Science.gov

Sample records for rat cerebellar cortex

  1. Stereological study of the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellar cortex development in rat.

    PubMed

    Hami, Javad; Vafaei-Nezhad, Saeed; Ghaemi, Kazem; Sadeghi, Akram; Ivar, Ghasem; Shojae, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes during pregnancy is associated with the deficits in balance and motor coordination and altered social behaviors in offspring. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of maternal diabetes and insulin treatment on the cerebellar volume and morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex of rat neonates during the first two postnatal weeks. Sprague Dawley female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition. At the end of pregnancy, the male offspring euthanized on postnatal days (P) 0, 7, and 14. Cavalieri's principle and fractionator methods were used to estimate the cerebellar volume, the thickness and the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex. In spite of P0, there was a significant reduction in the cerebellar volume and the thickness of the external granule, molecular, and internal granule layers between the diabetic and the control animals. In diabetic group, the granular and purkinje cell densities were increased at P0. Moreover, the number of granular and purkinje cells in the cerebellum of diabetic neonates was reduced in comparison with the control group at P7 and P14. There were no significant differences in either the volume and thickness or the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex between the insulin-treated diabetic group and controls. Our data indicate that diabetes in pregnancy disrupts the morphogenesis of cerebellar cortex. This dysmorphogenesis may be part of the cascade of events through which diabetes during pregnancy affects motor coordination and social behaviors in offspring. PMID:26842601

  2. Importance of Nitric Oxide for Local Increases of Blood Flow in Rat Cerebellar Cortex During Electrical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgoren, Nuran; Fabricius, Martin; Lauritzen, Martin

    1994-06-01

    The endothelium-derived relaxing factor, probably nitric oxide (NO), is a potent vasodilator that regulates the vascular tone in several vascular beds, including the brain. We explored the possibility that NO might be of importance for the increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with activity of the well-defined neuronal circuits of the rat cerebellar cortex. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure increases of cerebellar blood flow evoked by trains of electrical stimulations of the dorsal surface. The evoked increases of CBF were frequency-dependent, being larger on than off the parallel fiber tracts, suggesting that conduction along parallel fibers and synaptic activation of target cells were important for the increase of CBF. This was verified experimentally since the evoked CBF increases were abolished by tetrodotoxin and reduced by 10 mM Mg2+ and selective antagonists for non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The cerebellar cortex contains high levels of NO synthase. This raised the possibility that NO was involved in the increase of CBF associated with neuronal activation. NO synthase inhibition by topical application of N^G-nitro-L-arginine attenuated the evoked CBF increase by about 50%. This effect was partially reversed by pretreatment with L-arginine, the natural substrate for the enzyme, while N^G-nitro-D-arginine, the inactive enantiomer, had no effect on the evoked CBF increases. Simultaneous blockade of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and NO synthase had no further suppressing effect on the blood flow increase than either substance alone, suggesting that the NO-dependent flow rise was dependent on postsynaptic mechanisms. These findings are consistent with the idea that local synthesis of NO is involved in the transduction mechanism between neuronal activity and increased CBF.

  3. Caytaxin Deficiency Disrupts Signaling Pathways in Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Gong, Suzhen; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically dystonic (dt) rat, an autosomal recessive model of generalized dystonia, harbors an insertional mutation in Atcay. As a result, dt rats are deficient in Atcay transcript and the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Previous electrophysiological and biochemical studies have defined olivocerebellar pathways, particularly the climbing fiber projection to Purkinje cells, as a site of significant functional abnormality in dt rats. In normal rats, Atcay transcript is abundantly expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of cerebellar cortex. To better understand the consequences of caytaxin deficiency in cerebellar cortex, differential gene expression was examined in dt rats and their normal littermates. Data from oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) identified phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, and extracellular matrix interactions as domains of cellular dysfunction in dt rats. In dt rats, genes encoding the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1, Crhr1) and calcium-transporting plasma membrane ATPase 4 (PMCA4, Atp2b4) showed the greatest up-regulation with QRT-PCR. Immunocytochemical experiments demonstrated that CRH-R1, CRH, and PMCA4 were up-regulated in cerebellar cortex of mutant rats. Along with previous electrophysiological and pharmacological studies, our data indicate that caytaxin plays a critical role in the molecular response of Purkinje cells to climbing fiber input. Caytaxin may also contribute to maturational events in cerebellar cortex. PMID:17092653

  4. Activity-induced tissue oxygenation changes in rat cerebellar cortex: interplay of postsynaptic activation and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Offenhauser, Nikolas; Thomsen, Kirsten; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging relies on the robust coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the physiological basis of the neuroimaging signals is still poorly understood. We examined the mechanisms of activity-dependent changes in tissue oxygenation in relation to variations in CBF responses and postsynaptic activity in rat cerebellar cortex. To increase synaptic activity we stimulated the monosynaptic, glutamatergic climbing fibres that excite Purkinje cells via AMPA receptors. We used local field potentials to indicate synaptic activity, and recorded tissue oxygen partial pressure (Ptiss,O2) by polarographic microelectrodes, and CBF using laser-Doppler flowmetry. The disappearance rate of oxygen in the tissue increased linearly with synaptic activity. This indicated that, without a threshold, oxygen consumption increased as a linear function of synaptic activity. The reduction in Ptiss,O2 preceded the rise in CBF. The time integral (area) of the negative Ptiss,O2 response increased non-linearly showing saturation at high levels of synaptic activity, concomitant with a steep rise in CBF. This was accompanied by a positive change in Ptiss,O2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition enhanced the initial negative Ptiss,O2 response (‘dip’), while attenuating the evoked CBF increase and positive Ptiss,O2 response equally. This indicates that increases in CBF counteract activity-induced reductions in Ptiss,O2, and suggests the presence of a tissue oxygen reserve. The changes in Ptiss,O2 and CBF were strongly attenuated by AMPA receptor blockade. Our findings suggest an inverse relationship between negative Ptiss,O2 and CBF responses, and provide direct in vivo evidence for a tight coupling between activity in postsynaptic AMPA receptors and cerebellar oxygen consumption. PMID:15774524

  5. [Ultrastructure of the cortex of the cerebellar nodulus in rats after a flight on the biosatellite Kosmos-1514].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, I B; D'iachkova, L N

    1986-01-01

    The ultrastructure of moss fibers and granule cells of the cortex of the cerebellum nodulus of rats flown for 5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1514 and exposed to 1 g for 6-8 hours upon return to Earth is indicative of an excess excitation of terminals of moss fibers and excitation of granule cells. The excitation of moss fiber terminals reflect the excitatory state of hair cells of the otolith apparatus and neurons of the vestibular ganglion produced by the effect of 1 g after exposure to microgravity. This state can be viewed as evidence of a greater sensitivity of the hair cell of the otolith organ--neuron of the vestibular ganglion system during exposure to microgravity. It is hypothesized that the sensitivity of this system of other mammals may also increase in microgravity. PMID:3784524

  6. Effect of two medium chain triglycerides-supplemented diets on synaptic morphology in the cerebellar cortex of late-adult rats.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Platano, Daniela; Aicardi, Giorgio; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2009-12-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) have shown beneficial effects in experimental models of neurodegeneration, designating aged individuals as possible recipients. However, few studies have investigated their consequences on aging brain. Here, late-adult rats (19 months of age) were fed for 8 weeks with two medium chain triglycerides-supplemented diets (MCT-SDs) and the average area (S), numeric density (Nv(s)), and surface density (S(v)) of synapses, as well as the average volume (V), numeric density (Nv(m)), and volume density (V(v)) of synaptic mitochondria were evaluated in granule cell layer of the cerebellar cortex (GCL-CCx) by computer-assisted morphometric methods. MCT content was 10 or 20%. About 10%MCT-SD induced the early appearance of senescent patterns (decreased Nv(s) and Nv(m); increased V), whereas 20%MCT-SD caused no changes. Recently, we have shown that both MCT-SDs accelerate aging in the stratum moleculare of CA1 (SM CA1), but are "antiaging" in the outer molecular layer of dentate gyrus (OML DG). Since GCL-CCx is more vulnerable to age than OML DG but less than SM CA1, present and previous results suggest that the effects of MCT-SDs in the aging brain critically depend on neuronal vulnerability to age, besides MCT percentage. PMID:19455680

  7. Temporal coupling between neuronal activity and blood flow in rat cerebellar cortex as indicated by field potential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Laser-Doppler flowmetry and extracellular recordings of field potentials were used to examine the temporal coupling between neuronal activity and increases in cerebellar blood flow (CeBF). Climbing fibre-evoked increases in CeBF were dependent on stimulus duration, indicating that increases in CeBF reflected a time integral in neuronal activity. The simplest way to represent neuronal activity over time was to obtain a running summation of evoked field potential amplitudes (runΣFP). RunΣFP was calculated for each stimulus protocol and compared with the time course of the CeBF responses to demonstrate coupling between nerve cell activity and CeBF. In the climbing fibre system, the amplitude and time course of CeBF were in agreement with the calculated postsynaptic runΣFP (2–20 Hz for 60 s). This suggested coupling between CeBF and neuronal activity in this excitatory, monosynaptic, afferent-input system under these conditions. There was no correlation between runΣFP and CeBF during prolonged stimulation. Parallel fibre-evoked increases in CeBF correlated with runΣFP of pre- and postsynaptic potentials (2–15 Hz for 60 s). At higher stimulation frequencies and during longer-lasting stimulation the time course and amplitudes of CeBF responses correlated with runΣFP of presynaptic, but not postsynaptic potentials. This suggested a more complex relationship in this mixed inhibitory-excitatory, disynaptic, afferent-input system. This study has demonstrated temporal coupling between neuronal activity and CeBF in the monosynaptic, excitatory climbing-fibre system. In the mixed mono- and disynaptic parallel fibre system, temporal coupling was most clearly observed at low stimulation frequencies. We propose that appropriate modelling of electrophysiological data is needed to document functional coupling of neuronal activity and blood flow. PMID:10673558

  8. Cerebellar Processing of Sensory Inputs Primes Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, B.; Hubsch, C.; Pradeep, S.; Roze, E.; Vidailhet, M.; Meunier, S.; Kishore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of the human primary motor cortex (M1) has a critical role in motor control and learning. The cerebellum facilitates these functions using sensory feedback. We investigated whether cerebellar processing of sensory afferent information influences the plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Theta-burst stimulation protocols (TBS), both excitatory and inhibitory, were used to modulate the excitability of the posterior cerebellar cortex and to condition an ongoing M1 plasticity. M1 plasticity was subsequently induced in 2 different ways: by paired associative stimulation (PAS) involving sensory processing and TBS that exclusively involves intracortical circuits of M1. Cerebellar excitation attenuated the PAS-induced M1 plasticity, whereas cerebellar inhibition enhanced and prolonged it. Furthermore, cerebellar inhibition abolished the topography-specific response of PAS-induced M1 plasticity, with the effects spreading to adjacent motor maps. Conversely, cerebellar excitation had no effect on the TBS-induced M1 plasticity. This demonstrates the key role of the cerebellum in priming M1 plasticity, and we propose that it is likely to occur at the thalamic or olivo-dentate nuclear level by influencing the sensory processing. We suggest that such a cerebellar priming of M1 plasticity could shape the impending motor command by favoring or inhibiting the recruitment of several muscle representations. PMID:22351647

  9. Diurnal influences on electrophysiological oscillations and coupling in the dorsal striatum and cerebellar cortex of the anesthetized rat

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Ariana; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Chapman, C. Andrew; Amir, Shimon; Courtemanche, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate behavioral processes over a 24 h period through clock gene expression. What is largely unknown is how these molecular influences shape neural activity in different brain areas. The clock gene Per2 is rhythmically expressed in the striatum and the cerebellum and its expression is linked with daily fluctuations in extracellular dopamine levels and D2 receptor activity. Electrophysiologically, dopamine depletion enhances striatal local field potential (LFP) oscillations. We investigated if LFP oscillations and synchrony were influenced by time of day, potentially via dopamine mechanisms. To assess the presence of a diurnal effect, oscillatory power and coherence were examined in the striatum and cerebellum of rats under urethane anesthesia at four different times of day zeitgeber time (ZT1, 7, 13 and 19—indicating number of hours after lights turned on in a 12:12 h light-dark cycle). We also investigated the diurnal response to systemic raclopride, a D2 receptor antagonist. Time of day affected the proportion of LFP oscillations within the 0–3 Hz band and the 3–8 Hz band. In both the striatum and the cerebellum, slow oscillations were strongest at ZT1 and weakest at ZT13. A 3–8 Hz oscillation was present when the slow oscillation was lowest, with peak 3–8 Hz activity occurring at ZT13. Raclopride enhanced the slow oscillations, and had the greatest effect at ZT13. Within the striatum and with the cerebellum, 0–3 Hz coherence was greatest at ZT1, when the slow oscillations were strongest. Coherence was also affected the most by raclopride at ZT13. Our results suggest that neural oscillations in the cerebellum and striatum, and the synchrony between these areas, are modulated by time of day, and that these changes are influenced by dopamine manipulation. This may provide insight into how circadian gene transcription patterns influence network electrophysiology. Future experiments will address how these network alterations are

  10. Cerebellar networks with the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    The dominant view of cerebellar function has been that it is exclusively concerned with motor control and coordination. Recent findings from neuroanatomical, behavioral, and imaging studies have profoundly changed this view. Neuroanatomical studies using virus transneuronal tracers have demonstrated that cerebellar output reaches vast areas of the neocortex, including regions of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, it has recently become clear that the cerebellum is reciprocally connected with the basal ganglia, which suggests that the two subcortical structures are part of a densely interconnected network. Taken together, these findings elucidate the neuroanatomical substrate for cerebellar involvement in non-motor functions mediated by the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in processes traditionally associated with the basal ganglia. PMID:23579055

  11. Long lasting cerebellar alterations after perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Campanille, Verónica; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Rivière, Stéphanie; Logica, Tamara; Kölliker, Rodolfo; Capani, Francisco; Castilla, Rocío

    2015-07-01

    The developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to injury before, at and after birth. Among possible insults, hypoxia suffered as a consequence of perinatal asphyxia (PA) exhibits the highest incidence levels and the cerebellar circuitry appears to be particularly susceptible, as the cellular makeup and the quantity of inputs change quickly during days and weeks following birth. In this work, we have used a murine model to induce severe global PA in rats at the time of birth. Short-term cerebellar alterations within this PA model have been previously reported but whether such alterations remain in adulthood has not been conclusively determined yet. For this reason, and given the crucial cerebellar role in determining connectivity patterns in the brain, the aim of our work is to unveil long-term cerebellum histomorphology following a PA insult. Morphological and cytological neuronal changes and glial reaction in the cerebellar cortex were analyzed at postnatal 120 (P120) following injury performed at birth. As compared to control, PA animals exhibited: (1) an increase in molecular and granular thickness, both presenting lower cellular density; (2) a disarrayed Purkinje cell layer presenting a higher number of anomalous calbindin-stained cells. (3) focal swelling and marked fragmentation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in Purkinje cell dendrites and, (4) an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in Bergmann cells and the granular layer. In conclusion, we demonstrate that PA produces long-term damage in cellular histomorphology in rat cerebellar cortex which could be involved in the pathogenesis of cognitive deficits observed in both animals and humans. PMID:26116983

  12. Neurotrophic effects of PACAP in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Botia, Béatrice; Basille, Magali; Allais, Aurélie; Raoult, Emilie; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Galas, Ludovic; Jolivel, Valérie; Wurtz, Olivier; Komuro, Hitoshi; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Burel, Delphine; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Vaudry, David

    2007-09-01

    In the rodent cerebellum, PACAP is expressed by Purkinje neurons and PAC1 receptors are present on granule cells during both the development period and in adulthood. Treatment of granule neurons with PACAP inhibits proliferation, slows migration, promotes survival and induces differentiation. PACAP also protects cerebellar granule cells against the deleterious effects of neurotoxic agents. Most of the neurotrophic effects of PACAP are mediated through the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and often involve the ERK MAPkinase. Caspase-3 is one of the key enzymes implicated in the neuroprotective action of PACAP but PACAP also inhibits caspase-9 activity and increases Bcl-2 expression. PACAP and functional PAC1 receptors are expressed in the monkey and human cerebellar cortex with a pattern of expression very similar to that described in rodents, suggesting that PACAP could also exert neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective functions in the cerebellum of primates including human. PMID:17544170

  13. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  14. Synaptic Multivesicular Release in the Cerebellar Cortex: Its Mechanism and Role in Neural Encoding and Processing.

    PubMed

    Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    The number of synaptic vesicles released during fast release plays a major role in determining the strength of postsynaptic response. However, it remains unresolved how the number of vesicles released in response to action potentials is controlled at a single synapse. Recent findings suggest that the Cav2.1 subtype (P/Q-type) of voltage-gated calcium channels is responsible for inducing presynaptic multivesicular release (MVR) at rat cerebellar glutamatergic synapses from granule cells to molecular layer interneurons. The topographical distance from Cav2.1 channels to exocytotic Ca(2+) sensors is a critical determinant of MVR. In physiological trains of presynaptic neurons, MVR significantly impacts the excitability of postsynaptic neurons, not only by increasing peak amplitude but also by prolonging decay time of the postsynaptic currents. Therefore, MVR contributes additional complexity to neural encoding and processing in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25971904

  15. Cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are concomitantly activated during eyeblink conditioning: a 7T fMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Thürling, Markus; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Stefanescu, Roxana M; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Ladd, Mark E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-21

    There are controversies whether learning of conditioned eyeblink responses primarily takes place within the cerebellar cortex, the interposed nuclei, or both. It has also been suggested that the cerebellar cortex may be important during early stages of learning, and that there is a shift to the cerebellar nuclei during later stages. As yet, human studies have provided little to resolve this question. In the present study, we established a setup that allows ultra-high-field 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the cerebellar cortex and interposed cerebellar nuclei simultaneously during delay eyeblink conditioning in humans. Event-related fMRI signals increased concomitantly in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during early acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in 20 healthy human subjects. ANOVAs with repeated-measures showed significant effects of time across five blocks of 20 conditioning trials in the cortex and nuclei (p < 0.05, permutation corrected). Activations were most pronounced in, but not limited to, lobules VI and interposed nuclei. Increased activations were most prominent at the first time the maximum number of conditioned responses was achieved. Our data are consistent with a simultaneous and synergistic two-site model of learning during acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblinks. Because increased MRI signal reflects synaptic activity, concomitantly increased signals in the cerebellar nuclei and cortex are consistent with findings of learning related potentiation at the mossy fiber to nuclear cell synapse and mossy fiber to granule cell synapse. Activity related to the expression of conditioned responses, however, cannot be excluded. PMID:25609637

  16. Localization of the cerebellar cortical zone mediating acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Adam B; Freeman, John H

    2014-10-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits eyelid closure before training. The CS and US inputs converge on Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. The cerebellar cortex plays a substantial role in acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning in rabbits and rodents, but the specific area of the cortex that is necessary for acquisition in rodents has not been identified. A recent study identified an eyeblink microzone in the mouse cerebellar cortex at the base of the primary fissure (Heiney, Kim, Augustine, & Medina, 2014). There is no evidence that the cortex in this eyeblink microzone plays a role in rodent eyeblink conditioning but it is a good candidate region. Experiment 1 examined the effects of unilateral (ipsilateral to the US) lesions of lobule HVI, the lateral anterior lobe, or the base of the primary fissure on eyeblink conditioning in rats. Lesions of either the anterior lobe or lobule HVI impaired acquisition, but lesions of the base of the primary fissure produced the largest deficit. Experiment 2 used reversible inactivation with muscimol to demonstrate that inactivation of the putative eyeblink microzone severely impaired acquisition and had only a modest effect on retention of eyeblink conditioning. The findings indicate that the base of the primary fissure is the critical zone of the cerebellar cortex for acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats. PMID:24931828

  17. High frequency synchrony in the cerebellar cortex during goal directed movements

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Jonathan D.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensory-motor integration and cognitive functions. The origin and function of the field potential oscillations in the cerebellum, especially in the high frequencies, have not been explored sufficiently. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of high frequency field potentials (150–350 Hz) in the cerebellar cortex in a behavioral context. To this end, we recorded from the paramedian lobule in rats using micro electro-corticogram (μ-ECoG) electrode arrays while the animal performed a lever press task using the forelimb. The phase synchrony analysis shows that the high frequency oscillations recorded at multiple points across the paramedian cortex episodically synchronize immediately before and desynchronize during the lever press. The electrode contacts were grouped according to their temporal course of phase synchrony around the time of lever press. Contact groups presented patches with slightly stronger synchrony values in the medio-lateral direction, and did not appear to form parasagittal zones. The size and location of these patches on the cortical surface are in agreement with the sensory evoked granular layer patches originally reported by Welker's lab (Shambes et al., 1978). Spatiotemporal synchrony of high frequency field potentials has not been reported at such large-scales previously in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:26257613

  18. Re-defining the cerebellar cortex as an assembly of non-uniform Purkinje cell microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Nadia L; Lang, Eric J; Sillitoe, Roy V; Apps, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellar cortex is generally assumed to have a uniform cytoarchitecture. Differences in cerebellar function are thought to arise, in the main, through distinct patterns of input and output connectivity, rather than as a result of variations in cortical microcircuitry. However, evidence from anatomical, physiological and genetic studies is increasingly challenging this orthodoxy and there are now various lines of evidence that the cerebellar cortex is non uniform. Here we develop the hypothesis that regional differences in cerebellar cortical microcircuit properties lead to important differences in information processing. PMID:25601779

  19. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  20. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D; Bertelsen, Mads F; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R; Reep, Roger L; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Manger, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  1. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  2. Calcium-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Sergei G; Pushchin, Igor I

    2008-07-01

    Studying the distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins allows one to discover specific neuron chemotypes involved in the regulation of the activity of various neural elements. While extensive data exist on Ca2+-binding proteins in the nervous system, in particular, in the cerebellar cortex of terrestrial mammals, the localization of these proteins in the cerebellar cortex of marine mammals has not been studied. We studied the localization of calretinin, calbindin, and parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncates and harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena. In both species, most Purkinje cells were calbindin-immunoreactive, while calretinin and parvalbumin were expressed in a small portion of Purkinje cells. In addition, calretinin-immunoreactive unipolar brush and granule cells and calbindin- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket, stellate, and Golgi cells were observed. Calretinin-immunoreactive corticopetal (mossy and climbing) fibers were found. Based on the length of the primary dendrite, short-, middle-, and long-dendrite unipolar brush cells could be distinguished. The validity of this classification was supported using cluster analysis suggesting the presence of several natural types of these cells. The distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the cetaceans studied was generally similar to that reported for terrestrial mammals, suggesting that this trait is evolutionarily conservative in mammals. PMID:18455363

  3. Antigenic compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex in an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Marotte, Lauren R; Hawkes, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellar cortex is apparently uniform in composition, but a complex heterogeneous pattern can be revealed by using biochemical markers such as zebrin II/aldolase C, which is expressed by a subset of Purkinje cells that form a highly reproducible array of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes. The architecture revealed by zebrin II expression is conserved among many taxa of birds and mammals. In this report zebrin II immunohistochemistry has been used in both section and whole-mount preparations to analyze the cerebellar architecture of the Australian tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). The gross appearance of the wallaby cerebellum is remarkable, with unusually elaborate cerebellar lobules with multiple sublobules and fissures. However, despite the morphological complexity, the underlying zone and stripe architecture is conserved and the typical mammalian organization is present. PMID:22907194

  4. Cerebellar Structure and Function in Male Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, WKHA emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone CS or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC. PMID:23398437

  5. Curcumin Can Prevent the Changes in Cerebellar Structure and Function Induced by Sodium Metabisulfite in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Rashidiani-Rashidabadi, Ali; Poostpasand, Aghdas; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Asadi-Golshan, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Sulfites are used as anti-microbial and anti-oxidant agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Curcumin, a flavonoid, is an Asian spice that shows neuroprotective activities. The current study aimed to stereologically assess the rats' cerebellar cortex and rotarod performance following sulfite exposure and determine the possible neuroprotective potential of curcumin. The rats were divided into five groups: distilled water, olive oil, curcumin (100 mg/kg/day), sodium metabisulfite (25 mg/kg/day), and sodium metabisulfite+curcumin. At 56 days after treatment, rotarod performance was tested, and then the cerebellum was removed for stereological analysis. The study results revealed 31%, 36%, 19% and 24% decrease in the total volume of the cerebellum, cortex, the total number of the Purkinje cells and length of the nerve fibers in the cortex per Purkinje, respectively in the sodium metabisulfite-treated rats compared to the distilled water group (p<0.01). The pre-trained animals on the rotarod apparatus were tested first on the fixed speed rotarod protocol followed by the accelerating rotarod protocol two days later. The results showed a significant decrease in the latency to fall in both test in sulfite-treated rats. The sulfite effects on the structural parameters and rotarod performance were significantly protected by the concomitant curcumin treatment (p<0.001). Sulfite can induce structural and functional changes in the rats' cerebellum and concomitant curcumin prescription plays a neuroprotective role. PMID:24465141

  6. Finding prefrontal cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Christiana M

    2016-08-15

    The prefrontal cortex of the rat. I. Cortical projection of the mediodorsal nucleus. II. Efferent connections The cortical projection field of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD) was identified in the rat using the Fink-Heimer silver technique for tracing degenerating fibers. Small stereotaxic lesions confined to MD were followed by terminal degeneration in the dorsal bank of the rhinal sulcus (sulcal cortex) and the medial wall of the hemisphere anterior and dorsal to the genu of the corpus callosum (medial cortex). No degenerating fibers were traced to the convexity of the hemisphere. The cortical formation receiving a projection from MD is of a relatively undifferentiated type which had been previously classified as juxtallocortex. A study of the efferent fiber connections of the rat׳s MD-projection cortex demonstrated some similarities to those of monkey prefrontal cortex. A substantial projection to the pretectal area and deep layers of the superior colliculus originates in medial cortex, a connection previously reported for caudal prefrontal (area 8) cortex in the monkey. Sulcal cortex projects to basal olfactory structures and lateral hypothalamus, as does orbital frontal cortex in the monkey. The rat׳s MD-projection cortex differs from that in the monkey in that it lacks a granular layer and appears to have no prominent direct associations with temporal and juxtahippocampal areas. Furthermore, retrograde degeneration does not appear in the rat thalamus after damage to MD-projection areas, suggesting that the striatum or thalamus receives a proportionally larger share of the MD-projection in this animal than it does in the monkey. Comparative behavioral investigations are in progress to investigate functional differences between granular prefrontal cortex in the primate and the relatively primitive MD-projection cortex in the rat. © 1969. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26867704

  7. Surface-based atlases of cerebellar cortex in the human, macaque, and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, David C.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes surface reconstructions and associated flat maps that represent the highly convoluted shape of cerebellar cortex in three species: human, macaque, and mouse. The reconstructions were based on high-resolution structural MRI data obtained from other laboratories. The surface areas determined for the fiducial reconstructions are about 600 cm(2) for the human, 60 cm(2) for the macaque, and 0.8 cm(2) for the mouse. As expected from the ribbon-like pattern of cerebellar folding, the cerebellar flat maps are elongated along the axis parallel to the midline. However, the degree of elongation varies markedly across species. The macaque flat map is many times longer than its mean width, whereas the mouse flat map is only slightly elongated and the human map is intermediate in its aspect ratio. These cerebellar atlases, along with associated software for visualization and for mapping experimental data onto the atlas, are freely available to the neuroscience community (see http:/brainmap.wustl.edu).

  8. Robustness effect of gap junctions between Golgi cells on cerebellar cortex oscillations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. Results Isolated GoCs coupled by gap junctions had a strong tendency to generate spontaneous oscillations without affecting their mean firing frequencies in response to distributed mossy fiber input. Conversely, when GoCs were synaptically connected in the granular layer, gap junctions increased the power of the oscillations, but the oscillations were primarily driven by the synaptic feedback loop between GoCs and GCs, and the gap junctions did not change oscillation frequency or the mean firing rate of either GoCs or GCs. Conclusion Our modeling results suggest that gap junctions between GoCs increase the robustness of cerebellar cortex oscillations that are primarily driven by the feedback loop between GoCs and GCs. The robustness effect of gap junctions on synaptically driven oscillations observed in our model may be a general mechanism, also present in other regions of the brain. PMID:22330240

  9. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:26982219

  10. Cerebellar vermis is a target of projections from the motor areas in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Keith A; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2011-09-20

    The cerebellum has a medial, cortico-nuclear zone consisting of the cerebellar vermis and the fastigial nucleus. Functionally, this zone is concerned with whole-body posture and locomotion. The vermis classically is thought to be included within the "spinocerebellum" and to receive somatic sensory input from ascending spinal pathways. In contrast, the lateral zone of the cerebellum is included in the "cerebro-cerebellum" because it is densely interconnected with the cerebral cortex. Here we report the surprising result that a portion of the vermis receives dense input from the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus into lobules VB-VIIIB of the vermis and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to define disynaptic inputs to it. We found that large numbers of neurons in the primary motor cortex and in several motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere project to the vermis. Thus, our results challenge the classical view of the vermis and indicate that it no longer should be considered as entirely isolated from the cerebral cortex. Instead, lobules VB-VIIIB represent a site where the cortical motor areas can influence descending control systems involved in the regulation of whole-body posture and locomotion. We argue that the projection from the cerebral cortex to the vermis is part of the neural substrate for anticipatory postural adjustments and speculate that dysfunction of this system may underlie some forms of dystonia. PMID:21911381

  11. [EXPRESSION OF DOUBLECORTIN AND NeuN IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR NEURONS IN RAT].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Karniushko, O A

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed on the offspring of 5 outbred female albino rats to give a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of doublecortin (DCX) and NeuN expression in the neurons of the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus in the early postnatal ontogenesis (postnatal days 2-15). DCX expression was detected in postmitotic neurons of the external granular layer and migrating neurons of the cerebellar cortex. At postnatal days 2 and 7 DCX expression in neocerebellum was higher than in paleocerebellum. NeuN expression was found to appear in migrating granule neurons, and reach the maximum in mature neurons of internal granular layer. DCX expression was not detected in Purkinje cells and in the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum. In neurons of the nucleus interpositus the expression of NeuN progressively increased from postnatal days 2 to 15. Thus, a comparative immunohistochemical study of the dynamics of the expression of the pair of molecular markers studied proved to be an effective way of the assessment of the development of granular neurons of the cerebellum in early postnatal ontogenesis. PMID:27487661

  12. Reevaluation of the Beam and Radial Hypotheses of Parallel Fiber Action in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The role of parallel fibers (PFs) in cerebellar physiology remains controversial. Early studies inspired the “beam” hypothesis whereby granule cell (GC) activation results in PF-driven, postsynaptic excitation of beams of Purkinje cells (PCs). However, the “radial” hypothesis postulates that the ascending limb of the GC axon provides the dominant input to PCs and generates patch-like responses. Using optical imaging and single-cell recordings in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo, this study reexamines the beam versus radial controversy. Electrical stimulation of mossy fibers (MFs) as well as microinjection of NMDA in the granular layer generates beam-like responses with a centrally located patch-like response. Remarkably, ipsilateral forepaw stimulation evokes a beam-like response in Crus I. Discrete molecular layer lesions demonstrate that PFs contribute to the peripherally generated responses in Crus I. In contrast, vibrissal stimulation induces patch-like activation of Crus II and GABAA antagonists fail to convert this patch-like activity into a beam-like response, implying that molecular layer inhibition does not prevent beam-like responses. However, blocking excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) generates beam-like responses in Crus II. These beam-like responses are suppressed by focal inhibition of MF-GC synaptic transmission. Using EAAT4 reporter transgenic mice, we show that peripherally evoked patch-like responses in Crus II are aligned between parasagittal bands of EAAT4. This is the first study to demonstrate beam-like responses in the cerebellar cortex to peripheral, MF, and GC stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of the responses depends on extracellular glutamate and its local regulation by EAATs. PMID:23843513

  13. Influence of thyroid hormones on maturation of rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Jimena; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2007-05-01

    Thyroid hormone influences brain maturation through interaction with nuclear receptors and regulation of gene expression. Their role on astrocyte maturation remains unclear. We have analyzed the role of thyroid hormone in rat cerebellar astrocyte maturation by comparing the sequential patterns of intermediate filament expression in normal and hypothyroid animals. During normal development astroglial cells sequentially express nestin, vimentin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Differentiated astrocytes appeared in the superior medullary vellum by postnatal day 2 and reached the white mater and internal granular layer by postnatal day 4. Intermediate filament marker expression was transiently lost from postnatal days 6 to 8 in anterior lobes, without an increased apoptosis. Vimentin expression was replaced by glial fibrillary acidic protein between postnatal days 10 and 32. The differentiated astrocytes were evenly distributed throughout the cerebellar slices, including the internal granular layer. Differences between normal and hypothyroid rats were observed starting from postnatal day 4, with lack of differentiated astrocytes in the internal granular layer. The transient decrease of astrocyte markers immunoreactivity in the anterior lobe did not take place in hypothyroid rats. The vimentin-glial fibrillary acidic protein transition was delayed and most differentiated astrocytes remained confined to the white matter. The results indicate that thyroid hormone deficiency induces a delay and a partial arrest of astrocyte differentiation. Astrocytes express thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta subtypes suggesting that astrocytes are direct target cells of thyroid hormones. PMID:17408906

  14. Glycine metabolism in rat kidney cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Rowsell, E V; Al-Naama, M M; Rowsell, K V

    1982-04-15

    When rat kidney cortex slices were incubated with glycine or [1-14C]glycine, after correcting for metabolite changes with control slices, product formation and glycine utilization fitted the requirements of the equation: 2 Glycine leads to ammonia + CO2 + serine. Evidence is presented that degradation via glyoxylate, by oxidation or transamination, is unlikely to have any significant role in kidney glycine catabolism. It is concluded that glycine metabolism in rat kidney is largely via glycine cleavage closely coupled with serine formation. 1-C decarboxylation and urea formation with glycine in rat hepatocyte suspensions were somewhat greater than decarboxylation or ammonia formation in kidney slices, showing that in the rat, potentially, the liver is quantitatively the more important organ in glycine catabolism. There was no evidence of ammonia formation from glycine with rat brain cortex, heart, spleen or diaphragm and 1-C decarboxylation was very weak. PMID:6810880

  15. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09862.001 PMID:26982219

  16. Temporal Sequence of Autolysis in the Cerebellar Cortex of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the temporal sequence of post-mortem changes in the cerebellar cortical granular and Purkinje cell layers of mice kept at a constant ambient temperature for up to 4 weeks. Nuclei of granule cell microneurons became pyknotic early after death, increasing progressively until, by 7 days, widespread nuclear lysis resulted in marked cellular depletion of the granular layer. Purkinje cells were relatively unaltered until about 96 h post mortem, at which time there was shrinkage and multivacuolation of the amphophilic cytoplasm, nuclear hyperchromasia and, sometimes, a perinuclear clear space. By 7 days, Purkinje cells had hypereosinophilic cytoplasm and frequent nuclear pyknosis. By 2 weeks after death, Purkinje cells showed homogenization, the cytoplasm being uniformly eosinophilic, progressing to a 'ghost-like' appearance in which the cytoplasm had pale eosinophilic staining with indistinct cell boundaries, and nuclei often absent. The results of this study could assist in differentiating post-mortem autolysis from ante-mortem lesions in the cerebellar cortex and determining the post-mortem interval. Moreover, this information could be useful when interpreting brain lesions in valuable mice found dead unexpectedly during the course of biomedical experiments. PMID:27156898

  17. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  18. Cerebellar-responsive neurons in the thalamic ventroanterior-ventrolateral complex of rats: in vivo electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, S F; Young, S J; Groves, P M; Tepper, J M

    1994-12-01

    In vivo intracellular recordings were obtained from identified thalamocortical neurons in the ventroanterior-ventrolateral complex in urethane-anesthetized rats. This thalamic nucleus has few interneurons. Neurons that responded to cerebellar stimulation were injected intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase or biocytin and examined with light and electron microscopy (see companion paper). Intrinsic membrane properties and voltage-dependent rhythmic activity of cerebellar-responsive ventroanterior-ventrolateral neurons were similar to those described previously for thalamic neurons. Thus, in addition to conventional "fast" Na(+)-dependent spikes, rat ventroanterior-ventrolateral neurons had "slow" Ca(2+)-mediated low-threshold spikes and membrane conductances that supported rhythmic oscillations. Two modes of spontaneous activity were observed: (i) a tonic firing pattern that consisted of irregularly occurring fast spikes that predominated when the membrane potential was more positive than about -60 mV, and (ii) a rhythmic firing pattern, observed when the membrane potential was more negative than about -65 mV, composed of periodic (4-8 Hz) membrane hyperpolarizations and ramp depolarizations that often produced a low-threshold spike and a burst of fast spikes. In some neurons, spontaneous fast prepotentials were also observed, often with a relatively constant rate (up to 70 Hz). Cerebellar stimulation elicited excitatory postsynaptic potentials that in some cases appeared to be all-or-none and were similar in form to fast prepotentials. Stimulation of ipsilateral motor cortex elicited a short-latency antidromic response followed by a monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potential, which had a slower rise time than excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked from cerebellum, suggesting that cortical inputs were electrotonically distal to cerebellar inputs. In the presence of moderate membrane hyperpolarization, the cortically evoked excitatory postsynaptic

  19. Altered cerebellar and prefrontal cortex function in rhesus monkeys that previously self-administered cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Jessica N.; Minhas, Davneet; Lopresti, Brian J.; Price, Julie C.; Bradberry, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Differences in brain function in cocaine users can occur even when frank deficits are not apparent, indicating neuroadaptive consequences of use. Using monkeys to investigate altered metabolic activity following chronic cocaine self-administration allows an assessment of altered function due to cocaine use, without the confound of pre-existing differences or polysubstance use often present in clinical studies. Objectives To evaluate alterations in metabolic function during a working memory task in prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum following one year of chronic cocaine self-administration followed by a 20 month drug-free period. Methods [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging was used to evaluate changes in relative regional metabolic activity associated with a delayed match to sample working memory task. Chronic cocaine animals were compared to a control group, and region of interest analyses focused on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and cerebellum. Results Despite no differences in task performance, in the cocaine group, the cerebellum showed greater metabolic activity during the working memory task (relative to the control task) compared to the control group. There was also a trend towards a significant difference between the groups in DLPFC activity (p=0.054), with the cocaine group exhibiting lower DLPFC metabolic activity during the delay task (relative to the control task) than the control group. Conclusion The results support clinical indications of increased cerebellar activity associated with chronic cocaine exposure. Consistent with evidence of functional interactions between cerebellum and prefrontal cortex, these changes may serve to compensate for potential impairments in functionality of DLPFC. PMID:24733237

  20. Enhanced inhibitory neurotransmission in the cerebellar cortex of Atp1a3-deficient heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Onaka, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Takeda, Naoki; Imoto, Keiji; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by excessive involuntary and prolonged simultaneous contractions of both agonist and antagonist muscles. Although the basal ganglia have long been proposed as the primary region, recent studies indicated that the cerebellum also plays a key role in the expression of dystonia. One hereditary form of dystonia, rapid-onset dystonia with parkinsonism (RDP), is caused by loss of function mutations of the gene for the Na pump α3 subunit (ATP1A3). Little information is available on the affected brain regions and mechanism for dystonia by the mutations in RDP. The Na pump is composed of α and β subunits and maintains ionic gradients of Na+ and K+ across the cell membrane. The gradients are utilized for neurotransmitter reuptake and their alteration modulates neural excitability. To provide insight into the molecular aetiology of RDP, we generated and analysed knockout heterozygous mice (Atp1a3+/−). Atp1a3+/− showed increased symptoms of dystonia that is induced by kainate injection into the cerebellar vermis. Atp1a3 mRNA was highly expressed in Purkinje cells and molecular-layer interneurons, and its product was concentrated at Purkinje cell soma, the site of abundant vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (VGAT) signal, suggesting the presynaptic localization of the α3 subunit in the inhibitory synapse. Electrophysiological studies showed that the inhibitory neurotransmission at molecular-layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses was enhanced in Atp1a3+/− cerebellar cortex, and that the enhancement originated via a presynaptic mechanism. Our results shed light on the role of Atp1a3 in the inhibitory synapse, and potential involvement of inhibitory synaptic dysfunction for the pathophysiology of dystonia. PMID:23652595

  1. The Role of Intermittent Hypoxia on the Proliferative Inhibition of Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sheng-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jou; Huang, Sung-Ying; Lien, Chih-Feng; Chen, Shee-Ping; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lin, Jian-Hong; Yang, Kun-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome, characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH), is linked with increased oxidative stress. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying IH and the effects of IH-induced oxidative stress on cerebellar astrocytes. Rat primary cerebellar astrocytes were kept in an incubator with an oscillating O2 concentration between 20% and 5% every 30 min for 1–4 days. Although the cell loss increased with the duration, the IH incubation didn’t induce apoptosis or necrosis, but rather a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of cerebellar astrocytes was noted. ROS accumulation was associated with cell loss during IH. PARP activation, resulting in p21 activation and cyclin D1 degradation was associated with cell cycle G0/G1 arrest of IH-treated cerebellar astrocytes. Our results suggest that IH induces cell loss by enhancing oxidative stress, PARP activation and cell cycle G0/G1 arrest in rat primary cerebellar astrocytes. PMID:26172116

  2. Twitch-related and rhythmic activation of the developing cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Sokoloff, Greta; Plumeau, Alan M; Mukherjee, Didhiti; Blumberg, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    The cerebellum is a critical sensorimotor structure that exhibits protracted postnatal development in mammals. Many aspects of cerebellar circuit development are activity dependent, but little is known about the nature and sources of the activity. Based on previous findings in 6-day-old rats, we proposed that myoclonic twitches, the spontaneous movements that occur exclusively during active sleep (AS), provide generalized as well as topographically precise activity to the developing cerebellum. Taking advantage of known stages of cerebellar cortical development, we examined the relationship between Purkinje cell activity (including complex and simple spikes), nuchal and hindlimb EMG activity, and behavioral state in unanesthetized 4-, 8-, and 12-day-old rats. AS-dependent increases in complex and simple spike activity peaked at 8 days of age, with 60% of units exhibiting significantly more activity during AS than wakefulness. Also, at all three ages, approximately one-third of complex and simple spikes significantly increased their activity within 100 ms of twitches in one of the two muscles from which we recorded. Finally, we observed rhythmicity of complex and simple spikes that was especially prominent at 8 days of age and was greatly diminished by 12 days of age, likely due to developmental changes in climbing fiber and mossy fiber innervation patterns. All together, these results indicate that the neurophysiological activity of the developing cerebellum can be used to make inferences about changes in its microcircuitry. They also support the hypothesis that sleep-related twitches are a prominent source of discrete climbing and mossy fiber activity that could contribute to the activity-dependent development of this critical sensorimotor structure. PMID:26156383

  3. Calbindin D28k distribution in neurons and reactive gliosis in cerebellar cortex of natural Rabies virus-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Verdes, José Manuel; de Sant'Ana, Fabiano José Ferreira; Sabalsagaray, María Jesús; Okada, Kosuke; Calliari, Aldo; Moraña, José Antonio; de Barros, Claudio Severo Lombardo

    2016-07-01

    Rabies has been an enigmatic disease because microscopic findings in central nervous system tissues do not always correlate well with the severity of the clinical illness. Immunohistochemical staining of the calcium-binding protein calbindin (specifically CbD28k) seems to be the technique most used to identify Purkinje neurons under normal and pathological conditions. In the present work, we evaluated CbD28k immunoreactivity in the cerebellar cortex of normal and natural Rabies virus (RABV)-infected cattle. We examined brains from 3 normal cows and from 6 crossbreed cattle with a histologic diagnosis of rabies. Samples were taken from the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and brainstem. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using the following primary antibodies: anti-RABV, anti-GFAP, and anti-CbD28k. In the cerebellar cortex, RABV infection caused the loss of CbD28k immunostaining in Purkinje cells; some large interneurons in the granular layer maintained their positive CbD28k immunoreaction. The identification of this loss of CbD28k reactivity in cerebellar Purkinje cells of RABV-infected cattle presents a potentially valuable tool to explore the impairment of Ca(2+) homeostasis. In addition, this may become a useful method to identify specific molecular alterations associated with the higher prevalence of Negri bodies in Purkinje cells of cattle. Furthermore, we detected the presence of rabies viral antigens in different regions of the central nervous system, accompanied by microglial proliferation and mild reactive astrogliosis. PMID:27154319

  4. Flavoprotein imaging in the cerebellar cortex in vivo: cellular and metabolic basis and insights into cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence is an activity dependent intrinsic signal. Flavoproteins are involved in the electron transport chain and change their fluorescence according to the cellular redox state. We have been using flavoprotein autofluorescence in the cerebellum to examine properties of cerebellar circuits. Studies have also focused on understanding the cellular and metabolic origins of this intrinsic optical signal. Parallel fiber stimulation evokes a beamlike response intersected by bands of decreased fluorescence. The beam response is biphasic, with an early fluorescence increase (light phase) followed by a slower decrease (dark phase). We show this signal originates from flavoproteins as determined by its wavelength selectivity and sensitivity to blockers of the electron transport chain. Selectively blocking glutamate receptors abolished the on-beam light phase with the dark phase remaining intact. This demonstrates that the light phase is due to postsynaptic neuronal activation and suggests the dark phase is primarily due to glial activation. The bands of reduced fluorescence intersecting the beam are primarily neuronal in origin, mediated by GABAergic transmission, and due to the inhibitory action of molecular layer interneurons on Purkinje cells and the interneurons themselves. This parasagittally organized molecular layer inhibition differentially modulates the spatial pattern of cerebellar cortical activity. Flavoprotein imaging also reveals the functional architectures underlying the responses to inferior olive and peripheral whisker pad stimulation. Therefore, flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging is providing new insights into cerebellar cortical function and neurometabolic coupling.

  5. From Neurons to Neuron Neighborhoods: the Rewiring of the Cerebellar Cortex in Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Remarkably little has been written on the biology of essential tremor (ET), despite its high prevalence. The olivary model, first proposed in the 1970s, is the traditional disease model for ET; however, the model is problematic for a number of reasons. Recently, intensive tissue-based studies have identified a series of structural changes in the brains of most ET cases, and nearly all of the observed changes are located in the cerebellar cortex. These studies suggest that Purkinje cells are central to the pathogenesis of ET and may thus provide a focus for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Arising from these studies, a new model of ET proposes that the population of Purkinje cells represents the site of the initial molecular/cellular events leading to ET. Furthermore, a number of secondary changes/remodeling observed in the molecular and granular layers (i.e., in the Purkinje cell “neighborhood”) are likely to be of additional mechanistic importance. On a physiological level, the presence of remodeling indicates the likely formation of aberrant synapses and the creation of new/abnormal cortical circuits in ET. Specific efforts need to be devoted to understanding the cascade of biochemical and cellular events occurring in the Purkinje cell layer in ET and its neuron neighborhood, as well as the physiological effects of secondary remodeling/rewiring that are likely to be occurring in this brain region in ET. PMID:24435423

  6. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  7. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  8. Mitochondrial structure in the rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Merry, B J

    1975-01-01

    Two distinct classes of mitochondria are described in the normal adrenal cortex of the Sprague Dawley CFY rat. Polyaminar mitochondria were frequently observed in the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis, particularly after ACTH stimulation of the cortex resulting from cold-stress exposure. It is uncertain whether such organelles are degenerating forms, or whether they have a specific functional role related to steroidogenesis in the normal cortical cell. In both normal and stressed adrenal cortices, protrusions of the outer membrane of mitochondria were evident, and were often seen penetrating lipid droplets. It is suggested that these protrusions may have some significance in the transport of cholesterol from the lipid droplet to the inner mitochondrial memrane 'desmolase complex', thus facilitating side-chain cleavage of cholesterol to pregnenolone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:166969

  9. Chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus enhances recovery of motor function after cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre G; Baker, Kenneth B; Schuster, Daniel; Butler, Robert S; Rezai, Ali

    2009-07-14

    Novel neurorehabilitative strategies are needed to improve motor outcomes following stroke. Based on the disynaptic excitatory projections of the dentatothalamocortical pathway to the motor cortex as well as to anterior and posterior cortical areas, we hypothesize that chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional dentate (lateral cerebellar) nucleus output can enhance motor recovery after ischemia via augmentation of perilesional cortical excitability. Seventy-five Wistar rats were pre-trained in the Montoya staircase task and subsequently underwent left cerebral ischemia with the 3-vessel occlusion model. All survivors underwent stereotactic right lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) implantation of bipolar electrodes. Rats were then randomized to 4 groups: LCN stimulation at 10 pps, 20 pps, 50 pps or sham stimulation, which was delivered for a period of 6 weeks. Performance on the Montoya staircase task was re-assessed over the last 4 weeks of the stimulation period. On the right (contralesional) side, motor performance of the groups undergoing sham, 10 pps, 20 pps and 50 pps stimulation was, respectively, 2.5+/-2.7; 2.1+/-2.5; 6.0+/-3.9 (p<0.01) and 4.5+/-3.5 pellets. There was no difference on the left (ipsilesional) side motor performance among the sham or stimulation groups, varying from 15.9+/-6.7 to 17.2+/-2.1 pellets. We conclude that contralesional chronic electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus at 20 pps but not at 10 or 50 pps improves motor recovery in rats following ischemic strokes. This effect is likely to be mediated by increased perilesional cortical excitability via chronic activation of the dentatothalamocortical pathway. PMID:19445910

  10. Cerebellar-responsive neurons in the thalamic ventroanterior-ventrolateral complex of rats: light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, S F; Tepper, J M; Groves, P M

    1994-12-01

    The morphology and synaptic organization of neurons in the ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus of rats was examined using in vivo intracellular staining techniques. Neurons were characterized electrophysiologically based on intrinsic membrane properties and synaptic responses to stimulation of motor cortex and cerebellar nuclei, as described in the companion paper. Cerebellar-responsive neurons were stained intracellularly with either horseradish peroxidase or biocytin. All stained ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus neurons were identified as thalamocortical neurons on anatomical (and often electrophysiological) grounds, consistent with previous findings that rat ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus is interneuron-sparse. Ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus neurons had three to eight thick primary dendrites. Proximal dendrites often exhibited a tufted branching pattern, from which many thinner, higher order dendrites arose. Dendrites branched to form a funnel-like infiltration of the neuropil that resulted in a spherical, roughly homogeneous dendritic field. The axon originated from the cell body or a proximal dendrite and coursed laterally and dorsally to innervate motor cortex. One to five axon collaterals were emitted in the rostral dorsolateral sector of the thalamic reticular nucleus; collaterals were not observed in the ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus or other nuclei in dorsal thalamus. The synaptic organization of the ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus was examined with electron microscopy, including two intracellularly labeled ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus neurons that were shown electrophysiologically to receive monosynaptic inputs from the cerebellum. The neuropil of rat ventroanterior-ventrolateral nucleus lacked the complexity and diversity found in corresponding thalamic nuclei of felines and primates, due to the paucity of interneurons. Vesicle-containing dendrites, dendrodendritic synapses and glomeruli were not observed. Three

  11. [An acute severe heat stroke patient showing abnormal diffuse high intensity of the cerebellar cortex in diffusion weighted image: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Yusuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Akira; Sobue, Gen

    2009-10-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of general convulsion, loss of consciousness and hyperthermia. A diagnosis of acute heat stroke was made clinically and neuroradiologically. As the consciousness level ameliorated, he developed severe abulia and mutism, then cerebellar ataxic syndrome (viz. truncal ataxia, hypermetria, ataxic speech and nystagmus). An MRI (diffusion weighted image; DWI) disclosed abnormal diffuse high signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex with reduced apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Two months later after the onset, truncal ataxia and dysarthria significantly improved, while dysmetria of the extremities rather worsened. At that time, the abnormal signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex disappeared, and the cerebellum became atrophic. The cerebellar blood flow was significantly decreased on brain SPECT (99mTc-ECD). The abnormal DWI signal intensity of the cerebellar cortex in the present patient may represent the cytotoxic edema of Purkinje cells resulting from heat stroke-related hyperthermia It is essential to repeat MRI examination for cerebellar pathology and to obtain better insight into sequelae in patients with acute heat stroke. Protirelin tartrate seemed to be valid for improvement of abulia in the present patient. Further study is indicated. PMID:19999144

  12. Effect of anesthesia on spontaneous activity and evoked potentials of the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Ordek, Gokhan; Groth, Jonathan D; Sahin, Mesut

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellum is a highly organized structure with a crystalline morphology that has always intrigued neuroscientists. Much of the cerebellar research has been conducted in anesthetized animals, particularly using ketamine and xylazine combination. It is not clear how the cerebellar cortical circuitry is affected by anesthesia. In this study, we have recorded spontaneous and evoked potentials from the cerebellar surface with chronically implanted, flexible-substrate, multi-electrode arrays. The frequency contents of the spontaneous activity suggest that ketamine/xylazine anesthesia suppresses most of the components except those below 30 Hz. This preliminary study also showed that multi channels of cerebellar cortical activity can be recorded using flexible multi-electrode arrays in behaving animals, which is very challenging task with single microelectrodes. PMID:23366022

  13. A theory of cerebellar cortex and adaptive motor control based on two types of universal function approximation capability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    Lesions of the cerebellum result in large errors in movements. The cerebellum adaptively controls the strength and timing of motor command signals depending on the internal and external environments of movements. The present theory describes how the cerebellar cortex can control signals for accurate and timed movements. A model network of the cerebellar Golgi and granule cells is shown to be equivalent to a multiple-input (from mossy fibers) hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units (granule cells) that receive a common recurrent inhibition (from a Golgi cell). The weighted sum of the hidden unit signals (Purkinje cell output) is theoretically analyzed regarding the capability of the network to perform two types of universal function approximation. The hidden units begin firing as the excitatory inputs exceed the recurrent inhibition. This simple threshold feature leads to the first approximation theory, and the network final output can be any continuous function of the multiple inputs. When the input is constant, this output becomes stationary. However, when the recurrent unit activity is triggered to decrease or the recurrent inhibition is triggered to increase through a certain mechanism (metabotropic modulation or extrasynaptic spillover), the network can generate any continuous signals for a prolonged period of change in the activity of recurrent signals, as the second approximation theory shows. By incorporating the cerebellar capability of two such types of approximations to a motor system, in which learning proceeds through repeated movement trials with accompanying corrections, accurate and timed responses for reaching the target can be adaptively acquired. Simple models of motor control can solve the motor error vs. sensory error problem, as well as the structural aspects of credit (or error) assignment problem. Two physiological experiments are proposed for examining the delay and trace conditioning of eyelid responses, as

  14. Electron tomographic structure and protein composition of isolated rat cerebellar, hippocampal and cortical postsynaptic densities.

    PubMed

    Farley, M M; Swulius, M T; Waxham, M N

    2015-09-24

    Electron tomography and immunogold labeling were used to analyze similarities and differences in the morphology and protein composition of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) isolated from adult rat cerebella, hippocampi, and cortices. There were similarities in physical dimensions and gross morphology between cortical, hippocampal and most cerebellar PSDs, although the morphology among cerebellar PSDs could be categorized into three distinct groups. The majority of cerebellar PSDs were composed of dense regions of protein, similar to cortical and hippocampal PSDs, while others were either composed of granular or lattice-like protein regions. Significant differences were found in protein composition and organization across PSDs from the different brain regions. The signaling protein, βCaMKII, was found to be a major component of each PSD type and was more abundant than αCaMKII in both hippocampal and cerebellar PSDs. The scaffold molecule PSD-95, a major component of cortical PSDs, was found absent in a fraction of cerebellar PSDs and when present was clustered in its distribution. In contrast, immunogold labeling for the proteasome was significantly more abundant in cerebellar and hippocampal PSDs than cortical PSDs. Together, these results indicate that PSDs exhibit remarkable diversity in their composition and morphology, presumably as a reflection of the unique functional demands placed on different synapses. PMID:26215919

  15. CEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA IN THE GUNN RAT IS ASSOCIATED WITH QUANTITATIVE CHANGES IN NEUROTYPIC AND GLIOTYPIC PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors are characterizing toxicant-induced injury to the nervous system by measuring nervous system cell-type specific proteins together with accompanying changes in morphology and behavior. In the present study, cerebellar neurotoxicity was assessed in the Gunn rat an autos...

  16. The Morpho/Functional Discrepancy in the Cerebellar Cortex: Looks Alone are Deceptive

    PubMed Central

    Rokni, Dan; Llinas, Rodolfo; Yarom, Yosef

    2008-01-01

    In a recent report we demonstrated that stimulation of cerebellar mossy fibers synchronously activates Purkinje cells that are located directly above the site of stimulation. We found that the activated Purkinje cells are arranged in a radial patch on the cerebellar surface and that this organization is independent of the integrity of the inhibitory system. This arrangement of activity is counterintuitive. The anatomical structure with the extensive parallel fiber system implies that mossy fiber stimulation will activate Purkinje cells along a beam of parallel fibers. In this short review we highlight this discrepancy between anatomical structure and functional dynamics and suggest a plausible underlying mechanism. PMID:19225592

  17. Global resting-state fMRI analysis identifies frontal cortex, striatal, and cerebellar dysconnectivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Savic, Aleksandar; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Bednarski, Sarah; Krystal, John H.; Bloch, Michael H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with regional hyperactivity in cortico-striatal circuits. However, the large-scale patterns of abnormal neural connectivity remain uncharacterized. Resting-state functional connectivity (rs-fcMRI) studies have shown altered connectivity within the implicated circuitry, but they have used seed-driven approaches wherein a circuit of interest is defined a priori. This limits their ability to identify network abnormalities beyond the prevailing framework. This limitation is particularly problematic within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is large and heterogeneous and where a priori specification of seeds is therefore difficult. A hypothesis-neutral data-driven approach to the analysis of connectivity is vital. Method We analyzed rs-fcMRI data collected at 3T in 27 OCD patients and 66 matched controls using a recently developed data-driven global brain connectivity (GBC) method, both within the PFC and across the whole brain. Results We found clusters of decreased connectivity in the left lateral PFC in both whole-brain and PFC-restricted analyses. Increased GBC was found in the right putamen and left cerebellar cortex. Within ROIs in the basal ganglia and thalamus, we identified increased GBC in dorsal striatum and anterior thalamus, which was reduced in patients on medication. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens exhibited decreased global connectivity, but increased connectivity specifically with the ventral anterior cingulate cortex in subjects with OCD. Conclusion These findings identify previously uncharacterized PFC and basal ganglia dysconnectivity in OCD and reveal differentially altered GBC in dorsal and ventral striatum. Results highlight complex disturbances in PFC networks, which could contribute to disrupted cortical-striatal-cerebellar circuits in OCD. PMID:24314349

  18. Development of motor coordination and cerebellar structure in male and female rat neonates exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Baxter, M. G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that the developing rat cerebellum is affected by exposure to hypergravity. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that the changes in cerebellar structure in hypergravity-exposed rat neonates may affect their motor coordination. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the changes observed at 1.5G will be magnified at higher gravitational loading. To test this hypothesis, we compared motor behavior, cerebellar structure, and protein expression in rat neonates exposed to 1.5 1.75G on a 24-ft centrifuge daily for 22.5 h starting on gestational day (G) 10, through birth on G22/G23 and through postnatal day (P) 21. Exposure to hypergravity impacted the neurodevelopmental process as indicated by: (1) impaired righting response on P3, more than doubling the righting time at 1.75G, and (2) delayed onset of the startle response by one day, from P9 in controls to P10 in hypergravity-exposed pups. Hypergravity exposure resulted in impaired motor functions as evidenced by performance on a rotarod on P21; the duration of the stay on the rotarod recorded for 1.75G pups of both sexes was one tenth that of the stationary control (SC) pups. These changes in motor behavior were associated with cerebellar changes: (1) cerebellar mass on P6 was decreased by 7.5% in 1.5G-exposed male pups, 27.5% in 1.75G-exposed male pups, 17.5% in 1.5G-exposed female pups, and 22.5% in 1.75G female pups and (2) changes in the expression of glial and neuronal proteins. The results of this study suggest that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar development as evidenced by decreased cerebellar mass and altered cerebellar protein expression; cerebellar changes observed in hypergravity-exposed rat neonates are associated with impaired motor behavior. Furthermore, the response to hypergravity appears to be different in male and female neonates. If one accepts that the hypergravity paradigm is a useful animal model with which to predict those biological processes

  19. Cerebellar Influence on Motor Cortex Plasticity: Behavioral Implications for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Asha; Meunier, Sabine; Popa, Traian

    2014-01-01

    Normal motor behavior involves the creation of appropriate activity patterns across motor networks, enabling firing synchrony, synaptic integration, and normal functioning of these networks. Strong topography-specific connections among the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and their projections to overlapping areas in the motor cortices suggest that these networks could influence each other’s plastic responses and functions. The defective striatal signaling in Parkinson’s disease (PD) could therefore lead to abnormal oscillatory activity and aberrant plasticity at multiple levels within the interlinked motor networks. Normal striatal dopaminergic signaling and cerebellar sensory processing functions influence the scaling and topographic specificity of M1 plasticity. Both these functions are abnormal in PD and appear to contribute to the abnormal M1 plasticity. Defective motor map plasticity and topographic specificity within M1 could lead to incorrect muscle synergies, which could manifest as abnormal or undesired movements, and as abnormal motor learning in PD. We propose that the loss of M1 plasticity in PD reflects a loss of co-ordination among the basal ganglia, cerebellar, and cortical inputs which translates to an abnormal plasticity of motor maps within M1 and eventually to some of the motor signs of PD. The initial benefits of dopamine replacement therapy on M1 plasticity and motor signs are lost during the progressive course of disease. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with advanced PD is linked to a loss of M1 sensorimotor plasticity and the attenuation of dyskinesias by cerebellar inhibitory stimulation is associated with restoration of M1 plasticity. Complimentary interventions should target reestablishing physiological communication between the striatal and cerebellar circuits, and within striato-cerebellar loop. This may facilitate correct motor synergies and reduce abnormal movements in PD. PMID:24834063

  20. Unusual morphological damage of Purkinje cells following postnatal BrdU administration in the cerebellar cortex of mouse.

    PubMed

    Takács, T

    2012-01-01

    Postnatal development of the cerebellum lasts for weeks in rodents and can be disturbed by systemic 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration. This thymidine analogue incorporates into the DNA of proliferating cells, and result in more or less serious damage or death granule cells, the most actively dividing neuronal population in the developing cerebellar cortex. Further consequences of postnatal BrdU administration are the interrupted postnatal migration and integrations as well as partial loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. In the present study, C57B16 mice were administered with 50 μg/g body weight BrdU, one sc. injection daily, between P0 and P11 postnatal days, respectively.Large "cavities" appeared in the cytoplasm of a subpopulation of Purkinje cells by P7 in about one-third of administered animals, their number are size of the cavities (and PCs exhibiting unusual morphology) decreased. EM studies revealed that the unusual Purkinje cells received numerous axonal inputs of unknown origin, first of all on their somatic and dendritic spines. The transitory appearance of a subpopulation of Purkinje cells possessing unusual morphology refers to the influence of other (neuronal, glial, or both) cells on their regular differentiation. PMID:22514871

  1. Dose-related cerebellar abnormality in rats with prenatal exposure to X-irradiation by magnetic resonance imaging volumetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Mori, Yuki; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2013-09-01

    Cerebellar abnormalities in 4-week-old rats with a single whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy on embryonic day (ED) 15 were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetry. A 3D T2 W-MRI anatomical sequence with high-spatial resolution at 11.7-tesla was acquired from the fixed rat heads. By MRI volumetry, whole cerebellar volumes decreased dose-dependently. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the cortical volume (standardized β=0.901; P<0.001) was a major explanatory variable for the whole cerebellar volume, whereas both volumes of the white matter and deep cerebellar nuclei also decreased depending on the X-irradiation dose. The present MRI volumetric analysis revealed a dose-related cerebellar cortical hypoplasia by prenatal exposure to X-irradiation on E15. PMID:23998266

  2. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Saidah; Soejono, Sri Kadarsih; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ERβ levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min per day for 12 weeks. The second group served as control. Rotarod test was carried out before and after exercise treatment. All rats were euthanized thereafter, and blood and cerebellums of the rats were collected. The serum and cerebellar estrogen as well as cerebellar ERβ levels were measured using ELISA assays. Results: The number of falls in the rotarod task of the exercise group was significantly lower than that of control group. The cerebellar estrogen level of the exercise group was significantly higher than that of control group. Accordingly, there was a significantly negative correlation between the number of falls and cerebellar estrogen level in the exercise group. Conclusion: The present study shows that a lengthy period of regular exercise improves the cerebellar estrogen level and motor coordination performance in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26221482

  3. Compartmentation of the cerebellar cortex: adaptation to lifestyle in the star-nosed mole Condylura cristata.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Hassan; Hoy, Nathan; Buchok, Matthew; Catania, Kenneth C; Hawkes, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The adult mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, concealed beneath the simple laminar architecture, it is organized rostrocaudally and mediolaterally into complex arrays of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes that is both highly reproducible between individuals and generally conserved across mammals and birds. Beyond this conservation, the general architecture appears to be adapted to the animal's way of life. To test this hypothesis, we have examined cerebellar compartmentation in the talpid star-nosed mole Condylura cristata. The star-nosed mole leads a subterranean life. It is largely blind and instead uses an array of fleshy appendages (the "star") to navigate and locate its prey. The hypothesis suggests that cerebellar architecture would be modified to reduce regions receiving visual input and expand those that receive trigeminal afferents from the star. Zebrin II and phospholipase Cß4 (PLCß4) immunocytochemistry was used to map the zone-and-stripe architecture of the cerebellum of the adult star-nosed mole. The general zone-and-stripe architecture characteristic of all mammals is present in the star-nosed mole. In the vermis, the four typical transverse zones are present, two with alternating zebrin II/PLCß4 stripes, two wholly zebrin II+/PLCß4-. However, the central and nodular zones (prominent visual receiving areas) are proportionally reduced in size and conversely, the trigeminal-receiving areas (the posterior zone of the vermis and crus I/II of the hemispheres) are uncharacteristically large. We therefore conclude that cerebellar architecture is generally conserved across the Mammalia but adapted to the specific lifestyle of the species. PMID:25337886

  4. Parasagittal zones in the cerebellar cortex differ in excitability, information processing, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Timothy J; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Cramer, Samuel W; Chen, Gang

    2012-06-01

    At the molecular and circuitry levels, the cerebellum exhibits a striking parasagittal zonation as exemplified by the spatial distribution of molecules expressed on Purkinje cells and the topography of the afferent and efferent projections. The physiology and function of the zonation is less clear. Activity-dependent optical imaging has proven a useful tool to examine the physiological properties of the parasagittal zonation in the intact animal. Recent findings show that zebrin II-positive and zebrin II-negative zones differ markedly in their responses to parallel fiber inputs. These findings suggest that cerebellar cortical excitability, information processing, and synaptic plasticity depend on the intrinsic properties of different parasagittal zones. PMID:22249913

  5. Cerebellar and Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Adaptation, Strategies, and Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jordan A.; Ivry, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. PMID:24916295

  6. Cerebellar and prefrontal cortex contributions to adaptation, strategies, and reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jordan A; Ivry, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, motor learning has been studied as an implicit learning process, one in which movement errors are used to improve performance in a continuous, gradual manner. The cerebellum figures prominently in this literature given well-established ideas about the role of this system in error-based learning and the production of automatized skills. Recent developments have brought into focus the relevance of multiple learning mechanisms for sensorimotor learning. These include processes involving repetition, reinforcement learning, and strategy utilization. We examine these developments, considering their implications for understanding cerebellar function and how this structure interacts with other neural systems to support motor learning. Converging lines of evidence from behavioral, computational, and neuropsychological studies suggest a fundamental distinction between processes that use error information to improve action execution or action selection. While the cerebellum is clearly linked to the former, its role in the latter remains an open question. PMID:24916295

  7. Sensory Stimulation-Dependent Plasticity in the Cerebellar Cortex of Alert Mice

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Ruiz, Javier; Cheron, Guy

    2012-01-01

    In vitro studies have supported the occurrence of cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), an interaction between the parallel fibers and Purkinje cells (PCs) that requires the combined activation of the parallel and climbing fibers. To demonstrate the existence of LTD in alert animals, we investigated the plasticity of local field potentials (LFPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the whisker pad. The recorded LFP showed two major negative waves corresponding to trigeminal (broken into the N2 and N3 components) and cortical responses. PC unitary extracellular recording showed that N2 and N3 occurred concurrently with PC evoked simple spikes, followed by an evoked complex spike. Polarity inversion of the N3 component at the PC level and N3 amplitude reduction after electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber volley applied on the surface of the cerebellum 2 ms earlier strongly suggest that N3 was related to the parallel fiber–PC synapse activity. LFP measurements elicited by single whisker pad stimulus were performed before and after trains of electrical stimuli given at a frequency of 8 Hz for 10 min. We demonstrated that during this later situation, the stimulation of the PC by parallel and climbing fibers was reinforced. After 8-Hz stimulation, we observed long-term modifications (lasting at least 30 min) characterized by a specific decrease of the N3 amplitude accompanied by an increase of the N2 and N3 latency peaks. These plastic modifications indicated the existence of cerebellar LTD in alert animals involving both timing and synaptic modulations. These results corroborate the idea that LTD may underlie basic physiological functions related to calcium-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:22563448

  8. CNS development under altered gravity: cerebellar glial and neuronal protein expression in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguon, K.; Li, G-H; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity, specifically in relation to the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously employed a hypergravity paradigm to assess the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. The present study addresses the molecular mechanisms involved in the cerebellar response to hypergravity. Specifically, the study focuses on the expression of selected glial and neuronal cerebellar proteins in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5 G) from embryonic day (E)11 to postnatal day (P)6 or P9 (the time of maximal cerebellar changes) comparing them against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Proteins were analyzed by quantitative Western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using quantitative PCR. Densitometric analysis of Western blots suggested a reduction in glial (glial acidic protein, GFAP) and neuronal (neuronal cell adhesion molecule, NCAM-L1, synaptophysin) proteins, but the changes in individual cerebellar proteins in hypergravity-exposed neonates appeared both age- and gender-specific. RNA analysis suggested a reduction in GFAP and synaptophysin mRNAs on P6. These data suggest that exposure to hypergravity may interfere with the expression of selected cerebellar proteins. These changes in protein expression may be involved in mediating the effect of hypergravity on the developing rat cerebellum. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CNS development under altered gravity: cerebellar glial and neuronal protein expression in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguon, K.; Li, G.-H.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity, specifically in relation to the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously employed a hypergravity paradigm to assess the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum [Exp. Biol. Med. 226 (2000) 790]. The present study addresses the molecular mechanisms involved in the cerebellar response to hypergravity. Specifically, the study focuses on the expression of selected glial and neuronal cerebellar proteins in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5 G) from embryonic day (E)11 to postnatal day (P)6 or P9 (the time of maximal cerebellar changes) comparing them against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Proteins were analyzed by quantitative Western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using quantitative PCR. Densitometric analysis of Western blots suggested a reduction in glial (glial acidic protein, GFAP) and neuronal (neuronal cell adhesion moiecule, NCAM-L1, synaptophysin) proteins, but the changes in individual cerebellar proteins in hypergravity-exposed neonates appeared both age- and gender-specific. RNA analysis suggested a reduction in GFAP and synaptophysin mRNAs on P6. These data suggest that exposure to hypergravity may interfere with the expression of selected cerebellar proteins. These changes in protein expression may be involved in mediating the effect of hypergravity on the developing rat cerebellum.

  10. Rearing conditions differently affect the motor performance and cerebellar morphology of prenatally stressed juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Ulupinar, Emel; Erol, Kevser; Ay, Hakan; Yucel, Ferruh

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most vulnerable parts of the brain to environmental changes. In this study, the effect of diverse environmental rearing conditions on the motor performances of prenatally stressed juvenile rats and its reflection to the cerebellar morphology were investigated. Prenatally stressed Wistar rats were grouped according to different rearing conditions (Enriched=EC, Standard=SC and Isolated=IC) after weaning. Six weeks later, male and female offspring from different litters were tested behaviorally. In rotarod and string suspension tests, females gained better scores than males. Significant gender and housing effects were observed especially on the motor functions requiring fine skills with the best performance by enriched females, but the worst by enriched males. The susceptibility of cerebellar macro- and micro-neurons to environmental conditions was compared using stereological methods. In female groups, no differences were observed in the volume proportions of cerebellar layers, soma sizes and the numerical densities of granule or Purkinje cells. However, a significant interaction between housing and gender was observed in the granule to Purkinje cell ratio of males, due to the increased numerical densities of the granule cells in enriched males. These data imply that proper functioning of the cerebellum relies on its well organized and evolutionarily conserved structure and circuitry. Although early life stress leads to long term behavioral and neurobiological consequences in the offspring, diverse rearing conditions can alter the motor skills of animals and synaptic connectivity between Purkinje and granular cells in a gender dependent manner. PMID:25315128

  11. In vivo imaging of neural reactive plasticity after laser axotomy in cerebellar cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Sacconi, L.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; Pavone, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-photon imaging provides valuable insights into the continuous reshaping of neuronal connectivity in live brain. We previously showed that single neuron or even single spine ablation can be achieved by laser-mediated dissection. Furthermore, single axonal branches can be dissected avoiding collateral damage to the adjacent dendrite and the formation of a persistent glial scar. Here, we describe the procedure to address the structural plasticity of cerebellar climbing fibers by combining two-photon in vivo imaging with laser axotomy in a mouse model. This method is a powerful tool to study the basic mechanisms of axonal rewiring after single branch axotomy in vivo. In fact, despite the denervated area being very small, the injured axons consistently reshape the connectivity with surrounding neurons, as indicated by the increase in the turnover of synaptic boutons. In addition, time-lapse imaging reveals the sprouting of new branches from the injured axon. Newly formed branches with varicosities suggest the possible formation of synaptic contacts. Correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that the sprouted branch contains large numbers of vesicles, with varicosities in the close vicinity of Purkinje dendrites.

  12. Cytarabine induced cerebellar neuronal damage in juvenile rat: correlating neurobehavioral performance with cellular and genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak S; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Chary, Namoju R; Shera, Firdos Y; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2012-03-11

    Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a pyrimidine analogue induces cerebellar dysfunction and behavioral abnormalities. Although many in vitro experiments have been conducted in the past demonstrating the lethal potential of Ara-C to cerebellar neurons, there is a paucity of literature available regarding the effects of Ara-C on the cellular and genetic material of cerebellum and its subsequent influence on the neurobehavioral performance in vivo. Rats were treated with Ara-C at the dose levels 50, 100 and 200mg/kg/day for 5 and 14 days by intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Endpoints of the evaluation included food and water intake, body and organ weight, behavioral parameters, histopathology, oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, expression of p53, caspase-3 and calbindin D-28K (calbindin) as well as histone acetylation and methylation. Ara-C treatment for 14 days significantly decreased the food and water intake, body weight gain and brain weight in rat as compared to the control. Alterations in various behavioral parameters were observed, indicating the impaired cerebellar function. Further, cellular abnormalities in the cerebellum such as Purkinje cell misalignment and granule cell cytotoxicity were observed. Positive correlation was observed between Ara-C induced disturbance in the motor performance and the Purkinje cell loss in rat cerebellum. Moreover, Ara-C treatment significantly increased the oxidative stress, DNA damage, TUNEL positive cells, p53 and caspase-3 positive cells in the rat cerebellum. Unlike short-term treatment, long-term Ara-C treatment significantly reduced calbindin expression in the cerebellum. Apart from this, 14 days Ara-C treatment led to significant alterations in the histone acetylation and methylation in the cerebellum, while in 5 days treatment no such alterations were observed. Present results indicated that Ara-C, by inducing oxidative stress mediated DNA damage, executes neuronal apoptosis which is accompanied by an increase in the p53

  13. CEREBELLAR HISTOGENESIS IN RATS EXPOSED TO 2450 MHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant rats were either exposed or sham exposed from day 13 of gestation until birth to 2450 MHz linearly polarized microwaves at 10 mW/sq cm. A third matching group served as cage control. After birth, the pups were kept with their mothers for 21 days without any treatment, an...

  14. Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Huang, Ming-De; Sun, Man-Li; Duan, Shumin; Yu, Yan-Qin

    2015-09-01

    Rats generate sweeping whisker movements in order to explore their environments and identify objects. In somatosensory pathways, neuronal activity is modulated by the frequency of whisker vibration. However, the potential role of rhythmic neuronal activity in the cerebral processing of sensory signals and its mechanism remain unclear. Here, we showed that rhythmic vibrissal stimulation with short duration in anesthetized rats resulted in an increase or decrease in the amplitude of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) in the contralateral barrel cortex. The plastic change of the SEPs was frequency dependent and long lasting. The long-lasting enhancement of the vibrissa-to-cortex evoked response was side- but not barrel-specific. Local application of dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid into the barrel cortex revealed that this vibrissa-to-cortex long-term plasticity in adult rats was N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent. Most interestingly, whisker trimming through postnatal day (P)1-7 but not P29-35 impaired the long-term plasticity induced by 100 Hz vibrissal stimulation. The short period of rhythmic vibrissal stimulation did not induce long-lasting plasticity of field potentials in the thalamus. In conclusion, our results suggest that natural rhythmic whisker activity modifies sensory information processing in cerebral cortex, providing further insight into sensory perception. PMID:24735674

  15. Cerebellar Cortex Granular Layer Interneurons in the Macaque Monkey Are Functionally Driven by Mossy Fiber Pathways through Net Excitation or Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Jean; Heiney, Shane A.; Kim, Gyutae; Blazquez, Pablo M.

    2013-01-01

    The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs) and granular layer output neurons (granule cells). GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL) during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by “eye position fields” and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties. PMID:24376524

  16. SUPERIOR COLLICULUS LESIONS AND FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS FROM RAT CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally assumed that the primary response of the rat flash evoked potential (FEP) is activated by a retino-geniculate pathway, and that the second response reflects input to the cortex by way of the superior colliculus (SC) or other brainstem structures. In the present st...

  17. Low and high dietary folic acid levels perturb postnatal cerebellar morphology in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Peña-Melián, Ángel; Maestro-de-Las-Casas, Carmen; Úbeda, Natalia; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, because methyl groups are critical for brain functions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different dietary levels of folic acid (FA) on postnatal cerebellar morphology, including the architecture and organisation of the various layers. A total of forty male OFA rats (a Sprague-Dawley strain), 5 weeks old, were classified into the following four dietary groups: FA deficient (0 mg/kg FA); FA supplemented (8 mg/kg FA); FA supra-supplemented (40 mg/kg FA); and control (2 mg/kg FA) (all n 10 per group). Rats were fed ad libitum for 30 d. The cerebellum was quickly removed and processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Slides were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (to label Bergmann glia), calbindin (to label Purkinje cells) and NeuN (to label post-mitotic neurons). Microscopic analysis revealed two types of defect: partial disappearance of fissures and/or neuronal ectopia, primarily in supra-supplemented animals (incidence of 80 %, P≤0·01), but also in deficient and supplemented groups (incidence of 40 %, P≤0·05), compared with control animals. The primary fissure was predominantly affected, sometimes accompanied by defects in the secondary fissure. Our findings show that growing rats fed an FA-modified diet, including both deficient and supplemented diets, have an increased risk of disturbances in cerebellar corticogenesis. Defects caused by these diets may have functional consequences in later life. The present study is the first to demonstrate that cerebellar morphological defects can arise from deficient, as well as high, FA levels in the diet. PMID:27153204

  18. Differences in in vitro cerebellar neuronal responses to hypoxia in eider ducks, chicken and rats.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Stian; Folkow, Lars P

    2009-11-01

    Ducks are well-known to be more tolerant to asphyxia than non-diving birds, but it is not known if their defences include enhanced neuronal hypoxia tolerance. To test this, we compared extracellular recordings of spontaneous activity in the Purkinje cell layer of 400 mum thick isolated cerebellar slices from eider ducks, chickens and rats, before, during and after 60 min hypoxia (95%N(2)-5%CO(2)) or chemical anoxia (hypoxia + 2 mM NaCN). Most slices rapidly lost activity in hypoxia, with or without recovery after rinse and return to normoxia (95%O(2)-5%CO(2)), but some maintained spontaneous activity throughout the insult. Proportions of 'surviving' (i.e. recovering or active) duck slices were significantly higher than for chickens in anoxia, and relative activity levels were higher for ducks than for chickens during hypoxia, anoxia and recovery. Survival of rat slices was significantly poorer than for birds under all conditions. Results suggest that (1) duck cerebellar neurons are intrinsically more hypoxia-tolerant than chicken neurons; (2) avian neurons are more hypoxia-tolerant than rat neurons, and (3) the enhanced hypoxic tolerance of duck neurons largely depended on efficient anaerobiosis since it mainly manifested itself in chemical anoxia. Mechanisms underlying the observed differences in neuronal hypoxic responses remain to be elucidated. PMID:19779726

  19. Rapid uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation accompanies glutamate toxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Marra, E; Passarella, S; Calissano, P

    1996-11-01

    A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to rat cerebellar granule cells causes a very rapid and progressive decrease in both cell and mitochondrial oxygen consumption caused by glucose and succinate addition, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 30 min after glutamate addition. Subsequent to glutamate exposure, a progressive decrease of respiratory control ratio to almost 1 was found within the following 3-5 h. The addition of extra calcium had no effect per se on oxygen consumption by cell homogenate. PMID:8981415

  20. Prenatal stress induces alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide that are correlated with deficits in spatial memory in rat's offspring.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damián G; Romero, Carolina B; Burdet, Berenice; Palumbo, María L; Zorrilla-Zubilete, María A

    2012-12-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) has been linked to abnormal cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in both animals and humans. Since PS has been shown to induce a cerebellar cytoarchitectural disarrangement and cerebellar abnormalities that have been linked to an impairment of behavioral functions, the aim of the present work was to investigate whether the exposure to PS in a period in which the cerebellum is still immature can induce behavioral deficits in the adult and whether this alterations are correlated with changes in nitric oxide (NO) and cellular oxidative mechanisms in offspring's cerebellum. Our results show impairments in spatial memory and territory discrimination in PS adult rats. PS offspring also displayed alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and activity. Moreover, a correlation between spatial memory deficits and the increase in NOS activity was found. The results found here may point to a role of cerebellar NO in the behavioral alterations induced by stress during early development stages. PMID:23022609

  1. Decoding bipedal locomotion from the rat sensorimotor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigosa, J.; Panarese, A.; Dominici, N.; Friedli, L.; van den Brand, R.; Carpaneto, J.; DiGiovanna, J.; Courtine, G.; Micera, S.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Decoding forelimb movements from the firing activity of cortical neurons has been interfaced with robotic and prosthetic systems to replace lost upper limb functions in humans. Despite the potential of this approach to improve locomotion and facilitate gait rehabilitation, decoding lower limb movement from the motor cortex has received comparatively little attention. Here, we performed experiments to identify the type and amount of information that can be decoded from neuronal ensemble activity in the hindlimb area of the rat motor cortex during bipedal locomotor tasks. Approach. Rats were trained to stand, step on a treadmill, walk overground and climb staircases in a bipedal posture. To impose this gait, the rats were secured in a robotic interface that provided support against the direction of gravity and in the mediolateral direction, but behaved transparently in the forward direction. After completion of training, rats were chronically implanted with a micro-wire array spanning the left hindlimb motor cortex to record single and multi-unit activity, and bipolar electrodes into 10 muscles of the right hindlimb to monitor electromyographic signals. Whole-body kinematics, muscle activity, and neural signals were simultaneously recorded during execution of the trained tasks over multiple days of testing. Hindlimb kinematics, muscle activity, gait phases, and locomotor tasks were decoded using offline classification algorithms. Main results. We found that the stance and swing phases of gait and the locomotor tasks were detected with accuracies as robust as 90% in all rats. Decoded hindlimb kinematics and muscle activity exhibited a larger variability across rats and tasks. Significance. Our study shows that the rodent motor cortex contains useful information for lower limb neuroprosthetic development. However, brain-machine interfaces estimating gait phases or locomotor behaviors, instead of continuous variables such as limb joint positions or speeds

  2. Visual cortex controls retinal output in the rat.

    PubMed

    Molotchnikoff, S; Tremblay, F

    1986-07-01

    The first objective of the present investigation was to shed more light on corticofugal influences on the retina by providing an analysis of the type and proportion of retinal ganglion cells that are affected by cooling the visual cortex in rats. The second question was to determine if the pretectum participates in functional cortico-retinal relationships. In urethane-anesthetized and paralyzed hooded rats, axonal activity of retinal ganglion cells was recorded with glass micropipettes at optic chiasm level. Units were classified as ON, OFF, suppressed-by-light and concentric. The visual cortex was inactivated by cooling its surface with a 4 mm2 steel probe using the Peltier effect. The pretectum was blocked with microinjections of 50 to 100 nanoliters of cobalt ions, lidocaine hydrochloride or KCl. The inactivations and recoveries at both sites were monitored by simultaneously recording evoked field potentials. Interrupting corticofugal impulses caused modifications of the evoked discharge pattern in all types of cells. The concentric type was the group least affected by cortical cooling. A common trend emerged suggesting that cooling of the visual cortex led to an enhancement of the initial evoked excitation. This was often followed by an enhanced post-excitatory inhibition. The Pearson coefficient allowed us to measure the degree of similarity between two histograms. When all data were pooled, a weak correlation between control and test histograms (r = 0.29, N = 56) was found, while the control and recovery patterns averaged a correlation of more than twice that size (r = 0.68). In a second series of experiments, the pretectum and visual cortex (VC) were simultaneously inactivated. It is shown that both sites summed their influence and acted synergistically upon the pattern of ganglion cell responses. The results strongly suggest that the visual cortex exerts a major control over the response pattern of thirty percent of retinal ganglion cells, and that the

  3. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABAA receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A.; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha; Morton, Russell A.; Everett, Julie C.; Zurek, Agnieszka A.; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ~60 mM (~0.28 g/dl) during the 4 hours of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 hrs after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased the expression of δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABAA receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats. PMID:24316160

  4. Insular Cortex and Consummatory Successive Negative Contrast in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-You; Roman, Christopher; Reilly, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Rats that are expecting a high value reward (e.g., 1.0 M sucrose) show an exaggerated underresponding when they are instead given a low value reward (e.g., 0.15% saccharin), an effect termed successive negative contrast (SNC). In the present experiment, insular cortex-lesioned (ICX) rats showed normal responsivity to sucrose and saccharin prior to the reward downshift. However, when switched from sucrose to saccharin during the postshift trials these rats displayed no evidence of SNC. Indeed, over the downshift trials these ICX rats consistently drank more saccharin than the ICX rats maintained on saccharin throughout the experiment. Potential interpretations are discussed including a lesion-induced impairment in the ability to accurately recognize the novelty of the postshift saccharin stimulus. PMID:19634939

  5. Characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Toms, N. J.; Jane, D. E.; Tse, H. W.; Roberts, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacology of excitatory amino acid (EAA)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, monitored via [3H]-inositol monophosphate accumulation, was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. 2. EAA-stimulated PI hydrolysis peaked after 4-5 days in vitro and subsequently declined. 3. The agonist order of potency was found to be (EC50): L-quisqualic acid (Quis) (2 microM) >> L-glutamate (50 microM) > (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD) (102 microM). L-Glutamate (Emax = 873% of basal activity) elicited the largest stimulation of PI hydrolysis, whereas Quis (Emax = 603%) and (1S,3R)-ACPD (Emax = 306%) produced somewhat lower stimulations. 4. Several phenylglycine derivatives were found to be active in inhibiting 2 microM Quis-stimulated PI hydrolysis, in order of potency (IC50): (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (41 microM) > or = (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (51 microM) >> (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (243 microM). 5. Cultured cerebellar granule cells of the rat appear to have Group I mGluR pharmacology similar to that reported for cloned mGluR1 and provide an ideal system for investigating novel mGluR1 ligands in a native environment. PMID:8680712

  6. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  7. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  8. Infrared thermal imaging of rat somatosensory cortex with whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ooi, Yasuhiro; Seki, Junji

    2012-04-01

    The present study aims to validate the applicability of infrared (IR) thermal imaging for the study of brain function through experiments on the rat barrel cortex. Regional changes in neural activity within the brain produce alterations in local thermal equilibrium via increases in metabolic activity and blood flow. We studied the relationship between temperature change and neural activity in anesthetized rats using IR imaging to visualize stimulus-induced changes in the somatosensory cortex of the brain. Sensory stimulation of the vibrissae (whiskers) was given for 10 s using an oscillating whisker vibrator (5-mm deflection at 10, 5, and 1 Hz). The brain temperature in the observational region continued to increase significantly with whisker stimulation. The mean peak recorded temperature changes were 0.048 ± 0.028, 0.054 ± 0.036, and 0.097 ± 0.015°C at 10, 5, and 1 Hz, respectively. We also observed that the temperature increase occurred in a focal spot, radiating to encompass a larger region within the contralateral barrel cortex region during single-whisker stimulation. Whisker stimulation also produced ipsilateral cortex temperature increases, which were localized in the same region as the pial arterioles. Temperature increase in the barrel cortex was also observed in rats treated with a calcium channel blocker (nimodipine), which acts to suppress the hemodynamic response to neural activity. Thus the location and area of temperature increase were found to change in accordance with the region of neural activation. These results indicate that IR thermal imaging is viable as a functional quantitative neuroimaging technique. PMID:22282486

  9. Inactivation of Cerebellar Cortical Crus II Disrupts Temporal Processing of Absolute Timing but not Relative Timing in Voluntary Movements

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the cerebellum plays an important role in temporal processing at the scale of milliseconds. However, it is not clear whether intrinsic cerebellar function involves the temporal processing of discrete or continuous events. Temporal processing during discrete events functions by counting absolute time like a stopwatch, while during continuous events it measures events at intervals. During the temporal processing of continuous events, animals might respond to rhythmic timing of sequential responses rather than to the absolute durations of intervals. Here, we tested the contribution of the cerebellar cortex to temporal processing of absolute and relative timings in voluntary movements. We injected muscimol and baclofen to a part of the cerebellar cortex of rats. We then tested the accuracy of their absolute or relative timing prediction using two timing tasks requiring almost identical reaching movements. Inactivation of the cerebellar cortex disrupted accurate temporal prediction in the absolute timing task. The rats formed two groups based on the changes to their timing accuracy following one of two distinct patterns which can be described as longer or shorter declines in the accuracy of learned intervals. However, a part of the cerebellar cortical inactivation did not affect the rats’ performance of relative timing tasks. We concluded that a part of the cerebellar cortex, Crus II, contributes to the accurate temporal prediction of absolute timing and that the entire cerebellar cortex may be unnecessary in cases in which accurately knowing the absolute duration of an interval is not required for temporal prediction. PMID:26941621

  10. Somatostatin binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, B.; Prieto, J.C.; Arilla, E. )

    1990-11-01

    A method has been developed for the study of somatostatin (SS) binding to dissociated cells from rat cerebral cortex. Binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS to cells obtained by mechanical dissociation of rat cerebral cortex was dependent on time and temperature, saturable, reversible and highly specific. Under conditions of equilibrium, i.e., 60 min at 25 degrees C, native SS inhibited tracer binding in a dose-dependent manner. The Scatchard analysis of binding data was linear and yielded a dissociation constant of 0.60 +/- 0.08 nM with a maximal binding capacity of 160 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein. The binding of {sup 125}I (Tyr11)SS was specific as shown in experiments on tracer displacement by the native peptides, SS analogues, and unrelated peptides.

  11. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao; Yang, Jun; Fei, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Zhu, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Zhang-Bo; Li, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jian-Fu

    2015-12-10

    In the study, we investigated the effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress gastric mucosal damage (SGMD), and its mechanisms in rats. The model of SGMD was established by restraining and water (21±1°C)-immersion for 3h. The gastric mucosal damage index (GMDI) indicated the severity of gastric mucosal damage. Histamine or receptor antagonist was microinjected into the FN. The decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle (DSCP) and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) were destroyed, respectively. The pathological changes of gastric mucosa were evaluated using biological signal acquisition system, Laser-Doppler flowmeter, and western blotting. We found that the microinjection of histamine (0.05, 0.5, and 5μg) into FN significantly attenuated the SGMD, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas, the microinjection of histamine H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) exacerbated the SGMD. The protective effect of histamine on SGMD was abolished by electrical lesion of DSCP or chemical ablation of LHA. The microinjection of histamine decreased the discharge frequency of the greater splanchnic nerve, and the gastric mucosal blood flow was increased. In addition, the cellular proliferation was enhanced, but the cellular apoptosis was reduced in the gastric mucosa. Also the pro-apoptosis protein, Bax, and caspase-3 were down-regulated, and the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 was up-regulated following microinjection of histamine. In conclusion, the FN participated in the regulation of SGMD after histamine microinjected into FN, and cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits (include: DSCP, LHA) contribute to the process, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy for SGMD. PMID:26474912

  12. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  13. Quercetin supplementation does not enhance cerebellar mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative status in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Rafael A; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aranda, Pilar; Martínez-López, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that quercetin may inhibit the mitochondrial and antioxidant adaptations induced by exercise in cerebellar tissue. Thirty-five 6-week-old Wistar rats were randomly allocated into the following groups: quercetin, exercised (Q-Ex; n = 9); quercetin, sedentary (Q-Sed; n = 9); no quercetin, exercised (NQ-Ex; n = 9); and no quercetin, sedentary (NQ-Sed; n = 8). After 6 weeks of quercetin supplementation and/or exercise training, cerebellums were collected. Protein carbonyl content (PCC), sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), messenger RNA levels, citrate synthase (CS), and mitochondrial DNA were measured. When Q-Sed was compared with NQ-Sed, PCC (P < .005) showed decreased levels, whereas PGC-1α, sirtuin 1 (both, P < .01), mitochondrial DNA (P < .001), and CS (P < .01) increased. However, when Q-Ex was compared with Q-Sed, PCC showed increased levels (P < .001), whereas CS decreased (P < .01). Furthermore, the NQ-Ex group experienced an increase in PGC-1α messenger RNA levels in comparison with NQ-Sed (P > .01). This effect, however, did not appear in Q-Ex (P < .05). Therefore, we must hypothesize that either the dose (25 mg/kg) or the length of the quercetin supplementation period that was used in the present study (or perhaps both) may impair exercise-induced adaptations in cerebellar tissue. PMID:26032482

  14. Microinjection of acetylcholine into cerebellar fastigial nucleus induces blood depressor response in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzheng; Luo, Wen; Zhou, Peiling; Sun, Tingzhe

    2016-08-26

    It is well known that the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) is involved in cardiovascular modulation, and has direct evidence of cholinergic activity; however, whether and how acetylcholine (ACh) in the FN modulates blood pressure has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed mean arterial pressure, maximal change in mean arterial pressure, and the reaction time of blood pressure changes after microinjection of cholinergic reagents into the FN in anesthetized rats. The results showed that ACh evoked a concentration-dependent (10, 30 and 100mM) effect on blood pressure down-regulation. The muscarinic ACh (mACh) receptor antagonist atropine, but not the nicotinic ACh (nACh) receptor antagonist mecamylamine, blocked the ACh-mediated depressor response. The mACh receptor agonist oxotremorine M, rather than nACh receptor agonist nicotine, mimicked the ACh-mediated blood pressure decrease in a dose-dependent manner (10, 30 and 100mM). These results indicate that cholinergic input in the cerebellar FN exerts a depressor effect on systemic blood pressure regulation, and such effects are substantially contributed by mACh rather than nACh receptors, although the precise mechanism concerning the role of mACh receptor in FN-mediated blood pressure modulation remains to be elucidated. PMID:27373533

  15. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Springer, Joe E

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  16. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  17. Antiphospholipid antibodies bind to rat cerebellar granule cells: the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Andreassi, C; Eboli, M L

    1998-11-27

    IgGs from sera containing antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), detected as antibodies to cardiolipin, or control sera were incubated with rat cerebellar granule cells in primary culture. Using a mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity assay (MTT test), aPL IgGs were shown to decrease MTT metabolism after 24 h incubation with the cells, and to cause non-toxic amounts of glutamate to become neurotoxic when added to the cells for 45 min. Acute and chronic aPL toxicity were prevented by MK-801. Sera containing aPL bound to intact cerebellar neurons, as revealed by an immunofluorescent technique. These results suggest that antiphospholipid antibodies interfere with excitatory pathways in glutamatergic cerebellar granule cells by a mechanism involving overactivation of the NMDA glutamate receptor. PMID:9865941

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Carnosine on Primary Culture of Rat Cerebellar Cells under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lopachev, A V; Lopacheva, O M; Abaimov, D A; Koroleva, O V; Vladychenskaya, E A; Erukhimovich, A A; Fedorova, T N

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a natural antioxidant, but its protective effect under oxidative stress induced by neurotoxins is studied insufficiently. In this work, we show the neuroprotective effect of carnosine in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells under oxidative stress induced by 1 mM 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), which directly generates free radicals both in the medium and in the cells, and 20 nM rotenone, which increases the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In both models, adding 2 mM carnosine to the incubation medium decreased cell death calculated using fluorescence microscopy and enhanced cell viability estimated by the MTT assay. The antioxidant effect of carnosine inside cultured cells was demonstrated using the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescein. Carnosine reduced by half the increase in the number of ROS in neurons induced by 20 nM rotenone. Using iron-induced chemiluminescence, we showed that preincubation of primary neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine prevents the decrease in endogenous antioxidant potential of cells induced by 1 mM AAPH and 20 nM rotenone. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we showed that a 10-min incubation of neuronal cultures with 2 mM carnosine leads to a 14.5-fold increase in carnosine content in cell lysates. Thus, carnosine is able to penetrate neurons and exerts an antioxidant effect. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of the peptide transporter PEPT2 in rat cerebellar cells, which suggests the possibility of carnosine transport into the cells. At the same time, Western blot analysis showed no carnosine-induced changes in the level of apoptosis regulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and in the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, which suggests that carnosine could have minimal or no side effects on proliferation and apoptosis control systems in normal cells. PMID:27297901

  19. Changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression following chronic cocaine.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Willard M; Brebner, Karen; Lynch, Wendy J; Patel, Kruti M; Robertson, Daniel J; Roberts, David C S; Vrana, Kent E

    2002-07-15

    Alterations in gene expression caused by repeated cocaine administration have been implicated in the long-term behavioral aspects of cocaine abuse. The frontal cortex mediates reinforcement, sensory, associative, and executive functions and plays an important role in the mesocortical dopamine reinforcement system. Repeated cocaine administration causes changes in frontal cortex gene expression that may lead to changes in the behaviors subserved by this brain region. Rats treated non-contingently with a binge model of cocaine (45 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days were screened for changes in relative mRNA abundance in the frontal cortex by cDNA hybridization arrays. To confirm changes, immunoreactive protein was measured (via protein-specific immunoblots) in a second group of identically-treated animals. Protein levels of protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein (ARC), as well as an antigen related to nerve growth factor I-B (NGFI-B-RA) were shown to be significantly induced after cocaine administration. Levels of NGFI-B mRNA were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR to be increased with cocaine administration. These observations are similar to previously reported cocaine-responsive changes in gene expression but novel to the frontal cortex. This study also validates the use of hybridization arrays for screening of neuronal gene expression changes and the utility of relative protein quantification as a post-hoc confirmation tool. PMID:12117546

  20. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  1. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes. PMID:20513244

  2. The vesicular glutamate transporter-1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression in rat postrhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Li, Xu; Cao, Haiyan; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple applications of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to glutamatergic neurons, or specific subclasses of glutamatergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop and analyze promoters that support glutamatergic-specific expression. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are found in different populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. We previously reported on a plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus vector that contains a VGLUT1 promoter. This vector supports long-term expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex, but does not support expression in VGLUT2-containing glutamatergic neurons in the ventral medial hypothalamus. This VGLUT1 promoter contains both the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and the VGLUT1 first intron. In this study, we begin to isolate and analyze the glutamatergic-specific regulatory elements in this VGLUT1 promoter. We show that the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression. We isolated a small, basal VGLUT1 promoter that does not support glutamatergic-specific expression. Next, we fused either the VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron to this basal promoter. The VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron, fused to the basal promoter, each supported glutamatergic-specific expression in POR cortex. PMID:21172319

  3. Scopolamine Enhances Generalization between Odor Representations in Rat Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a critical, modulatory role in plasticity in many sensory systems. In the rat olfactory system, both behavioral and physiological data indicate that ACh may be required for normal odor memory and synaptic plasticity. Based on these data, neural network models have hypothesized that ACh muscarinic receptors reduce interference between learned cortical representations of odors within the piriform cortex. In this study, odor receptive fields of rat anterior piriform cortex (aPCX) single-units for alkane odors were mapped before and after either a systemic injection of the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) or aPCX surface application of 500 μM scopolamine (or saline/ACSF controls). Cross-habituation between alkanes differing by two to four carbons was then examined following a 50-sec habituating stimulus. The results demonstrate that neither aPCX spontaneous activity nor odor-evoked activity (receptive field) was affected by scopolamine, but that cross-habituation in aPCX neurons was enhanced significantly by either systemic or cortical scopolamine. These results indicate that scopolamine selectively enhances generalization between odor representations in aPCX in a simple memory task. Given that ACh primarily affects intracortical association fibers in the aPCX, the results support a role for the association system in odor memory and discrimination and indicate an important ACh modulatory control over this basic sensory process. PMID:11584075

  4. Anatomical observations of the rat cerebellar nodulus after 24 hr of spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Holstein, G R; Kukielka, E; Martinelli, G P

    1999-07-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes alterations in postural, locomotor and oculomotor functions. The vestibular abnormalities experienced by astronauts entail immediate reflex motor responses, including postural illusions, sensations of rotation, nystagmus, dizziness and vertigo, as well as space motion sickness. Adaptation to the microgravity environment usually occurs within one week, and a subsequent re-adaptation period of several months is often required upon return to Earth. Some astronauts experience recurrences of dizziness, nausea, and vomiting, as well as marked disturbances in postural equilibrium in the absence of vision during this readaptation period. The mechanisms underlying such adaptation processes remain unclear, although current evidence favors some type of sensory conflict. The purpose of the present study was to explore the structural basis for the reorganization in the central vestibular system that underlies the process of adaptation to altered gravitational environments. Hindbrain tissue was obtained from rats flown on the Neurolab shuttle mission (STS-90) that launched on April 17, 1998. Tissue for the present report was obtained from four adult Fisher 344 rats sacrificed on orbit during flight day 2 (FD2), 24 hr after launch. Equal numbers of vivarium control animals and cage-controls were sacrificed 48 and 96 hr, respectively, after the flight dissections. Following decapitation, each hindbrain was immersion-fixed for 45 min in 4% paraformaldehyde/0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M phosphate buffer pH 7.3, and then transferred to a 4% paraformaldehyde solution in 0.1M phosphate buffer for 18 days at 4 degrees C. After this fixation, the cerebellum was dissected away from the ventral portion of the brainstem by severing the cerebellar peduncles. The entire cerebellum of each rat was cut by Vibratome into 100 micrometers thick sections in the parasagittal plane. These sections were collected serially and processed for electron microscopy by

  5. Organization of tectopontine terminals within the pontine nuclei of the rat and their spatial relationship to terminals from the visual and somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Cornelius; Horowski, Anja; Möck, Martin; Thier, Peter

    2005-04-11

    We investigated the spatial relationship of axonal and dendritic structures in the rat pontine nuclei (PN), which transfer visual signals from the superior colliculus (SC) and visual cortex (A17) to the cerebellum. Double anterograde tracing (DiI and DiAsp) from different sites in the SC showed that the tectal retinotopy of visual signals is largely lost in the PN. Whereas axon terminals from lateral sites in the SC were confined to a single terminal field close to the cerebral peduncle, medial sites in the SC projected to an additional dorsolateral one. On the other hand, axon terminals originating from the two structures occupy close but, nevertheless, totally nonoverlapping terminal fields within the PN. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis of the dendritic trees of intracellularly filled identified pontine projection neurons showed that the dendritic fields were confined to either the SC or the A17 terminal fields and never extended into both. We also investigated the projections carrying cortical somatosensory inputs to the PN as these signals are known to converge with tectal ones in the cerebellum. However, terminals originating in the whisker representation of the primary somatosensory cortex and in the SC were located in segregated pontine compartments as well. Our results, therefore, point to a possible pontocerebellar mapping rule: Functionally related signals, commonly destined for common cerebellar target zones but residing in different afferent locations, may be kept segregated on the level of the PN and converge only later at specific sites in the granular layer of cerebellar cortex. PMID:15739237

  6. Protective effect of fangchinoline on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon Ok; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2002-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effect of fangchinoline, a bis- benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which exhibits the characteristics of a Ca2+ channel blocker, on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. NaCN produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Pretreatment with fangchinoline over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the NaCN-induced neuronal cell death, glutamate release into medium, and elevation of [Ca2+]i and oxidants generation. These results suggest that fangchinoline may mitigate the harmful effects of cyanide-induced neuronal cell death by interfering with [Ca2+]i influx, due to its function as a Ca2+ channel blocker, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and oxidants generation. PMID:12135109

  7. Cerebellar connections to the dorsomedial and posterior nuclei of the hypothalamus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    ÇAVDAR, SAFİYE; ŞAN, TANGÜL; AKER, REZZAN; ŞEHİRLİ, ÜMİT; ONAT, FİLİZ

    2001-01-01

    The stimulation or ablation of cerebellar structures has produced a variety of visceral responses, indicating a cerebellar role in visceral functions. Studies using anterograde and retrograde tracing methods have revealed connections between the hypothalamus and cerebellar structures. The aim of this study is to investigate the cerebellar connections of the dorsomedial (DMH) and posterior hypothalamic nuclei using retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the present study, micro-injection of HRP restricted within the borders of the DMH showed that the projections of this nucleus are not uniform throughout its extent. The posterior DMH receives projections from the cerebellum, whereas the anterior DMH does not. These projections were from the (greatest to least concentration) lateral (dentate), anterior interposed (emboliform), and medial (fastigial) cerebellar nuclei. In addition, both the anterior and posterior DMH receive projections from various areas of the brainstem which confirms earlier studies and provides detailed descriptions. This study also demonstrates the distribution of labelled neurons to cerebellar and brainstem nuclei following HRP injection into the posterior hypothalamic nucleus. It provides clear evidence for a direct cerebellar nuclei-posterior DMH and cerebellar nuclei-posterior hypothalamic nucleus connections. We suggest that the brainstem reticular nuclei and other connections, such as the solitary, trigeminal and vestibular nuclei, of both DMH and posterior hypothalamus may contribute to the indirect cerebellohypothalamic connections. These observations offer a new perspective on the question of how the cerebellum may influence autonomic activity. PMID:11215766

  8. Uptake and metabolism of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate and L-(/sup 3/H)glutamine in adult rat cerebellar slices

    SciTech Connect

    de Barry, J.; Vincendon, G.; Gombos, G.

    1983-10-01

    Using very low concentrations (1 mumol range) of L-2-3-(/sup 3/H)glutamate, (/sup 3/H-Glu) or L-2-3-(/sup 3/H)glutamine (/sup 3/H-Gln), the authors have previously shown by autoradiography that these amino acids were preferentially taken up in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, the accumulation of /sup 3/H-Glu was essentially glial in these conditions. Uptake and metabolism of either (/sup 3/H-Glu) or (/sup 3/H-Gln) were studied in adult rat cerebellar slices. Both amino acids were rapidly converted into other metabolic compounds: after seven minutes of incubation in the presence of exogenous /sup 3/H-Glu, 70% of the tissue accumulated radioactivity was found to be in compounds other than glutamate. The main metabolites were Gln (42%), alpha-ketoglutarate (25%) and GABA (1,4%). In the presence of exogenous /sup 3/H-Gln the rate of metabolism was slightly slower (50% after seven minutes of incubation) and the metabolites were also Glu (29%), alpha-ketoglutarate (15%) and GABA (5%). Using depolarizing conditions (56 mM KCl) with either exogenous /sup 3/H-Glu or /sup 3/H-Gln, the radioactivity was preferentially accumulated in glutamate compared to control. From these results we conclude: i) there are two cellular compartments for the neurotransmission-glutamate-glutamine cycle; one is glial, the other neuronal; ii) these two cellular compartments contain both Gln and Glu; iii) transmitter glutamate is always in equilibrium with the so-called ''metabolic'' pool of glutamate; iv) the regulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle occurs at least at two different levels: the uptake of glutamate and the enzymatic activity of the neuronal glutaminase.

  9. Sexually Monomorphic Maps and Dimorphic Responses in Rat Genital Cortex.

    PubMed

    Lenschow, Constanze; Copley, Sean; Gardiner, Jayne M; Talbot, Zoe N; Vitenzon, Ariel; Brecht, Michael

    2016-01-11

    Mammalian external genitals show sexual dimorphism [1, 2] and can change size and shape upon sexual arousal. Genitals feature prominently in the oldest pieces of figural art [3] and phallic depictions of penises informed psychoanalytic thought about sexuality [4, 5]. Despite this longstanding interest, the neural representations of genitals are still poorly understood [6]. In somatosensory cortex specifically, many studies did not detect any cortical representation of genitals [7-9]. Studies in humans debate whether genitals are represented displaced below the foot of the cortical body map [10-12] or whether they are represented somatotopically [13-15]. We wondered what a high-resolution mapping of genital representations might tell us about the sexual differentiation of the mammalian brain. We identified genital responses in rat somatosensory cortex in a region previously assigned as arm/leg cortex. Genital responses were more common in males than in females. Despite such response dimorphism, we observed a stunning anatomical monomorphism of cortical penis and clitoris input maps revealed by cytochrome-oxidase-staining of cortical layer 4. Genital representations were somatotopic and bilaterally symmetric, and their relative size increased markedly during puberty. Size, shape, and erect posture give the cortical penis representation a phallic appearance pointing to a role in sexually aroused states. Cortical genital neurons showed unusual multi-body-part responses and sexually dimorphic receptive fields. Specifically, genital neurons were co-activated by distant body regions, which are touched during mounting in the respective sex. Genital maps indicate a deep homology of penis and clitoris representations in line with a fundamentally bi-sexual layout [16] of the vertebrate brain. PMID:26725197

  10. Hyperspectral optical tomography of intrinsic signals in the rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Konecky, Soren D; Wilson, Robert H; Hagen, Nathan; Mazhar, Amaan; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S; Frostig, Ron D; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a tomographic approach for three-dimensional imaging of evoked hemodynamic activity, using broadband illumination and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) image reconstruction. Changes in diffuse reflectance in the rat somatosensory cortex due to stimulation of a single whisker were imaged at a frame rate of 5 Hz using a hyperspectral image mapping spectrometer. In each frame, images in 38 wavelength bands from 484 to 652 nm were acquired simultaneously. For data analysis, we developed a hyperspectral DOT algorithm that used the Rytov approximation to quantify changes in tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin ([Formula: see text]) and deoxyhemoglobin (ctHb) in three dimensions. Using this algorithm, the maximum changes in [Formula: see text] and ctHb were found to occur at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] beneath the surface of the cortex, respectively. Rytov tomographic reconstructions revealed maximal spatially localized increases and decreases in [Formula: see text] and ctHb of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, with these maximum changes occurring at [Formula: see text] poststimulus. The localized optical signals from the Rytov approximation were greater than those from modified Beer-Lambert, likely due in part to the inability of planar reflectance to account for partial volume effects. PMID:26835483

  11. Interactions between two propagating waves in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Xu, W; Wang, Z; Takagaki, K; Li, B; Wu, J-Y

    2012-08-01

    Sensory-evoked propagating waves are frequently observed in sensory cortex. However, it is largely unknown how an evoked propagating wave affects the activity evoked by subsequent sensory inputs, or how two propagating waves interact when evoked by simultaneous sensory inputs. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we investigated the interactions between two evoked waves in rat visual cortex, and the spatiotemporal patterns of depolarization in the neuronal population due to wave-to-wave interactions. We have found that visually-evoked propagating waves have a refractory period of about 300 ms, within which the response to a subsequent visual stimulus is suppressed. Simultaneous presentation of two visual stimuli at different locations can evoke two waves propagating toward each other, and these two waves fuse. Fusion significantly shortens the latency and half-width of the response, leading to changes in the spatial profile of evoked population activity. The visually-evoked propagating wave may also be suppressed by a preceding spontaneous wave. The refractory period following a propagating wave and the fusion between two waves may contribute to visual sensory processing by modifying the spatiotemporal profile of population neuronal activity evoked by sensory events. PMID:22561730

  12. Perirhinal Cortex Hyperexcitability in Pilocarpine-Treated Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Ruba; Longo, Daniela; Biagini, Giuseppe; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex (PC), which is heavily connected with several epileptogenic regions of the limbic system such as the entorhinal cortex and amygdala, is involved in the generation and spread of seizures. However, the functional alterations occurring within an epileptic PC network are unknown. Here, we analyzed this issue by using in vitro electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry in brain tissue obtained from pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and age-matched, nonepileptic controls (NECs). Neurons recorded intracellularly from the PC deep layers in the two experimental groups had similar intrinsic and firing properties and generated spontaneous depolarizing and hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potentials with comparable duration and amplitude. However, spontaneous and stimulus-induced epileptiform discharges were seen with field potential recordings in over one-fifth of pilocarpine-treated slices but never in NEC tissue. These network events were reduced in duration by antagonizing NMDA receptors and abolished by NMDA + non-NMDA glutamatergic receptor antagonists. Pharmacologically isolated isolated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials had reversal potentials for the early GABAA receptor-mediated component that were significantly more depolarized in pilocarpine-treated cells. Experiments with a potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 antibody identified, in pilocarpine-treated PC, a significant immunostaining decrease that could not be explained by neuronal loss. However, interneurons expressing parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y were found to be decreased throughout the PC, whereas cholecystokinin-positive cells were diminished in superficial layers. These findings demonstrate synaptic hyper-excitability that is contributed by attenuated inhibition in the PC of pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats and underscore the role of PC networks in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:20865722

  13. Splitting of the cerebellar vermis in juvenile rats--effects on social behavior, vocalization and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Afif, Shadi; Staden, Mareike; Krauss, Joachim K; Schwabe, Kerstin; Hermann, Elvis J

    2013-08-01

    Radical resection of malignant midline tumors of the posterior fossa in childhood followed by adjuvant therapies like chemotherapy or radiotherapy often leads to longterm survival and even healing of such patients. Therefore, quality of life becomes particular important. Postoperative neurological deficits, such as cerebellar mutism and ataxia have been attributed to splitting of the cerebellar vermis to remove these tumors. Here, we tested the effect of vermian splitting in juvenile rats on social behavior, vocalization and motor activity. Juvenile male Sprague Dawley rats, aged 23 days, underwent vermian splitting under general anesthesia after medial suboccipital craniotomy (lesioned group, n=16). In sham-lesioned rats, only craniotomy was performed and the dura was opened with release of cerebrospinal fluid (n=16). Naïve rats served as controls (n=14). All groups were tested on day 0 (before surgery), and on days 1-4 and 7 after surgery for locomotor activity, motor coordination, social behavior, and ultrasound vocalization during social interaction. Finally, splitting of the vermis was histologically verified. Social interaction was reduced for two days after surgery in lesioned rats compared to sham-lesioned rats and controls. Vocalization was decreased for one day compared to controls. Locomotor activity was disturbed for several days after surgery in both lesioned and sham-lesioned rats as compared to controls. Deficient social behavior and vocalization after surgery are related to vermian splitting in juvenile rats. These results indicate that similar to the human context vermian splitting can reduce communicative drive in the early postsurgical phase. PMID:23685319

  14. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-10-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Perirhinal cortex lesions in rats: Novelty detection and sensitivity to interference.

    PubMed

    Albasser, Mathieu M; Olarte-Sánchez, Cristian M; Amin, Eman; Brown, Malcolm W; Kinnavane, Lisa; Aggleton, John P

    2015-06-01

    Rats with perirhinal cortex lesions received multiple object recognition trials within a continuous session to examine whether they show false memories. Experiment 1 focused on exploration patterns during the first object recognition test postsurgery, in which each trial contained 1 novel and 1 familiar object. The perirhinal cortex lesions reduced time spent exploring novel objects, but did not affect overall time spent exploring the test objects (novel plus familiar). Replications with subsequent cohorts of rats (Experiments 2, 3, 4.1) repeated this pattern of results. When all recognition memory data were combined (Experiments 1-4), giving totals of 44 perirhinal lesion rats and 40 surgical sham controls, the perirhinal cortex lesions caused a marginal reduction in total exploration time. That decrease in time with novel objects was often compensated by increased exploration of familiar objects. Experiment 4 also assessed the impact of proactive interference on recognition memory. Evidence emerged that prior object experience could additionally impair recognition performance in rats with perirhinal cortex lesions. Experiment 5 examined exploration levels when rats were just given pairs of novel objects to explore. Despite their perirhinal cortex lesions, exploration levels were comparable with those of control rats. While the results of Experiment 4 support the notion that perirhinal lesions can increase sensitivity to proactive interference, the overall findings question whether rats lacking a perirhinal cortex typically behave as if novel objects are familiar, that is, show false recognition. Rather, the rats retain a signal of novelty but struggle to discriminate the identity of that signal. PMID:26030425

  16. Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Acrolein, a member of reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including β-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: • Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. • Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. • Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

  17. PSD-95 regulates NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar granule neurons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Losi, Gabriele; Prybylowski, Kate; Fu, Zhanyan; Luo, Jianhong; Wenthold, Robert J; Vicini, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    We transfected a green fluorescent protein-tagged PSD-95 (PSD-95gfp) into cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) to investigate the role of PSD-95 in excitatory synapse maturation. Cells were grown in low potassium to favour functional synapse formation in vitro. Transfected cells displayed clear clusters of PSD-95gfp, often at the extremities of the short dendritic trees. We recorded NMDA and AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA- and AMPA-mESPCs) in the presence of TTX and bicuculline. At days in vitro (DIV) 7–8 PSD-95gfp-transfected cells had NMDA-mEPSCs with faster decay and smaller amplitudes than matching controls. In contrast, AMPA-mEPSC frequencies and amplitudes were increased. Whole-cell current density and ifenprodil sensitivity were reduced in PSD-95gfp cells, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunits containing NMDA receptors. No changes were observed compared to control when cells were transfected with cDNA for PSD-95gfp with palmitoylation site mutations that prevent targeting to the synapse. Overexpression of the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit, but not the NR2B subunit, prevented NMDA-mEPSC amplitude reduction when cotransfected with PSD-95gfp. PSD-95gfp overexpression produced faster NMDA-mEPSC decay when transfected alone or with either NR2 subunit. Surface staining of the epitope-tagged NR2 subunits revealed that colocalization with PSD-95gfp was higher for flag-tagged NR2A subunit clusters than for flag-tagged NR2B subunit clusters. These data suggest that PSD-95 overexpression in CGCs favours synaptic maturation by allowing synaptic insertion of NR2A and depressing expression of NR2B subunits. PMID:12576494

  18. Developmental features of rat cerebellar neural cells cultured in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, V.; Ciotti, M.T.; Aloisi, F.; Levi, G.

    1986-01-01

    We studied some aspects of the differentiation of rat cerebellar neural cells obtained from 8-day postnatal animals and cultured in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The ability of the cells to take up radioactive transmitter amino acids was analyzed autoradiographically. The L-glutamate analogue /sup 3/H-D-aspartate was taken up by astroglial cells, but not by granule neurons, even in late cultures (20 days in vitro). This is in agreement with the lack of depolarization-induced release of /sup 3/H-D-aspartate previously observed in this type of culture. In contrast, /sup 3/H-(GABA) was scarcely accumulated by glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, but taken up by glutamate-decarboxylase-positive inhibitory interneurons and was released in a Ca2+-dependent way upon depolarization: /sup 3/H-GABA evoked release progressively increased with time in culture. Interestingly, the expression of the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I was much reduced in granule cells cultured in CDM as compared to those maintained in the presence of serum. These data would indicate that in CDM the differentiation of granule neurons is not complete, while that of GABAergic neurons is not greatly affected. Whether the diminished differentiation of granule cells must be attributed only to serum deprivation or also to other differences in the composition of the culture medium remains to be established. /sup 3/H-GABA was avidly taken up also by a population of cells which were not recognized by antibodies raised against GFAP, glutamate decarboxylase, and microtubule-associated protein 2. These cells have been characterized as bipotential precursors of oligodendrocytes and of a subpopulation of astrocytes bearing a stellate shape and capable of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake.

  19. Ouabain-induced changes in MAP kinase phosphorylation in primary culture of rat cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Lopachev, Alexander V; Lopacheva, Olga M; Osipova, Ekaterina A; Vladychenskaya, Elizaveta A; Smolyaninova, Larisa V; Fedorova, Tatiana N; Koroleva, Olga V; Akkuratov, Evgeny E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiotonic steroid (CTS) ouabain is a well-established inhibitor of Na,K-ATPase capable of inducing signalling processes including changes in the activity of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) in various cell types. With increasing evidence of endogenous CTS in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, it is of particular interest to study ouabain-induced signalling in neurons, especially the activation of MAPK, because they are the key kinases activated in response to extracellular signals and regulating cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigated the effect of ouabain on the level of phosphorylation of three MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) and on cell survival in the primary culture of rat cerebellar cells. Using Western blotting we described the time course and concentration dependence of phosphorylation for ERK1/2, JNK and p38 in response to ouabain. We discovered that ouabain at a concentration of 1 μM does not cause cell death in cultured neurons while it changes the phosphorylation level of the three MAPK: ERK1/2 is phosphorylated transiently, p38 shows sustained phosphorylation, and JNK is dephosphorylated after a long-term incubation. We showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation increase does not depend on ouabain-induced calcium increase and p38 activation. Changes in p38 phosphorylation, which is independent from ERK1/2 activation, are calcium dependent. Changes in JNK phosphorylation are calcium dependent and also depend on ERK1/2 and p38 activation. Ten-micromolar ouabain leads to cell death, and we conclude that different effects of 1-μM and 10-μM ouabain depend on different ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation profiles. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27338714

  20. 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase is expressed in dissociated rat cerebellar cells and included in the postsynaptic density fraction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Jung; Jung, Jae Seob; Jin, IngNyol; Moon, Il Soo

    2003-08-31

    We have shown by protein sequencing that the phosphotyrosine-containing 48 kDa protein band of the rat cerebellar postsynaptic density fraction (CBL-PSD) is 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase 2 (CNP2). Immunoblot analysis indicated that both CNP1 and CNP2 isoforms are present in the CBL-PSD fraction, whereas there is little CNP2 in the forebrain (FB)-PSD fraction. Both isoforms in the CBL-PSD fraction were tyrosine-phosphorylated to a basal extent. They were efficiently dissociated from the complexes in the PSD fraction by salt, but not by non-ionic detergents such as n-octyl glucoside (OG) and Triton X-100. Immunocytochemistry of dissociated cerebellar cultures revealed patchy CNP staining in oligodendrocytes (OLs), Purkinje cells (PCs), and unidentified PSD95-positive cells, but no staining in granule cells (GCs). Our results indicate that both CNP1 and CNP2 are expressed in cerian populations of cerebellar cells in addition to OL, and that they are associated with complexes that are co-isolated with the PSD. PMID:14503857

  1. Ischemia deteriorates the spike encoding of rat cerebellar Purkinje cells by raising intracellular Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Shidi; Chen Na; Yang Zhilai; Huang Li; Zhu Yan; Guan Sudong; Chen Qianfen; Wang Jinhui

    2008-02-08

    Ischemia-induced excitotoxicity at cerebellar Purkinje cells is presumably due to a persistent glutamate action. To the fact that they are more vulnerable to ischemia than other glutamate-innervated neurons, we studied whether additional mechanisms are present and whether cytoplasm Ca{sup 2+} plays a key role in their ischemic excitotoxicity. Ischemic changes in the excitability of Purkinje cells were measured by whole-cell recording in cerebellar slices of rats with less glutamate action. The role of cytoplasm Ca{sup 2+} was examined by two-photon cellular imaging and BAPTA infusion in Purkinje cells. Lowering perfusion rate to cerebellar slices deteriorated spike timing and raised spike capacity of Purkinje cells. These changes were associated with the reduction of spike refractory periods and threshold potentials, as well as the loss of their control to spike encoding. Ischemia-induced functional deterioration at Purkinje neurons was accompanied by cytoplasm Ca{sup 2+} rise and prevented by BAPTA infusion. Therefore, the ischemia destabilizes the spike encoding of Purkinje cells via raising cytoplasm Ca{sup 2+} without a need for glutamate, which subsequently causes their excitotoxic death.

  2. Hippocampus, Perirhinal Cortex, and Complex Visual Discriminations in Rats and Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Jena B.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Velu, Priya D.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex, are known to be essential for the formation of long-term memory. Recent animal and human studies have investigated whether perirhinal cortex might also be important for visual perception. In our study, using a simultaneous oddity discrimination task, rats with…

  3. Dysgranular Retrosplenial Cortex Lesions in Rats Disrupt Cross-Modal Object Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindley, Emma L.; Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Aggleton, John P.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2014-01-01

    The retrosplenial cortex supports navigation, with one role thought to be the integration of different spatial cue types. This hypothesis was extended by examining the integration of nonspatial cues. Rats with lesions in either the dysgranular subregion of retrosplenial cortex (area 30) or lesions in both the granular and dysgranular subregions…

  4. Lesions of Rat Infralimbic Cortex Enhance Recovery and Reinstatement of an Appetitive Pavlovian Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Sarah E. V.; Kilcross, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has a well-established role in the inhibition of inappropriate responding, and evidence suggests that the infralimbic (IL) region of the rat medial PFC (MPFC) may be involved in some aspects of extinction of conditioned fear. MPFC lesions including, but not those sparing the IL cortex increase spontaneous recovery of…

  5. A Novel Role for the Rat Retrosplenial Cortex in Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Hindley, Emma L.; Haddon, Josephine E.; Vann, Seralynne D.; Aggleton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    By virtue of its frontal and hippocampal connections, the retrosplenial cortex is uniquely placed to support cognition. Here, we tested whether the retrosplenial cortex is required for frontal tasks analogous to the Stroop Test, i.e., for the ability to select between conflicting responses and inhibit responding to task-irrelevant cues. Rats first…

  6. Milnacipran Remediates Impulsive Deficits in Rats with Lesions of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshida, Takayuki; Izumi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deficits in impulse control are often observed in psychiatric disorders in which abnormalities of the prefrontal cortex are observed, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder. We recently found that milnacipran, a serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, could suppress impulsive action in normal rats. However, whether milnacipran could suppress elevated impulsive action in rats with lesions of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which is functionally comparable with the human prefrontal cortex, remains unknown. Methods: Selective lesions of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex were made using quinolinic acid in rats previously trained on a 3-choice serial reaction time task. Sham rats received phosphate buffered saline. Following a period of recovery, milnacipran (0 or 10mg/kg/d × 14 days) was orally administered 60 minutes prior to testing on the 3-choice task. After 7 days of drug cessation, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological analysis, and morphological analysis were conducted. Results: Lesions of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex induced impulsive deficits, and repeated milnacipran ameliorated the impulsive deficit both during the dosing period and after the cessation of the drug. Repeated milnacipran remediated the protein levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor and postsynaptic density-95, dendritic spine density, and excitatory currents in the few surviving neurons in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of ventromedial prefrontal cortex-lesioned rats. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that milnacipran treatment could be a novel strategy for the treatment of psychiatric disorders that are associated with a lack of impulse control. PMID:25522418

  7. Loss of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 from the Centrosome of Neurons in Developing Mouse Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Momoko; Hirata, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the centrosome of neurons does not have microtubule nucleating activity. Microtubule nucleation requires γ-tubulin as well as its recruiting proteins, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 that anchor γ-tubulin to the centrosome. Change in the localization of these proteins during in vivo development of brain, however, has not been well examined. In this study we investigate the localization of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD and CDK5RAP2 in developing cerebral and cerebellar cortex with immunofluorescence. We found that γ-tubulin and its recruiting proteins were localized at centrosomes of immature neurons, while they were lost at centrosomes in mature neurons. This indicated that the loss of microtubule nucleating activity at the centrosome of neurons is due to the loss of γ-tubulin-recruiting proteins from the centrosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that these proteins are still expressed after birth, suggesting that they have a role in microtubule generation in cell body and dendrites of mature neurons. Microtubule regrowth experiments on cultured mature neurons showed that microtubules are nucleated not at the centrosome but within dendrites. These data indicated the translocation of microtubule-organizing activity from the centrosome to dendrites during maturation of neurons, which would explain the mixed polarity of microtubules in dendrites. PMID:26633906

  8. Loss of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 from the Centrosome of Neurons in Developing Mouse Cerebral and Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Satoshi; Shigematsu, Momoko; Hirata, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kensuke

    2015-10-29

    It has been recently reported that the centrosome of neurons does not have microtubule nucleating activity. Microtubule nucleation requires γ-tubulin as well as its recruiting proteins, GCP-WD/NEDD1 and CDK5RAP2 that anchor γ-tubulin to the centrosome. Change in the localization of these proteins during in vivo development of brain, however, has not been well examined. In this study we investigate the localization of γ-tubulin, GCP-WD and CDK5RAP2 in developing cerebral and cerebellar cortex with immunofluorescence. We found that γ-tubulin and its recruiting proteins were localized at centrosomes of immature neurons, while they were lost at centrosomes in mature neurons. This indicated that the loss of microtubule nucleating activity at the centrosome of neurons is due to the loss of γ-tubulin-recruiting proteins from the centrosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that these proteins are still expressed after birth, suggesting that they have a role in microtubule generation in cell body and dendrites of mature neurons. Microtubule regrowth experiments on cultured mature neurons showed that microtubules are nucleated not at the centrosome but within dendrites. These data indicated the translocation of microtubule-organizing activity from the centrosome to dendrites during maturation of neurons, which would explain the mixed polarity of microtubules in dendrites. PMID:26633906

  9. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia of Place Discrimination in Retrosplenial Cortex and Hippocampal Lesioned Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haijima, Asahi; Ichitani, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Retrograde and anterograde amnesic effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat retrosplenial cortex (RS) and hippocampus (HPC) were investigated. To test retrograde amnesia, rats were trained with two-arm place discrimination in a radial maze 4 wk and 1 d before surgery with a different arm pair, respectively. In the retention test 1 wk after…

  10. Ablation of Cerebellar Nuclei Prevents H-Reflex Down-Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiang Yang; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2005-01-01

    While studies of cerebellar involvement in learning and memory have described plasticity within the cerebellum, its role in acquisition of plasticity elsewhere in the CNS is largely unexplored. This study set out to determine whether the cerebellum is needed for acquisition of the spinal cord plasticity that underlies operantly conditioned…

  11. Triacylglycerol metabolism in isolated rat kidney cortex tubules.

    PubMed

    Wirthensohn, G; Guder, W G

    1980-01-15

    Triacylglycerol metabolism has been studied in kidney cortex tubules from starved rats, prepared by collagenase treatment. Triacylglycerol was determined by a newly developed fully enzymic method. Incubation of tubules in the absence of fatty acids led to a decrease of endogenous triacylglycerol by about 50% in 1h. Addition of albuminbound oleate or palmitate resulted in a steady increase of tissue triacylglycerol over 2h. The rate of triacylglycerol synthesis was linearly dependent on oleate concentration up to 0.8mm, reaching a saturation at higher concentrations. Triacylglycerol formation from palmitate was less than that from oleate. This difference was qualitatively the same when net synthesis was compared with incorporation of labelled fatty acids. Quantitatively, however, the difference was less with the incorporation technique. Gluconeogenic substrates, which by themselves had no effect on triacylglycerol concentrations, stimulated neutral lipid formation from fatty acids. Glucose and lysine did not have such a stimulatory effect. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from lactate by mercaptopicolinic acid likewise inhibited triacylglycerol formation. This inhibitory effect was seen with oleate as well as with oleate plus lactate. When [2-(14)C]lactate was used the incorporation of label into triacylglycerol was found in the glycerol moiety exclusively. Addition of dl-beta-hydroxybutyrate (5mm) to the incubation medium in the presence of oleate or oleate plus lactate led to a significant increase in triacylglycerol formation. In contrast with the gluconeogenic substrates, dl-beta-hydroxybutyrate had no stimulatory effect on fatty acid uptake. The results suggest that renal triacylglycerol formation is a quantitatively important metabolic process. The finding that gluconeogenic substrates, but not glucose, increase lipid formation, indicates that the glycerol moiety is formed by glyceroneogenesis in the proximal tubules. The effect of ketone bodies seems to be

  12. Slow GABAA mediated synaptic transmission in rat visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sceniak, Michael P; MacIver, M Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous reports of inhibition in the neocortex suggest that inhibition is mediated predominantly through GABAA receptors exhibiting fast kinetics. Within the hippocampus, it has been shown that GABAA responses can take the form of either fast or slow response kinetics. Our findings indicate, for the first time, that the neocortex displays synaptic responses with slow GABAA receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). These IPSCs are kinetically and pharmacologically similar to responses found in the hippocampus, although the anatomical specificity of evoked responses is unique from hippocampus. Spontaneous slow GABAA IPSCs were recorded from both pyramidal and inhibitory neurons in rat visual cortex. Results GABAA slow IPSCs were significantly different from fast responses with respect to rise times and decay time constants, but not amplitudes. Spontaneously occurring GABAA slow IPSCs were nearly 100 times less frequent than fast sIPSCs and both were completely abolished by the chloride channel blocker, picrotoxin. The GABAA subunit-specific antagonist, furosemide, depressed spontaneous and evoked GABAA fast IPSCs, but not slow GABAA-mediated IPSCs. Anatomical specificity was evident using minimal stimulation: IPSCs with slow kinetics were evoked predominantly through stimulation of layer 1/2 apical dendritic zones of layer 4 pyramidal neurons and across their basal dendrites, while GABAA fast IPSCs were evoked through stimulation throughout the dendritic arborization. Many evoked IPSCs were also composed of a combination of fast and slow IPSC components. Conclusion GABAA slow IPSCs displayed durations that were approximately 4 fold longer than typical GABAA fast IPSCs, but shorter than GABAB-mediated inhibition. The anatomical and pharmacological specificity of evoked slow IPSCs suggests a unique origin of synaptic input. Incorporating GABAA slow IPSCs into computational models of cortical function will help improve our understanding of

  13. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Aaron A.; Clark, Benjamin J.; Demecha, Alexis J.; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas. PMID:25601828

  14. High dosage of monosodium glutamate causes deficits of the motor coordination and the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Prastiwi, D; Djunaidi, A; Partadiredja, G

    2015-11-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been widely used throughout the world as a flavoring agent of food. However, MSG at certain dosages is also thought to cause damage to many organs, including cerebellum. This study aimed at investigating the effects of different doses of MSG on the motor coordination and the number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of Wistar rats. A total of 24 male rats aged 4 to 5 weeks were divided into four groups, namely, control (C), T2.5, T3, and T3.5 groups, which received intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 2.5 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG, 3.0 mg/g bw of MSG, and 3.5 mg/g bw of MSG, respectively, for 10 consecutive days. The motor coordination of the rats was examined prior and subsequent to the treatment. The number of cerebellar Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. It has been found that the administration of MSG at a dosage of 3.5 mg/g bw, but not at lower dosages, caused a significant decrease of motor coordination and the estimated total number of Purkinje cells of rats. There was also a significant correlation between motor coordination and the total number of Purkinje cells. PMID:25697849

  15. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cerebral and cerebellar injury induced by obstructive jaundice in rats via inducing expression of TIPE-2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Zu, Guo; Zhou, Lu; Che, Ningwei; Guo, Jing; Liang, Zhanhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) on cerebral and cerebellar injury in experimental obstructive jaundice (OJ). OJ was done by ligature and section of extrahepatic biliary duct. Rg1 was injected intraperitoneally (10 mg kg(-1)d(-1) or 20 mg kg(-1) d(-1)). Comparison of serum total bile salts (TBA), total bilirubin (TBil), direct bilirubin (DBil), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β among groups. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined, also apoptosis and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 (TNF-α-inducible protein 8-like 2) were tested in cerebrum and cerebellum. Our results showed that Rg1 reduced MDA and apoptosis in cerebrum and cerebellum induced by OJ, also GSH and antioxidant enzyme activity were raised obviously in rats treated with Rg1. Moreover, decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats and Rg1 could improve the decreased mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in OJ rats. In conclusion, Rg1 decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis, also recovered the antioxidant status and mRNA and protein levels of TIPE2 in the cerebrum and cerebellum of OJ rats. PMID:26592478

  16. Baseline theta activities in medial prefrontal cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei are associated with the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-jie; Chen, Hao; Hu, Chen; Ke, Xian-feng; Yang, Li; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Bo

    2014-12-15

    It has been shown that both the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the cerebellum are involved in the extinction of trace conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). However, the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction are still relatively unclear. Theta oscillation in either the mPFC or the cerebellum has been revealed to correlate with the performance of trace CRs during the asymptotic acquisition. Therefore, we sought to further evaluate the impacts of pre-conditioned stimulus (CS) spontaneous theta (5.0-10.0Hz) oscillations in the mPFC and the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) on the extinction of trace CRs. Albino guinea pigs were given acquisition training for ten daily sessions followed by seven daily sessions of extinction. Local field potential (LFP) signals in the mPFC and the DCN were recorded when the animals received the CS-alone extinction training. It was found that higher mPFC relative theta ratios [theta/(delta+beta)] during the baseline period (850-ms prior to the CS onset) were predictive of fewer CR incidences rather than more adaptive CR performance (i.e., higher CR magnitude and later CR peak/onset latencies). Likewise, the pre-CS DCN theta activity was associated with the faster CR extinction. Furthermore, it was revealed that the power of pre-CS theta activities in the mPFC and the DCN were correlated until the extinction training day 2. Collectively, these results suggest that the mPFC and the DCN may interact with each other, and the brain oscillation state in which baseline theta activities in both areas are present contributes to the subsequent extinction of trace CRs. PMID:25200518

  17. Development of closed-loop neural interface technology in a rat model: combining motor cortex operant conditioning with visual cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Timothy Charles; Lehmkuhle, Mark J; Gage, Gregory J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2010-04-01

    Closed-loop neural interface technology that combines neural ensemble decoding with simultaneous electrical microstimulation feedback is hypothesized to improve deep brain stimulation techniques, neuromotor prosthetic applications, and epilepsy treatment. Here we describe our iterative results in a rat model of a sensory and motor neurophysiological feedback control system. Three rats were chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays in both the motor and visual cortices. The rats were subsequently trained over a period of weeks to modulate their motor cortex ensemble unit activity upon delivery of intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex in order to receive a food reward. Rats were given continuous feedback via visual cortex ICMS during the response periods that was representative of the motor cortex ensemble dynamics. Analysis revealed that the feedback provided the animals with indicators of the behavioral trials. At the hardware level, this preparation provides a tractable test model for improving the technology of closed-loop neural devices. PMID:20144922

  18. Pharmacological properties and H+ sensitivity of excitatory amino acid receptor channels in rat cerebellar granule neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Traynelis, S F; Cull-Candy, S G

    1991-01-01

    1. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), and kainate receptor channels have been examined in rat cerebellar granule neurones with whole-cell and single-channel patch-clamp methods. The whole-cell peak and steady-state aspartate and NMDA currents were reversibly inhibited by extracellular protons; the IC50 (concentration producing half-maximal inhibition) for the full H+ inhibition curve for NMDA receptors corresponded to pH 7.3, near to physiological pH. (S)-AMPA and kainate whole-cell currents were inhibited by protons with IC50 values that corresponded to pH 6.3 and 5.7, respectively; these receptors were, however, insensitive to H+ concentrations that inhibited NMDA receptor responses. 2. Proton inhibition of the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated responses was voltage insensitive, and did not involve a shift in reversal potential. 3. The EC50 (concentration producing half-maximal effect) for aspartate calculated from the whole-cell dose-response curve was similar at pH 6.8 and 7.6 (mean 11.2 microM). Although the EC50 for glycine potentiation of the aspartate response was marginally increased from 273 nM at pH 7.6 to 373 nM at pH 6.8, H+ inhibition was not overcome by up to 1 mM-external glycine. Inhibiting concentrations of H+ appropriate for AMPA and kainate receptors did not markedly alter the EC50 values determined for (S)-AMPA (3.4 microM) and kainate (114 microM) at pH 7.2. 4. Treatment of neurones with N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetic acid, dithiothretiol or diethyl pyrocarbonate did not influence proton inhibition of NMDA receptor responses. However, treatment with diethyl pyrocarbonate, which potentiated aspartate responses, appeared to reduce the effectiveness of Zn2+ inhibition of NMDA receptors. 5. Desensitization of whole-cell NMDA and (S)-AMPA currents was studied with ionophoretic application of agonist to the cell soma. Whole-cell aspartate currents desensitized rapidly, irrespective of the

  19. Ultrastructure of neurons and interneuronal connections in the sensomotor cortex of progeny of alcohol-addicted rats

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, E.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper studies the ultrastructure of neurons and interneuronal connections in the sensomotor cortex of the progeny of alcohol-addicted rats. Experiments were carried out on 12 female and four male albino rats; they were given alcohol solutions for 4 months and then mated. The female rats continued to ingest alcohol until the young rats acquired vision. The sensomotor cortex of experimental young rats aged 21 and 30 days and of intact animals of the same age was investigated; the sections were stained with uranyl acetate and studied. It is shown that alcoholic intoxication of females and males causes significant disturbances of the structural organization of the sensomotor cortex in the progeny.

  20. Characterization of the Brain Injury, Neurobehavioral Profiles and Histopathology in a Rat Model of Cerebellar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Rolland, William; Hartman, Richard; Kamper, Joel; Suzuki, Hidenori; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage (SCH) represents approximately 10% of all intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and is an important clinical problem of which little is known. This study stereotaxically infused collagenase (type VII) into the deep cerebellar paramedian white matter, which corresponds to the most common clinical injury region. Measures of hemostasis (brain water, hemoglobin assay, Evans blue, collagen-IV, ZO-1, and MMP-2 and MMP-9) and neurodeficit were quantified twenty-four hours later (Experiment 1). Long-term functional outcomes were measured over thirty days using the ataxia scale (modified Luciani), open field, wire suspension, beam balance and inclined plane (Experiment 2). Neurocognitive ability was assessed on the third week using the rotarod (motor learning), T-maze (working memory) and water-maze (spatial learning and memory) (Experiment 3), followed by a histopathological analysis one week later (Experiment 4). Stereotaxic collagenase infusion caused dose-dependent elevations in brain edema, neurodeficit, hematoma volume and blood-brain barrier rupture, while physiological variables remained stable. Most functional outcomes normalized by third week, while neurocognitive testing showed deficits parallel to the cystic-cavitary lesion at thirty days. All animals survived until sacrifice, and obstructive hydrocephalus did not develop. These results suggest that the model can generate important translational information about this subtype of ICH, and could be used for future investigations of therapeutic mechanisms after cerebellar hemorrhage. PMID:20887722

  1. Human Topological Task Adapted for Rats: Spatial Information Processes of the Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.; Howard, Brian P.; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2008-01-01

    Human research has shown that lesions of the parietal cortex disrupt spatial information processing, specifically topological information. Similar findings have been found in nonhumans. It has been difficult to determine homologies between human and non-human mnemonic mechanisms for spatial information processing because methodologies and neuropathology differ. The first objective of the present study was to adapt a previously established human task for rats. The second objective was to better characterize the role of parietal cortex (PC) and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) for topological spatial information processing. Rats had to distinguish whether a ball inside a ring or a ball outside a ring was the correct, rewarded object. After rats reached criterion on the task (>95%) they were randomly assigned to a lesion group (control, PC, dHPC). Animals were then re-tested. Post-surgery data show that controls were 94% correct on average, dHPC rats were 89% correct on average, and PC rats were 56% correct on average. The results from the present study suggest that the parietal cortex, but not the dHPC processes topological spatial information. The present data are the first to support comparable topological spatial information processes of the parietal cortex in humans and rats. PMID:18571941

  2. Rac1 and Cdc42 Play Important Roles in Arsenic Neurotoxicity in Primary Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    An, Yuan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaona; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore whether Rac1 and Cdc42, representative members of Ras homologue guanosine triphosphatases (Rho GTPases), are involved in neurotoxicity induced by arsenic exposure in rat nervous system. Expressions of Rac1 and Cdc42 in rat cerebellum and cerebrum exposed to different doses of NaAsO2 (Wistar rats drank 0, 2, 10, and 50 mg/L NaAsO2 water for 3 months) were examined. Both Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in cerebellum (P < 0.01) by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assay, but in cerebrum, Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions only in 2 mg/L exposure groups were significantly higher than those in control groups (P < 0.01). Five to 50 μM NaAsO2 decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultured rat astrocytes, whereas 1 μM NaAsO2 increased the cell viability in these cells. Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, decreased NaAsO2-induced apoptosis and increased the cell viability in primary cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Cdc42 inhibitor, ZCL278, increased cell viability in the cells exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Taken together, our current studies in vivo and in vitro indicate that activations of Rac1 and Cdc42 play a very important role in arsenic neurotoxicity in rat cerebellum, providing a new insight into arsenic neurotoxicity. PMID:26231544

  3. Histamine-induced calcium entry in rat cerebellar astrocytes: evidence for capacitative and non-capacitative mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Silke; Pfeiffer, Fatima; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of histamine on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) of cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes using fura-2-based Ca2+ imaging microscopy.Most of the cells responded to the application of histamine with an increase in [Ca2+]i which was antagonized by the H1 receptor blocker mepyramine. When histamine was applied for several minutes, the majority of the cells displayed a biphasic Ca2+ response consisting of an initial transient peak and a sustained component. In contrast to the initial transient [Ca2+]i response, the sustained, receptor-activated increase in [Ca2+]i was rapidly abolished by chelation of extracellular Ca2+ or addition of Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, but was unaffected by nifedipine, an antagonist of L-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. These data indicate that the sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on Ca2+ influx.When intracellular Ca2+ stores were emptied by prolonged application of histamine in Ca2+-free conditions, Ca2+ re-addition after removal of the agonist did not lead to an ‘overshoot’ of [Ca2+]i indicative of store-operated Ca2+ influx. However, Ca2+ stores were refilled despite the absence of any substantial change in the fura-2 signal.Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores using cyclopiazonic acid in Ca2+-free saline and subsequent re-addition of Ca2+ to the saline resulted in an increase in [Ca2+]i that was significantly enhanced in the presence of histamine.The results suggest that besides capacitative mechanisms, a non-capacitative, voltage-independent pathway is involved in histamine-induced Ca2+ entry into cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. PMID:10990540

  4. Protective potential of Bacopa monniera (Brahmi) extract on aluminum induced cerebellar toxicity and associated neuromuscular status in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, S; Mahdi, A A; Hasan, M; Mitra, K; Mahdi, F

    2011-01-01

    The present study attempts to assess the comparative effects of Bacopa monniera, (40 mg/kg body weight) and donepezil (2.5 mg/kg b. wt) on aluminum (100 mg / kg b. wt. of AlCl3) mediated oxidative damage in the cerebellum of aged rats (24 months) along with the associated dysfunctioning of neuromuscular coordination and motor activity. A significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and increased total reacting oxygen species, lipid and protein peroxidation products observed in aluminum exposed rats. We observed that treatment with B. monniera extract restored the altered antioxidant enzyme activities more, when compared with donepezil. However, acetylcholinesterase showed similar effect both in donepezil and B. monniera treated groups. The content of aluminum was increased in all experimental groups, however, iron content was found increased in all groups except the B. monniera treated groups. Moreover, aluminum treated groups of rats exhibited significant changes in behavioral profiles but these changes were in both B. monniera and donepezil treated groups. The light microscopic and ultrastructural studies revealed damaged Purkinje's neurons and altered granular cell layer along with the increased accumulation of lipofuscin granules in aluminum treated animals. These changes were quite less pronounced in B. monniera group than that of donepezil and this may be due to the reduction of excess iron content by B. monniera. On the basis of our results it may be concluded that Al may be linked with cerebellar degeneration and neuromuscular disorders while Bacopa monniera extract helps in reversing these changes. PMID:21366957

  5. Noradrenaline depletion blocks behavioral sparing and alters cortical morphogenesis after neonatal frontal cortex damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolb, B; Sutherland, R J

    1992-06-01

    The possibility that cortical noradrenaline (NA) is necessary for sparing of function that occurs after neonatal frontal cortex damage was examined. Spatial localization by rats with frontal cortex damage on postnatal day 7 (P7) was better than that by rats with similar damage sustained as adults. The sparing was abolished in rats depleted of cortical NA by means of neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6HDA) administration. The blockade of sparing in the P7 frontal operates was associated with a smaller brain, thinner cortex, and reduced cortical dendritic branching relative to saline-treated P7 frontal operates. NA depletion alone in unoperated rats did not affect spatial learning but did reduce brain size and dendritic branching. Rats with frontal lesions on P4 did not show sparing of spatial localization, and 6HDA administration had no additional behavioral effect. Overall, these data are consistent with the notion that NA has some general function in maintaining some forms of plasticity in posterior cortex. PMID:1607943

  6. Different Degrees of Iodine Deficiency Inhibit Differentiation of Cerebellar Granular Cells in Rat Offspring, via BMP-Smad1/5/8 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Lei, Xibing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Song, Heling; Li, Min; Min, Hui; Yu, Ye; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) during development results in dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS) and affects psychomotor and motor function. It is worth noting that maternal mild and marginal ID tends to be the most common reason of preventable neurodevelopmental impairment, via a mechanism that has not been elucidated. Therefore, our aim was to study the effects of developmental mild and marginal ID on the differentiation of cerebellar granule cells (GCs) and investigate the activation of BMP-Smad1/5/8 signaling, which is crucial for the development and differentiation of cerebellum. Three developmental rat models were created by feeding dam rats with a diet deficient in iodine and deionized water supplemented with potassium iodide. Our results showed that different degrees of ID inhibited and delayed the differentiation of cerebellar GCs on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14, and PN21. Moreover, mild and severe ID reduced the expression of BMP2 and p-Smad1/5/8, and increased the levels of Id2 on PN7, PN14, and PN21. However, marginal ID rarely altered expression of these proteins in the offspring. Our study supports the hypothesis that mild and severe ID during development inhibits the differentiation of cerebellar GCs, which may be ascribed to the down-regulation of BMP-Smad1/5/8 signaling and the overexpression of Id2. Furthermore, it was speculated that maternal marginal ID rarely affected the differentiation of cerebellar GCs in the offspring. PMID:26307610

  7. Developmental and comparative aspects of posterior medial thalamocortical innervation of barrel cortex in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Kichula, Elizabeth A.; Huntley, George W.

    2016-01-01

    The thalamocortical projection to rodent barrel cortex consists of inputs from the ventral posterior medial (VPM) and posterior medial (POm) nuclei that terminate in largely non-overlapping territories in and outside of layer IV. This projection in both rats and mice has been used extensively to study development and plasticity of highly-organized synaptic circuits. Whereas the VPM pathway has been well characterized in both rats and mice, organization of the POm pathway has only been described in rats, and no studies have focused exclusively on the development of the POm projection. Here, using transport of PHA-L or carbocyanine dyes, we characterize the POm thalamocortical innervation of adult mouse barrel cortex and describe its early postnatal development in both mice and rats. In adult mice, POm inputs form a dense plexus in layer Va that extends uniformly underneath layer IV barrels and septa. Innervation of layer IV is very sparse; a clear septal innervation pattern is evident only at the layer IV/Va border. This pattern differs subtly from that described previously in rats. Developmentally, in both species, POm axons are present in barrel cortex at birth, where in mice, they occupy layer IV as it differentiates. In contrast, in rats, POm axons do not enter layer IV until 1–2 days after its emergence from the cortical plate. In both species, arbors undergo progressive and directed growth. However, no layer IV septal innervation pattern emerges until several days after the cytoarchitectonic appearance of barrels and well after the emergence of whisker-related clusters of VPM thalamocortical axons. The mature pattern resolves earlier in rats than in mice. Taken together, these data reveal anatomical differences between mice and rats in development and organization of POm inputs to barrel cortex, with implications for species differences in the nature and plasticity of lemniscal and paralemniscal information processing. PMID:18496871

  8. The compartmental restriction of cerebellar interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Consalez, G. Giacomo; Hawkes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Purkinje cells (PC's) of the cerebellar cortex are subdivided into multiple different molecular phenotypes that form an elaborate array of parasagittal stripes. This array serves as a scaffold around which afferent topography is organized. The ways in which cerebellar interneurons may be restricted by this scaffolding are less well-understood. This review begins with a brief survey of cerebellar topography. Next, it reviews the development of stripes in the cerebellum with a particular emphasis on the embryological origins of cerebellar interneurons. These data serve as a foundation to discuss the hypothesis that cerebellar compartment boundaries also restrict cerebellar interneurons, both excitatory [granule cells, unipolar brush cells (UBCs)] and inhibitory (e.g., Golgi cells, basket cells). Finally, it is proposed that the same PC scaffold that restricts afferent terminal fields to stripes may also act to organize cerebellar interneurons. PMID:23346049

  9. Memory for frequency in rats: role of the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kesner, R P

    1990-05-01

    On a radial arm maze rats were tested for frequency memory of specific spatial locations, a task that presumably involves the coding of temporal information. On any trial during the study phase rats were allowed to visit three different spatial locations only once and one spatial location twice. During the test phase the rats were given a choice between a spatial location that had been visited once and spatial location that had been visited twice. The rats were reinforced for selecting the twice-visited spatial location. The number of spatial locations between a repetition (lag) was varied from one to three. After extensive training rats displayed memory for frequency only for a lag of three spatial locations, i.e., they displayed a repetition lag effect. Animals then received control, medial prefrontal cortex, or hippocampal lesions. Upon subsequent retests control rats continued to display frequency memory, but animals with medial prefrontal cortex or hippocampal lesions displayed a marked impairment. These data support the idea that both the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex code temporal order information. PMID:2350324

  10. Effects on K+ currents in rat cerebellar granule neurones of a membrane-permeable analogue of the calcium chelator BAPTA.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, C. S.; Mathie, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Whole cell recordings of voltage-activated K+ currents were made with the amphotericin B perforated patch technique from cerebellar granule (CG) neurones of 6-8 days rats that had been in culture for 1 to 16 days. By use of appropriate voltage protocols, the effects of the membrane-permeant form of BAPTA, 1,2-bis-(2-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), on the transient A current (IKA), the delayed rectifier current (IKV) and a standing outward current (IKSO) were investigated. 2. Bath application of 25 microM BAPTA-AM inhibited both IKV and IKSO in cultured neurones, but did not seem to affect IKA. Neither 25 microM BAPTA (free acid) nor 25 microM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (EDTA-AM) had any significant effect on the magnitude of IKSO. Similarly in short-term (1-2 days) cultured CG neurones IKV, but not IKA, was inhibited by 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 3. BAPTA-AM (2.5 microM) reduced IKV in short-term culture CG neurones, with further inhibition being seen when the perfusate was changed to one containing 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 4. Tetraethylammonium ions (TEA) (10 mM) reversibly inhibited IKV in these cells with a similar rate of block of IKV to that induced by 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 5. The degree of inhibition of IKV by 25 microM BAPTA-AM was both time- and voltage-dependent, in contrast to the inhibition of this current by TEA. 6. These data indicate that BAPTA-AM reduces K+ currents in cerebellar granule neurones and that this inhibition cannot be explained in terms of intracellular Ca2+ chelation, but is a direct effect on the underlying channels. PMID:8842443

  11. Inhibition of the amygdala central nucleus by stimulation of cerebellar output in rats: a putative mechanism for extinction of the conditioned fear response.

    PubMed

    Magal, Ari; Mintz, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The amygdala and the cerebellum serve two distinctively different functions. The amygdala plays a role in the expression of emotional information, whereas the cerebellum is involved in the timing of discrete motor responses. Interaction between these two systems is the basis of the two-stage theory of learning, according to which an encounter with a challenging event triggers fast classical conditioning of fear-conditioned responses in the amygdala and slow conditioning of motor-conditioned responses in the cerebellum. A third stage was hypothesised when an apparent interaction between amygdala and cerebellar associative plasticity was observed: an adaptive rate of cerebellum-dependent motor-conditioned responses was associated with a decrease in amygdala-dependent fear-conditioned responses, and was interpreted as extinction of amygdala-related fear-conditioned responses by the cerebellar output. To explore this hypothesis, we mimicked some components of classical eyeblink conditioning in anesthetised rats by applying an aversive periorbital pulse as an unconditioned stimulus and a train of pulses to the cerebellar output nuclei as a cerebellar neuronal-conditioned response. The central amygdala multiple unit response to the periorbital pulse was measured with or without a preceding train to the cerebellar output nuclei. The results showed that activation of the cerebellar output nuclei prior to periorbital stimulation produced diverse patterns of inhibition of the amygdala response to the periorbital aversive stimulus, depending upon the nucleus stimulated, the laterality of the nucleus stimulated, and the stimulus interval used. These results provide a putative extinction mechanism of learned fear behavior, and could have implications for the treatment of pathologies involving abnormal fear responses by using motor training as therapy. PMID:25185877

  12. Relationship between lipophilicity of C6-10 hydrocarbon solvents and their ROS-inducing potency in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Dreiem, A; Myhre, O; Fonnum, F

    2002-12-01

    We have studied the effects of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic C6-10 solvents on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat cerebellar granule cell cultures. ROS formation was assessed by monitoring oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) to the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). We found that aromatic solvents with C > 7, and aliphatic and alicyclic solvents with C > or = 7 induce ROS formation in rat cerebellar granule cells in vitro. The response increased with increasing solvent concentration. The potency of the compounds within each homologous group seemed to be correlated to their octanol water partition-coefficients. The aromatic solvents were generally less efficient in inducing ROS formation than the aliphatic and the alicyclic compounds. PMID:12520760

  13. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiao; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianfu; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yanming; Wang, Changcheng; Fei, Sujuan; Zhu, Jinzhou; Zhu, Shengping; Liu, Zhangbo; Li, Tingting; Lv, Shengxiang; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the effffects and the possible mechanism of microinjection of histamine into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage (SGMD) in rats. The effect of microinjection of histamine into FN on SGMD was observed. Methods: The model of SGMD was established by restraint and water (21 ± 1°C)-immersion (RWI) for 3 h in rats. The gastric mucosal damage index indicated the severity of SGMD. Western blotting was performed to assess gastric mucosal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Results: We observed that histamine microinjection into the FN markedly attenuated SGMD in a dose-dependent manner, and was prevented by pre-treatment with the ranitidine (a selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist) into the FN. The effect of histamine was abolished by pre-treatment with 3-MPA (a glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist) into the FN. There was a decrease in the discharge frequency of greater splanchnic nerve, and an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow after histamine injection into the FN. Additionally, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative factors of gastric mucosa might be involved in this process. Conclusion: The exogenous histamine in FN participates in the regulation of SGMD, and our results may help to provide new ideas on the treatment of gastroenterological diseases. PMID:26550464

  14. Dissociating Movement from Movement Timing in the Rat Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Eric B.; Powers, Marissa E.

    2014-01-01

    Neural encoding of the passage of time to produce temporally precise movements remains an open question. Neurons in several brain regions across different experimental contexts encode estimates of temporal intervals by scaling their activity in proportion to the interval duration. In motor cortex the degree to which this scaled activity relies upon afferent feedback and is guided by motor output remains unclear. Using a neural reward paradigm to dissociate neural activity from motor output before and after complete spinal transection, we show that temporally scaled activity occurs in the rat hindlimb motor cortex in the absence of motor output and after transection. Context-dependent changes in the encoding are plastic, reversible, and re-established following injury. Therefore, in the absence of motor output and despite a loss of afferent feedback, thought necessary for timed movements, the rat motor cortex displays scaled activity during a broad range of temporally demanding tasks similar to that identified in other brain regions. PMID:25411486

  15. No changes in cerebral microcirculatory parameters in rat during local cortex exposure to microwaves.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirota, Shogo; Ushiyama, Akira; Hirata, Akimasa; Arima, Takuji; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Nagai, Akiko; Ohkubo, Chiyoji

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether cerebral microcirculatory parameters in rats were modified during local cortex exposure to a radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF) under non-thermal conditions. The cortex tissue targeted was locally exposed to 1439 MHz RF using a figure-8 loop antenna at an averaged specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg in the target area for 50 min. Three microcirculatory parameters related to cerebral inflammation were measured by the cranial window method in real-time under RF exposure. No extravasation of intravenously injected fluorescent dye was observed during RF exposure. There was no significant difference either in pial venule blood flow velocity or diameter between exposed and sham-exposed rats. Histological evaluation for the brain immediately after RF exposure did not reveal any serum albumin leakage sites or degenerate neurons. These findings suggest that no dynamic changes occurred in cerebral microcirculation even during local cortex exposure under these conditions. PMID:25792647

  16. Contralateral Disconnection of the Rat Prelimbic Cortex and Dorsomedial Striatum Impairs Cue-Guided Behavioral Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Phillip M.; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Switches in reward outcomes or reward-predictive cues are two fundamental ways in which information is used to flexibly shift response patterns. The rat prelimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum support behavioral flexibility based on a change in outcomes. The present experiments investigated whether these two brain regions are necessary for…

  17. MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX LESIONS AND SPATIAL DELAYED ALTERNATION IN THE RAT: RECOVERY OR SPARING?

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Experiment 1, Long-Evans rat pups received medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) aspirations or sham surgery on Postnatal Day 10 (PND10) and were then trained on PND23 to perform one of two T-maze tasks: iscrete-trials delayed alternation (DA) or simple position discrimination (PD). ...

  18. FOCAL LESIONS OF VISUAL CORTEX: EFFECTS ON VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Focal lesions were placed in the visual cortex of Long-Evans hooded rats, immediately below skull screw recording electrodes. Lesions were produced by heat and extended an average depth of about 0.9 mm below the cortical surface. Evoked potentials recorded from the electrode over...

  19. UPTAKE OF INORGANIC LEAD IN VITRO BY ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA AND TISSUE SLICES OF RAT RENAL CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Slices of rat renal cortex were shown to take up Pb2+ during incubation in vitro; Pb2+ was also shown to enter mitochondria within the slices. The uptake of Pb2+ by isolated mitochondria was inhibited by N3-, La3+ and ruthenium red. A steady state of uptake was attained within 60...

  20. EFFECTS OF INORGANIC LEAD IN VITRO ON ION EXCHANGES AND RESPIRATORY METABOLISM OF RAT KIDNEY CORTEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of Pb2+ added in vitro to tissue slices, isolated tubules and isolated mitochondria of rat kidney cortex have been studied. Slices were depleted of K+ and loaded with Na+, Cl- and water by pre-incubation at 1C, and reversal of these changes was then induced by incubat...

  1. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  2. Optogenetic Manipulation of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Sato, Ayana; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) are the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Although their anatomical connections and physiological response properties have been extensively studied, the causal role of their activity in behavioral, cognitive and autonomic functions is still unclear because PC activity cannot be selectively controlled. Here we developed a novel technique using optogenetics for selective and rapidly reversible manipulation of PC activity in vivo. We injected into rat cerebellar cortex lentiviruses expressing either the light-activated cationic channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or light-driven chloride pump halorhodopsin (eNpHR) under the control of the PC-specific L7 promoter. Transgene expression was observed in most PCs (ChR2, 92.6%; eNpHR, 95.3%), as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. In vivo electrophysiological recordings showed that all light-responsive PCs in ChR2-transduced rats increased frequency of simple spike in response to blue laser illumination. Similarly, most light-responsive PCs (93.8%) in eNpHR-transduced rats decreased frequency of simple spike in response to orange laser illumination. We then applied these techniques to characterize the roles of rat cerebellar uvula, one of the cardiovascular regulatory regions in the cerebellum, in resting blood pressure (BP) regulation in anesthetized rats. ChR2-mediated photostimulation and eNpHR-mediated photoinhibition of the uvula had opposite effects on resting BP, inducing depressor and pressor responses, respectively. In contrast, manipulation of PC activity within the neighboring lobule VIII had no effect on BP. Blue and orange laser illumination onto PBS-injected lobule IX didn't affect BP, indicating the observed effects on BP were actually due to PC activation and inhibition. These results clearly demonstrate that the optogenetic method we developed here will provide a powerful way to elucidate a causal relationship between local PC activity and functions of the cerebellum

  3. Ethanol intake-induced apoptosis in glial cells and axonal disorders in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats (voluntary ethanol consumers).

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelo; Sauce, Rafael; Oliveira, Suelen Alves; de Almeida Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo; Stefanini, Maíra Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol intake may cause alterations in cellular metabolism altering motricity, learning and cognition. The cerebellum is one of the most susceptible organs to ethanol-related disorders during development, and is associated with oxidative stress-induced apoptosis being crucial for pathogenic consequences. The UChA variety is a special strain of Wistar rat genetically selected and represents a rare model for the studies related to genetic, biochemical, physiological, nutritional, and pharmacological effects of ethanol. We evaluated the structure and apoptosis in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats. There were two groups of 09 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol, and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (v/v) (<2 g ethanol/kg body weight/day). At 120 days old, rats were anaesthetized followed by decapitation, and their cerebella were collected and fixed. Cerebellar sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry for Caspase-3 and XIAP and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UChA group showed more glial cells immunoreactive for caspase-3 and less for XIAP than control group. Alcohol consumption affected myelin integrity. Severe ultrastructural damages in UChA group were observed such as disruption of the myelin sheath, disorganization and deformation of its components, and an increase in the interaxonal spaces. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that ethanol induced apoptosis in the glial cells and promoted an intense change in the myelin sheath of UChA rats, which may cause functional disorders. PMID:26072102

  4. Neural Representations of Natural and Scrambled Movies Progressively Change from Rat Striate to Temporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Kasper; Van den Bergh, Gert; Vermaercke, Ben; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the rodent has come forward as a candidate model for investigating higher level visual abilities such as object vision. This view has been backed up substantially by evidence from behavioral studies that show rats can be trained to express visual object recognition and categorization capabilities. However, almost no studies have investigated the functional properties of rodent extrastriate visual cortex using stimuli that target object vision, leaving a gap compared with the primate literature. Therefore, we recorded single-neuron responses along a proposed ventral pathway in rat visual cortex to investigate hallmarks of primate neural object representations such as preference for intact versus scrambled stimuli and category-selectivity. We presented natural movies containing a rat or no rat as well as their phase-scrambled versions. Population analyses showed increased dissociation in representations of natural versus scrambled stimuli along the targeted stream, but without a clear preference for natural stimuli. Along the measured cortical hierarchy the neural response seemed to be driven increasingly by features that are not V1-like and destroyed by phase-scrambling. However, there was no evidence for category selectivity for the rat versus nonrat distinction. Together, these findings provide insights about differences and commonalities between rodent and primate visual cortex. PMID:27146315

  5. Neural Representations of Natural and Scrambled Movies Progressively Change from Rat Striate to Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vinken, Kasper; Van den Bergh, Gert; Vermaercke, Ben; Op de Beeck, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the rodent has come forward as a candidate model for investigating higher level visual abilities such as object vision. This view has been backed up substantially by evidence from behavioral studies that show rats can be trained to express visual object recognition and categorization capabilities. However, almost no studies have investigated the functional properties of rodent extrastriate visual cortex using stimuli that target object vision, leaving a gap compared with the primate literature. Therefore, we recorded single-neuron responses along a proposed ventral pathway in rat visual cortex to investigate hallmarks of primate neural object representations such as preference for intact versus scrambled stimuli and category-selectivity. We presented natural movies containing a rat or no rat as well as their phase-scrambled versions. Population analyses showed increased dissociation in representations of natural versus scrambled stimuli along the targeted stream, but without a clear preference for natural stimuli. Along the measured cortical hierarchy the neural response seemed to be driven increasingly by features that are not V1-like and destroyed by phase-scrambling. However, there was no evidence for category selectivity for the rat versus nonrat distinction. Together, these findings provide insights about differences and commonalities between rodent and primate visual cortex. PMID:27146315

  6. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex. PMID:27563414

  7. Coenzyme Q10 Abrogated the 28 Days Aluminium Chloride Induced Oxidative Changes in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anuradha S.; Nirwane, Abhijit; Kamble, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to elucidate the impact of oral administration of aluminium chloride for 28 days with respect to oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex of female rats. Further, to investigate the potentials of Coenzyme (Co) Q10 (4, 8, and 12 mg/kg, i.p.) in mitigating the detrimental changes. Materials and Methods: Biochemical estimations of cerebral lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out after 28 days of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and Co Q10 exposures along with histopathological examination of cerebral cortex of the rats. Results: Subacute exposure to AlCl3(5 mg/kg) led to significant decrease in levels of GSH, vitamin E and activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and an increase in LPO of cerebral cortex. These aberrations were restored by Co Q10 (12 mg/kg, i.p.). This protection offered was comparable to that of L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a reference standard. Histopathological evaluations confirmed that the normal cerebral morphology was maintained by Co Q10. Conclusion: Thus, AlCl3 exposure hampers the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and induces oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of female Wistar rats. Supplementation with intraperitoneal Co Q10 abrogated these deleterious effects of AlCl3. PMID:25253934

  8. Effects of naltrexone on firing activity of rat cortex neurons and its interactions with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kozhechkin, S N; Mednikova, Yu S; Kolik, L G

    2013-09-01

    Naltrexone dose-dependently decreased neuron firing rate in the rat frontal cortex after intravenous (1-20 mg/kg) and microelectrophoretic administration. Microelectrophoretic applications of naltrexone reduced the excitatory neuronal response of neurons to low doses of ethanol (electroosmotic application) and potentiated depression of firing activity induced by ethanol in high doses. We concluded that opioid peptides take part in generation of spontaneous neuronal activity in the frontal cortex and neuronal excitation caused by ethanol in low doses. Naltrexone acts as a synergist of ethanol in its depressive effect on cortical neurons. PMID:24288728

  9. [Quantitative evaluation of ultrastructural restructuring in the adrenal cortex of rats under stress].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, T I

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analysis has revealed that submicroscopic changes of the rat adrenal cortex in dynamics of the stress reaction examined at the level of "functional element" which combines basic structural components of the parenchyma and stroma are of the polyphase character and agree with data from the biochemical analysis of 11-OCS in blood plasma. At the stage of exhaustion of the stress reaction (72 hours of immobilization) the ultrastructure of the adrenal cortex testifies to the preservation of functional reserves in the secretory cells. PMID:3672636

  10. Cognitive control and the anterior cingulate cortex: how conflicting stimuli affect attentional control in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Lori A.; Creer, David J.; McGaughy, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex is critical for cognitive control. One prefrontal subregion, the anterior cingulate cortex, is hypothesized to be necessary to resolve response conflicts, disregard salient distractors and alter behavior in response to the generation of an error. These situations all involve goal-oriented monitoring of performance in order to effectively adjust cognitive processes. Several neuropsychological disorders, e.g., schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive compulsive disorder, are accompanied by morphological changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. These changes are hypothesized to underlie the impairments on tasks that require cognitive control found in these subjects. A novel conflict monitoring task was used to assess the effects on cognitive control of excitotoxic lesions to anterior cingulate cortex in rats. Prior to surgery all subjects showed improved accuracy on the second of two consecutive, incongruent trials. Lesions to the anterior cingulate cortex abolished this. Lesioned animals had difficulty in adjusting cognitive control on a trial-by-trial basis regardless of whether cognitive changes were increased or decreased. These results support a role for the anterior cingulate cortex in adjustments in cognitive control. PMID:25051488

  11. Cognitive control and the anterior cingulate cortex: how conflicting stimuli affect attentional control in the rat.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lori A; Creer, David J; McGaughy, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence supports the hypothesis that the prefrontal cortex is critical for cognitive control. One prefrontal subregion, the anterior cingulate cortex, is hypothesized to be necessary to resolve response conflicts, disregard salient distractors and alter behavior in response to the generation of an error. These situations all involve goal-oriented monitoring of performance in order to effectively adjust cognitive processes. Several neuropsychological disorders, e.g., schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive compulsive disorder, are accompanied by morphological changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. These changes are hypothesized to underlie the impairments on tasks that require cognitive control found in these subjects. A novel conflict monitoring task was used to assess the effects on cognitive control of excitotoxic lesions to anterior cingulate cortex in rats. Prior to surgery all subjects showed improved accuracy on the second of two consecutive, incongruent trials. Lesions to the anterior cingulate cortex abolished this. Lesioned animals had difficulty in adjusting cognitive control on a trial-by-trial basis regardless of whether cognitive changes were increased or decreased. These results support a role for the anterior cingulate cortex in adjustments in cognitive control. PMID:25051488

  12. Influence of iron deficiency and lead treatment on behavior and cerebellar and hippocampal polyamine levels in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Adhami, V M; Husain, R; Husain, R; Seth, P K

    1996-08-01

    Effect of lead exposure and iron-deficiency on polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus was investigated in weaned rats. Lactating dams with one day old litters were given 0.2% (w/v) lead acetate in drinking water from postnatal day one to twenty one and maintained on an iron-deficient diet. There was an overall reduction of putrescine, spermidine and spermine in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus consequent to lead exposure and iron-deficiency alone. Lead exposure and iron-deficiency together did not potentiate the polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus uniformly. However, the enhanced lowering of putrescine in the hippocampal glia, spermidine in cerebellar neuronal and spermine in both neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum during the critical stage of brain development may result in stunted neuronal growth and sprouting in lead exposed and iron-deficient animals. The behavioral alterations as observed in the present study may be due to impaired neuronal development resulting from a depressed polyamine pathway and which could be attributed to cognitive deficits in growing children. PMID:8895845

  13. Paired-pulse facilitation of multivesicular release and intersynaptic spillover of glutamate at rat cerebellar granule cell–interneurone synapses

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Shin’Ichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    A simple form of presynaptic plasticity, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), has been explained as a transient increase in the probability of vesicular release. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record synaptic activity in rat cerebellar slices, we found different forms of presynaptically originated short-term plasticity during glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission from granule cells (GCs) to molecular-layer interneurones (INs). Paired-pulse activation of GC axons at short intervals (30–100 ms) elicited not only a facilitation in the peak amplitude (PPFamp), but also a prolongation in the decay-time constant (PPPdecay) of the EPSCs recorded from INs. The results of pharmacological tests and kinetics analyses suggest that the mechanisms underlying the respective types of short-term plasticity were different. PPFamp was elicited by a transient increase in the number of released vesicles. On the other hand, PPPdecay was caused not only by delayed release as has been reported but also by extrasynaptic spillover of the GC transmitter and the subsequent intersynaptic pooling. Both PPFamp and PPPdecay closely rely on repetitive-activation-induced multivesicular release. Using a dynamic clamp technique, we further examined the physiological significance of different presynaptic plasticity, and found that PPFamp and PPPdecay can differentially encode and process neuronal information by influencing the total synaptic charge transferred to postsynaptic INs to reflect activation frequency of the presynaptic GCs. PMID:22930264

  14. Inhibitory effect of fangchinoline on excitatory amino acids-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Oh, S K; Kim, H S; Seong, Y H

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate receptors-mediated excitotoxicity is believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline, a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which has a characteristic as a Ca2+ channel blocker, on excitatory amino acids (EAAs)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 1 mM) and kainate (100 microM)-induced neuronal cell death which was measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1 mM) and kainate (100 microM), which was measured by HPLC. And fangchinoline (5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM)-induced elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. These results suggest that inhibition of Ca2+ influx by fangchinoline may contribute to the beneficial effects on neurodegenerative effect of glutamate in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11339637

  15. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  16. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  17. Ethanol preconditioning of rat cerebellar cultures targets NMDA receptors to the synapse and enhances peroxiredoxin 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert M; Tajuddin, Nuzhath; Campbell, Edward M; Neafsey, Edward J; Collins, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that light-moderate alcohol (ethanol) consumers tend to have reduced risks of cognitive impairment and progression to dementia during aging. Exploring possible mechanisms, we previously found that moderate ethanol preconditioning (MEP, 20-30mM) of rat brain cultures for several days instigated neuroprotection against β-amyloid peptides. Our biochemical evidence implicated the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) as a potential neuroprotective "sensor", specifically via synaptic NMDAR signaling. It remains unclear how ethanol modulates the receptor and its downstream targets to engender neuroprotection. Here we confirm with deconvolution microscopy that MEP of rat mixed cerebellar cultures robustly increases synaptic NMDAR localization. Phospho-activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Src and Pyk2, known to be linked to synaptic NMDAR, is also demonstrated. Additionally, the preconditioning enhances levels of an antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), reported to be downstream of synaptic NMDAR signaling, and NMDAR antagonism with memantine (earlier found to abrogate MEP neuroprotection) blocks the Prx2 elevations. To further link Prx2 with antioxidant-based neuroprotection, we circumvented the ethanol preconditioning-NMDAR pathway by pharmacologically increasing Prx2 with the naturally-occurring cruciferous compound, 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T). Thus, D3T pretreatment elevated Prx2 expression to a similar extent as MEP, while concomitantly preventing β-amyloid neurotoxicity; D3T also protected the cultures from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. The findings support a mechanism that couples synaptic NMDAR signaling, Prx2 expression and augmented antioxidant defenses in ethanol preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. That this mechanism can be emulated by a cruciferous vegetable constituent suggests that such naturally-occurring "neutraceuticals" may be useful in therapy for oxidative stress-related dementias. PMID:27021955

  18. Decreased norepinephrine (NE) uptake in cerebral cortex and inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.A.; Rigler-Daugherty, S.K.; Long, G.; Jobe, P.C.; Wade, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    GEP rats are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to seizures caused by a variety of stimuli, most notably sound. Pharmacological treatments that reduce the synaptic concentration of NE increase seizure severity in GEP rats while elevations in NE have the opposite effect. GEP rats also display a widespread deficit in brain NE concentration suggesting that their increased seizure susceptibility is related to a deficit in noradrenergic transmission. The authors have compared the kinetics of /sup 3/H-NE uptake in the P/sub 2/ synaptosomal fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of normal and GEP-rats. Although the apparent Kms were not significantly different (Normal +/- SEM:0.37 +/- 0.13..mu..M; GEP +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.07..mu..M), the Vmax for GEP rats was 48% lower than that of normal rats (Normal +/- SEM: 474 +/- 45 fmole/mg/4min; GEP +/- SEM: 248 +/- 16 fmole/mg/4min). Because of the possible role of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the initiation of sound-induced seizures in GEP rats, the authors measured synaptosomal NE uptake in the IC using a NE concentration of 50 nM. The IC synaptosomal NE uptake was found to be 35% lower in GEP than in normal rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in noradrenergic transmission is related to the increased seizure susceptibility of GEP rats.

  19. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma.

    PubMed

    Owler, Brian K; Makeham, John M; Shingde, Meena; Besser, Michael

    2005-04-01

    A case of cerebellar liponeurocytoma in a 34-year-old man is reported. There are only 19 other cases reporting this entity in the medical literature. The diagnostic, radiological and clinical features associated with this tumour are reviewed and discussed in relation to our case. The differences in behaviour and prognosis between medulloblastoma and cerebellar liponeurocytoma are presented with the corresponding implications for management. PMID:15851097

  20. A neuro-inspired model-based closed-loop neuroprosthesis for the substitution of a cerebellar learning function in anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogri, Roni; Bamford, Simeon A.; Taub, Aryeh H.; Magal, Ari; Giudice, Paolo Del; Mintz, Matti

    2015-02-01

    Neuroprostheses could potentially recover functions lost due to neural damage. Typical neuroprostheses connect an intact brain with the external environment, thus replacing damaged sensory or motor pathways. Recently, closed-loop neuroprostheses, bidirectionally interfaced with the brain, have begun to emerge, offering an opportunity to substitute malfunctioning brain structures. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a neuro-inspired model-based approach to neuroprostheses. A VLSI chip was designed to implement essential cerebellar synaptic plasticity rules, and was interfaced with cerebellar input and output nuclei in real time, thus reproducing cerebellum-dependent learning in anesthetized rats. Such a model-based approach does not require prior system identification, allowing for de novo experience-based learning in the brain-chip hybrid, with potential clinical advantages and limitations when compared to existing parametric ``black box'' models.

  1. A neuro-inspired model-based closed-loop neuroprosthesis for the substitution of a cerebellar learning function in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Hogri, Roni; Bamford, Simeon A.; Taub, Aryeh H.; Magal, Ari; Giudice, Paolo Del; Mintz, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprostheses could potentially recover functions lost due to neural damage. Typical neuroprostheses connect an intact brain with the external environment, thus replacing damaged sensory or motor pathways. Recently, closed-loop neuroprostheses, bidirectionally interfaced with the brain, have begun to emerge, offering an opportunity to substitute malfunctioning brain structures. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a neuro-inspired model-based approach to neuroprostheses. A VLSI chip was designed to implement essential cerebellar synaptic plasticity rules, and was interfaced with cerebellar input and output nuclei in real time, thus reproducing cerebellum-dependent learning in anesthetized rats. Such a model-based approach does not require prior system identification, allowing for de novo experience-based learning in the brain-chip hybrid, with potential clinical advantages and limitations when compared to existing parametric “black box” models. PMID:25677559

  2. A neuro-inspired model-based closed-loop neuroprosthesis for the substitution of a cerebellar learning function in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Hogri, Roni; Bamford, Simeon A; Taub, Aryeh H; Magal, Ari; Del Giudice, Paolo; Mintz, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprostheses could potentially recover functions lost due to neural damage. Typical neuroprostheses connect an intact brain with the external environment, thus replacing damaged sensory or motor pathways. Recently, closed-loop neuroprostheses, bidirectionally interfaced with the brain, have begun to emerge, offering an opportunity to substitute malfunctioning brain structures. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a neuro-inspired model-based approach to neuroprostheses. A VLSI chip was designed to implement essential cerebellar synaptic plasticity rules, and was interfaced with cerebellar input and output nuclei in real time, thus reproducing cerebellum-dependent learning in anesthetized rats. Such a model-based approach does not require prior system identification, allowing for de novo experience-based learning in the brain-chip hybrid, with potential clinical advantages and limitations when compared to existing parametric "black box" models. PMID:25677559

  3. Enhanced behavioral recovery from sensorimotor cortex lesions after pyramidotomy in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fanardjian, V V; Gevorkyan, O V; Mallina, R K; Melik-Moussian, A B; Meliksetyan, I B

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral transection of the bulbar pyramid, performed before the ablation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, has been shown to facilitate the recovery of operantly conditioned reflexes and compensatory processes in rats. Such enhanced behavioral recovery was absent when only the sensorimotor cortex was ablated. This phenomenon is explained by the switching of motor activity under the control of the cortico-rubrospinal system. Switching of the descending influences is accomplished through the following loop: cortico-rubral projection-red nucleus-inferior olive-cerebellum-thalamus-cerebral cortex. This suggests that a preliminary lesion of the peripheral part of the system, represented by a descending spinal projection, facilitates the recovery processes to develop during the subsequent destruction of its central part. PMID:11486486

  4. Methylmercury differentially affects GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous IPSCs in Purkinje and granule cells of rat cerebellar slices

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2003-01-01

    Using whole-cell recording techniques we compared effects of the environmental cerebellar neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg) on spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) of both Purkinje and granule cells in cerebellar slices of the rat. In Purkinje cells, bath application of 10, 20 or 100 μM MeHg initially increased then suppressed the frequency of sIPSCs to zero. In granule cells, the initial increase in frequency was not observed in ≈50 % of cells examined, but suppression of sIPSCs by MeHg occurred in every cell tested. For both cells, time to onset of effects of MeHg was inversely related to the concentration; moreover, the pattern of changes in mIPSCs induced by MeHg in the presence of tetrodotoxin was similar to that in sIPSCs. For each concentration of MeHg, it took 2–3 times longer to block sIPSCs in Purkinje cells than it did in granule cells. MeHg also initially increased then decreased amplitudes of sIPSCs to block in both cells; again the response was more variable in granule cells. In most Purkinje and some granule cells, MeHg induced a giant, slow inward current during the late stages of exposure. Appearance of this current appeared to be MeHg concentration dependent, and the direction of current flow was reversed by changing the holding potentials. Reduction of the [Cl−] in the internal solution caused inwardly directed, but not outwardly directed giant currents to disappear, suggesting that this current is a Cl−-mediated response. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block it. MeHg apparently acts at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to alter GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission. GABAA receptors in granule cells appear to be more sensitive to block by MeHg than are those in Purkinje cells, although the general patterns of effects on the two cells are similar. PMID:12879869

  5. Cerebellar neurocognition and Korsakoff's syndrome: an hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Goossensen, Anne

    2010-08-01

    In literature, the cerebellum is given a substantial role in cognitive processes, in addition to traditional views on cerebellar function of regulating motor behaviour. The phenomenon of cerebellar damage causing impairments in memory and executive functioning was observed in various cerebellar disorders. Cerebellar cognitive dysfunction can be interpreted as a disturbance of cerebello-cerebral connections to areas of the cerebral cortex involved in cognitive processing, but the exact nature of the cognitive dysregulation is not known. Memory and executive dysfunction are important clinical features of Korsakoff's syndrome. We hypothesize that the Korsakoff syndrome might be an example of cerebellar neurocognitive dysfunctioning, caused by cerebello-cerebral pathways being disconnected in brain areas that are classically affected in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Further research is needed to support the possibility of cerebellar neurocognitive disturbances in Korsakoff's syndrome. If correct, this hypothesis may contribute to a better understanding of the clinical and neuropsychological profile of Korsakoff's syndrome. PMID:20303220

  6. Chronic In Vivo Imaging of Ponto-Cerebellar Mossy Fibers Reveals Morphological Stability during Whisker Sensory Manipulation in the Adult Rat123

    PubMed Central

    Rylkova, Daria; Crank, Aidan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cerebellum receives extensive disynaptic input from the neocortex via the basal pontine nuclei, the neurons of which send mossy fiber (MF) axons to the granule cell layer of the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. Although this cortico-cerebellar circuit has been implicated in tasks such as sensory discrimination and motor learning, little is known about the potential role of MF morphological plasticity in the function of the cerebellar granule cell layer. To address this issue, we labeled MFs with EGFP via viral infection of the basal pons in adult rats and performed in vivo two-photon imaging of MFs in Crus I/II of the cerebellar hemisphere over a period of several weeks. Following the acquisition of baseline images, animals were housed in control, enriched, or deprived sensory environments. Morphological dynamics were assessed by tracing MF axons and their terminals, and by tracking the stability of filopodia arising from MF terminal rosettes. MF axons and terminals were found to be remarkably stable. Parameters derived neither from measurements of axonal arbor geometry nor from the morphology of individual rosettes and their filopodial extensions significantly changed under control conditions over 4 weeks of imaging. Increasing whisker stimulation by manipulating the sensory environment or decreasing such stimulation by whisker trimming also failed to alter MF structure. Our studies indicate that pontine MF axons projecting to Crus I/II in adult rats do not undergo significant structural rearrangements over the course of weeks, and that this stability is not altered by the sustained manipulation of whisker sensorimotor experience. PMID:26693178

  7. [Epileptiform activity in the somatosensory cortex of rats with trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Reshetniak, V K; Igon'kina, S I; Zinkevich, V A

    1992-07-01

    It was shown in experiments on rats that penicillin 1 microliter microinjection (100 U) into the caudal nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve, accounting for formation of a generator of pathologically enhanced excitation (GREE), brings about in rats the pain syndrome with characteristic for trigeminal neuralgia behavioural manifestations and the emergence of epileptiform activity in the somatosensory cortex, especially pronounced in the contralateral hemisphere. The emergence of this activity reflects, on the one hand, the action of the GREE in the caudal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve and, on the other hand, the involvement of the somatosensory cortex taking over stimulation from the hyperactive caudal nucleus, into formation of a pathological algic system of this form of trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:1467469

  8. Adaptive categorization of sound frequency does not require the auditory cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Tyler L; Lorenc, Maja; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    A defining feature of adaptive behavior is our ability to change the way we interpret sensory stimuli depending on context. Rapid adaptation in behavior has been attributed to frontal cortical circuits, but it is not clear if sensory cortexes also play an essential role in such tasks. In this study we tested whether the auditory cortex was necessary for rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. We used a two-alternative choice sound-categorization task for rats in which the boundary that separated two acoustic categories changed several times within a behavioral session. These shifts in the boundary resulted in changes in the rewarded action for a subset of stimuli. We found that extensive lesions of the auditory cortex did not impair the ability of rats to switch between categorization contingencies and sound discrimination performance was minimally impaired. Similar results were obtained after reversible inactivation of the auditory cortex with muscimol. In contrast, lesions of the auditory thalamus largely impaired discrimination performance and, as a result, the ability to modify behavior across contingencies. Thalamic lesions did not impair performance of a visual discrimination task, indicating that the effects were specific to audition and not to motor preparation or execution. These results suggest that subcortical outputs of the auditory thalamus can mediate rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. PMID:26156379

  9. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  10. EVIDENCE FOR A REGIONAL SPECIFICITY IN THE DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION OF NORADRENERGIC VARICOSITIES IN RAT CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Agster, Kara L.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A.; Clark, Brian D.; Waterhouse, Barry D.

    2012-01-01

    The brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is the sole source of norepinephrine (NE)-containing fibers in the mammalian cortex. Previous studies suggest that the density of noradrenergic fibers in rat is relatively uniform across cortical regions and that cells in the nucleus discharge en masse. This implies that activation of the LC results in equivalent release of NE throughout the cortex. However, it is possible that there could be differences in the density of axonal varicosities across regions, and that these differences, rather than a difference in fiber density may contribute to the regulation of NE efflux. Quantification of dopamine beta hydroxylase (DβH) immunostained varicosities was performed on several cortical regions and in the ventral posterior medial (VPM) thalamus using unbiased sampling methods. The density of DβH varicosites is greater in the prefrontal cortex than in motor, somatosensory, or piriform cortices, greater in superficial than in deep layers of cortex, and greater in VPM than in somatosensory cortex. Our results provide anatomical evidence for non-uniform release of NE across functionally discrete cortical regions. This morphology may account for differential, region specific, impact of LC output on different cortical areas. PMID:23184811

  11. Two rules for callosal connectivity in striate cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Olavarria, J F

    1995-10-01

    In the rat, callosal cells occupy lateral as well as medial portions of striate cortex. In the region of the border between areas 17 and 18, which contains a representation of the vertical meridian of the visual field, cells projecting through the corpus callosum are concentrated throughout the depth of the cortex. In contrast, in medial portion of striate cortex, where peripheral portions of the visual field are represented, callosal cells are preferentially found in infragranular layers. These differences in topography and laminar distribution suggest that these callosal regions, referred to as medial and lateral callosal regions in the present study, subserve different functions. We explored this possibility by analyzing the patterns of callosal linkages in these two callosal regions. We charted the location of retrogradely labeled cells within striate cortex of one hemisphere after placing restricted injections of one or more fluorescent tracers into selected sites in the contralateral striate cortex. We found the medial and lateral callosal regions have distinctly different topographic organizations. Injections into medial striate cortex of one hemisphere produced labeled cells predominantly in mirror-symmetric loci in medial portions of contralateral striate cortex. The arrangement of these connections suggests that they mediate direct interactions between cortical regions representing visual fields located symmetrically on opposite sides of the vertical meridian of the visual field. In contrast, the mapping in the lateral callosal region is reversed: injections into the 17/18a border produced labeled fields located medial to the contralateral 17/18a border, while injections slightly medial to the 17/18a border produced labeled fields located at the contralateral 17/18a border.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8550874

  12. Topographic organization of the basal forebrain projections to the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that the basal forebrain (BF) modulates cortical activation via its projections to the entire cortical mantle. However, the organization of these projections is only partially understood or, for certain areas, unknown. In this study, we examined the topographic organization of cholinergic and noncholinergic projections from the BF to the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortex by using retrograde tracing combined with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry in rats. The perirhinal and postrhinal cortex receives major cholinergic and noncholinergic input from the caudal BF, including the caudal globus pallidus and substantia innominata and moderate input from the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, whereas the entorhinal cortex receives major input from the rostral BF, including the medial septum and the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band. In the perirhinal cases, cholinergic projection neurons are distributed more caudally in the caudal globus pallidus than noncholinergic projection neurons. Compared with the perirhinal cases, the distribution of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons projecting to the postrhinal cortex shifts slightly caudally in the caudal globus pallidus. The distribution of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons projecting to the lateral entorhinal cortex extends more caudally in the BF than to the medial entorhinal cortex. The ratio of ChAT-positive projection neurons to total projection neurons is higher in the perirhinal/postrhinal cases (26-48%) than in the entorhinal cases (13-30%). These results indicate that the organization of cholinergic and noncholinergic projections from the BF to the parahippocampal cortex is more complex than previously described. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2503-2515, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780730

  13. Hippocampus, perirhinal cortex, and complex visual discriminations in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Velu, Priya D.

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex, are known to be essential for the formation of long-term memory. Recent animal and human studies have investigated whether perirhinal cortex might also be important for visual perception. In our study, using a simultaneous oddity discrimination task, rats with perirhinal lesions were impaired and did not exhibit the normal preference for exploring the odd object. Notably, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited the same impairment. Thus, the deficit is unlikely to illuminate functions attributed specifically to perirhinal cortex. Both lesion groups were able to acquire visual discriminations involving the same objects used in the oddity task. Patients with hippocampal damage or larger medial temporal lobe lesions were intact in a similar oddity task that allowed participants to explore objects quickly using eye movements. We suggest that humans were able to rely on an intact working memory capacity to perform this task, whereas rats (who moved slowly among the objects) needed to rely on long-term memory. PMID:25593294

  14. [Histostructural changes of rat cerebral cortex during hemorrhagic stroke modeling].

    PubMed

    Savos'ko, S I; Chaĭkovs'kyĭ, Iu B; Pogoriela, N Kh; Makarenko, O M

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes during modeling of primary and secondary acute hemorrhagic stroke were studied in rats. We revealed differences in the activity of pharmacological action of medications under condition of acute stroke. The action of medications increased viability of neurons in both hemispheres of rat cerebrum at a right-side primary and secondary hemorrhagic stroke. Following secondary stroke, the amount of degenerative neurons amounted 25.5 +/- 0.8 cells/mm2, following the action ofcerebrolysin this value was 17.6 +/- 1.7 cells/ mm2 and after the action of cortexine and cerebral this value amounted 18.0 +/- 0.9 cells/mm2 and 10.7 +/- 0.4 cells/ mm2, respectively. In control animals the number of degenerative neurons did not exceed 2% and averaged 1.5 +/- 0.1 cells/mm2. Analysis of the morphological and statistical data showed that the most effective remedies under the primary and secondary hemorrhagic insult are cortexine and cerebral. Cerebral was found to be more effective. PMID:23233944

  15. Anti-Yo Antibody Uptake and Interaction with Its Intracellular Target Antigen Causes Purkinje Cell Death in Rat Cerebellar Slice Cultures: A Possible Mechanism for Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration in Humans with Gynecological or Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, John E.; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Clardy, Stacey L.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Carlson, Noel G.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Yo antibodies are immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies reactive with a 62 kDa Purkinje cell cytoplasmic protein. These antibodies are closely associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in the setting of gynecological and breast malignancies. We have previously demonstrated that incubation of rat cerebellar slice cultures with patient sera and cerebrospinal fluid containing anti-Yo antibodies resulted in Purkinje cell death. The present study addressed three fundamental questions regarding the role of anti-Yo antibodies in disease pathogenesis: 1) Whether the Purkinje cell cytotoxicity required binding of anti-Yo antibody to its intraneuronal 62 kDa target antigen; 2) whether Purkinje cell death might be initiated by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity rather than intracellular antibody binding; and 3) whether Purkinje cell death might simply be a more general result of intracellular antibody accumulation, rather than of specific antibody-antigen interaction. In our study, incubation of rat cerebellar slice cultures with anti-Yo IgG resulted in intracellular antibody binding, and cell death. Infiltration of the Purkinje cell layer by cells of macrophage/microglia lineage was not observed until extensive cell death was already present. Adsorption of anti-Yo IgG with its 62 kDa target antigen abolished both antibody accumulation and cytotoxicity. Antibodies to other intracellular Purkinje cell proteins were also taken up by Purkinje cells and accumulated intracellularly; these included calbindin, calmodulin, PCP-2, and patient anti-Purkinje cell antibodies not reactive with the 62 kDa Yo antigen. However, intracellular accumulation of these antibodies did not affect Purkinje cell viability. The present study is the first to demonstrate that anti-Yo antibodies cause Purkinje cell death by binding to the intracellular 62 kDa Yo antigen. Anti-Yo antibody cytotoxicity did not involve other antibodies or factors present in patient serum and was not

  16. Dopamine in the prefrontal cortex regulates rats behavioral flexibility to changing reward value.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sabrina; Dieckmann, Marco; Schwabe, Kerstin

    2009-03-01

    Prefrontocortical dopamine (DA) plays an essential role in the representation of reward value and is implicated in behavioral flexibility. We here tested the effect of systemic and local blockade of DA D1- and D2-receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) by using an operant paradigm, where rats have to adjust their behavior to changing reward value. Rats were trained in a Skinner box, where different numbers of lever-presses for pellet-rewards were assigned to and switched between two levers. After rats commit to the efficient lever the lever-occupancy reversed and rats had to switch to the now efficient one. Rats were either intraperitoneally injected with the DA D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 (40 microg/kg), the DA D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride (10mg/kg), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Two other groups received bilateral local mPFC- or OFC-infusions of SCH23390, sulpiride (both 3 microg/0.5 microl), or PBS (0.5 microl) through previously implanted cannulae. After initial detection of reverse of lever-occupancy, systemic and local blockade of D1-receptors increased the number of switches back to the previously efficient lever, thus reducing the total number of reverses completed. D2-receptor blockade deteriorated this measure after local mPFC-infusion. Notably, initial detection of reverse of lever-occupancy was not affected. Blockade of DA receptors within the prefrontal cortex do not deteriorate the detection of changes in reward value, whereas maintenance of behavioral adaptation is disturbed. Interestingly, blockade of DA receptors in the mPFC and OFC had similar effects, i.e., these regions apparently act in a cooperative manner. PMID:19041903

  17. Cerebellar neuronal apoptosis in heroin-addicted rats and its molecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hongwei; Wang, Xuemei; Zhang, Jianlong; Ma, Chuang; Su, Yinxia; Li, Xiujuan; Liu, Xiaoshan; Su, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Background: The overall objective of this study was to investigate neuronal apoptosis and expression of apoptosis related proteins (c-jun, cytc and Bax) in the cerebellum of rates with heroin addiction. Material/Methods: 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats which weighing 200-220 g were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8 per group): control group, 10-day heroin-addicted group, 20-day heroin-addicted group, 30-day heroin-addicted group and 40-day heroin-addicted group. Rats in the control group were treated with normal saline. Rats in the addiction groups (20 d, 30 d, 40 d) were all given subcutaneous injection with heroin for 15 days to induce heroin addiction. After injected with heroin for 15 days, rats were treated with naloxone at a dose of 5 mg/kg to induce abstinence for 30 mins to examine the addiction of rats. They were then continued to be treated with heroin for another 10 days, 20 days, 30 days, and 40 days respectively to establish heroin-addicted models. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was employed to identify apoptotic cells [6]. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay were also used in the study to examine the protein expressions of c-jun, cytc and Bax in the cerebellum. Results: Compared with the control group, the proportion of apoptotic neurons increased significantly in the heroin addiction groups (10 d, 20 d, 30 d, 40 d) (P < 0.05), also accompanied by markedly increased expressions of c-jun, cytc and Bax (P < 0.05) depending on doses of heroin in the cerebellum. Thus, the significant differences were observed in heroin addiction groups (10 d, 20 d,30 d, 40 d) and control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Long-term use of heroin may induce neuronal apoptosis in the cerebellum by raising the expressions of pro-apoptotic c-jun, cytc and Bax, which might be one of mechanisms underlying the heroin-induced cerebellum neuronal damage. PMID:26339395

  18. Mefenamic acid bi-directionally modulates the transient outward K{sup +} current in rat cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Man; Shi Wenjie; Fei Xiaowei; Liu Yarong; Zeng Ximin; Mei Yanai

    2008-02-01

    The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on ion channels has been widely studied in several cell models, but less is known about their modulatory mechanisms. In this report, the effect of mefenamic acid on voltage-activated transient outward K{sup +} current (I{sub A}) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was investigated. At a concentration of 5 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M, mefenamic acid reversibly inhibited I{sub A} in a dose-dependent manner. However, mefenamic acid at a concentration of 1 {mu}M significantly increased the amplitude of I{sub A} to 113 {+-} 1.5% of the control. At more than 10 {mu}M, mefenamic acid inhibited the amplitude of I{sub A} without any effect on activation or inactivation. In addition, a higher concentration of mefenamic acid induced a significant acceleration of recovery from inactivation with an increase of the peak amplitude elicited by the second test pulse. Intracellular application of mefenamic acid could significantly increase the amplitude of I{sub A}, but had no effect on the inhibition induced by extracellular mefenamic acid, implying that mefenamic acid may exert its effect from both inside and outside the ion channel. Furthermore, the activation of current induced by intracellular application of mefenamic acid was mimicked by other cyclooxygenase inhibitors and arachidonic acid. Our data demonstrate that mefenamic acid is able to bi-directionally modulate I{sub A} channels in neurons at different concentrations and by different methods of application, and two different mechanisms may be involved.

  19. Regulation of store-operated calcium entry by calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Karthika; Lohr, Christian; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2006-09-13

    We have studied store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in Bergmann glia and granule cell layer astrocytes in acute brain slices of the rat cerebellum, using the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo-4 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Astrocytes were identified by their morphology, location, and their Ca2+ response in K+-free solution. Depletion of Ca2+ stores by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) (20 microM) induced SOCE in both types of astrocyte. A similar Ca2+ influx was elicited by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (CMZ) (1 microM). The SOCE channel blocker 2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate (2-APB) (100 microM) and the Ca2+ release-activated channel blocker 3,5-bistrifluoromethyl pyrazole derivative (BTP2) (20 microM) suppressed the CPA- and the CMZ-induced Ca2+ influx. Pretreatment of acute slices with the specific Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) inhibitor bromoenol lactone (BEL) (25 microM) blocked the CPA- and the CMZ-induced Ca2+ influx. The lysophospholipid products of iPLA2, lysophosphatidylcholine (250 nM) and lysophosphatidylinositol (250 nM), but not lysophosphatidic acid (250 nM), induced a BTP2- and 2-APB-sensitive, but BEL-insensitive, Ca2+ influx. CPA or CMZ enhanced the BEL-sensitive enzymatic activity of iPLA2 in cerebellar astrocyte culture. Inhibition of iPLA2 expression by specific antisense oligodeoxynucleotide of iPLA2 reduced the SOCE and the Ca2+ store refilling in cultured astrocytes. Spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocytes in situ were reduced after inhibiting SOCE channels or iPLA2 activity. The results suggest that the depletion of Ca2+ stores activates iPLA2 to open Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane by the formation of lysophospholipids in astrocytes, presumably to refill the stores and allow normal Ca2+ signaling. PMID:16971542

  20. GDF-15 enhances intracellular Ca2+ by increasing Cav1.3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Mei; Wang, Chang-Ying; Hu, Changlong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    GDF-15 (growth/differentiation factor 15) is a novel member of the TGF (transforming growth factor)-β superfamily that has critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We reported previously that GDF-15 increased delayed rectifier outward K+ currents and Kv2.1 α subunit expression through TβRII (TGF-β receptor II) to activate Src kinase and Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons). In the present study, we found that treatment of CGNs with GDF-15 for 24 h increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to membrane depolarization, as determined by Ca2+ imaging. Whole-cell current recordings indicated that GDF-15 increased the inward Ca2+ current (ICa) without altering steady-state activation of Ca2+ channels. Treatment with nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, abrogated GDF-15-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ICa. The GDF-15-induced increase in ICa was mediated via up-regulation of the Cav1.3 α subunit, which was attenuated by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathways and by pharmacological inhibition of Src-mediated TβRII phosphorylation. Given that Cav1.3 is not only a channel for Ca2+ influx, but also a transcriptional regulator, our data confirm that GDF-15 induces protein expression via TβRII and activation of a non-Smad pathway, and provide novel insight into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in neurons. PMID:27114559

  1. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4 weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [14C]-iodoantipyrine 1 week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. PMID:25747184

  2. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-05-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine 1week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. PMID:25747184

  3. Progesterone and cocaine administration affect serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Perrotti, L I; Beck, K D; Luine, V N; Quiñones, V

    2000-09-22

    Due to the hypothetical role of ovarian hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in cocaine-induced behavioral activity and self-administration, this study investigated the effects of cocaine, estrogen, and progesterone administration on monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of ovariectomized hormone-treated rats. Rats were given either 'binge' cocaine or saline, and one of four hormone treatments: vehicle, estrogen, progesterone, or estrogen+progesterone. The co-administration of progesterone and cocaine resulted in increased levels of serotonin when compared to saline-treated controls and cocaine-treated animals in the other hormone-treatment groups. Further, progesterone-treated rats had higher levels of 5-HIAA than vehicle or estrogen-treated rats. Although levels of dopamine, DOPAC, and homovanillic acid were decreased after cocaine, these alterations failed to reach significance. These results show an interaction between the endocrine environment and cocaine-induced alterations in serotonin system in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, these changes may contribute to previously reported gender and estrous cycle differences in behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:10984630

  4. Output of Neurogliaform Cells to Various Neuron Types in the Human and Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Szabolcs; Komlósi, Gergely; Szabadics, János; Varga, Csaba; Tóth, Éva; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Neurogliaform cells in the rat elicit combined GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated postsynaptic responses on cortical pyramidal cells and establish electrical synapses with various interneuron types. However, the involvement of GABAB receptors in postsynaptic effects of neurogliaform cells on other GABAergic interneurons is not clear. We measured the postsynaptic effects of neurogliaform cells in vitro applying simultaneous whole-cell recordings in human and rat cortex. Single action potentials of human neurogliaform cells evoked unitary IPSPs composed of GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated components in various types of inteneuron and in pyramidal cells. Slow IPSPs were combined with homologous and heterologous electrical coupling between neurogliaform cells and several human interneuron types. In the rat, single action potentials in neurogliaform cells elicited GABAB receptor-mediated component in responses of neurogliaform, regular spiking, and fast spiking interneurons following the GABAA receptor-mediated component in postsynaptic responses. In conclusion, human and rat neurogliaform cells elicit slow IPSPs and reach GABAA and GABAB receptors on several interneuron types with a connection-specific involvement of GABAB receptors. The electrical synapses recorded between human neurogliaform cells and various interneuron types represent the first electrical synapses recorded in the human cortex. PMID:18946546

  5. Quantitative analysis of somatosensory cortex development in metatherians and monotremes, with comparison to the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2015-01-01

    Metatherians and monotremes are born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation. Quantitative analysis of isocortical sections held in the collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin was used to compare the pace of somatosensory cortex development relative to body size and pallial thickness between metatherian groups, monotremes, and the laboratory rat. Analysis indicated that the pace of pallial growth in the monotremes is much lower than that in the metatherians or laboratory rat, with an estimated 8.6-fold increase in parietal cortex thickness between 10 and 100 mm body length, compared to a 10- to 20-fold increase among the metatherians and the rat. It was found that aggregation of cortical plate neurons occurs at similar embryo size in the mammals studied (around 8-14 mm body length) and a similar pallial thickness (around 200 µm), but that proliferative zone involution occurs at a much higher body size and pallial thickness in the monotremes compared to the metatherians and the laboratory rat. The observations suggest that cortical development in the monotremes is slower and subject to different regulatory signals to the therians studied. The slow pace may be related to either generally slower metabolism in monotremes or less efficient nutrient supply to the offspring due to the lack of teats. PMID:25393314

  6. Lithium/pilocarpine status epilepticus-induced neuropathology of piriform cortex and adjoining structures in rats is age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Druga, R; Kubová, H; Suchomelová, L; Haugvicová, R

    2003-01-01

    Distribution of LiCl/pilocarpine status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage was studied in the piriform cortex and in adjoining structures in 12-day-old, 25-day-old and adult rats. No distinct structural and neuronal alterations were detected in the basal telencephalon in 12-day-old rats surviving status epilepticus (SE) for one week or two months. In 25-day-old rats a decrease in Nissl staining was evident. There was also cell loss and gliosis in the caudal 2/3 of the piriform cortex, in the superficial amygdaloid nuclei, in the dorsal and ventral endopiriform nucleus and in the rostrolateral part of the entorhinal cortical area. In adult animals, the topography of neuropathological changes in the basal telencephalon was comparable to those in 25-day-old rats. The damage in the caudal 2/3 or caudal half of the piriform cortex in adult rats with survival times one week or two months was characterized by a marked loss of neurons and striking glial infiltration. The thickness of the piriform cortex and superficial amygdaloid nuclei was significantly reduced. In 25-day-old and in adult animals the sublayer IIb and layer III of the piriform cortex was more affected, while sublayer IIa was less damaged. Parvalbumin (PV) immunocytochemistry revealed a significant decrease in the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in the rostral piriform cortex and in the dorsal claustrum in animals surviving for two months. PMID:12678669

  7. [Cerebellar stroke].

    PubMed

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  8. Delayed synchronization of activity in cortex and subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew; Bolam, J Paul; Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oscillations may play a role in the functional organization of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, and it is important to understand their underlying mechanisms. The cortex often drives basal ganglia (BG) activity, and particularly, oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, the STN may also indirectly influence cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize the delayed (>200 ms) responses of STN neurons to synchronized cortical inputs, focusing on their relationship with oscillatory cortical activity. We recorded the short-latency and delayed responses of STN units and frontal electrocorticogram (ECoG) to cortical stimulation in anaesthetized rats. Similar to previous studies, stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex, but not temporal cortex, evoked a short-latency triphasic response, followed by a sustained reduction or pause in firing, in rostral STN units. Caudal STN units did not show the short-latency triphasic response but often displayed a prolonged firing reduction. Oscillations in STN unit activity and ECoG were common after this sustained firing reduction, particularly between 200 and 600 ms after frontal cortical stimulation. These delayed oscillations were significantly coherent in a broad frequency band of 5–30 Hz. Coherence with ECoG at 5–15 Hz was observed throughout STN, though coherence at 15–30 Hz was largely restricted to rostral STN. Furthermore, oscillatory responses at 5–30 Hz in rostral STN predominantly led those in cortex (mean latency of 29 ms) after frontal cortical stimulation. These findings suggest that STN neurons responding to corticosubthalamic inputs may provide a delayed input to cortex, via BG output nuclei, and thence, thalamocortical pathways. PMID:16709634

  9. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  10. Sound Sequence Discrimination Learning Motivated by Reward Requires Dopaminergic D2 Receptor Activation in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudoh, Masaharu; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that sound sequence discrimination learning requires cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex (AC) in rats. In that study, reward was used for motivating discrimination behavior in rats. Therefore, dopaminergic inputs mediating reward signals may have an important role in the learning. We tested the possibility in the…

  11. Behavioral Modulation of Stimulus-Evoked Oscillations in Barrel Cortex of Alert Rats

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Carmena, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked oscillations have been observed in the visual, auditory, olfactory and somatosensory systems. To further our understanding of these oscillations, it is essential to study their occurrence and behavioral modulation in alert, awake animals. Here we show that microstimulation in barrel cortex of alert rats evokes 15–18 Hz oscillations that are strongly modulated by motor behavior. In freely whisking rats, we found that the power of the microstimulation-evoked oscillation in the local field potential was inversely correlated to the strength of whisking. This relationship was also present in rats performing a stimulus detection task suggesting that the effect was not due to sleep or drowsiness. Further, we present a computational model of the thalamocortical loop which recreates the observed phenomenon and predicts some of its underlying causes. These findings demonstrate that stimulus-evoked oscillations are strongly influenced by motor modulation of afferent somatosensory circuits. PMID:19521539

  12. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function. PMID:26257334

  13. Number and Laminar Distribution of Neurons in a Thalamocortical Projection Column of Rat Vibrissal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Verena C.; Oberlaender, M.; de Kock, Christiaan P.J.; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2010-01-01

    This is the second article in a series of three studies that investigate the anatomical determinants of thalamocortical (TC) input to excitatory neurons in a cortical column of rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Here, we report the number and distribution of NeuN-positive neurons within the C2, D2, and D3 TC projection columns in P27 rat somatosensory barrel cortex based on an exhaustive identification of 89 834 somata in a 1.15 mm3 volume of cortex. A single column contained 19 109 ± 444 neurons (17 560 ± 399 when normalized to a standard-size projection column). Neuron density differences along the vertical column axis delineated “cytoarchitectonic” layers. The resulting neuron numbers per layer in the average column were 63 ± 10 (L1), 2039 ± 524 (L2), 3735 ± 905 (L3), 4447 ± 439 (L4), 1737 ± 251 (L5A), 2235 ± 99 (L5B), 3786 ± 168 (L6A), and 1066 ± 170 (L6B). These data were then used to derive the layer-specific action potential (AP) output of a projection column. The estimates confirmed previous reports suggesting that the ensembles of spiny L4 and thick-tufted pyramidal neurons emit the major fraction of APs of a column. The number of APs evoked in a column by a sensory stimulus (principal whisker deflection) was estimated as 4441 within 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:20534784

  14. Age-related changes in neural gap detection thresholds in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Xu, Xiaoxiao; He, Juan; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the auditory system to resolve sound temporal information is crucial for the understanding of human speech and other species-specific communications. Gap detection threshold, i.e. the ability to detect the shortest duration of a silent interval in a sound, is commonly used to study the auditory temporal resolution. Behavioral studies in humans and rats have shown that normal developing infants have higher gap detection thresholds than adults; however, the underlying neural mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we determined and compared the neural gap detection thresholds in the primary auditory cortex of three age groups of rats: the juvenile group (postnatal day 20-30), adult group I (8-10 weeks), and adult group II (28-30 weeks). We found age-related changes in auditory temporal acuity in the auditory cortex, i.e. the proportion of cortical units with short neural gap detection thresholds (< 5 ms) was much lower in juvenile groups compared with that in both adult groups at a constant sound level, and no significant differences in neural gap detection thresholds were found between the two adult groups. In addition, units in the auditory cortex of each group generally showed better gap detection thresholds at higher sound levels than at lower sound levels, exhibiting a level-dependent temporal acuity. These results provided evidence for neural correlates of age-related changes in behavioral gap detection ability during postnatal hearing development. PMID:25388865

  15. Comparing the functional representations of central and border whiskers in rat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brett-Green, B A; Chen-Bee, C H; Frostig, R D

    2001-12-15

    The anatomical representations of the large facial whiskers, termed barrels, are topographically organized and highly segregated in the posteromedial barrel subfield (PMBSF) of rat layer IV primary somatosensory cortex. Although the functional representations of single whiskers are aligned with their appropriate barrels, their areal extents are rather large, spreading outward from the appropriate barrel along the tangential plane and thereby spanning multiple neighboring and non-neighboring barrels and septal regions. To date, single-whisker functional representations have been characterized primarily for whiskers whose corresponding barrels are located centrally within the PMBSF (central whiskers). Using intrinsic signal imaging verified with post-imaging single-unit recording, we demonstrate that border whiskers, whose barrels are located at the borders of the PMBSF, also evoke large activity areas that are similar in size to those of central whiskers but spread beyond the PMBSF and sometimes beyond primary somatosensory cortex into the neighboring dysgranular zones. This study indicates that the large functional representation of a single whisker is a basic functional feature of the rat whisker-to-barrel system and, combined with results from other studies, suggest that a large functional representation of a small, point-like area on the sensory epithelium may be a functional feature of primary sensory cortex in general. PMID:11739601

  16. Spontaneous neural activity in the primary visual cortex of retinal degenerated rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Ke; Xu, Ping; Ng, Tsz Kin; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang

    2016-06-01

    Retinal degeneration (RD) models have been widely used to study retinal degenerative diseases for a long time. The biological and electrophysiological presentations of changes in the retina during degeneration progress have been well investigated; thus, the present study is aimed at investigating the electrophysiological effects of RD in the primary visual cortex. We extracellularly recorded the spontaneous neural activities in the primary visual cortex of RD rats. The firing rate, interspike interval (ISI) and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity of spontaneous neural activities were subsequently analyzed. When compared to the control group, it was found that the neurons in primary visual cortex of the RD model fired more frequently. In addition, there was a decrease in LZ complexity of spontaneous neural firing in the RD model. These results suggest that the progress of RD may not only affect the retina itself but also the primary visual cortex, which may result in an unbalanced inhibition-excitation system as well as the decreased arising rate of new patterns of spontaneous activities. PMID:27132087

  17. Vocalization–whisking coordination and multisensory integration of social signals in rat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P; Mielke, Falk; Bobrov, Evgeny; Brecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions involve multi-modal signaling. Here, we study interacting rats to investigate audio-haptic coordination and multisensory integration in the auditory cortex. We find that facial touch is associated with an increased rate of ultrasonic vocalizations, which are emitted at the whisking rate (∼8 Hz) and preferentially initiated in the retraction phase of whisking. In a small subset of auditory cortex regular-spiking neurons, we observed excitatory and heterogeneous responses to ultrasonic vocalizations. Most fast-spiking neurons showed a stronger response to calls. Interestingly, facial touch-induced inhibition in the primary auditory cortex and off-responses after termination of touch were twofold stronger than responses to vocalizations. Further, touch modulated the responsiveness of auditory cortex neurons to ultrasonic vocalizations. In summary, facial touch during social interactions involves precisely orchestrated calling-whisking patterns. While ultrasonic vocalizations elicited a rather weak population response from the regular spikers, the modulation of neuronal responses by facial touch was remarkably strong. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03185.001 PMID:25485525

  18. Effects of oxotremorine on local glucose utilization in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, M.; Wamsley, J.K.; Rapoport, S.I.; London, E.D.

    1982-08-01

    The (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose technique was used to examine the effects of central muscarinic stimulation on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in the cerebral cortex of the unanesthetized rat. Systemic administration of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (OXO, 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) increased LCGU in the neocortex, mesocortex, and paleocortex. In the neocortex, OXO was more potent in elevating LCGU of the auditory, frontal, and sensorimotor regions compared with the visual cortex. Within these neocortical regions, OXO effects were greatest in cortical layers IV and V. OXO effects were more dramatic in the neocortex than in the meso- or paleocortex, and no significant effect occurred in the perirhinal and pyriform cortices. OXO-induced LCGU increases were not influenced by methylatropine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) but were antagonized completely by scopolamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Scopolamine reduced LCGU in layer IV of the auditory cortex and in the retrosplenial cortex. The distribution and magnitude of the cortical LCGU response to OXO apparently were related to the distributions of cholinergic neurochemical markers, especially high affinity muscarinic binding sites.

  19. [The role of the orbitofrontal cortex in delayed reinforcement choice in rats].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Akane; Okumura, Satomi; Aoyama, Kenjiro; Uekita, Tomoko

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that lesions of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in rats induce impulsive choices in delayed reinforcement tasks. However, some studies have suggested that the OFC is not related to impulsivity but instead to compulsivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of OFC lesions on choice in a T-maze. First, 14 rats were trained to discriminate spatially between a high-reward arm with a delay of 15 seconds and a low-reward arm without a delay. The high-reward arm contained 10 food pellets, whereas the low-reward arm contained only one pellet. In the presurgery test, all rats chose the high-reward arm in most trials. In the postsurgery test, both OFC lesioned (n = 7) and control (sham-lesioned and intact; n = 7) rats continued to choose the high-reward arm in most trials. Following the postsurgery test, the high- and low-reward arms were reversed. In the reversal test, OFC lesioned rats made significantly fewer high-reward choices than did control rats. These results indicate that OFC lesions induced compulsive choices rather than impulsive choices. PMID:26964376

  20. HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Prefrontal Cortex Hyper-Excitability is Enhanced by Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Wesley N; Chen, Lihua; Hu, Xiu-Ti; Napier, T Celeste

    2016-07-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is dysregulated in HIV-1-infected humans and the dysregulation is enhanced by cocaine abuse. Understanding mPFC pathophysiology in this comorbid state has been hampered by the dearth of relevant animal models. To help fill this knowledge gap, electrophysiological assessments were made of mPFC pyramidal neurons (PN) from adult male HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) F344 rats (which express seven of the nine HIV-1 toxic proteins) and non-Tg F344 rats that self-administered cocaine for 14 days (COC-SA), as well as saline-yoked controls (SAL-Yoked) and experimentally naive Tg and non-Tg rats. Forebrain slices were harvested and prepared for whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and in treated rats, this occurred after 14-18 days of forced abstinence. Aged-matched rats were used for immunohistochemical detection of the L-channel protein, Cav1.2-α1c. We determined that: (i) the two genotypes acquired the operant task and maintained similar levels of COC-SA, (ii) forced abstinence from COC-SA enhanced mPFC PN excitability in both genotypes, and neurons from Tg rats exhibited the greatest pathophysiology, (iii) neurons from SAL-Yoked Tg rats were more excitable than those from SAL-Yoked non-Tg rats, and in Tg rats (iv) blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels reduced the enhanced excitability, and (v) Cav1.2-immunoreactivity was increased. These findings provide the first assessment of the mPFC pathophysiology in a rodent model of HIV-1-mediated neuropathology with and without cocaine self-administration. Outcomes reveal an enhanced cortical excitability during chronic exposure to HIV-1 proteins that is excessively exacerbated with cocaine abuse. Such neuropathophysiology may underlie the cognitive dysregulation reported for comorbid humans. PMID:26677947

  1. Cerebellar abiotrophy.

    PubMed

    DeBowes, R M; Leipold, H W; Turner-Beatty, M

    1987-08-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative condition of Arabian horses that produces signs of head tremors and ataxia. Affected foals demonstrate clinical signs between the time of birth and 6 months of age. The condition is untreatable, although some animals have reportedly improved to varying degrees. The disease is believed to be inherited; however, definitive evidence is lacking at this time. PMID:3497695

  2. Alteration of Rat Fetal Cerebral Cortex Development after Prenatal Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Naveau, Elise; Pinson, Anneline; Gérard, Arlette; Nguyen, Laurent; Charlier, Corinne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Parent, Anne-Simone

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants that persist in environment and human tissues. Perinatal exposure to these endocrine disruptors causes cognitive deficits and learning disabilities in children. These effects may involve their ability to interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action. We tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to PCBs can concomitantly alter TH levels and TH-regulated events during cerebral cortex development: progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit and neuron migration. Pregnant rats exposed to the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 ended gestation with reduced total and free serum thyroxine levels. Exposure to Aroclor 1254 increased cell cycle exit of the neuronal progenitors and delayed radial neuronal migration in the fetal cortex. Progenitor cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation rate were not altered by prenatal exposure to PCBs. Given that PCBs remain ubiquitous, though diminishing, contaminants in human systems, it is important that we further understand their deleterious effects in the brain. PMID:24642964

  3. Effects of vigabatrin and of GABA on myelinated rat cerebellar cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hauw, J. J.; Boutry, J. M.; Sun, P.; Sazdovitch, V.; Duyckaerts, C.

    1989-01-01

    1 The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high concentrations of vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA) and of GABA on myelin of the central nervous system cultures. 2 Explants of rat cerebellum were cultured for 14-19 days in vitro on collagen-coated coverslips in Leighton tubes. They were exposed for up to 14 days to 500 nmol ml-1 vigabatrin or to 1000 nmol ml-1 GABA. 3 Qualitative and quantitative blind examination of living cultures and of Sudan black B-stained slides showed mild toxicity of both drugs for myelinated fibres. No clear-cut differences could be demonstrated between the two compounds, although vigabatrin seemed slightly more toxic than GABA at these doses. 4 In electron microscopy, no patent intramyelinic oedema nor primary demyelination were seen. On the contrary, some degenerating myelinated fibres and astrocytic gliosis were seen in both experimental conditions. The changes involved axons as well as myelin sheaths. 5 The toxicity of GABA and vigabatrin was surprisingly mild in this very sensitive model. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:2757909

  4. The metabolism of histamine in rat hypothalamus and cortex after reserpine treatment.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Martin; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    The effect of reserpine on histamine (HA) and tele-methylhistamine (N(τ)-MHA) in hypothalamus and cortex of rats was analyzed and compared to catecholamines. IP injection of reserpine (5 mg/kg) confirmed the effectiveness of reserpine treatment on noradrenaline and dopamine levels. Our in-vitro experiment with synaptosomal/crude mitochondrial fraction from hypothalamus and cortex confirmed that while mono amine oxidase (MAO) is an efficient metabolic enzyme for catecholamines, HA is not significantly affected by its enzymatic action. HMT activity after reserpine, pargyline and L-histidine treatment showed no differences compared to the control values. However HDC was significantly increased in both hypothalamus and cortex. In this study, Ws/Ws rats with deficiency of mast cells were used to clarify aspects of HA metabolism in HAergic neurons by eliminating the contribution of mast cells. The irreversible MAO-B inhibitor Pargyline (65 mg/kg) failed to accumulate N(τ)-MHA in the hypothalamus. However, when animals treated with reserpine and pargyline/reserpine were compared, the last group showed higher N(τ)-MHA values (p < 0.01). Moreover, the precursor of HA, L-histidine (1 g/kg), produced an increase of HA in the hypothalamus to 166% and the cortex to 348%. In conclusion, our results suggest that the effect of reserpine on the HA pools in the brain might be different. The neuronal HA pools are more resistant to reserpine as compared to those of catecholamine. Moreover, the HAergic pool appears to be more resistant to depletion than mast cells' pool, and thus HDC/HMT activity and its localization may play a key role in the understanding of HA metabolism in brain after reserpine treatment. PMID:25936509

  5. Single Prolonged Stress Decreases Glutamate, Glutamine, and Creatine Concentrations In The Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Dayan; Perrine, Shane A.; George, Sophie A.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Liberzon, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Application of Single Prolonged Stress (SPS) in rats induces changes in neuroendocrine function and arousal that are characteristic of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). PTSD, in humans, is associated with decreased neural activity in the prefrontal cortex, increased neural activity in the amygdala complex, and reduced neuronal integrity in the hippocampus. However, the extent to which SPS models these aspects of PTSD has not been established. In order to address this, we used high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS 1H MRS) ex vivo to assay levels of neurochemicals critical for energy metabolism (creatine and lactate), excitatory (glutamate and glutamine) and inhibitory (gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)) neurotransmission, and neuronal integrity (N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), amygdala complex, and hippocampus of SPS and control rats. Glutamate, glutamine, and creatine levels were decreased in the mPFC of SPS rats when compared to controls, which suggests decreased excitatory tone in this region. SPS did not alter the neurochemical profiles of either the hippocampus or amygdala. These data suggest that SPS selectively attenuates excitatory tone, without a disruption of neuronal integrity, in the mPFC. PMID:20546834

  6. Neuronal representation of audio-place associations in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Li, Bao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stimulus-place associative task requires humans or animals to associate or map different stimuli with different locations. It is know that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats, also termed prelimbic cortex (PrL), is important for performing stimulus-place associations. However, little is known about how mPFC neurons encode stimulus-palce associations. To address this, the present study trained rats on an audio-place associative task, whereby the animals were required to associate two different tones with entering two different arms in a Y-shaped maze. Reversible inactivation of the mPFC by local infusion of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol severely impaired the performance of rats on the associative task, again indicating an important role of mPFC in the task performance. Single-unit recording showed that a group of mPFC neurons (40/275, 14.5 %) fired preferentially for the audio-place associations, providing the first electrophysiological evidence for the involvement of mPFC cells in representing audio-place associations. PMID:26391676

  7. Repeated cocaine administration promotes long-term potentiation induction in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2007-08-01

    Although drug-induced adaptations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) may contribute to several core aspects of addictive behaviors, it is not clear yet whether drugs of abuse elicit changes in synaptic plasticity at the PFC excitatory synapses. Here we report that, following repeated cocaine administration (15 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal injection for 5 consecutive days) with a 3-day withdrawal, excitatory synapses to layer V pyramidal neurons in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) become highly sensitive to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) by repeated correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity. This promoted LTP induction is caused by cocaine-induced reduction of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of mPFC pyramidal neurons. In contrast, in slices from rats treated with saline or a single dose of cocaine, the same LTP induction protocol did not induce significant LTP unless the blockade of GABA(A) receptors. Blockade of the D1-like receptors specifically prevented the cocaine-induced enhancement of LTP. Repeated cocaine exposure reduced the GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Biotinylation experiments revealed a significant reduction of surface GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression in mPFC slices from repeated cocaine-treated rats. These findings support an important role for cocaine-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity in the PFC in the development of drug-associated behavioral plasticity. PMID:17050645

  8. Relationship between neural, vascular, and BOLD signals in isoflurane-anesthetized rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kim, Tae; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Wang, Ping; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2007-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in anesthetized rodents has been commonly performed with alpha-chloralose, which can be used only for terminal experiments. To develop a survival fMRI protocol, an isoflurane (ISO) -anesthetized rat model was systematically evaluated by simultaneous measurements of field potential (FP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the somatosensory cortex. A conventional forepaw stimulation paradigm with 0.3 ms pulse width, 1.2 mA current, and 3 Hz frequency induced 54% less evoked FP and 84% less CBF response under ISO than alpha-chloralose. To improve stimulation-induced responses under ISO, 10-pulse stimulations were performed with variations of width, current, and frequency. For widths of 0.1-5.0 ms and currents of 0.4-2.0 mA, evoked FP and CBF increased similarly and reached a plateau. The evoked FP increased monotonically for intervals from 50 to 500 ms, but the CBF peaked at an interval of 83 ms (approximately 12 Hz frequency). These data suggest that different anesthetics profoundly affect FP and CBF responses in different ways, which requires optimizing stimulation parameters for each anesthetic. With the refined stimulation parameters, fMRI consistently detected a well-localized activation focus at the primary somatosensory cortex in ISO-anesthetized rats. Thus, the ISO-anesthetized rat model can be used for cerebrovascular activation studies, allowing repeated noninvasive survival experiments. PMID:16731882

  9. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania.

    PubMed

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-07-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  10. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  11. Effect of fish oil intake on glucose levels in rat prefrontal cortex, as measured by microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain glucose sensing may contribute to energy homeostasis control. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) participates in the hedonic component of feeding control. As high-fat diets may disrupt energy homeostasis, we evaluated in male Wistar rats whether intake of high-fat fish-oil diet modified cortical glucose extracellular levels and the feeding induced by intracerebroventricular glucose or PFC glucoprivation. Methods Glucose levels in PFC microdialysates were measured before and after a 30-min meal. Food intake was measured in animals receiving intracerebroventricular glucose followed, 30-min. later, by 2-deoxy-D-glucose injected into the PFC. Results The fish-oil group showed normal body weight and serum insulin while fat pads weight and glucose levels were increased. Baseline PFC glucose and 30-min. carbohydrates intake were similar between the groups. Feeding-induced PFC glucose levels increased earlier and more pronouncedly in fish-oil than in control rats. Intracerebroventricular glucose inhibited feeding consistently in the control but not in the fish-oil group. Local PFC glucoprivation with 2-DG attenuated glucose-induced hypophagia. Conclusions The present experiments have shown that, following food intake, more glucose reached the prefrontal cortex of the rats fed the high-fat fish-oil diet than of the rats fed the control diet. However, when administered directly into the lateral cerebral ventricle, glucose was able to consistently inhibit feeding only in the control rats. The findings indicate that, an impairment of glucose transport into the brain does not contribute to the disturbances induced by the high-fat fish-oil feeding. PMID:24369745

  12. The effect of retrosplenial cortex lesions in rats on incidental and active spatial learning

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, A. J. D.; Hindley, E. L.; Pearce, J. M.; Vann, S. D.; Aggleton, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the importance of the retrosplenial cortex for the incidental learning of the spatial arrangement of distinctive features within a scene. In a modified Morris water-maze, rats spontaneously learnt the location of an escape platform prior to swimming to that location. For this, rats were repeatedly placed on a submerged platform in one corner of either a rectangular (Experiment 1) or square (Experiments 2, 3) pool with walls of different appearance. The rats were then released in the center of the pool for their first test trial. In Experiment 1, the correct corner and its diagonally opposite partner (also correct) were specified by the geometric properties of the pool. Rats with retrosplenial lesions took longer to first reach a correct corner, subsequently showing an attenuated preference for the correct corners. A reduced preference for the correct corner was also found in Experiment 2, when platform location was determined by the juxtaposition of highly salient visual cues (black vs. white walls). In Experiment 3, less salient visual cues (striped vs. white walls) led to a robust lesion impairment, as the retrosplenial lesioned rats showed no preference for the correct corner. When subsequently trained actively to swim to the correct corner over successive trials, retrosplenial lesions spared performance on all three discriminations. The findings not only reveal the importance of the retrosplenial cortex for processing various classes of visuospatial information but also highlight a broader role in the incidental learning of the features of a spatial array, consistent with the translation of scene information. PMID:25705182

  13. Bone mineral crystal size and organization vary across mature rat bone cortex.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Mikael J; Kaspersen, Jørn D; Olsson, Ulf; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Bech, Martin; Schaff, Florian; Tägil, Magnus; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-09-01

    The macro- and micro-features of bone can be assessed by using imaging methods. However, nano- and molecular features require more detailed characterization, such as use of e.g., vibrational spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Nano- and molecular features also affect the mechanical competence of bone tissue. The aim of the present study was to reveal the effects of mineralization and its alterations on the mineral crystal scale, by investigating the spatial variation of molecular composition and mineral crystal structure across the cross-section of femur diaphyses in young rats, and healthy and osteoporotic mature rats (N=5). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques with high spatial resolution were used at identical locations over the whole cross-section. This allowed quantification of point-by-point information about the spatial distribution of mineral crystal volume. All measured parameters (crystal dimensions, degree of orientation and predominant orientation) varied across the cortex. Specifically, the crystal dimensions were lower in the central cortex than in the endosteal and periosteal regions. Mineral crystal orientation followed the cortical circumference in the periosteal and endosteal regions, but was less well-oriented in the central regions. Central cortex is formed rapidly during development through endochondral ossification. Since rats possess no osteonal remodeling, this bone remains (until old age). Significant linear correlations were observed between the dimensional and organizational parameters, e.g., between crystal length and degree of orientation (R(2)=0.83, p<0.001). Application of SAXS/WAXS provides valuable information on bone nanostructure and its constituents, effects of diseases and, prospectively, mechanical competence. PMID:27417019

  14. Orbital cortex neuronal responses during an odor-based conditioned associative task in rats.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, M; Nishijo, H; Uwano, T; Tamura, R; Furuta, I; Kawasaki, M; Takashima, Y; Ono, T

    2000-01-01

    Neuronal activity in the rat orbital cortex during discrimination of various odors [five volatile organic compounds (acetophenone, isoamyl acetate, cyclohexanone, p-cymene and 1,8-cineole), and food- and cosmetic-related odorants (black pepper, cheese, rose and perfume)] and other conditioned sensory stimuli (tones, light and air puff) was recorded and compared with behavioral responses to the same odors (black pepper, cheese, rose and perfume). In a neurophysiological study, the rats were trained to lick a spout that protruded close to its mouth to obtain sucrose or intracranial self-stimulation reward after presentation of conditioned stimuli. Of 150 orbital cortex neurons recorded during the task, 65 responded to one or more types of sensory stimuli. Of these, 73.8% (48/65) responded during presentation of an odor. Although the mean breadth of responsiveness (entropy) of the olfactory neurons based on the responses to five volatile organic compounds and air (control) was rather high (0.795), these stimuli were well discriminated in an odor space resulting from multidimensional scaling using Pearson's correlation coefficients between the stimuli. In a behavioral study, a rat was housed in an equilateral octagonal cage, with free access to food and choice among eight levers, four of which elicited only water (no odor, controls), and four of which elicited both water and one of four odors (black pepper, cheese, rose or perfume). Lever presses for each odor and control were counted. Distributions of these five stimuli (four odors and air) in an odor space derived from the multidimensional scaling using Pearson's correlation coefficients based on behavioral responses were very similar to those based on neuronal responses to the same five stimuli. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficients between the same five stimuli based on the neuronal responses and those based on behavioral responses were significantly correlated. The results demonstrated a pivotal role of

  15. Characterization of hemodynamics and oxygenation in the renal cortex of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer; Niendorf, Thoralf; Cantow, Kathleen; Flemming, Bert; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2015-03-01

    We have performed a pre-clinical study on 13 rats to investigate the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy for quantification of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the renal cortex of small animals. These measurements were combined with laser-Doppler fluxmetry and a fluorescence quenching technique for quantification of tissue oxygen tension. Hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation were determined from experimental data by a Monte Carlo model. The methods were applied to investigate and compare temporal changes during several types of interventions such as arterial and venous occlusions, as well as hyperoxia, hypoxia and hypercapnia induced by different mixtures of the inspired gas.

  16. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  17. Excitotoxic increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase in the rat olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Abbondanza, A; Virgili, M; Contestabile, A; Stirpe, F

    1995-05-26

    Excitotoxic lesions induced by systemic injection of kainic acid, resulted in 2-3-fold increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase activities in the rat olfactory cortex 48-72 h after drug administration. A significant increase of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase ratio was also observed at 4 and 48 h post-injection. No similar changes were noticed in the hippocampus. The enhancement of enzyme activity seems to be primarily a consequence of the altered cell composition in damaged area. Free radicals produced by the increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could in turn aggravate the excitotoxic brain injury. PMID:7656426

  18. Implications on cerebellar function from information coding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiming

    2008-01-01

    One function of the cerebellar cortex is to process information. There are at least two types of information. Temporal information is encoded in the timing pattern of action and synaptic potentials, whereas structural information is encoded in the spatial pattern of the cerebellar synaptic circuitry. Intuitively, analysis of highly complex information in the time domain would require a cerebellar cortex with structural complexity to match. Information theory offers a way to estimate quantitatively both types of information and thereby helps to test hypotheses or advance theories of cerebellar neurobiology. These estimates suggest: (i) That the mossy-fiber-granule-cell system carries far more (temporal) information than the climbing fiber system, (ii) that Purkinje cells extract only a fraction of the (temporal) information from their afferents, and (iii) that the cerebellar cortex has a large (spatial) information coding capacity. Concerning information, one can argue that the cerebellar cortex analyzes temporal information in its afferents as a search engine, in search of coincidental mossy fiber events based on timing cues provided by climbing fiber events. Results of successive searches are continuously being converted into structural information encoded in the spatial distribution pattern of granule-cell-Purkinje-cell synapses along granule cell axons, thereby providing an adaptive and indeed self-correcting dimension to the structural information code. The search engine operation involves cellular mechanisms acting on temporal events and is part of an associative learning process. The conversion and generation of structural information involves neuroplasticity mechanisms acting at the synaptic level, with electrophysiological as well as structural consequences, and may be part of the short- and long-term memory process. These and other attributes qualify the cerebellar cortex as a dynamic information processing center, contributing to memory and learning while

  19. Kinetic and functional analysis of transient, persistent and resurgent sodium currents in rat cerebellar granule cells in situ: an electrophysiological and modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Magistretti, Jacopo; Castelli, Loretta; Forti, Lia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar neurones show complex and differentiated mechanisms of action potential generation that have been proposed to depend on peculiar properties of their voltage-dependent Na+ currents. In this study we analysed voltage-dependent Na+ currents of rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs) by performing whole-cell, patch-clamp experiments in acute rat cerebellar slices. A transient Na+ current (INaT) was always present and had the properties of a typical fast-activating/inactivating Na+ current. In addition to INaT, robust persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na+ currents were observed. INaP peaked at ∼−40 mV, showed half-maximal activation at ∼−55 mV, and its maximal amplitude was about 1.5% of that of INaT. INaR was elicited by repolarizing pulses applied following step depolarizations able to activate/inactivate INaT, and showed voltage- and time-dependent activation and voltage-dependent decay kinetics. The conductance underlying INaR showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence, with peak at −35 mV. A significant correlation was found between GC INaR and INaT peak amplitudes; however, GCs expressing INaT of similar size showed marked variability in terms of INaR amplitude, and in a fraction of cells INaR was undetectable. INaT, INaP and INaR could be accounted for by a 13-state kinetic scheme comprising closed, open, inactivated and blocked states. Current-clamp experiments carried out to identify possible functional correlates of INaP and/or INaR revealed that in GCs single action potentials were followed by depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs). In a majority of cells, DAPs showed properties consistent with INaR playing a role in their generation. Computer modelling showed that INaR promotes DAP generation and enhances high-frequency firing, whereas INaP boosts near-threshold firing activity. Our findings suggest that special properties of voltage-dependent Na+ currents provides GCs with mechanisms suitable for shaping activity patterns, with potentially

  20. Survival of interneurons and parallel fiber synapses in a cerebellar cortex deprived of Purkinje cells: studies in the double mutant mouse Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-).

    PubMed

    Zanjani, S Hadi; Selimi, Fekrije; Vogel, Michael W; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Boeuf, Julien; Mariani, Jean; Bailly, Yannick J

    2006-08-01

    The Lurcher mutation in the Grid2 gene causes the cell autonomous death of virtually all cerebellar Purkinje cells and the target-related death of 90% of the granule cells and 60-75% of the olivary neurons. Inactivation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, in heterozygous Lurcher mutants (Grid2Lc/+) rescues approximately 60% of the granule cells, but does not rescue Purkinje or olivary neurons. Given the larger size of the cerebellar molecular layer in Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) double mutants compared to Grid2Lc/+ mutants, we analyzed the survival of the stellate and basket interneurons as well as the synaptic connectivity of parallel fibers originating from the surviving granule cells in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets in the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) cerebellum. Quantification showed a significantly higher density of interneurons ( approximately 60%) in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) mice compared to Grid2Lc/+, suggesting that interneurons are subject to a BAX-dependent target-related death in the Lurcher mutants. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed the normal ultrastructural aspect of a number of parallel fibers in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+; Bax(-/-) double mutant mice and preserved their numerous synaptic contacts on interneurons, suggesting that interneurons could play a trophic role for axon terminals of surviving granule cells. Finally, parallel fibers varicosities in the double mutant established "pseudo-synapses" on glia as well as displayed autophagic profiles, suggesting that the connections established by the parallel fibers in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets were subject to a high turnover involving autophagy. PMID:16739195

  1. Neural Resolution of Formant Frequencies in the Primary Auditory Cortex of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Honey, Christian; Schnupp, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-resonance sounds play an important role in animal communication and auditory object recognition, yet very little is known about the cortical representation of this class of sounds. In this study we shine light on one simple aspect: how well does the firing rate of cortical neurons resolve resonant (“formant”) frequencies of vowel-like pulse-resonance sounds. We recorded neural responses in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of anesthetized rats to two-formant pulse-resonance sounds, and estimated their formant resolving power using a statistical kernel smoothing method which takes into account the natural variability of cortical responses. While formant-tuning functions were diverse in structure across different penetrations, most were sensitive to changes in formant frequency, with a frequency resolution comparable to that reported for rat cochlear filters. PMID:26252382

  2. Prenatal Protein Malnutrition Decreases KCNJ3 and 2DG Activity in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, A.C.; Jakovcevski, M.; McGaughy, J.A.; Calderwood, S.K.; Mokler, D.J.; Rushmore, R.J.; Galler, J.R.; Akbarian, S.A.; Rosene, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition (PPM) in rats causes enduring changes in brain and behavior including increased cognitive rigidity and decreased inhibitory control. A preliminary gene microarray screen of PPM rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) identified alterations in KCNJ3 (GIRK1/Kir3.1), a gene important for regulating neuronal excitability. Follow-up with polymerase chain reaction and Western blot showed decreased KCNJ3 expression in PFC, but not hippocampus or brainstem. To verify localization of the effect to the PFC, baseline regional brain activity was assessed with 14C-2-deoxyglucose. Results showed decreased activation in PFC but not hippocampus. Together these findings point to the unique vulnerability of the PFC to the nutritional insult during early brain development, with enduring effects in adulthood on KCNJ3 expression and baseline metabolic activity. PMID:25446346

  3. Prenatal protein malnutrition decreases KCNJ3 and 2DG activity in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Amaral, A C; Jakovcevski, M; McGaughy, J A; Calderwood, S K; Mokler, D J; Rushmore, R J; Galler, J R; Akbarian, S A; Rosene, D L

    2015-02-12

    Prenatal protein malnutrition (PPM) in rats causes enduring changes in brain and behavior including increased cognitive rigidity and decreased inhibitory control. A preliminary gene microarray screen of PPM rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) identified alterations in KCNJ3 (GIRK1/Kir3.1), a gene important for regulating neuronal excitability. Follow-up with polymerase chain reaction and Western blot showed decreased KCNJ3 expression in the PFC, but not hippocampus or brainstem. To verify localization of the effect to the PFC, baseline regional brain activity was assessed with (14)C-2-deoxyglucose. Results showed decreased activation in the PFC but not hippocampus. Together these findings point to the unique vulnerability of the PFC to the nutritional insult during early brain development, with enduring effects in adulthood on KCNJ3 expression and baseline metabolic activity. PMID:25446346

  4. Estrogen in prefrontal cortex blocks stress-induced cognitive impairments in female rats.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Wei, Jing; Yan, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Animal and human studies have found that males and females show distinct stress responses. Recent studies suggest the contribution of estrogen in the brain to this sexual dimorphism. Repeated stress has been found to impair cognitive behaviors via suppressing glutamatergic transmission and glutamate receptor surface expression in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in male rats. On the contrary, female rats exposed to the same stress paradigms show normal synaptic function and PFC-mediated cognition. The level of aromatase, the enzyme for the biosynthesis of estrogen, is significantly higher in the PFC of females than males. The stress-induced glutamatergic deficits and memory impairment are unmasked by blocking estrogen receptors or aromatase in females, suggesting a protective role of estrogen against the detrimental effects of repeated stress. PMID:26321384

  5. Speech training alters tone frequency tuning in rat primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T.; Perez, Claudia A.; Carraway, Ryan S.; Chang, Kevin Q.; Roland, Jarod L.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in both humans and animals have documented improved performance following discrimination training. This enhanced performance is often associated with cortical response changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term speech training on multiple tasks can improve primary auditory cortex (A1) responses compared to rats trained on a single speech discrimination task or experimentally naïve rats. Specifically, we compared the percent of A1 responding to trained sounds, the responses to both trained and untrained sounds, receptive field properties of A1 neurons, and the neural discrimination of pairs of speech sounds in speech trained and naïve rats. Speech training led to accurate discrimination of consonant and vowel sounds, but did not enhance A1 response strength or the neural discrimination of these sounds. Speech training altered tone responses in rats trained on six speech discrimination tasks but not in rats trained on a single speech discrimination task. Extensive speech training resulted in broader frequency tuning, shorter onset latencies, a decreased driven response to tones, and caused a shift in the frequency map to favor tones in the range where speech sounds are the loudest. Both the number of trained tasks and the number of days of training strongly predict the percent of A1 responding to a low frequency tone. Rats trained on a single speech discrimination task performed less accurately than rats trained on multiple tasks and did not exhibit A1 response changes. Our results indicate that extensive speech training can reorganize the A1 frequency map, which may have downstream consequences on speech sound processing. PMID:24344364

  6. Chronic Ritalin Administration during Adulthood Increases Serotonin Pool in Rat Medial Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Samira; Nahavandi, Arezo; Madjd, Zahra; Shahbazi, Ali; Niknazar, Somayeh; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ritalin has high tendency to be abused. It has been the main indication to control attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The college students may seek for it to improve their memory, decrease the need for sleep (especially during exams), which at least partially, can be related to serotonergic system. Therefore, it seems worthy to evaluate the effect of Ritalin intake on mature brain. There are many studies on Ritalin effect on developing brain, but only few studies on adults are available. This study was undertaken to find Ritalin effect on serotonin transporter (SERT) density in medial frontal cortex (MFC) of mature rat. Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. Rats were assigned into five groups (n = 6 per group): one control, two Ritalin and two vehicle groups. Twelve rats received Ritalin (20 mg/kg/twice a day) orally for eleven continuous days. After one week of withdrawal and another two weeks of rest, in order to evaluate short-term effects of Ritalin, six rats were sacrificed. Another six rats were studied to detect the long-term effects of Ritalin; therefore, they were sacrificed 12 weeks after the previous group. The immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the results. Results: Immunohistochemistry studies showed a higher density of SERT in both 2 and 12 weeks after withdrawal from Ritalin intake in MFC of rat and there was no significant difference between these two groups. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated both short- and long-term effects of Ritalin on frontal serotonergic system after withdrawal period. PMID:23748891

  7. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  8. Perirhinal cortex lesions uncover subsidiary systems in the rat for the detection of novel and familiar objects

    PubMed Central

    Albasser, Mathieu M; Amin, Eman; Iordanova, Mihaela D; Brown, Malcolm W; Pearce, John M; Aggleton, John P

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the impact of perirhinal cortex lesions on tests of object recognition. Object recognition was tested directly by looking at the preferential exploration of novel objects over simultaneously presented familiar objects. Object recognition was also tested indirectly by presenting just novel objects or just familiar objects, and recording exploration levels. Rats with perirhinal cortex lesions were severely impaired at discriminating a novel object from a simultaneously presented familiar object (direct test), yet displayed normal levels of exploration to novel objects presented on their own and showed normal declines in exploration times for familiar objects that were repeatedly presented (indirect tests). This effective reduction in the exploration of familiar objects after perirhinal cortex lesions points to the sparing of some recognition mechanisms. This possibility led us to determine whether rats with perirhinal cortex lesions can overcome their preferential exploration deficits when given multiple object familiarisation trials prior to that same (familiar) object being paired with a novel object. It was found that after multiple familiarisation trials, objects could now successfully be recognised as familiar by rats with perirhinal cortex lesions, both following a 90-min delay (the longest delay tested) and when object recognition was tested in the dark after familiarisation trials in the light. These latter findings reveal: (i) the presumed recruitment of other regions to solve recognition memory problems in the absence of perirhinal cortex tissue; and (ii) that these additional recognition mechanisms require more familiarisation trials than perirhinal-based recognition mechanisms. PMID:21707792

  9. Cytoplasmic and nuclear estradiol receptors in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of female rats during the neonatal period

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkina, I.V.; Babichev, V.N.; Ozol', L.Y.

    1986-07-01

    The content of estradifol receptors (E/sub 2/) in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of female rats was investigated in the course of neonatal development. In the cytosol of the hypothalamus and cortex, the E/sub 2/-binding proteins, which possess high capacity, include both the true estradiol receptors and proteins identical with ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein. True receptors E/sub 2/ were detected in the nuclear fraction; in the hypothalamus their concentration was virtually unchanged, while in the cortex it decreased from the first to fifth days of postnatal development.

  10. Enhancement of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Metabolism in Rat Brain Frontal Cortex Using a β3 Adrenoceptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Mirbolooki, M. Reza; Schade, Kimberly N.; Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of β3-adrenergic receptor mediated activation of rat brain frontal cortex using mirabegron (a selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist), measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Another β3-agonis t, CL 316,243, did not have this effect due to impermeability through the blood brain barrier (BBB), while atomoxetine, a norepinephrine transporter blocker, did increase 18F-FDG uptake in the frontal cortex. Mirabegron exhibited a dose-dependent increase in frontal cortex 18F-FDG uptake. These findings suggest a possible use of selective β3-adrenoceptor agonists in reversing regional glucose hypometabolism in the brain. PMID:25347981