barbara; Soldato, Piero Del; Berti, Ferruccio

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin, NCX 4016, to control vasoconstrictor responses induced by electrical field stimulation (TNS) or by exogenous norepinephrine (NE) was investigated in perfused rat tail artery with intact endothelium. NCX 4016 (25, 50 and 100 μM) dose-dependently antagonized the vasoconstriction caused by TNS (from 0.5 to 64 Hz) and by NE (from 0.01 to 10 μM). The vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016 (100 μM) in NE-precontracted arteries was concomitant with a marked increase of tissue cyclic GMP (4.9 fold, P<0.001) and was significantly antagonized by the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, methylene blue and 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. The effect of NCX 4016 was endothelium NO-independent since, in preparations perfused with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (10 μM), this compound prevented the rise in basal perfusion pressure and reversed the accentuation of vasoconstrictor responses caused by NO synthase inhibition. Aspirin-moiety released by NCX 4016 inhibited the 6-keto-PGF1α formation without interfering with the vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016, while aspirin (100 μM) was devoid of any activity against vasoconstriction induced by both TNS and NE in perfused rat tail artery. NCX 4016 moderated adrenergic vasoconstriction in perfused rat tail arteries by a direct donation of NO without involving the relaxant factors such as PGI2 and NO from endothelial cells. The results obtained with NCX 4016 in perfused rat tail artery bears some therapeutical potential in conditions associated with vascular smooth muscle hyperreactivity to adrenergic stimulation. PMID:12208780

  13. Arterial morphology responds differently to Captopril then N-acetylcysteine in a monocrotaline rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert; Wu, Qingping; Baumgardt, Shelley; Kohlhepp, Laura; Shingrani, Rahul; Krenz, Gary

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an incurable condition inevitably resulting in death because of increased right heart workload and eventual failure. PH causes pulmonary vascular remodeling, including muscularization of the arteries, and a reduction in the typically large vascular compliance of the pulmonary circulation. We used a rat model of monocrotaline (MCT) induced PH to evaluated and compared Captopril (an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor with antioxidant capacity) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a mucolytic with a large antioxidant capacity) as possible treatments. Twenty-eight days after MCT injection, the rats were sacrificed and heart, blood, and lungs were studied to measure indices such as right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), hematocrit, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), vessel morphology and biomechanics. We implemented microfocal X-ray computed tomography to image the pulmonary arterial tree at intravascular pressures of 30, 21, 12, and 6 mmHg and then used automated vessel detection and measurement algorithms to perform morphological analysis and estimate the distensibility of the arterial tree. The vessel detection and measurement algorithms quickly and effectively mapped and measured the vascular trees at each intravascular pressure. Monocrotaline treatment, and the ensuing PH, resulted in a significantly decreased arterial distensibility, increased PVR, and tended to decrease the length of the main pulmonary trunk. In rats with PH induced by monocrotaline, Captopril treatment significantly increased arterial distensibility and decrease PVR. NAC treatment did not result in an improvement, it did not significantly increase distensibility and resulted in further increase in PVR. Interestingly, NAC tended to increase peripheral vascular density. The results suggest that arterial distensibility may be more important than distal collateral pathways in maintaining PVR at normally low values.

  14. F 15845, a new blocker of the persistent sodium current prevents consequences of hypoxia in rat femoral artery

    PubMed Central

    Bocquet, A; Sablayrolles, S; Vacher, B; Le Grand, B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The persistent sodium current is involved in myocardial ischaemia and is selectively inhibited by the newly described 3-(R)-[3-(2-methoxyphenylthio-2-(S)-methylpropyl]amino-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,5-benzoxathiepine bromhydrate (F 15845). Here, we describe the pharmacological profile of F 15845 against the effects of hypoxia in femoral arteries in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Isometric tension measurement of rat isolated femoral arteries was used to characterize the protective effect of F 15845 against contraction of the vessels induced by veratrine (100 µg·mL−1) or hypoxia. KEY RESULTS Rat femoral artery expressed the Nav1.5 channel isoform. When exposed to veratrine (100 µg·mL−1), vessels developed a rapid and strong contraction that was abolished by both absence of sodium and blockade of the Na+/Ca++ exchanger by KB-R7943 (10 and 32 µmol·L−1) or treatment with F 15845. When used before veratrine exposure, the potency of F 15845 depended on the extracellular K+ concentration (IC50 = 11 and 0.77 µmol·L−1 for 5 and 20 mmol·L−1 KCl, respectively), whereas its potency was unaffected by extracellular K+ concentration when given after veratrine. F 15845 did not affect either KCl (80 mmol·L−1) or phenylephrine-induced femoral artery contraction. Moreover, endothelium disruption did not affect the protective effect of F 15845 against veratrine-induced femoral artery contraction, suggesting a mechanism of action dependent on smooth muscle cells. Finally, F 15845 prevented in a concentration-dependent manner rat femoral artery contraction induced by hypoxia. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS F 15845, a selective blocker of the persistent sodium current prevented vascular contraction induced by hypoxic conditions. PMID:20735424

  15. Electrophysiological characterization of the cerebellum in the arterially perfused hindbrain and upper body of the rat.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Nadia L; Rawson, John A; Apps, Richard

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, a non-pulsatile arterially perfused hindbrain and upper body rat preparation is described which is an extension of the brainstem preparation reported by Potts et al., (Brain Res Bull 53(1):59-67), 1. The modified in situ preparation allows study of cerebellar function whilst preserving the integrity of many of its interconnections with the brainstem, upper spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system of the head and forelimbs. Evoked mossy fibre, climbing fibre and parallel fibre field potentials and EMG activity elicited in forelimb biceps muscle by interpositus stimulation provided evidence that both cerebellar inputs and outputs remain operational in this preparation. Similarly, the spontaneous and evoked single unit activity of Purkinje cells, putative Golgi cells, molecular interneurones and cerebellar nuclear neurones was similar to activity patterns reported in vivo. The advantages of the preparation include the ability to record, without the complications of anaesthesia, stabile single unit activity for extended periods (3 h or more), from regions of the rat cerebellum that are difficult to access in vivo. The preparation should therefore be a useful adjunct to in vitro and in vivo studies of neural circuits underlying cerebellar contributions to movement control and motor learning. PMID:20033360

  16. MRI-derived arterial input functions for PET kinetic modelling in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition provides the high temporal and spatial resolution of MRI with the specificity of PET. In PET, accurate modelling of physiological function in vivo requires the time-activity curve of tracer in blood plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). As the gold standard method of blood sampling is inherently prohibitive in the small animal case, here we discuss how we prepare to rapidly sample MRI signals from gadolinium-doped tracer to obtain the tracer input functions from a simultaneous PET-MR measurement. ΔR2* measurements taken from EPI images were used to obtain first pass bolus AIFs in the rat brain from DSC-MRI datasets of 5 rats. AIFs obtained using our automatic algorithm were found to be consistent between animals and compared well with manual methods without need for a priori voxel selection. A variable flip angle FLASH sequence used for T1 mapping was successfully tested in a phantom study, providing accurate measurements of Gd concentration.

  17. Carvacrol Exerts Neuroprotective Effects Via Suppression of the Inflammatory Response in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlan; Hua, Cong; Pan, Xiaoqiang; Fu, Xijia; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation plays an important role in cerebral ischemia. Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, is naturally occurring in various plants belonging to the family Lamiaceae and exerts protective effects in a mice model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing infarct volume and decreasing the expression of cleaved caspase-3. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms by which carvacrol protect the brain have yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on inflammatory reaction and inflammatory mediators in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The results of the present study showed that carvacrol inhibited the levels of inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2. It also increased SOD activity and decreased MDA level in ischemic cortical tissues. In addition, carvacrol treatment suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase in the protein expression of nuclear NF-kB p65. In conclusion, we have shown that carvacrol inhibits the inflammatory response via inhibition of the NF-kB signaling pathway in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, carvacrol may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27324156

  18. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  19. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  20. Heterotopic auxiliary rat liver transplantation with flow-regulated portal vein arterialization in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.(1-3) The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.(4) In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.(5-6) We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor's portal vein was carried out via the recipient's right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient's aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. (7) In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft's weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  1. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  2. Activin A increases arterial pressure in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in rats by angiotension II.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingyan; Fan, Yuqi; Lu, Yaqiong; Qi, Yan; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Zhonghui

    2016-06-15

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an important role in the central nervous system as a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the central nervous system is characterized as an important integrative site to regulate arterial pressure (AP). However, whether activin A in the PVN is involved in the regulation of AP is not well characterized. This study aimed to determine the effect of activin A on AP in the PVN in rats. The results showed that activin βA, activin type IIA and IIB receptors (ActRIIA and ActRIIB), and Smad2 and Smad3 mRNA expressions were detectable in the PVN of WKY rats by reverse-transcription PCR, and the expression of ActRIIA protein in the PVN was further confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. A microinjection of angiotensin II (AngII) (0.1 nmol/100 nl) or activin A (2 ng/100 nl) into the PVN increased AP significantly in WKY rats (P<0.05). Moreover, activin A (5 ng/ml) promoted AngII release from the primary cultured PVN neurons that can increase AP and upregulated the expressions of ActRIIA and Smad3 mRNA in the primary cultured PVN neurons (P<0.05). These data suggest that activin A can regulate AP in the PVN in an autocrine or a paracrine manner, which is related to AngII release and the ActRIIA-Smad3 signal pathway. PMID:27138952

  3. Effects of various combinations of benzodiazepines with buprenorphine on arterial blood gases in rats.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Stéphane O; Mégarbane, Bruno; Borron, Stephen W; Risède, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Ricordel, Ivan; Baud, Frédéric J

    2008-09-01

    Fatalities have been attributed to combinations of high-dose buprenorphine with benzodiazepines. In rats, high-dose buprenorphine combined with midazolam was shown to induce sustained respiratory acidosis, while buprenorphine alone did not. However, the effects of buprenorphine combined with pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines remain unknown. Our objective was to compare the acute effects of four selected benzodiazepines used intravenously at equi-efficacious doses in rats, alone and in combination with buprenorphine on sedation, respiratory rate and arterial blood gases. Buprenorphine (30 mg/kg) did not significantly modify sedation level or respiratory rate, but induced mild and transient effects on pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05). Similarly, despite having no effects on respiratory rate, nordiazepam (10 mg/kg), bromazepam (1 mg/kg) and oxazepam (12 mg/kg) mildly and transiently altered pH and PaCO(2) (P < 0.05), whereas clonazepam (5 mg/kg) did not. Buprenorphine combined with each benzodiazepine induced no significant effects on respiratory rate or blood gases, in comparison with buprenorphine alone. However, combinations of oxazepam or nordiazepam with buprenorphine significantly deepened sedation. While both combinations reduced respiratory rate, buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg clonazepam significantly increased PaCO(2) and buprenorphine + 30 mg/kg nordiazepam decreased PaO(2). In conclusion, not all benzodiazepines induce significant respiratory depression at therapeutic doses. We were unable to demonstrate significant effects on rat ventilatory parameters of buprenorphine combined with equi-efficacious pharmacological doses of benzodiazepines in comparison with buprenorphine alone. Our results may suggest that effects of these combinations are rather mild. Respiratory failure may, however, result from the association of buprenorphine with elevated doses of benzodiazepines. PMID:18684226

  4. Estrogens are needed for the improvement in endothelium-mediated dilation induced by a chronic increase in blood flow in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Tarhouni, K; Guihot, A L; Vessieres, E; Procaccio, V; Grimaud, L; Abraham, P; Lenfant, F; Arnal, J F; Favre, J; Loufrani, L; Henrion, D

    2016-05-01

    Resistance arteries play a key role in the control of local blood flow. They undergo outward remodeling in response to a chronic increase in blood flow as seen in collateral artery growth in ischemic disorders. We have previously shown that mesenteric artery outward remodeling depends on the endothelial estrogen receptor alpha. As outward arterial remodeling is associated with improved endothelium-dependent dilation, we hypothesized that estrogens might also play a role in flow-mediated improvement of endothelium-dependent dilation. Local increase in blood flow in first order mesenteric arteries was obtained after ligation of adjacent arteries in three-month old ovariectomized female rats treated with 17-beta-estradiol (OVX+E2) or vehicle (OVX). After 2 weeks, diameter was equivalent in high flow (HF) than in normal flow (NF) arteries with a greater wall to lumen ratio in HF vessels in OVX rats. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was lower in HF than in NF vessels. eNOS and caveolin-1 expression level was equivalent in HF and NF arteries. By contrast, arterial diameter was 30% greater in HF than in NF arteries and the wall to lumen ratio was not changed in OVX+E2 rats. Acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was higher in HF than in NF arteries. The expression level of eNOS was higher and that of caveolin-1 was lower in HF than in NF arteries. Acetylcholine (NO-dependent)-mediated relaxation was partly inhibited by the NO-synthesis blocker L-NAME in OVX rats whereas L-NAME blocked totally the relaxation in OVX+E2 rats. Endothelium-independent relaxation (sodium nitroprusside) was equivalent in OXV and OVX+E2 rats. Similarly, serotonin- and phenylephrine-mediated contractions were higher in HF than in NF arteries in both OVX and OVX+E2 rats in association with high ratio of phosphorylated ERK1/2 to ERK1/2. Thus, we demonstrated the essential role of endogenous E2 in flow-mediated improvement of endothelium (NO)-mediated dilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. PMID:26471832

  5. The vertebrobasilar arterial system in guinea pig as compared with dog and human.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Michalska, E

    1998-01-01

    The arterial system formed by branches of the vertebral and basilar arteries in guinea pig was compared to that of dog and human. The vertebrobasilar arterial system in particular species shows similarities and differences, considering its structure and arising branches. The differences are mainly due to the length of the basilar artery. In guinea pig the vertebrobasilar system distribute blood to the 2/3 of the brain. The same distribution is in dog. In human the carotid system predominates in the supply of the brain. PMID:9835170

  6. Lower brainstem dysfunction in an infant with persistent primitive trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Tohru; Saito, Yoshiaki; Miki, Shiho; Nagaishi, Jun-Ichi; Hanaki, Keiichi; Tomita, Yutaka; Fukuda, Chisako; Fujii, Shinya; Fujiwara, Kazunori; Kawamoto, Katsuyuki; Hata, Fumiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2007-04-01

    A 6-month-old boy with persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) presented with stridor, dysphagia, delayed motor development and postural neck and shoulder dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging/angiography and ultrasonography revealed PPTA, with flow from the dilated basilar artery to the right internal carotid artery, lower brainstem compression by the dilated basilar artery, and cerebellar vermis hypoplasia. Evoked potentials showed lower pons and medulla oblongata functional disruption. These lesions may be related to vascular etiology in the lower brainstem or to congenital malformation syndrome involving infratentorial structures. The relationship of this condition to Möbius syndrome is discussed. PMID:17008040

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke on canonical transient receptor potential expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuqin; Lin, Chunyi; Jia, Jing; Tian, Lichun; Yang, Kai; Zhao, Lei; Lai, Ning; Jiang, Qian; Sun, Yueqian; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary hypertension and furthermore provide effective targets for prevention and treatment, the effects of chronic CS on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle in vivo and nicotine treatment on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in vitro were investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that chronic CS exposure led to rat weight loss, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial remodeling. A fluorescence microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in rat distal PASMCs. Results showed that basal [Ca2+]i and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) levels in PASMCs from 3- and 6-mo CS-exposed rats were markedly higher than those in cells from the unexposed control animals (the increases in 6-mo CS group were more significant than that in 3-mo group), accompanied with increased canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) and TRPC6 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in isolated distal PA. Simultaneously, in vitro study showed that nicotine treatment (10 nM) significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i and SOCE and upregulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in cultured rat distal PASMCs. TRPC siRNA knockdown strategies revealed that the elevations of basal [Ca2+]i and SOCE induced by nicotine in PASMCs were TRPC1 and TRPC6 dependent. These results suggested that chronic CS-induced changes in vascular tone and structure in PA and the development of pulmonary hypertension might be largely due to upregulation of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in PASMCs, in which nicotine played an important role. PMID:24336649

  8. Estimation of pulmonary arterial volume changes in the normal and hypertensive fawn-hooded rat from 3D micro-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Wietholt, Christian; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2002-04-01

    In the study of pulmonary vascular remodeling, much can be learned from observing the morphological changes undergone in the pulmonary arteries of the rat lung when exposed to chronic hypoxia or other challenges which elicit a remodeling response. Remodeling effects include thickening of vessel walls, and loss of wall compliance. Morphometric data can be used to localize the hemodynamic and functional consequences. We developed a CT imaging method for measuring the pulmonary arterial tree over a range of pressures in rat lungs. X-ray micro-focal isotropic volumetric imaging of the arterial tree in the intact rat lung provides detailed information on the size, shape and mechanical properties of the arterial network. In this study, we investigate the changes in arterial volume with step changes in pressure for both normoxic and hypoxic Fawn-Hooded (FH) rats. We show that FH rats exposed to hypoxia tend to have reduced arterial volume changes for the same preload when compared to FH controls. A secondary objective of this work is to quantify various phenotypes to better understand the genetic contribution of vascular remodeling in the lungs. This volume estimation method shows promise in high throughput phenotyping, distinguishing differences in the pulmonary hypertensive rat model.

  9. 3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol reduces vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Young; Seok, Young Mi; Woodman, Owen L; Williams, Spencer J; Kim, In Kyeom

    2012-02-01

    3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol (DiOHF) exerts endothelium-independent relaxation in rat aortic rings. In this study, we hypothesized that DiOHF reduces vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries. The third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries were permeabilized with β-escin and subjected to tension measurement. Cumulative addition of phenylephrine (0.3-30 μM) produced concentration-dependent vascular contraction of endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded arterial rings, which were inhibited by pretreatment with DiOHF (10, 30, or 100 μM). In addition, DiOHF dose-dependently decreased vascular contractions induced by 3.0 μM phenylephrine. β-Escin-permeabilized third-order branches of mesenteric arteries were contracted with Ca²⁺, NaF, or guanosine-5'-(γ-thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) 30 min after pretreatment with DiOHF or vehicle. Pretreatment with DiOHF for 30 min inhibited vascular contraction induced by cumulative additions of Ca²⁺ (pCa 9.0-6.0) or NaF (4.0-16.0 mM) in permeabilized arterial rings. Cumulative addition of DiOHF also reduced vascular contraction induced by Ca²⁺-controlled solution of pCa 6.0, 16.0 mM NaF, or 100 μM GTPγS in permeabilized arterial rings. DiOHF inhibited the increase in vascular tension provoked by calyculin A, even though it did not affect vascular tension already produced by calyculin A. DiOHF accelerated the relaxation induced by rapidly lowering Ca²⁺. DiOHF reduced vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries. These results suggest that DiOHF may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21993847

  10. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  11. Differential Measurement of Basilar Membrane Vibration in Sensitive Gerbil Cochleae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2009-02-01

    Basilar membrane vibrations in the transverse direction were measured at two longitudinal locations using a laser interferometer. The magnitude transfer function of the cochlear partition between the two locations was obtained by calculating the ratio of the vibration magnitude at the apical location to that at the basal location as a function of the stimulus frequencies. Measured differential transfer function showed a response peak at a frequency below the best frequency of the apical location with a magnitude >1, and the minimum magnitude near the best frequency of the basal location with an amplitude as small as 0.01. These data indicate that the cochlea achieves its high sensitivity, sharp tuning, and nonlinearity through amplification and attenuation of basilar membrane vibration.

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Are Involved in Regulating Hypocontractility of Mesenteric Artery to Norepinephrine in Cirrhotic Rats with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liu, De-Jun; Huo, Yan-Miao; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress is involved in the hypocontractility of visceral artery to vasoconstrictors and formation of hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhosis with portal hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the mesenteric artery contractility in CCl4-induced cirrhotic rats, and the roles of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) desensitization and RhoA /Rho associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) pathways. Methods: The mesenteric artery contraction to norepinephrine (NE) was determined by vessel perfusion system following treatments with apocynin, tempol or PEG-catalase. The protein expression of α1 adrenergic receptor, β-arrestin-2, ROCK-1, moesin and p-moesin was measured by western blot. The interaction between α1 adrenergic receptor and β-arrestin-2 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. Results: Pretreatment with apocynin or PEG-catalase in cirrhotic rats, the hydrogen peroxide level in the mesenteric arteriole was significantly decreased, and the dose-response curve of mesenteric arteriole to NE moved to the left with EC50 decreased. There was no significant change for the expression of α1 adrenergic receptor. However, the protein expression of β-arrestin-2 and its affinity with α1 adrenergic receptor were significantly decreased. The ROCK-1 activity and anti- Y-27632 inhibition in cirrhotic rats increased significantly with the protein expression unchanged. Such effects were not observed in tempol-treated group. Conclusion: The H2O2 decrease in mesenteric artery from rats with cirrhosis resulted in down regulation of the β-arrestin-2 expression and its binding ability with α1 adrenergic receptor, thereby affecting the agonist-induced ROCK activation and improving the contractile response in blood vessels. PMID:24719556

  13. In vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" phenomenon in rat arterial bloodstream: a preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-07-01

    The "black hole," a hypo-echoic hole at the center of the bloodstream surrounded by a hyper-echoic zone in cross-sectional views, has been observed in ultrasound backscattering measurements of blood with red blood cell aggregation in in vitro studies. We investigated whether the phenomenon occurs in the in vivo arterial bloodstream of rats using a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. Longitudinal and cross-sectional ultrasound images of the rat common carotid artery (CCA) and abdominal aorta were obtained using a 40-MHz ultrasound system. A high-frame-rate retrospective imaging mode was employed to precisely examine the dynamic changes in blood echogenicity in the arteries. When the imaging was performed with non-invasive scanning, blood echogenicity was very low in the CCA as compared with the surrounding tissues, exhibiting no hypo-echoic zone at the center of the vessel. Invasive imaging of the CCA by incising the skin and subcutaneous tissues at the imaging area provided clearer and brighter blood echo images, showing the "black hole" phenomenon near the center of the vessel in longitudinal view. The "black hole" was also observed in the abdominal aorta under direct imaging after laparotomy. The aortic "black hole" was clearly observed in both longitudinal and cross-sectional views. Although the "black hole" was always observed near the center of the arteries during the diastolic phase, it dissipated or was off-center along with the asymmetric arterial wall dilation at systole. In conclusion, we report the first in vivo observation of the hypo-echoic "black hole" caused by the radial variation of red blood cell aggregation in arterial bloodstream. PMID:24785440

  14. Tunicamycin-Induced Alterations in the Vasorelaxant Response in Organ-Cultured Superior Mesenteric Arteries of Rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Ando, Makoto; Watanabe, Shun; Iguchi, Maika; Nagata, Mako; Kobayashi, Shota; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In cellular events, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has an important role in the development of various diseases including cardiovascular diseases. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation, is known to be an inducer of ER stress. However, the extent to which tunicamycin affects the vasorelaxant function is not completely understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of tunicamycin on relaxations induced by various vasorelaxant agents, including acetylcholine (ACh; endothelium-dependent vasodilator), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; endothelium-independent vasodilator), isoprenaline (ISO; beta-adrenoceptor agonist), forskolin (FSK; adenylyl cyclase activator), and cromakalim [ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel activator] in organ-cultured superior mesenteric arteries of rats, which are treated with either a vehicle [dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)] or tunicamycin (20 µg/mL for 22-24 h). Protein levels of the ER stress marker binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) were determined by Western blotting. Tunicamycin increased the expression of BiP in organ-cultured arteries. Tunicamycin impaired ACh-induced relaxation, but did not alter SNP-induced relaxation. Tunicamycin also impaired vasorelaxation induced by ISO, FSK, and cromakalim; moreover, it reduced basal nitric oxide (NO) formation. In conclusion, short-term treatment with tunicamycin not only caused endothelial dysfunction but also impaired cAMP- and KATP-mediated responses in the superior mesenteric arteries of rats. These alterations in tunicamycin-treated arteries may be due to reduced basal NO formation. This work provides new insight into ER stress in vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582328

  15. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  16. Overexpression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and in balloon-injured carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Daum, G; Forough, R; Clowes, M; Walter, U; Clowes, A W

    1998-05-01

    Endothelial cells in normal blood vessels might prevent the unscheduled proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by the expression of cell migration and growth inhibitors. NO, a potent vasodilator, generated by endothelium-specific constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) might be such an inhibitor. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed human ecNOS in syngeneic rat arterial SMCs using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. Compared with SMCs transduced with vector alone (LXSN SMCs), DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were inhibited in the ecNOS-expressing SMCs (LCNSN SMCs). Basal and stimulated (by the calcium ionophore A23187) secretion of NO and intracellular cGMP were increased in LCNSN SMCs. Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), an inhibitor of NO synthesis, enhanced the proliferation of LCNSN SMCs but had no effect on LXSN SMCs. LCNSN SMCs seeded onto the luminal surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries inhibited neointimal formation by 37% and induced marked dilatation (3-fold increase in vessel diameter) at 2 weeks compared with LXSN SMC-seeded arteries. Orally administered L-NA blocked these changes. Phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, which is regulated in part by NO, was elevated in LCNSN SMCs and in LCNSN SMC-seeded arteries. This study demonstrates that NO generation by ecNOS inhibits SMC proliferation in vitro and modulates vascular tone locally in vivo. PMID:9576106

  17. Systolic aortic pressure-time area is a useful index describing arterial wave properties in rats with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Yu, Hsi-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ming; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of arterial wave properties in terms of arterial wave transit time (τw) and wave reflection factor (Rf) requires simultaneous records of aortic pressure and flow signals. However, in clinical practice, it will be helpful to describe the pulsatile ventricular afterload using less-invasive parameters if possible. We investigated the possibility of systolic aortic pressure-time area (PTAs), calculated from the measured aortic pressure alone, acting as systolic workload imposed on the rat diabetic heart. Arterial wave reflections were derived using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. The cardiovascular condition in the rats with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes was characterized by (1) an elevation in PTAs; and (2) an increase in Rf and decrease in τw. We found that an inverse linear correlation between PTAs and arterial τw reached significance (τw = 38.5462 - 0.0022 × PTAs; r = 0.7708, P < 0.0001). By contrast, as the PTAs increased, the reflection intensity increased: Rf = -0.5439 + 0.0002 × PTAs; r = 0.8701; P <0 .0001. All these findings suggested that as diabetes stiffened aortas, the augmented aortic PTAs might act as a useful index describing the diabetes-related deterioration in systolic ventricular workload. PMID:26620634

  18. Vasodilator actions of abnormal-cannabidiol in rat isolated small mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa Ho, W-S; Hiley, C Robin

    2003-01-01

    The nonpsychoactive cannabinoid abnormal-cannabidiol (trans-4-[3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) (abn-cbd) produced concentration-dependent relaxation of methoxamine-precontracted rat small mesenteric artery. Endothelial removal reduced abn-cbd potency six-fold without affecting the maximum relaxation. In endothelium-intact vessels, abn-cbd was less potent under 60 mM KCl-induced tone and inhibited by combination of L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor; 300 μM), apamin (small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels inhibitor; 50 nM) and charybdotoxin (inhibitor of intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BKCa; 50 nM). L-NAME alone or in combination with either toxin alone had little effect. In intact vessels, relaxations to abn-cbd were inhibited by SR 141716A (cannabinoid receptor antagonist; 1 or 3 μM). Concomitant addition of L-NAME, apamin and charybdotoxin had no further effect. Other cannabinoid receptor antagonists either had little (SR 144528; 1 μM and AM 251; 1 μM) or no effect (AM 630; 10 μM and AM 281; 1 μM). Inhibition of gap junctions, Gi/o protein coupling and protein kinase A also had no effect. Endothelium-independent relaxation to abn-cbd was unaffected by L-NAME, apamin plus charybdotoxin or capsaicin (10 μM). Abn-cbd inhibited CaCl2-induced contractions in vessels with depleted intracellular Ca2+ stores and stimulated with methoxamine or KCl. This was insensitive to SR 141716A (3 μM) but greatly reduced in vessels stimulated with ionomycin (Ca2+ ionophore; 1 μM). We conclude that abn-cbd relaxes the rat small mesenteric artery by endothelium-dependent activation of K+ channels via SR 141716A-sensitive pathways, which do not involve CB1 and CB2 receptors. It also causes endothelium-independent, SR 141716A-insensitive, relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. PMID:12711633

  19. Vasorelaxant effects of oleamide in rat small mesenteric artery indicate action at a novel cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Pui Man; Hiley, C Robin

    2006-03-01

    Oleamide (cis-9-octadecenoamide) exhibits some cannabimimetic responses despite its low affinities at the currently known cannabinoid receptors. Here we have investigated whether or not it is a vasorelaxant in rat small mesenteric arteries. Oleamide elicited vasorelaxation (EC50=1.2+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=99.1+/-3.9%, n=8) which was reduced by endothelial removal. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduced the response (EC50=5.3+/-1.6 microM, Rmax=59.2+/-7.7%, n=7; P<0.01) as did blockade of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KCa) with apamin plus charybdotoxin (both 50 nM) (EC50=2.1+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=58.4+/-1.9%, n=5; P<0.05). Desensitisation of vanilloid receptors with capsaicin (10 microM for 30 min) shifted the oleamide concentration-response curve approximately 30-fold to the right (n=7; P<0.01). Pertussis toxin (400 ng ml-1 for 2 h) caused a two-fold shift in the response curve (EC50=2.2+/-0.4 microM, Rmax=66.8+/-4.5%, n=6; P<0.01). Rimonabant (CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; SR141716A; 3 microM) significantly inhibited relaxation induced by oleamide (EC50=3.5+/-0.3 microM, Rmax=75.1+/-1.9%; n=8; P<0.05). In contrast, neither the more selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (1 microM), nor the CB2 antagonist, SR144528 (1 microM), had significant effects. O-1918 (10 microM), a putative antagonist at a novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (abnormal-cannabidiol site), markedly reduced the relaxation to oleamide (n=7; P<0.01). It is concluded that oleamide responses in the rat isolated small mesenteric artery are partly dependent on the presence of the endothelium, activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KC)) and involve capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Oleamide may share a receptor (sensitive to rimonabant and O-1918, and coupled to KC) and Gi/o) with anandamide in this vessel. This might be distinct from both of the known cannabinoid receptors and the novel abnormal-cannabidiol site. PMID:16415907

  20. Only weak vasorelaxant properties of loop diuretics in isolated resistance arteries from man, rat and guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Pickkers, Peter; Russel, Frans G M; Thien, Theo; Hughes, Alun D; Smits, Paul

    2003-04-18

    Besides their diuretic action, loop diuretics may induce a rapid vasodilator effect that contribute to their short-term therapeutic properties. We examined the effects of furosemide (10(-6)-10(-3) mol l(-1)) in comparison with bumetanide (10(-6)-10(-4) mol l(-1)) on isolated resistance arteries from rat and guinea pig mesentery and human subcutaneous fat, and investigated the mechanism of the acute direct vasorelaxant action on an isometric microvascular myograph. Both loop diuretics induced concentration-dependent relaxation of resistance vessels irrespective of membrane potential. The maximal effect of furosemide was greatest in rat and least in human arteries. Both diuretics caused a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve to extracellular Ca(2+). Incubation with indomethacin (2 x 10(-5) mol l(-1)) or mechanical removal of the endothelium did not inhibit the loop diuretic-induced relaxation. At high concentrations (10(-4)-10(-3) mol l(-1)) loop diuretics exert only weak direct relaxant effects on isolated human subcutaneous resistance arteries compared to the vasorelaxant effects in rat and guinea pig mesenteric vessels. PMID:12694811

  1. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  2. Adipose-derived stromal cell autologous transplantation ameliorates pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by shunt flow in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Guangqing; Sun, Hourong; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Shuming

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkinetic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) severely influences the success of operation for congenital heart disease and deteriorates the prognosis of disease. Adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) is a good alternative multipotent stem cell for regeneration medicine. PAH rat models were established by arteriovenous shunt and ADSCs were isolated, cultured, and labeled in vitro. Twelve weeks after shunt operation, rats received an injection of 5 × 10(7) ADSCs. Two weeks after transplantation, hemodynamic abnormality induced by the shunt flow and the hypertrophy of right ventricle were reversed, which was confirmed by invasive measurement and echocardiography examination. The PAH rats receiving cell transplantation demonstrated decreased remodeling of small arteries in the lung; immunohistochemistry analysis showed augmented expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and increased number of pulmonary small arteries. Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of HGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase increased, respectively, in the lung after cell transplantation. Our results suggested that ADSC transplantation can ameliorate PAH induced by shunt flow by enhancing the expression of HGF and subsequently promoting angiogenesis in the injured lung tissue. PMID:20828291

  3. Increased peripherin in sympathetic axons innervating plantar metatarsal arteries in STZ-induced type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Niloufer J.; Frugier, Tony; Hunne, Billie; Brock, James A.

    2014-01-01

    A common characteristic of axonopathy is the abnormal accumulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We recently reported that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes produced a change in the morphology of sympathetic nerve fibers supplying rat plantar metatarsal arteries (PMAs). Here we investigated whether these morphological changes are associated with axonal accumulation of the type III intermediate filament peripherin and the microtubule protein β-tubulin III, as both are implicated in axonal remodeling. PMAs from hyperglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a low dose of insulin (STZ-LI) were compared with those from normoglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a high dose of insulin (STZ-HI) and vehicle-treated controls. Western blotting revealed an increase in protein expression level for peripherin in PMAs from STZ-LI rats but no change in that for β-tubulin III. In addition, there was an increase in the number of peripherin immunoreactive nerve fibers in the perivascular nerve plexus of PMAs from STZ-LI rats. Co-labeling for peripherin and neuropeptide Y (a marker for sympathetic axons) revealed that peripherin immunoreactivity increased in sympathetic axons. None of these changes were detected in PMAs from STZ-HI rats, indicating that increased peripherin in sympathetic axons of STZ-LI rats is likely due to hyperglycemia and provides a marker of diabetes-induced nerve damage. PMID:24847201

  4. Determination of the effects of pulmonary arterial hypertension and therapy on the cardiovascular system of rats by impedance cardiography

    PubMed Central

    Buyukakilli, Belgin; Gurgul, Serkan; Cıtırık, Derya; Hallioglu, Olgu; Ozeren, Murat; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of bosentan, sildenafil, and combined therapy on the cardiovascular system using impedance cardiography (ICG) in rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods Seventy male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into five groups. A single dose of MCT was given to all rats, except to the control group. After 4 weeks, bosentan, sildenafil, and combined treatment was started and lasted for 3 weeks. The last group that developed PAH did not receive any medication. Echocardiographic evaluation was performed to determine the PAH development. Thoracic fluid content index (TFCI), stroke volume index (SI), heart rate (HR), cardiac index (CI), and myocardial contractility index (IC) were determined. All procedures were performed at the baseline and after 4 and 7 weeks. Results Echocardiographic parameters showed that the all MCT-injected rats developed PAH. There were no significant inter- and intra-group differences in TFCI, SI, and IC (P > 0.05), but at the 7th week, CI value in the sildenafil-treated PAH rats was significantly higher than in other groups and HR of PAH rats with combined therapy was significantly lower than in other groups. Conclusion PAH did not have an effect on LV function of rats, or if it did, the effect was compensated by physiological processes. Also, sildenafil treatment deteriorated the LV cardiac index. PMID:25358882

  5. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26957055

  6. Renal function and structure in a rat model of arterial calcification and increased pulse pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Virginie; Jover, Bernard; Casellas, Daniel; Cordaillat, Magali; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lartaud, Isabelle

    2008-10-01

    Clinical studies suggest a strong link between tissue calcification and pressure hyperpulsatility in end stage renal disease patients. Using a Wistar rat model of arterial elastocalcinosis and hyperpulsatility [vitamin D and nicotine (VDN) treatment], we evaluated the relative importance of tissue calcification and hyperpulsatility in the etiology of renal failure. VDN rats showed significant increases in aortic wall calcium content (50 times; 992+/-171 vs. control 19+/-1 micromol/g dry wt) and pulse pressure (1.5 times; 61+/-4 vs. control 40+/-2 mmHg). Significant renal calcification (16 times; 124+/-27 vs. control 8.1+/-0.7 micromol/g dry wt) occurred mainly within the media of the preglomerular vasculature and in the areas of interstitial fibrosis in VDN. Extensive renal damages (5 times; 26+/-5% of collapsed-atrophic or sclerotic glomeruli, or glomerular cysts vs. control 5.2+/-0.3%; 28 times; 61+/-12% areas of focal, cortical areas exhibiting interstitial fibrosis per section vs. control 2.2+/-0.6%) were observed histologically. The glomerular filtration rate significantly decreased (880+/-40 vs. control 1,058+/-44 microl.min(-1).g kidney wt(-1)). Albuminuria increased six times (1.6+/-0.4 vs. control 0.27+/-0.04 mg/24 h). There were significant linear relationships between albuminuria and pulse pressure (r2=0.408; n=24) or renal calcium content (r2=0.328; n=24; P<0.05) and between glomerular filtration rate and pulse pressure (r2=0.168; n=27). To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of links between both 1) hyperpulsatility and renal dysfunction, and 2) renal calcification and renal dysfunction. Given the increasing frequency of end-stage renal disease, this model could prove useful for preclinical evaluation of drugs that prevent or attenuate hyperpulsatility and/or tissue calcification. PMID:18715942

  7. The vascular effects of different arginase inhibitors in rat isolated aorta and mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, NN; Harris, EE; Chin-Dusting, JFP; Andrews, KL

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase share the common substrate L-arginine, and arginase inhibition is proposed to increase NO production by increasing intracellular levels of L-arginine. Many different inhibitors are used, and here we have examined the effects of these inhibitors on vascular tissue. Experimental approach Each arginase inhibitor was assessed by its effects on isolated rings of aorta and mesenteric arteries from rats by: (i) their ability to preserve the tolerance to repeated applications of the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine (ACh); and (ii) their direct vasorelaxant effect. Key results In both vessel types, tolerance (defined as a reduced response upon second application) to ACh was reversed with addition of L-arginine, (S)-(2-boronethyl)-L-cysteine HCl (BEC) or NG-Hydroxy-L-arginine (L-NOHA). On the other hand, Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly augmented the response to ACh, an effect that was partially reversed with L-arginine. No effect on tolerance to ACh was observed with L-valine, nor-valine or D,L, α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). BEC, L-NOHA and nor-NOHA elicited endothelium-independent vasorelaxation in both endothelium intact and denuded aorta while L-valine, DFMO and nor-valine did not. Conclusions and implications BEC and L-NOHA, but not nor-NOHA, L-valine, DFMO or nor-valine, significantly reversed tolerance to ACh possibly conserving L-arginine levels and therefore increasing NO bioavailability. However, both BEC and L-NOHA caused endothelium-independent vasorelaxation in rat aorta, suggesting that these inhibitors have a role beyond arginase inhibition alone. Our data thus questions the interpretation of many studies using these antagonists as specific arginase inhibitors in the vasculature, without verification with other methods. PMID:19133993

  8. An Exploration of the Control of Micturition Using a Novel in Situ Arterially Perfused Rat Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Sadananda, Prajni; Drake, Marcus J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to develop and refine a decerebrate arterially perfused rat (DAPR) preparation that allows the complete bladder filling and voiding cycle to be investigated without some of the restrictions inherent with in vivo experimentation [e.g., ease and speed of set up (30 min), control over the extracellular milieu and free of anesthetic agents]. Both spontaneous (naturalistic bladder filling from ureters) and evoked (in response to intravesical infusion) voids were routinely and reproducibly observed which had similar pressure characteristics. The DAPR allows the simultaneous measurement of bladder intra-luminal pressure, external urinary sphincter–electromyogram (EUS–EMG), pelvic afferent nerve activity, pudendal motor activity, and permits excellent visualization of the entire lower urinary tract, during typical rat filling and voiding responses. The voiding responses were modulated or eliminated by interventions at a number of levels including at the afferent terminal fields (intravesical capsaicin sensitization–desensitization), autonomic (ganglion blockade with hexamethonium), and somatic motor (vecuronium block of the EUS) outflow and required intact brainstem/hindbrain-spinal coordination (as demonstrated by sequential hindbrain transections). Both innocuous (e.g., perineal stimulation) and nociceptive (tail/paw pinch) somatic stimuli elicited an increase in EUS–EMG indicating intact sensory feedback loops. Spontaneous non-micturition contractions were observed between fluid infusions at a frequency and amplitude of 1.4 ± 0.9 per minute and 1.4 ± 0.3 mmHg, respectively and their amplitude increased when autonomic control was compromised. In conclusion, the DAPR is a tractable and useful model for the study of neural bladder control showing intact afferent signaling, spinal and hindbrain co-ordination and efferent control over the lower urinary tract end organs and can be extended to study bladder pathologies and trial novel

  9. Intravascular streaming and variable delivery to brain following carotid artery infusions in the Sprague-Dawley rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saris, S.C.; Wright, D.C.; Oldfield, E.H.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1988-02-01

    Intracarotid artery infusions in animals are commonly performed in studies of the blood-brain barrier and in chemotherapy trials. Implicit in the analysis of these experiments is that the infusate will be distributed to the territory of the internal carotid artery in a manner that is proportional to blood flow. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to determine if poor infusate mixing with blood due to intravascular streaming occurred during intracarotid artery drug infusions and if it could be eliminated with fast retrograde infusion. In three experimental groups, a radiolabeled flow tracer--/sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine (IAP)--was infused retrograde through the external carotid artery into the common carotid artery at slow, medium, and fast rates (0.45, 1.5, and 5.0 ml/min). In a control group, IAP was injected intravenously (i.v.). Local isotope concentrations in the brain were determined by quantitative autoradiography, and the variability of isotope delivery was assessed in the frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and caudate putamen of all animals. Streaming phenomena were manifest in all selected anatomic areas after the slow and medium rates of intraarterial infusion. After fast intracarotid infusion or i.v. injection, there was uniform distribution of isotope in the same brain regions.

  10. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  11. Three-dimensional organization of the hepatic artery terminal branches: a scanning electron microscopic study of vascular corrosion casts of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Pannarale, Luigi; Onori, Paolo; Borghese, Federica; Conte, Davide; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2007-01-01

    The hepatic artery plays an important role in the nourishment of liver parenchyma. The arterial distribution generates debate on where the artery terminates in the liver although is accepted that terminal branching of hepatic artery opened into sinusoids and form arterio-portal anastomosis. This implies that sinusoids are fed by both arterial and portal vessels characterized by different pressures. The presence of a double feeding to the sinusoids from the vena porta, at a pressure of 6-7 cm H2O, and from the hepatic artery, at a pressure of 12-25 cm H2O, has generated many studies for the need to explain the prevalence of flow from the vena porta. For this reason, we have studied the terminal hepatic artery branches in the rat by using special microvascular corrosion casting procedure which makes possible to better follow the hepatic artery terminal branches. Twelve young sexually mature male and female Wistar rats were used in this study. More than one hundred vascular corrosion casts of terminal hepatic arterioles were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Histological samples were prepared using standard techniques for light microscopy. The experimental approach allow to easily follow the three-dimensional course of hepatic artery branches which is extremely difficult in standard injections. In all our observations of the rat liver vascular corrosion casts, terminal hepatic artery branches do not end directly in the sinusoidal beds. Terminal hepatic artery branches end into peribiliary plexus, periportal plexus and single capillaries of the portal space. We have not found any arterio-venous shunt nor any arterial vessel flowing into a venous vessel or a sinusoid. This means that only venous blood at a lowered pressure reaches the vena porta branches and the sinusoids. PMID:17580655

  12. Obesity-related pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats correlates with increased circulating inflammatory cytokines and lipids and with oxidant damage in the arterial wall but not with hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David C.; Garat, Chrystelle V.; Crossno, Joseph T.; MacLean, Paul S.; Sullivan, Timothy M.; Erickson, Paul F.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Harral, Julie W.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is causally linked to a number of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, renal dysfunction, and cancer. Obesity has also been linked to pulmonary disorders, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It was long believed that obesity-related PAH was the result of hypoventilation and hypoxia due to the increased mechanical load of excess body fat. However, in recent years it has been proposed that the metabolic and inflammatory disturbances of obesity may also play a role in the development of PAH. To determine whether PAH develops in obese rats in the absence of hypoxia, we assessed pulmonary hemodynamics and pulmonary artery (PA) structure in the diet-resistant/diet-induced obesity (DR/DIO) and Zucker lean/fatty rat models. We found that high-fat feeding (DR/DIO) or overfeeding (Zucker) elicited PA remodeling, neomuscularization of distal arterioles, and elevated PA pressure, accompanied by right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. PA thickening and distal neomuscularization were also observed in DIO rats on a low-fat diet. No evidence of hypoventilation or chronic hypoxia was detected in either model, nor was there a correlation between blood glucose or insulin levels and PAH. However, circulating inflammatory cytokine levels were increased with high-fat feeding or calorie overload, and hyperlipidemia and oxidant damage in the PA wall correlated with PAH in the DR/DIO model. We conclude that hyperlipidemia and peripheral inflammation correlate with the development of PAH in obese subjects. Obesity-related inflammation may predispose to PAH even in the absence of hypoxia. PMID:25610600

  13. Caveolar disruption causes contraction of rat femoral arteries via reduced basal NO release and subsequent closure of BKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Brakati, AY; Kamishima, T; Dart, C

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Caveolae act as signalling hubs in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Caveolar disruption by the membrane cholesterol depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (M-β-CD) has various functional effects on arteries including (i) impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation, and (ii) alteration of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction independently of the endothelium. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of M-β-CD on rat femoral arteries. Methods. Isometric force was measured in rat femoral arteries stimulated to contract with a solution containing 20 mM K+ and 200 nM Bay K 8644 (20 K/Bay K) or with one containing 80 mM K+(80 K). Results. Incubation of arteries with M-β-CD (5 mM, 60 min) increased force in response to 20 K/Bay K but not that induced by 80 K. Application of cholesterol saturated M-β-CD (Ch-MCD, 5 mM, 50 min) reversed the effects of M-β-CD. After mechanical removal of endothelial cells M-β-CD caused only a small enhancement of contractions to 20 K/Bay K. This result suggests M-β-CD acts via altering release of an endothelial-derived vasodilator or vasoconstrictor. When nitric oxide synthase was blocked by pre-incubation of arteries with L-NAME (250 µM) the contraction of arteries to 20 K/Bay K was enhanced, and this effect was abolished by pre-treatment with M-β-CD. This suggests M-β-CD is inhibiting endothelial NO release. Inhibition of large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated (BKCa) channels with 2 mM TEA+ or 100 nM Iberiotoxin (IbTX) enhanced 20 K/Bay K contractions. L-NAME attenuated the contractile effect of IbTX, as did endothelial removal. Conclusions. Our results suggest caveolar disruption results in decreased release of endothelial-derived nitric oxide in rat femoral artery, resulting in a reduced contribution of BKCa channels to the smooth muscle cell membrane potential, causing depolarisation and contraction. PMID:26038721

  14. Effects of basilar membrane arch and radial tension on the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wei Xuan; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The basilar membrane velocity of gerbil cochlea showed discrepancy between theoretical model and experimental measurements. We hypothesize that the reasons of such discrepancies are due to the arch towards the scala tympani and radial tension present in the basilar membrane of the gerbil cochlea. The arch changes the bending stiffness in the basilar membrane, reduces the effective fluid force on the membrane and increases the basilar membrane's inertia. The existence of the radial tension also dampens the acoustic travelling wave. In this paper, the wave number functions along the gerbil basilar membrane are calculated from experimentally measured physical parameters with the theoretical model as well as extracted from experimentally measured basilar membrane velocity with the wave number inversion formula. The two wave number functions are compared and the effects of the tension and membrane arch on the wave number are studied based on various parameters of the model. We found that the bending stiffness across the gerbil basilar membrane varies (1-2 orders along the cochlea in the section 2.2 mm-3 mm from base) more than the calculated value in the flat basilar membrane model and the radial tension increases the damping of the travelling wave in gerbil cochlea significantly (5 times more than that without radial tension). These effects of arch and radial tension in the basilar membrane elucidate the discrepancy between previous theoretical model and experimental measurements in gerbil cochlea. PMID:26070425

  15. Systemic Hypoxia and the Depression of Synaptic Transmission in Rat Hippocampus after Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, J C; Gervitz, L M; Hamilton, M E; Walker, J A

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between step reductions in inspired oxygen and the amplitude of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) recorded from hippocampal CA1 neurons was examined in anaesthetized rats with a unilateral common carotid artery occlusion. The amplitudes of fEPSPs recorded from the hippocampus ipsilateral to the occlusion were significantly more depressed with hypoxia than were the fEPSPs recorded from the contralateral hippocampus. The adenosine A1-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT), blunted the hypoxic depression of the fEPSP. Tissue partial pressure of oxygen (Ptiss,O2) was measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampus using glass Clark-style microelectrodes. Ptiss,O2 fell to similar levels as a function of inspired oxygen in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampus, and in the ipsilateral hippocampus after administration of 8-CPT. Hippocampal blood flow (HBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. A decline in HBF was associated with systemic hypoxia in both hippocampi. HBF, as a function of inspired oxygen, fell significantly more in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hippocampus. We conclude that endogenous adenosine acting at the neuronal A1 receptor plays a major role in the depression of synaptic transmission during hypoxic ischaemia. The greater susceptibility of the fEPSP in the ipsilateral hippocampus to systemic hypoxia cannot be explained entirely by differences in Ptiss,O2 or HBF between the two hemispheres. PMID:12807994

  16. Transdifferentiation-Induced Neural Stem Cells Promote Recovery of Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Maoying; Li, Shaowu; Wu, Bingshan; Nie, Xiaohu; Jiao, Jiao; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yesen; Sun, Yilin; Wicha, Max S.; Chang, Alfred E.; Gao, Shaorong; Li, Qiao; Xu, Ruxiang

    2015-01-01

    Induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can be directly transdifferentiated from somatic cells. One potential clinical application of the iNSCs is for nerve regeneration. However, it is unknown whether iNSCs function in disease models. We produced transdifferentiated iNSCs by conditional overexpressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Mycin mouse embryonic fibroblasts. They expanded readily in vitro and expressed NSC mRNA profile and protein markers. These iNSCs differentiated into mature astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Importantly, they reduced lesion size, promoted the recovery of motor and sensory function as well as metabolism status in middle cerebral artery stroke rats. These iNSCs secreted nerve growth factors, which was associated with observed protection of neurons from apoptosis. Furthermore, iNSCs migrated to and passed through the lesion in the cerebral cortex, where Tuj1+ neurons were detected. These findings have revealed the function of transdifferentiated iNSCs in vivo, and thus provide experimental evidence to support the development of personalized regenerative therapy for CNS diseases by using genetically engineered autologous somatic cells. PMID:26352672

  17. Garcinielliptone FC, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from Platonia insignis Mart., promotes vasorelaxant effect on rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; da Costa-Júnior, Joaquim Soares; Moura, Lucas Henrique Porfírio; Ferraz, Alexandre Barros Falcão; Rossatto, Raíssa Rebés; David, Jorge Maurício; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Oliveira, Rita de Cássia Meneses; Citó, Antônia Maria das Graças Lopes; de Oliveira, Aldeídia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Polyisoprenylated benzophenones represent a group of chemical compounds commonly identified in Clusiaceae species and are responsible for a large amount of biological activities. In this work, the vasorelaxant effect induced by garcinielliptone FC (GFC) isolated from Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae), a monotype species from Platonia genus, was investigated. GFC promoted an endothelium-independent vasorelaxation on phenylephrine (PHE, 10(-5) mol L(-1))-induced vasoconstriction, but not on KCl (80 mmol L(-1))-induced vasoconstriction, on rat superior mesenteric artery rings. In addition, a concentration-dependent decrease of PHE- or serotonin-induced cumulative concentration-response curves was observed for GFC, and a slight decrease of pD₂ value on CaCl₂-induced vasoconstriction. In a Ca(2+)-free medium, GFC interfered in calcium mobilisation from PHE (10(-5) mol L(-1))-sensitive intracellular stores. GFC-induced vasorelaxant effect is probably mediated by a dual effect on mobilisation of calcium intracellular stores and attenuation of transmembrane calcium influx. PMID:24579922

  18. Oxytocin decreases diurnal and nocturnal arterial blood pressure in the conscious unrestrained spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Jolanta; Aliou, Yessoufou; Lavoie, Julie L; Gaab, Katie; Jankowski, Marek; Broderick, Tom L

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we assessed the effects of oxytocin (OT) on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (LA) in male spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) and Sprague-Dawley (SDR) controls using telemetry. OT was given by intravenous injections of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.4mg/kg to assess short term acute effects or by daily subcutaneous injections of 0.5 or 1.0mg/kg for 5 days. Compared to the saline infusion, (i) intravenous OT, regardless of concentration, increased MAP in SHR and SDR, (ii) HR increased, but was periodically lower in both strains with 0.2 or 0.4mg/kg, and (iii) no effects of OT on LA were observed. Subcutaneous injections demonstrated that (i) 1.0mg/kg for 5days lowered diurnal MAP and HR in SDR and SHR, persisting for 6 days, (ii) 1.0mg/kg decreased nocturnal HR in SDR, (iii) 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg decreased MAP with minor effects on HR in the SHR, and lastly (iv) OT decreased LA mainly during the diurnal cycle in both strains. Our main results show that OT induces significant beneficial effects on cardiovascular function over several diurnal and nocturnal cycles in the SHR, with the most prominent effect being a robust decrease in MAP. PMID:27020751

  19. Biphasic Effect of Diabetes on Neuronal Nitric Oxide Release in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Esther; Caracuel, Laura; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Callejo, María; Xavier, Fabiano E.; Balfagón, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We analysed possible time-dependent changes in nitrergic perivascular innervation function from diabetic rats and mechanisms implicated. Materials and Methods In endothelium-denuded mesenteric arteries from control and four- (4W) and eight-week (8W) streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats the vasoconstriction to EFS (electrical field stimulation) was analysed before and after preincubation with L-NAME. Neuronal NO release was analysed in the absence and presence of L-arginine, tetrahydrobiopterine (BH4) and L-arginine plus BH4. Superoxide anion (O2-), peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. Expressions of Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS, p-nNOS Ser1417, p-nNOS Ser847, and Arginase (Arg) I and II were analysed. Results EFS response was enhanced at 4W, and to a lesser extent at 8W. L-NAME increased EFS response in control rats and at 8W, but not at 4W. NO release was decreased at 4W and restored at 8W. L-arginine or BH4 increased NO release at 4W, but not 8W. SOD activity and O2- generation were increased at both 4W and 8W. ONOO- decreased at 4W while increased at 8W. Cu-Zn SOD, nNOS and p-NOS Ser1417 expressions remained unmodified at 4W and 8W, whereas p-nNOS Ser847 was increased at 4W. ArgI was overexpressed at 4W, remaining unmodified at 8W. ArgII expression was similar in all groups. Conclusions Our results show a time-dependent effect of diabetes on neuronal NO release. At 4W, diabetes induced increased O2- generation, nNOS uncoupling and overexpression of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847, resulting in decreased NO release. At 8W, NO release was restored, involving normalisation of ArgI and p-nNOS Ser847 expressions. PMID:27272874

  20. Endothelium-dependent mechanisms of the vasodilatory effect of the endocannabinoid, anandamide, in the rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; MacLean, Margaret R; Kozłowska, Hanna; Malinowska, Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Endocannabinoids exhibit vasodilatory properties and reduce blood pressure in vivo. However, the influence and mechanism of action of the prominent endocannabinoid, anandamide (AEA), in pulmonary arteries are not known. The present study determined the vascular response to AEA in isolated rat pulmonary arteries. AEA relaxed rat pulmonary arteries that were pre-constricted with U-46619. This relaxation was reduced by the following conditions:removal of the endothelium; in KCl pre-constricted preparations; in the presence of the potassium channel (K(Ca)) blockers, tetraethylammonium and the combination of charybdotoxin and apamin, and the prostacyclin receptor antagonist, RO1138452. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin), nitric oxide (NO) synthase (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (URB597) alone or in combination diminished AEA-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact vessels. The remaining experiments were performed in the presence of URB597 to eliminate the influence of AEA metabolites. Antagonists of the endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CB(x)), O-1918 and cannabidiol, attenuated the AEA-induced response. Antagonists of CB(1), CB(2) and TRPV1 receptors, AM251, AM630 and capsazepine, respectively, did not modify the AEA-induced response. A reference activator of CB(x) receptors, abnormal cannabidiol, mimicked the receptor-mediated AEA effects. The present study demonstrated that AEA relaxed rat pulmonary arteries in an endothelium-dependent fashion via the activation of the O-1918-sensitive CB(x) receptor and/or prostacyclin-like vasoactive products of AEA. One or both of these mechanisms may involve K(Ca) or the NO pathway. PMID:22627170

  1. Alterations in EDHF-mediated hyperpolarization and relaxation in mesenteric arteries of female rats in long-term deficiency of oestrogen and during oestrus cycle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Yue; Hattori, Yuichi; Fukao, Mistuhiro; Sato, Atsushi; Sakuma, Ichiro; Kanno, Morio

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether endothelium-dependent relaxations are altered in mesenteric arteries from young female rats during oestrus cycle and after castration. The contractile response to phenylephrine (Phe) was significantly enhanced in arteries from rats subjected to ovariectomy than in those from sham-operated (control) rats. Treatment of ovariectomized rats with 17β-oestradiol returned the Phe response to the control level. Arteries from rats at the diestrus stage also exhibited greater contraction in response to Phe. In the presence of 100 μM NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), the enhancement of the Phe contractile response associated with oestrogen deficiency was not observed. Endothelium-dependent relaxations elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) in arteries precontracted with Phe were significantly reduced in ovariectomized and diestrus rats regardless of whether endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) was blocked with L-NOARG. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol prevented the reduced vascular relaxant response to ACh in ovariectomized rats. The reduction in the ACh responses observed in ovariectomized and diestrus rats was eliminated when 500 nM apamin and 100 nM charybdotoxin were present. ACh-induced endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations were depressed in arteries from ovariectomized and diestrus rats. The hyperpolarizing response to ACh was significantly improved when ovariectomized rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol. The resting membrane potentials and pinacidil-induced hyperpolarizations were unaffected by ovariectomy or the diestrus stage. These results suggest that oestrogen-deficient states of both short and long duration reduce the basal release of NO from the endothelium and specifically attenuate endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation transduced by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. PMID:11226134

  2. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  3. Prevention of arterial thrombosis by edoxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor in rats: monotherapy and in combination with antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuko; Kamisato, Chikako; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In addition to platelet aggregation, coagulation activation is considered to be involved in arterial thrombosis. In this study, we determined antithrombotic effects of edoxaban, an oral factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, as both a monotherapy and in combination with antiplatelet agents in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. We further examined its effects on a procoagulant biomarker and bleeding. Arterial thrombosis was induced by topical application of 15% ferric chloride to rat abdominal aortas. Bleeding time was measured by a tail incision method. Edoxaban, clopidogrel, and aspirin were orally administered 30min, 4h, and 2h before thrombus or bleeding induction. As a biomarker of coagulation activation, plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) was measured. Edoxaban dose-dependently prevented arterial thrombosis in a manner comparable to clopidogrel and aspirin. The combination of edoxaban plus clopidogrel or edoxaban plus aspirin significantly potentiated the antithrombotic effects compared with these drugs alone. The combination of edoxaban and clopidogrel was more potent than clopidogrel and aspirin. Plasma TAT concentration was elevated after thrombus induction and suppressed by edoxaban and clopidogrel, but not by aspirin, suggesting P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet procoagulant activity. Bleeding time was prolonged by the coadministration of edoxaban and clopidogrel, but not by edoxaban and aspirin. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the monotherapy with edoxaban and combination therapy with edoxaban plus clopidogrel or edoxaban plus aspirin are promising options for the prevention of arterial thrombosis as effective as the standard antiplatelet agents; however, a combination of edoxaban and clopidogrel increased the risk of bleeding. PMID:27288116

  4. Pathological role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors in arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Regina; Ziani, Khalid; Miquel, Raquel; Noguera, M Antonia; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-01-01

    1. The role of a constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors was analysed in arteries obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and controls (WKY) divided into three groups: young prehypertensive, adult hypertensive, and adult animals chronically treated with captopril (50 mg kg(-1) per day orally) in order to prevent the hypertensive state. 2. In adult SHR, a significant increase in BMY 7378 potency (not in prazosin potency) was observed in aorta, mesenteric artery, and the first and second branches of the small mesenteric arteries with respect to WKY rats. This difference was not observed in iliac and tail arteries, which suggests an increased functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors only in some vessels of SHR. 3. The increase in the resting tone (IRT) observed in absence of agonist, inhibited by BMY 7378, that represents the constitutively active population of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors, was also significantly greater in aorta and mesenteric artery from adult SHR. 4. In young and captopril treated adult animals, no differences between strains with respect to BMY 7378 potency, or IRT were observed. 5. The increase in the functional role of alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors and their constitutive activity observed in hypertension is prevented by captopril treatment. The pathological consequence of this change is the slower rate of recovery of the basal tone after removal of an adrenergic stimulus, observed in vessels from hypertensive animals that had shown an increase in the functionality of constitutively active alpha(1D)-adrenoceptors. This change was not observed in prehypertensive or captopril treated animals. PMID:11786496

  5. Pathological role of a constitutively active population of α1D-adrenoceptors in arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, Regina; Ziani, Khalid; Miquel, Raquel; Noguera, M Antonia; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2002-01-01

    The role of a constitutively active population of α1D-adrenoceptors was analysed in arteries obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and controls (WKY) divided into three groups: young prehypertensive, adult hypertensive, and adult animals chronically treated with captopril (50 mg kg−1 per day orally) in order to prevent the hypertensive state.In adult SHR, a significant increase in BMY 7378 potency (not in prazosin potency) was observed in aorta, mesenteric artery, and the first and second branches of the small mesenteric arteries with respect to WKY rats. This difference was not observed in iliac and tail arteries, which suggests an increased functional role of α1D-adrenoceptors only in some vessels of SHR.The increase in the resting tone (IRT) observed in absence of agonist, inhibited by BMY 7378, that represents the constitutively active population of α1D-adrenoceptors, was also significantly greater in aorta and mesenteric artery from adult SHR.In young and captopril treated adult animals, no differences between strains with respect to BMY 7378 potency, or IRT were observed.The increase in the functional role of α1D-adrenoceptors and their constitutive activity observed in hypertension is prevented by captopril treatment. The pathological consequence of this change is the slower rate of recovery of the basal tone after removal of an adrenergic stimulus, observed in vessels from hypertensive animals that had shown an increase in the functionality of constitutively active α1D-adrenoceptors. This change was not observed in prehypertensive or captopril treated animals. PMID:11786496

  6. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeong Uk

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  7. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yeong Uk; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  8. Effects of high calcium diet on arterial smooth muscle function and electrolyte balance in mineralocorticoid-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Arvola, P.; Ruskoaho, H.; Pörsti, I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of a high calcium diet (2.5%) on blood pressure, electrolyte balance, plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and arterial smooth muscle responses were studied in one-kidney deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-NaCl hypertensive Wistar rats. 2. Calcium supplementation for 8 weeks markedly attenuated the development of DOC-NaCl hypertension and the associated cardiac hypertrophy, and prevented the DOC-NaCl-induced sodium-volume retention as judged by reduced plasma Na+, and decreased plasma and ventricular ANP concentrations in high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. However, calcium supplementation did not affect the DOC-NaCl-induced rise in platelet [Ca2+]i. 3. Smooth muscle contractions of isolated mesenteric arterial rings in response to depolarization by K+ (20-30 mM) were enhanced in DOC-NaCl-treated rats, this enhancement being abolished by concurrent oral calcium loading. The Ca2+ entry blocker nifedipine (10 nM) inhibited the contractions induced by K+ (30-125 mM) more effectively in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls, while the inhibition in calcium-loaded DOC-NaCl rats was significantly greater than in controls only with 30 mM K+. 4. The contractions of mesenteric arterial rings induced by omission of K+ from the organ baths were used to evaluate cell membrane permeability to ions. In chemically denervated rings the onset of the gradual rise in contractile force in K(+)-free medium occurred earlier, and the rate of the contraction was faster in DOC-NaCl-treated rats than in controls and high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. Smooth muscle relaxation induced by 0.5 mM K+ upon K(+)-free contractions was clearly slower in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls and calcium-supplemented DOC-NaCl rats. 5. The functions of arterial smooth muscle Na+, Ca2+ exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase were evaluated by the aortic contractions elicited by low Na+ medium, and the subsequent relaxation responses induced by Ca(2+)-free solution (in the

  9. Long-term survival in permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion: a model of malignant stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Henning, Robert H.; Schilling, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by an intraluminal filament is widely used to study focal brain ischemia in male Sprague-Dawley rats. However, permanent occlusion goes along with a high fatality. To overcome this drawback we designed a new filament carrying a bowling pin-shaped tip (BP-tip) and compared this with three conventionally tipped filaments. Follow-up periods were 24 h (all groups) and 72 and 120 h in BP-tip group. Ischemic damage and swelling were quantified using silver nitrate staining. Collateral flow via the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) was assessed using selective dye perfusion of the internal carotid artery. Despite a comparable decrease of brain perfusion in all groups, ischemic damage was significantly smaller in BP-tips (p < 0.05). Moreover, BP-tip significantly reduced mortality from 60% to 12.5% and widely spared the occipital region and hypothalamus from ischemic damage. Conventional but not BP-tip filaments induced vascular distortion, measured as gross displacement of the MCA origin, which correlated with occipital infarction size. Accordingly, BP-tip occluded rats showed a significantly better collateral filling of the PCA territory. Ischemic volume significantly increased in BP-tip occlusion at 72 h follow-up. BP-tip filaments offer superior survival in permanent MCA occlusion, while mimicking the course of a malignant stroke in patients. PMID:27329690

  10. Training a Sophisticated Microsurgical Technique: Interposition of External Jugular Vein Graft in the Common Carotid Artery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A.; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.1-5 The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. 6-8 The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.9-11 This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., 9 as well as others.12-14 Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain expertise fast

  11. Training a sophisticated microsurgical technique: interposition of external jugular vein graft in the common carotid artery in rats.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Jalaie, Houman; Kalder, Johannes; Langer, Stephan; Koeppel, Thomas A; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is one the primary causes of stenosis in arterialized veins that are of great importance in arterial coronary bypass surgery, in peripheral arterial bypass surgery as well as in arteriovenous fistulas.(1-5) The experimental procedure of vein graft interposition in the common carotid artery by using the cuff-technique has been applied in several research projects to examine the aetiology of neointimal hyperplasia and therapeutic options to address it. (6-8) The cuff prevents vessel anastomotic remodeling and induces turbulence within the graft and thereby the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Using the superior caval vein graft is an established small-animal model for venous arterialization experiment.(9-11) This current protocol refers to an established jugular vein graft interposition technique first described by Zou et al., (9) as well as others.(12-14) Nevertheless, these cited small animal protocols are complicated. To simplify the procedure and to minimize the number of experimental animals needed, a detailed operation protocol by video training is presented. This video should help the novice surgeon to learn both the cuff-technique and the vein graft interposition. Hereby, the right external jugular vein was grafted in cuff-technique in the common carotid artery of 21 female Sprague Dawley rats categorized in three equal groups that were sacrificed on day 21, 42 and 84, respectively. Notably, no donor animals were needed, because auto-transplantations were performed. The survival rate was 100 % at the time point of sacrifice. In addition, the graft patency rate was 60 % for the first 10 operated animals and 82 % for the remaining 11 animals. The blood flow at the time of sacrifice was 8±3 ml/min. In conclusion, this surgical protocol considerably simplifies, optimizes and standardizes this complicated procedure. It gives novice surgeons easy, step-by-step instruction, explaining possible pitfalls, thereby helping them to gain

  12. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  13. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  14. 4,4'-Methylenedianiline Alters Serotonergic Transport in a Novel, Sex-Specific Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats.

    PubMed

    Carroll-Turpin, Michelle; Hebert, Valeria; Chotibut, Tanya; Wensler, Heather; Krentzel, Dallas; Varner, Kurt James; Burn, Brendan R; Chen, Yi-Fan; Abreo, Fleurette; Dugas, Tammy Renee

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure as a result of arterial wall thickening. Patients are 3-4 times more likely to be women than men. This gender discrepancy demonstrates a need for an animal model with similar sex differences. 4,4'-Methylenedianiline (DAPM) is an aromatic amine used industrially in the synthesis of polyurethanes. Chronic, intermittent treatment of male and female rats with DAPM resulted in medial hyperplasia of pulmonary arterioles, exclusively in females, coupled to increases in pulmonary arterial pressures. Significant increases in plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and serotonin, but decreases in nitrite [Formula: see text], were observed in females treated with DAPM. A decrease was observed in the serum ratio of the estrogen metabolites 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE1)/16α-hydroxyestrogen (16α-OHE1). In females, ET-1,[Formula: see text] , and 2-OHE1/16α-OHE1 were significantly correlated with peak pressure gradient, an indirect measure of pulmonary arterial pressure. Expression of the serotonin transport protein (SERT) was significantly higher in the arteries of DAPM-treated females. In vitro, DAPM induced human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and serotonin uptake, both of which were inhibited by treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. DAPM also induced the release of serotonin from human pulmonary endothelial cells in culture, which is blocked by ICI 182,780. Taken together, this suggests that DAPM-mediated dysregulation of serotonin transport is estrogen-receptor dependent. Thus, DAPM-induced PAH pathology may be a new tool to clarify the sex selectivity of PAH disease pathogenesis. PMID:26116029

  15. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  16. Linked opening angle and histological and mechanical aspects of the proximal pulmonary arteries of healthy and pulmonary hypertensive rats and calves.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Lammers, Steven R; Kao, Philip H; Reusser, Mark; Stenmark, Kurt R; Hunter, Kendall S; Qi, H Jerry; Shandas, Robin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding how arterial remodeling changes the mechanical behavior of pulmonary arteries (PAs) is important to the evaluation of pulmonary vascular function. Early and current efforts have focused on the arteries' histological changes, their mechanical properties under in vitro mechanical testing, and their zero-stress and no-load states. However, the linkage between the histology and mechanical behavior is still not well understood. To explore this linkage, we investigated the geometry, residual stretch, and histology of proximal PAs in both adult rat and neonatal calf hypoxic models of pulmonary hypertension (PH), compared their changes due to chronic hypoxia across species, and proposed a two-layer mechanical model of artery to relate the opening angle to the stiffness ratio of the PA outer to inner layer. We found that the proximal PA remodeling in calves was quite different from that in rats. In rats, the arterial wall thickness, inner diameter, and outer layer thickness fraction all increased dramatically in PH and the opening angle decreased significantly, whereas in calves, only the arterial wall thickness increased in PH. The proposed model predicted that the stiffness ratio of the calf proximal PAs changed very little from control to hypertensive group, while the decrease of opening angle in rat proximal PAs in response to chronic hypoxia was approximately linear to the increase of the stiffness ratio. We conclude that the arterial remodeling in rat and calf proximal PAs is different and the change of opening angle can be linked to the change of the arterial histological structure and mechanics. PMID:21856906

  17. Nicorandil Prevents Right Ventricular Remodeling by Inhibiting Apoptosis and Lowering Pressure Overload in Rats with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan-Zhe; Wang, Hui; Bi, Li-Qing; Xie, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Most of the deaths among patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are caused by progressive right ventricular (RV) pathological remodeling, dysfunction, and failure. Nicorandil can inhibit the development of PAH by reducing pulmonary artery pressure and RV hypertrophy. However, whether nicorandil can inhibit apoptosis in RV cardiomyocytes and prevent RV remodeling has been unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings RV remodeling was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (MCT). RV systolic pressure (RVSP) was measured at the end of each week after MCT injection. Blood samples were drawn for brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) ELISA analysis. The hearts were excised for histopathological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical, and Western blotting analyses. The MCT-injected rats exhibited greater mortality and less weight gain and showed significantly increased RVSP and RV hypertrophy during the second week. These worsened during the third week. MCT injection for three weeks caused pathological RV remodeling, characterized by hypertrophy, fibrosis, dysfunction, and RV mitochondrial impairment, as indicated by increased levels of apoptosis. Nicorandil improved survival, weight gain, and RV function, ameliorated RV pressure overload, and prevented maladaptive RV remodeling in PAH rats. Nicorandil also reduced the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, with a concomitant increase in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) reversed these beneficial effects of nicorandil in MCT-injected rats. Conclusions/Significance Nicorandil inhibits PAH-induced RV remodeling in rats not only by reducing RV pressure overload but also by inhibiting apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through the activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ (mitoKATP) channels. The use of a mitoKATP channel opener such as nicorandil for PAH-associated RV remodeling and dysfunction may represent a new therapeutic strategy for the amelioration of RV remodeling during

  18. 15-oxo-ETE-induced internal carotid artery constriction in hypoxic rats is mediated by potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Liu, Y; Lu, P; Zhu, D; Zhu, Y

    2016-07-18

    Our own study as well as others have previously reported that hypoxia activates 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) in the brain, causing a series of chain reactions, which exacerbates ischemic stroke. 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 15-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxo-ETE/15-KETE) are 15-LO-specific metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA). 15-HETE was found to be rapidly converted into 15-oxo-ETE by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in some circumstances. We have demonstrated that 15-HETE promotes cerebral vasoconstriction during hypoxia. However, the effect of 15-oxo-ETE upon the contraction of cerebral vasculature remains unclear. To investigate this effect and to clarify the underlying mechanism, we performed immunohistochemistry and Western blot to test the expression of 15-PGDH in rat cerebral tissue, examined internal carotid artery (ICA) tension in isolated rat ICA rings. Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to analyze the expression of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels (Kv2.1, Kv1.5, and Kv1.1) in cultured cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). The results showed that the levels of 15-PGDH expression were drastically elevated in the cerebral of rats with hypoxia, and 15-oxo-ETE enhanced ICA contraction in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was more significant in the hypoxic rats than in the normoxic rats. We also found that 15-oxo-ETE significantly attenuated the expression of Kv2.1 and Kv1.5, but not Kv1.1. In conclusion, these results suggest that 15-oxo-ETE leads to the contraction of the ICA, especially under hypoxic conditions and that specific Kv channels may play an important role in 15-oxo-ETE-induced ICA constriction. PMID:26447508

  19. Enhanced Endothelin-1 Mediated Vasoconstriction of the Ophthalmic Artery May Exacerbate Retinal Damage after Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Blixt, Frank W.; Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Johnson, Leif; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature is often the target of stroke studies. However, the vasculature supplying the eye might also be affected by ischemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the transient global cerebral ischemia (GCI) enhances vascular effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine/serotonin (5-HT) on the ophthalmic artery in rats, leading to delayed retinal damage. This was preformed using myography on the ophthalmic artery, coupled with immunohistochemistry and electroretinogram (ERG) to assess the ischemic consequences on the retina. Results showed a significant increase of ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction at 48 hours post ischemia. The retina did not exhibit any morphological changes throughout the study. However, we found an increase of GFAP and vimentin expression at 72 hours and 7 days after ischemia, indicating Müller cell mediated gliosis. ERG revealed significantly decreased function at 72 hours, but recovered almost completely after 7 days. In conclusion, we propose that the increased contractile response via ET-1 receptors in the ophthalmic artery after 48 hours may elicit negative retinal consequences due to a second ischemic period. This may exacerbate retinal damage after ischemia as illustrated by the decreased retinal function and Müller cell activation. The ophthalmic artery and ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction may be a valid and novel therapeutic target after longer periods of ischemic insults. PMID:27322388

  20. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Derksen, Carol; Saqqur, Maher; Khan, Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo. PMID:26933370

  1. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Derksen, Carol; Saqqur, Maher; Khan, Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic carotid - basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo. PMID:26933370

  2. Ipsilateral common iliac artery plus femoral artery clamping for inducing sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats: a reliable and simple method

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a practical model of sciatic ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury producing serious neurologic deficits and being technically feasible compared with the current time consuming or ineffective models. Thirty rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 5). Animal were anesthetized by using ketamine (50 mg/kg) and xylazine (4 mg/kg). Experimental groups included a sham-operated group and five I/R groups with different reperfusion time intervals (0 h, 3 h, 1 d, 4 d, 7 d). In I/R groups, the right common iliac artery and the right femoral artery were clamped for 3 hrs. Sham-operated animals underwent only laparotomy without induction of ischemia. Just before euthanasia, behavioral scores (based on gait, grasp, paw position, and pinch sensitivity) were obtained and then sciatic nerves were removed for light-microscopy studies (for ischemic fiber degeneration (IFD) and edema). Behavioral score deteriorated among the ischemic groups compared with the control group (p < 0.01), with maximal behavioral deficit occurring at 4 days of reperfusion. Axonal swelling and IFD were found to happen only after 4 and 7 days, respectively. Our observations led to an easy-to-use but strong enough method for inducing and studying I/R injury in peripheral nerves. PMID:19102739

  3. Protons modulate perivascular axo-axonal neurotransmission in the rat mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Shingo; Hirai, Kazuhiro; Ozaki, Shuichiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Fukushima-Miyashita, Satoko; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine releases protons from adrenergic nerves via stimulation of nicotinic ACh receptors and activates transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors located on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves, resulting in vasodilatation. The present study investigated whether perivascular nerves release protons, which modulate axon-axonal neurotransmission. Experiment Approach Perfusion pressure and pH levels of perfusate in rat-perfused mesenteric vascular beds without endothelium were measured with a pressure transducer and a pH meter respectively. Key Results Periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) initially induced vasoconstriction, which was followed by long-lasting vasodilatation and decreased pH levels in the perfusate. Cold-storage denervation of the preparation abolished the decreased pH and vascular responses to PNS. The adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine inhibited PNS-induced vasoconstriction and effects on pH, but not PNS-induced vasodilatation. Capsaicin (CGRP depletor), capsazepine and ruthenium red (TRPV1 inhibitors) attenuated the PNS-induced decrease in pH and vasodilatation. In denuded preparations, ACh caused long-lasting vasodilatation and lowered pH; these effects were inhibited by capsaicin pretreatment and atropine, but not by guanethidine or mecamylamine. Capsaicin injection induced vasodilatation and a reduction in pH, which were abolished by ruthenium red. The use of a fluorescent pH indicator demonstrated that application of nicotine, ACh and capsaicin outside small mesenteric arteries reduced perivascular pH levels and these effects were abolished in a Ca2+-free medium. Conclusion and Implication These results suggest that protons are released from perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves upon PNS and these protons modulate transmission in CGRPergic nerves. PMID:25117291

  4. Involvement of Potassium Channels in Vasorelaxant Effect Induced by Valeriana prionophylla Standl. in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Filho, Abrahão Alves; Rodrigues, Lilia Simone Urzedo; Araújo, Jaíse Paiva; Maciel, Priscilla Maria Pereira; de Albuquerque, Jamile Morais; Cehinel Filho, Valdir; Cáceres, Armando; Fregoneze, Josmara Bartolomei; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida; Silva, Darizy Flávia

    2013-01-01

    Assays in vitro and in vivo were performed on extract from roots and leaves from the Valeriana prionophylla Standl. (VPR and VPF, resp.). In phenylephrine (1 μM) precontracted rings, VPR (0.01–300 μg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation (maximum response (MR) = 75.4 ± 4.0%, EC50 = 5.97 (3.8–9.3) μg/mL, n = 6]); this effect was significantly modified after removal of the endothelium (EC50 = 39.6 (27.2–57.6) μg/mL, P < 0.05). However, VPF-induced vasorelaxation was less effective compared to VPR. When rings were preincubated with L-NAME (100 μM) or indomethacin (10 μM), the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by VPR was significantly attenuated (MR = 20.9 ± 2.3%, 34.2 ± 2.9%, resp., P < 0.001). In rings denuded endothelium, precontracted with KCl (80 mM), or in preparations pretreated with KCl (20 mM) or tetraethylammonium (1 or 3 mM), the vasorelaxant activity of VPR was significantly attenuated (MR = 40.0 ± 8.2, n = 5; 50.5 ± 6.0%; 49.3 ± 6.4%; 46.8 ± 6.2%; resp., P < 0.01). In contrast, neither glibenclamide (10 μM), barium chloride (30 μM), nor 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) affected VPR-induced relaxation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypotension induced by VPR seems to involve, at least in part, a vascular component. Furthermore, endothelium-independent relaxation induced by VPR involves K+ channels activation, most likely due to BKCa channels, in the rat superior mesenteric artery. PMID:24023569

  5. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to acetylcholine and phenylephrine in cirrhotic rats challenged with endotoxin: the role of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Tavangar, Seyed-Mohammad; Nikoui, Vahid; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Eftekhari, Golnar; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2015-06-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with vascular dysfunction and endotoxemia. These experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the administration of a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) worsens vascular dysfunction in rats subjected to bile-duct ligation (BDL), and to determine whether LPS initiates changes in vascular Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression. Four weeks after BDL, the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or LPS (1.0 mg/kg body mass). Three hours later, the superior mesenteric artery was isolated, perfused, and then subjected to the vasoconstriction and vasodilatation effects of phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. Our results show that phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction decreased in the cirrhotic vascular bed (BDL rats) compared with the vascular bed of the sham-operated animals, and that the LPS injections in the cirrhotic (BDL) rats worsened this response. LPS injection administered to the sham-operated animals had no such effect. On the other hand, both the BDL procedure and the LPS injection increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation, but LPS administration to the BDL rats had no effect on this response. The mRNA levels of TLR4 did not change, but immunohistochemical studies showed that TLR4 localization switched from the endothelium to vascular smooth muscle cells following chronic BDL. In conclusion, acute endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats is associated with hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and tolerance to the effects of acetylcholine. Altered localization of TLR4 may be responsible for these effects. PMID:25978623

  6. Mechanics of the Unusual Basilar Membrane in Gerbil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapuria, Santosh; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2011-11-01

    The basilar membrane in gerbil differs from most other mammals, since its width and thickness show little variation from base to apex, and tympanic fiber layer in the pectinate zone forms a pronounced arch. Measurements indicate a quadratically increasing stiffness under point loading, which is contrary to the expected behavior of an arch. The plateau value has been considered to be the physiologically relevant stiffness, but it only occurs after 10-25 μm of deflection, whereas the normal physiological deflection is in the submicron range. The present work aims to resolve these contradictions by considering the mechanics of the geometric configuration.

  7. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  8. Aldosterone alters the participation of endothelial factors in noradrenaline vasoconstriction differently in resistance arteries from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Fabiano E; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Avendaño, María Soledad; Sastre, Esther; Yela, Rubén; Velázquez, Kyra; Salaíces, Mercedes; Balfagón, Gloria

    2011-03-11

    This study analyzed the effect of aldosterone (0.05mg/kg per day, 3 weeks) on vasoconstriction induced by noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries from WKY rats and SHR. Contraction to noradrenaline was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated and aldosterone-treatedrats from both strains. Participation of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions, thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin in this response was determined. 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1alpha and thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) releases were determined by enzyme immunoassay. NO and superoxide anion release were also determined by fluorescence and chemiluminiscence, respectively. Aldosterone did not modify noradrenaline-induced contraction in either strain. In mesenteric resistance arteries from both aldosterone-treated groups, endothelium removal or preincubation with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME increased the noradrenaline-induced contraction, while incubation with the superoxide anion scavenger tempol decreased it. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin and NS-398, respectively) decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals, while this response was not modified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. TxA(2) synthesis inhibitor (furegrelate), or TxA2 receptor antagonist (SQ 29 548) also decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals. In untreated SHR, but not WKY rats, this response was increased by L-NAME, and reduced by tempol, indomethacin, NS-398 or SQ 29 548. Aldosterone treatment did not modify NO or TxB(2) release, but it did increase superoxide anion and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) release in mesenteric resistance arteries from both strains. In conclusion, chronic aldosterone treatment reduces smooth muscle contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimuli, producing a new balance in the release of endothelium-derived prostanoids and NO. PMID:21262224

  9. Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. II. Impact of exercise training in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Nathan T.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Rector, R. Scott; Davis, J. Wade; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the extent to which exercise training alters global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries and aortic endothelial cells of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Transcriptional profiles of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle feed arteries (SFA and GFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EndEx; n = 12) or a interval sprint training program (IST; n = 12) or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12) were examined. In response to EndEx, there were 39 upregulated (e.g., MANF) and 20 downregulated (e.g., ALOX15) genes in SFA and 1 upregulated (i.e., Wisp2) and 1 downregulated (i.e., Crem) gene in GFA [false discovery rate (FDR) < 10%]. In response to IST, there were 305 upregulated (e.g., MANF, HSPA12B) and 324 downregulated genes in SFA and 101 upregulated and 66 downregulated genes in GFA, with an overlap of 32 genes between arteries. Furthermore, in aortic endothelial cells, there were 183 upregulated (e.g., eNOS, SOD-3) and 141 downregulated (e.g., ATF3, Clec1b, npy, leptin) genes with EndEx and 71 upregulated and 69 downregulated genes with IST, with an overlap of 35 between exercise programs. Expression of only two genes (Tubb2b and Slc9a3r2) was altered (i.e., increased) by exercise in all three arteries. The finding that both EndEx and IST produced greater transcriptional changes in the SFA compared with the GFA is intriguing when considering the fact that treadmill bouts of exercise are associated with greater relative increases in blood flow to the gastrocnemius muscle compared with the soleus muscle. PMID:24408995

  10. [Effect of bilateral common carotid artery ligation on prostaglandin levels (TXA2, PGI2) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP, SHRSR) and normotensive rats (WKY)].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Y; Suzuki, S; Shimizu, J; Inamura, K; Sugimoto, S; Terashi, A

    1986-06-01

    Three different levels of global forebrain ischemia were induced in rats and their plasma levels of Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6 Keto PGF1 alpha were determined to investigate the relation between severity of ischemia and eicosanoid production. Ischemia stimulates the activity of cellular lipase whose actions cause deacylation of brain phospholipids and release of free fatty acids. Arachidonic acid (A.A.) is one of the predominant fatty acids which is liberated in brain after ischemia. A.A. is the primary substrate for the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and Prostacyclin (PGI2), which play an important role in regulation of platelet aggregation and vasotonus. Thromboxane is a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor. On the other hand, PGI2 has the opposite nature. Therefore it can be considered that PGs and moreover, the balance of TXA2 and PGI2 may have an intimate relation to the development of cerebral ischemia. Three different levels of ischemia were produced by bilateral carotid artery ligation (BLCL) using three kinds of rats with different blood pressure ranges, namely, SHRSP (Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats), SHRSR (Stroke-resistant spontaneously hypertensive rats) and WKY (Wistar kyoto rats). It is known that higher pressure groups suffer severe ischemia by BLCL procedure. Hypertensive rats (SHRSP, SHRSR) were originally produced from WKY. The experimental animals used were about 300 gr and 16 weeks old male rats. The plasma and brain TXB2 and 6 Keto-PGF1 alpha, stable metabolites of TXA2 and PGI2 were measured by radioimmunoassay. The chronological changes of brain and plasma PGs levels after ischemia using SHRSR were also investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3524627

  11. Morphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the effect of bromocriptine and cyclosporine on the vasospastic femoral artery of rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Başocak, Kahan; Canaz, Hüseyin; Canaz, Gökhan; İplikçioğlu, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is the main causes of mortality and morbidity in patiens with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The arterial narrowing mechanism that develops after SAH is not yet fully understood but many studies showed that hypotension, neurogenic reflexes, clots in the subarachnoidal space, spasmogenic agents, humoral and celluler immunity play a role in the etiology. In this study we investigate the effects of Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A in vasospasm secondary to SAH on rat femoral artery from ultrastructural and morphometric perspectives. 120 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 12 groups: Vasospasm (V), control (K), surgical control (CK) groups, vasospasm+Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A groups (VCyA, VBr, VBr+CyA), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A control groups (CK, BK, Br+CyAK), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A surgical control groups (BCK, CyCK, Br+CyACK). In order to create SAH model, 0, 1 cm3 blood injected into silastic sheath wrapped rat femoral artery. Bromocriptine (2 mg/kg/d) and Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg/d) combinations applied to control, surgical control and vasospastic models. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy used during this study. Statistical evaluation of the morphometric measurement data concerning vascular wall thickness and luminal cross-sectional areas of all groups were performed using Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon-signed rank, and Student-t tests. Cyclosporine A, whose effects in the prevention of vasospasm have been demonstrated in previous studies. In this study we discovered that Bromocriptine demonstrated strong effects similar to Cyclosporine-A. Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A markedly prevent the development of chronic morphologic vasospasm following SAH. The combined use of both drugs does not change this preventive effect. PMID:26770311

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibition attenuates middle cerebral artery remodeling but increases cerebral ischemic damage in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Girgla, Saavia S.; Moreno, Guillermo; McClain, Jonathon L.; Dorrance, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension causes vascular inflammation evidenced by an increase in perivascular macrophages and proinflammatory cytokines in the arterial wall. Perivascular macrophage depletion reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in cerebral arteries of hypertensive rats and attenuated inward remodeling, suggesting that TNF-α might play a role in the remodeling process. We hypothesized that TNF-α inhibition would improve middle cerebral artery (MCA) structure and reduce damage after cerebral ischemia in hypertensive rats. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept (ETN; 1.25 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip daily) or PBS (equivolume) for 6 wk. The myogenic tone generation, postischemic dilation, and passive structure of MCAs were assessed by pressure myography. Cerebral ischemia was induced by MCA occlusion (MCAO). Myogenic tone was unchanged, but MCAs from SHRSP + ETN had larger passive lumen diameter and reduced wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio. Cerebral infarct size was increased in SHRSP + ETN after transient MCAO, despite an improvement in dilation of nonischemic MCA. The increase in infarct size was linked to a reduction in the number of microglia in the infarct core and upregulation of markers of classical macrophage/microglia polarization. There was no difference in infarct size after permanent MCAO or when untreated SHRSP subjected to transient MCAO were given ETN at reperfusion. Our data suggests that TNF-α inhibition attenuates hypertensive MCA remodeling but exacerbates cerebral damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury likely due to inhibition of the innate immune response of the brain. PMID:25015967

  13. Endothelial dysfunction of rat coronary arteries after exposure to low concentrations of mercury is dependent on reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Furieri, Lorena B; Galán, María; Avendaño, María S; García-Redondo, Ana B; Aguado, Andrea; Martínez, Sonia; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Bartolomé, M Visitación; Alonso, María J; Vassallo, Dalton V; Salaices, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Exposure to mercury is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying mechanisms are not well explored. We analysed whether chronic exposure to low mercury doses affects endothelial modulation of the coronary circulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Left coronary arteries and hearts from Wistar rats treated with either HgCl2 (first dose 4.6 µg·kg−1, subsequent doses 0.07 µg·kg−1 day−1, 30 days) or vehicle were used. Endothelial cells from pig coronary arteries incubated with HgCl2 were also used. KEY RESULTS Mercury treatment increased 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction but reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation. It also reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the effects of NO synthase inhibition with L-NAME (100 µmol·L−1) on 5-HT and acetylcholine responses. Superoxide anion production and mRNA levels of NOX-1 and NOX-4 were all increased. The superoxide anion scavenger tiron (1 mmol·L−1) reduced 5-HT responses and increased acetylcholine responses only in vessels from mercury-treated rats. In isolated hearts from mercury-treated rats, coronary perfusion and diastolic pressure were unchanged, but developed isovolumetric systolic pressure was reduced. In these hearts, L-NAME increased coronary perfusion pressure and diastolic pressure while it further reduced developed systolic pressure. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Chronic exposure to low doses of mercury promotes endothelial dysfunction of coronary arteries, as shown by decreased NO bioavailability induced by increased oxidative stress. These effects on coronary function increase resistance to flow, which under overload conditions might cause ventricular contraction and relaxation impairment. These findings provide further evidence that mercury, even at low doses, could be an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. PMID:21232032

  14. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, D.K.; Grover, A.K.; Daniel, E.E.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with (3H) prazosin and (3H)yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the (3H)prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the (3H) yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the (3H)prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that (3H)prazosin and (3H)yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle.

  15. Hair bundle profiles along the chick basilar papilla

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, R. K.; ILE, K. E.; DUBIN, M. G.; SAUNDERS, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells play a central role in the transduction of sound into neural output. Anatomical descriptions of these cells, and their protruding hair bundles, are of fundamental interest since hair cell transduction is dependent on hair bundle micromechanics and hair bundle micromechanics depends on hair bundle morphology. In this paper, we describe quantitatively changes in the staircase profile of the hair bundle along the apical portion of the chick's basilar papilla. Images of hair cells from 8 discretely dissected segments of the apical 3rd of the basilar papilla were archived, and the profile contour outlined by the tips of the stereocilia was digitised and curves were fitted by linear and power equations. The hair bundles of tall hair cells exhibited both linear and curvilinear profiles, which were equally distributed along the papilla. All short hair cells in our sample had straight contours. The differences in hair bundle shape among the tall hair cells may lead to differential susceptibility to injury and some variance in the current-displacement transduction curves due to differences in the translation of forces throughout the hair bundle. PMID:11215761

  16. Identification of L- and T-type Ca2+ channels in rat cerebral arteries: role in myogenic tone development.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahman, Rasha R; Harraz, Osama F; Brett, Suzanne E; Anfinogenova, Yana; Mufti, Rania E; Goldman, Daniel; Welsh, Donald G

    2013-01-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels are broadly expressed in arterial smooth muscle cells, and their voltage-dependent properties are important in tone development. Recent studies have noted that these Ca(2+) channels are not singularly expressed in vascular tissue and that other subtypes are likely present. In this study, we ascertained which voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are expressed in rat cerebral arterial smooth muscle and determined their contribution to the myogenic response. mRNA analysis revealed that the α(1)-subunit of L-type (Ca(v)1.2) and T-type (Ca(v)3.1 and Ca(v)3.2) Ca(2+) channels are present in isolated smooth muscle cells. Western blot analysis subsequently confirmed protein expression in whole arteries. With the use of patch clamp electrophysiology, nifedipine-sensitive and -insensitive Ba(2+) currents were isolated and each were shown to retain electrical characteristics consistent with L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels. The nifedipine-insensitive Ba(2+) current was blocked by mibefradil, kurtoxin, and efonidpine, T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitors. Pressure myography revealed that L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibition reduced tone at 20 and 80 mmHg, with the greatest effect at high pressure when the vessel is depolarized. In comparison, the effect of T-type Ca(2+) channel blockade on myogenic tone was more limited, with their greatest effect at low pressure where vessels are hyperpolarized. Blood flow modeling revealed that the vasomotor responses induced by T-type Ca(2+) blockade could alter arterial flow by ∼20-50%. Overall, our findings indicate that L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed in cerebral arterial smooth muscle and can be electrically isolated from one another. Both conductances contribute to myogenic tone, although their overall contribution is unequal. PMID:23103495

  17. Effects of aging on agonist-activated sup 86 Rb efflux in arteries of Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.H.; Tulenko, T.N. )

    1989-08-01

    Segments of thoracic aorta (DTA), tail artery (TA), and mesenteric artery branches (MAB) were obtained from male Fischer 344 rats at ages of 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, and 30 mo and were used to determine the effects of aging on agonist-activated {sup 86}Rb (and {sup 42}K) efflux. At all three arterial sites, basal efflux decreased during development (1-6 mo), but no further changes were observed with aging (6-30 mo). The initial efflux response to 10 microM norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 1 microM propranolol exhibited either no change (DTA) or an increase (TA and MAB) during development (1-6 mo), but all three sites showed a large decrease during aging (6-30 mo). Changes in the steady-state response to NE paralleled changes in the basal efflux at all ages and arterial sites. The initial efflux response to 75 mM K+-physiological salt solution (PSS) for the DTA in the presence of 1 microM phentolamine and 1 microM propranolol decreased during development followed by an increase during aging, whereas for the TA and MAB, there were no significant changes with age. The steady-state efflux response to K+ decreased during development at all three sites but was increased only for the DTA during aging. The steady-state efflux response to K+ was not altered for the TA and MAB during aging. Efflux responses using {sup 42}K were qualitatively similar, but rate constants were quantitatively larger than those with {sup 86}Rb at all three arterial sites and at all ages.

  18. Vasorelaxation to N-oleoylethanolamine in rat isolated arteries: mechanisms of action and modulation via cyclooxygenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wheal, AJ; Alexander, SPH; Randall, MD

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The endocannabinoid-like molecule N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) is found in the small intestine and regulates food intake and promotes weight loss. The principal aim of the present study was to evaluate the vascular effects of OEA. Experimental approach: Perfused isolated mesenteric arterial beds were pre-contracted with methoxamine or high potassium buffers and concentration-response curves to OEA were constructed. Combinations of inhibitors to block nitric oxide production, sensory nerve activity, cyclooxygenase activity, potassium channels, chloride channels and gap junctions, and a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, were used during these experiments. The effects of OEA on caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer were also assessed. Isolated thoracic aortic rings were used as a comparison. Key results: OEA caused concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in rat isolated mesenteric arterial beds and thoracic aortic rings, with a greater maximal response in mesenteric vessels. This relaxation was sensitive to inhibition of sensory nerve activity and endothelial removal in both preparations. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin reversed the effects of capsaicin pre-treatment in perfused mesenteric arterial beds and indomethacin alone enhanced vasorelaxation to OEA. The OEA-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by a CB1 receptor antagonist only in aortic rings. In mesenteric arteries, OEA suppressed caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer. Conclusions and implications: The vasorelaxant effects of OEA are partly dependent on sensory nerve activity and a functional endothelium in the vasculature. In addition, vasorelaxation to OEA is enhanced following cyclooxygenase inhibition. OEA may also interfere with the release of intracellular calcium in arterial preparations. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476

  19. High oxygen modifies vasodilator effect of cysteine via enhanced oxidative stress and thromboxane production in the rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Feng, Guo-Gang; Li, Jiazheng; Nakamura, Emi; Hayashi, Hisaki; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Whether high oxygen is harmful to the vascular function is unclear. The present study examined if high oxygen modifies vasodilator effect of cysteine via enhanced oxidative stress and thromboxane production. Rat mesenteric arteries with endothelium at 95 or 50 % oxygen were subjected to isometric force recordings, measurement of thromboxane B2 levels, determination of superoxide and peroxynitrite levels and evaluation of NADPH oxidase subunit protein expression, respectively. L-cysteine (0.01-3 mM) constricted or dilated arteries at 95 and 50 % oxygen, respectively. Thromboxane receptor antagonist SQ-29,548 (1 μM) abolished the constriction at 95 % oxygen. L-cysteine (3 mM) increased levels of thromboxane B2 in arteries upon 95 % oxygen application. L-cysteine relaxed arteries treated with superoxide inhibitor tiron (2 mM) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor gp91ds-tat (1 μM) irrespective of the oxygen concentration while ATP-sensitive K(+) channel inhibitor glibenclamide (1 μM) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) inhibitor DL-propargylglycine (10 mM) similarly abolished the relaxation. L-cysteine (3 mM) with 95 % oxygen augmented levels of superoxide as well as nitrotyrosine within the artery, concomitantly with enhanced membrane protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox. The higher concentration of oxygen attenuates L-cysteine-induced vasodilation via superoxide production mediated by NADPH oxidase along with thromboxane A2 production, resulting in vasoconstriction. The increased levels of superoxide, as well as peroxynitrite, coexist with the impaired vasodilation related to ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and CSE. Higher oxygen with plasma cysteine may cause oxidative stress and vasoconstrictor prostanoid production in blood vessels. PMID:27389323

  20. Coil treatment of a fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with a combination of "kissing" neuroform stents, TriSpan-, 3D- and fibered coils, and permanent implantation of the microguidewires.

    PubMed

    Henkes, H; Kirsch, M; Mariushi, W; Miloslavski, E; Brew, S; Kühne, D

    2004-06-01

    Endovascular coil occlusion of fusiform intracranial aneurysms without sacrifice of the parent artery can be technically challenging. Bridging of wide aneurysm necks with stents is common practice for side-wall aneurysms but is less frequently used for bifurcation aneurysms. We describe the technical aspects of the successful coil occlusion of a fusiform aneurysm of the upper basilar trunk, with preservation of the parent vessel. The procedure comprised the following steps: (a) stenting of the left V1- and proximal V2 segments; (b) simultaneous deployment of two Neuroform stents from both P1 segments down to the basilar artery ("kissing" stents) (c) using a TriSpan device to hold (d) three-dimensional electrolytically detachable coils in place and (e) filling the aneurysmal lumen mainly with fibered electrolytically detachable coils; and finally (f) cutting the extracorporeal part of both microguidewires below the skin level in both groins, leaving the microguidewires as they were used for the deployment of the stents in place, thus reaching from both P2 segments down to the basilar artery and further proximally. PMID:15103433

  1. Decreased excitability and voltage-gated sodium currents in aortic baroreceptor neurons contribute to the impairment of arterial baroreflex in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong-Ku; Park, Kwang-Hwa; Baik, Soon-Koo; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, which is manifested by an impairment of the arterial baroreflex, is prevalent irrespective of etiology and contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex remain unknown. In the present study, we examined whether the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex is attributable to the dysfunction of aortic baroreceptor (AB) neurons. Biliary and nonbiliary cirrhotic rats were generated via common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA), respectively. Histological and molecular biological examinations confirmed the development of fibrosis in the livers of both cirrhotic rat models. The heart rate changes during phenylephrine-induced baroreceptor activation indicated that baroreflex sensitivity was blunted in the CBDL and TAA rats. Under the current-clamp mode of the patch-clamp technique, cell excitability was recorded in DiI-labeled AB neurons. The number of action potential discharges in the A- and C-type AB neurons was significantly decreased because of the increased rheobase and threshold potential in the CBDL and TAA rats compared with sham-operated rats. Real-time PCR and Western blotting indicated that the NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 transcripts and proteins were significantly downregulated in the nodose ganglion neurons from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Consistent with these molecular data, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV currents and the tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV currents were significantly decreased in A- and C-type AB neurons, respectively, from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Taken together, these findings implicate a key cellular mechanism in the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex. PMID:26984890

  2. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 Receptors Decreases the Contractile Response to Angiotensin II in Resistance Mesenteric Arteries from Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Graziela N.; Lobato, Nubia S.; Filgueira, Fernando P.; Akamine, Eliana H.; Aragão, Danielle S.; Casarini, Dulce E.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Fortes, Zuleica B.

    2014-01-01

    It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese) and non-obese Wistar rats (control) were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats. PMID:25170617

  3. Upregulation of ERK1/2-eNOS via AT2 receptors decreases the contractile response to angiotensin II in resistance mesenteric arteries from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Graziela N; Lobato, Nubia S; Filgueira, Fernando P; Akamine, Eliana H; Aragão, Danielle S; Casarini, Dulce E; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B

    2014-01-01

    It has been clearly established that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) are important mediators of angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling via AT1 receptors in the vasculature. However, evidence for a role of these kinases in changes of Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in obesity is still lacking. Here we sought to determine whether vascular MAPKs are differentially activated by Ang II in obese animals. The role of AT2 receptors was also evaluated. Male monosodium glutamate-induced obese (obese) and non-obese Wistar rats (control) were used. The circulating concentrations of Ang I and Ang II, determined by HPLC, were increased in obese rats. Ang II-induced isometric contraction was decreased in endothelium-intact resistance mesenteric arteries from obese compared with control rats and exhibited a retarded AT1 receptor antagonist response. Blocking of AT2 receptors and inhibition of either endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) or extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) restored Ang II-induced contraction in obese rats. Western blot analysis revealed increased protein expression of AT2 receptors in arteries from obese rats. Basal and Ang II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was also increased in obese rats. Blockade of either AT1 or AT2 receptors corrected the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from obese rats to levels observed in control preparations. Phosphorylation of eNOS was increased in obese rats. Incubation with the ERK1/2 inhibitor before Ang II stimulation did not affect eNOS phosphorylation in control rats; however, it corrected the increased phosphorylation of eNOS in obese rats. These results clearly demonstrate that enhanced AT2 receptor and ERK1/2-induced, NO-mediated vasodilation reduces Ang II-induced contraction in an endothelium-dependent manner in obese rats. PMID:25170617

  4. Potentiation by vasopressin of adrenergic vasoconstriction in the rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, I; Medina, P; Segarra, G; Martínez, M C; Aldasoro, M; Vila, J M; Lluch, S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in rat mesenteric artery rings whether low concentrations of vasopressin could modify the contractile responses to noradrenaline and electrical stimulation of perivascular nerves. Vasopressin (10−10–10−7 M) caused concentration-dependent contractions (pD2=8.36±0.09). The V1-receptor antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP (10−9–10−8 M) produced parallel rightward shifts of the control curve for vasopressin. Schild analysis yielded a pA2 value of 9.83 with a slope of 1.10±0.14. Vasopressin (3×10 −10 and 10−9 M) caused concentration-dependent potentiation of the contractions elicited by electrical stimulation (2–8 Hz; 0.2 ms duration for 30 s) and produced leftward shifts of the concentration-response curve for noradrenaline. The V1-receptor antagonist induced concentration-dependent inhibitions of potentiation induced by vasopressin. The selective V1-receptor agonist [Phe*, Orn8]-vasotocin (3×10 −10 and 10−9 M) induced potentiation of electrical stimulation-evoked responses which was also inhibited in the presence of the V1 antagonist (10−8 M). In contrast, the V2-receptor agonist deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (desmopressin 10−8–10−7 M) did not modify the electrical stimulation-induced responses and the V2-receptor antagonist [d(CH2)5, D-Ile*, Ile4, Arg8]-vasopressin (10−8–10−7 M) did not affect the potentiation evoked by vasopressin. In artery rings contracted by 10−6 M noradrenaline in the presence of 10−6 M guanethidine and 10−6 M atropine, electrical stimulation (2, 4 and 8 Hz) produced frequency-dependent relaxations which were unaffected by 10−9 M vasopressin but abolished by 10−6 M tetrodotoxin. Vasopressin also potentiated contractions elicited by KCl and contractions induced by addition of CaCl2 to KCl depolarized vessels. The augmenting effects were inhibited by the V1 antagonist. In the presence of the calcium antagonist nifedipine (10

  5. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) - A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Vedaraju, K S; Manjappa, B H; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  6. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) – A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vedaraju, KS; Manjappa, BH; Nagaraj, BR

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  7. Iron-induced remodeling in cultured rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V; Atkins, James L; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Pitt, Bruce R

    2012-02-01

    Although iron is known to be a component of the pathogenesis and/or maintenance of acute lung injury (ALI) in experimental animals and human subjects, the majority of these studies have focused on disturbances in iron homeostasis in the airways resulting from exposure to noxious gases and particles. Considerably less is known about the effect of increased plasma levels of redox-reactive non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) and its impact on pulmonary endothelium. Plasma levels of NTBI can increase under various pathophysiological conditions, including those associated with ALI, and multiple mechanisms are in place to affect the [Fe(2+)]/[Fe(3+)] redox steady state. It is well accepted, however, that intracellular transport of NTBI occurs after reduction of [Fe(3+)] to [Fe(2+)] (and is mediated by divalent metal transporters). Accordingly, as an experimental model to investigate mechanisms mediating vascular effects of redox reactive iron, rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (RPAECs) were subjected to pulse treatment (10 min) with [Fe(2+)] nitriloacetate (30 μM) in the presence of pyrithione, an iron ionophore, to acutely increase intracellular labile pool of iron. Cellular iron influx and cell shape profile were monitored with time-lapse imaging techniques. Exposure of RPAECs to [Fe(2+)] resulted in: (i) an increase in intracellular iron as detected by the iron sensitive fluorophore, PhenGreen; (ii) depletion of cell glutathione; and (iii) nuclear translocation of stress-response transcriptional factors Nrf2 and NFkB (p65). The resulting iron-induced cell alterations were characterized by cell polarization and formation of membrane cuplike and microvilli-like projections abundant with ICAM-1, caveolin-1, and F-actin. The iron-induced re-arrangements in cytoskeleton, alterations in focal cell-cell interactions, and cell buckling were accompanied by decrease in electrical resistance of RPAEC monolayer. These effects were partially eliminated in the presence of N

  8. Nerve regeneration and elastin formation within poly(glycerol sebacate)-based synthetic arterial grafts one-year post-implantation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert A.; Wu, Wei; Yao, Mingyi; Dutta, Debaditya; Duan, Xinjie; Bachman, Timothy N.; Champion, Hunter C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Robertson, Anne M.; Kim, Kang; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long term performance of cell-free vascular grafts made from a fast-degrading elastic polymer. We fabricated small arterial grafts from microporous tubes of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) reinforced with polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers on the outer surface. Grafts were interpositioned in rat abdominal aortas and characterized at 1 year post-implant. Grafts remodeled into “neoarteries” (regenerated arteries) with similar gross appearance to native rat aortas. Neoarteries mimic arterial tissue architecture with a confluent endothelium and media and adventita-like layers. Patent vessels (80%) showed no significant stenosis, dilation, or calcification. Neoarteries contain nerves and have the same amount of mature elastin as native arteries. Despite some differences in matrix organization, regenerated arteries had similar dynamic mechanical compliance to native arteries in vivo. Neoarteries responded to vasomotor agents, albeit with different magnitude than native aortas. These data suggest that an elastic vascular graft that resorbs quickly has potential to improve the performance of vascular grafts used in small arteries. This design may also promote constructive remodeling in other soft tissues. PMID:24119457

  9. Pharmacologic analysis of 7-O-ethyl-fangchinoline-induced vasodilation properties in isolated perfused common carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, M; Zenda, H; Chiba, S

    1991-10-01

    Using the cannula insertion method, we investigated vascular effects of 7-O-ethyl-fangchinoline (TJN-220) derived from tetrandrine in isolated and perfused common carotid arteries of Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A single dose of TJN-220 caused a vasodilation in a dose-related manner in arteries preconstricted by phenylephrine. The vasodilation was not inhibited by propranolol, a potent beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. A potent alpha-antagonist bunazosin inhibited the vasoconstriction to norepinephrine while TJN-220 did not modify the norepinephrine-induced constriction, indicating TJN-220 had no alpha-blocking activity. A potent calcium entry blocker, diltiazem, markedly attenuated the KCl-induced vasoconstriction, and TJN-220 slightly but significantly attenuated the KCl-induced one in large doses. The vasodilation of TJN-220 was not abolished after removing the endothelium by an intraluminal administration of saponin, although the ACh-induced dilation was completely abolished by it. A comparison of vascular responses in WKY and SHR revealed no significant differences. From these results, it is concluded that 1) a new tetrandrine derivative, TJN-220 has relatively long-lasting vasorelaxant properties, 2) the dilatory effects might not be related to adrenergic, muscarinic or endothelium-dependent mechanisms, and 3) the effects might partially be due to calcium entry antagonistic properties. PMID:1806292

  10. Mixing during intravertebral arterial infusions in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Robert J; Warren, Kathy; Balis, Frank; Patronas, Nicholas; Dedrick, Robert L

    2002-06-01

    Regional delivery of drugs can offer a pharmacokinetic advantage in the treatment of localized tumors. One method of regional delivery is by intra-arterial infusion into the basilar/vertebral artery network that provides local access to infratentorial tumors, which are frequent locations of childhood brain cancers. Proper delivery of drug by infused solutions requires adequate mixing of the infusate at the site of infusion within the artery lumen. Our mixing studies with an in vitro model of the vertebral artery network indicate that streaming of drug solution is likely to occur at low, steady infusion rates of 2 ml/min. Streaming leads to maldistribution of drug to distal perfused brain regions and may result in toxic levels in some regions while concurrently yielding subtherapeutic levels in adjacent regions. According to our model findings, distribution to both brain hemispheres is not likely following infusion into a single vertebral artery even if the infusate is well-mixed at the infusion site. This outcome results from the unique fluid flow properties of two converging channels, which are represented by the left and right vertebral branches converging into the basilar. Fluid in the model remains stratified on the side of the basilar artery served by the infused vertebral artery. Careful thought and planning of the methods of intravertebral drug infusions for treating posterior fossa tumors are required to assure proper distribution of the drug to the desired tissue regions. Improper delivery may be responsible for some noted toxicities or for failure of the treatments. PMID:12164691

  11. Inhibitory effect of Bailing capsule on hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Peng, Kejun; Zhou, Yutian; Deng, Fengmei; Ma, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigated the effects of Bailing capsule on hypoxia-induced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Methods: This prospective study was performed at the Central Laboratory, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, China between April 2012 and November 2014. Ten healthy adult male Wistar rats were administrated with gastric perfusion of Bailing capsule to obtain serum containing the tested drugs. Proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells proliferation was measured using cell counting kit-8 assay. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat PASMCs was determined through a fluorometric assay, whereas production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) was detected by ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), c-fos, and c-jun in PASMCs was also determined using immunohistochemistry staining and qRT-PCR. Results: We observed that the medicated serum obviously inhibited hypoxia-induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the medicated serum significantly reduced hypoxia-induced production of ROS and ET-1, as well as expression of PCNA, c-fos, and c-jun, in PASMCs. Conclusion: Results demonstrated that Bailing capsule can inhibit hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation possibly by suppressing ET-1 and ROS production and by inhibiting expression of PCNA, c-fos, and c-jun. These results suggest that Bailing possess antiproliferative property, which is probably one of the underlying mechanisms of Bailing capsule for the clinical treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27146611

  12. Modulation of Ca2+ channels by opioid receptor antagonists in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kai, Li; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Hu, De-Yao; Shi, Yu-Liang; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2002-10-01

    The effects of hemorrhagic shock on Ba currents ( ) via Ca channels and the regulation of the channels in the vascular hyporesponse stage of hemorrhagic shock by opioid receptor antagonists were examined by using the whole-cell recording of patch-clamp technique in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats. The results showed that hemorrhagic shock induced an inhibition of Ca channels in the cells; 10 micro M of naloxone and 100 n of naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and beta-funaltrexamine increased the in the cells of rats in shock. After inhibition of protein kinase C by using 1-(5-isoquindinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine via electrodes, the enhancement of by the antagonists was not observed. These results suggested that the inhibition of Ca channel induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by delta-, kappa-, and mu -opioid receptors in the cells and may be partly responsible for vascular hyporesponse. The enhancement of was mediated by activation of protein kinase C and may be responsible for the antagonist-caused improvement in the response of resistance arteries to vasoactive stimulants at the decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:12352325

  13. beta. -adrenergic receptor binding characteristics and responsiveness in cultured Wistar-Kyoto rat arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jazayeri, A.; Meyer, W.J. III

    1988-01-01

    The tone of arterial blood vessels is regulated by the catecholamines through their receptors on arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC). ..beta..-/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors of ASMC mediate vasodilation through agonist mediated c-AMP production. Previous reports have described these receptors on freshly isolated blood vessels. This study demonstrates the presence of ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors on cultured rat ASMC and that these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptor binding was measured using (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to the membrane of cultured ASMC from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. The ASMC ..beta..-adrenergic receptors have a Kd of 0.56 +/- 0.16 nM and a Bmax of 57.2 +/- 21.7 fmol/mg protein. Competition binding studies revealed a much greater affinity of these receptors for epinephrine than norepinephrine, indicating the preponderance of a ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype. Isoproterenol stimulation of cultured ASMC resulted in a 14 +/- 7 fold increase in intracellular c-AMP content of these cells indicating these receptors are functional. ..beta..-adrenergic receptors of cultured ASMC provide an excellent system in which the association between hypertension and observed ..beta..-adrenergic receptor differences can be further explored.

  14. A Rat Model of Thrombosis in Common Carotid Artery Induced by Implantable Wireless Light-Emitting Diode Device

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Lin, Yun-Han; Lou, Shyh-Liang; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2014-01-01

    This work has developed a novel approach to form common carotid artery (CCA) thrombus in rats with a wireless implantable light-emitting diode (LED) device. The device mainly consists of an external controller and an internal LED assembly. The controller was responsible for wirelessly transmitting electrical power. The internal LED assembly served as an implant to receive the power and irradiate light on CCA. The thrombus formation was identified with animal sonography, 7T magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathologic examination. The present study showed that a LED assembly implanted on the outer surface of CCA could induce acute occlusion with single irradiation with 6 mW/cm2 LED for 4 h. If intermittent irradiation with 4.3–4.5 mW/cm2 LED for 2 h was shut off for 30 min, then irradiation for another 2 h was applied; the thrombus was observed to grow gradually and was totally occluded at 7 days. Compared with the contralateral CCA without LED irradiation, the arterial endothelium in the LED-irradiated artery was discontinued. Our study has shown that, by adjusting the duration of irradiation and the power intensity of LED, it is possible to produce acute occlusion and progressive thrombosis, which can be used as an animal model for antithrombotic drug development. PMID:25045695

  15. Vertebro-Basilar Junction Aneurysms: A Single Centre Experience and Meta-Analysis of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option. PMID:25489898

  16. Locus coeruleus noradrenergic innervation of the amygdala facilitates alerting-induced constriction of the rat tail artery.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mazher; Kulasekara, Keerthi; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Blessing, William W

    2016-06-01

    The amygdala, innervated by the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, processes salient environmental events. α2-adrenoceptor-stimulating drugs (clonidine-like agents) suppress the behavioral and physiological components of the response to salient events. Activation of sympathetic outflow to the cutaneous vascular bed is part of the physiological response to salience-mediated activation of the amygdala. We have determined whether acute systemic and intra-amygdala administration of clonidine, and chronic immunotoxin-mediated destruction of the noradrenergic innervation of the amygdala, impairs salience-related vasoconstrictor episodes in the tail artery of conscious freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. After acute intraperitoneal injection of clonidine (10, 50, and 100 μg/kg), there was a dose-related decrease in the reduction in tail blood flow elicited by alerting stimuli, an effect prevented by prior administration of the α2-adrenergic blocking drug idazoxan (1 mg/kg ip or 75 nmol bilateral intra-amygdala). A dose-related decrease in alerting-induced tail artery vasoconstriction was also observed after bilateral intra-amygdala injection of clonidine (5, 10, and 20 nmol in 200 nl), an effect substantially prevented by prior bilateral intra-amygdala injection of idazoxan. Intra-amygdala injection of idazoxan by itself did not alter tail artery vasoconstriction elicited by alerting stimuli. Intra-amygdala injection of saporin coupled to antibodies to dopamine-β-hydroxylase (immunotoxin) destroyed the noradrenergic innervation of the amygdala and the parent noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. The reduction in tail blood flow elicited by standardized alerting stimuli was substantially reduced in immunotoxin-treated rats. Thus, inhibiting the release of noradrenaline within the amygdala reduces activation of the sympathetic outflow to the vascular beds elicited by salient events. PMID:27101292

  17. Chronic fluoxetine treatment increases NO bioavailability and calcium-sensitive potassium channels activation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Camila A; Ferreira, Nathanne S; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Evora, Paulo R B; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-10-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has effects beyond its antidepressant properties, altering, e.g., mechanisms involved in blood pressure and vasomotor tone control. Although many studies have addressed the acute impact of fluoxetine on the cardiovascular system, there is a paucity of information on the chronic vascular effects of this SSRI. We tested the hypothesis that chronic fluoxetine treatment enhances the vascular reactivity to vasodilator stimuli by increasing nitric oxide (NO) signaling and activation of potassium (K+) channels. Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (I) vehicle (water for 21 days) or (II) chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 21 days). Fluoxetine treatment increased endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxation (analyzed by mesenteric resistance arteries reactivity) as well as constitutive NO synthase (NOS) activity, phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine1177 and NO production, determined by western blot and fluorescence. On the other hand, fluoxetine treatment did not alter vascular expression of neuronal and inducible NOS or guanylyl cyclase (GC). Arteries from fluoxetine-treated rats exhibited increased relaxation to pinacidil. Increased acetylcholine vasorelaxation was abolished by a calcium-activated K+ channel (KCa) blocker, but not by an inhibitor of KATP channels. On the other hand, vascular responses to Bay 41-2272 and 8-bromo-cGMP were similar between the groups. In conclusion, chronic fluoxetine treatment increases endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of mesenteric resistance arteries by mechanisms that involve increased eNOS activity, NO generation, and KCa channels activation. These effects may contribute to the cardiovascular effects associated with chronic fluoxetine treatment. PMID:26362752

  18. Basic fibroblast growth factor enhances the coupling of intimal hyperplasia and proliferation of vasa vasorum in injured rat arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, E R; Nugent, M A; Smith, L T; Karnovsky, M J

    1992-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is mitogenic for smooth muscle cells (SMC) and angiogenic. We examined the in vivo effects of bFGF in balloon denuded carotid arteries of laboratory rats. bFGF was administered continuously from polymer-based devices at 34 ng/d into the periadventitial space of rat carotid arteries for 2 wk. Intimal hyperplasia was not observed in the absence of injury or with lipopolysaccharide induced endothelial dysfunction. Different degrees of vascular injury produced proportionally more intimal hyperplasia. bFGF increased the intimal hyperplastic response 1.3-fold with severe vascular injury, and 2.4-fold with more mild injury. Increased cell proliferation, not extracellular matrix production, accounted for these effects. Cell density was unchanged for the control and bFGF-treated groups, and the number of proliferating intimal cells at 2 wk rose to an amount equivalent to the increase in mass; 1.9- and 4.0-fold for severe and lesser injury, respectively. The relative ability of heparin to reduce SMC proliferation was not altered by the presence of bFGF.bFGF also induced profound angiogenesis within and surrounding the polymeric releasing device, and in the vasa vasorum immediately around the injured arteries. bFGF's effect on vasa was linearly related to the amount of SMC proliferation within the blood vessel. Thus, the in vivo mitogenic and angiogenic potential of bFGF are coupled, and may be similarly modulated by the products of local injury and/or factors in the vessel wall. Images PMID:1371124

  19. Prevention of neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid artery via small interference RNA mediated downregulation of osteopontin gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Sun, Yingxian; Wang, Tairan; Liu, Guinan

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to take osteopontin (OPN) as molecular target to study its effects on injured intima model of carotid artery in rat using perivascular transfer of OPN-small interference RNA (siRNA). OPN mRNA in cultured VSMCs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and OPN-siRNA-002 was determined as the most sensitive sequence and used as transfected siRNA in the subsequent animal experiments. We established rat carotid arterial intima-injured model with balloon-injured method, and then perivascularly transfected OPN-siRNA-002 to study the role of OPN-siRNA in regulating several related genes including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), as well as its role in neointimal formation. OPN mRNA and protein decreased about 50 % with corresponding decrease in intima thickness after transfecting with specific OPN-siRNA-002 compared with Pluronic control group and OPN-SCR-siRNA group on each time point (n = 6, p < 0.001), and this inhibiting effects persisted up to 14 days after balloon injury. PCNA, TGF-β1, MMP-2, and MMP-14 mRNA and protein correlated directly with the respective levels of OPN, suggesting its functions via regulating these downstream factors (n = 6, p < 0.001). OPN may be a potential target gene in reducing the risk for arterial restenosis after vascular intervention. PMID:23467880

  20. Effects of baicalin on collagen Ι and collagen ΙΙΙ expression in pulmonary arteries of rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LIU, PANPAN; YAN, SHUANGQUAN; CHEN, MAYUN; CHEN, ALI; YAO, DAN; XU, XIAOMEI; CAI, XUEDING; WANG, LIANGXING; HUANG, XIAOYING

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and accumulation of collagen play an important role in the formation and progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Baicalin has been reported to prevent bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of baicalin in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension remains unknown. A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-1 motif (ADAMTS-1) is a secreted enzyme that acts on a wide variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates associated with vascular diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on the synthesis of collagen I in rats with pulmonary hypertension induced by hypoxia and the changes in ADAMTS-1 expression. A total of 24 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups as follows: the control group (C), the hypoxia group (H) and the hypoxia + baicalin group (B). The rats in groups H and B were kept in a normobaric hypoxic chamber for 4 weeks, and the rats in group C were exposed to room air. We measured the hemodynamic indexes, including mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), mean systemic (carotid) artery pressure (mSAP), and then calculated the mass ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum [RV/(LV + S)] to reflect the extent of right ventricular hypertrophy. We measured the mRNA and protein expression levels of type I collagen, type III collagen and ADAMTS-1 by hybridization in situ, and immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, respectively. The results revealed that treatment with baicalin significantly reduced pulmonary artery pressure and attenuated the remodeling of the pulmonary artery under hypoxic conditions by increasing the expression of ADAMTS-1, so that the synthesis of type I collagen and its mRNA expression were inhibited. In conclusion, baicalin effectively inhibits the synthesis of collagen I in pulmonary arteries and this is associated with an increase in the expression of ADAMTS-1. Thus, treatment with baicalin may be an effective method for

  1. Correlation Between Echo-Tracking Parameters and In Vitro Measurements of Arterial Contraction and Relaxation in Rats Fed a High-Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhan, Wei-Wei; Wu, Yong-Jie; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Wu-Gang; Chen, Dong-Rui; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Zhen-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Min; Zheng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Echo-tracking (ET) is a new technique that allows the assessment of arterial function and stiffness. This study aimed to ascertain the utility of the echo-tracking (ET) technique to assess vascular stiffness in rats with hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Material/Methods ET was used to measure the arterial stiffness of the aorta in cholesterol-fed Sprague-Dawley rats (group T1, n=10, for 4 weeks; group T2, n=10, for 12 weeks) and normal control rats (group C1, n=10; group C2, n=10). In vitro isometric tension experiments were used to measure the maximum contractile tension (MCT) and maximum relaxation percentage (MRR%) of aortic rings. Indicators of arterial stiffness and aortic MCT and MRR% were compared between groups using linear regression analysis. Light microscopic evaluation was used to demonstrate atherosclerotic changes in the aorta. Results The rat models were successfully induced; pathological examination of the aortas showed significant atherosclerosis in group T2, but not in groups C1, C2, or T1. The arterial stiffness parameters obtained using ET and aortic rings in vitro showed significant impairments in T1 and T2 rats compared with C1 and C2 controls (all P<0.05 vs. controls). In addition, these impairments were greater in the T2 group than in the T1 group (all P<0.05). Finally, MRR% correlated with the distensibility coefficient (r=0.396, P=0.012), arterial compliance (r=0.317, P=0.047), stiffness parameter β (r=−0.406, P=0.009) and one-point pulse wave β (r=−0.434, P=0.005). Conclusions These results suggest that ET could be used to evaluate the changes in arterial wall elasticity associated with atherosclerosis and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26420461

  2. Frequency-Selective Response of the Tectorial Membrane in the Frog Basilar Papilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoffelen, R. L. M.; Segenhout, J. M.; van Dijk, P.

    2009-02-01

    The frog's basilar papilla is a useful study object for cochlear mechanics, because of it's relatively simple anatomy and functionality. We investigated the displacement amplitudes of the basilar papilla's tectorial membrane in response to stimulation of the oval window at various frequencies within the auditory range of the Northern leopard frog. From our measurement data we find that the tectorial membrane exhibits a frequency selective response. The peak response was found to occur at 1500Hz in correspondence with known data for the response of auditory nerve fibers from the organ. From these data we conclude that mechanical tuning contributes significantly to the frequency selectivity of the frog's basilar papilla

  3. Comparison of the effects of semicarbazide and {beta}-aminopropionitrile on the arterial extracellular matrix in the Brown Norway rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Nathalie; Kakou, Augustine; Challande, Pascal; Lacolley, Patrick; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary

    2009-09-15

    To investigate a putative role for semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) organization, we compared arteries of growing Brown Norway (BN) rats after chronic administration of semicarbazide (SCZ) and {beta}-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), two inhibitors with different properties and relative specificities for SSAO and lysyl oxidase (LOX). The BN model is particularly well adapted to evaluating effects of toxic compounds on the arterial elastic network. We measured aortic LOX and SSAO activities and quantified several ECM parameters. After a pilot study comparing doses previously studied and testing for additivity, we studied low and high equimolar doses of SCZ and BAPN. Both compounds similarly inhibited LOX, whereas SCZ inhibited SSAO far more effectively than BAPN. Both decreased carotid wall rupture pressure, increased tail tendon collagen solubility, decreased aortic insoluble elastin (% dry weight) and dose-dependently increased defects in the internal elastic lamina of abdominal aorta, iliac and renal arteries. Our results suggest that either these effects are mediated by LOX inhibition, SCZ being slightly more effective than BAPN in our conditions, or SSAO acts similarly to and in synergy with LOX on ECM, the greater SCZ effect reflecting the simultaneous inhibition of both enzymes. However, the high SCZ dose increased aortic collagen and ECM proteins other than insoluble elastin markedly more than did equimolar BAPN, possibly revealing a specific effect of SSAO inhibition. To discriminate between the two above possibilities, and to demonstrate unequivocally a specific effect of SSAO inhibition on ECM formation or organization, we must await availability of more specific inhibitors.

  4. Acrolein inhalation alters arterial blood gases and triggers carotid body-mediated cardiovascular responses in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Christina M.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Carll, Alex P.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Winsett, Darrell W.; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Air pollution exposure affects autonomic function, heart rate, blood pressure and left ventricular function. While the mechanism for these effects is uncertain, several studies have reported that air pollution exposure modifies activity of the carotid body, the major organ that senses changes in arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and elicits downstream changes in autonomic control and cardiac function. Objective We hypothesized that exposure to acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde and mucosal irritant found in cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust, would activate the carotid body chemoreceptor response and lead to secondary cardiovascular responses in rats. Materials and methods Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were exposed once for 3 h to 3 ppm acrolein gas or filtered air in whole body plethysmograph chambers. To determine if the carotid body mediated acrolein-induced cardiovascular responses, rats were pretreated with an inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme essential for carotid body signal transduction. Results Acrolein exposure induced several cardiovascular effects. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure increased during exposure, while cardiac contractility decreased 1 day after exposure. The cardiovascular effects were associated with decreases in pO2, breathing frequency and expiratory time, and increases in sympathetic tone during exposure followed by parasympathetic dominance after exposure. The CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein exposure. Discussion and conclusion Pretreatment with the CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein, suggesting that the cardiovascular responses with acrolein may be mediated by carotid body-triggered changes in autonomic tone. (This abstract does not reflect EPA policy.) PMID:25600140

  5. Abnormal expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 in pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats treated with monocrotaline

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Luo, Qin; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent researches have shown that dysfunctional intracellular vesicular trafficking exists in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular trafficking in pulmonary vasculature in PAH remains unclear. Objective: To elucidate possible roles of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular trafficking in the development of PAH in rats treated with monocrotaline, changes in the expression of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and synaptosome-associated membrane protein (SNAP) 23 were examined together with expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2) and cellular apoptosis. Methods: The mRNA expression was investigated by real time-PCR and protein expression by immunoblot method in rat lung. Caspase-3 was used as an indicator of cellular apoptosis and examined by immunoblot method. Results: During the development of PAH, mRNA and protein expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 all significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase, then all significantly decreased when PAH established. The expression of eNOS and BMPR2 changed similarly, while the mRNA and protein of cav-1 both downregulated after monocrotaline treatment. Caspase-3 was also increased after exposure to monocrotaline. Conclusions: Since the expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH and accompanied with abnormal expression of eNOS, BMPR2 and cav-1 and with enhanced cellular apoptosis, NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 appear to be associated with the development of PAH in rats treated with monocrotaline. PMID:25932111

  6. Colony social stress differentially alters blood pressure and resistance-sized mesenteric artery reactivity in SHR/y and WKY male rats.

    PubMed

    Toot, Jonathan D; Reho, John J; Novak, Jacqueline; Dunphy, Gail; Ely, Daniel L; Ramirez, Rolando J

    2011-01-01

    Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, testosterone, and spontaneously hypertensive rat Y chromosome (SHR Yc) play a role in a genetic model of hypertension. Male rats with the SHR Yc and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) autosomes (denoted SHR/y) exhibit these characteristics when compared to rats with the WKY Yc and WKY autosomes (denoted WKY). We hypothesized that chronic social stress will increase blood pressure and SNS activity more in SHR/y males compared to WKY males, resulting in increased myogenic reactivity along with decreased vasoconstriction of small mesenteric arteries. SHR/y and WKY males were housed in strain- specific colonies (10 males with 10 females) or as controls (10 males). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and blood samples were collected prior to termination. Second-order mesenteric arteries were studied using a pressure arteriograph in which myogenic reactivity and phenylephrine (PE) responsiveness were measured. SHR/y colony SBP, and circulating norepinephrine and testosterone concentrations were elevated compared to control and WKY colony males (p < 0.05). Mesenteric artery myogenic reactivity was increased in SHR/y colony males (p < 0.001). Mesenteric arteries from SHR/y colony males exhibited a significant decrease in PE-induced constriction. Colony social stress elevated both SNS activity and testosterone level which may be responsible for the increased mesenteric artery myogenic reactivity, and SBP as noted in SHR/y males. PMID:20666653

  7. Reduced activity of SKC a and Na-K ATPase underlies the accelerated impairment of EDH-type relaxations in mesenteric arteries of aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Billy W C; Man, Ricky Y K; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-06-01

    Aging is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction due to reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and/or reduced endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations (EDH). This study examines the hypothesis that hypertension aggravates the impairment of EDH-type relaxation due to aging. EDH-type relaxations were studied in superior mesenteric arteries isolated from Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats of 12, 36, 60, and 72 weeks of age. EDH-type relaxations in WKY were reduced with aging, and this was associated with an impairment of the function of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SKC a) and sodium-potassium ATPase (Na-K ATPase). EDH-type relaxation in SHR was smaller than that in WKY arteries, and further reduction occurred with aging. Pharmacological experiments suggested a reduced involvement of SKC a and Na-K ATPase and activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and silent information regulator T1 (sirtuin-1; SIRT1) in mesenteric arteries of 12-week-old SHR. These pharmacological findings suggest that in superior mesenteric arteries of the rat, the reduction in EDH-type relaxation occurs with aging and that such a reduction is exacerbated in hypertension. The latter exacerbation appears to involve proteins associated with the process of cellular senescence and is related to impaired function of SKC a and Na-K ATPase, a phenomenon that is also observed in mesenteric arteries of older normotensive rats. PMID:26171229

  8. Modulation of arterial pressure by P2 purinoceptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane C; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2010-12-01

    In the present study we evaluated the role of purinergic mechanisms in the PVN on the tonic modulation of the autonomic function to the cardiovascular system as well on the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation in awake rats. Guide-cannulae were bilaterally implanted in the direction of the PVN of male Wistar rats. Femoral artery and vein were catheterized one day before the experiments. Chemoreflex was activated with KCN (80 μg/0.05 ml, i.v.) before and after microinjections of P2 receptors antagonist into the PVN. Microinjection of PPADS, a non selective P2X antagonist, into the PVN (n=6) produced a significant increase in the baseline MAP (99±2 vs 112±3 mmHg) and HR (332±8 vs 375±8 bpm) but had no effect on the pressor and bradycardic responses to chemoreflex activation. Intravenous injection of vasopressin receptors antagonist after microinjection of PPADS into the PVN produced no effect on the increased baseline MAP. Simultaneous microinjection of PPADS and KYN into the PVN (n=6) had no effect in the baseline MAP, HR or in the pressor and bradycardic responses to chemoreflex activation. We conclude that P2 purinoceptors in the PVN are involved in the modulation of baseline autonomic function to the cardiovascular system but not in the cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex activation in awake rats. PMID:20655811

  9. Excess Salt Increases Infarct Size Produced by Photothrombotic Distal Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hiroshi; Nabika, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral circulation is known to be vulnerable to high salt loading. However, no study has investigated the effects of excess salt on focal ischemic brain injury. After 14 days of salt loading (0.9% saline) or water, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were subjected to photothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and infarct volume was determined at 48 h after MCAO: albumin and hemoglobin contents in discrete brain regions were also determined in SHR. Salt loading did not affect blood pressure levels in SHR and WKY. After MCAO, regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), determined with two ways of laser-Doppler flowmetry (one-point measurement or manual scanning), was more steeply decreased in the salt-loaded group than in the control group. In SHR/Izm, infarct volume in the salt-loaded group was 112±27 mm3, which was significantly larger than 77±12 mm3 in the control group (p = 0.002), while the extents of blood-brain barrier disruption (brain albumin and hemoglobin levels) were not affected by excess salt. In WKY, salt loading did not significantly increase infarct size. These results show the detrimental effects of salt loading on intra-ischemic CBF and subsequent brain infarction produced by phototrhombotic MCAO in hypertensive rats. PMID:24816928

  10. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors mediating contraction in arteries of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats are of the alpha 1D or alpha 1A subtypes.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; Ibarra, M

    1996-03-18

    Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor subtypes mediating contraction in carotid, aorta, mesenteric and caudal arteries from both Wistar Kyoto (WKY) normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats were investigated by using the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine and antagonized with selective, competitive antagonists WB-4101, 5-methyl urapidil or BMY 7378 (8-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-8-azaspiro(4,5)decane -7,9-dione dihydrochloride). Isometric tension changes were recorded after methoxamine addition to the arterial rings, and the effects of the antagonists determined. All the antagonists shifted to the right the concentration-response curve to methoxamine. pA2 values indicate that all arteries but caudal express the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype, since BMY 7378 values were high in these arteries. Due to the high pA2 values for 5-methyl urapidil and WB-4101 and the low values for BMY 7378 we conclude that the tail artery expresses the alpha 1A and not the alpha 1B subtype. No differences were found between both strains of rats, suggesting that hypertension does not modify the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries. PMID:8846824

  11. Potential Role of Axonal Chemorepellent Slit2 in Modulating Adventitial Inflammation in a Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Xiao, Yan; Subramanian, Romesh R; Okamoto, Ei-Ichi; Wilcox, Josiah N; Anderson, Leonard; De Leon, Hector

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte infiltration of adventitial and perivascular tissues is an early event in the development of vascular remodeling after injury. We investigated whether Slit/Robo-an axonal chemorepellent system in vertebrate and invertebrate development-is activated during the inflammatory phase that follows endothelial denudation. Using the rat carotid artery model of angioplasty, we conducted a time course analysis of mRNAs encoding Slit ligands (Slit2 and Slit3) and Robo receptors (Robo1, Robo2, and Robo4), as well as proinflammatory cell adhesion molecule (CAM) genes. Adventitial inflammatory cells were counted in immunostained arterial sections. E-selectin, vascular CAM-1, and intercellular CAM-1 were upregulated 2-3 hours after injury, followed by infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes as evidenced by real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. Slit2, Slit3, and Robo genes exhibited no expression changes at 3 hours; however, they were markedly upregulated 1 day after angioplasty. Intercellular CAM-1 expression was reduced by 50%, and the number of adventitial neutrophils decreased by >75% 1 day after angioplasty. Slit2 has been shown to be a potent chemorepelent of leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Thus, we decided to further investigate the localization of Slit2 in injured vessels. Immunohistochemical stainings revealed the presence of Slit2 within the vessel wall and in the perivascular vasa vasorum of naive and injured arteries. Double immunohistochemical analyses showed that infiltrating monocytes expressed Slit2 in the perivascular and adventitial tissues of injured arteries 1 and 3 days postangioplasty. In addition, recombinant full-length Slit2 and Slit2-N/1118, an N-terminal fragment of Slit2, inhibited stromal cell-derived factor 1-mediated migration of circulating rat peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In summary, adventitial activation of CAM genes and neutrophil infiltration preceded

  12. Thrombectomy in posterior circulation stroke through persistent primitive trigeminal artery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Mjhl; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dinkelaar, W; de Rooij, Tpw; van Es, Acgm; van der Kallen, B F; Emmer, B J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) of acute posterior circulation occlusion in a patient with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA). The patient presented with an acute left sided hemiparesis and loss of consciousness (Glasgow coma score of 5). Computed tomography angiography showed an acute occlusion of the right internal carotid artery (ICA), the PPTA, distal basilar artery (BA), right posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and right superior cerebellar artery (SCA). Stent-retriever assisted thrombectomy was not considered possible through the hypoplastic proximal BA. After passage of the proximal ICA occlusion, the right PCA and SCA were recanalized through the PPTA, with a single thrombectomy procedure. Ten days after intervention patient was discharged scoring optimal EMV with only a mild facial and left hand paresis remaining. PPTA is a persistent embryological carotid-basilar connection. Knowledge of existing (embryonic) variants in neurovascular anatomy is essential when planning and performing acute neurointerventional procedures. PMID:26464287

  13. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca2+) currents, when using Ba2+ as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift ( ~−10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivaiton rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries via multi-modal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. PMID:24921632

  14. Basilar membrane vibration is not involved in the reverse propagation of otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    He, W; Ren, T

    2013-01-01

    To understand how the inner ear-generated sound, i.e., otoacoustic emission, exits the cochlea, we created a sound source electrically in the second turn and measured basilar membrane vibrations at two longitudinal locations in the first turn in living gerbil cochleae using a laser interferometer. For a given longitudinal location, electrically evoked basilar membrane vibrations showed the same tuning and phase lag as those induced by sounds. For a given frequency, the phase measured at a basal location led that at a more apical location, indicating that either an electrical or an acoustical stimulus evoked a forward travelling wave. Under postmortem conditions, the electrically evoked emissions showed no significant change while the basilar membrane vibration nearly disappeared. The current data indicate that basilar membrane vibration was not involved in the backward propagation of otoacoustic emissions and that sounds exit the cochlea probably through alternative media, such as cochlear fluids. PMID:23695199

  15. Dynamic spatio-temporal imaging of early reflow in a neonatal rat stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Leger, Pierre-Louis; Bonnin, Philippe; Lacombe, Pierre; Couture-Lepetit, Elisabeth; Fau, Sebastien; Renolleau, Sylvain; Gharib, Abdallah; Baud, Olivier; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to better understand blood-flow changes in large arteries and microvessels during the first 15 minutes of reflow in a P7 rat model of arterial occlusion. Blood-flow changes were monitored by using ultrasound imaging with sequential Doppler recordings in internal carotid arteries (ICAs) and basilar trunk. Relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes were obtained by using laser speckle Doppler monitoring. Tissue perfusion was measured with [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Cerebral energy metabolism was evaluated by mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Gradual increase in mean blood-flow velocities illustrated a gradual perfusion during early reflow in both ICAs. On ischemia, the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory presented a residual perfusion, whereas the caudal territory remained normally perfused. On reflow, speckle images showed a caudorostral propagation of reperfusion through anastomotic connections, and a reduced perfusion in the MCA territory. Autoradiography highlighted the caudorostral gradient, and persistent perfusion in ventral and medial regions. These blood-flow changes were accompanied by mitochondrial respiration impairment in the ipsilateral cortex. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of a primary collateral pathway through the circle of Willis, providing an immediate diversion of blood flow toward ischemic regions, and secondary efficient cortical anastomoses in the immature rat brain. PMID:23047273

  16. The effect of ACE inhibition on the pulmonary vasculature in combined model of chronic hypoxia and pulmonary arterial banding in Sprague Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Shanelle; Baumgardt, Shelley; Molthen, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Microfocal CT was used to image the pulmonary arterial (PA) tree in rodent models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). CT images were used to measure the arterial tree diameter along the main arterial trunk at several hydrostatic intravascular pressures and calculate distensibility. High-resolution planar angiographic imaging was also used to examine distal PA microstructure. Data on pulmonary artery tree morphology improves our understanding of vascular remodeling and response to treatments. Angiotensin II (ATII) has been identified as a mediator of vasoconstriction and proliferative mitotic function. ATII has been shown to promote vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia as well as stimulate synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. Available ATII is targeted through angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), a method that has been used in animal models of PH to attenuate vascular remodeling and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance. In this study, we used rat models of chronic hypoxia to induce PH combined with partial left pulmonary artery occlusion (arterial banding, PLPAO) to evaluate effects of the ACEI, captopril, on pulmonary vascular hemodynamic and morphology. Male Sprague Dawley rats were placed in hypoxia (FiO2 0.1), with one group having underwent PLPAO three days prior to the chronic hypoxia. After the twenty-first day of hypoxia exposure, treatment was started with captopril (20 mg/kg/day) for an additional twenty-one days. At the endpoint, lungs were excised and isolated to examine: pulmonary vascular resistance, ACE activity, pulmonary vessel morphology and biomechanics. Hematocrit and RV/LV+septum ratio was also measured. CT planar images showed less vessel dropout in rats treated with captopril versus the non-treatment lungs. Distensibility data shows no change in rats treated with captopril in both chronic hypoxia (CH) and CH with PLPAO (CH+PLPAO) models. Hemodynamic measurements also show no change in the pulmonary vascular

  17. The effects of chronic lead treatment and hypertension on the severity of cardiac arrhythmias induced by coronary artery occlusion or by noradrenaline in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Evis, M J; Dhaliwal, K; Kane, K A; Moore, M R; Parratt, J R

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic (3 months) lead (250 or 1000 ppm), administered as lead acetate in the drinking water, commencing either after weaning (in normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive male rats) or from conception (normotensive rats only) altered the susceptibility of the heart to arrhythmias induced either by coronary artery occlusion or by noradrenaline. Treatment with lead alone had no marked effect on the arrhythmias elicited by either method. Spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with either dose of lead exhibited more ectopic beats following coronary artery occlusion than normotensive rats but not more than those observed in control spontaneously hypertensive rats. An enhanced arrhythmogenic effect of noradrenaline was observed only in hypertensive rats administered 250 ppm lead. Both doses of lead accelerated the development of high blood pressure and in normotensive rats the higher dose also resulted in an elevated pressure. Following administration of lead, blood lead concentrations were elevated to 0.96 and 2.11 mumol l-1 after 250 and 1000 ppm, respectively. Accumulation of lead in heart and bone was also observed. We conclude that chronic exposure to these concentrations of lead, when combined with high blood pressure, slightly enhances the susceptibility of the heart to arrhythmias induced by myocardial ischaemia. PMID:3579598

  18. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine restores systemic nitric oxide availability and corrects depressions in arterial blood pressure and heart rate in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengyuan; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R; Guo, Zhixin; Zhang, Wei; McNeill, John H

    2006-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity are key features of diabetes mellitus that eventually result in cardiovascular abnormalities. We assessed whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and glutathione precursor, could prevent the hyperglycaemia induced increase in oxidative stress, restore NO availability and prevent depression of arterial blood pressure and heart rate in vivo in experimental diabetes. Control (C) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic (D) rats were treated or not treated with NAC in drinking water for 8 weeks, initiated 1 week after induction of diabetes. At termination, plasma levels of free 15-F2t-isoprostane, a specific marker of oxygen free radical induced lipid peroxidation, was increased while the plasma total antioxidant concentration was decreased in untreated diabetic rats as compared to control rats (P<0.05). This was accompanied by a significant reduction of plasma levels of nitrate and nitrite, stable metabolites of NO, (P<0.05, D vs. C) and a reduced endothelial NO synthase protein expression in the heart and in aortic and mesenteric artery tissues. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures (SBP, DBP and MAP) and heart rate (HR) were reduced in diabetic rats (P<0.05 vs. C) and NAC normalised the changes that occurred in the diabetic rats. The protective effects may be attributable to restoration of NO bioavailability in the circulation. PMID:16390827

  19. Antagonistic effects of selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists MDL73005EF and tamsulosin and partial agonists clonidine and tizanidine in rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Enomoto, K; Koike, K

    2001-01-01

    The antagonistic effects of MDL73005EF and tamsulosin and partial agonists clonidine and tizanidine at rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery alpha1-adrenoceptors were investigated in this study. Selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists MDL73005EF and tamsulosin dose-dependently shifted the concentration-response curves for noradrenaline to the right. Schild plots of the results obtained from the inhibition by MDL73005EF (pA2 8.30 +/- 0.04) and tamsulosin (pA2 10.51 +/- 0.06) of noradrenaline yielded a straight line with a slope of unity in rat thoracic aorta. The slopes of Schild plots obtained from the inhibition by MDL73005EF and tamsulosin of noradrenaline were significantly different from unity in rabbit iliac artery. Schild plots of the results obtained from the inhibition by clonidine and tizanidine of noradrenaline yielded a straight line with a slope of unity in rat thoracic aorta (pA2 7.08 +/- 0.04 and 7.32 +/- 0.04, respectively). These results suggest that alpha1D-adrenoceptors play a significant role in the alpha1-adrenoceptor-agonist-induced contraction of rat thoracic aorta and rabbit iliac artery, and that clonidine and tizanidine interact with the alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtype as competitive antagonists in rat thoracic aorta. PMID:11206183

  20. A microsurgical procedure for middle cerebral artery occlusion by intraluminal monofilament insertion technique in the rat: a special emphasis on the methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although there are many experimental studies describing the methodology of the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the literature, only limited data on these distinct anatomical structures and the details of the surgical procedure in a step by step manner. The aim of the present study simply is to examine the surgical anatomy of MCAO model and its modifications in the rat. Materials and methods Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were used; 20 during the training phase and 20 for the main study. The monofilament sutures were prepared as described in the literature. All surgical steps of the study were performed under the operating microscope, including insertion of monofilament into middle cerebral artery through the internal carotid artery. Results After an extensive training period, we lost two rats in four weeks. The effects of MCAO were confirmed by the evidence of severe motor deficit during the recovery period, and histopathological findings of infarction were proved in all 18 surviving rats. Conclusion In this study, a microsurgical guideline of the MCAO model in the rat is provided with the detailed description of all steps of the intraluminal monofilament insertion method with related figures. PMID:24949193

  1. The adipokine chemerin amplifies electrical field-stimulated contraction in the isolated rat superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Winner, Brittany M; Charvat, Trevor; Krasinksi, Antoni; Punna, Sreenivas; Watts, Stephanie W

    2016-08-01

    The adipokine chemerin causes arterial contraction and is implicated in blood pressure regulation, especially in obese subjects with elevated levels of circulating chemerin. Because chemerin is expressed in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) that surrounds the sympathetic innervation of the blood vessel, we tested the hypothesis that chemerin (endogenous and exogenous) amplifies the sympathetic nervous system in mediating electrical field-stimulated (EFS) contraction. The superior mesenteric artery, with or without PVAT and with endothelium and sympathetic nerve intact, was mounted into isolated tissue baths and used for isometric contraction and stimulation. Immunohistochemistry validated a robust expression of chemerin in the PVAT surrounding the superior mesenteric artery. EFS (0.3-20 Hz) caused a frequency-dependent contraction in isolated arteries that was reduced by the chemerin receptor ChemR23 antagonist CCX832 alone (100 nM; with, but not without, PVAT), but not by the inactive congener CCX826 (100 nM). Exogenous chemerin-9 (1 μM)-amplified EFS-induced contraction in arteries (with and without PVAT) was blocked by CCX832 and the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin. CCX832 did not directly inhibit, nor did chemerin directly amplify, norepinephrine-induced contraction. Whole mount immunohistochemical experiments support colocalization of ChemR23 with the sympathetic nerve marker tyrosine hydroxylase in superior mesenteric PVAT and, to a lesser extent, in arteries and veins. These studies support the idea that exogenous chemerin modifies sympathetic nerve-mediated contraction through ChemR23 and that ChemR23 may be endogenously activated. This is significant because of the well-appreciated role of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure control. PMID:27371688

  2. Sympathetic innervation and excitability of arterioles originating from the rat middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C E; Hirst, G D; Silverberg, G D; van Helden, D F

    1986-01-01

    The densities of the adrenergic innervation of the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries and their extracerebral branches have been determined using fluorescence histochemistry. The density of the nerve plexus on the internal carotid artery was greater than that of the middle cerebral artery. The density of the plexus on the middle cerebral artery decreased with increasing distance from its origin. The density and the peripheral extent of the nerve fibre plexus on the arterioles arising from the carotid artery were greater than those arising from the middle cerebral artery. On any arteriole the density of innervation decreased with increasing distance from its origin. The passive electrical properties of proximal and distal middle cerebral arteriolar segments were compared. Both proximal and distal arteriolar segments had similar resistances and time constants in the order of 100 M omega and 250 ms respectively. Small regenerative responses could be elicited in all proximal middle cerebral arteriolar segments but only in a proportion of corresponding distal segments. The addition of external tetraethylammonium ions (TEA) provided much larger regenerative responses. Action potentials in proximal middle cerebral arteriolar segments had larger peak amplitudes and faster rise times than those of corresponding distal segments. Distal carotid arteriolar segments had similar voltage-dependent excitability as proximal segments of middle cerebral arterioles but generated less inward current for a given voltage step. There was a direct correlation between the density of innervation and the voltage-dependent excitability of arteriolar smooth muscle cells. The possibility that the presence of nerves is correlated with the density of calcium channels is discussed. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:3701653

  3. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  4. Impairment of endothelial SKCa channels and of downstream hyperpolarizing pathways in mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Weston, AH; Porter, EL; Harno, E; Edwards, G

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous studies have shown that endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of myocytes is reduced in resistance arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The aim of the present study was to determine whether this reflects down-regulation of endothelial K+ channels or their associated pathways. Experimental approach: Changes in vascular K+ channel responses and expression were determined by a combination of membrane potential recordings and Western blotting. Key results: Endothelium-dependent myocyte hyperpolarizations induced by acetylcholine, 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) (opens small- and intermediate-conductance calcium-sensitive K+ channels, SKCa and IKCa, respectively) or cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine (SKCa opener) were reduced in mesenteric arteries from SHRs. After blocking SKCa channels with apamin, hyperpolarizations to acetylcholine and NS309 in SHR arteries were similar to those of controls. Hyperpolarization to 5 mM KCl was reduced in SHR arteries due to loss of the Ba2+-sensitive, inward-rectifier channel (KIR) component; the contribution of ouabain-sensitive, Na+/K+-ATPases was unaffected. Protein expression of both SKCa and KIR channels was reduced in SHR arteries; the caveolin-1 monomer/dimer ratio was increased. Conclusions and implications: In SHRs, the distinct pathway that generates endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in vascular myocyte by activation of IKCa channels and Na+/K+-ATPases remains intact. The second pathway, initiated by endothelial SKCa channel activation and amplified by KIR opening on both endothelial cells and myocytes is compromised in SHRs due to down-regulation of both SKCa and KIR and to changes in caveolin-1 oligomers. These impairments in the SKCa–KIR pathway shed new light on vascular control mechanisms and on the underlying vascular changes in hypertension. This article is commented on by Garland, pp. 833–835 of this

  5. Regulation of sympathetic tone and arterial pressure by rostral ventrolateral medulla after depletion of C1 cells in rat

    PubMed Central

    Schreihofer, Ann M; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2000-01-01

    In this study we examined whether the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) maintains resting sympathetic vasomotor tone and activates sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) after the depletion of bulbospinal C1 adrenergic neurones. Bulbospinal C1 cells were destroyed (≈84% loss) by bilateral microinjections (spinal segments T2-T3) of an anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase antibody conjugated to the ribosomal toxin saporin (anti-DβH-SAP). Extracellular recording and juxtacellular labelling of bulbospinal barosensitive neurones in the RVLM revealed that treatment with anti-DβH-SAP spared the lightly myelinated neurones with no tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. In rats treated with anti-DβH-SAP, inhibition of RVLM neurones by bilateral microinjection of muscimol eliminated splanchnic SNA and produced the same degree of hypotension as in control rats. Following treatment with anti-DβH-SAP the sympathoexcitatory (splanchnic nerve) and pressor responses to electrical stimulation of the RVLM were reduced. Treatment with anti-DβH-SAP also eliminated the majority of A5 noradrenergic neurones. However, rats with selective lesion of A5 cells by microinjection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the pons showed no deficits to stimulation of the RVLM. In summary, the loss of 84% of bulbospinal adrenergic neurones does not alter the ability of RVLM to maintain SNA and arterial pressure at rest in anaesthetized rats, but this loss reduces the sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses evoked by RVLM stimulation. The data suggest sympathoexcitatory roles for both the C1 cells and non-C1 cells of the RVLM and further suggest the C1 cells are critical for the full expression of sympathoexcitatory responses generated by the RVLM. PMID:11080264

  6. Heart function in magnetic resonance imaging and the mesenteric artery reactivity in rats receiving lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Skoczynska, A; Skórka, T; Wojakowska, A; Nowacki, D; Turczyn, B; Poręba, R; Tyrankiewicz, U; Byk, K; Szuba, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb)-contaminated drinking water on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-estimated cardiac function, vascular reactivity, and serum lipids in rats. For 3 months, male Wistar rats, aged 4-6 weeks, were given drinking water with the addition of lead acetate at a concentration of 100 ppm Pb (10 rats) or water free from Pb (8 control rats). The cardiac MRI was performed at rest and under β-adrenergic stimulation on a 4.7 T scanner using electrocardiogram-triggered gradient echo (FLASH) cine sequence. After 1-2 weeks of the MRI test, experiments were performed ex vivo. After stabilization of perfusion pressure (PP), norepinephrine at doses from 0.01 to 5.0 μg was dissolved in Krebs solution, injected in a volume of 100 μl, and next infused at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml into the isolated mesenteric artery. In this manner, preconstricted mesenteric bed was used to determine PP changes induced by acetylcholine, given at doses from 0.05 to 5.0 μg, before and during the infusion of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (1.0 μg/ml). At the end, dobutamine (5 mg), followed by potassium chloride (10.5 mg), was injected. Lipid levels were determined enzymatically, blood Pb level was measured by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This study showed that Pb impairs the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pb-induced changes in response to resistance of vessels to vasoactive agents may be secondary to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. The high-density lipoprotein subfraction 2 (HDL2) is involved in the cardiovascular effect of Pb. PMID:23760256

  7. Cerebralcare Granule® attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Zhou, Chang-Man; Qin-Hu; Liu, Yu-Ying; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Xu, Xiang-Shun; Li, Quan; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Mao, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Chuan-She; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2012-10-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent edema are major contributors to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, for which the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfied. Cerebralcare Granule® (CG) is a compound Chinese medicine widely used in China for treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. CG has been demonstrated efficacy in attenuating the cerebral microcirculatory disturbance and hippocampal neuron injury following global cerebral ischemia. However, the effects of CG on BBB disruption following cerebral ischemia have not been investigated. In this study, we examined the therapeutic effect of CG on the BBB disruption in a focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250 to 300 g) were subjected to 1h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). CG (0.4 g/kg or 0.8 g/kg) was administrated orally 3h after reperfusion for the first time and then once daily up to 6 days. The results showed that Evans blue extravasation, brain water content, albumin leakage, infarction volume and neurological deficits increased in MCAO model rats, and were attenuated significantly by CG treatment. T2-weighted MRI and electron microscopy further confirmed the brain edema reduction in CG-treated rats. Treatment with CG improved cerebral blood flow (CBF). Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy showed that the tight junction proteins claudin-5, JAM-1, occludin and zonula occluden-1 between endothelial cells were significantly degradated, but the protein expression of caveolin-1, the principal marker of caveolae in endothelial cells, increased after ischemia, all of which were alleviated by CG treatment. In conclusion, the post-treatment with CG significantly reduced BBB permeability and brain edema, which were correlated with preventing the degradation of the tight junction proteins and inhibiting the expression of caveolin-1 in the endothelial cells. These findings provide a novel approach to the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID

  8. Laser-induced collagen remodeling and deposition within the basilar membrane of the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Anvari, Bahman; Mazhar, Amaan; Pikkula, Brian; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    The cochlea is the mammalian organ of hearing. Its predominant vibratory element, the basilar membrane, is tonotopically tuned, based on the spatial variation of its mass and stiffness. The constituent collagen fibers of the basilar membrane affect its stiffness. Laser irradiation can induce collagen remodeling and deposition in various tissues. We tested whether similar effects could be induced within the basilar membrane. Trypan blue was perfused into the scala tympani of anesthetized mice to stain the basilar membrane. We then irradiated the cochleas with a 694-nm pulsed ruby laser at 15 or 180 J /cm2. The mice were sacrificed 14 to 16 days later and collagen organization was studied. Polarization microscopy revealed that laser irradiation increased the birefringence within the basilar membrane in a dose-dependent manner. Electron microscopy demonstrated an increase in the density of collagen fibers and the deposition of new fibrils between collagen fibers after laser irradiation. As an assessment of hearing, auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were found to increase moderately after 15 J/cm2 and substantially after 180 J /cm2. Our results demonstrate that collagen remodeling and new collagen deposition occurs within the basilar membrane after laser irradiation in a similar fashion to that found in other tissues. PMID:17477714

  9. Role of Neural NO Synthase (nNOS) Uncoupling in the Dysfunctional Nitrergic Vasorelaxation of Penile Arteries from Insulin-Resistant Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ana; Contreras, Cristina; Martínez, María Pilar; Climent, Belén; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Objective Erectile dysfunction (ED) is considered as an early sign of vascular disease due to its high prevalence in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Endothelial and neural dysfunction involving nitric oxide (NO) are usually implicated in the pathophysiology of the diabetic ED, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study assessed the role of oxidative stress in the dysfunctional neural vasodilator responses of penile arteries in the obese Zucker rat (OZR), an experimental model of metabolic syndrome/prediabetes. Methods and Results Electrical field stimulation (EFS) under non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) conditions evoked relaxations that were significantly reduced in penile arteries of OZR compared with those of lean Zucker rats (LZR). Blockade of NO synthase (NOS) inhibited neural relaxations in both LZR and OZR, while saturating concentrations of the NOS substrate L-arginine reversed the inhibition and restored relaxations in OZR to levels in arteries from LZR. nNOS expression was unchanged in arteries from OZR compared to LZR and nNOS selective inhibition decreased the EFS relaxations in LZR but not in OZR, while endothelium removal did not alter these responses in either strain. Superoxide anion production and nitro-tyrosine immunostaining were elevated in the erectile tissue from OZR. Treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or acute incubation with the NOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) restored neural relaxations in OZR to levels in control arteries, while inhibition of the enzyme of BH4 synthesis GTP-cyclohydrolase (GCH) reduced neural relaxations in arteries from LZR but not OZR. The NO donor SNAP induced decreases in intracellular calcium that were impaired in arteries from OZR compared to controls. Conclusions The present study demonstrates nitrergic dysfunction and impaired neural NO signalling due to oxidative stress and nNOS uncoupling in penile arteries under conditions of insulin resistance. This

  10. Frame-rate analysis of arterial blood flow in human and rat using laser speckle image sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Naomichi; Sato, Junki; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki; Funamizu, Hideki; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2014-05-01

    In imaging of blood flow by means of a laser speckle technique, we have proposed so far an estimation parameter based on the spatial contrast of speckle patterns observed for the blood flow in skin tissue and a blood vessel. This parameter enable us to image a relative blood flow distribution from a single speckle pattern, thus, it analyzes the blood flow with a frame-rate of an imaging device used. In this study, we investigated availability of this parameter for detecting changes in arterial blood flow caused by medication and cold stimulation to the skin tissue. Experiments were conducted for an anesthetized rat and a human wrist to confirm the feasibility of the present parameter.

  11. Omega-conotoxin GVIA is a potent inhibitor of sympathetic neurogenic responses in rat small mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Pruneau, D.; Angus, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of the N-type calcium channel blocker, omega-conotoxin GVIA, on contractile responses to nerve stimulation, noradrenaline and KCl in rat small mesenteric arteries. In separate experiments, single and summated excitatory junctional potentials (e.j.ps) evoked by nerve stimulation were recorded with an intracellular electrode in the absence and presence of omega-conotoxin. 2. Electrical field stimulation of intramural sympathetic nerves (30 V; 0.25 ms pulse width; 3 s train length; 4-24 Hz) caused frequency-dependent contractions. Cumulative concentration-response curves for the contractions induced by noradrenaline and KCl were constructed in the same preparations. Stimulation at 0.2 Hz and 10 Hz induced respectively single e.j.ps without contractions and summated e.j.ps associated with a contractile response. 3. omega-Conotoxin (0.1 to 3 nM) inhibited markedly and in a concentration-dependent manner both the contractions and e.j.ps to electrical field stimulation. The concentration-response curves to exogenous noradrenaline and KCl remained unaffected. 4. The time-course for the effects of omega-conotoxin (0.3 to 3 nM) indicated a slow onset of action with at least one hour to achieve an equilibrium. 5. The experiments indicate that omega-conotoxin acts prejunctionally to inhibit sympathetic neurotransmission in rat small arteries presumably by inhibition of noradrenaline release. We suggest that omega-conotoxin could be a useful tool to study the control of vascular tone through the autonomic nervous system. PMID:2372658

  12. Role of heme oxygenase in modulating endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Porteri, Enzo; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzoni, Damiano; Paiardi, Silvia; de Ciuceis, Carolina; Boari, Gianluca E M; Foglio, Eleonora; Favero, Gaia; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    It has been proposed that endothelial dysfunction is due to the excessive degradation of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidative stress. The enzyme heme-oxygenase (HO) seems to exert a protective effect on oxidative stress in the vasculature, both in animal models and in humans. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of inhibition or activation of HO on endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Six SHR were treated with cobalt protoporphyrin IX 50 mg/Kg (CoPP), an activator of HO; six SHR with stannous mesoporphyrin 30 mg/Kg (SnMP), an inhibitor of HO, and six SHR with saline. As controls, six Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were treated with CoPP, six WKY with SnMP, and six WKY with saline. Drugs were injected in the peritoneum once a week for 2 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured (tail cuff method) before and after treatment. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were mounted on a micromyograph. Endothelial function was evaluated as a cumulative concentration-response curve to acetylcholine (ACH), before and after preincubation with N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, inhibitor of NO synthase), and to bradykinin (BK). In SHR treatment with CoPP, improved ACH-and BK-induced vasodilatation (ANOVA p < 0.001) and this improvement was abolished by L-NMMA (ANOVA p < 0.001). SnMP was devoid of effects on endothelial function. In WKY, both activation and inhibition of HO did not substantially affect endothelium-mediated vasodilatation. The stimulation of HO seems to induce an improvement of endothelial dysfunction in SHR by possibly reducing oxidative stress and increasing NO availability. PMID:19886854

  13. A modified rat model of neonatal anoxia: Development and evaluation by pulseoximetry, arterial gasometry and Fos immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Takada, S H; Sampaio, C A G; Allemandi, W; Ito, P H; Takase, L F; Nogueira, M I

    2011-05-15

    Neonatal anoxia is a worldwide clinical problem that has serious and lasting consequences. The diversity of models does not allow complete reproducibility, so a standardized model is needed. In this study, we developed a rat model of neonatal anoxia that utilizes a semi-hermetic system suitable for oxygen deprivation. The validity of this model was confirmed using pulse oximetry, arterial gasometry, observation of skin color and behavior and analysis of Fos immunoreactivity in brain regions that function in respiratory control. For these experiments, 87 male albino neonate rats (Rattus norvegicus, lineage Wistar) aged approximate 30 postnatal hours were divided into anoxia and control groups. The pups were kept in an euthanasia polycarbonate chamber at 36±1 °C, with continuous 100% nitrogen gas flow at 3 L/min and 101.7 kPa for 25 min. The peripheral arterial oxygen saturation of the anoxia group decreased 75% from its initial value. Decreased pH and partial pressure of oxygen and increased partial pressure of carbon dioxide were observed in this group, indicating metabolic acidosis, hypoxia and hypercapnia, respectively. Analysis of neuronal activation showed Fos immunoreactivity in the solitary tract nucleus, the lateral reticular nucleus and the area postrema, confirming that those conditions activated areas related to respiratory control in the nervous system. Therefore, the proposed model of neonatal anoxia allows standardization and precise control of the anoxic condition, which should be of great value in indentifying both the mechanisms underlying neonatal anoxia and novel therapeutic strategies to combat or prevent this widespread public health problem. PMID:21439321

  14. The effects of verapamil, prenylamine, flunarizine and cinnarizine on coronary artery occlusion-induced arrhythmias in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fagbemi, O.; Kane, K. A.; McDonald, F. M.; Parratt, J. R.; Rothaul, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    In male rats, anaesthetized with pentobarbitone, ligation of the main left coronary artery causes an early phase of ventricular arrhythmias which last about 30 min. In approximately 60% of control animals, ventricular fibrillation occurs but since spontaneous reversion to sinus rhythm may occur, mortality is of the order of 30%. When administered intravenously 15 min prior to ligation, verapamil (0.01 and 0.05 mg kg-1), prenylamine (0.5 mg kg-1), flunarizine (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg-1) and cinnarizine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg-1) protected against these arrhythmias. Higher doses of verapamil (0.1 and 0.5 mg kg-1), prenylamine (5 mg kg-1) and flunarizine (2.5 mg kg-1) did not afford a similar protection and mortality was increased to or above control values. Death was due in prenylamine-treated rats to atrioventricular block leading to asystole whereas in those administered verapamil or flunarizine it was a consequence of persistent ventricular fibrillation. Prior to ligation, a sustained fall in mean arterial blood pressure was observed only following the administration of the highest doses of prenylamine, flunarizine and cinnarizine. Heart rate was reduced by administration of only the highest dose of prenylamine. These studies show that although the four calcium antagonists studied, i.e. verapamil, prenylamine, flunarizine and cinnarizine do suppress ischaemia-induced arrhythmias, this protective effect may be limited to a narrow concentration range. PMID:6487894

  15. Effect of naringin on hemodynamic changes and left ventricular function in renal artery occluded renovascular hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Visnagri, Asjad; Adil, Mohammad; Kandhare, Amit D.; Bodhankar, Subhash L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal artery occlusion (RAO) induced hypertension is a major health problem associated with structural and functional variations of the renal and cardiac vasculature. Naringin a flavanone glycoside derived possesses metal-chelating, antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive activity of naringin in RAO induced hypertension in rats. Material and Methods: Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were divided into five groups Sham, RAO, naringin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg). Animals were pretreated with naringin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg p.o) for 4 weeks. On the last day of the experiment, left renal artery was occluded with renal bulldog clamp for 4 h. After assessment of hemodynamic and left ventricular function various biochemical (superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione [GSH] and malondialdehyde [MDA]) and histological parameters were determined in the kidney. Results: RAO group significantly (P < 0.001) increased hemodynamic parameters at 15, 30 and 45 min of clamp removal. Naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treated groups showed a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters at 15 min. after clamp removal that remained sustained for 60 min. Naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treated groups showed significant improvement in left ventricular function at 15, 30 and 45 min after clamp removal. Alteration in level of SOD, GSH and MDA was significantly restored by naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treatment. It also reduced histological aberration induced in kidney by RAO. Conclusion: It is concluded that the antihypertensive activity of naringin may result through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25883516

  16. Effect of short-term organoid culture on the pharmaco-mechanical properties of rat extra- and intrapulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Christelle; Savineau, Jean Pierre; Crevel, Huguette; Marthan, Roger; Rousseau, Eric

    2005-11-01

    1 Organoid cultured explants from differentiated tissues have gained renewed interest in the undertaking of physiological and pharmacological studies. In the work herein, we examined the pharmaco-mechanical properties of an in vitro model consisting of organoid cultured rings derived from rat extra- and intrapulmonary arteries, over a period of 4 days in culture. 2 Mechanical changes were quantified using isometric tension measurements on both fresh and cultured pulmonary arterial tissues, with experiments performed in the presence or absence of 10% foetal calf serum. Conventional histochemical and immunofluorescent stainings were also performed to assess tissue structure integrity and apoptosis. 3 The explants developed spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRC) in approximately half of the vessels. SRC amplitude and time course were modified by conditions and agents acting on membrane potential (high-potassium solutions--levcromakalim, a potassium channel opener), while nitrendipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, suppressed SRC. 4 Cultured explants also developed a hyper-reactivity to high potassium challenges (10-40 mM). Whereas contraction to serotonin (5-HT) was enhanced in intrapulmonary arteries, contraction to endothelin-1 remained unchanged after 4 days of culture. Serum did not alter contractile properties during the culture period. 5 Endothelial-dependent relaxation was maintained in response to A23187 500 microM, but was abolished in response to 10 microM carbamylcholine. 6 Histological and immuno-histological analyses revealed the absence of hypertrophied vascular wall or apoptosis. 7 In conclusion, the contractile phenotype as well as tissue structure integrity of organoid explants remain essentially intact during short-term culture, making this model suitable for pharmaco-genomic studies. PMID:16151441

  17. Decreased creatine kinase is linked to diastolic dysfunction in rats with right heart failure induced by pulmonary artery hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Ewan D.; Benoist, David; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Stones, Rachel; Helmes, Michiel; Wüst, Rob C.I.; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Steele, Derek S.; White, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the role of creatine kinase in the contractile dysfunction of right ventricular failure caused by pulmonary artery hypertension. Pulmonary artery hypertension and right ventricular failure were induced in rats by monocrotaline and compared to saline-injected control animals. In vivo right ventricular diastolic pressure–volume relationships were measured in anesthetized animals; diastolic force–length relationships in single enzymatically dissociated myocytes and myocardial creatine kinase levels by Western blot. We observed diastolic dysfunction in right ventricular failure indicated by significantly steeper diastolic pressure–volume relationships in vivo and diastolic force–length relationships in single myocytes. There was a significant reduction in creatine kinase protein expression in failing right ventricle. Dysfunction also manifested as a shorter diastolic sarcomere length in failing myocytes. This was associated with a Ca2 +-independent mechanism that was sensitive to cross-bridge cycling inhibition. In saponin-skinned failing myocytes, addition of exogenous creatine kinase significantly lengthened sarcomeres, while in intact healthy myocytes, inhibition of creatine kinase significantly shortened sarcomeres. Creatine kinase inhibition also changed the relatively flat contraction amplitude–stimulation frequency relationship of healthy myocytes into a steeply negative, failing phenotype. Decreased creatine kinase expression leads to diastolic dysfunction. We propose that this is via local reduction in ATP:ADP ratio and thus to Ca2 +-independent force production and diastolic sarcomere shortening. Creatine kinase inhibition also mimics a definitive characteristic of heart failure, the inability to respond to increased demand. Novel therapies for pulmonary artery hypertension are needed. Our data suggest that cardiac energetics would be a potential ventricular therapeutic target. PMID:26116865

  18. Inflammation in rat pregnancy inhibits spiral artery remodeling leading to fetal growth restriction and features of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Komisarenko, Maria; Sperou, Arissa; Macdonald-Goodfellow, Shannyn; Adams, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia (PE) are often associated with abnormal maternal inflammation, deficient spiral artery (SA) remodeling, and altered uteroplacental perfusion. Here, we provide evidence of a novel mechanistic link between abnormal maternal inflammation and the development of FGR with features of PE. Using a model in which pregnant rats are administered low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational days 13.5–16.5, we show that abnormal inflammation resulted in FGR mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). Inflammation was also associated with deficient trophoblast invasion and SA remodeling, as well as with altered uteroplacental hemodynamics and placental nitrosative stress. Moreover, inflammation increased maternal mean arterial pressure (MAP) and was associated with renal structural alterations and proteinuria characteristic of PE. Finally, transdermal administration of the nitric oxide (NO) mimetic glyceryl trinitrate prevented altered uteroplacental perfusion, LPS-induced inflammation, placental nitrosative stress, renal structural and functional alterations, increase in MAP, and FGR. These findings demonstrate that maternal inflammation can lead to severe pregnancy complications via a mechanism that involves increased maternal levels of TNF. Our study provides a rationale for the use of antiinflammatory agents or NO-mimetics in the treatment and/or prevention of inflammation-associated pregnancy complications. PMID:24395887

  19. Sertoli cells and various types of multinucleates in the rat seminiferous tubules following temporary ligation of the testicular artery.

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, M

    1986-01-01

    The effects of temporary ligation of the testicular artery have been analysed in rats with respect to Sertoli cells and multinucleated spermatogenic cells. The first cells to show ultrastructural changes are the Sertoli cells which progressively degenerate, leading to complete necrosis as the duration of ligation and post-ligation survival interval increases. The degree of degeneration of spermatogenic cells depends on the severity of Sertoli cell destruction. Temporary ligation of the testicular artery causes the formation of various types of multinucleated spermatogenic cells in the seminiferous epithelium. The mechanisms involved in the multinucleate formation are cell fusion, karyokinesis devoid of cytokinesis and phagocytosis. The variety of noxious agents causing formation of multinucleated spermatogenic cells in the seminiferous tubules of a number of species including man implies that the occurrence of multinucleated spermatogenic cells is not a specific response of the testis to a particular type of agent. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:3693041

  20. β2-Adrenergic Receptor-Dependent Attenuation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction Prevents Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Intermittent Hypoxic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hisashi; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Nara, Akina; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Ogura, Sayoko; Fujii, Yutaka; Umetani, Keiji; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Pearson, James T.; Uemura, Koichi; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2014-01-01

    In sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), intermittent hypoxia (IH) induces repeated episodes of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) during sleep, which presumably contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the prevalence of PAH was low and severity is mostly mild in SAS patients, and mild or no right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) was reported in IH-exposed animals. The question then arises as to why PAH is not a universal finding in SAS if repeated hypoxia of sufficient duration causes cycling HPV. In the present study, rats underwent IH at a rate of 3 min cycles of 4–21% O2 for 8 h/d for 6w. Assessment of diameter changes in small pulmonary arteries in response to acute hypoxia and drugs were performed using synchrotron radiation microangiography on anesthetized rats. In IH-rats, neither PAH nor RVH was observed and HPV was strongly reversed. Nadolol (a hydrophilic β1, 2-blocker) augmented the attenuated HPV to almost the same level as that in N-rats, but atenolol (a hydrophilic β1-blocker) had no effect on the HPV in IH. These β-blockers had almost no effect on the HPV in N-rats. Chronic administration of nadolol during 6 weeks of IH exposure induced PAH and RVH in IH-rats, but did not in N-rats. Meanwhile, atenolol had no effect on morphometric and hemodynamic changes in N and IH-rats. Protein expression of the β1-adrenergic receptor (AR) was down-regulated while that of β2AR was preserved in pulmonary arteries of IH-rats. Phosphorylation of p85 (chief component of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)), protein kinase B (Akt), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were abrogated by chronic administration of nadolol in the lung tissue of IH-rats. We conclude that IH-derived activation of β2AR in the pulmonary arteries attenuates the HPV, thereby preventing progression of IH-induced PAH. This protective effect may depend on the β2AR-Gi mediated PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:25350545

  1. The SPECT imaging shows the accumulation of neural progenitor cells into internal organs after systemic administration in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Riikka S; Narkilahti, Susanna; Huhtala, Tuulia; Liimatainen, Timo; Suuronen, Tiina; Närvänen, Ale; Suuronen, Riitta; Hovatta, Outi; Jolkkonen, Jukka

    2008-08-01

    The regenerative potential of stem cells from various sources has been under intense investigation in the experimental models of cerebral ischemia. To end up with a restorative therapeutic treatment, it is crucial to get the cell transplants to the site of injury. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of small animal SPECT/CT in assessing the definite accumulation of (111)In-oxine-labeled human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitors and rat hippocampal progenitors after intravenous or intra-arterial administration (femoral vein vs. common carotid artery) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and sham-operated rats. Cell detection was carried out immediately and 24h after the infusion using a SPECT/CT device. The results showed that after intravenous injections both cell types accumulated primarily into internal organs, instead of brain. In contrast, after intra-arterial injection, a weak signal was detected in the ischemic hemisphere. Additional studies showed that the detection sensitivity of SPECT/CT device was approximately 1000 (111)In-oxine-labeled cells and labeling did not affect the cell viability. In conclusion, a small animal SPECT is powerful technique to study the whole body biodistribution of cell-based therapies. Our data showed that intravenous administration is not an optimal route to deliver neural progenitor cell-containing transplants into the brain after MCAO in rats. PMID:18572314

  2. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snus and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu Cangbao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-04-15

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ET{sub B}, serotonin 5-HT{sub 1B}, and thromboxane A{sub 2} TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine was kept at plasma level of snus users (25 ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250 ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ET{sub B} receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, and TP receptor agonist U46619 were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of ET{sub B}, 5-HT{sub 1B}, and TP receptors was studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Organ culture with WSS or DSS (25 ng nicotine/ml) lowered the 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor-mediated contraction. Furthermore, DSS shifted the TP receptor-mediated contraction curve left-wards with a stronger contraction. High dose of nicotine (250 ng nicotine/ml) increased the ET{sub B} receptor-mediated contraction. The combined 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated contraction was increased, and both the 5-CT and TxA2 induced contractions were left-ward shifted by WSS, DSS, or

  3. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases. PMID:21729992

  4. Reduced nitric oxide-mediated relaxation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the tail arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Suppian, Rapeah; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-15

    Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study aimed to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), in the relaxation of ventral tail arteries of rats under diabetic conditions. Relaxations of tail arteries of control and diabetic rats were studied in wire myograph. Western blotting and immunostaining were used to determine the presence of proteins. Acetylcholine-induced relaxations were significantly smaller in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 70.81 ± 2.48% versus 85.05 ± 3.15%). Incubation with the combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin and potassium channel blockers, TRAM 34 and UCL 1684, demonstrated that NO-mediated relaxation was attenuated significantly in diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 48.47 ± 5.84% versus 68.39 ± 6.34%). EDH-type (in the presence of indomethacin and NO synthase inhibitor, LNAME) and prostacyclin-mediated (in the presence of LNAME plus TRAM 34 and UCL 1684) relaxations were not significantly reduced in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats [Rmax: (EDH; 17.81 ± 6.74% versus 34.16 ± 4.59%) (prostacyclin; 15.85 ± 3.27% versus 17.23 ± 3.75%)]. Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, salbutamol and prostacyclin were comparable in the two types of preparations. Western blotting and immunostaining indicated that diabetes diminished the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), while increasing those of COX-1 and COX-2. Thus, since acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation was impaired in diabetes because of reduced eNOS protein expression, pharmacological intervention improving NO bioavailability could be useful in the management of diabetic endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26825543

  5. Comparison of the Efficiencies of Buffers Containing Ankaferd and Chitosan on Hemostasis in an Experimental Rat Model with Femoral Artery Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abacıoğlu, Serkan; Aydın, Kemal; Büyükcam, Fatih; Kaya, Ural; Işık, Bahattin; Karakılıç, Muhammed Evvah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In the first assessment of trauma patients with major vascular injuries, we need effective and rapid-acting homeostatic materials. In this study we compare the efficiencies of Ankaferd Blood Stopper® and a chitosan linear polymer (Celox®) in an experimental rat model with femoral artery bleeding. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 g were divided into 3 groups: control, Ankaferd, and chitosan. The femoral artery and vein were visualized and bleeding was started by an incision. The bleeding time was recorded and categorized as ‘bleeding stopped at the second minute’, ‘bleeding stopped at the fourth minute’, and ‘unsuccessful’ if bleeding continued after the fourth minute. Results: In the control group, 60% of the bleeding did not stop. In the first 4 min in the Ankaferd group, the bleeding stopped in all rats; only in 1 of the rats in the chitosan group did the bleeding not stop. In stopping the bleeding in the first 4 min, Ankaferd was similar to chitosan but better than the control group; the chitosan group was similar to the control, but the p-value was close to significance. Conclusion: For major arterial bleeding, the main treatment is surgical bleeding control, but outside of the hospital we can use buffers containing Ankaferd and chitosan on the bleeding region. The results of this study should be supported with larger studies. Furthermore, in our study, healthy rats were used. New studies are needed to evaluate the results of hypovolemic and hypotensive cases with major artery bleeding. PMID:25913214

  6. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present prior to treatment. A prediction of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The two modeling approaches capture similar qualitative trends for the initial locations of thrombus within the SMP foam.

  7. Longitudinal pattern of basilar membrane vibration in the sensitive cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying

    2002-12-01

    In the normal mammalian ear, sound vibrates the eardrum, causing the tiny bones of the middle ear to vibrate, transferring the vibration to the inner ear fluids. The vibration propagates from the base of the cochlea to its apex along the cochlear partition. As essential as this concept is to the theory of hearing, the waveform of cochlear partition vibration has yet to be measured in vivo. Here I report a "snapshot" (the instantaneous waveform of cochlear partition vibration) measured in the basal turn of the sensitive gerbil cochlea using a scanning laser interferometer. For 16-kHz tones, the phase delay is up to 6 radians over the observed cochlear length (<1,000 μm), and instantaneous waveforms show sound propagation along the cochlear partition, supporting the existence of the cochlear traveling wave. The detectable basilar membrane response to a low-level 16-kHz tone occurs over a very restricted (600 μm) range. The observed vibration shows compressive nonlinear growth, a shorter wavelength, and a slower propagation velocity along the cochlear length than previously reported. Data obtained at different frequencies show the relationship between the longitudinal pattern and frequency tuning, demonstrating that the observed localized traveling wave in this study is indeed the spatial representation of the sharp tuning observed in the frequency domain.

  8. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.N.; Maitland, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present within the pre-treatment aneurysms. An estimation of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The Newtonian viscosity model and the porous media model capture similar qualitative trends, though both yield a smaller volume of thrombus within the SMP foam. PMID:23329002

  9. Elevating microRNA-122 in blood improves outcomes after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da Zhi; Jickling, Glen C; Ander, Bradley P; Hull, Heather; Zhan, Xinhua; Cox, Christopher; Shroff, Natasha; Dykstra-Aiello, Cheryl; Stamova, Boryana; Sharp, Frank R

    2016-08-01

    Because our recent studies have demonstrated that miR-122 decreased in whole blood of patients and in whole blood of rats following ischemic stroke, we tested whether elevating blood miR-122 would improve stroke outcomes in rats. Young adult rats were subjected to a temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham operation. A polyethylene glycol-liposome-based transfection system was used to administer a miR-122 mimic after MCAO. Neurological deficits, brain infarction, brain vessel integrity, adhesion molecule expression and expression of miR-122 target and indirect-target genes were examined in blood at 24 h after MCAO with or without miR-122 treatment. miR-122 decreased in blood after MCAO, whereas miR-122 mimic elevated miR-122 in blood 24 h after MCAO. Intravenous but not intracerebroventricular injection of miR-122 mimic decreased neurological deficits and brain infarction, attenuated ICAM-1 expression, and maintained vessel integrity after MCAO. The miR-122 mimic also down-regulated direct target genes (e.g. Vcam1, Nos2, Pla2g2a) and indirect target genes (e.g. Alox5, Itga2b, Timp3, Il1b, Il2, Mmp8) in blood after MCAO which are predicted to affect cell adhesion, diapedesis, leukocyte extravasation, eicosanoid and atherosclerosis signaling. The data show that elevating miR-122 improves stroke outcomes and we postulate this occurs via downregulating miR-122 target genes in blood leukocytes. PMID:26661204

  10. Low-speed treadmill running exercise improves memory function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Haruka; Hamakawa, Michiru; Ishida, Akimasa; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroki; Ishida, Kazuto

    2013-04-15

    Physical exercise may enhance the recovery of impaired memory function in stroke rats. However the appropriate conditions of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are not yet known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect exercise intensity on memory function after cerebral infarction in rats. The animals were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min to induce stroke and were randomly assigned to four groups; Low-Ex, High-Ex, Non-Ex and Sham. On the fourth day after surgery, rats in the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups were forced to exercise using a treadmill for 30 min every day for four weeks. Memory functions were examined during the last 5 days of the experiment (27-32 days after MCAO) by three types of tests: an object recognition test, an object location test and a passive avoidance test. After the final memory test, the infarct volume, number of neurons and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were analyzed by histochemistry. Memory functions in the Low-Ex group were improved in all tests. In the High-Ex group, only the passive avoidance test improved, but not the object recognition or object location tests. Both the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups had reduced infarct volumes. Although the number of neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups was increased, the number for the Low-Ex group increased more than that for the High-Ex group. Moreover hippocampal MAP2 immunoreactivity in the High-Ex group was reduced compared to that in the Low-Ex group. These data suggest that the effects of exercise on memory impairment after cerebral infarction depend on exercise intensity. PMID:23266325

  11. Elevating microRNA-122 in blood improves outcomes after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jickling, Glen C; Ander, Bradley P; Hull, Heather; Zhan, Xinhua; Cox, Christopher; Shroff, Natasha; Dykstra-Aiello, Cheryl; Stamova, Boryana; Sharp, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Because our recent studies have demonstrated that miR-122 decreased in whole blood of patients and in whole blood of rats following ischemic stroke, we tested whether elevating blood miR-122 would improve stroke outcomes in rats. Young adult rats were subjected to a temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham operation. A polyethylene glycol-liposome-based transfection system was used to administer a miR-122 mimic after MCAO. Neurological deficits, brain infarction, brain vessel integrity, adhesion molecule expression and expression of miR-122 target and indirect-target genes were examined in blood at 24 h after MCAO with or without miR-122 treatment. miR-122 decreased in blood after MCAO, whereas miR-122 mimic elevated miR-122 in blood 24 h after MCAO. Intravenous but not intracerebroventricular injection of miR-122 mimic decreased neurological deficits and brain infarction, attenuated ICAM-1 expression, and maintained vessel integrity after MCAO. The miR-122 mimic also down-regulated direct target genes (e.g. Vcam1, Nos2, Pla2g2a) and indirect target genes (e.g. Alox5, Itga2b, Timp3, Il1b, Il2, Mmp8) in blood after MCAO which are predicted to affect cell adhesion, diapedesis, leukocyte extravasation, eicosanoid and atherosclerosis signaling. The data show that elevating miR-122 improves stroke outcomes and we postulate this occurs via downregulating miR-122 target genes in blood leukocytes. PMID:26661204

  12. Exercise training causes differential changes in gene expression in diaphragm arteries and 2A arterioles of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Akter, Sadia; Davis, J Wade

    2015-09-15

    We employed next-generation, transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to assess the effects of two different exercise training protocols on transcriptional profiles in diaphragm second-order arterioles (D2a) and in the diaphragm feed artery (DFA) from Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Arterioles were isolated from the diaphragm of OLETF rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EX; n = 13), interval sprint training program (SPRINT; n = 14), or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12). Our hypothesis was that exercise training would have similar effects on gene expression in the diaphragm and soleus muscle arterioles because diaphragm blood flow increases during exercise to a similar extent as in soleus. Results reveal that several canonical pathways that were significantly altered by exercise in limb skeletal muscles were not among the pathways significantly changed in the diaphragm arterioles including actin cytoskeleton signaling, role of NFAT in regulation of immune response, protein kinase A signaling, and protein ubiquitination pathway. EX training altered the expression of a smaller number of genes than did SPRINT in the DFA but induced a larger number of genes with altered expression in the D2a than did SPRINT. In fact, FDR differential expression analysis (FDR, 10%) indicated that only two genes exhibited altered expression in D2a of SPRINT rats. Very few of the genes that exhibited altered expression in the DFA or D2a were also altered in limb muscle arterioles. Finally, results indicate that the 2a arterioles of soleus muscle (S2a) from endurance-trained animals and the DFA of SPRINT animals exhibited the largest number of genes with altered expression. PMID:26183478

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Cha, Choong Ik; Kim, Dong-Sik; Choe, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) may have multiple therapeutic applications for cell based therapy including the treatment of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). As low survival rates and potential tumorigenicity of implanted cells could undermine the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) cell-based therapy, we chose to investigate the use of conditioned medium (CM) from a culture of MSC cells as a feasible alternative. Methods: CM was prepared by culturing hUCB-MSCs in three-dimensional spheroids. In a rat model of PAH induced by monocrotaline, we infused CM or the control unconditioned culture media via the tail-vein of 6-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Results: Compared with the control unconditioned media, CM infusion reduced the ventricular pressure, the right ventricle/(left ventricle+interventricular septum) ratio, and maintained respiratory function in the treated animals. Also, the number of interleukin 1α (IL-1α), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)–positive cells increased in lung samples and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL)–positive cells decreased significantly in the CM treated animals. Conclusions: From our in vivo data in the rat model, the observed decreases in the TUNEL staining suggest a potential therapeutic benefit of the CM in ameliorating PAH-mediated lung tissue damage. Increased IL-1α, CCL5, and TIMP-1 levels may play important roles in this regard. PMID:26471341

  14. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries is not inhibited by antagonists of H2 S-synthesizing pathways.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Shaifta, Yasin; Ward, Jeremy P T; Aaronson, Philip I

    2015-01-15

    An increase in the H2 S (hydrogen sulphide, hereafter sulphide) concentration in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) has been proposed to mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). We evaluated this hypothesis in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs) by examining the effects of the sulphide precursor cysteine and sulphide-synthesis blockers on HPV and also on normoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (NPV) stimulated by prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ) and by the drug LY83583, which causes contraction in IPAs by increasing cellular reactive oxygen species levels. Experiments with several blockers of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the enzyme responsible for sulphide synthesis in the vasculature, demonstrated that propargylglycine (PAG, 1 mm) had little or no effect on the NPV caused by PGF2α or LY83583. Conversely, other CSE antagonists tested, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 100 μm), β-cyanoalanine (BCA, 500 μm) and hydroxylamine (HA, 100 μm), altered the NPV to PGF2α (BCA increased, HA inhibited) and/or LY83583 (BCA increased, AOAA and HA inhibited). Preincubating IPAs in physiological saline solution (PSS) containing 1 mm cysteine increased the amplitude of the NPV to PGF2(α) by ∼50%, and had a similar effect on HPV elicited by hypoxic challenge with 0% O2 . The enhancement of both responses by cysteine was abolished by pretreatment with 1 mm PAG. Measurements carried out with an amperometric electrode demonstrated that incubation with 1 mm cysteine under anoxic conditions (to minimize sulphide oxidation) greatly potentiated the release of sulphide from pieces of rat liver and that this release was strongly antagonized by PAG, indicating that at this concentration PAG could enter cells intact and antagonize CSE. PAG at 1 mm had no effect on HPV recorded in control PSS, or in PSS supplemented with physiological concentrations of cysteine (10 μm), cystine (50 μm) and glutamate (100 μm) in order to prevent the possible depletion of intracellular

  15. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries is not inhibited by antagonists of H2S-synthesizing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Shaifta, Yasin; Ward, Jeremy P T; Aaronson, Philip I

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the H2S (hydrogen sulphide, hereafter sulphide) concentration in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) has been proposed to mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). We evaluated this hypothesis in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs) by examining the effects of the sulphide precursor cysteine and sulphide-synthesis blockers on HPV and also on normoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (NPV) stimulated by prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and by the drug LY83583, which causes contraction in IPAs by increasing cellular reactive oxygen species levels. Experiments with several blockers of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the enzyme responsible for sulphide synthesis in the vasculature, demonstrated that propargylglycine (PAG, 1 mm) had little or no effect on the NPV caused by PGF2α or LY83583. Conversely, other CSE antagonists tested, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 100 μm), β-cyanoalanine (BCA, 500 μm) and hydroxylamine (HA, 100 μm), altered the NPV to PGF2α (BCA increased, HA inhibited) and/or LY83583 (BCA increased, AOAA and HA inhibited). Preincubating IPAs in physiological saline solution (PSS) containing 1 mm cysteine increased the amplitude of the NPV to PGF2α by ∼50%, and had a similar effect on HPV elicited by hypoxic challenge with 0% O2. The enhancement of both responses by cysteine was abolished by pretreatment with 1 mm PAG. Measurements carried out with an amperometric electrode demonstrated that incubation with 1 mm cysteine under anoxic conditions (to minimize sulphide oxidation) greatly potentiated the release of sulphide from pieces of rat liver and that this release was strongly antagonized by PAG, indicating that at this concentration PAG could enter cells intact and antagonize CSE. PAG at 1 mm had no effect on HPV recorded in control PSS, or in PSS supplemented with physiological concentrations of cysteine (10 μm), cystine (50 μm) and glutamate (100 μm) in order to prevent the possible depletion of

  16. Cell Permeable Peptide Conjugated Nanoerythrosomes of Fasudil Prolong Pulmonary Arterial Vasodilation in PAH Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Patel, Brijeshkumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a cell permeable peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), conjugated nanoerythrosomes (NERs) containing fasudil, a rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, produces prolonged pulmonary preferential vasodilation. CAR conjugated NERs containing fasudil were prepared by hypotonic lysis and extrusion method, optimized for various physicochemical properties in-vitro. The formulations were then used to study the hemodynamic efficacy in a monocrotaline-induced rodent model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CAR-NERs-Fasudil was spherical in shape with an average vesicle size and entrapment efficiency of 161.3±1.37nm and 48.81±1.96%, respectively. Formulations were stable for ~3 weeks when stored at 4°C and the drug was released in a controlled fashion for >48 hrs. The uptake of CAR-NERs-Fasudil by TGF-β activated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell was ~1.5 fold greater than the uptake of NERs-Fasudil. CAR-NERs-Fasudil inhibited ROCK activity and 5-hydroxytryptamine induced cell proliferation. In terms of reduction of pulmonary arterial pressure, intratracheal administration of CAR-NERs-Fasudil was ~2-fold more specific to the lungs compared with plain fasudil. Overall, CAR peptide grafted nanoerythrosomes offers a new platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of a rho-kinase inhibitor, fasudil, without affecting peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25460151

  17. Inactivation of G(i) proteins by pertussis toxin diminishes the effectiveness of adrenergic stimuli in conduit arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zemancíková, A; Török, J; Zicha, J; Kunes, J

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) which eliminates the activity of G(i) proteins effectively reduces blood pressure (BP) and vascular resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In this study we have compared the functional characteristics of isolated arteries from SHR with and without PTX-treatment (10 microg/kg i.v., 48 h before the experiment). Rings of thoracic aorta, superior mesenteric artery and main pulmonary artery were studied under isometric conditions to measure the reactivity of these vessels to receptor agonists and to transmural electrical stimuli. We have found that the treatment of SHR with PTX had no effect on endothelium-dependent relaxation of thoracic aorta induced by acetylcholine. In PTX-treated SHR, the maximum contraction of mesenteric artery to exogenous noradrenaline was reduced and the dose-response curve to cumulative concentration of noradrenaline was shifted to the right. Similarly, a reduction in the magnitude of neurogenic contractions elicited by electrical stimulation of perivascular nerves was observed in the mesenteric artery from PTX-treated SHR. PTX treatment of SHR also abolished the potentiating effect of angiotensin II on neurogenic contractions of the main pulmonary artery. These results indicate that PTX treatment markedly diminishes the effectiveness of adrenergic stimuli in vasculature of SHR. This could importantly affect BP regulation in genetic hypertension. PMID:18570536

  18. Broad-range TRP channel inhibitors (2-APB, flufenamic acid, SKF-96365) affect differently contraction of resistance and conduit femoral arteries of rat.

    PubMed

    Bencze, Michal; Behuliak, Michal; Vavřínová, Anna; Zicha, Josef

    2015-10-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are proposed to contribute to membrane depolarization and Ca2+ influx into vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Our aim was to study the effects of widely used broad-range TRP channel inhibitors--2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), flufenamic acid (FFA) and SKF-96365--on the contraction of freshly isolated small and large arteries. Endothelium-denuded resistance (≈250 µm) and conduit (≈1000 µm) femoral arteries were isolated from adult Wistar rats and mounted in wire myograph. The effects of the above mentioned TRP channel inhibitors and voltage-dependent calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine were studied on arterial contractions induced by phenylephrine, U-46619 or K+. Phenylephrine-induced contractions were also studied in the absence of extracellular Na+. mRNA expression of particular canonical and melastatin TRP channel subunits in femoral vascular bed was determined. TRP channel inhibitors attenuated K+-induced contraction less than nifedipine. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was more influenced by 2-APB in resistance arteries, while FFA completely prevented U-46619-induced contraction in both sizes of arteries. The absence of extracellular Na+ prevented the inhibitory effects of 2-APB, but not those of FFA. The observed effects of broad-range TRP channel inhibitors, which were dependent on the size of the artery, confirmed the involvement of TRP channels in agonist-induced contractions. The inhibitory effects of 2-APB (but not those of FFA or SKF-96365) were dependent on the presence of extracellular Na+. PMID:26384458

  19. In vivo measurement of arterial and venous oxygenation in the rat using 3D spectral-spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, P; Shankar, R A; Zweier, J L

    1998-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) instrumentation, enabling the performance of three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of free radicals, has been developed to study spatially defined differences in tissue metabolism and oxygenation. Using this instrumentation 3D images of nitroxides in rat tail were obtained. The images visualize the arterial and venous vasculature in the tail segment. Based on the exchange broadening influence of oxygen on the EPR linewidth of nitroxides, we performed localized oxygen measurements in the in vivo rat. An oxygen concentration of 300+/-30 microM was measured in the arteries and 50+/-20 microM in the veins. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing in vivo, non-invasive measurements and mapping of localized oxygenation in small animals using spectral-spatial EPR imaging techniques. PMID:9703045

  20. Audiogram, body mass, and basilar papilla length: correlations in birds and predictions for extinct archosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleich, Otto; Dooling, Robert J.; Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2005-12-01

    The inner ear in the group of archosaurs (birds, crocodilians, and extinct dinosaurs) shows a high degree of structural similarity, enabling predictions of their function in extinct species based on relationships among similar variables in living birds. Behavioral audiograms and morphological data on the length of the auditory sensory epithelium (the basilar papilla) are available for many avian species. By bringing different data sets together, we show that body mass and the size of the basilar papilla are significantly correlated, and the most sensitive frequency in a given species is inversely related to the body mass and the length of the basilar papilla. We also demonstrate that the frequency of best hearing is correlated with the high-frequency limit of hearing. Small species with a short basilar papilla hear higher frequencies compared with larger species with a longer basilar papilla. Based on the regression analysis of two significant correlations in living archosaurs (best audiogram frequency vs body mass and best audiogram frequency vs papillar length), we suggest that hearing in large dinosaurs was restricted to low frequencies with a high-frequency limit below 3 kHz.

  1. Antagonism of Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels mediates the vasorelaxant effect of Catharanthus roseus-derived vindorosine in rat renal artery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Cheang, Wai San; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Li, Yong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Wang, Guo-Cai; Huang, Yu; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-12-01

    Catharanthus roseus is a traditional herbal medicine used in Asian and African countries for the treatment of various diseases including hypertension. The present study examined possible cellular mechanisms for the relaxation of rat renal arteries induced by vindorosine extracted from C. roseus. Intrarenal arteries were isolated from 200-300 g male Sprague-Dawley rats and treated with different pharmacological blockers and inhibitors for the measurement of vascular reactivity on a Multi Myograph System. Fluorescence imaging by laser scanning confocal microscopy was utilized to determine the intracellular Ca(2+) level in the vascular smooth muscles of the renal arteries. Vindorosine in micromolar concentrations relaxes renal arteries precontracted by KCl, phenylephrine, 11-dideoxy-9α,11α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α, and serotonin. Vindorosine-induced relaxations were unaffected by endothelium denudation or by treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, or K(+) channel blockers such as tetraethylammonium ions, glibenclamide, and BaCl2. Vindorosine-induced relaxations were attenuated in the presence of 0.1 µM nifedipine (an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker). Vindorosine also concentration-dependently suppressed contractions induced by CaCl2 (0.01-5 mM) in Ca-free 60 mM KCl solution. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging using fluo-4 demonstrated that 30 min incubation with 100 µM vindorosine reduced the 60 mM KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) influx in the smooth muscles of rat renal arteries. The present study is probably the first report of blood vessel relaxation by vindorosine and the possible underlying mechanisms involving the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry via L-type Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscles. PMID:25340466

  2. Evaluation of the middle cerebral artery occlusion techniques in the rat by in-vitro 3-dimensional micro- and nano computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are widely used in stroke research. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and compare the cerebral macro- and microvascular architecture of rats in two different models of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion using an innovative quantitative micro- and nano-CT imaging technique. Methods 4h of middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed in rats using the macrosphere method or the suture technique. After contrast perfusion, brains were isolated and scanned en-bloc using micro-CT (8 μm)3 or nano-CT at 500 nm3 voxel size to generate 3D images of the cerebral vasculature. The arterial vascular volume fraction and gray scale attenuation was determined and the significance of differences in measurements was tested with analysis of variance [ANOVA]. Results Micro-CT provided quantitative information on vascular morphology. Micro- and nano-CT proved to visualize and differentiate vascular occlusion territories performed in both models of cerebral ischemia. The suture technique leads to a remarkable decrease in the intravascular volume fraction of the middle cerebral artery perfusion territory. Blocking the medial cerebral artery with macrospheres, the vascular volume fraction of the involved hemisphere decreased significantly (p < 0.001), independently of the number of macrospheres, and was comparable to the suture method. We established gray scale measurements by which focal cerebral ischemia could be radiographically categorized (p < 0.001). Nano-CT imaging demonstrates collateral perfusion related to different occluded vessel territories after macrosphere perfusion. Conclusion Micro- and Nano-CT imaging is feasible for analysis and differentiation of different models of focal cerebral ischemia in rats. PMID:20509884

  3. Protein kinase A regulation of T-type Ca2+ channels in rat cerebral arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; Welsh, Donald G

    2013-07-01

    Recent investigations have identified that T-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.x) are expressed in rat cerebral arterial smooth muscle. In the study reported here, we isolated the T-type conductance, differentiated the current into the CaV3.1/CaV3.2 subtypes and determined whether they are subject to protein kinase regulation. Using patch clamp electrophysiology, whole-cell Ba(2+) current was monitored and initially subdivided into nifedipine-sensitive and -insensitive components. The latter conductance was abolished by T-type Ca(2+) channel blockers and was faster with leftward shifted activation/inactivation properties, reminiscent of a T-type channel. Approximately 60% of this T-type conductance was blocked by 50 µM Ni(2+), a concentration that selectively interferes with CaV3.2 channels. Subsequent work revealed that the whole-cell T-type conductance was subject to protein kinase A (PKA) modulation. Specifically, positive PKA modulators (db-cAMP, forskolin, isoproterenol) suppressed T-type currents and evoked a hyperpolarized shift in steady-state inactivation. Blocking PKA (with KT5720) masked this suppression without altering the basal T-type conductance. A similar effect was observed with stHt31, a peptide inhibitor of A-kinase anchoring proteins. A final set of experiments revealed that PKA-induced suppression targeted the CaV3.2 subtype. In summary, this study revealed that a T-type Ca(2+) channel conductance can be isolated in arterial smooth muscle, and differentiated into CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 components. It also showed that vasodilatory signaling cascades inhibit this conductance by targeting CaV3.2. Such targeting would impact Ca(2+) dynamics and consequent tone regulation in the cerebral circulation. PMID:23613468

  4. Differences in sensitivity of rat mesenteric small arteries to agonists when studied as ring preparations or as cannulated preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Buus, N. H.; VanBavel, E.; Mulvany, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. Pharmacological experiments on vascular tissue are normally performed on isometric ring or strip preparations. The aim of this study was to compare the isometric characteristics with the characteristics obtained if vessels were examined under the more physiologically appropriate isobaric condition. 2. Rat mesenteric small arteries were mounted either on two steel wires for isometric force measurement (wire-myograph) or cannulated for measurement of the internal diameter under isobaric conditions (pressure-myograph). 3. The passive pressure-diameter characteristics of the small arteries were similar on the wire- and pressure-myograph (using the Laplace relation to convert wall tension-internal circumference data from the wire-myograph to effective pressure-diameter characteristics). 4. In cumulative concentration-response experiments with noradrenaline and phenylephrine, the threshold concentration was 8-10 times lower, and the EC50-concentration was 4-5 times lower, in the pressure myograph compared to the wire-myograph. Thus vessels were not only more sensitive on the pressure myograph, but the slopes of the concentration-response curves were less steep. Similar experiments with vasopressin also showed this difference in the threshold-concentration and slope, but EC50 concentrations were similar. 5. Cumulative concentration-response experiments with K+ showed no difference either in EC50 or in slope on the wire- and pressure-myographs. 6. On the wire-myograph, some vessels were stretched longitudinally (to mimic the longitudinal stretch which had to be used in the pressure-myograph to avoid buckling). Such stretch did not affect the passive characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7915613

  5. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness. PMID:22140051

  6. Epidermal growth factor-like repeats of tenascin-C-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of epidermal growth factor receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Nakasaki, Asuka; Shimojo, Naoshi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC), one of matricellular proteins, has been suggested to be involved in cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the mechanisms of how TNC constricts cerebral arteries remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine if epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats of TNC is involved in TNC-induced constriction of cerebral arteries in rats via EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Two dosages of recombinant TNC (r-TNC) consisting of the EGF-like repeats was administered intracisternally to healthy rats, and its vasoconstrictor effects were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests and India-ink angiography at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the administration. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to explore the underlying mechanisms on constricted cerebral arteries after 24 hours. The effects of a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (AG1478) on r-TNC-induced vasoconstriction were evaluated by neurobehavioral tests, India-ink angiography and immunohistochemistry at 24 hours after the administration. A higher dosage of r-TNC induced cerebral arterial constriction more severely, which continued for 48 hours. The effects were associated with the activation of EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in the smooth muscle cell layer of the constricted cerebral artery, while c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 were not activated. AG1478 blocked r-TNC-induced vasoconstrictive effects, as well as activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. These findings demonstrate that TNC induces constriction of cerebral arteries via activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. PMID:27086972

  7. Role of R-type calcium channels in the response of the perfused arterial and venous mesenteric vasculature of the rat to platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Claing, A.; Bkaily, G.; Berthiaume, N.; Sirois, P.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; D'Orléans-Juste, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The vasoactive properties of platelet-activating factor (PAF) were studied in the arterial and venous vasculature of the rat double-perfused mesenteric bed. Although PAF (0.01-0.3 pmol) induced a dose-dependent vasodilatation of the arterial mesenteric vasculature, it triggered only vasoconstrictions on the venous side, with an intact endothelium as bradykinin induced a significant venodilatation. 2. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, markedly reduced the vasodilatation induced by PAF in the arterial mesenteric vasculature and potentiated the contractile responses of the venous side to the same agent. 3. The PAF antagonist, WEB-2170, markedly reduced the response to PAF on both sides of the mesenteric vasculature. However, the IC50 of WEB-2170 against PAF was reached at a much higher concentration (1 x 10(-8) M) on the arterial side than on the venous side (5.3 x 10(-11) M). Furthermore, a second antagonist of PAF receptors, SRI-63441, although being less potent on the venous vasculature than WEB-2170, was equipotent in antagonizing the venoconstriction and the arterial</