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Sample records for rat brain striatal

  1. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  2. Multigenerational prenatal stress increases the coherence of brain signaling among cortico-striatal-limbic circuits in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Skelin, I; Needham, M A; Molina, L M; Metz, G A S; Gruber, A J

    2015-03-19

    Prenatal stress (PNS) is a significant risk factor for the development of psychopathology in adulthood such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and addiction. Animal models of PNS resemble many of the effects of PNS on humans and provide a means to study the accumulated effects of PNS over several generations on brain function. Here, we examined how mild PNS delivered during the third week in utero over four consecutive generations affects behavioral flexibility and functional signaling among cortical and limbic structures. These multi-generational prenatally stressed (MGPNS) rats were not impaired on an odor-cued reversal learning task as compared to control animals. Unilateral field potential (FP) recordings from the medial prefrontal cortex, basolateral amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and striatal territories revealed widespread differences in brain signaling between these groups during the odor sampling phase of the task. The FP power was significantly lower in most structures across most frequency bands in MGPNS animals, and the relative increase in power from baseline during the task was lower for the beta band (12-30Hz) in MGPNS animals as compared to controls. The coherence of FPs between brain regions, however, was much higher in MGPNS animals among all structures and for most frequency bands. We propose that this pattern of changes in brain signaling reflects a simplification of network processing, which is consistent with reports of reduced spine density and dendritic complexity in the brains of animals receiving PNS. Our data support the proposal that recurrent ancestral stress leads to adaptations in the brain, and that these may confer adaptive behavior in some circumstances as compared to single-generation PNS. PMID:25595989

  3. Calcium antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride affects striatal D2 dopamine receptors in the young adult and aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, M; Ogawa, N; Haba, K; Hirata, H; Mori, A

    1991-01-01

    The calcium (Ca) antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride (FNZ) has been reported to induce parkinsonism, especially in the elderly. The effects of FNZ on dopamine receptors in rat striatal membranes, especially in aged rats, were studied using radiolabeled receptor assay. Similar displacing potencies in [(3)H]spiperone bindings were exhibited for FNZ and the Ca antagonists verapamil and nicardipine. FNZ was found to directly and competitively effect D2 receptors (D2-Rs) as an antagonist, without effecting D1 receptors. Furthermore, the washing of preoccupied membranes revealed that FNZ has a long-acting potent effect on D2-Rs. The comparative study of FNZ and sulpiride in young-adult and aged rats showed that the effect of FNZ on D2-Rs was more marked in aged rats. These results might be related to FNZ-induced parkinsonism and its high incidence in the elderly. PMID:15374420

  4. In vitro and in vivo neurochemical effects of methylenedioxymethamphetamine on striatal monoaminergic systems in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C J; Levin, J A; Lovenberg, W

    1987-03-01

    A single high dose of methylenedioxymethamphetamine, a psychedelic agent, produced a rapid and persistent depletion of striatal indoles similar to that observed following administration of the serotonergic neurotoxin p-chloroamphetamine. The drug had little effect on dopaminergic variables. Like p-chloroamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine was found to be a relatively selective agent for inducing [3H]serotonin release in vitro. The serotonin uptake inhibitor, citalopram, blocked both [3H]serotonin release in vitro and striatal serotonin depletion in vivo, indicating that both processes were carrier dependent. In vivo comparisons of the stereoisomers of methylenedioxymethamphetamine indicated two phases of serotonin depletion similar to those reported for p-chloroamphetamine. Although both the (+)- and (-)-stereoisomers produced an acute (3 hr) decrease in striatal indoles, the long-term effects of the drug showed stereoselectivity in that the (+)-enantiomer produced the most dramatic serotonin depletion. Comparison of the effects of the stereoisomers of methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its n-desmethyl analog, methylenedioxyamphetamine, on [3H]serotonin and [3H]dopamine release in vitro showed the (+)-enantiomer of both drugs to be the more potent releasing agent. In spite of its reported lack of hallucinogenic activity, (+)methylenedioxyamphetamine was found to be of a potency similar to that of (+)methylenedioxymethamphetamine in inducing [3H]serotonin release in vitro. The results are discussed in terms of the neurochemical similarities between methylenedioxymethamphetamine and p-chloroamphetamine as well as the proposed role of serotonin release in the behavioral effects of methylenedioxymethamphetamine. PMID:2881549

  5. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: Development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa; Scremin, Oscar; Maarek, Jean-Michel; Holschneider, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex--changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  6. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  7. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment. PMID:26991136

  8. Dopaminergic toxicity of the herbicide atrazine in rat striatal slices

    PubMed Central

    Filipov, Nikolay M.; Stewart, Molly A.; Carr, Russell L.; Sistrunk, Shannon C.

    2007-01-01

    A possible link between Parkinson’s disease and pesticide exposure has been suggested, and recently it was shown that the herbicide atrazine (ATR) modulates catecholamine metabolism in PC12 cells and affects basal ganglia function in vivo. Hence, the objectives of this study were to: (i) determine if ATR is capable of modulating dopamine (DA) metabolism in striatal tissue slices in vitro and (ii) to explore possible mechanisms of its effects. Striatal tissues from adult male Sprague Dawley rats were incubated with up to 500 μM ATR in a metabolic shaker bath at 37 °C and an atmosphere of 95% O2 and 5% CO2 for 4 h. At the end of incubation, samples were collected for both tissue and media levels of DA and its metabolites (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC and homovanillic acid, HVA), which were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). To gain some mechanistic insight in to the way ATR affects DA metabolism, several pharmacological manipulations were performed. Striata exposed to ATR at concentrations of 100 μM and greater had a dose-dependent decrease of tissue levels of DA. At doses of ATR 50 μM and greater, the DOPAC+HVA/DA ratio was dose-dependently increased. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) protein levels and activity were not affected by ATR treatment. However, high potassium induced DA release into the medium was decreased, whereas the increase in media DA observed in the presence of the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine was increased even further by ATR in a dose-dependent manner. All of these effects of ATR were observed at levels that were not toxic to the tissue, as LDH release into the medium (lactate dehydrogenase, an index of non-specific cytotoxicity) was not affected by ATR. Taken together, results from this study suggest that ATR decreases tissue DA levels not by affecting TH activity, but possibly by interfering with the vesicular storage and

  9. Prepuberal stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a rat model of hyper-activity and attention-deficit: permanent effects on attention, brain amino acids and synaptic markers in the fronto-striatal interface.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Lucia A; Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A; Arra, Claudio; Boatto, Gianpiero; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Tino, Angela; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates. PMID:24709857

  10. Prepuberal Stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a Rat Model of Hyper-Activity and Attention-Deficit: Permanent Effects on Attention, Brain Amino Acids and Synaptic Markers in the Fronto-Striatal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A.; Arra, Claudio; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates. PMID:24709857

  11. Striatal hyperthermia associated with arousal: intracranial thermorecordings in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, E A; Wise, R A

    2001-11-01

    Humans and experimental animals show strong increases in body temperature in response to a variety of stimuli presumed to have stress as their common denominator. To assess the brain's role in this 'emotional' hyperthermia, temperatures were continuously recorded in dorsal and ventral striatum and in deep temporal muscle of freely moving rats exposed to different arousing and mild stress stimuli (placement in the test cage, 20-s sound stimulation, i.v. saline injection, 3-min social interaction with conspecific, and 3-min tail-pinch). The stimuli caused brain hyperthermia of differing degrees but similar pattern, in both the dorsal and ventral striatum. Ventral striatum had approximately 0.4 degrees C higher basal temperature than dorsal striatum, each of these brain temperatures was higher than that in deep temporal muscle. Maximal increases in brain temperature ( approximately 0.8-1.2 degrees C for 20-40 min) occurred upon placement in the test cages, during tail-pinch and during social interaction, all of which were accompanied by behavioral activation. These increases developed with short onset latencies (up to 5-15 s) and always preceded increases in muscle temperature. Significant but smaller increases in brain temperature ( approximately 0.2 degrees C for 4-6 min) were detected after sound stimulation and i.v. saline injection that induced minimal changes in behavior and no change in muscle temperature. Thus, it appears that brain hyperthermia can be triggered by quite different arousing or stressful stimuli that disturb an organism's homeostasis and demand adaptive responding. Although the exact mechanisms of local heat production in brain tissue remain to be confirmed, neuronal activation appears to be the primary triggering force behind changes in brain temperature that are sufficient to affect body temperature. Because most neural processes are temperature-dependent, change in local temperature may result in dramatic modulation of the efficiency of

  12. Differences in the time course of haloperidol-induced up-regulation of rat striatal and mesolimbic dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, E.S.; Csernansky, J.G.; Hollister, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Regional differences in the onset and persistence of increased dopamine D2 receptor density in rat brain were studied following daily injections of haloperidol for 3, 7, 14, or 28 days. Striatal (/sup 3/H)-spiroperidol Bmax values were significantly increased following 3 - 28 days of haloperidol treatment, as compared to saline controls. Olfactory tubercle Bmax values were significantly increased only after 14 or 28 days of haloperidol treatment. Nucleus accumbens Bmax values were significantly increased only in the 14-day drug treatment group, suggesting that dopamine D2 receptor up-regulation in nucleus accumbens may reverse during ongoing neuroleptic treatment. These findings suggest that important differences in adaptive responses to chronic dopamine blockade may exist between dopaminergic synapses located in various rat brain regions.

  13. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  14. Sex-Dependent Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transport in Preadolescent Rats Exposed Prenatally and/or Postnatally to Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Sirova, Jana; Kristofikova, Zdenka; Vrajova, Monika; Fujakova-Lipski, Michaela; Ripova, Daniela; Klaschka, Jan; Slamberova, Romana

    2016-08-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly used psychostimulant drug, the chronic abuse of which leads to neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The global use of MA is increasing, including in pregnant women. Since MA can cross both placental and haematoencephalic barriers and is also present in maternal milk, children of chronically abused mothers are exposed prenatally as well as postnatally. Women seem to be more vulnerable to some aspects of MA abuse than men. MA is thought to exert its effects among others via direct interactions with dopamine transporters (DATs) in the brain tissue. Sexual dimorphism of the DAT system could be a base of sex-dependent actions of MA observed in behavioural and neurochemical studies. Possible sex differences in the DATs of preadolescent offspring exposed to MA prenatally and/or postnatally have not yet been evaluated. We examined the striatal synaptosomal DATs (the activity and density of surface expressed DATs and total DAT expression) in preadolescent male and female Wistar rats (31-35-day old animals) exposed prenatally and/or postnatally to MA (daily 5 mg/kg, s.c. to mothers during pregnancy and lactation). To distinguish between specific and nonspecific effects of MA on DATs, we also evaluated the in vitro effects of lipophilic MA on the fluidity of striatal membranes isolated from preadolescent and young adult rats of both sexes. We observed similar changes in the DATs of preadolescent rats exposed prenatally or postnatally (MA-mediated drop in the reserve pool but no alterations in surface-expressed DATs). However, prenatal exposure evoked significant changes in males and postnatal exposure in females. A significant decrease in the activity of surface-expressed DATs was found only in postnatally exposed females sensitized to MA via prenatal exposure. MA applied in vitro increased the fluidity of striatal membranes of preadolescent female but not male rats. In summary, DATs of preadolescent males are more sensitive to

  15. Role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and K(+)-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Zazpe, A; Artaiz, I; Del Río, J

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was aimed at examining the role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and depolarization-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices. [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) release was measured in both brain regions and endogenous dopamine release from striatal slices was also studied. 2. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT (0.5-10 microM) produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]-DA efflux evoked by K+ (20 mM) from slices of rat olfactory tubercle. 1-Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 5-HT also increased K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux. 3. 5-HT (1-100 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner basal [3H]-DA release from olfactory tubercle and striatal slices as well as endogenous DA release from striatal slices. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonists 2-methyl-5-HT and 1-phenylbiguanide were weaker releasing agents. In all cases, the release was Ca2+ independent and tetrodotoxin insensitive. 4. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron and tropisetron (0.2 microM) significantly blocked the enhanced K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux from rat olfactory tubercle slices induced by 2-methyl-5HT. A ten fold higher concentration of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin was ineffective. 5. Much higher concentrations, up to 50 microM, of the same 5-HT3 receptor antagonists did not block the increase in basal [3H]-DA release from striatal or olfactory tubercle slices induced by 5-HT or the release of endogenous DA induced by 5-HT from striatal slices.2+ off PMID:7858893

  16. Sex-related differences in striatal dopaminergic system after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiupeng; Cao, Shengwu; Chao, Honglu; Liu, Yinlong; Ji, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated alterations in the dopamine (DA) system after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Additionally, the existence of significant sex-related differences in the dopaminergic system has long been recognized. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether TBI would differentially alter, in female and male mice, the expression and the function of the striatal vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2), an important DA transporter. After controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, female mice showed significantly lower striatal DA concentrations and K(+)-evoked DA output. By contrast, no significant sex-related differences were observed in the mRNA and protein levels of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and VMAT-2 and the methamphetamine (MA)-evoked DA output. These results demonstrated clear sex-related differences in striatal VMAT-2 function in response to TBI and suggested that female mice may be more sensitive to the TBI-induced inhibition of the VMAT-2 function, as indicated by the greater degree of deficits observed when the VMAT-2 DA-storage function was inhibited by TBI. Moreover, the TBI-induced suppression of locomotion was more pronounced than female mice. Such findings highlight the need for sex-specific considerations when examining differences among brain injury conditions. PMID:27210290

  17. Changes in striatal dopamine release in stress-induced conditioned suppression of motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Nabeshima, T; Kuno, A; Wada, M; Ukai, R; Kameyama, T

    1996-05-01

    Rats received a footshock for 10 min in a chamber with a metallic grid floor, and then placed into the chamber for 30 min after 6 days. The motility of the shocked rats showed a significant decrease (conditioned suppression of motility). In addition, the extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum were also reduced significantly in in vivo microdialysis study. Thus, dysfunction in the striatal DAergic neuronal systems is responsible for mental stress responses such as conditioned fear stress. PMID:8762174

  18. Optogenetic control of striatal dopamine release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Vance, Zachary B; Sullivan, Ryan P; Bonin, Keith D; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01

    Optogenetic control over neuronal firing has become an increasingly elegant method to dissect the microcircuitry of mammalian brains. To date, examination of these manipulations on neurotransmitter release has been minimal. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of optogenetic stimulation on dopamine neurotransmission in the dorsal striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats. By combining the tight spatial and temporal resolution of both optogenetics and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry we have determined the parameters necessary to control phasic dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of rats in vivo. The kinetics of optically induced dopamine release mirror established models of electrically evoked release, indicating that potential artifacts of electrical stimulation on ion channels and the dopamine transporter are negligible. Furthermore a lack of change in extracellular pH indicates that optical stimulation does not alter blood flow. Optical control over dopamine release is highly reproducible and flexible. We are able to repeatedly evoke concentrations of dopamine release as small as a single dopamine transient (50 nM). A U-shaped frequency response curve exists with maximal stimulation inducing dopamine effluxes exceeding 500 nM. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for understanding the neurobiological basis of dopaminergic-based disorders and provide the framework to effectively manipulate dopamine patterns. PMID:20534006

  19. Local infusion of interleukin-6 attenuates the neurotoxic effects of NMDA on rat striatal cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Toulmond, S; Vige, X; Fage, D; Benavides, J

    1992-09-14

    The potential neuroprotective effects of IL-6 against the excitotoxic neuronal loss induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) have been studied. Infusion into the rat striatum of excitotoxic amounts (250 nmol) of NMDA resulted in a 45% decrease in striatal choline acetyl transferase activity (ChAT; a marker of cholinergic neurons) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, a marker of GABAergic neurons) at 2 days post-injection. Co-infusion of 10 U of IL-6 reduced the loss of ChAT activity to 21% but failed to prevent the loss of GAD activity. IL-6 per se, up to the dose of 500 U, failed to affect ChAT or GAD activities. The in vivo effects of IL-6 are not mediated by a direct antagonism of NMDA toxicity, since IL-6 (up to a concentration of 500 and 5000 U/ml, respectively) did not antagonize either the increase in cyclic GMP levels resulting from NMDA receptor activation in cerebellar slices or the glutamate-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase, an index of neurotoxicity, by cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that the increase in IL-6 levels observed in experimental brain lesions may play a role in the protection and regeneration of cholinergic neurons. PMID:1331914

  20. Extrasynaptic Neurotransmission in the Modulation of Brain Function. Focus on the Striatal Neuronal–Glial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Rivera, Alicia; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Garriga, Pere; Narváez, José Angel; Ciruela, Francisco; Guescini, Michele; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2012-01-01

    Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT) and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT) and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons, and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal cellular networks

  1. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages. PMID:26700436

  2. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  3. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  4. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  5. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol during Adolescence Differentially Modulates Striatal CB1 Receptor Expression and the Acute and Chronic Effects on Learning in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Weed, Peter F; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Ketchum, Myles J; Winsauer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic administration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence would (1) modify any sex-specific effects of THC on learning and (2) affect the development of tolerance to THC as an adult. Male and female rats received daily injections of saline or 5.6 mg/kg of THC from postnatal day 35-75, yielding four groups (female/saline, female/THC, male/saline, and male/THC). Rats were then trained on a procedure that assayed both learning and performance behavior and administered 0.32-18 mg/kg of THC acutely as adults (experiment 1). THC produced rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in both sexes; however, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the rate-decreasing effects. Rats were then chronically administered 10 mg/kg of THC (experiment 2). Rats that received THC during adolescence developed tolerance to the rate-decreasing effects more slowly and less completely than did rats that received saline; in addition, females developed tolerance to the error-increasing effects of THC slower than males did. Western blot analysis of brain tissue indicated long-term changes in hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) levels despite levels that were indistinguishable immediately after chronic treatment during adolescence. Striatal CB1R levels were increased in adult rats that received THC during adolescence; hippocampal CB1R levels varied by sex. In summary, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the acute and chronic effects of THC, and chronic administration of THC during adolescence produced long-term changes in CB1R levels that correlated with decreased tolerance development to the rate-decreasing effects of THC. PMID:26462539

  6. Modulation of Corpus Striatal Neurochemistry by Astrocytes and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Yelkenli, İbrahim Halil; Ulupinar, Emel; Korkmaz, Orhan Tansel; Şener, Erol; Kuş, Gökhan; Filiz, Zeynep; Tunçel, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In various neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes play direct, active, and critical roles in mediating neuronal survival and functions. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has neurotrophic actions and modulates a number of astrocytic activities. In this study, the effects of VIP on the striatal neurochemistry were investigated in parkinsonian rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operated, unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned, and lesioned + VIP-administered (25 ng/kg i.p.) groups. VIP was first injected 1 h after the intrastriatal 6-OHDA microinjection and then every 2 days throughout 15 days. Extracellular striatal concentration of glutathione (GSH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (GLU), and lactate were measured in microdialysates by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantification of GABA and activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-expressing cells were determined by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)/ADNP + glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that a 6-OHDA lesion significantly increased the density of astrocytes in the striatum and VIP treatment slightly reduced the gliosis. Extracellular concentration of GABA, GLU, and lactate levels did not change, but GSH level significantly increased in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. VIP treatment reduced GSH level comparable to sham-operated groups, but enhanced GABA and GLU levels. Our double labeling results showed that VIP primarily acts on neurons to increase ADNP and GAD expression for protection. These results suggest that, in the 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration model, astrocytes were possibly activated for forefront defensiveness by modulating striatal neurochemistry. PMID:27115671

  7. Diazepam blocks striatal lipid peroxidation and improves stereotyped activity in a rat model of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Escobar-Briones, Carolina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Alvarez-Ruiz, Yarummy; Maldonado, Perla D; Santana, Ricardo A; Santamaría, Abel; Carrillo-Mora, Paul

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the effect of a single dose of diazepam was tested on different markers of oxidative damage in the striatum of rats in an acute model of immobilization (restraint) stress. In addition, the locomotor activity was measured at the end of the restraint period. Immobilization was induced to animals for 24 hr, and then, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase activity and content, and mitochondrial function were all estimated in striatal tissue samples. Corticosterone levels were measured in serum. Diazepam was given to rats as a pre-treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 20 min. before the initiation of stress. Our results indicate that acute stress produced enhanced striatal levels of lipid peroxidation (73% above the control), decreased superoxide dismutase activity (54% below the control), reduced levels of mitochondrial function (35% below the control) and increased corticosterone serum levels (86% above the control). Pre-treatment of stressed rats with diazepam decreased the striatal lipid peroxidation levels (68% below the stress group) and improved mitochondrial function (18% above the stress group), but only mild preservation of superoxide dismutase activity was detected (17% above the stress group). In regard to the motor assessment, only the stereotyped activity was increased in the stress group with respect to control (46% above the control), and this effect was prevented by diazepam administration (30% below the stress group). The preventive actions of diazepam in this acute model of stress suggest that drugs exhibiting anxiolytic and antioxidant properties might be useful for the design of therapies against early acute phases of physic stress. PMID:21645264

  8. In vivo extracellular recording of striatal neurons in the awake rat following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Morales, M; Woodward, D J; Hoffer, B J; Janak, P H

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the functional effects of dopaminergic input to the dorsal striatum and to compare the effects of dopaminergic lesions in awake and anesthetized animals. We examined the effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the ascending dopaminergic bundle on the firing properties of dorsal striatal neurons in the awake freely moving rat using chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays. We recorded extracellular activity of striatal neurons under baseline conditions and following the systemic injection of apomorphine in awake and anesthetized subjects. Firing rates were higher in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion compared to rates of neurons from the contralateral unlesioned hemisphere. Striatal firing rates from sham and no-surgery control rats were, in general, higher than those from the contralateral unlesioned striatum of experimental subjects. Apomorphine (0.05 mg/kg, sc) normalized the differences in firing rates in lesioned animals by increasing firing of neurons within the contralateral unlesioned side, while simultaneously decreasing firing of neurons within the ipsilateral lesioned side. Mean firing rates were substantially higher in awake animals than in subjects anesthetized with chloral hydrate, perhaps reflecting anesthesia-induced decreases in excitatory input to striatal neurons. Chloral hydrate anesthesia decreased firing rates of neurons in the lesioned, unlesioned, and control striata to a similar degree, although absolute firing rates of neurons from the 6-OHDA-lesioned striata remained elevated over all other groups. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions also altered the pattern of spike output in the awake animal as indicated by an increase in the number of bursts per minute following dopaminergic deafferentation. This and other burst parameters were altered by apomorphine. Our findings show that effects of dopaminergic deafferentation can be measured in the awake behaving

  9. Scoliosis in rats with experimentally-induced hemiparkinsonism: dependence upon striatal dopamine denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, M; Utsumi, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Rats suffering from experimental hemiparkinsonism induced by a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left area ventralis tegmenti showed a strong ipsilateral deviation and scoliosis-like skeletal deformity. The rats often showed single rotatory curves affecting the thoracic and lumbar regions, although cases with multiple curves were also found. The severity of the scoliosis was closely related to a decrease in extracellular striatal dopamine measured with microdialysis and to the development of postsynaptic dopamine receptor supersensitivity, functionally evaluated with rotational behaviour elicited with apomorphine. Indeed, rats with the strongest dopamine depletion (greater than 95%) and the strongest rotational responses showed the sharpest spinal deviation and skeletal deformity. These findings agree with the clinical observations that scoliosis occurs in patients with Parkinson's disease and its direction is correlated with the side of the major signs and symptoms of parkinsonism. Images PMID:2303830

  10. Anticipatory reward signals in ventral striatal neurons of behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Khamassi, Mehdi; Mulder, Antonius B; Tabuchi, Eiichi; Douchamps, Vincent; Wiener, Sidney I

    2008-11-01

    It has been proposed that the striatum plays a crucial role in learning to select appropriate actions, optimizing rewards according to the principles of 'Actor-Critic' models of trial-and-error learning. The ventral striatum (VS), as Critic, would employ a temporal difference (TD) learning algorithm to predict rewards and drive dopaminergic neurons. This study examined this model's adequacy for VS responses to multiple rewards in rats. The respective arms of a plus-maze provided rewards of varying magnitudes; multiple rewards were provided at 1-s intervals while the rat stood still. Neurons discharged phasically prior to each reward, during both initial approach and immobile waiting, demonstrating that this signal is predictive and not simply motor-related. In different neurons, responses could be greater for early, middle or late droplets in the sequence. Strikingly, this activity often reappeared after the final reward, as if in anticipation of yet another. In contrast, previous TD learning models show decremental reward-prediction profiles during reward consumption due to a temporal-order signal introduced to reproduce accurate timing in dopaminergic reward-prediction error signals. To resolve this inconsistency in a biologically plausible manner, we adapted the TD learning model such that input information is nonhomogeneously distributed among different neurons. By suppressing reward temporal-order signals and varying richness of spatial and visual input information, the model reproduced the experimental data. This validates the feasibility of a TD-learning architecture where different groups of neurons participate in solving the task based on varied input information. PMID:18973599

  11. Effect of chronic treatment with angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists on striatal dopamine levels in normal rats and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Sierrra-Paredes, German; Guerra, Maria J; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial effects of angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1) inhibition have been observed in a number of brain processes mediated by oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Parkinson's disease. However, important counterregulatory interactions between dopamine and angiotensin systems have recently been demonstrated in several peripheral tissues, and it is possible that a decrease in dopamine levels due to AT1 inhibition may interfere with neuroprotective strategies. The present experiments involving rats with normal dopaminergic innervation indicate that chronic treatment with the AT1 antagonist candesartan does not significantly affect striatal levels of dopamine, serotonin or metabolites, as does not significantly affect motor behavior, as evaluated by the rotarod test. Interestingly, chronic administration of candesartan to normal rats induced a marked increase in dopamine D1 and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression. In a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA, no differences in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels were observed between candesartan-treated rats and untreated, which suggests that chronic treatment with candesartan does not significantly affect the process of L-DOPA decarboxylation and dopamine release in Parkinson's disease patients. Candesartan did not induce any differences in the striatal expression of dopamine D1 and D2 and serotonin 5-HT1B receptors in 6ydroxydopamine-lesioned rats treated with L-DOPA. The results suggest that chronic treatment with AT1 antagonists as a neuroprotective strategy does not significantly affect striatal dopamine release or motor behavior. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. PMID:23973568

  12. Extrinsic Sources of Cholinergic Innervation of the Striatal Complex: A Whole-Brain Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dautan, Daniel; Hacioğlu Bay, Husniye; Bolam, J. Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V.; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the striatal complex plays an important role in normal behavior and is affected in a number of neurological disorders. Although early studies suggested that acetylcholine in the striatum (STR) is derived almost exclusively from cholinergic interneurons (CIN), recent axonal mapping studies using conditional anterograde tracing have revealed the existence of a prominent direct cholinergic pathway from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. The identification of the importance of this pathway is essential for creating a complete model of cholinergic modulation in the striatum, and it opens the question as to whether other populations of cholinergic neurons may also contribute to such modulation. Here, using novel viral tracing technologies based on phenotype-specific fluorescent reporter expression in combination with retrograde tracing, we aimed to define other sources of cholinergic innervation of the striatum. Systematic mapping of the projections of all cholinergic structures in the brain (Ch1 to Ch8) by means of conditional tracing of cholinergic axons, revealed that the only extrinsic source of cholinergic innervation arises in the brainstem pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Our results thus place the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal nuclei in a key and exclusive position to provide extrinsic cholinergic modulation of the activity of the striatal systems. PMID:26834571

  13. Development-related expression of AKAP79 in the striatal compartments of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Neudörfer, F; Bohl, J

    2001-01-01

    The expression of AKAP79 which tethers regulatory proteins within postsynaptic densities has been studied in the two striatal compartments, i.e. patches and matrix, at different stages of the developing human brain by means of immunohistochemistry. The two striatal compartments exhibit various intensities of diffuse immunolabelling and a different number of immunoreactive nerve cells. From the 14th to 20th gestational week a nearly homogeneous distribution of immunoreactive structures in the two compartments of the striatum is seen. Thereafter, a decrease in immunoreactive structures within the matrix is observed (22nd-25th week, intermediate stage). From the 27th week onwards the patch compartment contains distinctly more immunoreactive puncta and nerve cells. Thus, the patches stand out clearly in the immunopreparations. This distribution pattern does not change during proceeding development. AKAP79-immunoreactive nerve cells closely resemble those constituting the class of medium-sized inhibitory projection neurons that receive the dopaminergic input of the striatum. Literature data suggest that AKAP79 may be functionally attributed to dopaminergic inputs. Accordingly, the patterns of AKAP79 expression can at least in part be correlated with the sequential occurrence of dopaminergic innervation. The mature matrix containing a dopaminergic innervation being as dense as in the patches displays distinctly less AKAP79-immunoreactive neurons and puncta than the patches. This discrepancy might indicate that a subpopulation of matrix neurons may, despite dopaminergic input, not express AKAP79. PMID:11275698

  14. Intravenous Cocaine Induces Rapid, Transient Excitation of Striatal Neurons via its Action on Peripheral Neural Elements: Single-cell, Iontophoretic Study in Awake and Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Brown, Paul Leon

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine’s (COC) direct interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter is usually considered the most important action underlying the psychomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of this drug. However, some physiological, behavioral and psycho-emotional effects of COC are very rapid and brief and they remain intact during DA receptor blockade, suggesting possible involvement of peripheral non-DA neural mechanisms. To assess this issue, single-unit recording with microiontophoresis was used to examine changes in impulse activity of dorsal and ventral striatal neurons to intravenous (iv) COC (0.25–0.5 mg/kg) in the same rats under two conditions: awake with dopamine (DA) receptor blockade and anesthetized with urethane. In the awake preparation ~70% striatal neurons showed rapid and transient (latency ~ 6 s, duration ~15 s) COC-induced excitations. These effects were stronger in ventral than dorsal striatum. During anesthesia, these phasic effects were fully blocked and COC slowly decreased neuronal discharge rate. COC-methiodide (COC-M), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, also caused phasic excitations in the awake, but not anesthetized condition. In contrast to regular COC, COC-M had no tonic effect on discharge rate in either preparation. Most striatal neurons that were phasically excited by both COC forms also showed short-latency excitations during tail-touch and tail-pinch in the awake preparation, an effect strongly attenuated during anesthesia. Finally, most striatal neurons that in awake conditions were phasically excited by somato-sensory stimuli and COC salts were also excited by iontophoretic glutamate (GLU). Although striatal neurons were sensitive to GLU in both preparations, the response magnitude at the same GLU current was higher in awake than anesthetized conditions. These data suggest that in awake animals iv COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, transiently excites striatal neurons via its action on peripheral neural elements

  15. Effects of the anti-dementia drug hopantenate calcium upon striatal dopaminergic neurons in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Toide, K

    1989-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of the anti-dementia drug calcium D-(+)-4-(2,4-dihydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-butyramido) butyrate hemihydrate (hopantenate) on the dopaminergic neurons of rats, and also compared the effects of the drug on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats (4 months old) and aged rats (21 months old). Hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased striatal dopamine (DA) levels, but displayed almost no effect upon the DOPAC and HVA levels. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of hopantenate upon tyrosine hydroxylase activity by examining NSD-1015-induced L-DOPA accumulation and found that hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased the L-DOPA accumulation. In addition, comparing the effect of hopantenate on dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats, we found that the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels were decreased as a concomitant of aging, and hopantenate 1000 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased DA and DOPAC levels in both ages. The above results clearly indicate that hopantenate enhanced DA biosynthesis by stimulating the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. Furthermore, the results of hopantenate upon dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats and aged rats suggest that sensitivity to the drug may not be different with age, though the striatal DA, DOPAC and HVA levels of rats were decreased as a concomitant of aging. PMID:2570556

  16. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  17. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: a unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J; Nelson, Anna M; Mandt, Bruce H; Larson, Gaynor A; Rorabaugh, Jacki M; Ng, Christopher M C; Barcomb, Kelsey M; Richards, Toni L; Allen, Richard M; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2013-09-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine's discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  18. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, M.F.; Reisine, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

  19. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  20. Behavioral and neural effects of intra-striatal infusion of anti-streptococcal antibodies in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Dafna; Benhar, Itai; Alvarez, Kathy; Mascaro-Blanco, Adita; Brimberg, Lior; Frenkel, Dan; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Joel, Daphna

    2014-01-01

    Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) infection is associated with a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The leading hypothesis regarding this association proposes that a GAS infection induces the production of auto-antibodies, which cross-react with neuronal determinants in the brain through the process of molecular mimicry. We have recently shown that exposure of rats to GAS antigen leads to the production of anti-neuronal antibodies concomitant with the development of behavioral alterations. The present study tested the causal role of the antibodies by assessing the behavior of naïve rats following passive transfer of purified antibodies from GAS-exposed rats. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) purified from the sera of GAS-exposed rats was infused directly into the striatum of naïve rats over a 21-day period. Their behavior in the induced-grooming, marble burying, food manipulation and beam walking assays was compared to that of naïve rats infused with IgG purified from adjuvant-exposed rats as well as of naïve rats. The pattern of in vivo antibody deposition in rat brain was evaluated using immunofluorescence and colocalization. Infusion of IgG from GAS-exposed rats to naïve rats led to behavioral and motor alterations partially mimicking those seen in GAS-exposed rats. IgG from GAS-exposed rats reacted with D1 and D2 dopamine receptors and 5HT-2A and 5HT-2C serotonin receptors in vitro. In vivo, IgG deposits in the striatum of infused rats colocalized with specific brain proteins such as dopamine receptors, the serotonin transporter and other neuronal proteins. Our results demonstrate the potential pathogenic role of autoantibodies produced following exposure to GAS in the induction of behavioral and motor alterations, and support a causal role for autoantibodies in GAS-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24561489

  1. Neuroimaging evidence of altered fronto-cortical and striatal function after prolonged cocaine self-administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gozzi, Alessandro; Tessari, Michela; Dacome, Lisa; Agosta, Federica; Lepore, Stefano; Lanzoni, Anna; Cristofori, Patrizia; Pich, Emilio M; Corsi, Mauro; Bifone, Angelo

    2011-11-01

    Cocaine addiction is often modeled in experimental paradigms where rodents learn to self-administer (SA) the drug. However, the extent to which these models replicate the functional alterations observed in clinical neuroimaging studies of cocaine addiction remains unknown. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess basal and evoked brain function in rats subjected to a prolonged, extended-access cocaine SA scheme. Specifically, we measured basal cerebral blood volume (bCBV), an established correlate of basal metabolism, and assessed the reactivity of the dopaminergic system by mapping the pharmacological MRI (phMRI) response evoked by the dopamine-releaser amphetamine. Cocaine-exposed subjects exhibited reduced bCBV in fronto-cortical areas, nucleus accumbens, ventral hippocampus, and thalamus. The cocaine group also showed an attenuated functional response to amphetamine in ventrostriatal areas, an effect that was significantly correlated with total cocaine intake. An inverse relationship between bCBV in the reticular thalamus and the frontal response elicited by amphetamine was found in control subjects but not in the cocaine group, suggesting that the inhibitory interplay within this attentional circuit may be compromised by the drug. Importantly, histopathological analysis did not reveal significant alterations of the microvascular bed in the brain of cocaine-exposed subjects, suggesting that the imaging findings cannot be merely ascribed to cocaine-induced vascular damage. These results document that chronic, extended-access cocaine SA in the rat produces focal fronto-cortical and striatal alterations that serve as plausible neurobiological substrate for the behavioral expression of compulsive drug intake in laboratory animals. PMID:21775976

  2. Endogenously released dopamine inhibits the binding of dopaminergic PET and SPECT ligands in superfused rat striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Gifford, A N; Gatley, S J; Ashby, C R

    1996-03-01

    Pharmacologically induced changes in synaptic levels of dopamine (DA) have been found, in some studies, to affect the in vivo binding of dopaminergic radioligands. In the present study we used a superfused brain slice preparation to examine the effect of synaptically released dopamine on the binding of some commonly used PET and SPECT radioligands under more controlled conditions than those present in vivo. The release of DA was evoked by electrical stimulation of striatal slices and the sensitivity of binding of the D1 receptor ligand, [3H]SCH 23390, the D2 receptor ligands [3H]raclopride and [123I]epidepride, and the DA uptake transporter ligands, [3H]WIN 35,428 and [123I]RTI-55, to the frequency of stimulation examined. Most affected by stimulation was the specific binding of [3H]SCH 23390, which was fully inhibited at 2.5 Hz. This was followed by [3H]raclopride and [123I]epidepride, respectively, the binding of the latter showing only a 50% reduction at the highest frequency of 10 Hz. [3H]WIN 35,428 and [123I]RTI-55 binding was unaffected by stimulation. The effects of stimulation on [3H]raclopride binding were prevented by reserpine pretreatment of the rat, when combined with inclusion of the dopamine synthesis inhibitor, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, in the superfusate medium. We conclude that, in brain slices, the binding of D1 and D2 receptor ligands but not that of DA uptake transporter ligands is readily inhibited by DA released into the synaptic cleft. Brain slices may prove to be a useful model system for the investigation of factors affecting competition between radioligand binding and endogenous neurotransmitters. PMID:9132991

  3. Intranasally applied L-DOPA alleviates parkinsonian symptoms in rats with unilateral nigro-striatal 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Chao, Owen Y; Mattern, Claudia; Silva, Angelica M De Souza; Wessler, Janet; Ruocco, Lucia A; Nikolaus, Susanne; Huston, Joseph P; Pum, Martin E

    2012-02-10

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the most effective drug for therapy of Parkinson's disease. However, the current clinical route of L-DOPA administration is variable and unreliable because of problems with drug absorption and first-pass metabolism. Administration of drugs via the nasal passage has been proven an effective alternate route for a number of medicinal substances. Here we examined the acute behavioral and neurochemical effects of intranasally (IN) applied L-DOPA in rats bearing unilateral lesions of the medial forebrain bundle, with severe depletion (97%) of striatal dopamine. Turning behavior in an open field, footslips on a horizontal grid and postural motor asymmetry in a cylinder were assessed following IN L-DOPA or vehicle administration with, or without, benserazide pre-treatment. IN L-DOPA without benserazide pre-treatment mildly decreased ipsilateral turnings and increased contralateral turnings 10-20 min after the treatment. IN L-DOPA with saline pre-treatment reduced contralateral forelimb-slips on the grid while no effects were evident in the cylinder test. These results support the hypothesis that L-DOPA can bypass the blood-brain barrier by the IN route and alleviate behavioral impairments in the hemiparkinsonian animal model. PMID:22108632

  4. Cocaine disposition in discrete regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1993-05-01

    It has been proposed that various effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system may be related to the capacity of the drug to selectively concentrate in specific regions of the brain. In rat brain, cocaine effects on striatal and nucleus accumbens dopaminergic systems show quantitative differences. However, the disposition of cocaine in various brain regions has not been reported. In the present studies we examined the cocaine concentrations over time in serum and discrete brain regions of the rat after single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. At different time points (5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min) after i.p. injection of cocaine hydrochloride (10 mg kg-1, free base) the rats were decapitated and cocaine in serum and various brain regions was quantitated by a specific gas liquid chromatographic method. There was large inter-individual variability in different rats at each time-point. The disposition pattern of cocaine in rats after i.p. administration was similar to that observed in humans after intranasal administration. Initial absorption rate was rapid and, on average, the peak levels of cocaine were achieved in 10 min. The cocaine levels remained relatively high over the next 50 min indicating continual absorption, and then declined with a rate such that the levels 4 h after cocaine administration were undetectable in most of the animals. The overall changes in cocaine levels in various brain regions paralleled the serum concentrations. The area under the cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) revealed more than three-fold differences in cocaine accumulation in various brain regions. This unequal disposition of cocaine may be responsible in part for differential biochemical effects in different brain regions. PMID:8499585

  5. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Gold, Mark S; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  6. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J.; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  7. Acute L: -DOPA effect on hydroxyl radical- and DOPAC-levels in striatal microdialysates of parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemysław; Kostrzewa, Rose Anna; Skaba, Dariusz; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2010-04-01

    The object of the current study was to determine the effect of L: -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L: -DOPA) on the in vivo striatal microdialysate levels of the respective dopamine and serotonin metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenlalanine (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and hydroxyl radical level (HO(*); 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA) in adult rats made parkinsonian by treatment at 3 days after birth with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 66.7 microg, base form, on each side; desipramine pretreatment, 1 h). Using HPLC/ED we found that in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats the basal striatal extraneuronal level of DOPAC was dramatically reduced and constituted only approximately 4.5% of referenced value (intact rats). Conversely, the striatal microdialysate level of 5-HIAA was elevated 2-fold in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Acute L: -DOPA (60 mg/kg i.p.; S-carbidopa pretreatment, 12.5 mg/kg i.p., 30 min) produced a rapid rise in the extraneuronal DOPAC in both tested groups but to a much greater extent in intact rats (P < 0.05). Levels of HO(*) (spin-trap products of salicylate, 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA) were elevated 2-fold in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. However, L: -DOPA did not enhance HO(*) production; acute 6-OHDOPA treatment (60 mg/kg i.p.) also did not alter HO(*) production. In summary, L: -DOPA, an effective drug in ameliorating PD symptoms, did not acutely pose a risk for HO(*) generation in parkinsonian rats. We conclude that L: -DOPA is not likely to generate reactive oxygen species in humans nor is L: -DOPA likely to accelerate PD in humans. PMID:19760476

  8. Modeling falls in Parkinson’s disease: slow gait, freezing episodes and falls in rats with extensive striatal dopamine loss

    PubMed Central

    Kucinski, Aaron; Albin, Roger L.; Lustig, Cindy; Sarter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Falls in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a major and levodopa-unresponsive source of morbidity. We previously described an animal model of falls resulting from impairments in attentional-motor interactions. Reproducing the multisystem dopaminergic-cholinergic cell loss in patients with a history for falls, partial loss of striatal dopamine innervation interacted with loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons to generate falls that was hypothesized to reflect impairments in the attentional control of gait and balance and the sequencing of complex movements [1]. As clinical evidence also indicates that basal ganglia dopamine (DA) loss per se is associated with severe discoordination and thus a greater risk for falls, here we demonstrate that relatively extensive striatal DA loss, in contrast to the lack of effects of smaller, dorsal striatal DA losses and sham lesions, increased falls and slips and caused slowing while traversing dynamic surfaces. Falls in large DA rats were associated specifically with spontaneous or slip-triggered stoppages of forward movement. Collectively, the evidence suggests that low motivation or vigor for movement in general, and for initiating corrective movements in particular, are major sources for falls in rats with large DA losses. Falls are a result of complex cognitive-motor interactions, and rats with large DA losses model the impact of a propensity for freezing of gait when traversing dynamic surfaces. PMID:25595423

  9. Methamphetamine, morphine, and their combination: acute changes in striatal dopaminergic transmission evaluated by microdialysis in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Frederico C; Lourenço, Elita; Milhazes, Nuno; Morgadinho, Teresa; Ribeiro, Carlos F; Ali, Syed F; Macedo, Tice R

    2006-08-01

    The co-administration of methamphetamine (METH) and MOR (MOR)-like compounds is becoming increasingly popular among drug abusers. Recently, it was demonstrated that rats would self-inject METH-heroin combination and that this combination produced a greater rewarding effect than the identical doses of METH alone and it was further suggested that enhanced reward might underlie the popularity of this combination. However, there is null information on the effects of the MOR-METH combination on striatal dopaminergic transmission. In the present article, in vivo brain microdialysis was used to examine the effects of two METH doses (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.; [METH1: hyperlocomotion-inducing] and [METH5: stereotypy-inducing], respectively) and MOR (10 mg/kg, i.p. [MOR10]) either alone or in combination on dopamine (DA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) release in caudate putamen (CPu) in freely moving rats. METH1 evoked a transient threefold increase in DA overflow in only one-third of dosed rats. On the contrary, METH5 elicited a 11-fold increase in the extracellular DA levels 30 min after dosing and stayed significantly (P < 0.05) above control levels up to 1.5 h. On the other hand, MOR10 did not significantly change DA extracellular levels. MOR10-METH1 combination prolonged DA outflow for 1 h in all rats dosed without changing peak effect compared to METH1. On the other hand, MOR10-METH5 combination did not change the peak effect nor the DA outflow profile compared to METH5 alone. Consistently, there is a concentration-dependent decrease in DOPAC efflux evoked by METH: METH1 evoked a smaller decrease in DOPAC outflow showing a tendency for returning to basal values whereas METH5 kept DOPAC extracellular levels reduced throughout the experiment. Again, MOR10 did not significantly change DOPAC extracellular levels. MOR delayed the onset without changing METH effect on the DOPAC output. These findings provide suggestive evidence that MOR potentiated the increase in

  10. Protective effect of L-kynurenine and probenecid on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced striatal toxicity in rats: implications of modulating kynurenate as a protective strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; González-Herrera, Irma Gabriela; García, Esperanza; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The neuroactive metabolite at the kynunerine pathway, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a well-known competitive antagonist at the co-agonist glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), and also decreases the extracellular levels of glutamate by blocking α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAchr) located on glutamatergic terminals. KYNA has been often reported to be neuroprotective in different neurotoxic models. The systemic administration of L-kynurenine (L-KYN)--the precursor of KYNA--together with probenecid (PROB)--an inhibitor of organic acids transport--to rodents increases KYNA levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. The striatal infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to rodents is one of the common models used to simulate Parkinson's disease (PD). Different studies have linked PD alterations with excessive glutamatergic transmission in the striatum since NMDAr antagonists exert beneficial effects in PD models. In this work we investigated the effect that a systemic administration of L-KYN+PROB exerted on the toxic model induced by 6-OHDA in rats. PROB (50 mg/kg, i.p.) + L-KYN (75 mg/kg, i.p.) were given to rats for seven consecutive days. On day two of treatment, the animals were infused with a single injection of 6-OHDA (20 μg/2 μl) into the right striatum. Fourteen days post-lesion, rotation behavior was assessed as a marker of motor impairment. The total levels of dopamine (DA) were also estimated in striatal tissue samples of 6-OHDA-treated animals as a neurochemical marker of damage. In addition, twenty eight days post-lesion, the striatal damage was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohistochemistry against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the same animals. Neurodegeneration was also assessed by Fluoro Jade staining. 6-OHDA infusion increased rotation behavior, striatal reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration, while DA levels were decreased. For all markers evaluated, we observed protective

  11. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality. PMID:23643981

  12. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging reveals striatal hypertrophy in a rat model of long-term stimulant treatment.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, D; Shah, R; Krivko, A; Cha, J; Guilfoyle, D N; Hrabe, J; Gerum, S; Xie, S; Duan, Y; Bansal, R; Leventhal, B L; Peterson, B S; Kellendonk, C; Posner, J

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant treatment is highly effective in mitigating symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), though the neurobiological underpinnings of this effect have not been established. Studies using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with ADHD have suggested that long-term stimulant treatment may improve symptoms of ADHD in part by stimulating striatal hypertrophy. This conclusion is limited, however, as these studies have either used cross-sectional sampling or did not assess the impact of treatment length on their dependent measures. We therefore used longitudinal anatomical MRI in a vehicle-controlled study design to confirm causality regarding stimulant effects on striatal morphology in a rodent model of clinically relevant long-term stimulant treatment. Sprague Dawley rats were orally administered either lisdexamfetamine (LDX, 'Vyvanse') or vehicle (N=12 per group) from postnatal day 25 (PD25, young juvenile) until PD95 (young adult), and imaged one day before and one day after the 70-day course of treatment. Our LDX dosing regimen yielded blood levels of dextroamphetamine comparable to those documented in patients. Longitudinal analysis of striatal volume revealed significant hypertrophy in LDX-treated animals when compared to vehicle-treated controls, with a significant treatment by time point interaction. These findings confirm a causal link between long-term stimulant treatment and striatal hypertrophy, and support utility of longitudinal MRI in rodents as a translational approach for bridging preclinical and clinical research. Having demonstrated comparable morphological effects in both humans and rodents using the same imaging technology, future studies may now use this rodent model to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of stimulant-induced striatal hypertrophy. PMID:27598968

  13. Dorsal striatal dopamine depletion impairs both allocentric and egocentric navigation in rats.

    PubMed

    Braun, Amanda A; Graham, Devon L; Schaefer, Tori L; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Successful navigation requires interactions among multiple but overlapping neural pathways mediating distinct capabilities, including egocentric (self-oriented, route-based) and allocentric (spatial, map-based) learning. Route-based navigation has been shown to be impaired following acute exposure to the dopaminergic (DA) drugs (+)-methamphetamine and (+)-amphetamine, but not the serotoninergic (5-HT) drugs (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or (±)-fenfluramine. The dopaminergic-rich neostriatum is involved in both allocentric and egocentric navigation. This experiment tested whether dorsal striatal DA loss using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections impaired one or both types of navigation. Two weeks following 6-OHDA injections, rats began testing in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) followed by the Morris water maze (MWM) for route-based and spatial navigation, respectively. 6-OHDA treatment significantly increased latency and errors in the CWM and path length, latency, and cumulative distance in the MWM with no difference on cued MWM trials. Neostriatal DA levels were reduced by 80% at 2 and 7 weeks post-treatment. In addition, 6-OHDA increased DA turnover and decreased norepinephrine (NE) levels. 6-OHDA injections did not alter monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. The data support that neostriatal DA modulates both types of navigation. PMID:22465436

  14. Release of (/sup 3/H)-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-03-05

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10/sup -7/ - 10/sup -5/M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of (/sup 3/H)5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of (/sup 3/H)DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both (/sup 5/H)5HT and (/sup 3/H)DA was Ca/sup 2 +/-independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)(/sup 3/H)MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA.

  15. Preferential cytoplasmic localization of delta-opioid receptors in rat striatal patches: comparison with plasmalemmal mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Pickel, V M

    2001-05-01

    The activation of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the caudate-putamen nucleus (CPN) produces regionally distinct changes in motor functions, many of which are also influenced by opioids active at micro-opioid receptors (MORs). These actions most likely occur in MOR-enriched patch compartments in the CPN. To determine the functional sites for DOR activation and potential interactions involving MOR in these regions, immunoperoxidase and immunogold-silver labeling methods were applied reversibly for the ultrastructural localization of DOR and MOR in single rat brain sections containing patches of the CPN. DOR immunoreactivity was commonly seen within the cytoplasm of spiny and aspiny neurons, many of which also expressed MOR. In dendrites and spines, DOR labeling was preferentially localized to membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and spine apparatus, whereas MOR showed a prominent plasmalemmal distribution. DOR- and/or MOR-labeled spines received asymmetric, excitatory synapses, some of which showed notable perforations, suggesting the involvement of these receptors in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. DORs were more frequently detected than were MORs within axon terminals that formed either asymmetric synapses with spine heads or symmetric synapses with spine necks. Our results suggest that in striatal patches, DORs, often in cooperation with MORs, play a direct modulatory role in controlling the postsynaptic excitability of spines, whereas presynaptic neurotransmitter release onto spines is mainly influenced by DOR activation. In comparison with MOR, the prevalent association of DOR with cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in intracellular trafficking of cell surface proteins suggests major differences in availability of these receptors to extracellular opioids. PMID:11312309

  16. A SINGLE HIGH DOSE OF METHAMPHETAMINE INCREASES COCAINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION BY DEPLETION OF STRIATAL DOPAMINE IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    XI, Z.-X.; KLEITZ, H. K.; DENG, X.; LADENHEIM, B.; PENG, X.-Q.; LI, X.; GARDNER, E. L.; STEIN, E. A.; CADET, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Psychostimulant addicts often take high doses of drugs, and high doses of psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (METH) are neurotoxic to striatal dopamine (DA) terminals. Yet, the effects of high doses of METH on drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior have not been examined. In the present study, we found that single high doses of METH in rats (10–20 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cocaine self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 (FR2) reinforcement conditions, while higher doses (40 mg/kg×1 or 10 mg/kg/2 h×4) caused high mortality among rats maintained on daily cocaine self-administration. The increased cocaine self-administration appeared to be a compensatory response to reduced cocaine reward after METH, because the same doses of METH caused a dose-dependent reduction both in “breakpoint” levels for cocaine self-administration under progressive-ratio reinforcement and in nucleus accumbens DA response to acute cocaine. Further, METH (10–20 mg/kg) produced large DA release (4000%–6000% over baseline), followed by a significant reduction in striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, but without significant changes in striatal DA transporter levels. These findings suggest that the present high doses of METH caused striatal DA depletion or hypofunction without severe damage in DA terminals, which may contribute to the increased cocaine-taking behavior observed in the present study. Provided that the present doses of METH may mimic METH overdose incidents in humans, the present findings suggest that METH-induced DA depletion or neurotoxicity may lead to an increase in subsequent drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior. PMID:19336247

  17. A single high dose of methamphetamine increases cocaine self-administration by depletion of striatal dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Xi, Z-X; Kleitz, H K; Deng, X; Ladenheim, B; Peng, X-Q; Li, X; Gardner, E L; Stein, E A; Cadet, J L

    2009-06-30

    Psychostimulant addicts often take high doses of drugs, and high doses of psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (METH) are neurotoxic to striatal dopamine (DA) terminals. Yet, the effects of high doses of METH on drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior have not been examined. In the present study, we found that single high doses of METH in rats (10-20 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cocaine self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 (FR2) reinforcement conditions, while higher doses (40 mg/kgx1 or 10 mg/kg/2 hx4) caused high mortality among rats maintained on daily cocaine self-administration. The increased cocaine self-administration appeared to be a compensatory response to reduced cocaine reward after METH, because the same doses of METH caused a dose-dependent reduction both in "break-point" levels for cocaine self-administration under progressive-ratio reinforcement and in nucleus accumbens DA response to acute cocaine. Further, METH (10-20 mg/kg) produced large DA release (4000%-6000% over baseline), followed by a significant reduction in striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, but without significant changes in striatal DA transporter levels. These findings suggest that the present high doses of METH caused striatal DA depletion or hypofunction without severe damage in DA terminals, which may contribute to the increased cocaine-taking behavior observed in the present study. Provided that the present doses of METH may mimic METH overdose incidents in humans, the present findings suggest that METH-induced DA depletion or neurotoxicity may lead to an increase in subsequent drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior. PMID:19336247

  18. Impaired selenoprotein expression in brain triggers striatal neuronal loss leading to coordination defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Seeher, Sandra; Carlson, Bradley A.; Miniard, Angela C.; Wirth, Eva K.; Mahdi, Yassin; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Driscoll, Donna M.; Schweizer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence (SECIS)-Binding Protein 2 (Secisbp2) binds to SECIS elements located in the 3′-untranslated region of eukaryotic selenoprotein mRNAs. It facilitates incorporation of the rare amino acid selenocysteine in response to UGA codons. Inactivation of Secisbp2 in hepatocytes greatly reduced selenoprotein levels. Neuron-specific inactivation of Secisbp2 (CamK-Cre; Secisbp2fl/fl) reduced cerebral expression of selenoproteins to a lesser extent than inactivation of tRNA[Ser]Sec. This allowed us to study the development of cortical parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which are completely lost in tRNA[Ser]Sec mutants. PV+ interneuron density was reduced in the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. In situ-hybridization for Gad67 confirmed the reduction of GABAergic interneurons. Because of the obvious movement phenotype involving a broad, dystonic gait, we suspected basal ganglia dysfunction. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was normal in substantia nigra neurons and their striatal terminals. However the densities of striatal PV+ and Gad67+ neurons were decreased by 65% and 49%, respectively. Likewise, the density of striatal cholinergic neurons was reduced by 68%. Our observations demonstrate that several classes of striatal interneurons depend on selenoprotein expression. These findings may offer an explanation for the movement phenotype of selenoprotein P-deficient mice and the movement disorder and mental retardation described in a patient carrying SECISBP2 mutations. PMID:24844465

  19. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  20. Striatal dynamics explain duration judgments

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa, Thiago S; Monteiro, Tiago; Motiwala, Asma; Soares, Sofia; Machens, Christian; Paton, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The striatum is an input structure of the basal ganglia implicated in several time-dependent functions including reinforcement learning, decision making, and interval timing. To determine whether striatal ensembles drive subjects' judgments of duration, we manipulated and recorded from striatal neurons in rats performing a duration categorization psychophysical task. We found that the dynamics of striatal neurons predicted duration judgments, and that simultaneously recorded ensembles could judge duration as well as the animal. Furthermore, striatal neurons were necessary for duration judgments, as muscimol infusions produced a specific impairment in animals' duration sensitivity. Lastly, we show that time as encoded by striatal populations ran faster or slower when rats judged a duration as longer or shorter, respectively. These results demonstrate that the speed with which striatal population state changes supports the fundamental ability of animals to judge the passage of time. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11386.001 PMID:26641377

  1. Turning off cortical ensembles stops striatal Up states and elicits phase perturbations in cortical and striatal slow oscillations in rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kasanetz, Fernando; Riquelme, Luis A; O'Donnell, Patricio; Murer, M Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    In vivo, cortical neurons and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) display robust subthreshold depolarizations (Up states) during which they are enabled to fire action potentials. In the cortex, Up states are believed to occur simultaneously in a neuronal ensemble and to be sustained by local network interactions. It is known that MSN are impelled into the Up state by extra-striatal (primarily cortical) inputs, but the mechanisms that sustain and determine the end of striatal Up states are still debated. Furthermore, it has not been established if brisk perturbations of ongoing cortical oscillations alter rhythmic transitions between Up and Down states in striatal neurons. Here we report that MSN Up states terminate abruptly when persistent activity in cortical ensembles providing afferents to a given striatal region is turned off by local electrical stimulation or ends spontaneously. In addition, we found that phase perturbations in MSN membrane potential slow oscillations induced by cortical stimulation replicate the stimulus-induced dynamics of spiking activity in cortical ensembles. Overall, these results suggest that striatal Up states are single-cell subthreshold representations of episodes of persistent spiking in cortical ensembles. A precise spatial and temporal alignment between episodes of cortical persistent activity and striatal Up states would allow MSN to detect specific cortical inputs embedded within a more general cortical signal. PMID:16931555

  2. Striatal GABA receptor alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Binoy, J; Anitha, M; Paulose, C S

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia in neonates disrupts the oxygen flow to the brain, essentially starving the brain and preventing it from performing vital biochemical processes important for central nervous system development. Hypoxia results in a permanent brain damage by gene and receptor level alterations mediated through neurotransmitters. The present study evaluated GABA, GABAA, GABAB receptor functions and gene expression changes in glutamate decarboxylase in the corpus striatum of hypoxic neonatal rats and the treatment groups with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Since GABA is the principal neurotransmitter involved in hypoxic ventilatory decline, the alterations in its level under hypoxic stress points to an important aspect of respiratory control. Following hypoxic stress, a significant decrease in total GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors function and GAD expression was observed in the striatum, which accounts for the ventilator decline. Hypoxic rats treated with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD to near control. Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation helps in overcoming reduction in oxygen supply. Treatment with oxygen alone and epinephrine was not effective in reversing the altered receptor functions. Thus, our study point to the functional role of GABA receptors in mediating ventilatory response to hypoxia and the neuroprotective role of glucose treatment. This has immense significance in the proper management of neonatal hypoxia for a better intellect in the later stages of life. PMID:22089934

  3. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum. PMID:27244237

  4. Melatonin Ameliorates Injury and Specific Responses of Ischemic Striatal Neurons in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuxin; Feng, Qiqi; Ma, Jing; Feng, Zhibo; Zhan, Mali; OuYang, Lisi; Mu, Shuhua; Liu, Bingbing; Jiang, Zhuyi; Jia, Yu; Li, Youlan

    2013-01-01

    Studies have confirmed that middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) causes striatal injury in which oxidative stress is involved in the pathological mechanism. Increasing evidence suggests that melatonin may have a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemic damage. This study aimed to examine the morphological changes of different striatal neuron types and the effect of melatonin on striatal injury by MCAO. The results showed that MCAO induced striatum-related dysfunctions of locomotion, coordination, and cognition, which were remarkably relieved with melatonin treatment. MCAO induced severe striatal neuronal apoptosis and loss, which was significantly decreased with melatonin treatment. Within the outer zone of the infarct, the number of Darpp-32+ projection neurons and the densities of dopamine-receptor-1 (D1)+ and dopamine-receptor-2 (D2)+ fibers were reduced; however, both parvalbumin (Parv)+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+ interneurons were not significantly decreased in number, and neuropeptide Y (NPY)+ and calretinin (Cr)+ interneurons were even increased. With melatonin treatment, the loss of projection neurons and characteristic responses of interneurons were notably attenuated. The present study demonstrates that the projection neurons are rather vulnerable to ischemic damage, whereas the interneurons display resistance and even hyperplasia against injury. In addition, melatonin alleviates striatal dysfunction, neuronal loss, and morphological transformation of interneurons resulting from cerebral ischemia. PMID:23686363

  5. Effects of L-Dopa on circadian rhythms of 6-OHDA striatal lesioned rats: a radiotelemetric study.

    PubMed

    Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas; Vidal, Johanna; Bruguerolle, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal variation in the motor function of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suggests the potential importance of a chronobiological and chronopharmacological approach in its clinical management. We previously documented the effects of striatal injection of 6-OHDA (as an animal model of PD) on the circadian rhythms of temperature (T), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (A). The present work assessed the possible influence of L-Dopa on these same rhythms in the 6-OHDA animal model of PD. The study began after a four-week recovery period following surgical implantation of telemetric devices to monitor the study variables and/or anaesthesia. The study was divided into an initial one-week control period (W1) for baseline measurement of T, HR, and A rhythms. Thereafter, stereotaxic 6-OHDA lesioning was done. and a second monitoring for two weeks followed (W2, W3). Rats were then randomly divided into two groups: eight control rats received, via a mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously, the excipient saline; the other eight rats received L-Dopa (100 mg/kg SC/day). After a seven-day period (W4), the pumps were removed and the T, HR, and A rhythms were monitored for two weeks (W5 and W6). To control for 6-OHDA striatal dopamine-induced depletion, 12 other rats were injected by identical methods (eight rats with 6-OHDA and four controls with saline) and sacrificed at W1, W3, and W5 for dopamine striatal content determination. To verify the delivery of levodopa from the osmotic pumps, plasma levels of levodopa and its main metabolites 3-OMD, DOPAC, and HVA were determined on separate group of rats receiving the drug under the same experimental conditions (osmotic pumps delivering continuously 10 microl/h for seven days, 100 mg/kg/subcutaneously). Our results agree with previously reported rhythmic changes induced by 6-OHDA--loss of circadian rhythmicity or changes in the main parameters of the registered rhythms. When circadian rhythmicity was abolished, L

  6. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR. PMID:26394534

  7. Hormonal, hypothalamic and striatal responses to reduced body weight gain are attenuated in anorectic rats bearing small tumors.

    PubMed

    Pourtau, Line; Leemburg, Susan; Roux, Pascale; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Costaglioli, Patricia; Garbay, Bertrand; Drutel, Guillaume; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2011-05-01

    Lack of compensatory or even reduced food intake is frequently observed in weight-losing cancer patients and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Our previous work has shown increased transcription factor expression in the hypothalamus and ventral striatum of anorectic rats bearing small tumors. mRNA expression of molecules known to be involved in pathways regulating appetite in these structures was therefore assessed in this study. Given that pain, pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic hormones can modify food intake, spinal cord cellular activation patterns and plasma concentrations of cytokines and hormones were also studied. Morris hepatoma 7777 cells injected subcutaneously in Buffalo rats provoked a 10% lower body weight and 15% reduction in food intake compared to free-feeding tumor-free animals 4 weeks later when the tumor represented 1-2% of body mass. No differences in spinal cord activation patterns or plasma concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed between groups. However, the changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations found in food-restricted weight-matched rats in comparison to ad libitum-fed animals did not occur in anorectic tumor-bearing animals. Real-time PCR showed that tumor-bearing rats did not display the increase in hypothalamic agouti-related peptide mRNA observed in food-restricted weight-matched animals. In addition, microarray analysis and real-time PCR revealed increased ventral striatal prostaglandin D synthase expression in food-restricted animals compared to anorectic tumor-bearing rats. These findings indicate that blunted hypothalamic AgRP mRNA expression, probably as a consequence of relatively high leptin and low ghrelin concentrations, and reduced ventral striatal prostaglandin D synthesis play a role in maintaining cancer-associated anorexia. PMID:21334429

  8. Characterization of the effects of serotonin on the release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine from rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Nurse, B.; Russell, V.A.; Taljaard, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    The effect of serotonin agonists on the depolarization (K+)-induced, calcium-dependent, release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine (DA) from rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices was investigated. Serotonin enhanced basal /sup 3/H overflow and reduced K+-induced release of (/sup 3/H)DA from nucleus accumbens slices. The effect of serotonin on basal /sup 3/H overflow was not altered by the serotonin antagonist, methysergide, or the serotonin re-uptake blocker, chlorimipramine, but was reversed by the DA re-uptake carrier inhibitors nomifensine and benztropine. With the effect on basal overflow blocked, serotonin did not modulate K+-induced release of (/sup 3/H)DA in the nucleus accumbens or striatum. The serotonin agonists, quipazine (in the presence of nomifensine) and 5-methoxytryptamine, did not significantly affect K+-induced release of (/sup 3/H)DA in the nucleus accumbens. This study does not support suggestions that serotonin receptors inhibit the depolarization-induced release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens or striatum of the rat brain. The present results do not preclude the possibility that serotonin may affect the mesolimbic reward system at a site which is post-synaptic to dopaminergic terminals in the nucleus accumbens.

  9. Large-Scale, Ion-Current-Based Proteomic Investigation of the Rat Striatal Proteome in a Model of Short- and Long-Term Cocaine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shichen; Jiang, Xiaosheng; Li, Jun; Straubinger, Robert M; Suarez, Mauricio; Tu, Chengjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Thompson, Alexis C; Qu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Given the tremendous detriments of cocaine dependence, effective diagnosis and patient stratification are critical for successful intervention yet difficult to achieve due to the largely unknown molecular mechanisms involved. To obtain new insights into cocaine dependence and withdrawal, we employed a reproducible, reliable, and large-scale proteomics approach to investigate the striatal proteomes of rats (n = 40, 10 per group) subjected to chronic cocaine exposure, followed by either short- (WD1) or long- (WD22) term withdrawal. By implementing a surfactant-aided precipitation/on-pellet digestion procedure, a reproducible and sensitive nanoLC-Orbitrap MS analysis, and an optimized ion-current-based MS1 quantification pipeline, >2000 nonredundant proteins were quantified confidently without missing data in any replicate. Although cocaine was cleared from the body, 129/37 altered proteins were observed in WD1/WD22 that are implicated in several biological processes related closely to drug-induced neuroplasticity. Although many of these changes recapitulate the findings from independent studies reported over the last two decades, some novel insights were obtained and further validated by immunoassays. For example, significantly elevated striatal protein kinase C activity persisted over the 22 day cocaine withdrawal. Cofilin-1 activity was up-regulated in WD1 and down-regulated in WD22. These discoveries suggest potentially distinct structural plasticity after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. In addition, this study provides compelling evidence that blood vessel narrowing, a long-known effect of cocaine use, occurred after long-term but not short-term withdrawal. In summary, this work developed a well-optimized paradigm for ion-current-based quantitative proteomics in brain tissues and obtained novel insights into molecular alterations in the striatum following cocaine exposure and withdrawal. PMID:27018876

  10. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-01

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders. PMID:15797529

  11. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; Torre, Adrianna De La; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-07-15

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  12. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; De La Torre, Adrianna; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  13. Methylphenidate Effects on Brain Activity as a Function of SLC6A3 Genotype and Striatal Dopamine Transporter Availability

    PubMed Central

    Kasparbauer, Anna-Maria; Rujescu, Dan; Riedel, Michael; Pogarell, Oliver; Costa, Anna; Meindl, Thomas; la Fougère, Christian; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We pharmacologically challenged catecholamine reuptake, using methylphenidate, to investigate its effects on brain activity during a motor response inhibition task as a function of the 3′-UTR variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene (SLC6A3) and the availability of DATs in the striatum. We measured the cerebral hemodynamic response of 50 healthy males during a Go/No-Go task, a measure of cognitive control, under the influence of 40 mg methylphenidate and placebo using 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects were grouped into 9-repeat (9R) carriers and 10/10 homozygotes on the basis of the SLC6A3 VNTR. During successful no-go trials compared with oddball trials, methylphenidate induced an increase of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal for carriers of the SLC6A3 9R allele but a decrease in 10/10 homozygotes in a thalamocortical network. The same pattern was observed in caudate and inferior frontal gyrus when successful no-go trials were compared with successful go trials. We additionally investigated in a subset of 35 participants whether baseline striatal DAT availability, ascertained with 123I-FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography, predicted the amount of methylphenidate-induced change in hemodynamic response or behavior. Striatal DAT availability was nominally greater in 9R carriers compared with 10/10 homozygotes (d=0.40), in line with meta-analyses, but did not predict BOLD or behavioral changes following MPH administration. We conclude that the effects of acute MPH administration on brain activation are dependent on DAT genotype, with 9R carriers showing enhanced BOLD following administration of a prodopaminergic compound. PMID:25220215

  14. Treadmill exercise ameliorates impairment of spatial learning ability through enhancing dopamine expression in hypoxic ischemia brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Youl; Lee, Shin-Ho; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Substantia nigra and striatum are vulnerable to hypoxic ischemia brain injury. Physical exercise promotes cell survival and functional recovery after brain injury. However, the effects of treadmill exercise on nigro-striatal dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by hypoxic ischemia brain injury in neonatal stage are largely unknown. We determined the effects of treadmill exercise on survival of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fibers in the striatum after hypoxic ischemia brain injury. On postnatal 7 day, left common carotid artery of the neonatal rats ligated for two hours and the neonatal rats were exposed to hypoxia conditions for one hour. The rat pups in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 12 weeks, starting 22 days after induction of hypoxic ischemia brain injury. Spatial learning ability in rat pups was determined by Morris water maze test after last treadmill exercise. The viability of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and dopamine fibers in the striatum were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. In this study, hypoxic ischemia injury caused loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fibers in the striatum. Induction of hypoxic ischemia deteriorated spatial learning ability. Treadmill exercise ameliorated nigro-striatal dopaminergic neuronal loss, resulting in the improvement of spatial learning ability. The present study suggests the possibility that treadmill exercise in early adolescent period may provide a useful strategy for the recovery after neonatal hypoxic ischemia brain injury. PMID:24278893

  15. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of rat substantia nigra up-regulate dopamine-induced phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein in striatal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, D G; Kobierski, L A; Konradi, C; Hyman, S E

    1994-01-01

    Destruction of the substantia nigra produces striatal D1 dopamine receptor supersensitivity without increasing receptor number or affinity, thus implicating postreceptor mechanisms. The nature of these mechanisms is unknown. Increased striatal c-fos expression ipsilateral to a unilateral lesion of the substantia nigra in rats treated with appropriate dopamine agonists provides a cellular marker of D1 receptor supersensitivity. D1 receptors are positively linked to adenylate cyclase and therefore to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Because expression of the c-fos gene in response to cAMP- and Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated protein kinases depends on phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) at Ser-133, we examined CREB phosphorylation after dopaminergic stimulation in cultured striatal neurons and in the striatum of rats after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine ablation of the substantia nigra. Using an antiserum specific for CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133, we found that dopamine increases CREB phosphorylation in cultured striatal neurons. This effect was blocked by a D1 antagonist. L-Dopa produced marked CREB phosphorylation in striatal neurons in rats ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. This response was blocked by a D1 antagonist, but not a D2 antagonist, and was reproduced by a D1 agonist, but not a D2 agonist. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that D1 receptor supersensitivity is associated with upregulated activity of cAMP-dependent or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, or both, following dopamine denervation of striatal neurons. Images PMID:7937819

  16. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation. PMID:25761571

  17. Ketamine decreased striatal [(11)C]raclopride binding with no alterations in static dopamine concentrations in the striatal extracellular fluid in the monkey brain: multiparametric PET studies combined with microdialysis analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, H; Harada, N; Nishiyama, S; Ohba, H; Sato, K; Fukumoto, D; Kakiuchi, T

    2000-08-01

    The effects of ketamine, a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, on the striatal dopaminergic system were evaluated multiparametrically in the monkey brain using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with microdialysis. L-[beta-(11)C]DOPA, [(11)C]raclopride, and [(11)C]beta-CFT were used to evaluate dopamine synthesis rate, D(2) receptor binding, and transporter availability, respectively, in conscious and ketamine-anesthetized animals. Dopamine concentrations in the striatal extracellular fluid (ECF) were simultaneously measured by PET. Thirty minutes prior to PET scan, intravenous administration of ketamine was started by continuous infusion at a rate of 3 or 10 mg/kg/h. Ketamine infusion dose-dependently decreased [(11)C]raclopride binding, but induced no significant changes in dopamine concentration in the striatal ECF as measured by microdialysis at any dose used. In contrast, ketamine increased both dopamine synthesis and DAT availability as measured by L-[beta-(11)C]DOPA and [(11)C]beta-CFT, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the inhibition of glutamatergic neuronal activity modulates dopamine turnover in the striatum by simultaneous enhancement of the dynamics of dopamine synthesis and DAT availability to the same extent, resulting in no apparent changes in ECF dopamine concentration as measured by microdialysis. It also suggests that the alteration of [(11)C]raclopride binding in vivo as measured by PET might not simply be modulated by the static synaptic concentration of dopamine. PMID:10881030

  18. Inhibition of ( sup 3 H)dopamine uptake into rat striatal slices by quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Leibee, L.L.; Jewell, A.L.; Fang, Zhaoxia; Crooks, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The effects of quaternary N-methylated nicotine derivatives were examined on in vitro uptake of ({sup 3}H)dopamine (({sup 3}H)DA) in rat striatal slices. Striatal slices were incubated with a 10 {mu}M concentration of the following compounds: N-methylnicotinium, N-methylnornicotinium, N-methylcotininium, N,N{prime}-dimethylnicotinium and N{prime}-methylnicotinium salts. The results clearly indicated that significant inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake occurred with those compounds possessing a N-methylpyridinium group; whereas, compounds that were methylated at the N{prime}-pyrrolidinium position were less effective or exhibited no inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake. The results suggest that high concentrations of quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites which are structurally related to the neurotoxin MPP{sup +}, and which may be formed in the CNS, may protect against Parkinson's Disease and explain the inverse relationship between smoking and Parkinsonism reported in epidemiologic studies.

  19. Effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.A.; Lamm, M.C.; Taljaard, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ethanol (10-200 mM) transiently increased tritium overflow from superfused rat nucleus accumbens slices previously incubated with (/sup 3/H)dopamine (DA) and (/sup 14/C)choline. The effect was greater in striatal tissue and did not appear to be a non-specific membrane effect since (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine (ACh) release was not affected. Lack of antagonism by picrotoxin suggested that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were not involved. Calcium was not a requirement and the DA uptake blocker, nomifensine, was without effect. Ethanol appeared to be causing (/sup 3/H)DA release into the cytoplasm. K+ -stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)DA and (/sup 14/C)ACh from nucleus accumbens and striatal slices was not affected. Clonidine-mediated inhibition of the K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)DA remained unaltered. Ethanol attenuated the isoproterenol-induced enhancement of (/sup 3/H)DA release. Ethanol therefore appeared to interact with components of the DA terminal causing a transient increase in the release of neurotransmitter without impairing K+-evoked release but apparently interfering with the isoproterenol-induced effect.

  20. Biogenic amines in striatum of rats that had been treated with ethanol, and their brains later stored in different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemyslaw; Labus, Lukasz; Stabryla, Joanna; Durczok, Artur; Brus, Ryszard; Nowicka, Joanna; Shani, Jashovam

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how ethanol pretreatment and storage temperatures of brain striatum affect levels of biogenic amines in this tissue. Adult Wistar male rats were injected with 25% ethanol (5.0 g/kg i.p.) while the control rats were administered i.p. with the same volume of saline. Two hours later the rats were decapitated, their brains removed, and the striatum separated. Each striatum was divided into three parts: one part was immediately frozen on dry ice and kept at -70 degrees C; a second fragment was kept in a household refrigerator (+4 degrees C); and the third fragment was kept at +22 degrees C. Twenty-four hours later, levels of DA, DOPAC, HVA, 3-MT, 5-HT, and 5-HIAA in the striatum were assayed by HPLC/ED. Immediately after decapitation; ethanol levels were assayed in the serum of ethanol-pretreated and saline-pretreated rats using gas chromatography. Our results indicate that levels of striatal DA, DOPAC, and HVA in saline-pretreated rats decreased significantly when the storage temperature of the striatum was raised from -70 degrees C, through +4 degrees C, to +22 degrees C, while levels of striatal 5-HT and 5-HIAA remained constant within the temperature range tested and levels of 3-MT fluctuated. In ethanol-pretreated rats, striatal levels of DOPAC, HVA, and 5-HIAA were increased in all three storage temperatures, while levels of DA, 5-HT, and 3-MT were decreased in those temperatures. Those decreases were most profound in striatal samples kept at +22 degrees C. We conclude that concern about possible interactions between drugs and biogenic amines should be exercised. PMID:14527879

  1. Electrophilic adduction of ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 by N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate inhibits ubiquitin activation and is accompanied by striatal injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Viquez, Olga M; Caito, Samuel W; McDonald, W Hayes; Friedman, David B; Valentine, William M

    2012-11-19

    Previous studies have shown ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 to be sensitive to adduction through both Michael addition and SN(2) chemistry in vitro. E1 presents a biologically important putative protein target for adduction due to its role in initiating ubiquitin based protein processing and the involvement of impaired ubiquitin protein processing in two types of familial Parkinson's disease. We tested whether E1 is susceptible to xenobiotic-mediated electrophilic adduction in vivo and explored the potential contribution of E1 adduction to neurodegenerative events in an animal model. N,N-Diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) was administered to rats using a protocol that produces covalent cysteine modifications in vivo, and brain E1 protein adducts were characterized and mapped using shotgun LC-MS/MS. E1 activity, global and specific protein expression, and protein carbonyls were used to characterize cellular responses and injury in whole brain and dorsal striatal samples. The data demonstrate that DEDC treatment produced S-(ethylaminocarbonyl) adducts on Cys234 and Cys179 residues of E1 and decreased the levels of activated E1 and total ubiquitinated proteins. Proteomic analysis of whole brain samples identified expression changes for proteins involved in myelin structure, antioxidant response, and catechol metabolism, systems often disrupted in neurodegenerative disease. Our studies also delineated localized injury within the striatum as indicated by decreased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, elevated protein carbonyl content, increased antioxidant enzyme and α-synuclein expression, and enhanced phosphorylation of tau and tyrosine hydroxylase. These data are consistent with E1 having similar susceptibility to adduction in vivo as previously reported in vitro and support further investigation into environmental agent adduction of E1 as a potential contributing factor to neurodegenerative disease. Additionally, this study supports the predictive value of in vitro screens

  2. Comparative studies of the release of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium species (MPP/sup +/) from rat and mouse brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, C.W.; Shen, R.S.; Gessner, W.; Brossi, A.

    1986-05-01

    The parkinsonian producing neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), selectively destroys nigrostriatal neurons in humans and primates and depletes striatal dopamine in mice but not in rats. MPTP is oxidized by monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) in glial cells and/or serotonergic neurons to form a 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium species (MPP/sup +/), which accumulates in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and is thought to cause cell destruction. The authors compared the spontaneous release of MPP/sup +/ in striatal and hypothalamic synaptosomes prepared from male Sprague-Dawley rats and male C57BL mice. Synaptosomes were preloaded with (/sup 3/H)-MPP/sup +/ (final concentration of 0.8 ..mu..M, 265 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mol) in physiological Tris containing 0.02% ascorbic acid for 7.5 min at 37/sup 0/C. Hypothalamic, but not striatal, (/sup 3/H)-MPP/sup +/ release from rat and mouse brain was directly proportional to its initial loading concentration (0.008-0.8 ..mu..M). Striatal synaptosomes from rats and mice gave identical rates of spontaneous release of (/sup 3/H)- MPP/sup +/, but the rate of release of hypothalamus is 60% faster in rats than in mice. (/sup 3/H)-MPP/sup +/ release from rat and mouse striatum, but not hypothalamus, was stimulated by monoamines and MAO substrates and inhibitors, a finding that suggests a role for MAO in the intraneuronal transport of MPP/sup +/.

  3. Increased extracellular dopamine concentrations and FosB/DeltaFosB expression in striatal brain areas of heterozygous GDNF knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Airavaara, Mikko; Planken, Anu; Gäddnäs, Helena; Piepponen, Timo Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Ahtee, Liisa

    2004-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of striatal dopaminergic neurons. To study whether reduced levels of endogenous GDNF affect the striatal dopaminergic transmission we estimated the basal extracellular levels of dopamine in vivo, the basal expression of FosB-related proteins in striatal brain areas as well as the effects of acute and repeated cocaine on locomotor activity and dopamine output in mice lacking one GDNF allele (heterozygous GDNF+/- mice). As expected the striatal GDNF protein content was found to be smaller in the GDNF+/- mice than in their wild-type littermates. Unexpectedly the extracellular dopamine concentration in the GDNF+/- mice in the dorsal striatum (CPu) was 2.0-fold, and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) 1.6-fold the concentration found in the wild-type littermates. Also FosB/DeltaFosB-like immunoreactivity was found to be elevated in the CPu as well as in the core and in the shell of NAc of the GDNF+/- mice as compared with the wild-type mice. This suggests chronic postsynaptic activation of these brain areas and is in line with elevated extracellular dopamine concentrations. Cocaine's effects acutely and after repeated treatment on locomotor activity were similar in the GDNF+/- and the wild-type mice. Neither did cocaine's acute effects on dopamine output differ between the mice of the two strains. Our findings demonstrate that reduced levels of endogenous GDNF induce alterations in dorsal striatal and accumbal dopaminergic transmission, and stress the importance of endogenous GDNF in the regulation of the dopaminergic neurons. PMID:15525275

  4. Effect of gonadectomy of biochemical indices of striatal dopamine D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors, their activity and adaptive response to antipsychotic drug treatment in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, T.L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous gonadal steroids in male and female rats were removed by gonadectomy (Gnx). Striatal D/sub 1/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding parameters and D/sub 1/ receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Striatal D/sub 2/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters in striatal slices and D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade consisted of the administration of the D/sub 2/ specific antagonist sulpiride (20 mg/kg) or vehicle i.p., 2x daily for 21 days followed by a 3 day drug withdrawal period. Gnx of female rats had no affect on striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity nor on the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment produced no adaptive changes in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in sham-operated or Gnx female rats. Gnx of male rats produced a statistically significant 10% decrease in striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites with no change in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and no change in striatal(/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment of sham-operated male rats produced a desensitization of the striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with no change in the number of (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites and no change in (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Gnx of male rats blocked the development of the striatal D/sub 1/ receptor desensitization response elicited by sub-chronic sulpiride treatment, without affecting striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 or (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. We have demonstrated that sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade in sham-operated male rats results in the desensitization of striatal D/sub 1/ receptor activity.

  5. Frontal decortication and adaptive changes in striatal cholinergic neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Consolo, S; Sieklucka, M; Fiorentini, F; Forloni, G; Ladinsky, H

    1986-01-15

    Interruption of the corticostriatal pathway by undercutting the cortex resulted in a reduction of glutamate uptake by 55% and in a depression of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis by 30% in striatum after two postlesion weeks without affecting the content of ACh and choline, the specific binding of [3H]dexetimide to muscarinic receptors, the activity of choline acetyltransferase and the levels of noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. The influence of this excitatory pathway on striatal cholinergic neuropharmacology was investigated. It was found that the effect of a number of agonists (R-apomorphine, bromocriptine, lisuride, quinpirole, JL-14389, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and methadone), capable of depressing cholinergic activity in the striatum through receptor-mediated responses--reflected as an increase in ACh content--is operative only when the corticostriatal pathway is intact. By contrast, antagonists capable of decreasing ACh content, i.e. the typical neuroleptics pimozide, haloperidol and the atypical ones clozapine, L-sulpiride, as well as the anti-muscarinic agent scopolamine, were not influenced by the lesion. The possibility that the lesion non-specifically damaged striatal cells on which the agonists, but not the antagonists acted was excluded by results showing, firstly, that the increase in striatal ACh elicited by the ACh precursor, choline, was not blocked by decortication, and secondly, that the degeneration of the corticostriatal neurons did not prevent the ACh-increasing effect of bromocriptine, a long-acting ergot alkaloid, when sufficient time was allowed for the drug to act. It was furthermore possible to restore the inhibitory action of apomorphine on cholinergic neurons either by short-term chemical lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic input or by the administration of choline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3004639

  6. Effects of naftidrofuryl oxalate on microsphere embolism-induced decrease in regional blood flow of rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, K.; Takagi, N.; Takeo, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether naftidrofuryl oxalate (naftidrofuryl), a vasodilator, is capable of improving brain regional blood flow of animals in sustained ischaemia. 2. Cerebral ischaemia was induced by injecting 900 microspheres (48 microns in diameter) into the right internal carotid artery of rats. Cerebral blood flow of brain regions was measured by a hydrogen clearance method on the 3rd, 7th and 28th days after the onset of ischaemia. Ischaemic animals were treated with naftidrofuryl, 15 mg kg-1 day-1 i.p., from the first to 28th day. 3. Microsphere-embolism caused a sustained decrease in cortical and striatal blood flow over a period of 28 days, whereas hippocampal blood flow was decreased on the 3rd day but not on the 7th or 28th day. On the 3rd day, the striatal and hippocampal but not cortical blood flow of naftidrofuryl-treated, microsphere-embolized rats was higher than untreated rats. On the 7th and 28th days, the cortical and striatal blood flow of the treated and untreated animals did not differ. 4. Brain slices from microsphere-embolized rats contained areas, which were not stained with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), to a similar degree on the 3rd, 7th and 28th days, indicating the genesis of cerebral infarction. TTC-unstained areas of microsphere-embolized rats that had received naftidrofuryl treatment were smaller than those of untreated rats on the 3rd and 7th days, but not on the 28th day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032646

  7. Differential sensitivity of medium- and large-sized striatal neurons to NMDA but not kainate receptor activation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, C; Itri, J N; Flores-Hernández, J; Hurst, R S; Calvert, C R; Levine, M S

    2001-11-01

    Infrared videomicroscopy and differential interference contrast optics were used to identify medium- and large-sized neurons in striatal slices from young rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained to compare membrane currents evoked by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate. Inward currents and current densities induced by NMDA were significantly smaller in large- than in medium-sized striatal neurons. The negative slope conductance for NMDA currents was greater in medium- than in large-sized neurons and more depolarization was required to remove the Mg2+ blockade. In contrast, currents induced by kainate were significantly greater in large-sized neurons whilst current densities were approximately equal in both cell types. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents occurred frequently in medium-sized neurons but were relatively infrequent in large-sized neurons. Excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation were smaller in large- than in medium-sized neurons. A final set of experiments assessed a functional consequence of the differential sensitivity of medium- and large-sized neurons to NMDA. Cell swelling was used to examine changes in somatic area in both neuronal types after prolonged application of NMDA or kainate. NMDA produced a time-dependent increase in somatic area in medium-sized neurons whilst it produced only minimal changes in large interneurons. In contrast, application of kainate produced significant swelling in both medium- and large-sized cells. We hypothesize that reduced sensitivity to NMDA may be due to variations in receptor subunit composition and/or the relative density of receptors in the two cell types. These findings help define the conditions that put neurons at risk for excitotoxic damage in neurological disorders. PMID:11860453

  8. Dopamine D2-like receptors selectively block N-type Ca2+ channels to reduce GABA release onto rat striatal cholinergic interneurones

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Toshihiko; Koga, Eiko

    2001-01-01

    The modulatory roles of dopamine (DA) in inhibitory transmission onto striatal large cholinergic interneurones were investigated in rat brain slices using patch-clamp recording. Pharmacologically isolated GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were recorded by focal stimulation within the striatum. Bath application of DA reversibly suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 10.0 μm). A D2-like receptor agonist, quinpirole (3–30 μm), also suppressed the IPSCs, whereas a D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 81297, did not affect IPSCs. Sulpiride, a D2-like receptor antagonist, blocked the DA-induced suppression of IPSCs (apparent dissociation constant (KB), 0.36 μm), while a D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH 23390 (10 μm), had no effect. DA (30 μm) reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) without changing their amplitude distribution, suggesting that GABA release was inhibited, whereas the sensitivity of postsynaptic GABAA receptors was not affected. The effect of DA on the frequency of mIPSCs was diminished when extracellular Ca2+ was replaced by Mg2+ (5 mm), indicating that DA affected the Ca2+ entry into the presynaptic terminal. An N-type Ca2+ channel selective blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CgTX, 3 μm), suppressed IPSCs by 65.4%, whereas a P/Q-type Ca2+ channel selective blocker, ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-Aga-IVA, 200 nm), suppressed IPSCs by 78.4%. Simultaneous application of both blockers suppressed IPSCs by 95.9%. Assuming a 3rd power relationship between Ca2+ concentration and transmitter release, the contribution of N-, P/Q- and other types of Ca2+ channels to presynaptic Ca2+ entry is estimated to be, respectively, 29.8, 40.0 and 34.5% at this synapse. After the application of ω-CgTX, DA (30 μm) no longer affected IPSCs. In contrast, ω-Aga-IVA did not alter the level of suppression by DA, suggesting that the action of DA was selective for N-type Ca2+ channels. A G protein alkylating agent, N

  9. Striatal and extrastriatal imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in the living human brain with [123I]epidepride single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuikka, J T; Akerman, K K; Hiltunen, J; Bergström, K A; Räsänen, P; Vanninen, E; Halldin, C; Tiihonen, J

    1997-05-01

    The iodine-123 labelled ligand benzamide epidepride was evaluated as a probe for in vivo imaging of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptor sites in the human brain. Four healthy males were imaged with a high-resolution single-photon emission tomography scanner. Striatal radioactivity peaked at 3 h after injection. The specific binding in the striatum was 0.91+/-0.03 at 3 h and this ratio steadily increased with time. Extrastriatal radioactivity was highest in the thalamus, in the midbrain and in the temporal cortex, and peaked at 45-60 min after injection of tracer. A smaller amount of radioactivity was found in the parietal, frontal and occipital cortices. Two radioactive metabolites were observed, of which one was more lipophilic than the parent compound. The radiation burden to the patient was 0.035 mSv/MBq (effective dose equivalent). The preliminary results showed that [123I]epidepride can be used for imaging striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2 receptor sites in the living human brain. PMID:9142727

  10. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R M; Ansari, M S; de Paulis, T; Schmidt, D E; Clanton, J A; Smith, H E; Manning, R G; Gillespie, D; Ebert, M H

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. "Iodopride" (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with [125I]iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, "iclopride" (KD 0.23 nM) and "itopride" (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, "epidepride" (KD 0.057 nM) and "ioxipride" (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8. PMID:1831229

  11. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  12. Sub-chronic treatment with classical but not atypical antipsychotics produces morphological changes in rat nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons directly related to "early onset" vacuous chewing.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Giorgio; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Bartholini, Francesco; Ruiu, Stefania; Saba, Pierluigi; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Pani, Luca

    2002-04-01

    In the present work, we investigated if an impairment of dopaminergic neurons after subchronic haloperidol treatment might be a possible physiopathologic substrate of the "early onset" vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rats. For this purpose, different antipsychotics were used to analyse a possible relationship between VCMs development and morphological alterations of tyrosine-hydroxylase-immunostained (TH-IM) neurons. Rats treated twice a day with haloperidol displayed a significant increase of VCMs that was both time- (2-4 weeks) and dose (0.1-1 mg/kg) dependent. Immunocytochemical analysis showed a shrinkage of TH-IM cell bodies in substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata and a reduction of TH-immunostaining in the striatum of haloperidol treated rats with the arising of VCMs. No differences were observed in TH-IM neurons of ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens vs. control rats. The atypical antipsychotics risperidone (2 mg/kg, twice a day), amisulpride (20 mg/kg, twice a day) and clozapine (10 mg/kg, twice a day) did not produce any nigro-striatal morphological changes or VCMs. TH-IM nigro-striatal neuron morphological alterations and VCMs were still present after three days of withdrawal in rats treated for four weeks with haloperidol (1 mg/kg). Both the main morphological changes and the behavioural correlate disappeared after three weeks of withdrawal. These results suggest that haloperidol induces a morphological impairment of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons which is directly associated with the arising, permanency and disappearance of VCMs in rats. PMID:11982629

  13. Compromised Blood-Brain Barrier Competence in Remote Brain Areas in Ischemic Stroke Rats at Chronic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Williams, Stephanie N.; Haim, Eithan D.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a life threatening disease leading to long-term disability in stroke survivors. Cerebral functional insufficiency in chronic stroke might be due to pathological changes in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion, i.e. diaschisis. Previously, we showed that the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) was implicated in subacute diaschisis. The present study investigated BBB competence in chronic diaschisis using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) rat model. Our results demonstrated significant BBB damage mostly in the ipsilateral striatum and motor cortex in rats at 30 days after tMCAO. The BBB alterations were also determined in the contralateral hemisphere via ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses. Major BBB pathological changes in contralateral remote striatum and motor cortex areas included: (1) vacuolated endothelial cells containing large autophagosomes, (2) degenerated pericytes displaying mitochondria with cristae disruption, (3) degenerated astrocytes and perivascular edema, (4) Evans Blue extravasation, and (5) appearance of parenchymal astrogliosis. Importantly, discrete analyses of striatal and motor cortex areas revealed significantly higher autophagosome accumulation in capillaries of ventral striatum and astrogliosis in dorsal striatum in both cerebral hemispheres. These widespread microvascular alterations in ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres suggest persistent and/or continued BBB damage in chronic ischemia. The pathological changes in remote brain areas likely indicate chronic ischemic diaschisis, which should be considered in the development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:24610730

  14. Effects of NaCl and sultopride on striatal [(3)H]spiperone binding in neonatal, adult and senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Makihata, J; Nomura, Y

    1984-01-01

    Effects of NaCl, (+)-and (-)-sultopride on striatal [(3)H]spiperone binding was investigated in 7-day, 70-day and 2-year-old rats. The amount of specific [(3)H]spiperone binding was the highest at 70 days and the value at adult stage was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those at 7 days and 2 years. NaCl (100 mM) significantly increased [(3)H]spiperone binding in neonatal (P < 0.01), adult (P < 0.05) and senescent (P < 0.05) animals. Scatchard analysis showed that the Bmax of low-affinity [(3)H]spiperone binding was significantly elevated by 100 mM NaCl compared to the value in control of adult animals. More potent inhibition of (-)-sultopride for [(3)H]spiperone binding than that of the (+)-enantiomer at adult stage was also observed at neonatal and senescent stages. NaCl (100 mM) significantly enhanced inhibitory activities of (+)- and (-)-sultopride at every stage. It is suggested that stabilizing effect of Na(+) on dopamine (DA) receptor complexes and increasing effect of Na(+) on binding affinity of benzamide to DA2 receptors keep functions through development and aging. PMID:24874236

  15. Effects on Spatial Cognition and Nociceptive Behavior Following Peripheral Nerve Injury in Rats with Lesion of the Striatal Marginal Division Induced by Kainic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxin; Zhou, Chang; Li, Guoying; Tian, Yinghong; Liu, Jing; Yan, Li; Jiang, Yuyun; Tian, Sumin

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic pain and cognitive deficit are frequently comorbidity in clinical, but their underlying correlation and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we utilized a combined rat model including kainic acid (KA) injection into bilateral striatal marginal division and chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). PET/CT scans revealed that the SUVmax of KA rats was significantly decreased when compared to naive and saline rats. In contrast to the naive and saline rats, KA rats had longer latencies in locating the hidden platform on day 4, 5 in Morris water maze task. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia of KA rats were alleviated following CCI. Immunostaining results showed that substance P was markedly increased within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn of KA rats after CCI, especially on the post-operative day 14. By means of real-time PCR, the up-regulation of GluR within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn was observed in all KA and CCI rats. PKCγ, IL-6 and NF-κB were up-regulated in both CCI rats when compared to naive and their respective sham rats. These results suggest that cognitive impairment of rats altered the pain behaviors, and these intracellular regulators play crucial roles in the process of neuropathic pain. PMID:26415594

  16. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  17. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  18. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. PMID:2464204

  19. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  20. Aberrant striatal dopamine transmitter dynamics in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Maina, Francis K; Birbeck, Johnna A; France, Marion M; Roberts, Joseph J P; Colombo, Michelle L; Mathews, Tiffany A

    2012-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the synaptic transmission of several monoaminergic neuronal systems, including forebrain dopamine-containing neurons. Recent evidence shows a strong correlation between neuropsychiatric disorders and BDNF hypofunction. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of low endogenous levels of BDNF on dopamine system function in the caudate-putamen using heterozygous BDNF (BDNF(+/-) ) mice. Apparent extracellular dopamine levels in the caudate-putamen, determined by quantitative microdialysis, were significantly elevated in BDNF(+/-) mice compared with wildtype controls (12 vs. 5 nM, respectively). BDNF(+/-) mice also had a potentiated increase in dopamine levels following potassium (120 mM)-stimulation (10-fold) relative to wildtype controls (6-fold). Slice fast-scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that BDNF(+/-) mice had reductions in both electrically evoked dopamine release and dopamine uptake rates in the caudate-putamen. Superfusion of BDNF led to partial recovery of the electrically stimulated dopamine release response in BDNF(+/-) mice. Conversely, tissue accumulation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, extracellular levels of dopamine metabolites, and spontaneous locomotor activity were unaltered. Together, this study indicates that endogenous BDNF influences dopamine system homeostasis by regulating the release and uptake dynamics of pre-synaptic dopamine transmission. PMID:21988371

  1. Preserving cortico-striatal function: deep brain stimulation in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Sean J.; Machado, Andre G.; Gale, John T.; Lobel, Darlene A.; Pandya, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of chorea, cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disturbances. Since the discovery of the HD gene, the pathogenesis has been outlined, but to date a cure has not been found. Disease modifying therapies are needed desperately to improve function, alleviate suffering, and provide hope for symptomatic patients. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a proven therapy for managing the symptoms of some neurodegenerative movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, has been reported as a palliative treatment in select cases of HD with debilitating chorea with variable success. New insights into the mechanism of action of DBS suggest it may have the potential to circumvent other manifestations of HD including cognitive deterioration. Furthermore, because DBS is already widely used, reversible, and has a risk profile that is relatively low, new studies can be initiated. In this article we contend that new clinical trials be considered to test the effects of DBS for HD. PMID:25814939

  2. Antagonism of quercetin against tremor induced by unilateral striatal lesion of 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xin; Yuan, Xia; Du, Li-Da; He, Guo-Rong; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in many plants, is reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tremor effects of quercetin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. In rats, quercetin had no effect on apomorphine-induced rotations, but it could significantly attenuate muscle tremor of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Interestingly, quercetin could decrease the burst frequency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that quercetin may have a protective effect on models to mimic muscle tremors of Parkinson's disease. This effect of quercetin may be associated with serotonergic system, but further study is needed. PMID:26217978

  3. Separation of the motor consequences from other actions of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the nigrostriatal neurones of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Garcia-Munoz, M; Arbuthnott, G W

    1985-12-01

    Male rats showed a clear preference for one forepaw when they were trained to press a lever for food reward. The preference was then changed by training, by local anaesthetic injection into the preferred paw, by lesions in the striatal output pathways in the brain, or by neurotoxin injection into the striatum contralateral to the side of the preferred paw. The pressing rate was not changed in spite of the change in paw use in any of these operations. This result is in marked contrast to the effect of reducing the dopamine concentration on the side contralateral to the preferred paw; in this case a marked reduction in responding is seen as well as the change in paw use. Thus medial forebrain bundle 6-hydroxydopamine lesions are more debilitating than either striatal damage or peripheral paralysis at least in the short term. PMID:3907747

  4. Differential organization of cortical inputs to striatal projection neurons of the matrix compartment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yunping; Lanciego, Jose; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Coulon, Patrice; Salin, Pascal; Kachidian, Philippe; Lei, Wanlong; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we described the differential organization of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal inputs to the spines of direct pathway (dSPNs) and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (iSPNs) of the matrix compartment. In the present electron microscopic (EM) analysis, we have refined understanding of the relative amounts of cortical axospinous vs. axodendritic input to the two types of SPNs. Of note, we found that individual dSPNs receive about twice as many axospinous synaptic terminals from IT-type (intratelencephalically projecting) cortical neurons as they do from PT-type (pyramidal tract projecting) cortical neurons. We also found that PT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were about 1.5 times as common on individual iSPNs as IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals. Overall, a higher percentage of IT-type terminals contacted dSPN than iSPN spines, while a higher percentage of PT-type terminals contacted iSPN than dSPN spines. Notably, IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were significantly larger on iSPN spines than on dSPN spines. By contrast to axospinous input, the axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs was more substantial than that to iSPNs, and the axodendritic IT-type input appeared to be meager and comparable for both SPN types. The prominent axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs may accentuate their PT-type responsiveness, and the large size of axospinous IT-type terminals on iSPNs may accentuate their IT-type responsiveness. Using transneuronal labeling with rabies virus to selectively label the cortical neurons with direct input to the dSPNs projecting to the substantia nigra pars reticulata, we found that the input predominantly arose from neurons in the upper layers of motor cortices, in which IT-type perikarya predominate. The differential cortical input to SPNs is likely to play key roles in motor control and motor learning. PMID:25926776

  5. Neurons from rat brain coupled to transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassanelli, S.; Fromherz, P.

    Field-effect transistors form spontaneously capacitive junctions with cultured nerve cells from rat brains. The transfer of ac signals from neurons to silicon is studied and used to parametrize an equivalent circuit. The coupling is distinctly weaker than in junctions assembled with leech nerve cells. The implications with respect to the recording and stimulation of neuronal activity by silicon devices are considered.

  6. The characterization of neuroenergetic effects of chronic L-tyrosine administration in young rats: evidence for striatal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Scaini, Giselli; Teixeira, Leticia J; Mota, Isabella T; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2015-02-01

    Tyrosinemia type II is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in hepatic cytosolic aminotransferase. Affected patients usually present a variable degree of mental retardation, which may be related to the level of plasma tyrosine. In the present study we evaluated effect of chronic administration of L-tyrosine on the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and complexes I, II, II-III and IV in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of rats in development. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old); rats were killed 12 h after last injection. Our results demonstrated that L-tyrosine inhibited the activity of citrate synthase in the hippocampus and striatum, malate dehydrogenase activity was increased in striatum and succinate dehydrogenase, complexes I and II-III activities were inhibited in striatum. However, complex IV activity was increased in hippocampus and inhibited in striatum. By these findings, we suggest that repeated administrations of L-tyrosine cause alterations in energy metabolism, which may be similar to the acute administration in brain of infant rats. Taking together the present findings and evidence from the literature, we hypothesize that energy metabolism impairment could be considered an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in patients with tyrosinemia type II. PMID:25252880

  7. Feeding-associated alterations in striatal neurotransmitter release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, I. N.; Ressler, K.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Published evidence suggests a role for dopaminergic (DA) brain pathways in feeding-associated behaviors. Using the novel technique of brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid (ECF) as an index of DA release, Church et al. described increases in levels of DA when animals had limited access to pellets, but not with free access. Dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens did increase with free access to pellets post starvation or after food reward. We used permanently implanted microdialysis probes to measure ECF levels of DA, DOPAC, HVA, and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) for up to 72 hours after implantation among rats experiencing different dietary regimens.

  8. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  9. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  10. Purified Rabies Vaccine (Suckling Rat Brain Origin)

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    A 10% suckling rat brain rabies vaccine free from encephalitogenic activity was prepared and inactivated with 1:8,000 beta-propiolactone (BPL), or ultraviolet light, or a combination of ultraviolet light and BPL, or 1% phenol. Potency was excellent in all samples, with the exception of the phenolized product which was marginal. A purified suckling rat brain (SRB) vaccine prepared by zonal centrifugation and inactivated with 1:8,000 BPL contained about 0.01 the amount of protein nitrogen of the unpurified 10% SRB vaccine. This purified product passed the National Institutes of Health potency test for rabies vaccine after administration of a quantity equivalent to a standard 10% brain suspension. PMID:5456012

  11. The rat striatum responds to nigro-striatal degeneration via the increased expression of proteins associated with growth and regeneration of neuronal circuitry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease is marked by degeneration of dopamine neurons projecting from the substantia nigra to the striatum. Although proteins expressed by the target striatum can positively affect the viability and growth of dopaminergic neurons, very little is known about the molecular response of the striatum as nigro-striatal denervation progresses. Here, iTRAQ labelling and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry have been used to quantitatively compare the striatal proteome of rats before, during, and after 6-OHDA induced dopamine denervation. Results iTRAQ analysis revealed the differential expression of 50 proteins at 3 days, 26 proteins at 7 days, and 34 proteins at 14 days post-lesioning, compared to the unlesioned striatum. While the denervated striatum showed a reduced expression of proteins associated with the loss of dopaminergic input (e.g., TH and DARPP-32), there was an increased expression of proteins associated with regeneration and growth of neurites (e.g., GFAP). In particular, the expression of guanine deaminase (GDA, cypin) – a protein known to be involved in dendritic branching – was significantly increased in the striatum at 3, 7 and 14 days post-lesioning (a finding verified by immunohistochemistry). Conclusions Together, these findings provide evidence to suggest that the response of the normal mammalian striatum to nigro-striatal denervation includes the increased expression of proteins that may have the capacity to facilitate repair and growth of neuronal circuitry. PMID:24834013

  12. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  13. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics. PMID:26350412

  14. Alteration of dopamine uptake into rat striatal vesicles and synaptosomes caused by an in vitro exposure to atrazine and some of its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Muhammad M.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that both in vivo and in vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) results in dopaminergic neurotoxicity manifested by decreased striatal dopamine (DA) levels. However, the mechanism behind this reduction is largely unknown. A decrease in striatal DA could be due to ATR exposure affecting vesicular and/or synaptosomal uptake resulting in disrupted vesicular storage and/or cellular uptake of DA. Hence, we investigated the effects of in vitro ATR exposure on DA uptake into isolated rat striatal synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. In addition to ATR, effects of its major mammalian metabolites, didealkyl atrazine (DACT), desethyl atrazine (DE) and desiopropyl atrazine (DIP) were investigated. ATR (1–250 μM) inhibited DA uptake into synaptic vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Of the three ATR metabolites tested, DACT did not affect vesicular DA uptake. DE and DIP, on the other hand, significantly decreased vesicular DA uptake with the effect of 100 μM DE/DIP being similar to the effect of the same concentration of ATR. Kinetic analysis of vesicular DA uptake indicated that ATR significantly decreased the Vmax while the Km value was not affected. Contrary to the inhibitory effects on vesicular DA uptake, synaptosomal DA uptake was marginally (6–13%) increased by ATR and DE, but not by DACT and DIP, at concentrations of ≤100 μM. As a result, ATR, DIP and DE increased the synaptosomal/vesicular (DAT/VMAT-2) uptake ratio. Collectively, results from this study suggest that ATR and two of its metabolites, DIP and DE, but not its major mammalian metabolite, DACT, decrease striatal DA levels, at least in part, by increasing cytosolic DA, which is prone to oxidative breakdown. PMID:18423833

  15. Activation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine, GTP, NaF and forskolin in striatal membranes of neonatal, adult and senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Makihata, J; Segawa, T

    1984-11-13

    Dopamine (DA) caused a significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase in neonatal and adult but not in senescent rats. GTP activated cyclase at the adult stage but not at both neonatal and senescent stages. NaF and forskolin activated cyclase at every stage. The coupling mechanism between DA1 receptors and catalytic units of cyclase seems to become functional at the neonatal stage but GTP recognition and/or binding sites lack in stimulatory GTP binding protein in neonatal and senescent membranes. PMID:6543337

  16. Increased Sensitivity to Cocaine Self-Administration in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats is Associated with Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125)I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the

  17. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  18. Heterogeneous expression of transketolase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Calingasan, N Y; Sheu, K F; Baker, H; Jung, E H; Paoletti, F; Gibson, G E

    1995-03-01

    Transketolase (TK; EC 2.2.1.1) is a key pentose phosphate shunt enzyme that plays an important role in the production of reducing equivalents and pentose sugars. TK activity declines in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease or Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as in thiamine-deficient rats. Understanding the role of TK in the pathophysiology of these neurodegenerative conditions requires knowledge of its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution within the brain. The current study employed in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to examine the distribution of TK mRNA and its encoded protein in adult rat brain. TK mRNA and protein were widely distributed throughout the brain. However, they were enriched in selective perikarya in the piriform cortex, nucleus of the diagonal band, red nucleus, dorsal raphe, pontine nucleus, locus coeruleus, trapezoid, inferior olive, and several cranial nerve nuclei. Lower expression of TK mRNA and protein occurred in layer V of cortex, olfactory tubercle, ventral pallidum, medial septal nucleus, hippocampus, thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, mammillary body, central gray, and the substantia nigra. TK immunoreactivity also occurred in the nuclei of ubiquitously distributed glial cells, as well as ependymal cells. The heterogeneous distribution of TK may reflect a variety of metabolic activities among different brain regions but does not provide a simple molecular explanation for selective cell death in either thiamine deficiency or other conditions where TK is reduced. PMID:7861132

  19. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  20. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  1. Relationship Between L-DOPA-Induced Reduction in Motor and Exploratory Activity and Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Beu, Markus; de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Huston, Joseph P.; Hautzel, Hubertus; Mattern, Claudia; Antke, Christina; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study assessed the influence of L-DOPA administration on neostriatal dopamine (DA) D2 receptor binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors in the rat. Methods: D2 receptor binding was measured in baseline, after challenge with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide, and after challenge with either 5 or 10 mg/kg L-DOPA plus benserazide. Additional rats received injections of saline. For baseline and challenges, striatal equilibrium ratios (V3″) were computed as estimation of the binding potential. Motor and exploratory behaviors were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]IBZM. D2 receptor binding was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h after radioligand administration for 60 min. Results: Both L-DOPA doses significantly reduced D2 receptor binding relative to baseline and led to significantly less ambulation, less head-shoulder motility, and more sitting relative to saline. Moreover, 10 mg/kg L-DOPA induced less head-shoulder motility, more sitting, and more grooming than 5 mg/kg L-DOPA. Analysis of time-behavior curves showed that L-DOPA-treated animals relative to saline exhibited a faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and a slower rate of decrease of both duration and frequency of head-shoulder motility from a lower maximum level. Conclusions: The reductions of striatal D2 receptor binding after L-DOPA may be conceived to reflect elevated concentrations of synaptic DA. L-DOPA-treated animals showed less ambulation and less head-shoulder motility than saline-treated animals, indicating an association between less behavioral activity and increased availability of striatal DA. The faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and the lower maximum levels of both head-shoulder motility duration and frequency may be interpreted in terms of influence of increased DA availability on behavioral habituation to a novel environment. PMID:26778989

  2. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed during the conversion of (1 beta-/sup 3/H)androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats.

  3. Long-term oral methylphenidate treatment in adolescent and adult rats: differential effects on brain morphology and function.

    PubMed

    van der Marel, Kajo; Klomp, Anne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Schipper, Pieter; Lucassen, Paul J; Homberg, Judith R; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a widely prescribed psychostimulant for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, which raises questions regarding its potential interference with the developing brain. In the present study, we investigated effects of 3 weeks oral methylphenidate (5 mg/kg) vs vehicle treatment on brain structure and function in adolescent (post-natal day [P]25) and adult (P65) rats. Following a 1-week washout period, we used multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess effects of age and treatment on independent component analysis-based functional connectivity (resting-state functional MRI), D-amphetamine-induced neural activation responses (pharmacological MRI), gray and white matter tissue volumes and cortical thickness (postmortem structural MRI), and white matter structural integrity (postmortem diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)). Many age-related differences were found, including cortical thinning, white matter development, larger dopamine-mediated activation responses and increased striatal functional connectivity. Methylphenidate reduced anterior cingulate cortical network strength in both adolescents and adults. In contrast to clinical observations from ADHD patient studies, methylphenidate did not increase white matter tissue volume or cortical thickness in rat. Nevertheless, DTI-based fractional anisotropy was higher in the anterior part of the corpus callosum following adolescent treatment. Furthermore, methylphenidate differentially affected adolescents and adults as evidenced by reduced striatal volume and myelination upon adolescent treatment, although we did not observe adverse treatment effects on striatal functional activity. Our findings of small but significant age-dependent effects of psychostimulant treatment in the striatum of healthy rats highlights the importance of further research in children and adolescents that are exposed to methylphenidate. PMID:23851400

  4. N-linked oligosaccharides are responsible for rat striatal dopamine D2 receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; McKelvy, J.F. )

    1989-10-01

    The glycoprotein nature of the binding subunit of the dopamine D2 receptor in rat striatum has been examined by photoaffinity labeling receptor preparations with N-(p-azido-m-(125I)iodophenethyl)spiperone followed by treatment of crude membrane receptor or receptor fractions isolated from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels with endo- and exoglycosidases. The major photoaffinity labeled protein migrates as a heterogeneous species on 10% SDS polyacrylamide gels and ranges from 130,000 to 75,000 relative molecular mass (Mr). This heterogeneity can be explained by glycosylation of the receptor by complex-type N-linked oligosaccharides. Three fractions of labeled receptor were isolated from SDS polyacrylamide gels over a range of 130,000 to 75,000 Mr; after digestion with peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase, all fractions yielded a single peptide approximately 40,000 Mr. Treatment of photoaffinity labeled membranes with alpha-mannosidase was without effect. The dopamine D2 receptor appears to contain substantial amounts of sialic acid as treatment of photoaffinity labeled membranes with neuraminidase increased the receptor mobility on SDS polyacrylamide gels to a species of 50,000-54,000 Mr. Treatment of the receptor with neuraminidase followed by endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase did not change the electrophoretic migration pattern from that seen after neuraminidase treatment alone, suggesting that the binding peptide contains no serine- or threonine-linked oligosaccharides. A smaller binding peptide of approximately 31,000 Mr is also apparent in crude photoaffinity labeled membranes. This material also contains N-linked oligosaccharide.

  5. The interrelationship of dopamine D2-like receptor availability in striatal and extrastriatal brain regions in healthy humans: A principal component analysis of [18F]Fallypride binding

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; Woodward, Neil D.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Riccardi, Patrizia; Ansari, M. Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Smith, Clarence E.; Hakyemez, Helene; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Individual differences in dopamine D2-like receptor availability arise across all brain regions expressing D2-like receptors. However, the inter-relationships in receptor availability across brain regions are poorly understood. To address this issue, we examined the relationship between D2-like binding potential (BPND) across striatal and extrastriatal regions in a sample of healthy participants. PET imaging was performed with the high affinity D2/D3 ligand [18F]fallypride in 45 participants. BPND images were submitted to voxel-wise principal components analysis to determine the pattern of associations across brain regions. Individual differences in D2-like BPND were explained by three distinguishable components. A single component explained almost all of the variance within the striatum, indicating that individual differences in receptor availability vary in a homogenous manner across the caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum. Cortical BPND was only modestly related to striatal BPND, and mostly loaded on a distinct component. After controlling for the general level of cortical D2-like BPND, an inverse relationship emerged between receptor availability in the striatum and the ventral temporal and ventromedial frontal cortices, suggesting possible cross-regulation of D2-like receptors in these regions. The analysis additionally revealed evidence of: 1) a distinct component involving the midbrain and limbic areas; 2) a dissociation between BPND in the medial and lateral temporal regions; and 3) a dissociation between BPND in the medial/midline and lateral thalamus. In summary, individual differences in D2-like receptor availability reflect several distinct patterns. This conclusion has significant implications for neuropsychiatric models that posit global or regionally specific relationships between dopaminergic tone and behavior. PMID:20149883

  6. Performance of a high-sensitivity dedicated cardiac SPECT scanner for striatal uptake quantification in the brain based on analysis of projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.; McQuaid, Sarah J.; Kijewski, Marie Foley; Mueller, Stefan P.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors have previously reported the advantages of high-sensitivity single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems for imaging structures located deep inside the brain. DaTscan (Isoflupane I-123) is a dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging agent that has shown potential for early detection of Parkinson disease (PD), as well as for monitoring progression of the disease. Realizing the full potential of DaTscan requires efficient estimation of striatal uptake from SPECT images. They have evaluated two SPECT systems, a conventional dual-head gamma camera with low-energy high-resolution collimators (conventional) and a dedicated high-sensitivity multidetector cardiac imaging system (dedicated) for imaging tasks related to PD. Methods: Cramer-Rao bounds (CRB) on precision of estimates of striatal and background activity concentrations were calculated from high-count, separate acquisitions of the compartments (right striata, left striata, background) of a striatal phantom. CRB on striatal and background activity concentration were calculated from essentially noise-free projection datasets, synthesized by scaling and summing the compartment projection datasets, for a range of total detected counts. They also calculated variances of estimates of specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios (BR) and asymmetry indices from these values using propagation of error analysis, as well as the precision of measuring changes in BR on the order of the average annual decline in early PD. Results: Under typical clinical conditions, the conventional camera detected 2 M counts while the dedicated camera detected 12 M counts. Assuming a normal BR of 5, the standard deviation of BR estimates was 0.042 and 0.021 for the conventional and dedicated system, respectively. For an 8% decrease to BR = 4.6, the signal-to-noise ratio were 6.8 (conventional) and 13.3 (dedicated); for a 5% decrease, they were 4.2 (conventional) and 8.3 (dedicated). Conclusions: This implies that PD can

  7. Performance of a high-sensitivity dedicated cardiac SPECT scanner for striatal uptake quantification in the brain based on analysis of projection data

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.; Müller, Stefan P.; McQuaid, Sarah J.; Kijewski, Marie Foley

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have previously reported the advantages of high-sensitivity single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems for imaging structures located deep inside the brain. DaTscan (Isoflupane I-123) is a dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging agent that has shown potential for early detection of Parkinson disease (PD), as well as for monitoring progression of the disease. Realizing the full potential of DaTscan requires efficient estimation of striatal uptake from SPECT images. They have evaluated two SPECT systems, a conventional dual-head gamma camera with low-energy high-resolution collimators (conventional) and a dedicated high-sensitivity multidetector cardiac imaging system (dedicated) for imaging tasks related to PD. Methods: Cramer–Rao bounds (CRB) on precision of estimates of striatal and background activity concentrations were calculated from high-count, separate acquisitions of the compartments (right striata, left striata, background) of a striatal phantom. CRB on striatal and background activity concentration were calculated from essentially noise-free projection datasets, synthesized by scaling and summing the compartment projection datasets, for a range of total detected counts. They also calculated variances of estimates of specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios (BR) and asymmetry indices from these values using propagation of error analysis, as well as the precision of measuring changes in BR on the order of the average annual decline in early PD. Results: Under typical clinical conditions, the conventional camera detected 2 M counts while the dedicated camera detected 12 M counts. Assuming a normal BR of 5, the standard deviation of BR estimates was 0.042 and 0.021 for the conventional and dedicated system, respectively. For an 8% decrease to BR = 4.6, the signal-to-noise ratio were 6.8 (conventional) and 13.3 (dedicated); for a 5% decrease, they were 4.2 (conventional) and 8.3 (dedicated). Conclusions: This implies that PD can

  8. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  9. Effects of amphetamine on striatal dopamine release, open-field activity, and play in Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Siviy, Stephen M; McDowell, Lana S; Eck, Samantha R; Turano, Alexandra; Akopian, Garnik; Walsh, John P

    2015-12-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has shown that juvenile Fischer 344 (F344) rats are less playful than other strains and also appear to be compromised in dopamine (DA) functioning. To determine whether the dysfunctional play in this strain is associated with deficits in the handling and delivery of vesicular DA, the following experiments assessed the extent to which F344 rats are differentially sensitive to the effects of amphetamine. When exposed to amphetamine, striatal slices obtained from F344 rats showed a small increase in unstimulated DA release when compared with slices from Sprague-Dawley rats; they also showed a more rapid high K+-mediated release of DA. These data provide tentative support for the hypothesis that F344 rats have a higher concentration of cytoplasmic DA than Sprague-Dawley rats. When rats were tested for activity in an open field, F344 rats presented a pattern of results that was consistent with either an enhanced response to amphetamine (3 mg/kg) or a more rapid release of DA (10 mg/kg). Although there was some indication that amphetamine had a dose-dependent differential effect on play in the two strains, play in F344 rats was not enhanced to any degree by amphetamine. Although these results are not consistent with our working hypothesis that F344 rats are less playful because of a deficit in vesicular release of DA, they still suggest that this strain may be a useful model for better understanding the role of DA in social behavior during the juvenile period. PMID:26397758

  10. The sesquiterpenes polygodial and drimanial in vitro affect glutamatergic transport in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lucia Helena; Cereser, Lucas; Junior, Isaac Zanonato; Jardim, Fluvia Melina Alves; Vendite, Deusa Aparecida; Frizzo, Marcos Emilio dos Santos; Yunes, Rosendo A; Calixto, João Batista; Wofchuk, Susana; Souza, Diogo O

    2006-03-01

    Natural products including those derived from plants, have over the years greatly contributed to the development of therapeutic drugs. Polygodial and drimanial are sesquiterpenes isolated from the bark of the plant Drymis Winteri (Winteraceae) that exhibit antinociceptive properties. Since peripheral glutamate presents nociceptive actions, in this study it was investigated the effects of hydroalcooholic extracts from Drymis winteri (polygodial and drimanial) on the glutamatergic system in rat brain. Polygodial and drimanial inhibited glutamate uptake by astrocytes, as well as by cortical, hippocampal and striatal slices, and increased synaptosomal glutamate release. These concurrent effects would predispose to an increase in the extracellular glutamate concentrations, leading to possible neurotoxic effects (excitotoxicity) of these natural compounds, which would suggest the need for some caution in their therapeutic application. PMID:16733820

  11. Biotelemetric Monitoring of Brain Neurochemistry in Conscious Rats Using Microsensors and Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Calia, Giammario; Rocchitta, Gaia; Migheli, Rossana; Puggioni, Giulia; Spissu, Ylenia; Bazzu, Gianfranco; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Lowry, John P.; O’Neill, Robert D.; Desole, Maria S.; Serra, Pier A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present the real-time monitoring of three key brain neurochemical species in conscious rats using implantable amperometric electrodes interfaced to a biotelemetric device. The new system, derived from a previous design, was coupled with carbon-based microsensors and a platinum-based biosensor for the detection of ascorbic acid (AA), O2 and glucose in the striatum of untethered, freely-moving rats. The miniaturized device consisted of a single-supply sensor driver, a current-to-voltage converter, a microcontroller and a miniaturized data transmitter. The redox currents were digitized to digital values by means of an analog-to-digital converter integrated in a peripheral interface controller (PIC), and sent to a personal computer by means of a miniaturized AM transmitter. The electronics were calibrated and tested in vitro under different experimental conditions and exhibited high stability, low power consumption and good linear response in the nanoampere current range. The in-vivo results confirmed previously published observations on striatal AA, oxygen and glucose dynamics recorded in tethered rats. This approach, based on simple and inexpensive components, could be used as a rapid and reliable model for studying the effects of different drugs on brain neurochemical systems. PMID:22574029

  12. Electrophysiological evidence that intrastriatally administered N-methyl-D-aspartate augments striatal dopamine tone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Overton, P; Clark, D

    1992-01-01

    The firing rate and terminal excitability of identified nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons was determined before, and over a 10-15 min period following, direct intrastriatal administration of the glutamate (GLU) agonist NMDA, or saline. NMDA (0.025 and 0.075 mumol) produced a short latency increase in DA cell firing rate. In 7/8 cases, this increase in firing rate was accompanied by a profound reduction in terminal excitability. The decrease in excitability usually outlasted the increase in firing rate (sometimes by more than 8 min), and was superseded at a later stage by a marked increase in excitability. None of these effects were seen with saline (n = 5), and they could all be blocked by preadministration of the competitive NMDA antagonist AP-7 (0.025 mumol; n = 6). The sequence of events leading to the observed results is argued to be as follows; NMDA initially excites striatal efferents to the DA cell, which through disinhibition and direct stimulation increase DA cell firing rate. Increased firing rate leads to enhanced striatal DA release. Dopamine's inhibitory influence pre-empts any effect NMDA itself may have on the terminals of nigrostriatal neurons, and counteracts NMDA's stimulatory effect on striatal output cells. Furthermore, the marked reduction in terminal excitability suggests that DA becomes the dominant influence in the striatum for a time. Hence, the net outcome of the injection is augmented striatal DA tone. Later, the effect of residual NMDA becomes predominant once more. PMID:1540303

  13. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  14. The combination of organoselenium compounds and guanosine prevents glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains.

    PubMed

    Dalla Corte, Cristiane L; Bastos, Luíza L; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Rocha, João B T; Soares, Félix A A

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the combination of guanosine and 2 organoselenium compounds (ebselen and diphenyl diselenide) against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains. Glutamate caused an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a decrease in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Guanosine, ebselen, and diphenyl diselenide prevented glutamate-induced ROS production in striatal, cortical and hippocampal slices. The combination of guanosine with organoselenium compounds was more effective against glutamate-induced ROS production than the individual compounds alone. Guanosine prevented [(3)H]-glutamate uptake inhibition in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Thus, protection against the harmful effects of glutamate is possibly due to the combination of the antioxidant properties of organoselenium compounds and the stimulatory effect of guanosine on glutamate uptake. In conclusion, the combination of antioxidants and glutamatergic system modulators could be considered a potential therapy against the prooxidant effects of glutamate. PMID:22133308

  15. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: association to striatal D2/D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and Positron emission tomography in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal, and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. These findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues. PMID:25142207

  16. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. These findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues. PMID:25142207

  17. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: Association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene -Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-08-20

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default modemore » network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. In conclusion, these findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues.« less

  18. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: Association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene -Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-08-20

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. In conclusion, these findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues.

  19. Ethanol effects on rat brain phosphoinositide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in acidic phospholipids in brain plasma and synaptic plasma membranes upon chronic ethanol administration was observed. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in an increase in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into the acidic phospholipids in synaptosomes. Postdecapitative ischemic treatment resulted rapid degradation of poly-PI in rat brain. However, there was a rapid appearance of IP{sub 2} in ethanol group which indicated a more rapid turnover of IP{sub 3} in the ethanol-treated rats. Carbachol stimulated accumulation of labeled inositol phosphates in brain slices and synaptosomes. Carbachol-stimulated release of IP and IP{sub 2} was calcium dependent and was inhibited by EGTA and atropine. Adenosine triphosphates and 1 mM further enhanced carbachol-induced formation of IP and IP{sub 2}, but showed an increase and a decrease in IP{sub 3} at 1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Guanosine triphosphate at 0.1 mM did not change in labeled IP, but there was a significant increase in labeled IP{sub 2} and decrease in IP{sub 3}. Mn and CMP greatly enhanced incorporation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol into PI, but not into poly-PI labeling in brain synaptosomes. Incubation of brain synaptosomes resulted in a Ca{sup 2+}, time-dependent release of labeled IP. However, the pool of PI labeled through this pathway is not susceptible to carbachol stimulation. When saponin permeabilized synaptosomal preparations were incubated with ({sup 3}H)-inositol-PI or ({sup 14}C)-arachidonoyl-PI, ATP enhanced the formation of labeled IP and DG.

  20. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of [18F]Fluoroalkyl Derivatives of Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) in Rat and Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourn, Michael R.; Hockley, Brian; Lee, Lihsueh; Hou, Catherine; Goswami, Rajesh; Ponde, Datta E.; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.

    2007-01-01

    The specific binding and regional brain pharmacokinetics of new fluorine-18 labeled radioligands for the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) were examined in the rat and primate brain. In the rat, 9-[18F]fluoropropyl-(±)-9-O-desmethyldihydrotetrabenazine ([18F]FP-(±)-DTBZ) showed better specific binding in the striatum than either (+)-[11C]dihydrotetrabenazine ([11C]DTBZ) or 9-[18F]fluoroethyl-(±)-9-O-desmethyldihydrotetrabenazine ([18F]FE-(±)-DTBZ). Using microPET, the regional brain pharmacokinetics of [18F]FE-(±)-DTBZ, [18F]FP-(±)-DTBZ and (+)-[11C]DTBZ were examined in the same monkey brain. (+)-[11C]DTBZ and [18F]FP-(±)-DTBZ showed similar brain uptakes and pharmacokinetics, with similar maximum striatum to cerebellum ratios (STR/CBL = 5.24 and 5.15, respectively) that were significantly better than obtained for [18F]FE-(±)-DTBZ (STR/CBL = 2.55). Striatal distribution volume ratios calculated using Logan plot analysis confirmed the better specific binding for the fluoropropyl compound (DVR = 3.32) vs. the fluoroethyl compound (DVR = 2.37). Using the resolved single active isomer of the fluoropropyl compound, [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ, even better specific to non-specific distribution was obtained, yielding the highest distribution volume ratio (DVR = 6.2) yet obtained for a VMAT2 ligand in any species. The binding of [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ to the VMAT2 was shown to be reversible by administration of a competing dose of unlabeled tetrabenazine. Metabolic defluorination was slow and minor for the [18F]fluoroalkylDTBZ ligands. The characteristics of high specific binding ratio, reversibility, metabolic stability, and longer half-life of the radionuclide make [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ a promising alternative VMAT2 radioligand suitable for widespread use in human PET studies of monoaminergic innervation of the brain. PMID:17383572

  2. Striatal and extrastriatal dopamine release in the common marmoset brain measured by positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fallypride.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kato, Koichi; Masuda, Chiaki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia show greater sensitivity to psychostimulants than healthy subjects. Sensitization to psychostimulants and resultant alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission in rodents has been suggested as a useful model of schizophrenia. This study sought to examine the use of methylphenidate as a psychostimulant to induce dopamine release and that of [(18)F]fallypride as a radioligand to quantify the release in a primate model of schizophrenia. Four common marmosets were scanned by positron emission tomography twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate dopamine release. Four other marmosets were sensitized by repeated methamphetamine (MAP) administration. Then, they were scanned twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate whether MAP-sensitization induced greater sensitivity to methylphenidate. We revealed a main effect of the methylphenidate challenge but not the MAP pretreatment on the striatal binding potential. These results suggest that methylphenidate-induced striatal dopamine release in the common marmoset could be evaluated by [(18)F]fallypride. PMID:26232153

  3. Deficits in striatal dopamine D(2) receptors and energy metabolism detected by in vivo microPET imaging in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Araujo, D M; Cherry, S R; Tatsukawa, K J; Toyokuni, T; Kornblum, H I

    2000-12-01

    Functional imaging by repeated noninvasive scans of specific (18)F tracer distribution using a high-resolution small-animal PET scanner, the microPET, assessed the time course of alterations in energy utilization and dopamine receptors in rats with unilateral striatal quinolinic acid lesions. Energy utilization ipsilateral to the lesion, determined using scans of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose uptake, was compromised severely 1 week after intrastriatal excitotoxin injections. When the same rats were imaged 5 and 7 weeks postlesion, decrements in energy metabolism were even more prominent. In contrast, lesion-induced effects on dopamine D(2) receptor binding were more progressive, with an initial upregulation of [3-(2'-(18)F]fluoroethyl)spiperone binding apparent 1 week postlesion followed by a decline 5 and 7 weeks thereafter. Additional experiments revealed that marked upregulation of dopamine D(2) receptors consequent to quinolinic acid injections could be detected as early as 3 days after the initial insult. Postmortem markers of striatal GABAergic neurons were assessed in the same rats 7 weeks after the lesion: expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and dopamine D(1) receptor mRNA, as well as [(3)H]SCH-23,390 and [(3)H]spiperone binding to dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors, respectively, detected prominent decrements consequent to the lesion. In contrast, by 7 weeks postlesion [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding to dopamine transport sites within the striatum appeared to be enhanced proximal to the quinolinic acid injection sites. The results demonstrate that functional imaging using the microPET is a useful technique to explore not only the progressive neurodegeneration that occurs in response to excitotoxic insults, but also to examine more closely the intricacies of neurotransmitter activity in a small animal model of HD. PMID:11085894

  4. Iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS) reduces brain cell damage in rats intrastriatally lesioned by quinolinate.

    PubMed

    González-Cortés, Carolina; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Gómez-López, Marcos Artemio; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Gómez-Ruiz, Celedonio; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is involved in the neurotoxic pattern produced by quinolinic acid in the rat brain [V. Pérez-De La Cruz, C. González-Cortés, S. Galván-Arzate, O.N. Medina-Campos, F. Pérez-Severiano, S.F. Ali, J. Pedraza-Chaverrí, A. Santamaría, Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III), Neuroscience 135 (2005) 463-474.]. The aim of this work was to investigate whether ONOO(-) can also be responsible for morphological alterations and inflammatory events in the same paradigm. For this purpose, we evaluated the effect of a pre-treatment with the iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS), a well-known ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst (10 mg/kg, i.p., 120 min before lesion), on the quinolinate-induced striatal cell damage and immunoreactivities to glial-fibrilar acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), one and seven days after the intrastriatal infusion of quinolinate (240 nmol/microl) to rats. The striatal tissue from animals lesioned by quinolinate showed a significant degree of damage and enhanced immunoreactivities to GFAP, IL-6 and iNOS, both at 1 and 7 days post-lesion. Pre-treatment of rats with Fe(TPPS) significantly attenuated or prevented all these markers at both post-lesion times tested, except for GFAP immunoreactivity at 7 days post-lesion and iNOS immunoreactivity at 1 day post-lesion. Altogether, our results suggest that ONOO(-) is actively participating in triggering inflammatory events and morphological alterations in the toxic model produced by quinolinate, since the use of agents affecting its formation, such as Fe(TPPS), are effective experimental tools to reduce the brain lesions associated to excitotoxic and oxidative damage. PMID:18579343

  5. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  6. Brain cholecystokinin and nutritional status in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, B S; Monahan, J W; Hirsch, J

    1979-01-01

    Under certain conditions, exogenously administered cholecystokinin (CCK) or its COOH-terminal octapeptide can terminate feeding and cause behavioral satiety in animals. Furthermore, high concentrations of CCK are normally found in the brains of vertebrate species. It has thus been hypothesized that brain CCK plays a role in the control of appetite. To explore this possibility, a COOH-terminal radioimmunoassay was used to measure concentrations of CCK in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem of rats and mice after a variety of nutritional manipulations. CCK, mainly in the form of its COOH-terminal octapeptide, was found to appear in rat brain shortly before birth and to increase rapidly in cortex and brain stem throughout the first 5 wk of life. Severe early undernutrition had no effect on the normal pattern of CCK development in rat brain. Adult rats deprived of food for up to 72 h and rats made hyperphagic with highly palatable diets showed no alterations in brain CCK concentrations or distribution of molecular forms of CCK as determined by Sephadex gel filtration of brain extracts. Normal CCK concentrations were also found in the brains of four strains of genetically obese rodents and in the brains of six animals made hyperphagic and obese by surgical or chemical lesioning of the ventromedial hypothalamus. It is concluded that despite extreme variations in the nutritional status of rats and mice, CCK concentrations in major structures of the brain are maintained with remarkable constancy. PMID:500815

  7. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  8. The central catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor tolcapone increases striatal hydroxyl radical production in L-DOPA/carbidopa treated rats.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, M; Xiao, A Y; Kuhn, W; Lehnfeld, R; Waldmeier, P; Sontag, K H; Riederer, P

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of catechol catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in the brains of subjects treated with L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine) and an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) inhibitor is suggested to cause an increase of L-DOPA, which might lead to oxidative damage through enhanced formation of free radicals. To investigate this hypothesis, the acute effects of two doses of the systemically administered COMT inhibitors entacapone (peripheral) and tolcapone (peripheral and central) on the extracellular formation of hydroxyl radicals in vivo following treatment with L-DOPA and the AADC inhibitor carbidopa were examined. The formation of extracellular hydroxyl radicals were determined by the measurement of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA), a reaction product of hydroxyl radicals with sodium salicylate, using microdialysis in the striatum of anesthetised rats. The COMT inhibitors were administered together with 50 mg/kg i.p. carbidopa as 5% gum arabic suspensions intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg body weight to a total of 36 male HAN-Wistars rats. L-DOPA was injected i.p. 40 min after drugs of interest. Microdialysis samples were collected every 20 min for 400 min at a perfusion rate of 1 microl/min. Systemically administered 10 mg/kg tolcapone, but not entacapone, induced an increase in hydroxyl radical formation in the striatum of anesthetised rats following treatment with L-DOPA/carbidopa. The increase in hydroxyl radical formation was reflected by higher extracellular concentrations of the hydroxylate product of salicylate, 2,3-DHBA, peaking at 192% of baseline at the end of the observation period. Similar results were also found using the AUC (area under the curve) value estimated for the observation period. We conclude that the increase in hydroxyl radical formation is likely to result from an increased rate of monoamine oxidase-mediated and non-enzymatic (autoxidation) dopamine metabolism following increased central

  9. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  10. Monocrotophos induced oxidative stress and alterations in brain dopamine and serotonin receptors in young rats.

    PubMed

    Sankhwar, Madhu L; Yadav, Rajesh S; Shukla, Rajendra K; Singh, Dhirendra; Ansari, Reyaz W; Pant, Aditya B; Parmar, Devendra; Khanna, Vinay K

    2016-03-01

    Human exposure to monocrotophos, an organophosphate pesticide, could occur due to its high use in agriculture to protect crops. Recently, we found that postlactational exposure to monocrotophos impaired cholinergic mechanisms in young rats and such changes persisted even after withdrawal of monocrotophos exposure. In continuation to this, the effect of monocrotophos on noncholinergic targets and role of oxidative stress in its neurotoxicity has been studied. Exposure of rats from postnatal day (PD)22 to PD49 to monocrotophos (0.50 or 1.0 mg kg(-1) body weight, perorally) significantly impaired motor activity and motor coordination on PD50 as compared to controls. A significant decrease in the binding of (3)H-spiperone to striatal membrane (26%, p < 0.01; 30%, p < 0.05) in rats exposed to monocrotophos at both the doses and increase in the binding of (3)H-ketanserin to frontocortical membrane (14%, p > 0.05; 37%, p < 0.05) in those exposed at a higher dose, respectively, was observed on PD50 compared with the controls. Alterations in the binding persisted even after withdrawal of monocrotophos exposure on PD65. Increased oxidative stress in brain regions following exposure of rats to monocrotophos was also observed on PD50 that persisted 15 days after withdrawal of exposure on PD65. The results suggest that monocrotophos exerts its neurobehavioral toxicity by affecting noncholinergic functions involving dopaminergic and serotonergic systems associated with enhanced oxidative stress. The results also exhibit vulnerability of developing brain to monocrotophos as most of the changes persisted even after withdrawal of its exposure. PMID:24105069

  11. Comparative studies of intracerebroventricularly administered cysteamine and pantethine in different behavioral tests and on brain catecholamines in rats.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, L; Alling, C; Widerlöv, E

    1990-01-01

    In a passive avoidance test, intracerebroventricular administration (post-trial treatment) of the somatostatin-depleting compound cysteamine decreased the avoidance latency of the rats in a dose-related manner, while the effect of pantethine (which is metabolized to cysteamine) was less pronounced. In open-field studies, both compounds decreased the motor activity (ambulation, rearing) of the animals 15 min after the injection followed by a subsequent recuperation of the locomotor depression. Following pantethine, the ambulation increased during the later tests (60 min, 240 min, 24 hr). Cysteamine decreased the noradrenaline and increased the dopamine and dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid content in the hypothalamus, whereas the effects of pantethine were less expressed. Both compounds slightly decreased the striatal noradrenaline and increased the dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid levels at 15 and 60 min after administration. However, contrary to pantethine, 4 hr after treatment with cysteamine, there was a decrease in dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid concentration in this brain region. These findings suggest that both pantethine and cysteamine attenuate passive avoidance latency after intracerebroventricular treatment. The different efficiency of pantethine and its metabolite cysteamine might be connected to the low pantetheinase activity of the brain tissue; however, some direct effects of pantethine cannot be excluded. The different effects of the two compounds on the open-field activity are possibly associated with the diverse effects of the compounds on the striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:2241425

  12. Cathepsin L Plays a Role in Quinolinic Acid-Induced NF-Κb Activation and Excitotoxicity in Rat Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Wu, Jun-Chao; Liang, Zhong-Qin; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The present study seeks to investigate the role of cathepsin L in glutamate receptor-induced transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and excitotoxicity in rats striatal neurons. Stereotaxic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist Quinolinic acid (QA) into the unilateral striatum was used to produce the in vivo excitotoxic model. Co-administration of QA and the cathepsin L inhibitor Z-FF-FMK or 1-Naphthalenesulfonyl-IW-CHO (NaphthaCHO) was used to assess the contribution of cathepsin L to QA-induced striatal neuron death. Western blot analysis and cathepsin L activity assay were used to assess the changes in the levels of cathepsin L after QA treatment. Western blot analysis was used to assess the changes in the protein levels of inhibitor of NF-κB alpha isoform (IκB-α) and phospho-IκB alpha (p-IκBα) after QA treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced NF-κB. Western blot analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation, changes in the levels of IKKα, p-IKKα, TP53, caspase-3, beclin1, p62, and LC3II/LC3I. The results show that QA-induced loss of striatal neurons were strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, up-regulation of NF-κB responsive gene TP53, and activation of caspase-3 was strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced increases in beclin 1, LC3II/LC3I, and down-regulation of p62 were reduced by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. These results suggest that cathepsin L is involved in glutamate receptor-induced NF-κB activation. Cathepsin L inhibitors have neuroprotective effects by inhibiting glutamate receptor-induced IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation. PMID:24073275

  13. Low and high cocaine locomotor responding male Sprague-Dawley rats differ in rapid cocaine-induced regulation of striatal dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Mandt, Bruce H; Zahniser, Nancy R

    2010-03-01

    Adult outbred Sprague-Dawley rats can be classified as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively). Importantly, LCRs and HCRs are distinguished by their differential responsiveness to acute cocaine-induced (but not baseline) locomotor activity, inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) and resulting extracellular DA (HCR > LCR), as well as by repeated cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and measures of cocaine's rewarding and reinforcing effects (LCR > HCR). Curiously, 30 min after acute cocaine HCRs exhibit greater DAT-mediated [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes than LCRs. To investigate this finding further, we measured locomotor activity, striatal [(3)H]DA uptake kinetics and DAT cell surface expression in LCRs and HCRs over an extended period (25-180 min) after a single relatively low-dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). HCRs exhibited the "predicted" locomotor response: a marked initial activation that returned to baseline by 120 min post-injection. While LCRs exhibited a >50% lower maximal locomotor response, this increase was sustained, lasting approximately 33% longer than in HCRs. At 25 min post-cocaine, maximal velocity (V(max)) of [(3)H]DA uptake was significantly higher by 25% in HCRs than LCRs, with no difference in affinity (K(m)). Despite the DAT V(max) difference, however, DAT surface expression did not differ between LCRs and HCRs. There was a similar trend (HCR > LCR) for DAT V(max) at 40 min, but not at 150 or 180 min. These findings suggest that, compared to LCRs, HCRs have an enhanced ability to rapidly up-regulate DAT function in response to acute cocaine, which may contribute to their more "normal" cocaine-induced locomotor activation. PMID:19951714

  14. Comparative patch-clamp studies with freshly dissociated rat hippocampal and striatal neurons on the NMDA receptor antagonistic effects of amantadine and memantine.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C G; Panchenko, V A; Pinchenko, V O; Tsyndrenko, A Y; Krishtal, O A

    1996-03-01

    Patch- and concentration-clamp techniques were used to compare the effects of the uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (+)-MK-801 (dizocilpine, (+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzocyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate), ketamine, memantine (1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane) and amantadine (1-amino-adamantane) on agonist-induced inward currents in freshly dissociated rat hippocampal and striatal neurons. In hippocampal neurons, ketamine (5 microM), menantine (10 microM) and amantadine (100 microM) selectively antagonized inward current responses to NMDA (500 microM plus glycine 5 microM) in a voltage-dependent manner without affecting responses to (s)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (100 microM) or gamma-aminobutyric acid (10 microM). The NMDA receptor antagonistic effect of all four agents was typical of open channel blockade. The kinetics of blockade/unblockade was inversely related to antagonist affinity. In hippocampal neurons amantadine was the least potent NMDA receptor antagonist (IC50 18.6 +/- 0.9 microM) and showed the fastest blocking kinetics, whereas (+)-MK-801 was the most potent (IC50 0.12 +/- 0.01 microM) and showed the slowest blocking kinetics. Memantine (IC50 1.04 +/- 0.26 microM) and ketamine (IC50 0.43 +/- 0.10 microM) were almost equipotent and had similar, intermediate blocking kinetics. In striatal neurons recorded under identical conditions (+)-MK-801, ketamine and memantine were 3- to 4-fold less potent whereas amantadine was somewhat more potent than on hippocampal neurons. This could offer an explanation for the better clinical profile of amantadine in Parkinson's disease, as therapeutically relevant concentrations of amantadine are likely to be more active in the striatum whereas memantine is likely to be more active in other structures. PMID:8963435

  15. Brain Injury After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Bao, Xuhui; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard; Thompson, B. Gregory; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Object Hypertension is the main cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), but the effects of hypertension on ICH-induced brain injury have not been well studied. In this study, we examined ICH-induced brain injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods This two-part study was performed on 12 weeks old male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. First, rats received an intracaudate injection of 0.3 units collagenase and hematoma sizes were determined at 24 hours. Second, rats were injected with 100-μL autologous whole blood into the right basal ganglia. Brain edema, neuronal death, ferritin expression, microglia activation, and neurological deficits were examined. Results Hematoma sizes were the same in SHR and WKY rats 24 hours after collagenase injection. SHR had greater neuronal death and neurological deficits after blood injection. ICH also resulted in higher brain ferritin levels and stronger activation of microglia in SHR. However, perihematomal brain edema was same in the SHR and WKY rats. Conclusion Moderate chronic hypertension resulted in more severe ICH-induced neuronal death and neurological deficits, but did not exaggerate hematoma enlargement and perihematomal brain edema in the rat ICH models. PMID:21294617

  16. The development of dopamine overflow from foetal nigral grafts in the intact rat striatum and their influence on contralateral striatal dopamine overflow.

    PubMed

    Earl, C D; Marburger, A; Sautter, J; Oertel, W H; Morgenstern, R

    2001-08-01

    In this study, cell suspensions of foetal rat ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic tissue were grafted to the intact (non-lesioned) striatum of adult rats. Differential pulse voltammetry at carbon-fibre micro electrodes (12 microm diameter) was employed to first, monitor the development of dopamine overflow over a 20 week period within the grafts and secondly, their influence on contralateral striatal dopamine overflow. At 8 and 20 weeks, animals were pre-treated with pargyline and both striata were monitored for dopamine overflow for 90 min following d-amphetamine administration. Amphetamine led to a significant increase in dopamine overflow in both the grafted striatum and the contralateral striatum. The time course of dopamine overflow in both the grafted striatum and the striatum contralateral to the graft was similar in all groups of animals. Although the actual concentration of dopamine measured in 20 week old grafts was more (approximately 21%) than that measured in 8 week old grafts, there was no significant difference between the two time points. The concentration of dopamine measured in the striatum contralateral to 8 week old grafts was significantly lower (approximately 43%) than that measured in the striatum of a normal control rats. There was no significant difference between the concentration of dopamine measured in the striatum contralateral to 20 week old grafts and normal control rats. In conclusion, dopamine overflow from a ventral mesencephalic graft does not change significantly between 8 and 20 weeks following grafting. However, the grafted tissue causes a decrease of d-amphetamine-induced dopamine overflow in the contralateral side 8 weeks following grafting, which is restored 12 weeks later. PMID:11408095

  17. [Effects of psychotropic drugs on lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation behavior in rats: correlation between self-stimulation behavior inhibition and striatal dopaminergic blockade by neuroleptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Tsumagari, T

    1984-06-01

    The effects of neuroleptic drugs on self-stimulation behavior were investigated in rats with electrodes chronically implanted in the lateral hypothalamus. Except for sulpiride and carpipramine, the neuroleptic drugs chlorpromazine, thioridazine, perphenazine, haloperidol, floropipamide, pimozide, clocapramine and oxypertine all suppressed self-stimulation behavior dose-dependently. The anti-anxiety drugs chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, clotiazepam and etizolam facilitated this behavior. The antidepressant drugs imipramine and amitriptyline suppressed this behavior slightly at the dose of 40 mg/kg. The alpha-antagonist phenoxybenzamine also suppressed this behavior, but the slope of its dose-response curve was gentle compared with those of the neuroleptic drugs. The inhibition produced by the neuroleptic drugs is considered to be mediated primarily at the dopaminergic receptors. Turning behavior induced by methamphetamine in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the caudate nucleus was used to assess the striatal dopaminergic blocking potency of the neuroleptic drugs. No correlation was found between the ED50 values for the turning behavior inhibition and the ED50 values for the self-stimulation behavior inhibition produced by these drugs, so the dopaminergic receptors in the striatum are apparently not involved in the mediation of self-stimulation behavior. PMID:6149172

  18. Immediate early gene expression reveals interactions between social and nicotine rewards on brain activity in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Bastle, Ryan M; Peartree, Natalie A; Goenaga, Julianna; Hatch, Kayla N; Henricks, Angela; Scott, Samantha; Hood, Lauren E; Neisewander, Janet L

    2016-10-15

    Smoking initiation predominantly occurs during adolescence, often in the presence of peers. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the rewarding effects of nicotine and social stimuli is vital. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we measured immediate early gene (IEG) expression in animals following exposure either to a reward-conditioned environment or to the unconditioned stimuli (US). Adolescent, male rats were assigned to the following CPP US conditions: (1) Saline+Isolated, (2) Nicotine+Isolated, (3) Saline+Social, or (4) Nicotine+Social. For Experiment 1, brain tissue was collected 90min following the CPP expression test and processed for Fos immunohistochemistry. We found that rats conditioned with nicotine with or without a social partner exhibited CPP; however, we found no group differences in Fos expression in any brain region analyzed, with the exception of the nucleus accumbens core that exhibited a social-induced attenuation in Fos expression. For Experiment 2, brain tissue was collected 90min following US exposure during the last conditioning session. We found social reward-induced increases in IEG expression in striatal and amydalar subregions. In contrast, nicotine reduced IEG expression in prefrontal and striatal subregions. Reward interactions were also found in the dorsolateral striatum, basolateral amygdala, and ventral tegmental area where nicotine alone attenuated IEG expression and social reward reversed this effect. These results suggest that in general social rewards enhance, whereas nicotine attenuates, activation of mesocorticolimbic regions; however, the rewards given together interact to enhance activation in some regions. The findings contribute to knowledge of how a social environment influences nicotine effects. PMID:27435419

  19. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  20. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  1. Delta FosB and AP-1-mediated transcription modulate cannabinoid CB1 receptor signaling and desensitization in striatal and limbic brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Lazenka, Matthew F.; David, Bethany G.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Nestler, Eric J.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration produces cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) desensitization and downregulation, as well as tolerance to its in vivo pharmacological effects. However, the magnitude of CB1R desensitization varies by brain region, with CB1Rs in the striatum and its output nuclei undergoing less desensitization than other regions. A growing body of data indicates that regional differences in CB1R desensitization are produced, in part, by THC-mediated induction of the stable transcription factor, ΔFosB, and subsequent regulation of CB1Rs. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether THC-mediated induction of ΔFosB in the striatum inhibits CB1R desensitization in the striatum and output nuclei. This hypothesis was tested using bitransgenic mice with inducible expression of ΔFosB or ΔcJun, a dominant negative inhibitor of AP-1-mediated transcription, in specific forebrain regions. Mice were treated repeatedly with escalating doses of THC or vehicle for 6.5 days, and CB1R-mediated G-protein activation was assessed using CP55,940-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. Overexpression of ΔFosB in striatal dopamine type 1 receptor-containing (D1R) medium spiny neurons (MSNs) attenuated CB1R desensitization in the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area (VTA) and amygdala. Expression of ΔcJun in striatal D1R- and dopamine type 2 receptor (D2R)-containing MSNs enhanced CB1R desensitization in the caudate-putamen and attenuated desensitization in the hippocampus and VTA. THC-mediated in vivo pharmacological effects were then assessed in ΔcJun-expressing mice. Tolerance to THC-mediated hypomotility was enhanced in ΔcJun-expressing mice. These data reveal that ΔFosB and possibly other AP-1 binding proteins regulate CB1R signaling and adaptation in the striatum and limbic system. PMID:25093286

  2. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  3. Toxicity of the Flame-Retardant BDE-49 on Brain Mitochondria and Neuronal Progenitor Striatal Cells Enhanced by a PTEN-Deficient Background

    PubMed Central

    Giulivi, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) represent an important group of flame retardants extensively used, tonnage of which in the environment has been steadily increasing over the past 25 years. PBDEs or metabolites can induce neurotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) through a variety of mechanisms. Recently, PBDEs with < 5 Br substitutions (i.e., 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-47] and 2,2′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-49]) have gained interest because of their high bioaccumulation. In particular, congeners such as BDE-49 arise as one of the most biologically active, with concentrations typically lower than those observed for BDE-47 in biological tissues; however, its potential to cause MD at biologically relevant concentrations is unknown. To this end, the effect of BDE-49 was studied in brain mitochondria and neuronal progenitor striatal cells (NPC). BDE-49 uncoupled mitochondria at concentrations < 0.1 nM, whereas at > 1 nM, it inhibited the electron transport at Complex V (mixed type inhibition; IC50 = 6 nM) and Complex IV (noncompetitive inhibition; IC50 = 40 nM). These concentrations are easily achieved in plasma concentrations considering that BDE-49 (this study, 400-fold) and other PBDEs accumulate 1–3 orders of magnitude in the cells, particularly in mitochondria and microsomes. Similar effects were observed in NPC and exacerbated with PTEN (negative modulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway) deficiency, background associated with autism-like behavior, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. PBDE-mediated MD per se or enhanced by a background that confers susceptibility to this exposure may have profound implications in the energy balance of brain. PMID:23288049

  4. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  5. Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction Method and Attenuation Correction in Brain Dopamine Transporter SPECT Using an Anthropomorphic Striatal Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Maebatake, Akira; Imamura, Ayaka; Kodera, Yui; Yamashita, Yasuo; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Baba, Shingo; Miwa, Kenta; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters for iterative reconstruction in different devices and collimators for dopamine transporter (DaT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The results were compared between filtered back projection (FBP) and different attenuation correction (AC) methods. Methods: An anthropomorphic striatal phantom was filled with 123I solutions at different striatum-to-background radioactivity ratios. Data were acquired using two SPECT/CT devices, equipped with a low-to-medium-energy general-purpose collimator (cameras A-1 and B-1) and a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator (cameras A-2 and B-2). The SPECT images were once reconstructed by FBP using Chang’s AC and once by ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) using both CTAC and Chang’s AC; moreover, scatter correction was performed. OSEM on cameras A-1 and A-2 included resolution recovery (RR). The images were analyzed, using the specific binding ratio (SBR). Regions of interest for the background were placed on both frontal and occipital regions. Results: The optimal number of iterations and subsets was 10i10s on camera A-1, 10i5s on camera A-2, and 7i6s on cameras B-1 and B-2. The optimal full width at half maximum of the Gaussian filter was 2.5 times the pixel size. In the comparison between FBP and OSEM, the quality was superior on OSEM-reconstructed images, although edge artifacts were observed in cameras A-1 and A-2. The SBR recovery of OSEM was higher than that of FBP on cameras A-1 and A-2, while no significant difference was detected on cameras B-1 and B-2. Good linearity of SBR was observed in all cameras. In the comparison between Chang’s AC and CTAC, a significant correlation was observed on all cameras. The difference in the background region influenced SBR differently in Chang’s AC and CTAC on cameras A-1 and B-1. Conclusion: Iterative reconstruction improved image quality on all cameras

  6. Increased sensitivity to transient global ischemia in aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Transient global brain ischemia induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) results in reperfusion injury associated with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is known to produce delayed selective neuronal cell loss and impairment of brainstem function, leading to post-resuscitation mortality. Levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified protein adducts, a marker of oxidative stress, was found to be elevated after CAR in rat brain. In this study we investigated the effects of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) on the recovery following CAR in the aged rat brain. Male Fischer 344 rats (6, 12 and 24-month old) underwent 7-minute cardiac arrest before resuscitation. Brainstem function was assessed by hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and HNE-adducts were measured by western blot analysis. Our data showed that in the 24-month old rats, overall survival rate, hippocampal CAl neuronal counts and HVR were significantly reduced compared to the younger rats. With PBN treatment, the recovery was improved in the aged rat brain, which was consistent with reduced HNE adducts in brain following CAR. Our data suggest that aged rats are more vulnerable to oxidative stress insult and treatment with PBN improves the outcome following reperfusion injury. The mechanism of action is most likely through the scavenging of reactive oxygen species resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation. PMID:17727265

  7. IN VITRO COMPARISON OF RAT AND CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterased showed that rat esterases we...

  8. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  9. Transcranial Photoacoustic Measurements of Cold-Injured Brains in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-09-01

    We performed transcranial photoacoustic measurements of cold-injured brains in rats. Before inducing injury, a signal peak was observed at two locations corresponding to the surfaces of the skull and brain, while after injury, a third peak appeared at a location corresponding to the back surface of the skull; the third peak was found to be caused by subdural hematoma. The signal peak for the brain surface shifted to a deeper region with elapse of time after injury, indicating deformation of the brain. These findings suggest that small hemorrhage and morphological change of the brain can be transcranially detected by photoacoustic measurement.

  10. Anticonvulsant compounds and 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonnycastle, D. D.; Giarman, N. J.; Paasonen, M. K.

    1957-01-01

    In rats, a series of anticonvulsant compounds have been shown to cause a significant elevation of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in comparison with control values. This increase in 5-HT only occurred in brain tissue and was not observed in spleen, upper small intestine or blood. Elevation of brain levels of 5-HT by iproniazid (Marsilid) or 5-hydroxytryptophan failed to give protection against the convulsant or lethal action of lept zol (75 mg./kg.). PMID:13446378

  11. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  12. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles. PMID:6529588

  13. Effects of photoradiation therapy on normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; McKean, J.; Boisvert, D.; Tulip, J.; Mielke, B.W.

    1984-12-01

    Laser photoradiation of the brain via an optical fiber positioned 5 mm above a burr hole was performed after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in 33 normal rats and 6 rats with an intracerebral glioma. Normal rats received HpD, 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight, followed by laser exposure at various doses or were exposed to a fixed laser dose after the administration of HpD, 2.5 to 20 mg/kg. One control group received neither HpD nor laser energy, and another was exposed to laser energy only. The 6 rats bearing an intracranial 9L glioma were treated with HpD, 5 mg/kg, followed by laser exposure at various high doses. The temperature in the cortex or tumor was measured with a probe during laser exposure. The rats were killed 72 hours after photoradiation, and the extent of necrosis of cerebral tissue was measured microscopically. In the normal rats, the extent of brain damage correlated with increases in the dose of both the laser and the HpD. In all 6 glioma-bearing rats, the high laser doses produced some focal necrosis in the tumors but also damaged adjacent normal brain tissue. The authors conclude that damage to normal brain tissue may be a significant complication of high dose photoradiation therapy for intracranial tumors.

  14. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes. PMID:25446347

  15. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  16. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence. PMID:26503310

  17. Diversity of endurance training effects on antioxidant defenses and oxidative damage in different brain regions of adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, M; Jagsz, S; Sadowska-Krepa, E; Chrapusta, S J; Klapcinska, B; Langfort, J

    2015-08-01

    Studies on the effect of physical activity on brain oxidative stress, performed mostly in adult rats, have shown that moderate aerobic activity increases resistance to oxidative stress and reduces cellular damage. These effects can greatly differ between various brain regions. The postnatal period of the highest brain sensitivity to various stimuli is adolescence. We hypothesized that endurance training will modify brain antioxidant barrier differently in various regions, depending on their role in locomotion. Therefore, we studied the effect of moderate intensity endurance training on the activities of selected antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, gluthathione peroxidase and catalase and the contents of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (the key index of lipid peroxidation) and glutathione in several brain regions with dissimilar relationship to locomotion, as well as in circulating blood. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the training on nitric oxide synthase activity that may be a major player in exercise-related oxidative stress in brain regions that are directly involved in the locomotion control and execution (the striatum, midbrain and cerebellum). The training significantly enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity only in the latter three regions. Surprisingly, it elevated the activities of all studied antioxidant enzymes (excepting gluthathione peroxidase) in the neocortex, while no appreciable change in these activities was found in either the cerebellum (except for elevated catalase activity), or the striatum, or the midbrain. The training also elevated total glutathione content (a key protector of brain proteins under the conditions of enhanced nitric oxide production) in the cerebellum and striatum, but not in the other regions. The observed brain changes greatly differed from those in circulating blood and did not prevent the training-related increases in oxidative damage as evidenced by elevations in cerebellar and striatal

  18. Role of Rho Kinase Inhibition in the Protective Effect of Fasudil and Simvastatin Against 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Induced Striatal Neurodegeneration and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Darwish, Hebatallah A; Abdelsalam, Rania M; Amin, HebatAllah A

    2016-08-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced neurotoxicity is an experimental model which mimics the pathology and motor abnormalities seen in Huntington's disease (HD) in human. The present investigation was directed to estimate the role of rho kinase (ROCK) inhibition in the possible protective effect of fasudil and simvastatin in 3-NP-induced striatal neurodegeneration in rats. Animals were injected s.c. with 3-NP (20 mg/kg/day) for 1 week with or without administration of fasudil (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.). At the end of experiment, motor and behavioral abnormalities were evaluated. Animals were then sacrificed for measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential as well as succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and caspase-3 activities in striatum. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level and protein expressions of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), ROCK, phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and iNOS), Bax, and Bcl-2 were estimated. Finally, histological changes as demonstrated by striatum injury score, glial activation, and percentage of altered mitochondria were assessed. Both fasudil and simvastatin effectively inhibited 3-NP-induced behavioral, biochemical, and histological changes through inhibition of ROCK activity. However, fasudil provided more amelioration in histological changes, mitochondrial membrane potential and SDH activity in addition to p-Akt and PGC-1α protein expressions. The present study highlights a significant role of ROCK/p-Akt/eNOS pathway in the protective effects of fasudil and simvastatin on neurotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by 3-NP in rats. Thus, specific inhibition of ROCK may be considered a promising new approach in the management of HD. PMID:26169112

  19. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  20. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  1. Transport of 3-hydroxybutyrate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Stevenson, J.H.; Couto, R.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Studies by a number of investigators have shown that 3-hydroxybutyrate is a preferred energy substrate for brain during early development. Since recent studies by the authors group suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane, the authors investigated the transport of ({sup 3}H) D- and L-3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxy-(3-{sup 14}C) butyrate by primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up into cultured rat brain astrocytes by both diffusion and a carrier mediated transport system, and further support the concept that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by brain cells.

  2. Striatal but not frontal cortical up-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in rats exposed to immune activation in utero and cannabinoid treatment in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Idrizi, Rejhan; Malcolm, Peter; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Suresh Sundram

    2016-06-30

    In utero maternal immune activation (MIA) and cannabinoid exposure during adolescence constitute environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We investigated these risk factors alone and in combination ("two-hit") on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and neuregulin-1 receptor (ErbB4) levels in the rat brain. EGFR but not ErbB4 receptor protein levels were significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and striatum of "two-hit" rats only, with no changes seen at the mRNA level. These findings support region specific EGF-system dysregulation as a plausible mechanism in this animal model of schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:27138815

  3. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  4. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  5. Spatial Discrimination Reversal Learning in Weanling Rats Is Impaired by Striatal Administration of an NMDA-Receptor Antagonist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Deborah J.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum plays a major role in both motor control and learning and memory, including executive function and "behavioral flexibility." Lesion, temporary inactivation, and infusion of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist into the dorsomedial striatum (dmSTR) impair reversal learning in adult rats. Systemic administration of MK-801…

  6. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  7. Neuropeptide Y receptors in rat brain: autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, J.C.; St-Pierre, S.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been characterized in rat brain using both membrane preparations and receptor autoradiography. Radiolabelled NPY binds with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of sites in rat brain membrane preparations. The ligand selectivity pattern reveals strong similarities between central and peripheral NPY receptors. NPY receptors are discretely distributed in rat brain with high densities found in the olfactory bulb, superficial layers of the cortex, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, various thalamic nuclei and area postrema. The presence of high densities of NPY and NPY receptors in such areas suggests that NPY could serve important functions as a major neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system.

  8. Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Kao, Dennis S.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Schulte, Marie L.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Regional-specific average time courses of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI contrast at 9.4T in lightly anesthetized resting rat brain are formed, and correlation coefficients between time course pairs are interpreted as measures of connectivity. A hierarchy of regional pairwise correlation coefficients (RPCCs) is observed, with the highest values found in the thalamus and cortex, both intra- and interhemisphere, and lower values between cortex and thalamus. Independent sensory networks are distinguished by two methods: data driven, where task activation defines regions of interest (ROI), and hypothesis driven, where regions are defined by the rat histological atlas. Success in these studies is attributed in part to the use of medetomidine hydrochloride (Domitor) for anesthesia. Consistent results in two different rat-brain systems, the sensorimotor and visual, strongly support the hypothesis that resting-state BOLD fluctuations are conserved across mammalian species and can be used to map brain systems. PMID:18429028

  9. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Cortico-limbic-striatal contribution after response and reversal learning: a metabolic mapping study.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, J L

    2011-01-12

    Learning of arbitrary stimulus-response associations is an adaptive behavior essential for species survival in an ever-changing environment. Particular subdivisions of the striatum have been shown to be critical for both motor-response learning and reversal learning. However, recent evidence suggests that different cortical and subcortical brain regions may be involved in response learning, a kind of learning more complex than previously thought. In fact, many brain regions subserving response learning seem to be also related to reversal learning, traditionally ascribed to the prefrontal cortex. The present study examined the role of different subdivisions of the rat prefrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and the ventral tegmental area on both response and reversal learning evaluated in the water T-maze. Increased neuronal metabolic activity, as measured by cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, was found in most brain regions after training rats in a response learning task as compared to yoked controls. Reversal learning was associated with a return to baseline CO activity levels except for the orbitofrontal cortex and the ventral tegmental area. Analysis of functional connectivity among brain regions showed significant correlations in CO activity between particular cortical and striatal subdivisions in the reversal learning group. These findings suggest that the interaction of specific frontal and subcortical regions is required for reversal but not for response learning. However, our findings support the involvement of a cortico-limbic-striatal circuit in both types of learning. PMID:21036158

  11. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  12. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  13. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  14. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus reverses akinesia in bilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Koke, S J; Kiss, Z H; Bland, B H

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia motor circuitry is a highly effective treatment for the debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent findings have indicated promising potential for PD therapy with DBS in brain structures outside the basal ganglia. For example, high frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) can reverse haloperidol-induced akinesia in rats [Jackson J, Young CK, Hu B, Bland BH (2008) High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Exp Neurol 213:210-219]. In the current study, we used the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinsonian akinesia in male Long-Evans rats to further explore the efficacy of PH DBS. The application of PH DBS in lesioned animals reversed akinesia in an active avoidance paradigm with increased latency compared to pre-lesion performance. The dramatic reversal of akinesia in two models of rodent Parkinsonism by PH DBS warrants further exploration of its therapeutic potential. PMID:19401216

  15. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off PMID:2853303

  16. Effects of the D3 preferring dopamine agonist pramipexole on sleep and waking, locomotor activity and striatal dopamine release in rats.

    PubMed

    Lagos, P; Scorza, C; Monti, J M; Jantos, H; Reyes-Parada, M; Silveira, R; Ponzoni, A

    1998-05-01

    Quantitation of 2 h sessions after administration of the D3 preferring dopamine (DA) agonist pramipexole (10-500 microg/kg) showed dose-related effects on wakefulness (W), slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep in rats. The 30 microg/kg dose of the DA agonist increased SWS and REM sleep and reduced W during the first recording hour, while the 500 microg/kg dose augmented W. On the other hand, W was increased while SWS and REMS were decreased after the 500 microg/kg dose during the second recording hour. The mixed D2- and D3 receptor antagonist YM-09151-2 (30-500 microg/kg), which per se affected sleep variables prevented the increase of REMS induced by pramipexole. Furthermore, the highest doses (500-1000 microg/kg) of the DA antagonist effectively antagonized the increase of W and reduction of SWS induced by the 500 microg/kg dose of the DA agonist. Pramipexole (30-100 microg/kg) induced a decrease of locomotor activity during the 2 h recording period. In addition, the 500 microg/kg dose gave rise to an initial reduction of motor behavior which was reverted 2 h later. Pramipexole (30 and 500 microg/kg) did not significantly affect striatal DA release during the first two hours following drug administration, as measured by microdialysis. It is tentatively suggested that D3 receptor could be involved in the pramipexole-induced increase of sleep and reduction of locomotor activity. On the other hand, the increase of W and of motor behavior after relatively high doses could be related to activation of postsynaptic D2 receptor. PMID:9619689

  17. Castration affects male rat brain opiate receptor content.

    PubMed

    Hahn, E F; Fishman, J

    1985-07-01

    We previously reported that saturable stereospecific binding of [3H]-naltrexone in rat brain homogenates prepared from castrated male rats was greater than the corresponding binding in intact animals. We now report that we have replicated these results and that the difficulty of other investigators in observing these differences is due to methodological factors. Specifically, when samples were filtered individually and rapidly, differences between castrated and intact rats were maintained. The increase in binding was also observed when tissues were washed to remove endogenous opioids prior to incubation, when [3H]-naloxone was used as the ligand, and when various antagonists were used as displacers in the radioreceptor assay. PMID:2991795

  18. Voltametric assessment of brain nitric oxide during heatstroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Canini, F; Bourdon, L; Cespuglio, R; Buguet, A

    1997-08-01

    Anesthetized rats exposed to a high ambient temperature develop heatstroke with brain ischemia. Since nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role during normothermic ischemia, its cortical and cerebellar production were continuously assessed in pentobarbital anesthetized rats exposed to heat by using differential pulsed voltammetry. After 60 min at thermoneutrality, the rats were submitted to an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C until death. After 60 min in the heat, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline, MK801 (1 mg.kg(-1)), an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, or L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-ANA; 100 mg.kg(-1)), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Just before death, a 70% increase in NO production was observed in both the cerebellum and the cortex of saline-treated rats. The cortical increase in NO was not modified by MK801 while the NO signal was suppressed by L-ANA. PMID:9291142

  19. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  20. Brain microsomal metabolism of phencyclidine in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, E M; Owens, S M

    1997-05-01

    These studies examined the microsomal brain metabolism of phencyclidine (PCP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Several monohydroxylated metabolites of PCP were detected including cis- and trans-1-(1-phenyl-4-hydroxycyclohexyl)piperidine (c-PPC and t-PPC) and 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)-4-hydroxypiperidine (PCHP). The in vitro formation of these metabolites required NADPH and was inhibited by carbon monoxide. c-PPC was formed in the male and female brain microsomes at rates of 7.1 +/- 1.3 and 5.7 +/- 1.1 fmol/min per mg, respectively, while t-PPC was formed at rates of 16.2 +/- 3.3 and 16.5 +/- 4.2 fmol/min per mg. PCHP had the highest formation rate at 50.7 +/- 8.9 and 48.2 +/- 8.8 fmol/min per mg, respectively. Although previous studies with rat liver microsomes find higher levels of PCP metabolism in male rats and the formation of an irreversibly bound metabolite in male rats, the present study of brain metabolism found no sex differences in brain metabolism. The formation of PCP metabolites in male rat livers is at least partially mediated by the male-specific isozyme CYP2C11, and possibly CYP2D1. Nevertheless, the formation of the major brain metabolite, PCHP, was not inhibited by an anti-CYP2C11 or an anti-CYP2D6 antibody. However, PCHP formation was inhibited by drug inhibitors of CYP2D1-mediated metabolism, suggesting the involvement of a CYP2D isoform. These data indicate brain metabolism of PCP is significant, but unlike the liver it is not sexually dimorphic. PMID:9187340

  1. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  2. Acetate Transport and Utilization in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Shestov, Alexander A.; Koski, Dee M.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Acetate, a glial-specific substrate, is an attractive alternative to glucose for the study of neuronal-glial interactions. The present study investigates the kinetics of acetate uptake and utilization in the rat brain in vivo during infusion of [2-13C]acetate using NMR spectroscopy. When plasma acetate concentration was increased, the rate of brain acetate utilization (CMRace) increased progressively and reached close to saturation for plasma acetate concentration > 2-3 mM, whereas brain acetate concentration continued to increase. The Michaelis-Menten constant for brain acetate utilization ( KMutil=0.01±0.14mM) was much smaller than for acetate transport through the blood-brain barrier ( KMt=4.18±0.83mM). The maximum transport capacity of acetate through the blood-brain barrier ( Vmaxt=0.96±0.18μmol/g/min) was nearly two-fold higher than the maximum rate of brain acetate utilization ( Vmaxutil=0.50±0.08μmol/g/min). We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, brain acetate utilization is saturated when plasma acetate concentrations increase above 2-3 mM. At such high plasma acetate concentration, the rate-limiting step for glial acetate metabolism is not the blood-brain barrier, but occurs after entry of acetate into the brain. PMID:19393008

  3. Huntington’s Disease and Striatal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cahill, Emma; Martin, Elodie; Bonnet, Cecilia; Vanhoutte, Peter; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG). The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT), impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction. PMID:22007160

  4. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  5. Compensation for cranial spill-in into the cerebellum improves quantitation of striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptors in rats with prolonged [¹⁸F]-DMFP infusions.

    PubMed

    Mille, Erik; Cumming, Paul; Rominger, Axel; La Fougère, Christian; Tatsch, Klaus; Wängler, Björn; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-08-01

    The condition of steady-state receptor binding in positron emission tomography (PET) studies is best obtained through the use of a bolus plus steady-infusion paradigm. This is a particularly important consideration in the context of in vivo competition studies, where a pharmacological challenge can be administered during the interval of steady-state ligand binding, as in the case of [¹¹C]-raclopride studies with amphetamine challenge. However, the short half-life of ¹¹C imposes limits on the practical duration of constant infusions. Therefore, we chose to test [¹⁸F]-DMFP as a tracer for dopamine D₂/₃ receptors in rat striatum in the paradigm. Using a conventional bolus injection, the [¹⁸F]-DMFP BP(ND) was 3.8 in striatum of anesthetized rats. When followed by a constant infusion, we obtained quasi-stable BP(ND) estimates of 4.5 within an interval of 45 min. During infusions lasting up to 4 h, BP(ND) declined progressively. This seemed due to the progressive spill-in of radioactivity from the cranium to the cerebellum reference region, despite optimized iterative reconstruction of the images. Therefore, we propose a new concept of compensation for this spill-in effect using pharmacokinetic considerations, without requiring high-resolution anatomical images. Challenge with amphetamine (1 and 4 mg/kg) evoked an ∼25% reduction in BP(ND) . There was no clear evidence of dose-dependence in the striatal-binding changes, despite the considerably greater physiological effect, as documented by ECG. Thus, the general applicability of the bolus plus infusion method with [¹⁸F]-DMFP for small animal studies is impeded by the substantial labeling of the cranium. The cranial uptake was linear, indicating first-order kinetics for the enzymatic defluorination of the tracer. Based on this phenomenon, we developed an analytic method compensating for the effects of progressive cranial labeling on the estimation of specific binding in striatum. PMID:22460766

  6. Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Papp, Eszter A; Leergaard, Trygve B; Calabrese, Evan; Johnson, G Allan; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2014-08-15

    Three-dimensional digital brain atlases represent an important new generation of neuroinformatics tools for understanding complex brain anatomy, assigning location to experimental data, and planning of experiments. We have acquired a microscopic resolution isotropic MRI and DTI atlasing template for the Sprague Dawley rat brain with 39 μm isotropic voxels for the MRI volume and 78 μm isotropic voxels for the DTI. Building on this template, we have delineated 76 major anatomical structures in the brain. Delineation criteria are provided for each structure. We have applied a spatial reference system based on internal brain landmarks according to the Waxholm Space standard, previously developed for the mouse brain, and furthermore connected this spatial reference system to the widely used stereotaxic coordinate system by identifying cranial sutures and related stereotaxic landmarks in the template using contrast given by the active staining technique applied to the tissue. With the release of the present atlasing template and anatomical delineations, we provide a new tool for spatial orientation analysis of neuroanatomical location, and planning and guidance of experimental procedures in the rat brain. The use of Waxholm Space and related infrastructures will connect the atlas to interoperable resources and services for multi-level data integration and analysis across reference spaces. PMID:24726336

  7. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  8. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  9. EFFECTS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE ON THE DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female Long-Evans rat pups, exposed to an oral dose of 14 mg chlorine dioxide C102)/kg/d (postnatal d 10), were examined for effects on brain development and for changes in thyroid activity. ody weight reductions were observed on postnatal (pn) d 11, 21, and 35. orebrain...

  10. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  11. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  12. DNA methylation markers in the postnatal developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K.; Stringfellow, Sara A.; Glover, Matthew E.; Wagle, Anjali A.; Clinton, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intense interest in how altered epigenetic processes including DNA methylation may contribute to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, there is a limited understanding of how methylation processes change during early postnatal brain development. The present study used in situ hybridization to assess mRNA expression for the three major DNA methyltranserases (DNMTs) – DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b – in the developing rat brain at seven developmental timepoints: postnatal days (P) 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 75. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine levels (an indicator of global DNA methylation) in selected brain regions during the first three postnatal weeks. DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b mRNAs are widely expressed throughout the adult and postnatal developing rat brain. Overall, DNMT mRNA levels reached their highest point in the first week of life and gradually decreased over the first three postnatal weeks within the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cingulate and lateral septum. Global DNA methylation levels did not follow this developmental pattern; methylation levels gradually increased over the first three postnatal weeks in the hippocampus, and remained stable in the developing amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Our results contribute to a growing understanding of how DNA methylation markers unfold in the developing brain, and highlight how these developmental processes may differ within distinct brain regions. PMID:23954679

  13. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  14. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  15. Where fMRI and electrophysiology agree to disagree: corticothalamic and striatal activity patterns in the WAG/Rij rat

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Asht Mangal; Ellens, Damien J.; Schridde, Ulrich; Motelow, Joshua E.; Purcaro, Michael J.; DeSalvo, Matthew N.; Enev, Miro; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between neuronal activity and hemodynamic changes plays a central role in functional neuroimaging. Under normal conditions and in neurological disorders such as epilepsy it is commonly assumed that increased functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals reflect increased neuronal activity, and that fMRI decreases represent neuronal activity decreases. Recent work suggests these assumptions usually hold true in the cerebral cortex. However, less is known about the basis of fMRI signals from subcortical structures such as the thalamus and basal ganglia. We used Wistar Albino Glaxo rats of Rijswijk (WAG/Rij), an established animal model of human absence epilepsy, to perform fMRI studies with blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) contrasts at 9.4 Tesla; as well as laser Doppler cerebral blood flow (CBF), local field potential (LFP), and multiunit activity (MUA) recordings. We found that during spike-wave discharges, the somatosensory cortex and thalamus showed increased fMRI, CBV, CBF, LFP and MUA signals. However, the caudate-putamen showed fMRI, CBV and CBF decreases despite increases in LFP and MUA signals. Similarly, during normal whisker stimulation the cortex and thalamus showed increases in CBF and MUA, while the caudate-putamen showed decreased CBF with increased MUA. These findings suggest that neuroimaging-related signals and electrophysiology tend to agree in the cortex and thalamus, but disagree in the caudate-putamen. These opposite changes in vascular and electrical activity indicate that caution should be applied when interpreting fMRI signals in both health and disease from the caudate-putamen, as well as possibly from other subcortical structures. PMID:22016539

  16. Striatal mRNA expression patterns underlying peak dose l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, L M; Parr-Brownlie, L C; Duncan, E J; Black, M A; Gemmell, N J; Dearden, P K; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-06-01

    l-DOPA is the primary pharmacological treatment for relief of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). With prolonged treatment (⩾5years) the majority of patients will develop abnormal involuntary movements as a result of l-DOPA treatment, known as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of dyskinesia is a crucial step toward developing treatments for this debilitating side effect. We used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD treated with a three-week dosing regimen of l-DOPA plus the dopa decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide (4mg/kg and 7.5mg/kgs.c., respectively) to induce dyskinesia in 50% of individuals. We then used RNA-seq to investigate the differences in mRNA expression in the striatum of dyskinetic animals, non-dyskinetic animals, and untreated parkinsonian controls at the peak of dyskinesia expression, 60min after l-DOPA administration. Overall, 255 genes were differentially expressed; with significant differences in mRNA expression observed between all three groups. In dyskinetic animals 129 genes were more highly expressed and 14 less highly expressed when compared with non-dyskinetic and untreated parkinsonian controls. In l-DOPA treated animals 42 genes were more highly expressed and 95 less highly expressed when compared with untreated parkinsonian controls. Gene set cluster analysis revealed an increase in expression of genes associated with the cytoskeleton and phosphoproteins in dyskinetic animals compared with non-dyskinetic animals, which is consistent with recent studies documenting an increase in synapses in dyskinetic animals. These genes may be potential targets for drugs to ameliorate l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia or as an adjunct treatment to prevent their occurrence. PMID:26968766

  17. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  18. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  19. Human and rat brain lipofuscin proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of an autofluorescent pigment called lipofuscin in neurons is an invariable hallmark of brain aging. So far, this material has been considered to be waste material without particular relevance for cellular pathology. However, two lines of evidence argue that lipofuscin may have yet ...

  20. Preserved Modular Network Organization in the Sedated Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Andreas; Künnecke, Basil; von Kienlin, Markus; Van der Linden, Annemie; Mueggler, Thomas; Verhoye, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    Translation of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) applications from human to rodents has experienced growing interest, and bears a great potential in pre-clinical imaging as it enables assessing non-invasively the topological organization of complex FC networks (FCNs) in rodent models under normal and various pathophysiological conditions. However, to date, little is known about the organizational architecture of FCNs in rodents in a mentally healthy state, although an understanding of the same is of paramount importance before investigating networks under compromised states. In this study, we characterized the properties of resting-state FCN in an extensive number of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) under medetomidine sedation by evaluating its modular organization and centrality of brain regions and tested for reproducibility. Fully-connected large-scale complex networks of positively and negatively weighted connections were constructed based on Pearson partial correlation analysis between the time courses of 36 brain regions encompassing almost the entire brain. Applying recently proposed complex network analysis measures, we show that the rat FCN exhibits a modular architecture, comprising six modules with a high between subject reproducibility. In addition, we identified network hubs with strong connections to diverse brain regions. Overall our results obtained under a straight medetomidine protocol show for the first time that the community structure of the rat brain is preserved under pharmacologically induced sedation with a network modularity contrasting from the one reported for deep anesthesia but closely resembles the organization described for the rat in conscious state. PMID:25181007

  1. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  2. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney. PMID:19375929

  3. Analysis of pralidoxime in serum, brain and CSF of rats.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás; Petroianu, Georg A; Lorke, Dietrich E; Omar, Abdulrab; Alafifi, Salem; Jasem, Almerri; Tekes, Kornélia

    2009-05-01

    After administration of various amounts of pralidoxime to rats, the levels in serum, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The calibration curves were established using spiked samples. The calibration covers the ranges from 0.3 - 200 microg/mL, 0.3 - 7 microg/mL and 0.1 - 7 microg/mL for serum, brain and CSF, respectively. The CZE measurement opens the way to the fast and reliable determination of pyridinium aldoxime concentrations in serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain, thereby monitoring blood-brain and blood-CSF penetration of pyridinium aldoxime-type antidotes clinically used in organophosphate poisoning. PMID:19442213

  4. Effect of total hepatectomy and administration of branched-chain amino acids on regional norepinephrine, dopamine, and amino acids in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Herlin, P M; James, J H; Nachbauer, C A; Fischer, J E

    1983-01-01

    In rats after total hepatectomy, the effect of infusing glucose alone or combined with branched-chain amino acids on amino acid concentrations in plasma and cerebral cortex and on catecholamine levels in eight different regions of the brain was studied. Infusion of branched-chain amino acids reduced the accumulation of tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine in plasma, while in cerebral cortex, the concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine were normalized and that of tryptophan was reduced greatly. In rats with hepatectomy and glucose infusion alone, norepinephrine levels were decreased in seven of eight brain regions with the exception of striatum, while dopamine was reduced significantly in striatum only. Infusion of branched-chain amino acids resulted in higher norepinephrine in cortex, mesencephalon, and hypothalamus and higher striatal dopamine 18 hours after hepatectomy. Thus, infusing branched-chain amino acids and reducing the accumulation of various neutral amino acids in brain may partially prevent the loss of norepinephrine from brain after total hepatectomy. PMID:6870374

  5. Striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir for L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Ogawa, Norio

    2014-01-01

    L-DOPA is therapeutically efficacious in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), although dopamine (DA) neurons are severely degenerated. Since cortical astrocytes express neutral amino acid transporter (LAT) and DA transporter (DAT), the uptake and metabolism of L-DOPA and DA in striatal astrocytes may influence their availability in the dopaminergic system of PD. To assess possible L-DOPA- and DA-uptake and metabolic properties of striatal astrocytes, we examined the expression of L-DOPA, DA and DAT in striatal astrocytes of hemi-parkinsonian model rats after repeated L-DOPA administration, and measured the contents of L-DOPA, DA and their metabolite in primary cultured striatal astrocytes after L-DOPA/DA treatment. Repeated injections of L-DOPA induced apparent L-DOPA- and DA-immunoreactivities and marked expression of DAT in reactive astrocytes on the lesioned side of the striatum in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Exposure to DA for 4h significantly increased the levels of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in cultured striatal astrocytes. L-DOPA was also markedly increased in cultured striatal astrocytes after 4-h L-DOPA exposure, but DA was not detected 4 or 8h after L-DOPA treatment, despite the expression of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase in astrocytes. Furthermore, the intracellular level of L-DOPA in cultured striatal astrocytes decreased rapidly after removal of extracellular L-DOPA. The results suggest that DA uptaken into striatal astrocytes is rapidly metabolized and that striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir of L-DOPA that govern the uptake or release of L-DOPA depending on extracellular L-DOPA concentration, but are less capable of converting L-DOPA to DA. PMID:25188235

  6. Intrinsic excitability varies by sex in prepubertal striatal medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dorris, David M.; Cao, Jinyan; Willett, Jaime A.; Hauser, Caitlin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties were traditionally associated with brain regions directly involved in reproduction in adult, postpubertal animals. There is growing acknowledgement that sex differences can exist in other developmental periods and brain regions as well. This includes the dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen), which shows robust sex differences in gene expression, neuromodulator action (including dopamine and 17β-estradiol), and relevant sensorimotor behaviors and pathologies such as the responsiveness to drugs of abuse. Here we examine whether these sex differences extend to striatal neuron electrophysiology. We test the hypothesis that passive and active medium spiny neuron (MSN) electrophysiological properties in prepubertal rat dorsal striatum differ by sex. We made whole cell recordings from male and females MSNs from acute brain slices. The slope of the evoked firing rate to current injection curve was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. The initial action potential firing rate was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. Action potential after-hyperpolarization peak was decreased, and threshold was hyperpolarized in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. No sex differences in passive electrophysiological properties or miniature excitatory synaptic currents were detected. These findings indicate that MSN excitability is increased in prepubertal females compared with males, providing a new mechanism that potentially contributes to generating sex differences in striatal-mediated processes. Broadly, these findings demonstrate that sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties can exist prepuberty in brain regions not directly related to reproduction. PMID:25376786

  7. Behavioral Sensitivity of Temporally Modulated Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, George S.; Wilson, A. George; Matell, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigations into the neural mechanisms that underlie temporal perception have revealed that the striatum is an important contributor to interval timing processes, and electrophysiological recording studies have shown that the firing rates of striatal neurons are modulated by the time in a trial at which an operant response is made. However, it remains unclear whether striatal firing rate modulations are related to the passage of time alone (i.e., whether temporal information is represented in an “abstract” manner independent of other attributes of biological importance), or whether this temporal information is embedded within striatal activity related to co-occurring contextual information, such as motor behaviors. This study evaluated these two hypotheses by recording from striatal neurons while rats performed a temporal production task. Rats were trained to respond at different nosepoke apertures for food reward under two simultaneously active reinforcement schedules: a variable-interval (VI-15 s) schedule and a fixed-interval (FI-15 s) schedule of reinforcement. Responding during a trial occurred in a sequential manner composing three phases; VI responding, FI responding, VI responding. The vast majority of task-sensitive striatal neurons (95%) varied their firing rates associated with equivalent behaviors (e.g., periods in which their snout was held within the nosepoke) across these behavioral phases, and 96% of cells varied their firing rates for the same behavior within a phase, thereby demonstrating their sensitivity to time. However, in a direct test of the abstract timing hypothesis, 91% of temporally modulated “hold” cells were further modulated by the overt motor behaviors associated with transitioning between nosepokes. As such, these data are inconsistent with the striatum representing time in an “abstract’ manner, but support the hypothesis that temporal information is embedded within contextual and motor functions of the

  8. Pituitary and brain D2 receptor density measured in vitro and in vivo in EEDQ treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ekman, A.; Eriksson, E. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the alkylating compound N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) on dopamine D2 receptor density in rat pituitary and brain was measured using in vitro and in vivo radioligand binding techniques. In the in vitro radioligand binding experiments EEDQ was found to reduce the density (B{sub max}) of ({sup 3}H)-spiperone binding sites in the striatum by 86% while in the pituitary the corresponding decrease was only 37%. The affinity (K{sub D}) of the remaining striatal and pituitary D2 receptors was not different in EEDQ treated animals as compared to controls. When D2 receptor density was measured in vivo the effect of EEDQ was less pronounced. Thus, in rats given EEDQ the specific binding of either of the two D2 ligands ({sup 3}H)-raclopride or ({sup 3}H)-spiperone in striatum and in the limbic forebrain was reduced by 45-62%; moreover, no significant decrease in pituitary D2 receptor density was observed. The data are discussed in relation to the finding that the same dose of EEDQ that failed to influence pituitary D2 receptor density as measured in vivo effectively antagonizes the prolactin decreasing effect of the partial D2 agonist (-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propyl-piperidine ((-)-3-PPP).

  9. Increase of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the rat brain by raunescine

    PubMed Central

    Paasonen, M. K.; Kärki, N. T.

    1959-01-01

    The Rauwolfia alkaloid raunescine (5 mg./kg., intraperitoneally) increased the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brains of rats after iproniazid pre-treatment. This was evident 3 to 4 hr. after raunescine administration. There was no general increase in the noradrenaline content of the brains. In the intestine, raunescine depleted the 5-hydroxytryptamine content by about 50% within 3 to 4 hr. if the animals had been pre-treated with iproniazid. Iproniazid did not increase the content of noradrenaline in the intestine. PMID:13662567

  10. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  11. Excitotoxic damage, disrupted energy metabolism, and oxidative stress in the rat brain: antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Herrera-Mundo, María Nieves; Mendoza-Macedo, Karina; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-05-01

    Excitotoxicity and disrupted energy metabolism are major events leading to nerve cell death in neurodegenerative disorders. These cooperative pathways share one common aspect: triggering of oxidative stress by free radical formation. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the antioxidant and energy precursor, levocarnitine (L-CAR), on the oxidative damage and the behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations produced in nerve tissue by the excitotoxin and free radical precursor, quinolinic acid (2,3-pyrindin dicarboxylic acid; QUIN), and the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). Oxidative damage was assessed by the estimation of reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptosomal fractions. Behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations were evaluated as markers of neurotoxicity in animals systemically administered with L-CAR, chronically injected with 3-NP and/or intrastriatally infused with QUIN. At micromolar concentrations, L-CAR reduced the three markers of oxidative stress stimulated by both toxins alone or in combination. L-CAR also prevented the rotation behavior evoked by QUIN and the hypokinetic pattern induced by 3-NP in rats. Morphological alterations produced by both toxins (increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactivity for QUIN and enhanced neuronal damage in different brain regions for 3-NP) were reduced by L-CAR. In addition, L-CAR prevented the synergistic action of 3-NP and QUIN to increase motor asymmetry and depleted striatal GABA levels. Our results suggest that the protective properties of L-CAR in the neurotoxic models tested are mostly mediated by its characteristics as an antioxidant agent. PMID:18194214

  12. Brain and behavioral perturbations in rats following Western diet access.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Sara L; Davidson, Terry L; Lee, Tien-Jui; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2015-10-01

    Energy dense "Western" diets (WD) are known to cause obesity as well as learning and memory impairments, blood-brain barrier damage, and psychological disturbances. Impaired glucose (GLUT1) and monocarboxylate (MCT1) transport may play a role in diet-induced dementia development. In contrast, ketogenic diets (KD) have been shown to be neuroprotective. We assessed the effect of 10, 40 and 90 days WD, KD and Chow maintenance on spontaneous alternation (SA) and vicarious trial and error (VTE) behaviors in male rats, then analyzed blood glucose, insulin, and ketone levels; and hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 mRNA. Compared to Chow and KD, rats fed WD had increased 90 day insulin levels. SA was decreased in WD rats at 10, but not 40 or 90 days. VTE was perturbed in WD-fed rats, particularly at 10 and 90 days, indicating hippocampal deficits. WD rats had lower hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 expression compared to Chow and KD, and KD rats had increased 90 day MCT1 expression compared to Chow and WD. These data suggest that WD reduces glucose and monocarboxylate transport at the hippocampus, which may result in learning and memory deficits. Further, KD consumption may be useful for MCT1 transporter recovery, which may benefit cognition. PMID:25862980

  13. Oxidative changes in brain of aniline-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Awasthi, S.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1992-10-01

    Oxidative stress in rat cerebellum, cortex and brain stem after a short-term high-dose exposure to aniline vapors under conditions akin to those after major chemical accidents, was studied. Significant increases in superoxide dismutase isozyme activities and formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive material along with depletion of ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl content suggest impairment of antioxidant defenses 24 h after single exposure to 15,302 ppm aniline vapors for 10 min.

  14. [Effect of phenibut on interhemispheric transmission in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Molodavkin, G M; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut on the transcallosal potential amplitude in the sensomotor brain cortex have been studied in rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) increases the transcallosal response amplitude, thus improving the interhemispheric transmission. This effect, being an objective evidence of the nootrope activity, confirms the drug status and corroborates the positive action of phenibut on the learning and memory processes. PMID:19334513

  15. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  16. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  17. Striatal vessels receive phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase-rich innervation from midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Javier; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; García-Hernández, Sonia; Lanciego, José L.; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is assumed that besides its roles in neuronal processing, dopamine (DA) is also involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. However, studies on the hemodynamic actions of DA have been mainly focused on the cerebral cortex, but the possibility that vessels in deeper brain structures receive dopaminergic axons and the origin of these axons have not been investigated. Bearing in mind the evidence of changes in the blood flow of basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and the pivotal role of the dopaminergic mesostriatal pathway in the pathophysiology of this disease, here we studied whether striatal vessels receive inputs from midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The injection of an anterograde neuronal tracer in combination with immunohistochemistry for dopaminergic, vascular and astroglial markers, and dopaminergic lesions, revealed that midbrain dopaminergic axons are in close apposition to striatal vessels and perivascular astrocytes. These axons form dense perivascular plexuses restricted to striatal regions in rats and monkeys. Interestingly, they are intensely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylated at Ser19 and Ser40 residues. The presence of phosphorylated TH in vessel terminals indicates they are probably the main source of basal TH activity in the striatum, and that after activation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, DA release onto vessels precedes that onto neurons. Furthermore, the relative weight of this “vascular component” within the mesostriatal pathway suggests that it plays a relevant role in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:25206324

  18. Reward cues in space: commonalities and differences in neural coding by hippocampal and ventral striatal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Lansink, Carien S.; Jackson, Jadin; Lankelma, Jan V.; Ito, Rutsuko; Robbins, Trevor W.; Everitt, Barry J.; Pennartz, Cyriel M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Forming place-reward associations critically depends on the integrity of the hippocampal-ventral striatal system. The ventral striatum receives a strong hippocampal input conveying spatial-contextual information, but it is unclear how this structure integrates this information to invigorate reward-directed behavior. Neuronal ensembles in rat hippocampus and ventral striatum were simultaneously recorded during a conditioning task in which navigation depended on path integration. In contrast to hippocampus, ventral striatal neurons showed low spatial selectivity, but rather coded behavioral task phases towards reaching goal sites. Outcome-predicting cues induced a remapping of firing patterns in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in episodic memory. Ventral striatum remapped in conjunction with the hippocampus, indicating that remapping can take place in multiple brain regions engaged in the same task. Subsets of ventral striatal neurons showed a “flip” from high activity when cue lights were illuminated to low activity in intertrial intervals, or vice versa. The cues induced an increase in spatial information transmission and sparsity in both structures. These effects were paralleled by an enhanced temporal specificity of ensemble coding and a more accurate reconstruction of the animal’s position from population firing patterns. Altogether, the results reveal strong differences in spatial processing between hippocampal area CA1 and ventral striatum, but indicate similarities in how discrete cues impact on this processing. PMID:22956836

  19. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-01

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. PMID:3707993

  20. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  1. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  2. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. I. Saturable sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; Goldberg, H.; Mccann, D.J.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Previous studies have identified a saturable site of d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine sequestration (AMSEQ) in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study characterized AMSEQ with respect to its subcellular, neuronal and regional distributions, ontogenetic development, pharmacological specificity and factors required for its maintenance. Although AMSEQ was reduced when assays were performed in Krebs' buffer incubated at 37{degree}C as compared to assays performed in isotonic Tris-sucrose buffer incubated at room temperature, the pharmacological profiles of AMSEQ were virtually identical under both conditions. AMSEQ was negligible in tissues outside the central nervous system, enriched in synaptosomes and partially reduced by striatal kainic acid lesion, indicating neuronal localization. The distribution of AMSEQ in the central nervous system was heterogenous. Highest levels were present in hypothalamus with progressively lower levels noted in parietal cortex, frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons-medulla and spinal cord. With regard to its ontogeny, AMSEQ increased early in neonatal life, reaching adult levels by postnatal day 14. Although the effects of amphetamine to abolish the transynaptosomal pH gradient suggest a possible role for this gradient in the maintenance of AMSEQ, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicates that other factors are involved. An interaction with an intrasynaptosomal acid, such as N-acetylaspartate, may account for AMSEQ maintenance. AMSEQ did not possess a stereospecific preference for either d-(IC50 = 177 microM) or I-amphetamine (IC50 = 173 microM). However, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicated structural specificity with antidepressants being relatively potent inhibitors. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  4. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex II affects dopamine metabolism and decreases its uptake into striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Cakała, Magdalena; Drabik, Jacek; Kaźmierczak, Anna; Kopczuk, Dorota; Adamczyk, Agata

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), is a specific inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, complex II in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and dopamine (DA) metabolism and its transport into rat striatal synaptosomes after exposure to 3-NP. The study was carried out using spectrophotometric, radiochemical and HPLC methods. Our data showed that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 3-NP (cumulated dose 100 mg/kg in 4 days) significantly affected DA metabolism, leading to the accumulation of its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxylphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the rat striatum. These experimental conditions had no effect on free radical dependent lipid peroxidation in the brain. In vitro experiments revealed that DA and DOPAC significantly decrease lipid peroxidation in the brain homogenate. Moreover, 3-NP significantly inhibited [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptosomes by specific dopamine transporter (DAT). The scavengers of superoxide radical (O2-) Tempol and Trolox had no effect on DAT function, but the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N w-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) prevented 3-NP-evoked DAT down-regulation. In summary, our results indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial complex II by 3-NP enhances DA degradation and decreases its uptake into synaptosomes. It is suggested that NO and energy failure are responsible for alteration of the dopaminergic system in the striatum. PMID:17183449

  5. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body. PMID:24486465

  6. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron level in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 hours (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1±3.0 vs. 9.9±0.2 mm3 in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm3 in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI. PMID:24935175

  7. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  8. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  9. Detecting Behavioral Deficits Post Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), ranging from mild to severe, almost always elicits an array of behavioral deficits in injured subjects. Some of these TBI-induced behavioral deficits include cognitive and vestibulomotor deficits as well as anxiety and other consequences. Rodent models of TBI have been (and still are) fundamental in establishing many of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI. Animal models are also utilized in screening and testing pharmacological effects of potential therapeutic agents for brain injury treatment. This chapter details validated protocols for each of these behavioral deficits post traumatic brain injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The elevated plus maze (EPM) protocol is described for assessing anxiety-like behavior; the Morris water maze protocol for assessing cognitive deficits in learning memory and spatial working memory and the rotarod test for assessing vestibulomotor deficits. PMID:27604739

  10. Global Proteomic Analysis of Brain Tissues in Transient Ischemia Brain Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulting from arterial occlusion or hypotension in patients leads to tissue hypoxia with glucose deprivation, which causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neuronal death. A proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in the brain of rats following a global ischemic stroke. The mechanisms involved the action in apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Rats were treated with ischemia-reperfusion brain injuries by the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. The cortical neuron proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM) and the control rats were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to purify and identify the protein profiles. Our results demonstrated that the SAM rats experienced brain cell death in the ischemic core. Fifteen proteins were expressed differentially between the SAM rats and control rats, which were assayed and validated in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the set of differentially expressed, down-regulated proteins included catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) and cathepsin D (CATD), which are implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis. After an ischemic stroke, one protein spot, namely the calretinin (CALB2) protein, showed increased expression. It mediated the effects of SAM administration on the apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the ischemic injury of neuronal cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis, which were accompanied by sustained activation of the IRE1-alpha/TRAF2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways. Proteomic analysis suggested that the differential expression of CALB2 during a global ischemic stroke could be involved in the mechanisms of ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis, which occurred via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, with activation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Based on these results, we also provide the molecular evidence supporting the ischemia-reperfusion-related neuronal injury

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Biogenic Monoamines in Rat Brain Dialysates Using Capillary High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photoluminescence Following Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Moon Chul; Shi, Guoyue; Borland, Laura; Michael, Adrian C.; Weber, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and 3-methoxytyramine in brain is important in understanding neurotransmitter activity. This study presents a sensitive determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain striatum microdialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with the photoluminescence following electron-transfer detection technique. Separation conditions were optimized by changing the concentration of an ion-interaction agent and the percentage of an organic modifier. The high concentration of ion-interaction agent enabled the amines as a class to be separated from interfering acids, but also made the separation very long. To shorten the separation time, 10% (v/v) acetonitrile was used as the organic modifier. Eight chromatographic runs during a 3-h period were analyzed in terms of retention times, peak heights, and peak widths. Chromatograms are very reproducible, with less than 1% changes in peak height over 3 h. Typical concentration detection limits at the optimum separation conditions were less than 100 pM for metabolic acids and ~200 pM for monoamines. The injection volume of the sample was 500 nL. Thus, the mass detection limits were less than 50 amol for metabolic acids and ~100 amol for monoamines. Typical separation time was less than 10 min. To validate the technique, the separation method was applied to the observation of drug-induced changes of monoamine concentrations in rat brain microdialysis samples. Local perfusion of tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, into the striatum of an anesthetized rat decreased dopamine, 3-methoxytyramine, and serotonin concentrations in dialysates. Successive monitoring of striatal dialysates at a temporal resolution of 7.7 min showed that the injection of nomifensine transiently increased dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in rat brain dialysate. PMID:16536408

  12. Alterations in the motor cortical and striatal glutamatergic system and D-serine levels in the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    El Arfani, Anissa; Albertini, Giulia; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is hallmarked by progressive degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons and is associated with aberrant glutamatergic activity. However, studies on the glutamatergic system in the motor cortex and striatum, two motor loop-related areas, are lacking in the clinically relevant bilateral SNc 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model, and therefore led to the rationale behind the present investigations. Using Western blotting, the expression levels of the glial glutamate transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST, as well as xCT, the specific subunit of system xc(-), and the vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUT1 and 2 were investigated at two different time points (1 week and 2 weeks) post-lesion. In addition, the total content of glutamate was measured. Moreover, the total D-serine levels were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time in these two PD-related areas in the bilateral 6-OHDA rat model. In the motor cortex, no significant changes were observed in the different glutamate transporter expression levels in the bilaterally-lesioned rats. In the striatum, GLAST expression was significantly decreased at both time points whereas VGLUT1 and 2 expressions were significantly decreased 2 weeks after bilateral 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesion resulted in an enhancement of the total d-serine content in both motor cortex and striatum at 1 week post-lesion suggesting its possible involvement in the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates disturbed glutamate and D-serine regulation in the bilateral SNc-lesioned brain which could contribute to the behavioral impairments in PD. PMID:26172319

  13. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats. PMID:3714850

  14. Thyroid hormone action in the adult brain: gene expression profiling of the effects of single and multiple doses of triiodo-L-thyronine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Tonacchera, Massimo; Pinchera, Aldo; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2008-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have profound effects on mood and behavior, but the molecular basis of thyroid hormone action in the adult brain is relatively unknown. In particular, few thyroid hormone-dependent genes have been identified in the adult brain despite extensive work carried out on the developing brain. In this work we performed global analysis of gene expression in the adult rat striatum in search for genomic changes taking place after administration of T(3) to hypothyroid rats. The hormone was administered in two different schedules: 1) a single, large dose of 25 microg per 100 g body weight (SD) or 2) 1.5 microg per 100 g body weight once daily for 5 d (RD). Twenty-four hours after the single or last of multiple doses, gene expression in the striatum was analyzed using Codelink microarrays. SD caused up-regulation of 149 genes and down-regulation of 88 genes. RD caused up-regulation of 18 genes and down-regulation of one gene. The results were confirmed by hybridization to Affymetrix microarrays and by TaqMan PCR. Among the genes identified are genes involved in circadian regulation and the regulation of signaling pathways in the striatum. These results suggest that thyroid hormone is involved in regulation of striatal physiology at multiple control points. In addition, they may explain the beneficial effects of large doses of thyroid hormone in bipolar disorders. PMID:18467437

  15. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J.; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  16. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  17. Chronic nicotine treatment induces rat CYP2D in the brain but not in the liver: an investigation of induction and time course

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jiang; Miksys, Sharon; Hoffmann, Ewa; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives CYP2D6 levels are higher in many brain regions of human smokers in comparison with nonsmokers. We have shown that CYP2D is expressed in rat brain regions and that enzyme activities correlate with protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. The aims of this study were to investigate whether nicotine can induce rat brain CYP2D, to determine the recovery time course of the induction and to investigate the mechanism of induction through measuring mRNA levels over time. Methods Rats were either treated once with either saline or nicotine (1 mg base/kg, subcutaneous and sacrificed 8 hours after the treatment or treated daily for 7 days and sacrificed 0.5–24 hours after the last injection. The CYP2D protein and mRNA levels were assessed by immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry and slot blotting. Results There were no changes in brain CYP2D levels after a single nicotine injection. Following chronic nicotine treatment, levels were maximal at 8 hours and returned to control levels by 12 hours after nicotine treatment in all 3 regions assessed. At 8 hours after nicotine treatment, CYP2D levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than levels in saline-treated control animals in the cerebellum (1.4-fold), hippocampus (1.3-fold) and striatum (3.2-fold); they tended to be higher in the frontal cortex, brainstem and thalamus. Induction was specific to brain region and cell, for example, in some striatal neurons and in neurons in the cerebellar granular layer and white matter. At no time was there any increase in brain CYP2D mRNA levels. Hepatic CYP2D levels were unchanged at all times tested. Conclusion Chronic nicotine treatment induced CYP2D enzymes in rat brain but not rat liver. The induction was maximal 8 hours after the last injection and did not involve alterations in mRNA, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism. These findings suggest that, in humans exposed to nicotine, response to centrally acting drugs metabolized by CYP2D, susceptibility to

  18. Region-specific restoration of striatal synaptic plasticity by dopamine grafts in experimental parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Daniella; Bagetta, Vincenza; Pendolino, Valentina; Zianni, Elisa; Grealish, Shane; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Calabresi, Paolo; Cenci, M Angela; Picconi, Barbara

    2013-11-12

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons can restore striatal dopamine levels and improve parkinsonian deficits, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Here, we show that transplants of dopamine neurons partially restore activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the host striatal neurons. We evaluated synaptic plasticity in regions distal or proximal to the transplant (i.e., dorsolateral and ventrolateral striatum) and compared the effects of dopamine- and serotonin-enriched grafts using a rat model of Parkinson disease. Naïve rats showed comparable intrinsic membrane properties in the two subregions but distinct patterns of long-term synaptic plasticity. The ventrolateral striatum showed long-term potentiation using the same protocol that elicited long-term depression in the dorsolateral striatum. The long-term potentiation was linked to higher expression of postsynaptic AMPA and N2B NMDA subunits (GluN2B) and was dependent on the activation of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits and the D1 dopamine receptor. In both regions, the synaptic plasticity was abolished after a severe dopamine depletion and could not be restored by grafted serotonergic neurons. Solely, dopamine-enriched grafts could restore the long-term potentiation and partially restore motor deficits in the rats. The restoration could only be seen close to the graft, in the ventrolateral striatum where the graft-derived reinnervation was denser, compared with the distal dorsolateral region. These data provide proof of concept that dopamine-enriched transplants are able to functionally integrate into the host brain and restore deficits in striatal synaptic plasticity after experimental parkinsonism. The region-specific restoration might impose limitations in symptomatic improvement following neural transplantation. PMID:24170862

  19. Impaired Striatal Akt Signaling Disrupts Dopamine Homeostasis and Increases Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Adeola R.; Owens, W. Anthony; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Saadat, Sanaz; Kennedy, Jack P.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Russo, Scott J.; Daws, Lynette C.; Niswender1, Kevin D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address “food-abuse” disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt) involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF) diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA) rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT). Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH)-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH)-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia. Conclusions/Significance Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie “food-abuse” disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular model

  20. Effects of some antioxidative aporphine derivatives on striatal dopaminergic transmission and on MPTP-induced striatal dopamine depletion in B6CBA mice.

    PubMed

    Loghin, Felicia; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Asencio, Marcelo; Comoy, Etienne; Speisky, Hernan; Cassels, Bruce K; Protais, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    (S)-(+)-boldine, an aporphine alkaloid displaying antioxidative and dopaminergic properties, and six of its derivatives (glaucine, 3-bromoboldine, 3-iodoboldine, 8-aminoboldine, 8-nitrosoboldine and 2,9-O,O'-dipivaloylboldine) were tested for these properties in comparison with their parent compound. All the tested compounds displayed in vitro antioxidative properties equal to or slightly weaker than those of boldine, and equal to or stronger than (+/-)-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8,-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox), a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, used as a reference compound. All the aporphine compounds tested displaced [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]raclopride from their specific binding sites in rat striatum. When tested on dopamine (DA) metabolism in the striatum of B6CBA mice, all the compounds, except 8-aminoboldine, increased striatal levels of DOPAC and HVA, and the HVA/DA ratio, indicating that they cross the blood-brain barrier and that they seem to act as dopamine antagonists in vivo. B6CBA mice were sensitive to the neurotoxic action of MPTP on dopaminergic neurons as indicated by the strongly decreased striatal levels of DA, DOPAC and HVA following administration of MPTP (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Among these aporphine derivatives, only 3-bromoboldine was able to reduce the MPTP-induced decrease of striatal levels of DA and DOPAC, whereas (R)-apomorphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg, i.p.), used as reference compounds, were very active. These data suggest that potent in vitro antioxidative properties and the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier are not sufficient criteria to predict the inhibition of neuronal degeneration induced by MPTP. PMID:12594006

  1. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for (1)H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  2. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  4. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  5. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  6. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Nan; Ye, Ling

    2010-04-16

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential ({zeta}-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  7. Intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate decreases brain inflammatory mediators and provides neuroprotection after brain hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Huijuan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury due to birth asphyxia is the major cause of death and long-term disabilities in newborns. We determined whether intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) could provide neuroprotection in neonatal rats after brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to brain HI. They were then treated by intranasal PDTC. Neurological outcome were evaluated 7 or 30 days after the brain HI. Brain tissues were harvested 6 or 24 h after the brain HI for biochemical analysis. Here, PDTC dose-dependently reduced brain HI-induced brain tissue loss with an effective dose (ED)50 at 27 mg/kg. PDTC needed to be applied within 45 min after the brain HI for this neuroprotection. This treatment reduced brain tissue loss and improved neurological and cognitive functions assessed 30 days after the HI. PDTC attenuated brain HI-induced lipid oxidative stress, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and various inflammatory mediators in the brain tissues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase after brain HI reduced brain tissue loss. Our results suggest that intranasal PDTC provides neuroprotection possibly via reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Intranasal PDTC may have a potential to provide neuroprotection to human neonates after birth asphyxia. PMID:23994718

  8. Immunochemical characterization of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate kinase from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, C J; Kok, J W; Schrama, L H; Oestreicher, A B; Gispen, W H

    1986-01-01

    Affinity-purified antibodies were used to identify a protein of molecular mass 45 kDa (45 kDa protein) in rat brain cytosol as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) kinase. Antibodies were raised in rabbits by immunization with the purified 45 kDa protein. Anti-(45 kDa protein) immunoglobulins were isolated by affinity chromatography of the antiserum on a solid immunosorbent, which was prepared by coupling a soluble rat brain fraction, the DEAE-cellulose pool containing 10-15% 45 kDa protein, to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The purified IgGs were specific for the 45 kDa protein as judged by immunoblot and by immunoprecipitation. The purified anti-(45 kDa protein) IgGs inhibited the enzyme activity of partially purified PtdIns4P kinase, whereas preimmune IgGs were ineffective. Immunoprecipitation of the 45 kDa protein from the partially purified enzyme preparation with the purified IgGs resulted in a concomitant decrease in the amount of 45 kDa protein and in PtdIns4P kinase activity. The amount of 45 kDa protein remaining in the supernatant and the activity of PtdIns4P kinase correlated with a coefficient of r = 0.87. The evidence presented lends further support for the notion that the catalytic activity of PtdIns4P kinase in rat brain cytosol resides in a 45 kDa protein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3010943

  9. Investigations on iodothyronine deiodinase activity in the maturing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ködding, R; Fuhrmann, H; von zur Mühlen, A

    1986-04-01

    5-Monodeiodination of T4 and T3 and 5'-monodeiodination of T4 and rT3 were studied in brain homogenates of male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 1-60 days. Portions of the homogenates were incubated with the substrates at 37 C for 30 min. The reaction products were estimated by specific RIAs. All of the four reactions were dependent upon time, temperature, pH, and upon the concentrations of substrate, thiol, and tissue protein. Maximal reactions were obtained between 40 and 160 mM dithioerythritol. T4 5'-deiodination proceeded optimally at pH 7.4 and 0.4 microM substrate, the other reactions at pH 8.5 and 10 microM substrate. The four reactions were inactivated by heat (56 C, 30 min) and inhibited by 10(-5) M iopanoic acid. Only rT3 5'-deiodination was inhibited by 3 X 10(-4) M propylthiouracil (greater than 95%). In cerebellum, basal ganglia, brainstem, and hypothalamus both T4 and T3 5-deiodinase activity were very high in perinatal rats [up to 5.56 pmol/(min X mg protein) in hypothalamus], and decreased rapidly with age. In cortex and olfactory bulb these enzyme activities were low after birth, followed by an increase during the growth spurt [up to 632 fmol/(min X mg protein) in olfactory bulb]. T4 and rT3 5'-deiodinase activity in all brain regions studied were at their lowest in perinatal rats. During and after the growth spurt an increase was observed [up to 457 fmol/(min X mg protein) in cerebellum]. The reciprocal course of 5- and 5'-deiodination between birth and growth spurt in most of the brain regions studied might lead to a reduced intracellular thyromimetic activity during the perinatal period. PMID:3948784

  10. Dynamic Changes of Striatal and Extrastriatal Abnormalities in Glutaric Aciduria Type I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M.; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Muhlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P. S.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Garbade, Sven F.; Kolker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as…

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rat brain following transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Sun, Xiaoyan; LaManna, Joseph C

    2008-01-01

    Aged rat brain is more sensitive to reperfusion injury induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The mitochondrial respiratory chain, the major source of free radicals during reperfusion, is likely to be the target of lipid peroxidation. Previous work has shown a higher mortality and lower hippocampal neuronal survival in older rats. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major product of lipid peroxidation, was found to be elevated in cortex and brainstem after resuscitation. In this study we investigated the acute changes of mitochondrial function in aging rat brain following cardiac arrest and resuscitation; the effect of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) was also tested. Fischer 344 rats, 6 and 24-month old, were subjected to cardiac arrest (7-10 minutes) and allowed to recover 1 hour after resuscitation. Mitochondria of cortex and brainstem were isolated and assayed for respiratory function. Compared to their respective non-arrested control group, 1h untreated groups (both 6 month and 24 month) had similar state 3 (ADP-stimulated) but higher state 4 (resting state) respiratory rates. The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) of cortex in the 1h untreated group was 26% lower than the non-arrested control group; similar results were found in brainstem. The decreased mitochondrial respiratory function was improved by PBN treatment. HNE-modified mitochondrial proteins were elevated 1h after resuscitation, with an evident change in the aged. Treatment with PBN reduced the elevated HNE production in mitochondria of cortex. The data suggest (i) there is increased sensitivity to lipid peroxidation with aging, (ii) mitochondrial respiratory function related to coupled oxidation decreases following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and (iii) treatment with antioxidant, such as PBN, reduces the oxidative damage following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:18290349

  12. Association between Age and Striatal Volume Stratified by CAG Repeat Length in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Elizabeth; Mills, James; Liu, Dawei; Nopoulos, Peggy; Ross, Christopher A.; Pierson, Ronald; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Longer CAG repeat length is associated with faster clinical progression in Huntington disease, although the effect of higher repeat length on brain atrophy is not well documented. Method: Striatal volumes were obtained from MRI scans of 720 individuals with prodromal Huntington disease. Striatal volume was plotted against age separately for groups with CAG repeat lengths of 38–39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47–54. Results: Slopes representing the association between age and striatal volume were significantly steeper as CAG repeat length increased. Discussion: Although cross-sectional, these data suggest that striatal atrophy, like clinical progression, may occur faster with higher CAG repeat lengths. PMID:21593963

  13. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  14. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  15. 2-hydroxyestradiol modifies serotonergic processes in the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic (5 day) 2-hydroxyestradiol or estradiol on catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the male rat brain were studied. The results indicate estrogen to be specific is inducing changes in dopaminergic systems; whereas its hydroxymetabolite appears to have a preference for serotonergic processes. In particular, in vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol appears to be a potent inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in brain; this inhibition is especially potent in the cortex, where it is equal in potency to serotonin. However, unlike serotonin, which is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine, 2-hydroxyestradiol is an uncompetitive inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in cortex and hypothalamus and a noncompetitive inhibitor in the striatum; this suggests that the inhibition of binding takes place at a point other than the site of serotonin uptake. In vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol also appears to increase the uptake of serotonin into these tissues, a change which would be expected if the imipramine binding is blocked.

  16. Altered extracellular striatal in vivo biotransformation of the opioid neuropeptide dynorphin A(1-17) in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Klintenberg, Rebecka; Andrén, Per E

    2005-02-01

    The in vivo biotransformation of dynorphin A(1-17) (Dyn A) was studied in the striatum of hemiparkinsonian rats by using microdialysis in combination with nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The microdialysis probes were implanted into both hemispheres of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats. Dyn A (10 pmol microl(-1)) was infused through the probes at 0.4 microl min(-1) for 2 h. Samples were collected every 30 min and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The results showed for the first time that there was a difference in the Dyn A biotransformation when comparing the two corresponding sides of the brain. Dyn A metabolites 1-8, 1-16, 5-17, 10-17, 7-10 and 8-10 were detected in the dopamine-depleted striatum but not in the untreated striatum. Dyn A biotransformed fragments found in both hemispheres were N-terminal fragments 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-11, 1-12 and 1-13, C-terminal fragments 2-17, 3-17, 4-17, 7-17 and 8-17 and internal fragments 2-5, 2-10, 2-11, 2-12, and 8-15. The relative levels of these fragments were lower in the dopamine-depleted striatum. The results imply that the extracellular in vivo processing of the dynorphin system is being disturbed in the 6-OHDA-lesion animal model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:15706626

  17. The impact of chronic stress on the rat brain lipidome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Chan, R B; Bravo, F V; Miranda, A; Silva, R R; Zhou, B; Marques, F; Pinto, V; Cerqueira, J J; Di Paolo, G; Sousa, N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a major risk factor for several human disorders that affect modern societies. The brain is a key target of chronic stress. In fact, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to stress affects learning and memory, decision making and emotional responses, and may even predispose for pathological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. Lipids are a major constituent of the brain and specifically signaling lipids have been shown to regulate brain function. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach to evaluate the impact of a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm on the rat brain in a region-specific manner. We found that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was the area with the highest degree of changes induced by chronic stress. Although the hippocampus presented relevant lipidomic changes, the amygdala and, to a greater extent, the cerebellum presented few lipid changes upon chronic stress exposure. The sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism were profoundly affected, showing an increase in ceramide (Cer) and a decrease in sphingomyelin (SM) and dihydrosphingomyelin (dhSM) levels, and a decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and ether phosphatidylcholine (PCe) and increase in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) levels, respectively. Furthermore, the fatty-acyl profile of phospholipids and diacylglycerol revealed that chronic stressed rats had higher 38 carbon(38C)-lipid levels in the hippocampus and reduced 36C-lipid levels in the PFC. Finally, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels in the PFC were found to be correlated with blood corticosterone (CORT) levels. In summary, lipidomic profiling of the effect of chronic stress allowed the identification of dysregulated lipid pathways, revealing putative targets for pharmacological intervention that may potentially be used to modulate stress-induced deficits. PMID:25754084

  18. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Lance M; Stauch, Kelly L; Fox, Howard S

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article "Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands" in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  19. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  20. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  1. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article “Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands” in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  2. In vitro screening of psychoactive drugs by [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ryouichi; Nagai, Fumiko; Ogata, Akio; Satoh, Kanako

    2007-12-01

    We constructed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale determination method of the psychoactive drugs that acted directly on the monoamine receptor by measuring the activation of [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)-triphosphate binding to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). This method can simultaneously measure the effects of three monoamines, namely dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE), in rat brain membranes using a 96-well microplate. Activation of D(1) and D(2) receptors in striatal membranes by DA as well as 5-HT and NEalpha(2) receptors in cortical membranes could be measured. Of 12 tested phenethylamines, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I) stimulated G protein binding. The other phenethylamines did not affect G protein binding. All 7 tryptamines tested stimulated G protein binding with the following rank order of potency; 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT)>5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT)>or=5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT)>N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT)>or=alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT). This assay system was able to designate psychoactive drugs as prohibited substances in accordance with criteria set forth by the Tokyo Metropolitan government. PMID:18057721

  3. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  4. BRAIN TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT IN RATS: A COMPARISON OF MICROWAVE AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The brain and core temperatures of rats and rat carcasses exposed to microwave radiation (2450 MHz) or elevated air temperatures were measured in two studies. In general, no substantial evidence for temperature differentials, or hot spots, in the brain of these animals was found....

  5. An assessment of the validity of densitometric measures of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers: relationship to apomorphine-induced rotations in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Cadet, J L; Kent, J D; Karanas, A L; Jackson-Lewis, V

    1990-10-01

    The power of immunohistochemical staining as a tool for the study of the neurochemical anatomy of the brain would be greatly enhanced if quantitative measures of staining were to be developed. We have here assessed the reliability and validity of two population measures of extent of fiber innervation: percent area occupied by staining, and average optical density (AOD) of staining. We have evaluated these measures for tyrosine hydroxylase-positive staining of the striatum in relation to apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. We have found that inter-operator reliability for the area measure is high (r = 0.98). Apomorphine-induced rotations were observed when the area measured was reduced to 2% or less of the control side, and when the density measure was reduced to 15% or less. These results are similar to those obtained previously for biochemical assay of TH activity, which showed rotations at reductions to 10% or less. We conclude that these density measures provide valid relative indices of extent of fiber innervation on the same section. The AOD measure appears to be more sensitive at lower levels of innervation. PMID:1980518

  6. Learning-related coordination of striatal and hippocampal theta rhythms during acquisition of a procedural maze task.

    PubMed

    DeCoteau, William E; Thorn, Catherine; Gibson, Daniel J; Courtemanche, Richard; Mitra, Partha; Kubota, Yasuo; Graybiel, Ann M

    2007-03-27

    The striatum and hippocampus are conventionally viewed as complementary learning and memory systems, with the hippocampus specialized for fact-based episodic memory and the striatum for procedural learning and memory. Here we directly tested whether these two systems exhibit independent or coordinated activity patterns during procedural learning. We trained rats on a conditional T-maze task requiring navigational and cue-based associative learning. We recorded local field potential (LFP) activity with tetrodes chronically implanted in the caudoputamen and the CA1 field of the dorsal hippocampus during 6-25 days of training. We show that simultaneously recorded striatal and hippocampal theta rhythms are modulated differently as the rats learned to perform the T-maze task but nevertheless become highly coherent during the choice period of the maze runs in rats that successfully learned the task. Moreover, in the rats that acquired the task, the phase of the striatal-hippocampal theta coherence was modified toward a consistent antiphase relationship, and these changes occurred in proportion to the levels of learning achieved. We suggest that rhythmic oscillations, including theta-band activity, could influence not only neural processing in cortico-basal ganglia circuits but also dynamic interactions between basal ganglia-based and hippocampus-based forebrain circuits during the acquisition and performance of learned behaviors. Experience-dependent changes in coordination of oscillatory activity across brain structures thus may parallel the well known plasticity of spike activity that occurs as a function of experience. PMID:17372196

  7. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Khushbu; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Kohli, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission) along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH). The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult. PMID:26236504

  8. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil) has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested. PMID:22709243

  9. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  10. Donepezil markedly potentiates memantine neurotoxicity in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, Catherine E; Wozniak, David F; Nardi, Anthony; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2008-02-01

    The NMDA antagonist, memantine (Namenda), and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept), are currently being used widely, either individually or in combination, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NMDA antagonists have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic properties; the latter is augmented by drugs, such as pilocarpine, that increase cholinergic activity. Whether donepezil, by increasing cholinergic activity, might augment memantine's neurotoxic potential has not been investigated. In the present study, we determined that a dose of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.), considered to be in the therapeutic (neuroprotective) range for rats, causes a mild neurotoxic reaction in the adult rat brain. Co-administration of memantine (20 or 30 mg/kg) with donepezil (2.5-10mg/kg) markedly potentiated this neurotoxic reaction, causing neuronal injury at lower doses of memantine, and causing the toxic reaction to become disseminated and lethal to neurons throughout many brain regions. These findings raise questions about using this drug combination in AD, especially in the absence of evidence that the combination is beneficial, or that either drug arrests or reverses the disease process. PMID:17112636

  11. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release. PMID:16157417

  12. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 3. [123I] and [125I]epidepride: in vivo studies in rhesus monkey brain and comparison with in vitro pharmacokinetics in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R M; Votaw, J R; Schmidt, D E; Ansari, M S; Holdeman, K P; de Paulis, T; Clanton, J A; Pfeffer, R; Manning, R G; Ebert, M H

    1993-01-01

    Studies of [123I]epidepride uptake in rhesus monkey brain were performed using single photon tomography. Striatal uptake peaked at 0.85% of administered dose/g at 107 min post-injection, then declined slowly to 0.70% of administered dose/g at 6 h. Striatal:posterior brain ratios rose from 2 at 25 min to 6.8 at 105 min, to 15 at 4 h and to 58 at 6.4 h. [123I]Epidepride was displaced by haloperidol (0.1 and 1 mg/kg) with a half-life of washout of 55 min. Little displacement of [123I]epidepride was observed following administration of 1 or 2 mg/kg d-amphetamine, respectively, indicating [123I]epidepride is not easily displaced by endogenous dopamine. In vitro equilibrium binding studies using rat striatum revealed a KD of 46 pM and Bmax of 33 pmol/g tissue at 37 degrees C, while at 25 degrees C the KD was 25 pM and the Bmax 32 pmol/g tissue. In vitro kinetic analysis of association and dissociation curves revealed a half-life for receptor dissociation at 37 degrees C of 15 min and 79-90 min at 25 degrees C. Allowing for the temperature difference, there is good correspondence between in vivo and in vitro dissociation kinetics at 25 degrees C. Increasing in vitro incubation temperature from 25 to 37 degrees C caused a 6-fold increase in the dissociation rate, suggesting that there is a change in binding kinetics at the dopamine D2 receptor at 37 degrees C compared to in vivo binding. The results of this study indicate that [123I]epidepride is an excellent radioligand for SPECT studies of the dopamine D2 receptor in man. PMID:8321085

  13. Chronic cocaine administration reduces striatal dopamine terminal density and striatal dopamine release which leads to drug-seeking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Parish, C L; Tomas, D; Horne, M K

    2011-02-01

    Drug addiction is associated with altered dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. We have previously shown that chronic stimulation of the dopamine D2 receptor (D(2)R) with cocaine results in reduced striatal DA terminal density. The aims of this study were to establish whether this reduction in DA terminal density results in reduced striatal DA release and increased cocaine-seeking behaviour and whether D(2)R antagonism can restore the cocaine-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and drug-seeking behaviour. Rats were housed individually and either control, cocaine, haloperidol (D(2)R antagonist), or cocaine and haloperidol was administered in the drinking water for 16 weeks. Chronic cocaine treatment, which reduced striatal DA terminal density by 20%, resulted in a reduction in basal (-34%) and cocaine-evoked (-33%) striatal DA release and increased cocaine-seeking behaviour. These cocaine-mediated effects on striatal DA terminal density, DA release and drug-seeking could be prevented by co-administration with haloperidol. Basal and cocaine-evoked DA release in the striatum directly correlated with DA terminal density and with preference for cocaine. We conclude that striatal DA terminal density and DA release is an important factor in maintaining drug preference and should be considered as a factor in drug-seeking behaviour and relapse. PMID:21129449

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of (S)-[(18)F]fesetron in the rat brain as a potential PET imaging agent for serotonin 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pithia, Neema K; Liang, Christopher; Pan, Xiang-Zuo; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2016-04-15

    Serotonin 5-HT3 receptors are involved in various brain functions including as an emesis target during cancer chemotherapy. We report here the development of (S)-2,3-dimethoxy-5-(3'-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)benzamide ([(18)F]fesetron) as a potential PET imaging agent for serotonin 5-HT3 receptors. By radiolabeling((S)-2,3-dimethoxy-5-(3'-tosyloxypropyl)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)benzamide) with fluorine-18, (S)-[(18)F]fesetron was obtained in 5 to 10% decay-corrected yields and with specific activities >74GBq/μmol at the end of radiosynthesis. PET imaging in rats showed low uptake of [(18)F]fesetron in the brain with retention of binding in the striatal and cerebellar regions. Using colliculi as a reference region, ratios were 3.4 for striata and 2.5 for cerebellum. Ex vivo brain PET analysis displayed binding of [(18)F]fesetron in the hippocampus, striatum and cerebellar regions. Cerebellar regions corresponded to area postrema and nucleus tract solitaris known to contain 5-HT3 receptors. Dorsal hippocampus showed the highest uptake with ratio of >17 with respect to colliculi, while area postrema and striata had ratios of >10. Thus, [(18)F]fesetron exhibited a unique binding profile to rat brain regions known to contain significant amounts of serotonin 5-HT3 receptors. However, the very low brain uptake limits its usefulness as a PET radiotracer in this animal model. PMID:26979158

  15. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  16. Lipid peroxidative stress and antioxidative enzymes in brains of milk-supplemented rats.

    PubMed

    Bay, B H; Lee, Y K; Tan, B K; Ling, E A

    1999-12-24

    Skim milk cultured with lactic acid bacteria has been previously reported to reduce lipid peroxidation in rat livers. In this study, the effects of skim milk and cultured milk supplementation on peroxidative stress in brains of weanling rats were investigated. We observed a reduction of brain thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) concentration in milk-supplemented animals as compared with controls. In brains of control rats, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme levels were significantly higher than those from the milk-supplemented animals. In addition, SOD activity in control animal brains had a positive correlation with the TBARS concentration. There was no significant differences in the brain glutathione-S-transferase (GST) levels of all the three groups of animals. The results suggest that milk supplementation may be beneficial in reducing peroxidative stress in the developing rat brain. PMID:10624826

  17. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  18. Expression of UGT1A subfamily in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yukiko; Katoh, Miki; Imai, Kuniyuki; Kondo, Yuya; Asai, Yuki; Ikushiro, Shin-Ichi; Nadai, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is an enzyme that catalyses a major phase II reaction in drug metabolism. Glucuronidation occurs mainly in the liver, but UGTs are also expressed in extrahepatic tissues, where they play an important role in local metabolism. UGT1A isoforms catalyse the glucuronidation of several drugs, neurotransmitters and neurosteroids that exert pharmacological and physiological effects on the brain. The aim of the current study was to determine UGT1A mRNA expression levels and glucuronidation activities in different regions of the rat brain (namely the cerebellum, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, piriform cortex, hippocampus, medulla oblongata, olfactory bulb, striatum and thalamus). It was found that all UGT1A isoforms were expressed in all the nine regions, but their expression levels differed between the regions. The difference between the regions of the brain where the mRNA levels were highest and those where they were lowest ranged between 2.1- to 7.8-fold. Glucuronidation activities were measured using the UGT substrates such as mycophenolic acid, p-nitrophenol and umbelliferone. Glucuronidation activity was detected in all nine regions of the brain. Activity levels differed between the regions, and were highest in the cerebellum, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb. Differences in glucuronidation activity between regions with the highest rates and those with the lowest rates ranged from 5.3- to 10.1-fold. These results will contribute to our current understanding of the physiological and pharmacokinetic roles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061716

  19. [Effects of total saponins of semen ziziphi Spinosae on brain damages and brain biochemical parameters under cerebral ischemia of rats].

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Huang, Z; Mo, Z; Pan, H; Ding, H

    1996-02-01

    Total saponins of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (ZS) can reduce the contents of water and MDA in ischemic rat's brain tissues, elevate the activity of SOD, CK and LDH, cut down the content of lactate and alleviate the damages of nerve cells in brain. The study shows that ZS possesses protective effects on cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:8758767

  20. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice.

    PubMed

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  1. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  2. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  3. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain. PMID:24217015

  4. Kyotorphin (tyrosine-arginine) synthetase in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Yoshihara, Y; Fukushima, N; Shiomi, H; Nakamura, A; Takagi, H

    1987-06-15

    Kyotorphin (Tyr-Arg) is a unique neuropeptide which produces analgesia by releasing Met-enkephalin from slices of the brain and spinal cord. Recent studies revealed that kyotorphin possesses the properties of neurotransmitter/neuroregulator. In the present study, we identified a kyotorphin synthetase in the soluble fraction of rat brain synaptosomes (synaptosol) and characterized it. The enzyme partially purified with Sephacryl S-300 showed an absolute requirement for ATP, MgCl2, tyrosine, and arginine. The optimal pH was 7.5-9.0 and the pI was determined to be 6.1-6.2 by isoelectric focusing. The Km was 25.6 microM for tyrosine, 926 microM for arginine, 294 microM for ATP, and 442 microM for MgCl2. The Vmax was 34.0 pmol/mg of protein/h. The apparent molecular size of this "kyotorphin synthetase" further purified by the DE52 column was 240,000-245,000 daltons, estimated using TSKgel G4000SW column chromatography. The enzyme reaction is represented by the following equation: Tyr + Arg + ATP + MgCl2 + kyotorphin synthetase----Tyr-Arg (kyotorphin) + AMP + PPi + MgCl2 + kyotorphin synthetase. The regional distribution and subcellular localization of the synthetase showed a close correlation to that of kyotorphin levels in the rat brain. The amounts of kyotorphin formed from amino acids by the synthetase in the dialyzed synaptosol was 3.0-4.0 times higher than that from precursor proteins by processing enzymes within the 30 min incubation. PMID:3597366

  5. An improved filtration procedure for measuring opiate receptors in small regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bardo, M T; Bhatnagar, R K; Gebhart, G F

    1982-12-01

    A modified filtration method for in vitro receptor binding was used to determine specific binding of [3H]naloxone to small regions of adult rat brain. Reliable determinations of ligand binding were quantified with about 50 micrograms of protein per assay tube. Large differences in [3H]naloxone binding were obtained between various brain nuclei, and these differences were consistent with prior determinations of opiate receptor densities in various rat brain nuclei using autoradiographic techniques. PMID:6292368

  6. Citrobacter koseri Brain Abscess in the Neonatal Rat: Survival and Replication within Human and Rat Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Stacy M.; Pollack, Harvey A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Badger, Julie L.

    2003-01-01

    A unique feature of Citrobacter koseri is the extremely high propensity to initiate brain abscesses during neonatal meningitis. Previous clinical reports and studies on infant rats have documented many Citrobacter-filled macrophages within the ventricles and brain abscesses. It has been hypothesized that intracellular survival and replication within macrophages may be a mechanism by which C. koseri subverts the host response and elicits chronic infection, resulting in brain abscess formation. In this study, we showed that C. koseri causes meningitis and brain abscesses in the neonatal rat model, and we utilized histology and magnetic resonance imaging technology to visualize brain abscess formation. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that macrophages (and not fibroblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or neurons) were the primary target for long-term C. koseri infection. To better understand C. koseri pathogenesis, we have characterized the interactions of C. koseri with human macrophages. We found that C. koseri survives and replicates within macrophages in vitro and that uptake of C. koseri increases in the presence of human pooled serum in a dose-dependent manner. EM studies lend support to the hypothesis that C. koseri uses morphologically different methods of uptake to enter macrophages. FcγRI blocking experiments show that this receptor primarily facilitates the entry of opsonized C. koseri into macrophages. Further, confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that C. koseri survives phagolysosomal fusion and that more than 90% of intracellular C. koseri organisms are colocalized within phagolysosomes. The ability of C. koseri to survive phagolysosome fusion and replicate within macrophages may contribute to the establishment of chronic central nervous system infection including brain abscesses.   PMID:14500508

  7. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  8. A scanning SAXS/WAXS study of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    A simultaneous SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) measurement setup was installed at BL45XU in SPring-8. The system comprises of a short (specimen-to-sample distance about 50cm) vacuum path and a mosaic CCD detector. It covers a q-range of 0.02-2.5 nm-1. Using this setup, lipids in formalin-fixed rat brain were analyzed. A brain slice was moved across the X-ray beam with a step size of 0.5 mm to map reflections from lipids in various areas of brain. White matter that contains myelin gave strong lamellar reflections in the small-angle region which are often unisotropic. Gray matter shows only a central scatter in the small-angle region. In the wide angle region, both white and gray matters gave rise to sharp rings that are due to lateral packing of hydrocarbon chains in the lipid membranes. The relative intensities of these rings were different in white and gray matters, showing that the lateral arrangements of the lipids in bilayers are different.

  9. Maturation of metabolic connectivity of the adolescent rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hongyoon; Choi, Yoori; Kim, Kyu Wan; Kang, Hyejin; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, E Edmund; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging has been used to examine developmental changes of the brain. While PET studies revealed maturation-related changes, maturation of metabolic connectivity of the brain is not yet understood. Here, we show that rat brain metabolism is reconfigured to achieve long-distance connections with higher energy efficiency during maturation. Metabolism increased in anterior cerebrum and decreased in thalamus and cerebellum during maturation. When functional covariance patterns of PET images were examined, metabolic networks including default mode network (DMN) were extracted. Connectivity increased between the anterior and posterior parts of DMN and sensory-motor cortices during maturation. Energy efficiency, a ratio of connectivity strength to metabolism of a region, increased in medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortices. Our data revealed that metabolic networks mature to increase metabolic connections and establish its efficiency between large-scale spatial components from childhood to early adulthood. Neurodevelopmental diseases might be understood by abnormal reconfiguration of metabolic connectivity and efficiency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11571.001 PMID:26613413

  10. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  11. Phospholipase A2 and 3H-hemicholinium-3 binding sites in rat brain: A potential second-messenger role for fatty acids in the regulation of high-affinity choline uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Saltarelli, M.D.; Yamada, K.; Coyle, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and fatty acid release in the regulation of sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in rat brain was assessed in vitro through the use of the specific binding of 3H-hemicholinium-3 (3H-HCh-3). Addition of arachidonic acid and other unsaturated fatty acids to rat striatal membranes in vitro resulted in a dose-dependent, temperature-independent activation of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Scatchard analysis revealed that these changes in binding result from a 2-fold increase in the affinity and capacity of 3H-HCh-3 binding. Saturated fatty acids, lysophospholipids, and phospholipids did not affect specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Addition of defatted BSA to membranes, which had been treated previously with arachidonic acid, completely reversed the increase in specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. However, several inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism, including nordihydroguaiaretic acid, indomethacin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, did not alter arachidonic acid-induced changes in 3H-HCh-3 binding, suggesting that unsaturated fatty acids, and not their metabolites, are directly responsible for the observed activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding. Additionally, unsaturated fatty acids dose-dependently inhibited high-affinity 3H-choline uptake in rat striatal synaptosomes, apparently due to the disruption of synaptosomal integrity. The phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinacrine hydrochloride, trifluoperazine, and 4-bromophenacylbromide dose-dependently inhibited potassium depolarization-induced activation of specific 3H-HCh-3 binding in slices of rat brain in vitro. Similarly, both quinacrine and trifluoperazine inhibited the metabolism of phospholipids and the release of fatty acids evoked by either elevated KCl or calcium ionophore A23187.

  12. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  13. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg). Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM) to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%), no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22316420

  14. Abnormal fronto-striatal functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinping; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jiaojian; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the relatively selective depletion of dopamine in the striatum, which consequently leads to dysfunctions in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuitries. It has been shown that the most common cognitive deficits in PD patients are related to the fronto-striatal circuits. In PD, most previous functional connectivity studies have been performed using seed-based methods to identify the brain regions that are abnormally connected to one or more seeds, but these cannot be used to quantify the interactions between one region and all other regions in a particular network. Functional connectivity degree, which is a measurement that can be used to quantify the functional or structural connectivity of a complex brain network, was adopted in this study to assess the interactions of the fronto-striatal network. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients had significantly decreased total functional connectivity degree for the left putamen and the right globus pallidum in fronto-striatal networks. Additionally, negative correlations between the fronto-pallial functional connectivity degree (i.e., the right globus pallidum with the left middle frontal gyrus, and with the right triangular part of inferior frontal gyrus) and disease duration were observed in PD patients. The results of this study demonstrate that fronto-striatal functional connectivity is abnormal in patients with PD and indicate that these deficits might be the result of motor and cognitive dysfunctions in PD patients. PMID:26724369

  15. Continuous and simultaneous electrochemical measurements of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain following brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuqing; Yu, Ping; Hao, Jie; Wang, Yuexiang; Ohsaka, Takeo; Mao, Lanqun

    2014-04-15

    Developing new tools and technologies to enable recording the dynamic changes of multiple neurochemicals is the essence of better understanding of the molecular basis of brain functions. This study demonstrates a microfluidic chip-based online electrochemical system (OECS) for in vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain. To fabricate the microfluidic chip-based detecting system, a microfluidic chip with patterned channel is developed into an electrochemical flow cell by incorporating the chip with three surface-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes as working electrodes, a Ag/AgCl wire as reference electrode, and a stainless steel tube as counter electrode. Selective detection of ascorbate is achieved by the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to largely facilitate the electrochemical oxidation of ascorbate, while a dehydrogenase-based biosensing mechanism with methylene green (MG) adsorbed onto SWNTs as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of dihydronicotiamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed for biosensing of glucose and lactate. To avoid the crosstalk among three sensors, the sensor alignment is carefully designed with the SWNT-modified electrode in the upstream channel and paralleled glucose and lactate biosensors in the downstream channels. With the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell as the detector, an OECS is successfully established by directly integrating the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell with in vivo microdialysis. The OECS exhibits a good linear response toward glucose, lactate, and ascorbate with less crosstalk. This property, along with the high stability and selectivity, enables the OECS for continuously monitoring three species in rat brain following brain ischemia. PMID:24621127

  16. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  17. Autoradiographic comparison of the distribution of the neutral endopeptidase enkephalinase and of. mu. and delta opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.

    1986-03-01

    The neutral endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11, also designated enkephalinase, has been visualized by in vitro autoradiography using the tritiated inhibitor (/sup 3/H)-N-((2RS)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxopropyl)glycine, ((/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly). Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly corresponding to 85% of the total binding to brain slices was inhibited by 1 ..mu..M thiorphan, a selective inhibitor of enkephalinase, but remained unchanged in the presence of captopril, a selective inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme. Very high levels of (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding were found in the choroid plexus and the substantia nigra. High levels were present in the caudate putamen, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The distribution of enkephalinase was compared to that of ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors, selectively labeled with (/sup 3/H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-glycinol and (/sup 3/H)Try-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr, respectively. In the caudate putamen, (/sup 3/H)HACBO-Gly binding overlapped the clustered ..mu.. sites but appeared more closely related to the diffusely distributed delta sites. The association of enkephalinase with delta and ..mu.. opioid receptors in these areas is consistent with the observed role of the enzyme in regulating the effects of opioid peptides in striatal dopamine release and analgesia, respectively. Except for the choroid plexus and the cerebellum, the close similarity observed in numerous rat brain areas between the distribution of enkephalinase and that of ..mu.. and/ or delta opioid binding sites could account for most of the pharmacological effects elicited by enkephalinase inhibitors.

  18. Voltammetric detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine release in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C; Petrovic, Jelena; Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R M

    2009-11-15

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important molecule in the brain that is implicated in mood and emotional processes. In vivo, its dynamic release and uptake kinetics are poorly understood due to a lack of analytical techniques for its rapid measurement. Whereas fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon fiber microelectrodes is used frequently to monitor subsecond dopamine release in freely moving and anesthetized rats, the electrooxidation of 5-HT forms products that quickly polymerize and irreversibly coat the carbon electrode surface. Previously described modifications of the electrochemical waveform allow stable and sensitive 5-HT measurements in mammalian tissue slice preparations and in the brain of fruit fly larvae. For in vivo applications in mammals, however, the problem of electrode deterioration persists. We identify the root of this problem to be fouling by extracellular metabolites such as 5-hydoxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), which is present in 200-1000 times the concentration of 5-HT and displays similar electrochemical properties, including filming of the electrode surface. To impede access of the 5-HIAA to the electrode surface, a thin layer of Nafion, a cation exchange polymer, has been electrodeposited onto cylindrical carbon-fiber microelectrodes. The presence of the Nafion film was confirmed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and was demonstrated by the diminution of the voltammetric signals for 5-HIAA as well as other common anionic species. The modified microelectrodes also display increased sensitivity to 5-HT, yielding a characteristic cyclic voltammogram that is easily distinguishable from other common electroactive brain species. The thickness of the Nafion coating and a diffusion coefficient (D) in the film for 5-HT were evaluated by measuring permeation through Nafion. In vivo, we used physiological, anatomical, and pharmacological evidence to validate the signal as 5-HT. Using Nafion-modified microelectrodes, we present the

  19. Biogenic monoamine uptake by rat brain synaptosomes during aging. Effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G

    1994-09-01

    1. In experiments on young (3-5-month-old), adult (10-11-month-old) and old (21-22-month-old) rats, it was found that significant age-related changes occurred in the high-affinity uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) by cortical and striatal synaptosomes. 2. Changes in DA, NA and 5-HT uptake during aging are suggested to be neurochemical correlates of cognition and memory deficits that develops in senescence. 3. The in vitro effects of the nootropic drugs piracetam, aniracetam, meclofenoxate and adafenoxate on the DA, NA and 5-HT uptake by cortical and striatal synaptosomes from young rats were studied. Administered in increasing concentrations (1 x 10(-4) to 5 x 10(-3) M) these drugs inhibited monoamine uptake. 4. Adafenoxate proved to be a more potent monoamine uptake inhibitor than the other three drugs; it inhibited the uptake in the frontal cortex and striatum without selectivity for either monoaminergic system. It is suggested that adafenoxate affects cognition through the involvement of central neurotransmission and particularly through the inhibition of monoamine uptake systems. PMID:7835648

  20. TOF-SIMS imaging of lipids on rat brain sections.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Since several decades, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) coupled to time of flight (TOF) is used for atomic or small inorganic/organic fragments imaging on different materials. With the advent of polyatomic ion sources leading to a significant increase of sensitivity in combination with a reasonable spatial resolution (1-10 μm), TOF-SIMS is becoming a more and more popular analytical platform for MS imaging. Even if this technique is limited to small molecules (typically below 1,000 Da), it offers enough sensitivity to detect and locate various classes of lipids directly on the surface of tissue sections. This chapter is thus dedicated to the TOF-SIMS analysis of lipids in positive and negative ion modes on rat brain tissue sections using a bismuth cluster ion source. PMID:25361663

  1. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  2. Neonatal Hypoxic/Ischemic Brain Injury Induces Production of Calretinin-Expressing Interneurons in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHENGANG; YOU, YAN; LEVISON, STEVEN W.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-induced striatal neurogenesis from progenitors in the adjacent subventricular zone (SVZ) in young and adult rodents has been reported. However, it has not been established whether the precursors that reside in the SVZ retain the capacity to produce the full range of striatal neurons that has been destroyed. By using a neonatal rat model of hypoxic/ischemic brain damage, we show here that virtually all of the newly produced striatal neurons are calretinin (CR)-immunoreactive (+), but not DARPP-32+, calbindin-D-28K+, parvalbumin+, somatostatin+, or choline acetyltransferase+. Retroviral fate-mapping studies confirm that these newly born CR++neurons are indeed descendants of the SVZ. Our studies indicate that, although the postnatal SVZ has the capacity to produce a range of neurons, only a subset of this repertoire is manifested in the brain after injury. PMID:18720478

  3. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients. PMID:27235733

  4. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  5. Brain Pathology in Adult Rats Treated With Domoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A C; Alemañ, N; Cifuentes, J M; Bermúdez, R; Peña, M López; Botana, L M

    2015-11-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin reported to produce damage to the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory. The authors inoculated rats intraperitoneally with an effective toxic dose of DA to study the distribution of the toxin in major internal organs by using immunohistochemistry, as well as to evaluate the induced pathology by means of histopathologic and immunohistochemical methods at different time points after toxin administration (6, 10, and 24 hours; 5 and 54 days). DA was detected by immunohistochemistry exclusively in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus at 6 and 10 hours after dosing. Lesions induced by DA were prominent at 5 days following treatment in selected regions of the brain: hippocampus, amygdala, piriform and perirhinal cortices, olfactory tubercle, septal nuclei, and thalamus. The authors found 2 types of lesions: delayed death of selective neurons and large areas of necrosis, both accompanied by astrocytosis and microgliosis. At 54 days after DA exposure, the pathology was characterized by still-distinguishable dying neurons, calcified lesions in the thalamus, persistent astrocytosis, and pronounced microgliosis. The expression of nitric oxide synthases suggests a role for nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and chronic inflammation induced by DA in the brain. PMID:25939577

  6. Expression and distribution of TRPV2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nedungadi, Thekkethil Prashant; Dutta, Mayurika; Bathina, Chandra Sekhar; Caterina, Michael J; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are non-selective cation channels that mediate sensory transduction. The neuroanatomical localization and the physiological roles of isoform TRPV2 in the rodent brain are largely unknown. We report here the neuroanatomical distribution of TRPV2 in the adult male rat brain focusing on the hypothalamus and hindbrain regions involved in osmoregulation, autonomic function and energy metabolism. For this we utilized immunohistochemistry combined with brightfield microscopy. In the forebrain, the densest immunostaining was seen in both the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and the magnocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. TRPV2 immunoreactivity was also seen in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus and the subfornical organ, in addition to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH), the medial forebrain bundle, the cingulate cortex and the globus pallidus to name a few. In the hindbrain, intense staining was seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract, hypoglossal nucleus, nucleus ambiguous, and the rostral division of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and some mild staining in the area prostrema. To ascertain the specificity of the TRPV2 antibody used in this paper, we compared the TRPV2 immunoreactivity of wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mouse brain tissue. Double immunostaining with arginine vasopressin (AVP) using confocal microscopy showed a high degree of colocalization of TRPV2 in the magnocellular SON and PVN. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) we also show that AVP neurons in the SON contain TRPV2 mRNA. TRPV2 was also co-localized with dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) in the NTS and the RVLM of the hindbrain. Based on our results, TRPV2 may play an important role in several CNS networks that regulate body fluid homeostasis, autonomic function, and metabolism. PMID:22750329

  7. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate. PMID:8186256

  8. Tannic acid alleviates lead acetate-induced neurochemical perturbations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashafaq, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Vishnoi, Shruti; Salman, Mohd; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-23

    Oxidative stress has been projected as a promising mechanism involved in lead exposure. The lead predisposition catalyzes oxidative reactions and generates reactive oxygen species. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of tannic acid (TA) on behavioral deficit, antioxidative deterioration induced by lead acetate (LA) exposure on experimental rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with 50mg/kg body weight of LA and TA for three times a week for two weeks. Our data showed LA-induced profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl observed in LA treated rats, whereas significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants, enzymatic antioxidants, neurotoxicity biomarker and histological changes were observed in LA treated rat brain. However, TA administration restored antioxidant status of brain significantly when compared to control. Our results demonstrate that TA exhibits potent antioxidant properties and suppresses oxidative damages in rat brain induced by LA treatment. These findings were further supported by the neurotoxicity biomarker and histopathological findings in the brain tissue showed that TA protected tissue from deleterious effects of LA exposure. It is concluded, these data suggest that LA induces oxidative stress and supplementation of TA has a powerful antioxidant effect, and it protected rat brain from poisonous effect of LA exposure in experimental rat. PMID:26851560

  9. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. (U-/sup 14/C)Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

  10. The Effects of Shilajit on Brain Edema, Intracranial Pressure and Neurologic Outcomes following the Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Mahmmodi, Reza; Shahrokhi, Nader; Shabani, Mohammad; Joukar, Siavash; Aqapour, Mobin

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Brain edema is one of the most serious causes of death within the first few days after trauma brain injury (TBI). In this study we have investigated the role of Shilajit on brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, intracranial pressure (ICP) and neurologic outcomes following brain trauma. Materials and Methods: Diffuse traumatic brain trauma was induced in rats by drop of a 250 g weight from a 2 m high (Marmarou’s methods). Animals were randomly divided into 5 groups including sham, TBI, TBI-vehicle, TBI-Shi150 group and TBI-Shi250 group. Rats were undergone intraperitoneal injection of Shilajit and vehicle at 1, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma. Brain water content, BBB permeability, ICP and neurologic outcomes were finally measured. Results: Brain water and Evans blue dye contents showed significant decrease in Shilajit-treated groups compared to the TBI-vehicle and TBI groups. Intracranial pressure at 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma had significant reduction in Shilajit-treated groups as compared to TBI-vehicle and TBI groups (P<0.001). The rate of neurologic outcomes improvement at 4, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma showed significant increase in Shilajit-treated groups in comparison to theTBI- vehicle and TBI groups (P <0.001). Conclusion: The present results indicated that Shilajit may cause in improvement of neurologic outcomes through decreasing brain edema, disrupting of BBB, and ICP after the TBI. PMID:23997917

  11. Rat strain differences in brain structure and neurochemistry in response to binge alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Dirk; Rohlfing, Torsten; Hsu, Oliver; Vinco, Shara; Orduna, Juan; Luong, Richard; Bell, Richard L; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Ventricular enlargement is a robust phenotype of the chronically dependent alcoholic human brain, yet the mechanism of ventriculomegaly is unestablished. Heterogeneous stock Wistar rats administered binge EtOH (3 g/kg intragastrically every 8 h for 4 days to average blood alcohol levels (BALs) of 250 mg/dL) demonstrate profound but reversible ventricular enlargement and changes in brain metabolites (e.g., N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline-containing compounds (Cho)). Objectives Here, alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats systematically bred from heterogeneous stock Wistar rats for differential alcohol drinking behavior were compared with Wistar rats to determine whether genetic divergence and consequent morphological and neurochemical variation affect the brain’s response to binge EtOH treatment. Methods The three rat lines were dosed equivalently and approached similar BALs. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy evaluated the effects of binge EtOH on brain. Results As observed in Wistar rats, P and NP rats showed decreases in NAA. Neither P nor NP rats, however, responded to EtOH intoxication with ventricular expansion or increases in Cho levels as previously noted in Wistar rats. Increases in ventricular volume correlated with increases in Cho in Wistar rats. Conclusions The latter finding suggests that ventricular volume expansion is related to adaptive changes in brain cell membranes in response to binge EtOH. That P and NP rats responded differently to EtOH argues for intrinsic differences in their brain cell membrane composition. Further, differential metabolite responses to EtOH administration by rat strain implicate selective genetic variation as underlying heterogeneous effects of chronic alcoholism in the human condition. PMID:24030467

  12. Effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on blood-brain barrier permeability in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-12-01

    During the last several decades, numerous studies have been performed aiming at the question of whether or not exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) influences the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of RFR on the permeability of BBB in male and female Wistar albino rats. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were analyzed separately in the study. Rats were exposed to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz continuous-wave (CW) RFR for 20 min (at SARs of 4.26 mW/kg and 1.46 mW/kg, respectively) while under anesthesia. Control rats were sham-exposed. Disruption of BBB integrity was detected spectrophotometrically using the Evans-blue dye, which has been used as a BBB tracer and is known to be bound to serum albumin. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were evaluated for BBB permeability. In female rats, no albumin extravasation was found in in the brain after RFR exposure. A significant increase in albumin was found in the brains of the RF-exposed male rats when compared to sham-exposed male brains. These results suggest that exposure to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz CW RFR at levels below the international limits can affect the vascular permeability in the brain of male rats. The possible risk of RFR exposure in humans is a major concern for the society. Thus, this topic should be investigated more thoroughly in the future. PMID:22047463

  13. EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA AND HYPERTHERMIA PLUS MICROWAVES ON RAT BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia, alone and in conjunction with microwave exposure, on brain energetics were studied in anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of temperature on adenosine triphosphate concentration (ATP) and creatine phosphate concentration (CP) was determi...

  14. Low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes caused by sodium fluoride exposure in rat's developmental brain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunyang; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fluorine, a toxic and reactive element, is widely prevalent throughout the environment and can induce toxicity when absorbed into the body. This study was to explore the possible mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity in rats treated with different levels of sodium fluoride (NaF). The rats' intelligence, as well as changes in neuronal morphology, glucose absorption, and functional gene expression within the brain were determined using the Morris water maze test, transmission electron microscopy, small-animal magnetic resonance imaging and Positron emission tomography and computed tomography, and Western blotting techniques. We found that NaF treatment-impaired learning and memory in these rats. Furthermore, NaF caused neuronal degeneration, decreased brain glucose utilization, decreased the protein expression of glucose transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat brains. The developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride may be closely associated with low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes. PMID:23982469

  15. Dual ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule on dopamine in rat models of Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Anyuan

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key neuromodulator in the brain that supports motor and cognitive functions. Here, we use apomorphine (Apo) and 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) to develop two rat models of Tourette's syndrome (TS), a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by stereotyped repetitive involuntary tics. The models enabled the assessment of unique ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule (NDG), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparation dedicated to the treatment of TS, on the striatal DA content of rats. By using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we found that long-term administration of NDG could, at least partially, restore the striatal dopamine alterations, either by increasing them after IDPN treatment or by decreasing them after Apo treatment. Taken together, our data indicated that NDG could ameliorate the abnormal striatal DA content dually, and the unique therapeutic property may be meaningful for the treatment of TS. PMID:25592875

  16. Striatal Circuits as a Common Node for Autism Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fuccillo, Marc V.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by two seemingly unrelated symptom domains—deficits in social interactions and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavioral output. Whether the diverse nature of ASD symptomatology represents distributed dysfunction of brain networks or abnormalities within specific neural circuits is unclear. Striatal dysfunction is postulated to underlie the repetitive motor behaviors seen in ASD, and neurological and brain-imaging studies have supported this assumption. However, as our appreciation of striatal function expands to include regulation of behavioral flexibility, motivational state, goal-directed learning, and attention, we consider whether alterations in striatal physiology are a central node mediating a range of autism-associated behaviors, including social and cognitive deficits that are hallmarks of the disease. This review investigates multiple genetic mouse models of ASD to explore whether abnormalities in striatal circuits constitute a common pathophysiological mechanism in the development of autism-related behaviors. Despite the heterogeneity of genetic insult investigated, numerous genetic ASD models display alterations in the structure and function of striatal circuits, as well as abnormal behaviors including repetitive grooming, stereotypic motor routines, deficits in social interaction and decision-making. Comparative analysis in rodents provides a unique opportunity to leverage growing genetic association data to reveal canonical neural circuits whose dysfunction directly contributes to discrete aspects of ASD symptomatology. The description of such circuits could provide both organizing principles for understanding the complex genetic etiology of ASD as well as novel treatment routes. Furthermore, this focus on striatal mechanisms of behavioral regulation may also prove useful for exploring the pathogenesis of other neuropsychiatric diseases, which display overlapping behavioral deficits with ASD

  17. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  18. Iron-induced Necrotic Brain Cell Death in Rats with Different Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingzhe; Du, Hanjian; Ni, Wei; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron overload has a key role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our recent study demonstrated that ICH-induced brain injury was greater in low capacity runner (LCR) than in high capacity runner (HCR) rats. The present study examines whether iron-induced brain injury differs between LCRs and HCRs. Adult male LCR and HCR rats had an intracaudate injection of iron or saline. Rats were euthanized at 2 and at 24 hours after T2 magnetic resonance imaging and the brains were used for immunostaining and Western blotting. LCRs had more hemispheric swelling, T2 lesion volumes, blood-brain barrier disruption and neuronal death at 24 hours after iron injection (p < 0.05). Many propidium iodide (PI) positive cells, indicative of necrotic cell death, were observed in the ipsilateral basal ganglia of both HCRs and LCRs at 2 hours after iron injection. PI fluorescence intensity was higher in LCRs than in HCRs. In addition, membrane attack complex (MAC) expression was increased at 2 hours after iron injection and was higher in LCRs than in HCRs. The PI positive cells colocalized with MAC positive cells in the ipsilateral basal ganglia. Iron induces more severe necrotic brain cell death, brain swelling, and blood-brain barrier disruption in LCR rats, which may be related with complement activation and MAC formation. PMID:25649272

  19. Expression of aquaporin-4 and pathological characteristics of brain injury in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENGCHENG; CHEN, JIANQIANG; LU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a widely distributed membrane protein, which is found in glial cells, ependymocytes and capillary endothelial cells in the brain, and particularly in the choroid plexus. AQP4 is a key regulator of water metabolism, and changes in its expression following brain injury are associated with pathological changes in the damaged side of the brain; however, the effects of brain injury on AQP4 and injury-induced pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and changes in brain water content, the expression of AQP4 expression and pathological characteristics in the damaged and contralateral non-damaged sides of the brain were examined. In the damaged side of the brain, vasogenic edema appeared first, followed by cellular edema. The aggravated cellular edema in the damaged side of the brain resulted in two periods of peak edema severity. Pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain occurred later than those in the damaged side; cellular edema appeared first, followed by vasogenic edema, which was alleviated earlier than the cellular edema. AQP4 was downregulated during vasogenic edema, and upregulated during cellular edema. Taken together, these results suggested that the downregulation of AQP4 was a result of vasogenic edema and that the upregulation of AQP4 may have induced cellular edema. PMID:26459070

  20. Effects of Chronic Renal Failure on Brain Cytochrome P450 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Naud, Judith; Harding, Jessica; Lamarche, Caroline; Beauchemin, Stephanie; Leblond, Francois A; Pichette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) impedes renal excretion of drugs and their metabolism by reducing the expression of liver cytochrome P450 (P450). Uremic serum contains factors, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), that decrease liver P450s. The P450s are also involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics in the brain. This study investigates: 1) the effects of CRF on rat brain P450, 2) the role of PTH in the downregulation of brain P450s in CRF rats, and 3) the effects of PTH on P450s in astrocytes. Protein and mRNA expression of P450s were assessed in the brain of CRF and control (CTL) rats, as well as from CTL or CRF rats that underwent parathyroidectomy (PTX) 1 week before nephrectomy. CYP3A activity was measured using 3-[(3, 4-difluorobenzyl) oxy]-5, 5-dimethyl-4-[4-methylsulfonyl) phenyl] furan-2(5H)-1 metabolism in brain microsomal preparation. CYP3A protein expression was assessed in primary cultured astrocytes incubated with serum obtained from CRF or CTL rats or with PTH. Significant downregulations (≥40%) of CYP1A, CYP2C11, and CYP3A proteins were observed in microsomes from CRF rat brains. CYP3A activity reduction was also observed. CYP3A expression and activity were unaffected in PTX-pretreated CRF rats. Serum of PTX-treated CRF rats had no impact on CYP3A levels in astrocytes compared with that of untreated CRF rats. Finally, PTH addition to normal calf serum induced a reduction in CYP3A protein similar to CRF serum, suggesting that CRF-induced hyperparathyroidism is associated with a significant decrease in P450 drug-metabolizing enzymes in the brain, which may have implications in drug response. PMID:27271372

  1. The effects in rats of lisdexamfetamine in combination with olanzapine on mesocorticolimbic dopamine efflux, striatal dopamine D2 receptor occupancy and stimulus generalization to a D-amphetamine cue.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Rowley, Helen L; Gosden, James; Kulkarni, Rajiv S; Slater, Nigel; Love, Patrick L; Wang, Yiyun; Heal, David

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia is poorly understood and two principle hypotheses have dominated the field. Firstly, that subcortical dopamine function is enhanced while cortical dopamine function is reduced and secondly, that cortical glutamate systems are dysfunctional. It is also widely accepted that currently used antipsychotics have essentially no impact on cognitive deficits and persistent negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Reduced dopamine transmission via dopamine D1 receptors in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesized to be involved in the aetiology of these symptom domains and enhancing cortical dopamine transmission within an optimal window has been suggested to be potentially beneficial. In these pre-clinical studies we have determined that combined administration of the d-amphetamine pro-drug, lisdexamfetamine and the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine increased dopamine efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens to an extent greater than either drug given separately without affecting olanzapine's ability to block striatal dopamine D2 receptors which is important for its antipsychotic activity. Furthermore, in an established rodent model used to compare the subjective effects of novel compounds the ability of lisdexamfetamine to generalize to a d-amphetamine cue was dose-dependently attenuated when co-administered with olanzapine suggesting that lisdexamfetamine may produce less marked subjective effects when administered adjunctively with olanzapine. PMID:26384654

  2. MRI Reveals Edema in Larynx (But Not in Brain) During Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Ichiro; Tanida, Mamoru; Wang, Mofei; Kurata, Yasutaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylactic shock is sometimes accompanied by local interstitial edema due to increased vascular permeability. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare edema in the larynx and brain of anesthetized rats during anaphylactic hypotension versus vasodilator-induced hypotension. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to hypotension induced by the ovalbumin antigen (n=7) or a vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; n=7). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-relaxation time (T2RT) were quantified on MRI performed repeatedly for up to 68 min after the injection of either agent. The presence of laryngeal edema was also examined by histological examination. Separately, the occurrence of brain edema was assessed by measuring brain water content using the wet/dry method in rats with anaphylaxis (n=5) or SNP (n=5) and the non-hypotensive control rats (n=5). Mast cells in hypothalamus were morphologically examined. Results Mean arterial blood pressure similarly decreased to 35 mmHg after an injection of the antigen or SNP. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (as reflected by elevated T2RT) was found in the larynx as early as 13 min after an injection of the antigen, but not SNP. A postmortem histological examination revealed epiglottic edema in the rats with anaphylaxis, but not SNP. In contrast, no significant changes in T2RT or ADC were detectable in the brains of any rats studied. In separate experiments, the quantified brain water content did not increase in either anaphylaxis or SNP rats, as compared with the non-hypotensive control rats. The numbers of mast cells with metachromatic granules in the hypothalamus were not different between rats with anaphylaxis and SNP, suggesting the absence of anaphylactic reaction in hypothalamus. Conclusion Edema was detected using the MRI technique in the larynx during rat anaphylaxis, but not in the brain. PMID:24179686

  3. Morphological and cellular changes within embryonic striatal grafts associated with enriched environment and involuntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Döbrössy, Máté D; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2006-12-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) and exercise have been implicated in influencing behaviour and altering neuronal processes associated with cellular morphology in both 'normal' and injured states of the CNS. Using a rodent model of Huntington's disease, we investigated whether prolonged EE or involuntary exercise can induce morphological and cellular changes within embryonic striatal transplants. Adult rats were trained on the Staircase test--requiring fine motor control to reach and collect reward pellets--prior to being lesioned unilaterally in the dorsal neostriatum with quinolinic acid. The lesioned animals received E15 whole ganglionic eminence cell suspension grafts followed by housing in EE or standard cages. Half of the animals in standard cages received daily forced exercise on a treadmill. The grafted animals showed significant functional recovery on both the Staircase test and in drug-induced rotation. Neither the housing conditions nor the training had an impact on the behaviour, with the exception of the treadmill reducing the ipsilateral drug-induced rotation observed amongst the lesioned animals. However, the animals housed in the EE had significantly increased striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, and graft neurons in these animals exhibited both greater spine densities and larger cell volumes. Animals on forced exercise regime had reduced BDNF levels and grafted cells with sparser spines. The study suggests that the context of the animal can affect the plasticity of transplanted cells. Appropriately exploiting the underlying, and yet unknown, mechanisms could lead the way to improved anatomical and potentially functional integration of the graft. PMID:17156383

  4. Effect of MCI-186 on ischemia-induced changes in monoamine metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Itoh, Y; Nishibori, M; Watanabe, T; Nishi, H; Saeki, K

    1989-11-01

    We examined the effects of MCI-186 (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a novel free radical scavenger and an inhibitor of ischemia-induced brain edema, on monoamine metabolism in the brains of both normal and ischemic rats. In normal rats, 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186, a dose that prevents ischemic brain edema, had no significant effect on brain concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or their metabolites. After the injection of 5 microliters of 3% polyvinyl acetate into the left internal carotid artery, concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid markedly increased, but that of norepinephrine decreased, in the left telencephalon of embolized rats compared with control rats injected with vehicle; the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid also increased slightly. These effects were maximal 2 hours after embolization. The turnover rate of dopamine between 6 and 8 hours after embolization was significantly higher but that of norepinephrine was slightly lower than that in vehicle-treated rats. When rats were treated with 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186 immediately after the injection of polyvinyl acetate, the embolization-induced changes in monoamine metabolism were less marked. Our results suggest that MCI-186 attenuates ischemia-induced changes in brain monoamine metabolism, probably due to its free radical scavenging action, although it has no marked effect in normal rats. PMID:2815191

  5. Population-averaged diffusion tensor imaging atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veraart, Jelle; Leergaard, Trygve B; Antonsen, Bjørnar T; Van Hecke, Wim; Blockx, Ines; Jeurissen, Ben; Jiang, Yi; Van der Linden, Annemie; Johnson, G Allan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-10-15

    Rats are widely used in experimental neurobiological research, and rat brain atlases are important resources for identifying brain regions in the context of experimental microsurgery, tissue sampling, and neuroimaging, as well as comparison of findings across experiments. Currently, most available rat brain atlases are constructed from histological material derived from single specimens, and provide two-dimensional or three-dimensional (3D) outlines of diverse brain regions and fiber tracts. Important limitations of such atlases are that they represent individual specimens, and that finer details of tissue architecture are lacking. Access to more detailed 3D brain atlases representative of a population of animals is needed. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique neuroimaging modality that provides sensitive information about orientation structure in tissues, and is widely applied in basic and clinical neuroscience investigations. To facilitate analysis and assignment of location in rat brain neuroimaging investigations, we have developed a population-averaged three-dimensional DTI atlas of the normal adult Sprague Dawley rat brain. The atlas is constructed from high resolution ex vivo DTI images, which were nonlinearly warped into a population-averaged in vivo brain template. The atlas currently comprises a selection of manually delineated brain regions, the caudate-putamen complex, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, external capsule, corpus callosum, internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fimbria of the hippocampus, fornix, anterior commisure, optic tract, and stria terminalis. The atlas is freely distributed and potentially useful for several purposes, including automated and manual delineation of rat brain structural and functional imaging data. PMID:21749925

  6. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  7. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  8. Rat brain endothelial cells are a target of manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marreilha dos Santos, Ana Paula; Milatovic, Dejan; Au, Catherine; Yin, Zhaobao; Batoreu, Maria Camila C.; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal, however exposure to high Mn levels can result in neurodegenerative changes resembling Parkinson´s disease (PD). Information on Mn´s effects on endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is lacking. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that BBB endothelial cells are a primary target for Mn-induced neurotoxicity. The studies were conducted in an in vitro BBB model of immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells. ROS production was determined by F2-Isoprostane (F2-IsoPs) measurement. The relationship between Mn toxicity and redox status was investigated upon intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion with diethylmaleate (DEM) or L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mn exposure (200 or 800 µM MnCl2 or MnSO4) for 4 or 24h led to significant decrease in cell viability vs. controls. DEM or BSO pre-treatment led to further enhancement in cytotoxicity vs. exposure to Mn alone, with more pronounced cell death after 24h DEM pre-treatment. F2-IsoPs levels in cells exposed to MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM), were significantly increased after 4h and remained elevated 24h after exposure compared with controls. Consistent with the effects on cell viability and F2-IsoPs, treatment with MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM) was also associated with a significant decrease in membrane potential. This effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to DEM plus MnCl2 vs. cells exposed to Mn alone. We conclude that Mn induces direct injury to mitochondria in RBE4 cells. The ensuing impairment in energy metabolism and redox status may modify the restrictive properties of the BBB compromising its function. PMID:20170646

  9. Upregulation of gene expression in reward-modulatory striatal opioid systems by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity 'epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food 'snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding. PMID:23864029

  10. Upregulation of Gene Expression in Reward-Modulatory Striatal Opioid Systems by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity ‘epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food ‘snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding. PMID:23864029

  11. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Servatius, Richard J.; Marx, Christine E.; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D.; Naylor, Jennifer C.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration. PMID:27616978

  12. Does bosentan protect diabetic brain alterations in rats? The role of endothelin-1 in the diabetic brain.

    PubMed

    Demir, Recep; Cadirci, Elif; Akpinar, Erol; Cayir, Yasemin; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik; Un, Harun; Kunak, Celalettin Semih; Yayla, Muhammed; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Demir, Ilknur

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major problem all over the world, affecting more people in recent years. Individuals with diabetes are more prone to disease than non-diabetics, especially vascular complications. The aim of this study was to examine the roles of the endothelin (ET)-1 in brain damage formed in a streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model, and the effect of bosentan, which is the non-specific ET1 receptor blocker in the prevention of the diabetes-induced brain damage. To examine the effects of bosentan (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) in this study, the rats were given the drug for 3 months. The rats were divided into four groups: the sham group (n = 10), the diabetic control group (n = 10), the group of diabetic rats given bosentan 50 mg/kg (n = 10) and the group of diabetic rats given bosentan 100 mg/kg (n = 10). Diabetes was induced in the rats by STZ (60 mg/kg i.p.). On day 91, all rats were killed. Brain tissues of the rats were measured by molecular, biochemical and histopathological methods. Antioxidant levels in the therapy groups were observed as quite near to the values in the healthy group. In this study, while the brain eNOS levels in the diabetic groups decreased, the ET1 and iNOS levels were found to be increased. However, in the diabetes group, hippocampus and cerebellum, pericellular oedema and a number of neuronal cytoretraction were increased in neuropiles, whereas these results were decreased in the therapy group. Based on all of these results, ET1 will not be ignored in diabetes-induced cerebral complications. PMID:25200216

  13. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Servatius, Richard J; Marx, Christine E; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D; Naylor, Jennifer C; Pang, Kevin C H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration. PMID:27616978

  14. Neural stem cell protects aged rat brain from ischemia–reperfusion injury through neurogenesis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) show therapeutic potential for ischemia in young-adult animals. However, the effect of aging on NSC therapy is largely unknown. In this work, NSCs were transplanted into aged (24-month-old) and young-adult (3-month-old) rats at 1 day after stroke. Infarct volume and neurobehavioral outcomes were examined. The number of differentiated NSCs was compared in aged and young-adult ischemic rats and angiogenesis and neurogenesis were also determined. We found that aged rats developed larger infarcts than young-adult rats after ischemia (P<0.05). The neurobehavioral outcome was also worse for aged rats comparing with young-adult rats. Brain infarction and neurologic deficits were attenuated after NSC transplantation in both aged and young-adult rats. The number of survived NSCs in aged rats was similar to that of the young-adult rats (P>0.05) and most of them were differentiated into glial fibrillary acidic protein+ (GFAP+) cells. More importantly, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were greatly enhanced in both aged and young-adult rats after transplantation compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (P<0.05), accompanied by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results showed that NSC therapy reduced ischemic brain injury, along with increased angiogenesis and neurogenesis in aged rats, suggesting that aging-related microenvironment does not preclude a beneficial response to NSCs transplantation during cerebral ischemia. PMID:24714034

  15. Iodine-125-labeled triiodothyronine in rat brain: evidence for localization in discrete neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dratman, M.B.; Futaesaku, Y.; Crutchfield, F.L.; Berman, N.; Payne, B.; Sar, M.; Stumpf, W.E.

    1982-01-15

    Autoradiograms prepared from adult rat brains demonstrate that nerve cells and neuropil in different brain regions selectively concentrate and retain intravenously administered triiodothyronine, by mechanisms susceptible to saturation with excess triiodothyronine. A neuroregulatory role for thyroid hormones, strongly supported by the observations, may account for their marked effects on behavior and the activity of the autonomic nervous system.

  16. Enhancement of Sexual Behavior in Female Rats by Neonatal Transplantation of Brain Tissue from Males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendash, Gary W.; Gorski, Roger A.

    1982-09-01

    Transplantation of preoptic tissue from male rat neonates into the preoptic area of female littermates increased masculine and feminine sexual behavior in the recipients during adulthood. This suggests that functional connections develop between the transplanted neural tissue and the host brain. A new intraparenchymal brain transplantation technique was used to achieve these results.

  17. Congenital Viral Infections of the Brain: Lessons Learned from Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Perlman, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, however, does not suffer from this limitation. LCMV is a well-known human pathogen. When the infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus can infect the fetus, and the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. Children with congenital LCMV infection often have substantial neurological deficits. The neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV is a superb model system of human congenital LCMV infection. Virtually all of the neuropathologic changes observed in humans congenitally infected with LCMV, including microencephaly, encephalomalacia, chorioretinitis, porencephalic cysts, neuronal migration disturbances, periventricular infection, and cerebellar hypoplasia, are reproduced in the rat model. Within the developing rat brain, LCMV selectively targets mitotically active neuronal precursors. Thus, the targets of infection and sites of pathology depend on host age at the time of infection. The rat model has further shown that the pathogenic changes induced by LCMV infection are both virus-mediated and immune-mediated. Furthermore, different brain regions simultaneously infected with LCMV can undergo widely different pathologic changes, reflecting different brain region–virus–immune system interactions. Because the neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV so faithfully reproduces the diverse neuropathology observed in the human counterpart, the rat model system is a highly valuable tool for the study of congenital LCMV infection and of all prenatal brain infections In addition, because LCMV induces delayed

  18. High-strain-rate brain injury model using submerged acute rat brain tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Lee, Sung J; Hong, Yu; King, Michael A; Subhash, Ghatu; Kwon, Jiwoon; Moore, David F

    2012-01-20

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has received increasing attention in recent years due to ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sudden impacts or explosive blasts generate stress and pressure waves that propagate at high velocities and affect sensitive neurological tissues. The immediate soft tissue response to these stress waves is difficult to assess using current in vivo imaging technologies. However, these stress waves and resultant stretching and shearing of tissue within the nano- to microsecond time scale of blast and impact are likely to cause initial injury. To visualize the effects of stress wave loading, we have developed a new ex vivo model in which living tissue slices from rat brain, attached to a ballistic gelatin substrate, were subjected to high-strain-rate loads using a polymer split Hopkinson pressure bar (PSHPB) with real-time high-speed imaging. In this study, average peak fluid pressure within the test chamber reached a value of 1584±63.3 psi. Cavitation due to a trailing underpressure wave was also observed. Time-resolved images of tissue deformation were collected and large maximum eigenstrains (0.03-0.42), minimum eigenstrains (-0.33 to -0.03), maximum shear strains (0.09-0.45), and strain rates (8.4×10³/sec) were estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). Injury at 4 and 6 h was quantified using Fluoro-Jade C. Neuronal injury due to PSHPB testing was found to be significantly greater than injury associated with the tissue slice paradigm alone. While large pressures and strains were encountered for these tests, this system provides a controllable test environment to study injury to submerged brain slices over a range of strain rate, pressure, and strain loads. PMID:21970544

  19. Felbamate increases [3H]glycine binding in rat brain and sections of human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R T; Sofia, R D; Layer, R T; Leiner, K A; Faull, R L; Narang, N; Wamsley, J K

    1998-08-01

    The anticonvulsant compound felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; FBM) appears to inhibit the function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex through an interaction with the strychnine-insensitive glycine recognition site. Since we have demonstrated previously that FBM inhibits the binding of [3H]5, 7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), a competitive antagonist at the glycine site, we assessed the ability of FBM to modulate the binding of an agonist, [3H]glycine, to rat forebrain membranes and human brain sections. In contrast to its ability to inhibit [3H]5,7-DCKA binding, FBM increased [3H]glycine binding (20 nM; EC50 = 485 microM; Emax = 211% of control; nH = 1.8). FBM, but not carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid or phenobarbital, also increased [3H]glycine binding (50 nM; EC50 = 142 microM; Emax = 157% of control; nH = 1.6) in human cortex sections. Autoradiographic analysis of human brain slices demonstrated that FBM produced the largest increases in [3H]glycine binding in the cortex, hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus. Because various ions can influence the binding of glycine-site ligands, we assessed their effects on FBM-modulation of [3H]glycine binding. FBM-enhanced [3H]glycine binding was attenuated by Zn++ and not inhibited by Mg++ in human brain. These results suggest that FBM increases [3H]glycine binding in a manner sensitive to ions which modulate the NMDA receptor. These data support the hypothesis that FBM produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects by inhibiting NMDA receptor function, likely through an allosteric modulation of the glycine site. PMID:9694960

  20. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  1. In vivo acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, H C; Randle, C L; Agrawal, D

    1982-04-25

    Examination of brain myelin proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography clearly showed that both proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM-20 were acylated 24 h after the intracerebral injection of 30-day-old rats with [3H]palmitic acid. The radioactivity associated with PLP remained after purification, re-electrophoresis, and fluorography. Most of the radioactivity associated with PLP was removed when the gels were treated with hydroxylamine and then fluorographed, indicating that fatty acids were bound to PLP by ester linkage. Cleavage of purified PLP with methanolic sodium hydroxide readily released almost all protein-bound radioactivity. Thin layer chromatography of this material on both silver nitrate and reverse-phase plates provided evidence that most of the radioactivity co-migrated with methyl palmitate (77%) and methyl stearate (19%); however, some radioactivity was associated with methyl oleate (4%). Gas-liquid chromatography of the fatty acids associated with PLP distinctly revealed the presence of methyl palmitate and a detectable peak of methyl stearate. PMID:7068653

  2. Brain stimulation in rats exposed to hyperbaric environments.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J; Spencer, J W

    1976-12-01

    Six rats were trained to make an operant response to receive brief trains of electrical current to the lateral hypothalamus (self-stimulation). All animals were then randomly exposed to pressures of 4.03, 5.51, 7.06, or 10.1 ATA breathing either compressed air or N2-O2 and 13.1 ATA (N2-O2 only). When the subjects breathed air at pressures of 7.06 and 10.1 ATA, rate of self-stimulation decreased by 32 and 43%, respectively. No differences were observed in rate of response at any pressure when the animals breathed N2-O2 with the partial pressure of oxygen maintained at 0.2 ATA. When an oxygen-nitrogen mixture was breathed at 3 ATA in which the PO2 was similar to compressed air at 10.1 ATA, self-stimulation rate was decreased by 40%; this suggests that PO2 is a critical variable influencing behavior mediated by brain stimulation. Results are discussed in terms of the use of self-stimulation as one tool for better understanding the neuronal mechanisms of behavior as they relate to breathing-gas mixtures at increased pressures. PMID:10897863

  3. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  4. Localization of a brain sulfotransferase, SULT4A1, in the human and rat brain: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Liyou, Nancy E; Buller, Kathryn M; Tresillian, Michael J; Elvin, Christopher M; Scott, Heather L; Dodd, Peter R; Tannenberg, Anthony E G; McManus, Michael E

    2003-12-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are believed to play a role in the neuromodulation of certain neurotransmitters and drugs. To date, four cytosolic sulfotransferases have been shown to be expressed in human brain. Recently, a novel human brain sulfotransferase has been identified and characterized, although its role and localization in the brain are unknown. Here we present the first immunohistochemical (IHC) localization of SULT4A1 in human brain using an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human SULT4A1. These results are supported and supplemented by the IHC localization of SULT4A1 in rat brain. In both human and rat brains, strong reactivity was found in several brain regions, including cerebral cortex, cerebellum, pituitary, and brainstem. Specific signal was entirely absent on sections for which preimmune serum from the corresponding animal, processed in the same way as the postimmune serum, was used in the primary screen. The findings from this study may assist in determining the physiological role of this SULT isoform. PMID:14623933

  5. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. PMID:23744884

  6. Cysteamine and pantethine effects on passive avoidance behavior, shuttle box learning, open-field activity, striatal catecholamines and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Ekman, R; Alling, C

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cysteamine and pantethine were compared on different behavioral tests and neurochemical parameters in rats. Cysteamine, administered in high dose (3.90 mM/kg s.c.), decreased the locomotor and rearing activities of rats, while it slightly but not significantly increased the avoidance latency in a passive avoidance test. Pantethine, 24 hr after its administration, significantly increased the dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels in the striatum. Cysteamine slightly reduced the DOPAC level without influencing the catecholamine levels in this brain area. The striatal somatostatin concentration was reduced 24 hr after the administration of cysteamine, while pantethine did not influence it. After repeated daily injections of pantethine, the drug facilitated the shuttle box learning process and increased the intertrial and open-field activities of the animals. Cysteamine only slightly increased the locomotion and rearing and did not influence the shuttle box learning. Both pantethine and cysteamine slowed the rate of the "body weight increase" of the animals when compared to a saline-treated group. These findings suggest that the locomotor activation induced by pantethine 24 hr after its administration plays an important role in its behavioral effects. It might be that the striatal dopaminergic transmission, modified by administration of pantethine, plays some role in the higher locomotor activity induced by the substance. PMID:2570553

  7. Age and sex-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Rocío; Gianotti, Magdalena; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Aging is responsible for the decline in the function of mitochondria and their increase in size and number--adaptive mechanism to restore mitochondrial function. Estrogens increase mitochondrial function, especially in female rats. The aim of this study was to determine the age-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function focusing on sex differences. Cellular and mitochondrial protein and DNA content, mitochondrial oxidative and phosphorylative function in male and female rat brain from four different age groups (6, 12, 18 and 24 months old) were analyzed. Mitochondria protein/DNA content decreased with aging shifting toward lesser mitochondrial functional capacity and the mitochondria number increased. A sex dimorphism was determined, with female rat brain showing mitochondria with greater functional capacity than males. These sex differences gradually increased during aging. PMID:21471708

  8. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation. PMID:21693116

  9. Postischemic hyperthermia induced caspase-3 activation in the newborn rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia and exacerbated the brain damage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Mu, Junwu; Kohzuki, Masatomo; Shimoya, Koichiro; Hosono, Takayoshi; Kanzaki, Toru; Murata, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The effects of postischemic hyperthermia were investigated in the newborn rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day-old rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by 8% oxygen for 30 min, and divided into a hyperthermia group (rectal temperature at 39 degrees C for 6 h) and a normothermia group. Hyperthermia resulted in an approximately 5-fold increase in activated caspase-3 24 h after HI when compared with the normothermia group, and gross loss of brain tissue was observed only in the hyperthermia group at 7 and 30 days after HI. Our results show that postischemic hyperthermia exacerbates HI injury in immature brains, and that the mechanism is strongly associated with activation of an apoptotic pathway. PMID:12907852

  10. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  11. Regional Volume Decreases in the Brain of Pax6 Heterozygous Mutant Rats: MRI Deformation-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Kotaro; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kikkawa, Takako; Kawashima, Ryuta; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a transcription factor that pleiotropically regulates various developmental processes in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we revealed that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey2/+) adult rats exhibit abnormalities in social interaction. However, the brain malformations underlying the behavioral abnormality are unknown. To elucidate the brain malformations in rSey2/+ rats, we morphometrically analyzed brains of rSey2/+ and wild type rats using small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty 10-week-old rats underwent brain MRI (29 rSey2/+ rats and 31 wild type rats). SPM8 software was used for image preprocessing and statistical image analysis. Normalized maps of the Jacobian determinant, a parameter for the expansion and/or contraction of brain regions, were obtained for each rat. rSey2/+ rats showed significant volume decreases in various brain regions including the neocortex, corpus callosum, olfactory structures, hippocampal formation, diencephalon, and midbrain compared to wild type rats. Among brain regions, the anterior commissure showed significant interaction between genotype and sex, indicating the effect of genotype difference on the anterior commissure volume was more robust in females than in males. The rSey2/+ rats exhibited decreased volume in various gray and white matter regions of the brain, which may contribute to manifestation of abnormal social behaviors. PMID:27355350

  12. Regional Volume Decreases in the Brain of Pax6 Heterozygous Mutant Rats: MRI Deformation-Based Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kotaro; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kikkawa, Takako; Kawashima, Ryuta; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a transcription factor that pleiotropically regulates various developmental processes in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we revealed that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey2/+) adult rats exhibit abnormalities in social interaction. However, the brain malformations underlying the behavioral abnormality are unknown. To elucidate the brain malformations in rSey2/+ rats, we morphometrically analyzed brains of rSey2/+ and wild type rats using small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty 10-week-old rats underwent brain MRI (29 rSey2/+ rats and 31 wild type rats). SPM8 software was used for image preprocessing and statistical image analysis. Normalized maps of the Jacobian determinant, a parameter for the expansion and/or contraction of brain regions, were obtained for each rat. rSey2/+ rats showed significant volume decreases in various brain regions including the neocortex, corpus callosum, olfactory structures, hippocampal formation, diencephalon, and midbrain compared to wild type rats. Among brain regions, the anterior commissure showed significant interaction between genotype and sex, indicating the effect of genotype difference on the anterior commissure volume was more robust in females than in males. The rSey2/+ rats exhibited decreased volume in various gray and white matter regions of the brain, which may contribute to manifestation of abnormal social behaviors. PMID:27355350

  13. Neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons in rat brains after stroke.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu-Wen; Duan, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xian-Hua; Wang, Yong-Quan; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Qiu-Wan; Cui, Hui-Ru; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2016-09-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-enhanced neurogenesis in ischemic brain injury, we used middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to induce transient focal ischemic brain injury. The results showed that ischemic injury significantly increased glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive (GFAP(+)) and nestin(+) cells in ipsilateral striatum 3 days following MCAO. Most GFAP(+) cells colocalized with nestin (GFAP(+)-nestin(+)), Pax6 (GFAP(+)-Pax6(+)), or Olig2 (GFAP(+)-Olig2(+)). VEGF further increased GFAP(+)-nestin(+) and GFAP(+)-Pax6(+) cells, and decreased GFAP(+)-Olig2(+) cells. We used striatal injection of GFAP targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein (pGfa2-EGFP) vectors combined with multiple immunofluorescent staining to trace the neural fates of EGFP-expressing (GFP(+)) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that MCAO-induced striatal reactive astrocytes differentiated into neural stem cells (GFP(+)-nestin(+) cells) at 3 days after MCAO, immature (GFP(+)-Tuj-1(+) cells) at 1 week and mature neurons (GFP(+)-MAP-2(+) or GFP(+)-NeuN(+) cells) at 2 weeks. VEGF increased GFP(+)-NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)-MAP-2(+) newborn neurons after MCAO. Fluorocitrate, an astrocytic inhibitor, significantly decreased GFAP and nestin expression in ischemic brains, and also reduced VEGF-enhanced neurogenic effects. This study is the first time to report that VEGF-mediated increase of newly generated neurons is dependent on the presence of reactive astrocytes. The results also illustrate cellular mechanism of VEGF-enhanced neural repair and functional plasticity in the brains after ischemic injury. We concluded that neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of striatal astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons, which should be very important for the reconstruction of neurovascular units/networks in non-neurogenic regions of the mammalian brain. PMID:26603138

  14. Dichloroacetate increases glucose use and decreases lactate in developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.L.; Hatch, J.P.; Prihoda, T.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) activates pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) by inhibiting PDH kinase. Neutralized DCA (100 mg/kg) or saline was intravenously administered to 20 to 25-day-old rats (50-75g). Fifteen minutes later a mixture of {sup 6-14}C glucose and {sup 3}H fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was administered intravenously and the animals were sacrificed by microwave irradiation (2450 MHz, 8.0 kW, 0.6-0.8 sec) after 2 or 5 min. Brain regional rates of glucose use and metabolite levels were determined. DCA-treated rats had increased rates of glucose use in all regions studied (cortex, thalamus, striatum, and brain stem), with an average increase of 41%. Lactate levels were lower in all regions, by an average of 35%. There were no significant changes in levels of ATP, creatine phosphate, or glycogen in any brain region. Blood levels of lactate did not differ significantly between the DCA- and the saline-treated groups. Blood glucose levels were higher in the DCA group. In rats sacrificed by freeze-blowing, DCA treatment caused lower brain levels of both lactate and pyruvate. These results cannot be explained by any systemic effect of DCA. Rather, it appears that in the immature rat, DCA treatment results in activation of brain PDH, increased metabolism of brain pyruvate and lactate, and a resulting increase in brain glycolytic rate.

  15. Involvement of Nuclear Related Factor 2 Signaling Pathway in the Brain of Obese Rats and Obesity-Resistant Rats Induced by High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Wei; Ding, Bing-Jie; Wang, Li-Jing; Shao, Yi; Xiao, Rong

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the mechanism of brain damage in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and diet-resistant (DR) rats from the viewpoint of redox state and nuclear related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks to obtain the DIO and DR rats. d-Galactose was injected subcutaneously through the back of the neck for 10 weeks to establish oxidative stress model rats. Then, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the level of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in serum and brain tissue were measured by using enzymatic assay kits. The levels of cholecystokinin and peptide YY in the brain tissue were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. In addition, the protein expression of Nrf2 and its downstream factors such as heme oxygenase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in the brain tissue were measured by Western blotting. In the brain of DIO rats, the level of GSH and ratio of GSH/GSSG were lower, whereas the GSH-Px concentration was higher compared with DR rats significantly. On the other hand, the GSSG level was higher in the serum of DIO rats compared with the DR rats. The oxidative stress state in the brain of DIO rats, but not in DR rats, were observed. In addition, the protein expressions of Nrf2 and NQO1 were downregulated in the brain of DR rats compared with that in DIO rats. Our data suggest that the Nrf2/NQO1 signaling pathway and redox state were involved in the pathogenesis of the rats prone to obesity, but not the DR rats resistant to obesity. PMID:26784831

  16. Cortico-Cortical, Cortico-Striatal, and Cortico-Thalamic White Matter Fiber Tracts Generated in the Macaque Brain via Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Rakesh M.; An, Michael; Poynton, Clare B.; Li, Muwei; Jiang, Hangyi; Oishi, Kenichi; Selemon, Lynn D.; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Probabilistic methods have the potential to generate multiple and complex white matter fiber tracts in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, a method based on dynamic programming (DP) is introduced to reconstruct fibers pathways whose complex anatomical structures cannot be resolved beyond the resolution of standard DTI data. DP is based on optimizing a sequentially additive cost function derived from a Gaussian diffusion model whose covariance is defined by the diffusion tensor. DP is used to determine the optimal path between initial and terminal nodes by efficiently searching over all paths, connecting the nodes, and choosing the path in which the total probability is maximized. An ex vivo high-resolution scan of a macaque hemi-brain is used to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of DP. DP can generate fiber bundles between distant cortical areas (superior longitudinal fasciculi, arcuate fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and fronto-occipital fasciculus), neighboring cortical areas (dorsal and ventral banks of the principal sulcus), as well as cortical projections to the hippocampal formation (cingulum bundle), neostriatum (motor cortical projections to the putamen), thalamus (subcortical bundle), and hippocampal formation projections to the mammillary bodies via the fornix. Validation is established either by comparison with in vivo intracellular transport of horseradish peroxidase in another macaque monkey or by comparison with atlases. DP is able to generate known pathways, including crossing and kissing tracts. Thus, DP has the potential to enhance neuroimaging studies of cortical connectivity. PMID:23879573

  17. Simultaneous telemetric monitoring of brain glucose and lactate and motion in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Rocchitta, Gaia; Secchi, Ottavio; Alvau, Maria Domenica; Farina, Donatella; Bazzu, Gianfranco; Calia, Giammario; Migheli, Rossana; Desole, Maria Speranza; O'Neill, Robert D; Serra, Pier A

    2013-11-01

    A new telemetry system for simultaneous detection of extracellular brain glucose and lactate and motion is presented. The device consists of dual-channel, single-supply miniature potentiostat-I/V converter, a microcontroller unit, a signal transmitter, and a miniaturized microvibration sensor. Although based on simple and inexpensive components, the biotelemetry device has been used for accurate transduction of the anodic oxidation currents generated on the surface of implanted glucose and lactate biosensors and animal microvibrations. The device was characterized and validated in vitro before in vivo experiments. The biosensors were implanted in the striatum of freely moving animals and the biotelemetric device was fixed to the animal's head. Physiological and pharmacological stimulations were given in order to induce striatal neural activation and to modify the motor behavior in awake, untethered animals. PMID:24102201

  18. Increased plasma levels and blunted effects of brain natriuretic peptide in rats with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A; Grossman, E; Keiser, H R

    1991-07-01

    The hemodynamic and renal effects of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were studied in conscious rats with experimental congestive heart failure (CHF) produced by an aortocaval fistula. The peptide had potent hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic effects in control rats, all of which were abolished in CHF. Plasma levels of BNP increased time-dependently during the development of CHF, and were more than four-fold higher in sodium retaining rats than in control rats. The data suggest that BNP secretion from the atria is increased in CHF, and that resistance to BNP, in addition to the relative resistance to atrial natriuretic factor, may contribute to sodium retention in CHF. PMID:1831369

  19. Lactoferrin during lactation protects the immature hypoxic-ischemic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    van de Looij, Yohan; Ginet, Vanessa; Chatagner, Alexandra; Toulotte, Audrey; Somm, Emmanuel; Hüppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding glycoprotein secreted in maternal milk presenting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It shows efficient absorption into the brain from nutritional source. Brain injury frequently resulting from cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) has a high incidence in premature infants with ensuing neurodevelopmental disabilities. We investigated the neuroprotective effect of maternal nutritional supplementation with Lf during lactation in a rat model of preterm HI brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), brain gene, and protein expression. Methods Moderate brain HI was induced using unilateral common carotid artery occlusion combined with hypoxia (6%, 30 min) in the postnatal day 3 (P3) rat brain (24–28 weeks human equivalent). High-field multimodal MRI techniques were used to investigate the effect of maternal Lf supplementation through lactation. Expression of cytokine coding genes (TNF-α and IL-6), the prosurvival/antiapoptotic AKT protein and caspase-3 activation were also analyzed in the acute phase after HI. Results MRI analysis demonstrated reduced cortical injury in Lf rats few hours post-HI and in long-term outcome (P25). Lf reduced HI-induced modifications of the cortical metabolism and altered white matter microstructure was recovered in Lf-supplemented rats at P25. Lf supplementation significantly decreased brain TNF-α and IL-6 gene transcription, increased phosphorylated AKT levels and reduced activation of caspase-3 at 24 h post-injury. Interpretation Lf given through lactation to rat pups with cerebral HI injury shows neuroprotective effects on brain metabolism, and cerebral gray and white matter recovery. This nutritional intervention may be of high interest for the clinical field of preterm brain neuroprotection. PMID:25574471

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor improves brain insulin sensitivity, but fails to prevent cognitive impairment in orchiectomy obese rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-08-01

    It is unclear whether the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor can counteract brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived obese rats. We hypothesized that DPP4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats received either a sham-operated (S, n=6) or bilateral orchiectomy (ORX, n=24). ORX rats were divided into two groups and fed with either a normal diet (ND (NDO)) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n=6/subgroup) to receive either a vehicle or vildagliptin (3 mg/kg per day, p.o.) for 4 weeks. After treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity and brain mitochondrial function were determined in each rat. We found that HFO rats exhibited peripheral and brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline. NDO rats did not develop peripheral and brain insulin resistance. However, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline occurred. Vildagliptin significantly improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, restored brain insulin sensitivity and decreased brain mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in HFO rats. However, vildagliptin did not restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in both NDO and HFO rats. These findings suggest that vildagliptin could not counteract the impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived subjects, despite its effects on improved peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity as well as brain mitochondrial function. PMID:26016746

  1. Lipid peroxidation in rat brain is increased by simulated weightlessness and decreased by a soy-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Soulsby, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study tested whether or not simulated weightlessness by tail-suspension increases the levels of lipid peroxidation products in rat brain. The brain tissues of rats on a soybean diet were also assayed for lipid peroxidation products to evaluate the possible role of soy-protein as a dietary anti-oxidant. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Group 1 rats were fed standard Purina rat chow ad libidum and served as controls. Group 2 rats were fed a soybean diet containing 37% soy-protein and were not tail-suspended. Group 3 rats were fed standard Purina rat chow ad libidum and were tail-suspended to induce simulated weightlessness. After 2 wk, all of the rats were killed. Each whole brain was segmented into frontal cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. After a specific weight of each segment was excised, the residual tissues were combined and used as a whole brain sample. The samples were analyzed for lipid peroxidation products by a chromogenic assay that reacts with malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HNE). The mean concentrations of lipid peroxidation products (MDA plus 4-HNE) in whole brain, frontal cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem of the control rats ranged from 16 to 18 micromol/g; the corresponding means ranged from 10 to 13 micromol/g in rats fed the soybean diet, and from 22 to 26 micromol/g in the tail-suspended rats. Thus, the mean levels of lipid peroxidation products in brain tissues were decreased in the rats fed the soy diet and were increased in the rats that were tail-suspended to simulate weightlessness, when compared to those of rats fed a regular diet. PMID:12017202

  2. Pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies of busulfan in rat plasma and brain.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Ehrsson, H; Wallin, I; Eksborg, S

    1988-01-01

    Busulfan kinetics were studied in the rat plasma and brain after an I.P. dose of 14C-busulfan or busulfan (15 mg/kg). The distribution of busulfan to the brain was rapid and the ratio brain/plasma concentration was 0.74 during the time-course of busulfan. The elimination half-lives in plasma and brain were 3h for intact busulfan and 8h for the 14C-radioactivity. The radioactivity remaining in plasma and brain after 24h was mostly busulfan metabolites e.g. sulfolane, 3-hydroxysulfolane and tetrahydrothiophene-1-oxide as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The protein binding to rat plasma was low (9.2 +/- 4.4%). PMID:3243326

  3. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  4. Combined effects of prenatal inhibition of vasculogenesis and neurogenesis on rat brain development

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Q.Y.; Ramakrishna, S.; Marchi, N.; Fazio, Vincent; Hallene, Kerri; Janigro, D.

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are one of the most common causes of neurological disabilities including autism and epilepsy. To disrupt cortical formation, methylazoxymethanol (MAM) or thalidomide (THAL) has been used to affect neurogenesis or vasculogenesis. Although previous models of MCD have been useful, these models primarily attack a single aspect of cortical development. We hypothesized that simultaneous prenatal exposure to MAM or THAL will lead to the development of a novel and specific type of brain maldevelopment. Rats were prenatally exposed to MAM and THAL. At early postnatal days, brains displayed abnormal ventricular size and hemispheric asymmetry due to altered brain water homeostasis. The postnatal brain was also characterized by gliosis in regions of focal leakage of the blood brain barrier. These morphological abnormalities gradually disappeared at adult stages. Although the adult MAM-THAL rats showed normal cortical morphology, abnormal hippocampal connectivity and mossy fiber sprouting persisted well into adulthood. PMID:18930144

  5. Epsilon Aminocaproic Acid Pretreatment Provides Neuroprotection Following Surgically Induced Brain Injury in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Komanapalli, Esther S; Sherchan, Prativa; Rolland, William; Khatibi, Nikan; Martin, Robert D; Applegate, Richard L; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can damage viable brain tissue unintentionally by a wide range of mechanisms. This surgically induced brain injury (SBI) can be a result of direct incision, electrocauterization, or tissue retraction. Plasmin, a serine protease that dissolves fibrin blood clots, has been shown to enhance cerebral edema and hemorrhage accumulation in the brain through disruption of the blood brain barrier. Epsilon aminocaproic acid (EAA), a recognized antifibrinolytic lysine analogue, can reduce the levels of active plasmin and, in doing so, potentially can preserve the neurovascular unit of the brain. We investigated the role of EAA as a pretreatment neuroprotective modality in a SBI rat model, hypothesizing that EAA therapy would protect brain tissue integrity, translating into preserved neurobehavioral function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: sham (n = 7), SBI (n = 7), SBI with low-dose EAA, 150 mg/kg (n = 7), and SBI with high-dose EAA, 450 mg/kg (n = 7). SBI was induced by partial right frontal lobe resection through a frontal craniotomy. Postoperative assessment at 24 h included neurobehavioral testing and measurement of brain water content. Results at 24 h showed both low- and high-dose EAA reduced brain water content and improved neurobehavioral function compared with the SBI groups. This suggests that EAA may be a useful pretherapeutic modality for SBI. Further studies are needed to clarify optimal therapeutic dosing and to identify mechanisms of neuroprotection in rat SBI models. PMID:26463967

  6. Delayed Postconditioning Protects against Focal Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chuancheng; Gao, Xuwen; Niu, Gang; Yan, Zhimin; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Heng

    2008-01-01

    Background We and others have reported that rapid ischemic postconditioning, interrupting early reperfusion after stroke, reduces infarction in rats. However, its extremely short therapeutic time windows, from a few seconds to minutes after reperfusion, may hinder its clinical translation. Thus, in this study we explored if delayed postconditioning, which is conducted a few hours after reperfusion, offers protection against stroke. Methods and Results Focal ischemia was generated by 30 min occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) combined with permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCA); delayed postconditioning was performed by repetitive, brief occlusion and release of the bilateral CCAs, or of the ipsilateral CCA alone. As a result, delayed postconditioning performed at 3h and 6h after stroke robustly reduced infarct size, with the strongest protection achieved by delayed postconditioning with 6 cycles of 15 min occlusion/15 min release of the ipsilateral CCA executed from 6h. We found that this delayed postconditioning provided long-term protection for up to two months by reducing infarction and improving outcomes of the behavioral tests; it also attenuated reduction in 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-uptake therefore improving metabolism, and reduced edema and blood brain barrier leakage. Reperfusion in ischemic stroke patients is usually achieved by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) application, however, t-PA's side effect may worsen ischemic injury. Thus, we tested whether delayed postconditioning counteracts the exacerbating effect of t-PA. The results showed that delayed postconditioning mitigated the worsening effect of t-PA on infarction. Conclusion Delayed postconditioning reduced ischemic injury after focal ischemia, which opens a new research avenue for stroke therapy and its underlying protective mechanisms. PMID:19066627

  7. Mechanisms of blast induced brain injuries, experimental studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Plantman, S; Angeria, M; Rostami, E; Bellander, B-M; Kirkegaard, M; Arborelius, U; Davidsson, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) potentially induced by blast waves from detonations result in significant diagnostic problems. It may be assumed that several mechanisms contribute to the injury. This study is an attempt to characterize the presumed components of the blast induced TBI. Our experimental models include a blast tube in which an anesthetized rat can be exposed to controlled detonations of explosives that result in a pressure wave with a magnitude between 130 and 260 kPa. In this model, the animal is fixed with a metal net to avoid head acceleration forces. The second model is a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle. In the third model the animal is subjected to a high-speed sagittal rotation angular acceleration. Immunohistochemical labeling for amyloid precursor protein revealed signs of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the penetration and rotation models. Signs of punctuate inflammation were observed after focal and rotation injury. Exposure in the blast tube did not induce DAI or detectable cell death, but functional changes. Affymetrix Gene arrays showed changes in the expression in a large number of gene families including cell death, inflammation and neurotransmitters in the hippocampus after both acceleration and penetration injuries. Exposure to the primary blast wave induced limited shifts in gene expression in the hippocampus. The most interesting findings were a downregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic transmission. These experiments indicate that rotational acceleration may be a critical factor for DAI and other acute changes after blast TBI. The further exploration of the mechanisms of blast TBI will have to include a search for long-term effects. PMID:20493951

  8. Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  9. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Fares, Raafat P; Belmeguenai, Amor; Sanchez, Pascal E; Kouchi, Hayet Y; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  10. Brain activation patterns at exhaustion in rats that differ in inherent exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Foley, Teresa E; Brooks, Leah R; Gilligan, Lori J; Burghardt, Paul R; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-01-01

    In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained) exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively). The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA) levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5-15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min) or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15-51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min). During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines. PMID:23028992

  11. Neuroanatomy-based matrix-guided trimming protocol for the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Rossella; Criado, Ana; Zantedeschi, Valentina; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Brain trimming through defined neuroanatomical landmarks is recommended to obtain consistent sections in rat toxicity studies. In this article, we describe a matrix-guided trimming protocol that uses channels to reproduce coronal levels of anatomical landmarks. Both setup phase and validation study were performed on Han Wistar male rats (Crl:WI(Han)), 10-week-old, with bodyweight of 298 ± 29 (SD) g, using a matrix (ASI-Instruments(®), Houston, TX) fitted for brains of rats with 200 to 400 g bodyweight. In the setup phase, we identified eight channels, that is, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21, matching the recommended landmarks midway to the optic chiasm, frontal pole, optic chiasm, infundibulum, mamillary bodies, midbrain, middle cerebellum, and posterior cerebellum, respectively. In the validation study, we trimmed the immersion-fixed brains of 60 rats using the selected channels to determine how consistently the channels reproduced anatomical landmarks. Percentage of success (i.e., presence of expected targets for each level) ranged from 89 to 100%. Where 100% success was not achieved, it was noted that the shift in brain trimming was toward the caudal pole. In conclusion, we developed and validated a trimming protocol for the rat brain that allow comparable extensiveness, homology, and relevance of coronal sections as the landmark-guided trimming with the advantage of being quickly learned by technicians. PMID:24947989

  12. Functional mitochondrial analysis in acute brain sections from adult rats reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Moffat, Cynthia; Seifert, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many neurological disorders that only develop or are much more severe in adults, yet no methodology exists that allows for medium-throughput functional mitochondrial analysis of brain sections from adult animals. We developed a technique for quantifying mitochondrial respiration in acutely isolated adult rat brain sections with the Seahorse XF Analyzer. Evaluating a range of conditions made quantifying mitochondrial function from acutely derived adult brain sections from the cortex, cerebellum, and trigeminal nucleus caudalis possible. Optimization of this technique demonstrated that the ideal section size was 1 mm wide. We found that sectioning brains at physiological temperatures was necessary for consistent metabolic analysis of trigeminal nucleus caudalis sections. Oxygen consumption in these sections was highly coupled to ATP synthesis, had robust spare respiratory capacities, and had limited nonmitochondrial respiration, all indicative of healthy tissue. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by identifying a decreased spare respiratory capacity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of a rat model of chronic migraine, a neurological disorder that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This technique allows for 24 acutely isolated sections from multiple brain regions of a single adult rat to be analyzed simultaneously with four sequential drug treatments, greatly advancing the ability to study mitochondrial physiology in adult neurological disorders. PMID:25252946

  13. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  14. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-10

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  15. Susceptibility of striatal neurons to excitotoxic injury correlates with basal levels of Bcl-2 and the induction of P53 and c-Myc immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhong-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Yumei; Chuang, De-Maw; DiFiglia, Marian; Chase, Thomas N; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2005-11-01

    The present studies evaluated the potential contribution of Bcl-2, p53, and c-Myc to the differential vulnerability of striatal neurons to the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA). In normal rat striatum, Bcl-2 immunoreactivity (Bcl-2-i) was most intense in large aspiny interneurons including choline acetyltransferase positive (CAT+) and parvalbumin positive (PARV+) neurons, but low in a majority of medium-sized neurons. In human brain, intense Bcl-2-i was seen in large striatal neurons but not in medium-sized spiny projection neurons. QA produced degeneration of numerous medium-sized neurons, but not those enriched in Bcl-2-i. Many Bcl-2-i-enriched interneurons including those with CAT+ and PARV+ survived QA injection, while medium-sized neurons labeled for calbindin D-28K (CAL D-28+) did not. In addition, proapoptotic proteins p53-i and c-Myc-i were robustly induced in medium-sized neurons, but not in most large neurons. The selective vulnerability of striatal medium spiny neurons to degeneration in a rodent model of Huntington's disease appears to correlate with their low levels of Bcl-2-i and high levels of induced p53-i and c-Myc-i. PMID:15922606

  16. Imaging of tumor angiogenesis in rat brains in vivo by photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Geng; Wang, Xueding; Xie, Xueyi; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2005-02-01

    Green laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser were employed as irradiation sources for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The vascular structure of the brain was imaged clearly, with optimal contrast, because blood has strong absorption near this wavelength. The photoacoustic images of rat brain tumors in this study clearly reveal the angiogenesis that is associated with tumors. Brain tumors can be identified based on the distorted vascular architecture of brain tumorigenesis and related vascular changes, such as hemorrhage. This research demonstrates that PAT can potentially provide a powerful tool for small-animal biological research.

  17. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-10-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release.

  18. Injected tryptophan increases brain but not plasma tryptophan levels more in ethanol treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    In the present study ethanol treatment given for two weeks decreased hepatic apo-tryptophan pyrrolase but not total tryptophan pyrrolase activity in rats. Tryptophan levels in plasma and brain did not increase significantly. But there was a marked increase of 5-HT but not 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentration in brain, suggesting a possible increase in the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase. The effect of a tryptophan load on brain 5-HT metabolism was therefore compared in controls and ethanol treated rats. One hour after tryptophan injection plasma concentrations of total and free tryptophan were identical in controls and ethanol treated rats, but the increases of brain tryptophan 5-HT and 5-HIAA were considerably greater in the latter group. The results are consistent with long term ethanol treatment enhancing brain serotonin metabolism and show that brain uptake/utilization of exogenous tryptophan is increased in ethanol treated rats and may be useful to understand the role and possible mechanism of tryptophan/serotonin involvement in mood regulation.

  19. Regional brain glucose use in unstressed rats after two days of starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Mans, A.M.; Davis, D.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Regional brain glucose use was measured in conscious, unrestrained, fed rats and after 2 days of starvation, using quantitative autoradiography and (6-/sup 14/C)glucose. Plasma glucose, lactate, and ketone body concentrations and brain glucose and lactate content were measured in separate groups of rats. Glucose concentrations were lower in starved rats in both plasma and brain; plasma ketone body concentrations were elevated. Glucose use was found to be lower throughout the brain by about 12%. While some areas seemed to be affected more than others, statistical analysis showed that none were exceptionally different. The results could not be explained by increased loss of /sup 14/C as lactate or pyruvate during the experimental period, because the arteriovenous differences of these species were insignificant. The calculated contribution by ketone bodies to the total energy consumption was between 3 and 9% for the brain as a whole in the starved rats and could, therefore, partially account for the depression seen in glucose use. It was concluded that glucose oxidation is slightly depressed throughout the brain after 2 days of starvation.

  20. Chlorpromazine Protects Against Apoptosis Induced by Exogenous Stimuli in the Developing Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Chen, Yang; Fu, Yingmei; Fang, Wenjuan; Wang, Jindong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Fengmin

    2011-01-01

    Background Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a commonly used antipsychotic drug, was found to play a neuroprotective role in various models of toxicity. However, whether CPZ has the potential to affect brain apoptosis in vivo is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effect of CPZ on the apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. Methodology The ethanol treated infant rat was utilized as a valid apoptotic model, which is commonly used and could trigger robust apoptosis in brain tissue. Prior to the induction of apoptosis by subcutaneous injection of ethanol, 7-day-old rats were treated with CPZ at several doses (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Apoptotic cells in the brain were measured using TUNEL analysis, and the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome c, the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 were assessed by immunostaining or western blot. Findings Compared to the group injected with ethanol only, the brains of the CPZ-pretreated rats had fewer apoptotic cells, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome c and Bax, and higher expression of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that CPZ could prevent apoptosis in the brain by regulating the mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions CPZ exerts an inhibitory effect on apoptosis induced by ethanol in the rat brain, intimating that it may offer a means of protecting nerve cells from apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. PMID:21779358

  1. Implants containing beta-amyloid protein are not neurotoxic to young and old rat brain.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J A; Stephenson, D T

    1992-01-01

    Because the cellular effects of beta-amyloid protein (beta-AP) are currently unclear, we evaluated the in vivo effects of beta-AP implants in a lipid matrix to prolong tissue exposure in the brains of rats. Young 3-month-old rats and aged 18-month-old rats received implants of beta-AP prepared in a cocoa butter matrix in the dorsal hippocampus and corpus striatum on one side of the brain and implants of either prolactin or scrambled beta-AP peptide in cocoa butter on the contralateral side. The old rats also received implants of beta-AP embedded in a cholesterol matrix or cholesterol alone in the frontal cortex. The young rats were sacrificed 3-4 days after implantation, while the old rats were sacrificed 6-8 weeks after implantation. Lesion size on the beta-AP implanted side did not differ significantly from lesion size observed with control peptides. Bielschowsky silver staining revealed few argyrophilic neurites and axonal spheroids associated with either beta-AP or control implants. Alz 50 and ubiquitin immunoreactivity were not observed. None of the implant sites demonstrated cytopathology characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. The results of this study indicate that beta-AP implantation into the brains of rats produced no consistent effect beyond that seen with control peptide implants. PMID:1461346

  2. Fluoride-Induced Neuron Apoptosis and Expressions of Inflammatory Factors by Activating Microglia in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nan; Liu, Yan; Liu, Shengnan; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Zhengdong; Xi, Shuhua

    2016-09-01

    Excessive exposure to fluoride results in structural and functional damages to the central nervous system (CNS), and neurotoxicity of fluoride may be associated with neurodegenerative changes. Chronic microglial activation appears to cause neuronal damage through producing proinflammatory cytokines and is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. It is not known about effects on microglia of fluoride. In the present study, healthy adult Wistar rats were exposed to 60 and 120 ppm fluoride in drinking water for 10 weeks, and control rats received deionized water. After 10 weeks, rats were sacrificed under anesthesia then apoptosis in neuron and inflammatory factors secreted by microglia were determined. We found that apoptosis of neurons in fluoride-treated rat brain increased and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive immunofluorescence increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. Bax protein expression increased and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in fluoride-treated rat brain compared with that of the control rat brain. The microglia in the hippocampus and cortex of fluoride-treated rats were activated by immunostaining with OX-42, a marker of activated microglia, and OX-42-positive microglia cells were more abundant in the hippocampus than in the cortex. The levels of IL-1β and IL-6 protein expression in OX-42-labeled microglial cells were significantly increased in the cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to fluoride, and TNF-α immunoreactivity in microglial cells of the hippocampus was significantly higher in the 120 ppm fluoride-treated group than that in the control group. Our results indicate that fluoride induced neuron apoptosis and expressions of inflammatory factors by activating microglia in rat brain. PMID:26253724

  3. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 3. [[sup 123]I] and [[sup 125]I]epidepride: In vivo studies in rhesus monkey brain and comparison with in vitro pharmacokinetics in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Votaw, J.R.; Schmidt, D.E.; Ansari, M.S.; Holdeman, K.P.; Paulis, T. de; Clanton, J.A.; Pfeffer, R.; Manning, R.G.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies of [[sup 123]I]epidepride uptake in rhesus monkey brain were performed using single photon tomography. Striatal uptake peaked at 0.85% of administered dose/g at 107 min post-injection, then declined slowly to 0.70% of administered dose/g at 6 h. Striatal:posterior brain ratios rose from 2 at 25 min to 6.8 at 105 min, to 15 at 4 h and to 58 at 6.4 h. [[sup 123]I]Epidepride was displaced by haloperidol (0.1 and 1 mg/kg) with a half-life of washout of 55 min. Little displacement of [[sup 123]I]epidepride was observed following administration of 1 or 2 mg/kg d-amphetamine, respectively, indicating [[sup 123]I]epidepride is not easily displaced by endogenous dopamine. In vitro equilibrium binding studies with [[sup 125]I]epidepride using rat striatum revealed a K[sub D] of 46 pM and B[sub max] of 33 pmol/g tissue at 37[degrees]C, while at 25[degrees]C the K[sub D] was 25 pM and the B[sub max] 32 pmol/g tissue. In vitro kinetic analysis of association and dissociation curves revealed a half-life for receptor dissociation at 37[degrees]C of 15 min and 79--90 min at 25[degrees]C. Allowing for the temperature difference, there is good correspondence between in vivo and in vitro dissociation kinetics at 25[degrees]C. Increasing in vitro incubation temperature from 25 to 37[degrees]C caused a 6-fold increase in the dissociation rate, suggesting that there is a change in binding kinetics at the dopamine D2 receptor at 37[degrees]C compared to in vivo binding. The results of this study indicate that [[sup 123]I]epidepride is an excellent radioligand for SPECT studies of the dopamine D2 receptor in man. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Brain trace element concentration of rats treated with the plant alkaloid, vincamine.

    PubMed

    Fayed, Abdel-Hasseb A

    2010-09-01

    Trace elements are essential for normal brain functions. Tiny amounts of these elements help in the formation of neurotransmitters and involved in the antioxidant defense and intracellular redox regulation and modulation of neural cells. Vincamine is a plant alkaloid used clinically as a peripheral vasodilator that increases cerebral blood flow and oxygen and glucose utilization by neural tissue to combat the effect of aging. Neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging characterized by a disturbance in trace element levels in the brain. The objective of this study was to determine the level of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), Selenium (Se), and chromium (Cr) in the brain of rats treated with vincamine. Vincamine was injected i.m. to rats at a dose of 15 mg/Kg bodyweight daily for 14 days. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, rats were killed, and brains were ashed and digested by concentrated acids and analyzed for trace elements concentrations by flame emission atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that Zn was the highest trace element in the brain of control rats (3.134 +/- 0.072 ppm) and Cr was the lowest (0.386 +/- 0.027 ppm). Vincamine administration significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the brain Fe concentration (1.393 +/- 0.165 ppm) compared to control (2.807 +/- 0.165 ppm). It was concluded that Zn was the highest trace element in the brain of rats. Vincamine administration resulted in approximately 50% reduction in brain Fe concentration which suggests its beneficial effect to prevent the oxidative stress of Fe in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. PMID:19902161

  5. Effects of zotepine, chlorpromazine and haloperidol on D-1, D-2, D-3 and D-4 subtypes of dopamine receptors in rat striatal and bovine caudate nucleus membranes.

    PubMed

    Arima, T; Makihata, J; Makimura, T; Nomura, Y; Segawa, T

    1986-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of zotepine (Zot) on D-1, D-2, D-3 and D-4 subtypes of dopamine (DA) receptors were investigated in crude synaptic membranes of rat striatum and bovine caudate nucleus and compared to those of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and haloperidol (HAL). From the IC(50)-values of Zot, CPZ and HAL, the K-values of each drug are estimated as follows: 34.4, 152 and 244 nM (D-1, (3)H-labeled cis-flupenthixol binding (1.0 nM) to rat membranes); 37.4, 7.1 and 2.4 nM (D-2, [(3)H]spiperone (Spi) binding (0.5 nM) to rat membranes in the presence of 0.1 ?M ketanserin); 73.1, 15.2 and 22.4 nM (D-3, (3)H-labeled N-propylapomorphine (NPA) binding (0.29 nM) to bovine membranes in the presence of 0.1 ?M Spi); 9.5, 65.3 and 3.1 nM (D-4, [(3)H]NPA binding (0.29 nM) bovine membranes in the presence of 25 nM DA), respectively. Zot binds with higher affinity to D-4 but lower affinity to D-3 than to other subtypes. It is also presumed that Zot binds to D-1 with high affinity and D-2 and D-3 with low affinity compared to CPZ and HAL. PMID:20493089

  6. Striatal development involves a switch in gene expression networks, followed by a myelination event: implications for neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Gabriela; Fan, Theresa; O’Dowd, Brian F.; George, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Because abnormal development of striatal neurons is thought to be part of pathology underlying major psychiatric illnesses, we studied the expression pattern of genes involved in striatal development and of genes comprising key striatal-specific pathways, during an active striatal maturation period, the first two postnatal weeks in rat. This period parallels human striatal development during the second trimester, when prenatal stress is though to lead to increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In order to identify genes involved in this developmental process, we used subtractive hybridization, followed by quantitative real-time PCR, which allowed us to characterize the developmental expression of over 60 genes, many not previously known to play a role in neuromaturation. Of these 12 were novel transcripts, which did not match known genes, but which showed strict developmental expression and may play a role in striatal neurodevelopment. We show that during the first two postnatal weeks in rat, an early gene expression network, still lacking key striatal-specific signaling pathways, is downregulated and replaced by a mature gene expression network, containing key striatal-specific genes including the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, conferring to these neurons their functional identity. Therefore, before this developmental switch, striatal neurons lack many of their key phenotypic characteristics. This maturation process is followed by a striking rise in expression of myelination genes, indicating a striatal-specific myelination event. Such strictly controlled developmental program has the potential to be a point of susceptibility to disruption by external factors. Indeed, this period is known to be a susceptibility period in both humans and rats. PMID:23184870

  7. Autoradiographic visualization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in rat brain with (/sup 3/H)captopril: localization to a striatonigral pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.; Lo, M.M.S.; Javitch, J.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-03-01

    The authors have visualized angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, peptidylpeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1) in rat brain by in vitro (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to brain slices displays a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 1.8 x 10/sup -9/ M) and a pharmacological profile similar to that of ACE activity. Very high densities of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding were found in the choroid plexus and the subfornical organ. High densities were present in the caudate putamen and substantia nigra, zona reticulata. Moderate levels were found in the entopeduncular nucleus, globus pallidus, and median eminence of the hypothalamus. Lower levels were detectable in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, the media habenula, the median preoptic area, and the locus coeruleus. Injection of ibotenic acid or colchicine into the caudate putamen decreased (/sup 3/H)captopril-associated autoradiographic grains by 85% in the ipsilateral caudate putamen and by > 50% in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. Thus, ACE in the substantia nigra is located on presynaptic terminals of axons originating from the caudate putamen, and ACE in the caudate putamen is situated in neuronal perikarya or at the terminals of striatal interneurons. The lack of effect of similar injections into the substantia nigra confirmed that the caudate putamen injections did not cause trans-synaptic changes. The presence of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding is consistent with an ACE-mediated production of angiotensin II in some brain regions. Although (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography reveals ACE in a striatonigral pathway, there is no evidence for angiotensin II involvement in such a neuronal pathway. 26 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Strain-Related Differences after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, Andrew; Register, David; Levasseur, Joseph E.; Churn, Severn B.; Sun, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The present study directly compares the effects of experimental brain injury in two commonly used rat strains: Fisher 344 and Sprague-Dawley. We previously found that Fisher rats have a higher mortality rate and more frequent seizure attacks at the same injury level than Sprague-Dawley rats. Although strain differences in rats are commonly accepted as contributing to variability among studies, there is a paucity of literature addressing strain influence in experimental neurotrauma. Therefore this study compares outcome measures in two rat strains following lateral fluid percussion injury. Fisher 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were monitored for changes in physiological measurements, intracranial pressure, and electroencephalographic activity. We further analyzed neuronal degeneration and cell death in the injured brain using Fluoro-Jade-B (FJB) histochemistry and caspase-3 immunostaining. Behavioral studies using the beam walk and Morris water maze were conducted to characterize strain differences in both motor and cognitive functional recovery following injury. We found that Fisher rats had significantly higher intracranial pressure, prolonged seizure activity, increased FJB-positive staining in the injured cortex and thalamus, and increased caspase-3 expression than Sprague-Dawley rats. On average, Fisher rats displayed a greater amount of total recording time in seizure activity and had longer ictal durations. The Fisher rats also had increased motor deficits, correlating with the above results. In spite of these results, Fisher rats performed better on cognitive tests following injury. The results demonstrate that different rat strains respond to injury differently, and thus in preclinical neurotrauma studies strain influence is an important consideration when evaluating outcomes. PMID:20392137

  9. Striatal volume predicts level of video game skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Boot, Walter R; Basak, Chandramallika; Neider, Mark B; Prakash, Ruchika S; Voss, Michelle W; Graybiel, Ann M; Simons, Daniel J; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-11-01

    Video game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks. PMID:20089946

  10. Experimental and numerical study on the mechanical behavior of rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Yousefi, H; Haghi, A Motevalli; Sadati, Sja

    2014-02-01

    Brain tissue is a very soft tissue in which the mechanical properties depend on the loading direction. While few studies have characterized these biomechanical properties, it is worth knowing that accurate characterization of the mechanical properties of brain tissue at different loading directions is a key asset for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. In this study, the hyperelastic mechanical properties of rat brain tissue were measured experimentally and computationally. Prepared cylindrical samples were excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by a tensile testing machine. The effects of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue were measured by applying load on both longitudinal and circumferential directions. The general prediction ability of the proposed hyperelastic model was verified using finite element (FE) simulations of brain tissue tension experiments. The uniaxial experimental results compared well with those predicted by the FE models. The results revealed the influence of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue. The Ogden hyperelastic material model was suitably represented by the non-linear behavior of the brain tissue, which can be used in future biomechanical simulations. The hyperelastic properties of brain tissue provided here have interest to the medical research community as there are several applications where accurate characterization of these properties are crucial for an accurate outcome, such as neurosurgery, robotic surgery, haptic device design or car manufacturing to evaluate possible trauma due to an impact. PMID:24519528

  11. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  12. Melanocortin MC4 receptor agonists alleviate brain damage in abdominal compartment syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Hong-Guang; Zhao, Zi-Ai; Chang, Ming-Tao; Li, Yang; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lian-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality in surgical departments and ICUs. However, its specific pathophysiology is unclear. IAH not only leads to intra-abdominal tissue damage but also causes dysfunction in distal organs, such as the brain. In this study, we explore the protective effects of melanocortin 4 receptor agonists in IAH-induced brain injury. The IAH rat models were induced by hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation (with the mean arterial pressure (MAP) maintained at 30 mm Hg for 90 min followed by the reinfusion of the withdrawn blood with lactated Ringer's solution). Then, air was injected into the peritoneal cavity of the rats to maintain an intra-abdominal pressure of 20 mm Hg for 4 h. The effects of the melanocortin 4 receptor agonist RO27-3225 in alleviating the rats' IAH brain injuries were observed, which indicated that RO27-3225 could reduce brain edema, the expressions of the IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, the blood-brain barrier's permeability and the aquaporin4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) levels. Moreover, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine and the selective melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist HS024 can negate the protective effects of the RO27-3225. The MC4R agonist can effectively reduce the intracerebral proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and alleviate the brain injury caused by blood-brain barrier damage following IAH. PMID:25616531

  13. Immunological identification and characterization of a delayed rectifier K+ channel polypeptide in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, J S

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies specific for the drk1 polypeptide were used to characterize the corresponding protein in rat brain. Recombinant and synthetic immunogens containing fragments of the drk1 polypeptide were produced. Antibodies raised to these immunogens display monospecific reactions with the same 130-kDa polypeptide on immunoblots of adult rat brain membranes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled brain membranes identifies a 38-kDa peptide in tight association with the drk1 polypeptide. Immunohistochemical staining of sections of adult rat cortex shows that drk1 protein is restricted to neurons, where staining is present on dendrites and cell bodies but not on axons. These studies point to the value of such immunological reagents to the further characterization of the components of this delayed rectifier K+ channel in the mammalian central nervous system. Images PMID:1961744

  14. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  15. Pharmacological modulation of brain levels of glutamate and GABA in rats exposed to total sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sahar Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate by selected antidepressants and anticonvulsants could play a beneficial role in total sleep deprivation (TSD) caused by depressed mood. In the present study, albino rats were exposed to TSD for five days. On the sixth day, the brains were removed, and GABA and glutamate levels were measured in the prefrontal cortex and thalamus to identify TSD-induced changes in untreated rats and in rats treated with carbamazepine 40 mg/kg intraperitoneally (IP), fluoxetine 20 mg/kg IP, or desipramine 10 mg/kg IP. Carbamazepine and fluoxetine significantly increased GABA and reduced glutamate levels in both brain areas. Desipramine administration did not affect GABA or glutamate concentrations in the tested brain areas; levels were comparable with those induced by TSD without treatment. These results suggest that administration of carbamazepine or fluoxetine could have a beneficial effect by increasing GABA levels during TSD.

  16. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  17. Effect of mealing on plasma and brain amino acid, and brain monoamine in rats after oral aspartame.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was investigated for its ability to alter brain amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume commercial diets for 60 minutes. In addition, the effects of mealing on the changes in plasma and brain amino acids and brain monoamines induced by glucose and/or insulin, and known pharmacologically active compounds, were studied. The consumption of the commercial chow largely prevented changes in blood glucose and amino acids, and brain amino acids and the monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin that might be expected to occur following glucose with or without insulin. Feeding failed to prevent changes in the above parameters when 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, p-chlorophenylalanine and reserpine were administered. The oral administration of up to 250 mg/kg BW APM with water or glucose followed by free feeding failed to alter brain monoamines. These studies demonstrate the potent ability of food to normalize biochemical parameters in blood and brain that otherwise might occur, and clearly show the lack of effect on brain monoamine levels of abuse doses of APM when administered with food. PMID:2940610

  18. Expression of Aquaporin 4 and Breakdown of the Blood-Brain Barrier after Hypoglycemia-Induced Brain Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yuwu; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Sun, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is a severe clinical event that often results in death. The mechanisms by which hypoglycemia induces brain edema are unclear. Methods In a hypoglycemic injury model established in adult rats, brain edema was verified by measuring brain water content and visualizing water accumulation using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Temporal expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated. We assessed the distribution and expression of AQP4 following glucose deprivation in astrocyte cultures. Results Brain edema was induced immediately after severe hypoglycemia but continued to progress even after recovery from hypoglycemia. Upregulation of AQP4 expression and moderate breakdown of the BBB were observed 24 h after recovery. In vitro, significant redistribution of AQP4 to the plasma membrane was induced following 6 h glucose deprivation. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is caused by cytotoxic and vasogenic factors. Changes in AQP4 location and expression may play a protective role in edema resolution. PMID:25264602

  19. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  20. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of fluvoxamine to the brain in rats under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Fukushima, Keizo; Ito, Yukako; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2012-07-01

    The effects of oxidative stress (OS) on the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine (FLV), particularly on FLV distribution in the plasma, were studied in ferric-nitrilotriacetate-induced OS rat models (OS rats). The study protocol involved a continuous FLV infusion (25.0 μg/kg/min). The resulting mean plasma FLV concentration measured in steady state OS rats was 0.13 ± 0.01 μg/mL, which was significantly lower than plasma concentrations measured in control rats (0.19 ± 0.01 μg/mL). Moreover, the mean FLV concentration in the OS rat brain (0.51 ± 0.08 μg/g) was determined to be approximately half the concentration in control rat brains (0.95 ± 0.11 μg/g). The FLV concentrations in both the unbound fraction of plasma and erythrocytes of OS rats were significantly greater than that of control rats. These results suggest the potential attenuation of FLV's pharmacological effects in patients under OS. PMID:22486632

  1. Characterization and in vivo regulation of V sub 1 -type vasopressin receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shewey, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Specific, high affinity binding sites for ({sup 3}H)-arginine{sup 8}-vasopressin (AVP) have been characterized in Long-Evans rat septal membranes. Binding displacement studies with peptide analogs of AVP indicate that this binding site is similar to the V{sub 1} (pressor)-type receptor for AVP. When added to rat brain septal slices that had been pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)-myoinositol, AVP stimulated the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1-phosphate (IP{sub 1}) in the presence of lithium in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulation was completely inhibited by the specific V{sub 1} antagonists, d(CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP, indicating that AVP stimulates hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids in rat brain septum through an interaction with V{sub 1}-type AVP receptors. Binding studies of AVP receptors in the septum of heterozygous (HE) and homozygous, Brattleboro (BB) rats revealed an increased number of receptors with a lower affinity for AVP in the HO-BB rat when compared to the HE-BB rat. AVP-stimulated accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} was significantly greater in the septum of the HO-BB rat than in the HE-BB rat. AVP receptor binding capacity correlated with release of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} for all three groups studied.

  2. Impact of acute and chronic stress hormone on male albino rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-Li; Chen, Ling; Dong, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the acute and chronic effect of stress (stress hormone) in male albino rat brain. Nor-epinephrine was used for the treatment and saline used for the control. Nor-epinephrine was dissolved in the saline and administered orally to the rats. Following nor-epinephrine administration, the brain was removed surgically at 6 h, 12 h and 45 days. Alanine tansaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were significantly altered in the rats. Lipid peroxidation was measured as malondialdehyde (MDA), showed altered lipid peroxidation. Hematological markers such as packed cell volume (PCV), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocytes and hemoglobin were significantly altered compared to controls. Altered serum biochemical and hematological markers, lipid peroxidation and enzyme activities leads to adverse effect in the cellular metabolism and physiological activities of rats. PMID:26261571

  3. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  4. Behavioural profile of Wistar rats with unilateral striatal lesion by quinolinic acid (animal model of Huntington disease) post-injection of apomorphine and exposure to static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Giorgetto, Carolina; Silva, Elaine Cristina Mazzei; Kitabatake, Takae Tamy; Bertolino, Guilherme; de Araujo, João Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    We analysed the motor behaviour of Wistar rats after 7 days lesion in the left striatum, injected with apomorphine (APO) and stimulated by a continuous magnetic field of 3,200 Gauss. For the behaviour assessment, we utilised the activity cage test and the rotarod test. Sixty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into six groups: control, sham, sham magnetic, lesion, and stimulated South and North Poles. After the experiments, coronal sections of the striatum were taken and stained with Nissl for analysis of the lesion. In the activity cage test for distance (F = 3.19), time of activity (F = 5.46) and crossings (F = 3.31) in all groups, except for the North Pole-stimulated group, we observed a significant increase in these behaviours when compared to the control group. Considering the number of counterclockwise turns, we observed a significant increase in the lesion in the South and North Pole stimulation groups compared with the control group. Highlighting the minor number of counterclockwise turns observed in the North Pole-stimulated group in relation to the South Pole-stimulated and Lesion groups (F = 16.01). The rotarod test revealed a decrease in the time spent in this apparatus for the Lesion group when compared to all other groups (F = 5.46). The morphometric analysis showed a reduction in the number of neurons in the Lesion group in relation to all other groups (F = 5.13). Thus, the results suggest that the static magnetic field north and south promoted a distinct behavioural profile and morphological preservation after 7 days of lesion with quinolinic acid associated with APO. PMID:25665872

  5. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide enriched butanolic residue from Senecio brasiliensis affects behavior and striatal neurotransmitter levels of rats in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, Daniel; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2015-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are toxins that are exclusively biosynthesized by plants and are commonly present in foods and herbs. PAs are usually associated with poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to PA integerrimine N-oxide of rats in adulthood. Pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the butanolic residue of Senecio brasiliensis by gavage on gestational days 6-20 at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg. During adulthood of the offspring, the following behavioral tests were performed: open-field, plus-maze, forced swimming, catalepsy and stereotypy. Histological analyses and monoamine levels were measured. Male offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg showed an increase in locomotion in the open-field test, an increased frequency of entries and time spent in open arms in elevated plus-maze test, as well as decreased swimming time. In the female offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg, there was an increased time of climbing in forced swimming and intensity of stereotyped behavior. The histological study indicates an increase in the number of multinucleated cells in the liver (6 and 9 mg/kg). In neurotransmitter analysis, specifically in the striatum, we observed change in dopamine and serotonin levels in the middle dose. Thus, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide changed behavior in adulthood and neurotransmitter levels in the striatum. Our results agree with previous studies, which showed that integerrimine N-oxide impaired physical and neurobehavioral development in childhood that can persist until adulthood. PMID:26416213

  6. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1–21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders. PMID:26388728

  7. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  8. Neuroprotection by Vitamin C Against Ethanol-Induced Neuroinflammation Associated Neurodegeneration in the Developing Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Shah, Shahid A; Badshah, Haroon; Kim, Min J; Ali, Tahir; Yoon, Gwang H; Kim, Tae H; Abid, Nouman B; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Khan, Sohail; Kim, Myeong O

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces oxidative stress and its exposure during early developmental age causes neuronal cell death which leads to several neurological disorders. We previously reported that vitamin C can protect against ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death in the developing rat brain. Here, we extended our study to understand the therapeutic efficacy of vitamin C against ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation mediated neurodegeneration in postnatal day 7 (PND7) rat. A single episode of ethanol (5g/kg) subcutaneous administration to postnatal day 7 rat significantly induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activated both microglia and astrocytes followed by the induction of different apoptotic markers. On the other hand, due to its free radical scavenging properties, vitamin C treatment significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species, suppressed both activated microglia and astrocytes and reversed other changes including elevated level of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c and different caspases such as caspase-9 and caspase-3 induced by ethanol in developing rat brain. Moreover, vitamin C treatment also reduced ethanol-induced activation of Poly [ADP-Ribose] Polymerase 1(PARP-1) and neurodegeneration as evident from Flouro-Jade-B and Nissl stainined neuronal cell death in PND7 rat brain. These findings suggest that vitamin C mitigated ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neuronal loss and may be beneficial against ethanol damaging effects in brain development. PMID:26831257

  9. Radioprotective effects of valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, YONG; NIU, JUNJIE; LI, SHUPENG; HOU, HUAYING; XU, YING; ZHANG, WEI; JIANG, YUHUA

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of brain tumors but can cause significant damage to surrounding normal brain. The radioprotective effects of valproic acid (VPA) on normal tissue in the rat brain were evaluated following irradiation. Male Wistar rats were used in the present study and 48 rats were randomly divided into four groups consisting of 12 rats each. The whole-brain irradiation (WBI) was delivered by X-ray and the rats received the following treatment once a day for 5 days. The control group (sham-exposed group) received sham irradiation plus physiological saline. The VPA group received sham irradiation plus 150 mg VPA/kg. The X-ray group received WBI plus physiological saline. The combined group received WBI plus 150 mg/kg intraperitoneally VPA. A total of 6 months post-irradiation, the rats were sacrificed and the brains were harvested. Cell apoptosis in the cortex was determined by immunohistochemistry 24 h post-irradiation using an antibody for protein caspase-3. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses were used to assess the effects of VPA on the radioprotection of rat normal brain cells 6 months post-irradiation. The weights of the animals in the TEM group measured over the two weeks after the first injection of VPA were also observed. Histological findings demonstrated that apoptosis occurred on the cortex 1 day after treatment, peaking in the X-ray group. The cells of the combined group showed a moderate caspase-3 staining compared to the X-ray group. There was a trend towards a lower body weight of the X-ray group following irradiation compared to either no-irradiation or rats of the combined group, although there was no significant difference in the average weight between the combined group and irradiated rats. Mild swelling of the capillary endothelial cells in the irregular lumen was observed in the combined group, whereas the X-ray group showed a severe structural disorder. In conclusion, VPA supplementation during

  10. Element distribution in the brain sections of rats measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. Q.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Chai, Z. F.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhao, X. Q.; Zuo, A. J.; Yang, R.

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of trace elements in brain sections was measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. The relative concentration was calculated by means of the normalization of Compton scattering intensity approximately 22 keV, after the normalization for collecting time of X-ray spectrum and the counting of the ion chamber, and subtracting the contribution of the polycarbonate film for supporting sample. Furthermore, the statistical evaluation of the element distribution in various regions of the brain sections of the 20-day-old rats was tested. For investigating the distribution of elements in the brain of iodine deficient rats, Wistar rats were fed with iodine deficient diet and deionized water (ID group). The rats were fed the same iodine deficient diet, but drank KIO 3 solution as control (CT group). The results showed that the contents of calcium (Ca) in thalamus (TH) and copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in cerebral cortex (CX) of ID rats were significantly lower than that of control rats, while the contents of phosphor (P), sulfur (S), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), bromine (Br), chlorine (Cl), zinc (Zn), Ca and Cu of ID in hippocampus (H) and the contents of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in cerebral cortex of ID rats were significantly higher. Especially, the difference of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in H between ID and CT was more significant. The contents of all elements measured in H were higher than (or equal to) CX and/or TH for both groups, except low Cl of the control rats. Furthermore Zn and Cu contents along the hippocampal fissure in both groups were 1.5 ( P<0.001) and 0.87( P<0.03) times higher than in hippocampus, respectively. Considering the results of cluster analysis our study shows that the marked alterations in the spatial distribution of Zn and Ca of ID rats brain during brain development stages. In addition, the effect of the perfusion with 0.9% NaCl solution before taking brain on the distribution of elements in the brain sections was observed and

  11. Imaging of water distribution in the rat brain by activation autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kogure, K.; Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Ido, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Regional water distribution in the rat brain was obtained autoradiographically by activation analysis. The autoradiogram obtained for the normal rat brain showed high accumulation of water in the areas of sensory-motor cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and amygdaloid cortex, whereas corpus callosum and internal capsule showed low water contents as expected. The estimated values of water content were 78.6 +/- 4.9 weight % for gray matter, and 73.5 +/- 4.9 weight % for white matter, respectively. The mean values of the water content were consistent with those obtained by a conventional drying-weighing method.

  12. 26Al incorporation into the brain of rat fetuses through the placental barrier and subsequent metabolism in postnatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Kakimi, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Aluminium (Al) inhibits prenatal and postnatal development of the brain. We used 26Al as a tracer, and measured 26Al incorporation into rat fetuses through the placental barrier by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). From day 15 to day 18 of gestation, 26AlCl 3 was subcutaneously injected into pregnant rats. Considerable amounts of 26Al were measured in the tissues of newborn rats immediately after birth. The amounts of 26Al in the liver and kidneys decreased rapidly during postnatal development. However, approximately 15% of 26Al incorporated into the brain of fetuses remained in the brain of adult rats 730 days after birth.

  13. Brain macrophages in rats following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucocytes with colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    Intravenous injections of colloidal carbon were used to label circulating mononuclear leucocytes. In the neonatal rats (3-5 days old), either 24 or 48 hours later, carbon-labelled macrophages were seen in the brain tissue. In the areas examined, notably the corpus callosum and the cerebral cortex, labelled macrophages were distributed randomly. They were either perivascular, perineuronal or lay between the nerve fibres. The labelled cells were mostly spindle-shaped with an eccentric nucleus and the cytoplasm at one pole of the cell was engorged with dark carbon particles. Abundant labelled cells were also seen over the brain surface in the layers of meninges. There was no evidence of leucocytic infiltration into the brain tissue of mature animals. It is concluded from the present work that a proportion (but not all) of the macrophages in the neonatal rat brain are derived from the blood stream. Images Figs. 1-8 PMID:632205

  14. Chitosan and cyclodextrin in intranasal microemulsion for improved brain buspirone hydrochloride pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Bshara, Hamza; Osman, Rihab; Mansour, Samar; El-Shamy, Abd El-Hameed A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop buspirone hydrochloride microemulsion formulations for intranasal administration to improve the drug bioavailability and provide high drug brain levels. For the purpose, chitosan aspartate, and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin were incorporated in the microemulsions. The prepared formulations were characterized. Biological investigations including pharmacokinetic studies, brain drug targeting efficiency determinations and histopathological examinations were performed on rats. The results showed that safe and stable mucoadhesive microemulsion suitable for nasal administration were successfully prepared. Ex vivo drug permeation revealed high drug permeation from microemulsions. Absolute bioavailability after intranasal administration of buspirone mucoadhesive microemulsion increased significantly and plasma concentration peaked at 15 min. The AUC0-360(brain) was 3 times that obtained after intravenous administration. A high brain targeting efficiency (86.6%) and a direct nose to brain transport (88%) confirmed the direct nose to brain transport of buspirone following nasal administration of the microemulsions. PMID:24274510

  15. CARBONYL SULFIDE INHALATION PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS IN F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, and is a metabolite of the neurotoxicant carbon disulfide. The potential neurotoxicity of inhaled COS was investigated in F344 rats. Male rats were exposed to 0, 75, 150, 300, or 600 ppm COS...

  16. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  17. Acetylcholine content in the brain of rats treated with paraoxon and obidoxime

    PubMed Central

    Milošević, M. P.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of obidoxime on the rise in brain acetylcholine caused by the anticholinesterase paraoxon was studied in the rat. 2. In animals poisoned with a sublethal dose of paraoxon and thereafter treated with obidoxime the levels of both “free” and total brain acetylcholine were practically the same as those in rats injected with paraoxon only. 3. After poisoning with doses of paraoxon which are lethal unless an oxime is also given, the total acetylcholine in the brain of obidoxime-protected rats continued to accumulate, reaching a peak 2 h after injection of paraoxon. At this time no signs of central effects such as convulsions or tremor were seen. 4. Atropine, given 30 min before paraoxon, markedly reduced the rise in total brain acetylcholine seen when the anticholinesterase is given alone. 5. In rats pretreated with atropine and obidoxime excessive doses of paraoxon which are lethal in the absence of the antidotes produced a rise in total brain acetylcholine which was directly proportional to the dose of paraoxon administered. PMID:5485148

  18. Brain oxidative damage restored by Sesbania grandiflora in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thiyagarajan; Sureka, Chandrabose; Bhuvana, Shanmugham; Begum, Vavamohaideen Hazeena

    2015-08-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with high risk of neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, etc., The present study was designed to evaluate the restorative effects of Sesbania grandiflora (S. grandiflora) on oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in the brain of rats. Adult male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 90 days and consecutively treated with S. grandiflora aqueous suspension (SGAS, 1000 mg/kg body weight per day by oral gavage) for a period of 3 weeks. The levels of protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, and activities of cytochrome P450, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were significantly increased, whereas the levels of total thiol, protein thiol, non-protein thiol, nucleic acids, tissue protein and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase were significantly diminished in the brain of rats exposed to cigarette smoke as compared with control rats. Also cigarette smoke exposure resulted in a significant alteration in brain total lipid, total cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids content. Treatment of SGAS is regressed these alterations induced by cigarette smoke. The results of our study suggest that S. grandiflora restores the brain from cigarette smoke induced oxidative damage. S. grandiflora could have rendered protection to the brain by stabilizing their cell membranes and prevented the protein oxidation, probably through its free radical scavenging and anti-peroxidative effect. PMID:25620659

  19. Increased concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine in vitamin B6 deficient neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R; Wagner, H N

    1987-12-01

    Increased concentrations of the endogenous tryptophan metabolite 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) were measured in the brains of vitamin B6 deficient neonatal rats. Mean concentrations of 3-HK in B6 deficient cerebellum, corpus striatum, frontal cortex, and pons/medulla ranged from 9.7 to 18.6 and 102 to 142 nmol/g of wet tissue at 14 and 18 days of age, respectively. 3-HK was not significantly increased in control neonatal or adult rat brain, vitamin B6 deficient rat brain at 7 days of age, or in brains from adult rats deprived of vitamin B6 for 58 days. The administration of daily intraperitoneal injections of vitamin B6 from the 14th to the 18th day of age decreased the concentration of 3-HK to control levels. 3-HK has been shown by other investigators to produce seizures when injected into the cerebral ventricles of adult rodents. Thus, our studies show the accumulation in brain of a putative endogenous convulsant as the result of a nutritional deficiency. PMID:3681302

  20. Cholestasis induced antinociception and decreased gene expression of MOR1 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S; Karami, Z; Mohammadian, A; Khosrobakhsh, F; Rostamzadeh, J

    2015-01-22

    We examined antinociception and gene expression of mu-opioid receptor 1 (MOR1) in some brain areas of cholestatic rats, 21 days after common bile duct ligation (BDL). Cholestasis was induced in male Wistar rats during laparotomy and common BDL. Pain behavior was assessed on days 7, 14 or 21 of BDL using a hotplate test in control, sham and cholestatic groups. On day 21 of BDL, other groups of rats were sacrificed, whole brains were extracted, and the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum in control, sham and cholestatic rats were dissected. We used a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for evaluating MOR1 gene expression. The results revealed that cholestatic rats showed significant antinociception on days 14 and 21 of ligation with the most significant effect on day 21, which was prevented by naloxone (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, the expression of MOR1 gene compared to the sham group was decreased by 42% in the hypothalamus, 41% in the PFC, and 67% in the hippocampus after 21 days of BDL, while no significant change in its expression in the striatum was observed. It can be concluded that a change in endogenous opioid levels and its subsequent influence on the gene expression of MOR in some areas of the rat brain may underlie the altered nociception and other possible pathological changes such as pruritus after induction of cholestasis. PMID:25290008

  1. Spontaneous Wheel Running Exercise Induces Brain Recovery via Neurotrophin-3 Expression Following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Mo; Lee, Sun Min; Kim, Min Hee

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) after applying spontaneous wheel running exercises (SWR) after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups; 20 rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact for TBI, and then, animals were randomly collected from the SWR group and subjected to wheel running exercise for 3 weeks. Ten rats were not subjected to any injury or running exercise to compare with the effect of TBI and SWR. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, skilled ladder rung walking test, and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining analysis for the evaluation of NT-3 expression were used to assess brain damage and recovery. [Results] The TBI-induced decrease in NT-3 expression was recovered by wheel running exercise. Moreover, decreased ischemic volume and progressive neurobehavioral outcome were observed in the SWR group. [Conclusion] Spontaneous running exercise promotes brain recovery and motor function through an increase in expression of NT-3. PMID:24259924

  2. Cerebrovascular responses of the rat brain to noxious stimuli as examined by functional near-infrared whole brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Wei; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2012-01-01

    While near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been increasingly used to detect stimulated brain activities with an advantage of dissociating regional oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations simultaneously, it has not been utilized much in pain research. Here, we investigated and demonstrated the feasibility of using this technique to obtain whole brain hemodynamics in rats and speculated on the functional relevance of the NIR-based hemodynamic signals during pain processing. NIR signals were emitted and collected using a 26-optodes array on rat's dorsal skull surface after the removal of skin. Following the subcutaneous injection of formalin (50 μl, 3%) into a hindpaw, several isolable brain regions showed hemodynamic changes, including the anterior cingulate cortex, primary/secondary somatosensory cortexes, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (n = 6). Time courses of hemodynamic changes in respective regions matched with the well-documented biphasic excitatory response. Surprisingly, an atypical pattern (i.e., a decrease in oxyhemoglobin concentration with a concomitant increase in deoxyhemoglobin concentration) was seen in phase II. In a separate group of rats with innocuous brush and noxious pinch of the same area (n = 11), results confirmed that the atypical pattern occurred more likely in the presence of nociception than nonpainful stimulation, suggesting it as a physiological substrate when the brain processes pain. In conclusion, the NIR whole brain imaging provides a useful alternative to study pain in vivo using small-animal models. Our results support the notion that neurovascular response patterns depend on stimuli, bringing attention to the interpretation of vascular-based neuroimaging data in studies of pain. PMID:22378174

  3. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Stemper, Brian D.; Olsen, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure. PMID:25910266

  4. Establishment and identification of a hypoxia-ischemia brain damage model in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; ZHANG, WEIRAN; HE, XUE; WANG, JINHU; JIANG, KEWEN; ZHAO, ZHENGYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to set up a reliable model of severe hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and several methods were used to identify whether the model was successful. A total of 40 healthy 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: The sham-surgery group (n=18) and the HIBD model group (n=22). The HIBD model was produced according to the traditional Rice method. The rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether. The left common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed, ligated and cut. Following this, the rats were exposed to hypoxia in a normobaric chamber filled with 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 2 h. In the sham-surgery group, the left CCA was exposed but was not ligated, cut or exposed to hypoxia. The neurobehavioral changes of the rats were observed in the 24 h after HIBD. The brains were collected after 72 h to observe the pathological morphological changes of the brain tissue. The behavioral ability and neurobehavioral changes we