Science.gov

Sample records for rat mammary cancer

  1. Tamoxifen induces regression of estradiol-induced mammary cancer in ACI.COP-Ept2 rat model

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlen, Rachel L.; Willbrand, Dana M.; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.; Ma, Lixin; Shull, James D.; Sauter, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    The ACI rat is a unique model of human breast cancer in that mammary cancers are induced by estrogen without carcinogens, irradiation, xenografts or transgenic manipulations. We sought to characterize mammary cancers in a congenic variant of the ACI rat, the ACI.COP-Ept2. All rats with estradiol implants developed mammary cancers in 5–7 months. Rats bearing estradiol-induced mammary cancers were treated with tamoxifen for three weeks. Tamoxifen reduced tumor mass, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, by 89%. Tumors expressed estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Erbb2. ERα and PR were overexpressed in tumor compared to adjacent non-tumor mammary gland. Thus, this model is highly relevant to hormone responsive human breast cancers. PMID:18830694

  2. Dietary genistein: perinatal mammary cancer prevention, bioavailability and toxicity testing in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fritz, W A; Coward, L; Wang, J; Lamartiniere, C A

    1998-12-01

    Asian women consuming a traditional diet high in soy have a low incidence of breast cancer, yet when they emigrate to the USA the second but not the first generation lose this protection. Accordingly, we hypothesized that early exposure to genistein, a major component of soy, could have a permanent protective effect against breast cancer. Sprague-Dawley CD rats were exposed to genistein from conception to day 21 post-partum in the diet at concentrations of 0, 25 and 250 mg genistein/kg AIN-76A diet. At day 50 post-partum, all animals were treated with 80 mg dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/kg body wt to induce mammary cancers. Dietary genistein resulted in dose-dependent protection against development of mammary tumors (fewer tumors per rat). Analysis of mammary whole mounts showed that 21- and 50-day-old female rats had fewer terminal end buds, terminal ductal structures that were undifferentiated and were most susceptible to carcinogenesis. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation studies revealed that dietary perinatal genistein resulted in a smaller proliferative compartment for terminal end buds. In rats fed the high genistein dose (250 mg/kg diet) total genistein concentrations in the serum and milk of dams 7 days postpartum were 418+/-198 and 137 pmol/ml, respectively. Total genistein concentrations in stomach milk, serum and mammary glands of 7-day-old offspring were 4439+/-1109 and 726 pmol/ml and 440+/-129 pmol/g, respectively. Total genistein concentrations in the serum and mammary glands of 21-day-old offspring were 1810+/-135 pmol/ml and 370+/-36 pmol/g, respectively. Dietary perinatal genistein did not cause significant toxicity in F0 and F1 females. We conclude that genistein in the diet at 'physiological levels' enhances cell differentiation, resulting in programming of mammary gland cells for reduced susceptibility to mammary cancer, with no observed toxicity to the reproductive tract of F1 females. PMID:9886571

  3. Amphiregulin Mediates Estrogen, Progesterone, and EGFR Signaling in the Normal Rat Mammary Gland and in Hormone-Dependent Rat Mammary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kariagina, Anastasia; Xie, Jianwei; Leipprandt, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Both estrogen (E) and progesterone (P) are implicated in the etiology of human breast cancer. Defining their mechanisms of action, particularly in vivo, is relevant to the prevention and therapy of breast cancer. We investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms of E and/or P-induced in vivo proliferation, in the normal rat mammary gland and in hormone-dependent rat mammary cancers which share many characteristics with the normal human breast and hormone-dependent breast cancers. We show that E+P treatment induced significantly greater proliferation in both the normal gland and mammary cancers compared to E alone. In both the normal gland and tumors, E+P-induced proliferation was mediated through the increased production of amphiregulin (Areg), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, and the activation of intracellular signaling pathways (Erk, Akt, JNK) downstream of EGFR that regulate proliferation. In vitro experiments using rat primary mammary organoids or T47D breast cancer cells confirmed that Areg and the synthetic progestin, R5020, synergize to promote cell proliferation through EGFR signaling. Iressa, an EGFR inhibitor, effectively blocked this proliferation. These results indicate that mediators of cross talk between E, P, and EGFR pathways may be considered as relevant molecular targets for the therapy of hormone-dependent breast cancers, especially in premenopausal women. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12672-010-0048-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21258428

  4. Gene expression and epigenetic profiles of mammary gland tissue: insight into the differential predisposition of four rat strains to mammary gland cancer.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-02-01

    Rats are excellent experimental models for studying breast cancer, but rat strains differ in susceptibility. Among the four strains used in this study, Fischer rats are less susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer, yet they are highly prone to extremely severe metastatic and drug-resistant tumors, in those case where they actually develop the disease. In contrast, Sprague Dawley rats are the most susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer among the strains. ACI rats are highly prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Long-Evans rats are commonly used in mammary gland carcinogenesis studies. The molecular mechanisms of differential breast cancer susceptibility among rat strains are not well understood. Here, gene expression analysis was conducted in the mammary gland tissue of four rat strains--August × Copenhagen Irish (ACI), Long Evans, Fischer-344 and Sprague Dawley--to evaluate possible explanations for the differing breast cancer predispositions. According to the DAVID functional annotation analysis, there were at least eleven, five, and one significantly different pathways, respectively, in Fischer-344, Long-Evans and Sprague Dawley rats, in comparison to ACI rats. Two strains, Fischer-344 and Long-Evans, displayed differential expression in the complement and coagulation cascades, chemokine signaling, PPAR signaling, renin-angiotensin system, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and glutathione metabolism pathways. The only pathway that was significantly different between the Sprague Dawley and the ACI rats was the ribosome pathway. Our data indicate that general cancer susceptibility and predisposition to the development of aggressive and metastatic cancer are independent genetic conditions. Moreover, we have identified several important differences in the basal epigenetic profile of four rat strains with varying degrees of susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25813725

  5. Dietary effects of mead acid on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary cancers in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, YUICHI; YOSHIZAWA, KATSUHIKO; HAMAZAKI, KEI; EMOTO, YUKO; YURI, TAKASHI; YUKI, MICHIKO; KAWASHIMA, HIROSHI; SHIKATA, NOBUAKI; TSUBURA, AIRO

    2016-01-01

    The effect of mead acid (MA; 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid) on the suppression of the development and growth of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancer in female Sprague-Dawley rats was examined. The MA diet (2.4% MA) or control (CTR) diet (0% MA) was started at 6 weeks of age, MNU was injected intraperitoneally at 7 weeks of age, and the rats were maintained on the respective diets for the whole experimental period (until 19 weeks of age). All induced mammary tumors were luminal A subtype carcinomas (estrogen and progesterone receptor positive and HER2/neu negative). The MA diet significantly suppressed the initiation and promotion phases of mammary carcinogenesis; MA suppressed the development (incidence, 61.5 vs. 100%; multiplicity, 2.1 vs. 4.5) and the growth (final tumor weight, 427.1 vs. 1,796.3 mg) of mammary cancers by suppressing cell proliferation, but not by accelerating cell death. There were evident changes in the major fatty acid composition of n-3, n-6, and n-9 fatty acids in the serum of the MA diet group; there was a significant increase in MA and significant decreases in oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. In non-tumorous mammary tissue, there was a significant increase in MA and a significant decrease in OA in the MA diet group. The n-6/n-3 ratios in serum and mammary tissue of the MA diet group were significantly decreased. The MA diet suppressed MNU-induced luminal A mammary cancer by lowering cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, MA may be a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent. In addition to hormone therapy, MA supplementation may be a beneficial chemotherapeutic agent for the luminal A subtype of breast cancer. PMID:26870330

  6. Inositol hexaphosphate and inositol inhibit DMBA-induced rat mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Vucenik, I; Yang, G Y; Shamsuddin, A M

    1995-05-01

    Because inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6) and inositol (Ins), contained in plants and most mammalian cells, have been demonstrated to have anti-cancer and anti-cell proliferative action in several experimental models of carcinogenesis we have examined the effect of InsP6 +/- Ins on DMBA-induced rat mammary tumor model. Starting two weeks prior to induction with DMBA, the drinking water of female Sprague-Dawley rats was supplemented with either: 15 mM InsP6, 15 mM Ins, or 15 mM InsP6 + 15 mM Ins; a control group received no inositol compounds. Animals (49-day-old) were given a single intragastric dose of DMBA (5 mg/rat) in 1 ml of corn oil administered by oral intubation. After 45 weeks of treatment, the animals in all the three treatment regimens showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in tumor incidence. Tumor number, multiplicity and tumor burden were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by InsP6 +/- Ins. When all the parameters were taken into consideration, the best results were obtained by the combination treatment of InsP6 + Ins. Four additional groups not receiving DMBA, but drinking tap water, InsP6, Ins, or InsP6 + Ins of the same molarity as experimental groups were observed for the duration of the study to monitor for any toxicity following this long-term treatment; no significant toxicity as evaluated by body weight gain, serum and bone mineral levels was detected. We demonstrate that InsP6 +/- Ins reproducibly inhibits experimental mammary carcinoma, therefore having great potential as a chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic agent for this disease as well. PMID:7767964

  7. Mammary cancers and pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about management and prognosis of mammary cancers that occur during and after pregnancy and during lactation. Pathological features of mammary cancers occurring during pregnancy are the same as those in non-pregnant women and survival rates are comparable. Management should be the same as in non-pregnant patients. Termination of pregnancy does not improve survival but it should be advised if the prognosis is poor. Mastectomy apparently presents little danger to the fetus, though treatment such as chemotherapy and irradiation should be avoided. Women who have received treatment for mammary cancer need not be advised against subsequent pregnancy. Routine ovarian radiation in non-pregnant premenopausal women is not generally to be recommended, since it does not prolong survival and would deprive some of the chance of further pregnancy. In lactating women who develop mammary cancers survival is apparently not adversely affected. Lactation should be suppressed initially and followed by mastectomy. Regimens of immunotherapy, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy may then be begun. Until results of current trials of combined treatments of mammary cancers associated with pregnancy are available, management should be neither aggressive nor tentative. It should be based on a well-balanced concept of applying all available treatments, as in non-pregnant patients. PMID:376044

  8. Genetic determination of susceptibility to estrogen-induced mammary cancer in the ACI rat: mapping of Emca1 and Emca2 to chromosomes 5 and 18.

    PubMed

    Gould, Karen A; Tochacek, Martin; Schaffer, Beverly S; Reindl, Tanya M; Murrin, Clare R; Lachel, Cynthia M; VanderWoude, Eric A; Pennington, Karen L; Flood, Lisa A; Bynote, Kimberly K; Meza, Jane L; Newton, Michael A; Shull, James D

    2004-12-01

    Hormonal, genetic, and environmental factors play major roles in the complex etiology of breast cancer. When treated continuously with 17beta-estradiol (E2), the ACI rat exhibits a genetically conferred propensity to develop mammary cancer. The susceptibility of the ACI rat to E2-induced mammary cancer appears to segregate as an incompletely dominant trait in crosses to the resistant Copenhagen (COP) strain. In both (ACI x COP)F(2) and (COP x ACI)F(2) populations, we find strong evidence for a major genetic determinant of susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer on distal rat chromosome 5. Our data are most consistent with a model in which the ACI allele of this locus, termed Emca1 (estrogen-induced mammary cancer 1), acts in an incompletely dominant manner to increase both tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity as well as to reduce tumor latency in these populations. We also find evidence suggestive of a second locus, Emca2, on chromosome 18 in the (ACI x COP)F(2) population. The ACI allele of Emca2 acts in a dominant manner to increase incidence and decrease latency. Together, Emca1 and Emca2 act independently to modify susceptibility to E2-induced mammary cancer. PMID:15611180

  9. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  10. Excess weight gain accelerates 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in a rat model of premenopausal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Shawna B.; Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N.; Neil, Elizabeth S.; Thompson, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the null effects generally reported, high-risk premenopausal women (Gail score ≥1.66) enrolled in the Breast Cancer Prevention P-1 Trial were recently reported to be at increased risk for breast cancer when overweight (HR, 1.59) or obese (HR, 1.70). To investigate this clinical observation in a preclinical setting, ovary-intact female rats were intraperitoneally injected with 50 mg/kg 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea at 21 days of age to simulate premenopausal women with increased risk. Two commercially available strains of Sprague Dawley rat (Taconic Farms) were used which are dietary resistant (DR) or dietary susceptible (DS) to excess weight gain when fed a purified diet containing 32% kcal from fat, similar to levels consumed by the typical American woman. DS rats were approximately 15.5% heavier than DR rats at study termination and plasma leptin indicated a marked difference in adiposity. DS rats had higher incidence (26% increase), multiplicity (2.5-fold increase), and burden (5.4-fold increase) of mammary carcinomas with a concomitant reduction in cancer latency (16% earlier detection) compared to DR rats (P <.001 for all analyses), and displayed a higher proportion of hormone receptor negative tumors compared to DR rats (OR=1.78, 95% CI 0.83–3.81). Circulating levels of several breast cancer risk factors including leptin, adiponectin:leptin ratio, insulin, IGF-1, IGF-1:IGFBP3 ratio, and calculated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were negatively impacted in DS rats (P <.05 for all analyses). These findings support further investigation of the effects of excess weight in high-risk premenopausal women and demonstrate a useful preclinical model for rapid evaluation of mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:24441676

  11. Characterization of mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea exposure-Potential for human male breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Elmore, Susan A; Tsubura, Airo

    2016-05-01

    The frequency of breast cancer in men is extremely rare, reported to be less than 1% and there is currently no available animal model for male mammary tumors. We compared the characteristics of various immunohistochemical markers in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats including: estrogen receptor α (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), androgen receptor (AR), receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2), GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Female mammary adenocarcinomas were strongly positive in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA and ER (100%) with only 60% and 53% expressing PgR and GATA3, respectively. 100% of male adenocarcinomas also exhibited strongly positive expression in the nuclei of tumor cells for PCNA, with 25% expressing AR and only 8% showing positivity for ER. Male carcinomas did not express PgR or GATA3 and none of the tumors, male or female, were positive for HER2. Based on the observed ER and PgR positivity and HER2 negativity within these tumors, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in female rats appear to be hormonally dependent, similar to human luminal A type breast cancer. In contrast, MNU-induced mammary adenocarcinomas in male rats showed no reactivity for ER, PgR, HER2 or GATA3, suggesting no hormonal dependency. Both male and female adenocarcinomas showed high proliferating activity by PCNA immunohistochemistry. Based on our literature review, human male breast cancers are mainly dependent on ER and/or PgR, therefore the biological pathogenesis of MNU-induced male mammary cancer in rats may differ from that of male breast cancer in humans. PMID:26852374

  12. In utero exposure of rats to high-fat diets perturbs gene expression profiles and cancer susceptibility of prepubertal mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Govindarajah, Vinothini; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Ying, Jun; Gear, Robin; Bornschein, Robert L; Medvedovic, Mario; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Human studies suggest that high-fat diets (HFDs) increase the risk of breast cancer. The 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary carcinogenesis rat model is commonly used to evaluate the effects of lifestyle factors such as HFD on mammary tumor risk. Past studies focused primarily on the effects of continuous maternal exposure on the risk of offspring at the end of puberty (PND50). We assessed the effects of prenatal HFD exposure on cancer susceptibility in prepubertal mammary glands and identified key gene networks associated with such disruption. During pregnancy, dams were fed AIN-93G-based diets with isocaloric high olive oil, butterfat or safflower oil. The control group received AIN-93G. Female offspring were treated with DMBA on PND21. However, a significant increase in tumor volume and a trend of shortened tumor latency were observed in rats with HFD exposure against the controls (P=.048 and P=.067, respectively). Large-volume tumors harbored carcinoma in situ. Transcriptome profiling identified 43 differentially expressed genes in the mammary glands of the HFBUTTER group as compared with control. Rapid hormone signaling was the most dysregulated pathway. The diet also induced aberrant expression of Dnmt3a, Mbd1 and Mbd3, consistent with potential epigenetic disruption. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence supporting susceptibility of prepubertal mammary glands to DMBA-induced tumorigenesis that can be modulated by dietary fat that involves aberrant gene expression and likely epigenetic dysregulation. PMID:26895667

  13. Importance of dietary fat during initiation versus promotion in rat mammary cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, C.M.; Bennink, M.R.

    1986-03-05

    This study was designed to determine if the fat content of the diet would alter 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) initiation of mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN-76 (high carbohydrate, HC) diet or a modified AIN-76 diet (high fat (37/sup 5/), HF) prior to initiation. The HF diet had the same energy to nutrient ratio as the HC diet. Two groups were fed either the HC or the HF diet during the initiation and promotion phase (HC-HC and HF-HF groups). A third group was fed the HF diet 20 days before and 12 days after initiation and then were fed the HC diet during the promotion phase (HF-HC group). Weight gain during promotion was similar for the HC-HC and HF-HC groups, but the HF-HF group gained 41% more weight. The HC-HC group had significantly fewer tumors than the HF-HF or HF-HC groups (HC-HC = 1.45 tumors/rat; HF-HF = 2.75 and HF-HC = 3.63). Surprisingly, feeding the HC diet during promotion did not cause a decrease in tumorigenesis (there was actually a non-significant increase). This work demonstrates that the fat (energy) content of the diet during DMBA initiation is critical. Furthermore, the fat (energy) content of the diet during initiation was more critical than during promotion.

  14. Anticancer and Cancer Prevention Effects of Piperine-Free Piper nigrum Extract on N-nitrosomethylurea-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sriwiriyajan, Somchai; Tedasen, Aman; Lailerd, Narissara; Boonyaphiphat, Pleumjit; Nitiruangjarat, Anupong; Deng, Yan; Graidist, Potchanapond

    2016-01-01

    Piper nigrum (P. nigrum) is commonly used in traditional medicine. This current study aimed to investigate the anticancer and cancer preventive activity of a piperine-free P. nigrum extract (PFPE) against breast cancer cells and N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats. The cytotoxic effects and the mechanism of action were investigated in breast cancer cells using the MTT assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. An acute toxicity study was conducted according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guideline. Female Sprague-Dawley rats with NMU-induced mammary tumors were used in preventive and anticancer studies. The results showed that PFPE inhibited the growth of luminal-like breast cancer cells more so than the basal-like ones by induction of apoptosis. In addition, PFPE exhibited greater selectivity against breast cancer cells than colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and neuroblastoma cells. In an acute toxicity study, a single oral administration of PFPE at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight resulted in no mortality and morbidity during a 14-day observation period. For the cancer preventive study, the incidence of tumor-bearing rats was 10% to 20% in rats treated with PFPE. For the anticancer activity study, the growth rate of tumors in the presence of PFPE-treated groups was much slower when compared with the control and vehicle groups. The extract itself caused no changes to the biochemical and hematologic parameters when compared with the control and vehicle groups. In conclusion, PFPE had a low toxicity and a potent antitumor effect on mammary tumorigenesis in rats. PMID:26511488

  15. Glucose transporter expression in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, A F; Leturque, A; Loizeau, M; Postic, C; Girard, J

    1990-01-01

    The expression of different glucose transporter isoforms was measured during the development and differentiation of the rat mammary gland. Before conception, when the mammary gland is mainly composed of adipocytes, Glut 4 and Glut 1 mRNAs and proteins were present. During pregnancy, the expression of Glut 4 decreased progressively, whereas that of Glut 1 increased. In the lactating mammary gland only Glut 1 was present, and was expressed at a high level. The absence of Glut 4 suggests that glucose transport is not regulated by insulin in the lactating rat mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2396989

  16. Salivary α-amylase exhibits antiproliferative effects in primary cell cultures of rat mammary epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most diagnosed cancers in females, frequently with fatal outcome, so that new strategies for modulating cell proliferation in the mammary tissue are urgently needed. There is some, as yet inconclusive evidence that α-amylase may constitute a novel candidate for affecting cellular growth. Methods The present investigation aimed to examine if salivary α-amylase, an enzyme well known for the metabolism of starch and recently introduced as a stress marker, is able to exert antiproliferative effects on the growth of mammary gland epithelial cells. For this purpose, primary epithelial cultures of breast tissue from two different inbred rat strains, Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis, as well as breast tumor cells of human origin were used. Treatment with human salivary α-amylase was performed once daily for 2 days followed by cell counting (trypan blue assay) to determine alterations in cell numbers. Cell senescence after α-amylase treatment was assessed by β-galactosidase assay. Endogenous α-amylase was detected in cells from F344 and Lewis by immunofluorescence. Results Salivary α-amylase treatment in vitro significantly decreased the proliferation of primary cells from F344 and Lewis rats in a concentration-dependent manner. Noticeably, the sensitivity towards α-amylase was significantly higher in Lewis cells with stronger impact on cell growth after 5 and 50 U/ml compared to F344 cells. An antiproliferative effect of α-amylase was also determined in mammary tumor cells of human origin, but this effect varied depending on the donor, age, and type of the cells. Conclusions The results presented here indicate for the first time that salivary α-amylase affects cell growth in rat mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumor cells of human origin. Thus, α-amylase may be considered a novel, promising target for balancing cellular growth, which may provide an interesting tool for tumor prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:22027017

  17. T2* relaxation times of intraductal murine mammary cancer, invasive mammary cancer, and normal mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Elizabeth; Fan, Xiaobing; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Markiewicz, Erica J.; Vosicky, James; Newstead, Gillian M.; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Krausz, Thomas; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of T2* to be a diagnostic indicator of early breast cancer in a mouse model. T2* is sensitive to susceptibility effects due to local inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, e.g., caused by hemosiderin or deoxyhemoglobin. In these mouse models, unlike in patients, the characteristics of single mammary ducts containing pure intraductal cancer can be evaluated. Methods: The C3(1)SV40Tag mouse model of breast cancer (n = 11) and normal FVB/N mice (n = 6) were used to measure T2* of normal mammary gland tissue, intraepithelial neoplasia, invasive cancers, mammary lymph nodes, and muscle. MRI experiments were performed on a 9.4T animal scanner. High resolution (117 microns) axial 2D multislice gradient echo images with fat suppression were acquired first to identify inguinal mammary gland. Then a multislice multigradient echo pulse sequence with and without fat suppression were performed over the inguinal mammary gland. The modulus of a complex double exponential decay detected by the multigradient echo sequence was used to fit the absolute proton free induction decay averaged over a region of interest to determine the T2* of water and fat signals. Results: The measured T2* values of tumor and muscle are similar (∼15 ms), and almost twice that of lymph nodes (∼8 ms). There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.03) between T2* in normal mammary tissue (13.7 ± 2.9 ms) and intraductal cancers (11 ± 2.0 ms) when a fat suppression pulse was applied. Conclusions: These are the first reported T2* measurements from single mammary ducts. The results demonstrated that T2* measurements may have utility for identifying early pre-invasive cancers in mouse models. This may inspire similar research for patients using T2* for diagnostic imaging of early breast cancer. PMID:22380363

  18. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  19. Lack of effect of metformin on mammary carcinogenesis in nondiabetic rat and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew D; Grubbs, Clinton J; Bode, Ann M; Reid, Joel M; McGovern, Renee; Bernard, Philip S; Stijleman, Inge J; Green, Jeffrey E; Bennett, Christina; Juliana, M Margaret; Moeinpour, Fariba; Steele, Vernon E; Lubet, Ronald A

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetics receiving the biguanide metformin, as compared with sulfonylureas or insulin, have a lower incidence of breast cancer. Metformin increases levels of activated AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and decreases circulating IGF-1; encouraging its potential use in both cancer prevention and therapeutic settings. In anticipation of clinical trials in nondiabetic women, the efficacy of metformin in nondiabetic rat and mouse mammary cancer models was evaluated. Metformin was administered by gavage or in the diet, at a human equivalent dose, in standard mammary cancer models: (i) methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) mammary cancers in rats, and (ii) MMTV-Neu/p53KO ER(-) (estrogen receptor-negative) mammary cancers in mice. In the MNU rat model, metformin dosing (150 or 50 mg/kg BW/d, by gavage) was ineffective in decreasing mammary cancer multiplicity, latency, or weight. Pharmacokinetic studies of metformin (150 mg/kg BW/d, by gavage) yielded plasma levels (Cmax and AUC) higher than humans taking 1.5 g/d. In rats bearing small palpable mammary cancers, short-term metformin (150 mg/kg BW/d) treatment increased levels of phospho-AMPK and phospho-p53 (Ser20), but failed to reduce Ki67 labeling or expression of proliferation-related genes. In the mouse model, dietary metformin (1,500 mg/kg diet) did not alter final cancer incidence, multiplicity, or weight. Metformin did not prevent mammary carcinogenesis in two mammary cancer models, raising questions about metformin efficacy in breast cancer in nondiabetic populations. PMID:25681088

  20. Relationship between histology, development and tumorigenesis of mammary gland in female rat.

    PubMed

    Líška, Ján; Brtko, Július; Dubovický, Michal; Macejová, Dana; Kissová, Viktória; Polák, Štefan; Ujházy, Eduard

    2016-02-14

    The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that undergoes structural and functional changes associated with growth, reproduction, and post-menopausal regression. The postnatal transformations of the epithelium and stromal cells of the mammary gland may contribute to its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. The increased cancer incidence in mammary glands of humans and similarly of rodents in association with their development is believed to be partly explained by proliferative activity together with lesser degree of differentiation, but it is not completely understood how the virgin gland retains its higher susceptibility to carcinogenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer. An early first full-term pregnancy may have a protective effect. Rodent models are useful for investigating potential breast carcinogens. The purpose of this review is to help recognizing histological appearance of the epithelium and the stroma of the normal mammary gland in rats, and throughout its development in relation to tumorigenic potential. PMID:26424555

  1. Obesity decreases serum selenium levels in DMBA-induced mammary tumor using Obese Zucker Rat Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we reported that obese Zucker rats had increased susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors compared to lean Zucker rats. Several studies suggest that lower serum selenium may play an important role in increasing the risk of several types of cancers (e.g, colon, breast and prostate canc...

  2. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis Reveals Abnormal Fatty Acid Composition in Tumor Micro- and Macroenvironments in Human Breast and Rat Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, Sixian; Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids play essential roles in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. To facilitate their avid growth and proliferation, cancer cells not only alter the fatty acid synthesis and metabolism intracellularly and extracellularly, but also in the macroenvironment via direct or indirect pathways. We report here, using Raman micro-spectroscopy, that an increase in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was identified in both cancerous and normal appearing breast tissue obtained from breast cancer patients and tumor-bearing rats. By minimizing confounding effects from mixed chemicals and optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of Raman spectra, we observed a large-scale transition from monounsaturated fatty acids to PUFAs in the tumor while only a small subset of fatty acids transitioned to PUFAs in the tumor micro- and macroenvironment. These data have important implications for further clarifying the macroenvironmental effect of cancer progression and provide new potential approaches for characterizing the tumor micro- and macroenvironment of breast cancer in both pre-clinical animal studies and clinical applications. PMID:27596041

  3. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis Reveals Abnormal Fatty Acid Composition in Tumor Micro- and Macroenvironments in Human Breast and Rat Mammary Cancer.

    PubMed

    You, Sixian; Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Chaney, Eric J; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids play essential roles in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. To facilitate their avid growth and proliferation, cancer cells not only alter the fatty acid synthesis and metabolism intracellularly and extracellularly, but also in the macroenvironment via direct or indirect pathways. We report here, using Raman micro-spectroscopy, that an increase in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was identified in both cancerous and normal appearing breast tissue obtained from breast cancer patients and tumor-bearing rats. By minimizing confounding effects from mixed chemicals and optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of Raman spectra, we observed a large-scale transition from monounsaturated fatty acids to PUFAs in the tumor while only a small subset of fatty acids transitioned to PUFAs in the tumor micro- and macroenvironment. These data have important implications for further clarifying the macroenvironmental effect of cancer progression and provide new potential approaches for characterizing the tumor micro- and macroenvironment of breast cancer in both pre-clinical animal studies and clinical applications. PMID:27596041

  4. A Cytogenetic Footprint for Mammary Carcinomas Induced by PhIP in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T

    2001-04-01

    PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine), a mutagen/carcinogen belonging to the class of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) found in cooked meats, is a mammary gland carcinogen in rats and has been implicated in the etiology of certain human cancers including breast cancer. To gain insight into the genomic alterations associated with PhIP-induced mammary gland carcinogenesis, we used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to examine chromosomal abnormalities in rat mammary carcinomas induced by PhIP, and for comparison, by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), a potent experimental mammary carcinogen. There was a consistent and characteristic pattern of chromosome-region loss in PhIP-induced carcinomas that clearly distinguished them from carcinomas induced by DMBA.

  5. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  6. Synthetic progestins differentially promote or prevent DMBA-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Benakanakere, Indira; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Carroll, Candace E.; Hyder, Salman M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent clinical trials demonstrate that combined oral dosing with estrogen and progestin increases the incidence of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Similarly, in a rat model system of mammary carcinogenesis, the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) decreases latency and increases incidence of DMBA-induced mammary tumors [Clin Can Res (2006) 12:4062]. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of four clinically-relevant progestins, MPA, norgestrel (N-EL), norethindrone (N-ONE), and megestrol acetate (MGA), on DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat. The experimental protocol involved implantation of 60-day release progestin pellets four weeks after rats were treated with DMBA. In contrast to the effect of MPA, N-ONE and N-EL, but not MGA, blocked DMBA-dependent carcinogenesis, and a dose-dependent effect on tumor growth was demonstrated for N-EL; MGA did not alter tumor growth. Histopathological studies demonstrated extensive hyperplastic lesions in mammary tissue of progestin-treated animals. Furthermore, following treatment with N-EL or N-ONE, immunohistochemical staining for VEGF in hyperplastic mammary tissue was lower than in animals treated with DMBA plus MPA or DMBA alone. Expression of VEGFR-1, ERα and PR was also lower in hyperplastic mammary tissue in N-EL, N-ONE and MGA treated animals. Interestingly, N-EL stimulated progression of existing mammary tumors in DMBA/MPA treated rats, suggesting stage-specific effects of N-EL in this model. Because N-EL and N-ONE prevent tumor growth in the early stages of DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats, these progestins may have potential as chemopreventive agents in women with no history of breast disease or family history of breast cancer. PMID:20699413

  7. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  8. The rat ErbB2 tyrosine kinase receptor produced in plants is immunogenic in mice and confers protective immunity against ErbB2(+) mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Matić, Slavica; Quaglino, Elena; Arata, Lucia; Riccardo, Federica; Pegoraro, Mattia; Vallino, Marta; Cavallo, Federica; Noris, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    The rat ErbB2 (rErbB2) protein is a 185-kDa glycoprotein belonging to the epidermal growth factor-related proteins (ErbB) of receptor tyrosine kinases. Overexpression and mutations of ErbB proteins lead to several malignancies including breast, lung, pancreatic, bladder and ovary carcinomas. ErbB2 is immunogenic and is an ideal candidate for cancer immunotherapy. We investigated the possibility of expressing the extracellular (EC) domain of rErbB2 (653 amino acids, aa) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, testing the influence of the 23 aa transmembrane (TM) sequence on protein accumulation. Synthetic variants of the rErbB2 gene portion encoding the EC domain, optimized with a human codon usage and either linked to the full TM domain (rErbB2_TM, 676 aa), to a portion of it (rErbB2-pTM, 662 aa), or deprived of it (rErbB2_noTM, 653 aa) were cloned in the pEAQ-HT expression vector as 6X His tag fusions. All rErbB2 variants (72-74.5 kDa) were transiently expressed, but the TM was detrimental for rErbB2 EC accumulation. rERbB2_noTM was the most expressed protein; it was solubilized and purified with Nickel affinity resin. When crude soluble extracts expressing rErbB2_noTM were administered to BALB/c mice, specific rErbB2 immune responses were triggered. A potent antitumour activity was induced when vaccinated mice were challenged with syngeneic transplantable ErbB2(+) mammary carcinoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of expression of rErbB2 in plants and of its efficacy in inducing a protective antitumour immune response, opening interesting perspectives for further immunological testing. PMID:25865255

  9. Reduction in mammary tumorigenesis in the rat by cabbage and cabbage residue.

    PubMed

    Bresnick, E; Birt, D F; Wolterman, K; Wheeler, M; Markin, R S

    1990-07-01

    Mammary cancer was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by a single injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and rats were randomized to control fat (5%) and high fat (24.6%) diets. In addition, dried cabbage (5 and 10%) and collards (5%) were included in the diets of some animals. No statistically significant differences were observed in food consumption, body wt gain and caloric intake between the MNU-treated and control groups in the rats fed the low-fat diet. However, the groups fed the high-fat diet consumed more than the rats maintained on the control diet. The rats on the control fat diet containing cabbage exhibited a significantly lower incidence of mammary cancer than rats that were fed the control-fat diet without cabbage. This effect was not observed in comparable rats on the high-fat diet. The inhibitory effect on mammary tumorigenesis was demonstrated using a residue obtained from cabbage by exhaustive extraction with methanol, methylene chloride and petroleum ether. These studies reinforce the efficacy of cabbage as a 'suppressor' of cancer in experimental model systems under control-fat dietary conditions. PMID:2372873

  10. Paternal selenium deficiency but not supplementation during preconception alters mammary gland development and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Guido, Luiza N; Fontelles, Camile C; Rosim, Mariana P; Pires, Vanessa C; Cozzolino, Silvia M F; Castro, Inar A; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Barbisan, Luis F; Ong, Thomas P

    2016-10-15

    Breast cancer is a global public health problem and accumulating evidence indicates early-life exposures as relevant factors in the disease risk determination. Recent studies have shown that paternal nutrition can influence offspring health including breast cancer risk. Selenium is a micronutrient with essential role in central aspects of embryogenesis, male fertility and cancer and that has been extensively studied as a chemopreventive agent in several breast cancer experimental models. Thus, we designed an animal study to evaluate whether paternal selenium deficiency or supplementation during preconception could affect the female offspring mammary gland development and breast cancer susceptibility. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN93-G diet containing 0.15 ppm (control diet), 0.05 ppm (deficient diet) or 1 ppm (supplemented diet) of selenium for 9 weeks and mated with control female rats. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in their female offspring. Paternal selenium deficiency increased the number of terminal end buds, epithelial elongation and cell proliferation in the mammary gland of the female rat offspring and these effects were associated with higher susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors (increased incidence and higher grade tumors). On the other hand, paternal selenium supplementation did not influence any of these parameters. These results highlight the importance of father's nutrition including selenium status as a relevant factor affecting daughter's breast cancer risk and paternal preconception as a potential developmental stage to start disease preventive strategies. PMID:27270969

  11. Digital dermatoglyphics in mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Bierman, H R; Faith, M R; Stewart, M E

    1988-01-01

    Fingerprints from 200 women with histologically proven breast cancer (case group) were compared to fingerprints from 138 women with no history of any malignant disease (control group). Of the patterns analyzed, four were significantly associated with breast cancer: accidentals, transitionals, angled ulnar loops, and horizontal ulnar loops. A fifth print, the angled radial loop, was found to be of borderline importance as an independent predictor of breast cancer. Of 200 patients in the case group, 27 had one or more accidental prints, 58 had one or more transitionals, 34 had one or more horizontal ulnar loops, and 93 had one or more angled ulnar loop patterns. In 138 control subjects there were 2 with accidental patterns, 21 with one or more transitionals, 6 with horizontal ulnar loops, and 16 with one or more angled ulnar loops. In addition, there appeared to be a gradient of risk; a woman with one type of suspicious print is at higher risk of breast cancer than a woman with none, and two suspicious prints indicate a higher risk than does one. If these findings are confirmed, the prints described will represent a noninvasive anatomical marker of breast cancer risk. PMID:3365570

  12. Expression Patterns of Circular RNAs from Primary Kinase Transcripts in the Mammary Glands of Lactating Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, ChunLei; Wu, Hui; Wang, YanHong; Zhao, YuLong; Fang, XingTang; Chen, CaiFa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Circular RNAs (circRNAs), a novel class of RNAs, perform important functions in biological processes. However, the role of circRNAs in the mammary gland remains unknown. The present study is aimed at identifying and characterizing the circRNAs expressed in the mammary gland of lactating rats. Methods Deep sequencing of RNase R-enriched rat lactating mammary gland samples was performed and circRNAs were predicted using a previously reported computational pipeline. Gene ontology terms of circRNA-producing genes were also analyzed. Results A total of 6,824 and 4,523 circRNAs were identified from rat mammary glands at two different lactation stages. Numerous circRNAs were specifically expressed at different lactation stages, and only 1,314 circRNAs were detected at both lactation stages. The majority of the candidate circRNAs map to noncoding intronic and intergenic regions. The results demonstrate a circular preference or specificity of some genes. DAVID analysis revealed an enrichment of protein kinases and related proteins among the set of genes encoding circRNAs. Interestingly, four protein-coding genes (Rev3l, IGSF11, MAML2, and LPP) that also transcribe high levels of circRNAs have been reported to be involved in cancer. Conclusion Our findings provide the basis for comparison between breast cancer profiles and for selecting representative circRNA candidates for future functional characterization in breast development and breast cancer. PMID:26472973

  13. Interaction of dimethylbenzanthracene and diethylstilbestrol on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; McKnight, B.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1980-06-01

    It has been reported that x-irradiation and diethylstilbestrol (DES) act synergistically on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats. The physical carcinogen, x-irradiation, was replaced by a chemical carcinogen, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), and their interaction was studied in this system. Thirty-three female ACI rats were given 13.3 mg of DMBA per 100 grams of body weight. A total of 10 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 8 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 2 in a single rat, over a 266-day study period. Twenty-nine rats were implanted with a cholesterol pellet containing 5 mg of DES, and a total of 47 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 5 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 42 in 5 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. Twenty-four rats were given a combined treatment of both compounds, DES 2 days before DMBA, and a total of 126 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 2 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 124 in 18 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. The interaction between DMBA and DES was interpreted to be synergistic in regard to the proportion of rats with one or more mammary adenocarcinomas, and the median times of appearance of both first and second mammary adenocarcinomas. These interactions between DMBA and DES resemble the previously reported synergistic interactions between radiation and DES on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats.

  14. Prognostic factors in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W; Hart, A A

    1976-04-01

    From a follow-up study of dogs surgically treated for mammary cancer, ten characteristics were analyzed statistically with special reference to their association with prognosis (expressed as survival for 2 years). The interrelations among five of the characteristics were also tested. The histologic type (descending range in malignancy: sarcomas greater than simple carcinomas greater than complex carcinomas), mode of growth (highly infiltrating greater than moderately infiltrating greater than expansive), clinical stage of complex carcinomas (large tumors and/or tumors involving the skin or underlying tissue greater than small, well-defined tumors), and size (greater than 15 cm greater than 11-15 cm greater than 5-10 cm greater than 0-5 cm) were of definite prognostic importance. The histologic grade was of possible prognostic importance. Localization, type of surgical therapy (mastectomy, block-dissection), growth in lymph vessels, involvement of regional lymph nodes, and duration of symptoms before treatment were not important to prognosis. A comparison between the factors associated with the prognosis of canine and human mammary cancer showed many similarities. However, the involvement of regional lymph nodes, important in women, was not so in bitches. PMID:1255797

  15. Flor-Essence? Herbal Tonic Promotes Mammary Tumor Development in Sprague Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L; Montgomery, J; Steinberg, S; Kulp, K

    2004-01-28

    Background: Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer often self-administer complementary and alternative medicines to augment their conventional treatments, improve health, or prevent recurrence. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} Tonic is a complex mixture of herbal extracts used by cancer patients because of anecdotal evidence that it can treat or prevent disease. Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were given water or exposed to 3% or 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} beginning at one day of age. Mammary tumors were induced with a single oral 40 mg/kg/bw dose of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene at 50 days of age and sacrificed at 23 weeks. Rats were maintained on AIN-76A diet. Results: Control rats had palpable mammary tumor incidence of 51.0% at 19 weeks of age compared to 65.0% and 59.4% for the 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} groups respectively. Overall, no significant difference in time until first palpable tumor was detected among any of the groups. At necropsy, mammary tumor incidence was 82.5% for controls compared to 90.0% and 97.3% for rats consuming 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign}, respectively. Mean mammary tumor multiplicity ({+-}SES) for the controls was 2.8 ({+-} 0.5) and statistically different from the 3% or 6% Flor- Essence{reg_sign} groups with 5.2 ({+-} 0.7), and 4.8 ({+-} 0.6), respectively (p{<=}0.01). As expected, the majority of isolated tumors were diagnosed as adenocarcinomas. Conclusions: Flor-Essence{reg_sign} can promote mammary tumor development in the Sprague Dawley rat model. This observation is contrary to widely available anecdotal evidence as well as the desire of the consumer that this commercially available herbal tonic will suppress and/or inhibit tumor growth.

  16. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  17. Modeling mechanical interactions between cancerous mammary acini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Liphardt, Jan; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-03-01

    The rules and mechanical forces governing cell motility and interactions with the extracellular matrix of a tissue are often critical for understanding the mechanisms by which breast cancer is able to spread through the breast tissue and eventually metastasize. Ex vivo experimentation has demonstrated the the formation of long collagen fibers through collagen gels between the cancerous mammary acini responsible for milk production, providing a fiber scaffolding along which cancer cells can disorganize. We present a minimal mechanical model that serves as a potential explanation for the formation of these collagen fibers and the resultant motion. Our working hypothesis is that cancerous cells induce this fiber formation by pulling on the gel and taking advantage of the specific mechanical properties of collagen. To model this system, we employ a new Eulerian, fixed grid simulation method to model the collagen as a nonlinear viscoelastic material subject to various forces coupled with a multi-agent model to describe individual cancer cells. We find that these phenomena can be explained two simple ideas: cells pull collagen radially inwards and move towards the tension gradient of the collagen gel, while being exposed to standard adhesive and collision forces.

  18. Inhibition of radiogenic mammary carcinoma in rats by estriol or tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, H.M.; Kumar, P.F.; Peterson, C.; Rodriguez-Sierra, J.F.; Abbo, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Mammary carcinomas have been induced by 3.5 Gy whole-body gamma radiation administered at age 40 to 50 days to virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats. In 142 irradiated controls carcinoma incidence averaged 7.8% in survivors observed less than 300 days and 38.3% of those surviving longer (P less than 0.001 by t test). Mammary cancer promotion was inhibited by two methods: estriol (E3) 638 micrograms/month (2.2 microns/mo) subcutaneously for natural life span begun 2 weeks after exposure reduced cancer incidence from 76% in controls to 48% after 331 to 449 mean days observation until neoplasia was palpable (P less than 0.02 by chi-square analysis). Uterine weights were similar in control and treated groups, and were 15% to 18% greater than uteri of nonirradiated controls from other simultaneous experiments. Six monthly 638-micrograms doses of 17 alpha ethinyl estriol (EE3) reduced tumors from 88% in controls to 64% (P less than 0.05 by chi-square analysis) and delayed cancer onset (P less than 0.01-0.04 by life table analysis). Ethinyl estradiol (EE2) after 6 months' treatment similarly delayed mammary tumor development reducing incidence to 75% (NS), with a six-fold increase in nonmammary epithelial malignant tumors. Estriol administration begun between 3 days before to 5 days after radiation did not alter mammary cancer incidence in six experiments. Monthly implantation of 2.5 mg tamoxifen (4.44 microns/mo) started 2 weeks after radiation reduced mammary cancer incidence from 83% to 14% after 307 to 314 days' observation (P less than 0.001 by chi-square analysis). Treated rats had atrophic ovaries and uteri consistent with blockade of endogenous estradiol activity.

  19. Mammary carcinogenesis in rats: basic facts and recent results in Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, s.

    1982-01-01

    Some research results from experiments investigating neutron-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats are presented. The additive effects of neutrons and 3-methylcholanthrene on mammary adenocarcinoma were determined. Synergism between diethylstilbestrol and neutrons was likewise studied. Differences in mammary neoplastic response between strains of laboratory rats was also investigated. (ACR)

  20. Early Effects of Blueberry and Concord Grape Intake on Rat Mammary Gland Development Suggest Potential Protective Mechanisms for Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) and Concord grapes (CG) are rich in anthocyanins and other polyphenols, which may be linked to reduced incidence of chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis in animal models. We evaluated the early effects of dietary exposure to BB and CG on mammary glands of female rat offspring. ...

  1. Detection of Expressional Changes Induced by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Developing Rat Mammary Gland via Exploratory Pathways Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beinder, Lea; Faehrmann, Nina; Wachtveitl, Rainer; Winterfeld, Ilona; Hartner, Andrea; Menendez-Castro, Carlos; Rauh, Manfred; Ruebner, Matthias; Huebner, Hanna; Noegel, Stephanie C.; Doerr, Helmuth G.; Rascher, Wolfgang; Fahlbusch, Fabian B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is thought to lead to fetal programming that in turn contributes to developmental changes of many organs postnatally. There is evidence that IUGR is a risk factor for the development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease later in life. A higher incidence of breast cancer was also observed after IUGR. This could be due to changes in mammary gland developmental pathways. We sought to characterise IUGR-induced alterations of the complex pathways of mammary development at the level of the transcriptome in a rat model of IUGR, using pathways analysis bioinformatics. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed the mammary glands of Wistar rats with IUGR induced by maternal low protein (LP) diet at the beginning (d21) and the end (d28) of pubertal ductal morphogenesis. Mammary glands of the LP group were smaller in size at d28, however did not show morphologic changes. We identified multiple differentially expressed genes in the mammary gland using Agilent SurePrint arrays at d21 and d28. In silico analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis. In mammary gland tissue of LP rats at d21 of life a prominent upregulation of WT1 and CDKN1A (p21) expression was observed. Differentially regulated genes were associated with the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-1/-2 pathway. Western Blot analysis showed reduced levels of phosphorylated ERK-1/-2 in the mammary glands of the LP group at d21. To identify possible changes in circulating steroid levels, serum LC-Tandem mass-spectrometry was performed. LP rats showed higher serum progesterone levels and an increased corticosterone/dehydrocorticosterone-ratio at d28. Conclusions/Significance Our data obtained from gene array analysis support the hypothesis that IUGR influences pubertal development of the rat mammary gland. We identified prominent differential regulation of genes and pathways for factors regulating cell cycle and growth. Moreover, we detected new

  2. Early soy exposure via maternal diet regulates rat mammary epithelial differentiation by paracrine signaling from stromal adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Shankar, Kartik; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2009-05-01

    Diet-mediated changes in transcriptional programs that promote the early differentiation of the mammary gland may lead to reduced breast cancer risk. The disparity in adult breast cancer incidence between Asian women and Western counterparts is attributed partly to high soy food intake. Here, we conducted genome-wide profiling of mammary tissues of weanling rats exposed to soy protein isolate (SPI) or control casein (CAS) via maternal diet to evaluate the contribution of early exposure on mammary gene expression. Of the identified 18 up- and 39 downregulated genes with SPI relative to CAS, a subset was associated with lipid metabolic pathways, consistent with reduced mammary adipocyte size and suggesting stromal adipocyte-specific genomic changes. Female offspring of rats fed SPI tended to have fewer terminal end buds (P = 0.06) and had significantly lower body weight and abdominal fat mass. To demonstrate the functional consequence of SPI-mediated adipocyte metabolic changes on neighboring mammary epithelium, the expression of in vivo regulated genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with soy isoflavone genistein and effects of the resultant conditioned medium (CM) on the differentiation of HC11 mammary epithelial cells were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and/or Western immunoblots. In differentiated 3T3-L1, genistein decreased fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase and increased hydroxysteroid 11-beta dehydrogenase 1 expression. CM from genistein-treated adipocytes had higher adiponectin levels and augmented prolactin-induced, glucocorticoid-regulated beta-casein levels. These findings suggest that soy-associated components, by targeting mammary adipocytes, alter paracrine signaling to enhance mammary epithelial differentiation, with important implications for the prevention of breast cancer associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:19321580

  3. Effect of bisphenol A on morphology, apoptosis and proliferation in the resting mammary gland of the adult albino rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa A A; Elbakry, Reda H; Bayomy, Naglaa A

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic oestrogen that is extensively used in a wide range of daily used plastic products. This makes it one of the environmental chemicals that may have impact on human health. Due to its oestrogenic effect, BPA might affect the mammary gland. This study aimed to investigate the influence of BPA on the histological structure of the mammary gland of the adult female albino rat and its effect on epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis status, in addition to its possible modulating effect on estrogen receptor expression. Thirty female adult albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups. The rats in the experimental group were gavaged with 5 mg/kg BPA daily for 8 weeks. The mammary glands were dissected and processed for histological and immunohistochemical stains for Ki-67, activated caspase-3 and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α). BPA induced an increase in the number and size of the acini and ducts in the mammary gland of treated rats with hyperplasia of their lining epithelial cells. The collagen fibre content was significantly increased in the connective tissue stroma separating the ducts. Immunohistochemical results showed a significant increase in Ki-67 and caspase-3, but a non-significant increase in ER-α expression. Bisphenol A induced structural changes and affected the proliferation rate of mammary glands, so it might be one of the predisposing factors for breast cancer. PMID:26877094

  4. The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism in pregnant rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, K.; Maple, R.; Vyas, C.; Munaim, S.; Darling, A.; Casey, T.; Alberts, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight on mammary metabolism of 10 pregnant rats was measured on Day 20 of pregnancy and after parturition. Rats were flown on the space shuttle from Day 11 through Day 20 of pregnancy. After their return to earth, glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide increased 43% (P < 0.05), and incorporation into fatty acids increased 300% (P < 0.005) compared to controls. It is unclear whether the enhanced glucose use is due to spaceflight or a response to landing. Casein mRNA and gross histology were not altered at Day 20 of pregnancy. Six rats gave birth (on Day 22 to 23 of pregnancy) and mammary metabolic activity was measured immediately postpartum. The earlier effects of spaceflight were no longer apparent. There was also no difference in expression of beta-casein mRNA. It is clear from these studies that spaceflight does not impair the normal development of the mammary gland, its ability to use glucose, nor the ability to express mRNA for a major milk protein.

  5. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  6. MNU-induced rat mammary carcinomas: immunohistology and estrogen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Soares-Maia, R; Faustino-Rocha, A; Teixeira-Guedes, C; Pinho-Oliveira, J; Talhada, D; Rema, A; Faria, F; Ginja, M; Ferreira, R; da Costa, R; Oliveira, Paula A; Lopes, C

    2013-01-01

    Environmental exposure to nitrosamines is associated with the development of cancer in a variety of target organs. One such carcinogen, N-methyl-N-nitrosurea (MNU), has long been used to induce mammary tumors in rats, which provide a useful model to study mammary carcinogenesis. However, some poorly clarified issues remain, such as the lack of a clear description of morphological patterns of tumors and the distribution and role of estrogen receptors (ERs) during tumor progression, as tumors overexpressing ERs show a paradoxical tendency to recur after ovariectomy. Mammary carcinomas were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats using MNU. The tumors were studied histologically and distribution of smooth muscle actin and ERs was studied immunohistochemically. All tumors presented both an epithelial and a myoepithelial component, demonstrated by immunohistochemical detection of smooth muscle actin. Tumors showed distinct histological patterns: well-differentiated papillary and adenoid areas and poorly differentiated solid and spindle-cell foci. Overexpression of ERs (>75% of labelled cells vs. 0-75% in control tissue) occurred in papillary and adenoid areas but not in solid and spindle-cell foci. Poorly differentiated tumor foci are likely to represent a more advanced, estrogen-independent phase in cancer progression and constitute the basis for tumor recurrence after ovariectomy. PMID:24099429

  7. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Adelina; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin) in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:22973534

  8. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  9. Naturally-occurring estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters, but not estradiol-17{beta}, preferentially induce mammary tumorigenesis in female rats: Implications for an important role in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Laura H.; Yu Jina; Xu Xiaomeng; Lee, Anthony J.; Zhu Baoting

    2008-06-15

    Because mammary glands are surrounded by adipose tissues, we hypothesize that the ultra-lipophilic endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters may have preferential hormonal and carcinogenic effects in mammary tissues compared to other target organs (such as the uterus and pituitary). This hypothesis is tested in the present study. We found that all 46 rats implanted with an estradiol-17{beta} pellet developed large pituitary tumors (average weight = 251 {+-}103 mg) and had to be terminated early, but only 48% of them developed mammary tumors. In addition, approximately one-fourth of them developed a huge uterus. In the 26 animals implanted with a mixture containing estradiol-17{beta}-stearate and estradiol-17{beta}-palmitate (two representative estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters) or in the 29 animals implanted with estradiol-17{beta}-stearate alone (in the same molar dose as estradiol-17{beta}), 73% and 79%, respectively, of them developed mammary tumors, whereas only 3 or 2 animals, respectively, had to be terminated early due to the presence of a large pituitary tumor. Both tumorous and normal mammary tissues contained much higher levels of estrogen esterase than other tissues, which catalyzes the releases of bioactive estrogens from their fatty acid esters. In conclusion, while estradiol-17{beta} is much stronger in inducing pituitary tumor (100% incidence) than mammary tumor, estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters have a higher efficacy than estradiol-17{beta} in inducing mammary tumor and yet it only has little ability to induce uterine out-growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. This study establishes the endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters as preferential inducers of mammary tumorigenesis.

  10. Bovine herpesvirus 4-based vector delivering a hybrid rat/human HER-2 oncoantigen efficiently protects mice from autochthonous Her-2+ mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacca, Sarah; Rolih, Valeria; Quaglino, Elena; Franceschi, Valentina; Tebaldi, Giulia; Bolli, Elisabetta; Rosamilia, Alfonso; Ottonello, Simone; Cavallo, Federica; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) oncogene is a major target for the immunotherapy of breast cancer. Following up to the therapeutic success achieved with Her-2-targeting monoclonal antibodies, immune-prophylactic approaches directed against Her-2 have also been investigated taking into account, and trying to overcome, Her-2 self-tolerance. Perhaps due to safety (and efficacy) concerns, the least explored anti-Her-2 active immunization strategy so far has been the one relying on viral-vectored vaccine formulations. Taking advantage of the favorable properties of bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) in terms of safety and ease of manipulation as well as its previously documented ability to transduce and confer immunogenicity to heterologous antigens, we tested the ability of different recombinant HER-2-BoHV-4 immunogens to 8break tolerance and elicit a protective, anti-mammary tumor antibody response in HER-2 transgenic BALB-neuT mice. All the tested constructs expressed the HER-2 transgenes at high levels and elicited significant cellular immune responses in BALB/c mice upon administration via either DNA vaccination or viral infection. In BALB-neuT mice, instead, only the viral construct expressing the membrane-bound chimeric form of Her-2 protein (BoHV-4-RHuT-gD) elicited a humoral immune response that was more intense and earlier-appearing than that induced by DNA vaccination. In keeping with this observation, two administrations of BoHV-4-RHuT-gD effectively protected BALB-neuT mice from tumor formation, with 50% of vaccinated animals tumor-free after 30 weeks from immunization compared to 100% of animals exhibiting at least one palpable tumor in the case of animals vaccinated with the other BoHV-4-HER-2 constructs. PMID:27141335

  11. Lactation stage-dependent expression of transporters in rat whole mammary gland and primary mammary epithelial organoids.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Samuel E; Alcorn, Jane

    2010-04-01

    Since solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play pivotal roles in the transport of both nutrients and drugs into breast milk, drug-nutrient transport interactions at the lactating mammary gland are possible. Our purpose was to characterize lactation stage-dependent changes in transporter expression in rat mammary gland and isolated mammary epithelial organoids (MEO) to provide additional insight for the safe use of maternal medications during breastfeeding. We used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess the temporal expression patterns of SLC and ABC transporters in rat mammary gland and isolated MEO at different stages of lactation. In whole mammary gland five distinct patterns of expression emerged relative to late gestation: (i) decreasing throughout lactation (Mdr1a, Mdr1b, Mrp1, Octn2, Ent2, Ent3, Ncbt2, Mtx1); (ii) prominent increase in early lactation, which may remain elevated or decline with advancing lactation (Octn1, Cnt2, Cnt3, Ent1, Pept1, Pept2); (iii) constant but decreasing later in lactation (Octn3, Dmt1); (iv) increasing until mid-to-late lactation (Oct1, Cnt1); and (v) prominent increase late in lactation (Ncbt1). In isolated MEO (an enriched source of mammary epithelial cells) major differences in expression patterns were noted for Octn3, Ncbt1, and Mtx1, but otherwise were reasonably similar with the whole mammary gland. In conclusion our study augments existing data on transporter expression in the lactating mammary gland. These data should facilitate investigations into lactation-stage dependent changes in drug or nutrient milk-to-serum concentration ratios, the potential for drug- or disease-transporter interactions, and mechanistic studies of transporter function in the lactating mammary gland. PMID:19702690

  12. A Rat Model to Study the Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Radiation-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Akimoto, Kenta; Furukawa, Yuki; Fukushi, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the relationship between radiation-induced breast cancer and obesity is needed for appropriate risk management and to prevent the development of a secondary cancer in patients who have been treated with radiation. Our goal was to develop an animal model to study the relationship by combining two existing Sprague-Dawley rat models of radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Female rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks and categorized as obesity prone or obesity resistant based on their body weight at 7 weeks of age, at which time the rats were irradiated with 4 Gy. Control rats were fed a standard diet and irradiated at the same time and in the same manner. All rats were maintained on their initial diets and assessed for palpable mammary cancers once a week for the next 30 weeks. The obesity-prone rats were heavier than those in the other groups. The obesity-prone rats were also younger than the other animals at the first detection of mammary carcinomas and their carcinoma weights were greater. A tendency toward higher insulin and leptin blood levels were observed in the obesity-prone rats compared to the other two groups. Blood angiotensin II levels were elevated in the obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Genes related to translation and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the carcinomas of obesity-prone rats. Expression profiles from human breast cancers were used to validate this animal model. As angiotensin is potentially an important factor in obesity-related morbidities and breast cancer, a second set of rats was fed in a similar manner, irradiated and then treated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, losartan and candesartan. Neither blocker altered mammary carcinogenesis; analyses of losartan-treated animals indicated that expression of renin in the renal cortex and of Agtr1a (angiotensin II receptor, type 1) in cancer tissue was significantly upregulated, suggesting the presence of

  13. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  14. Evaluation of molecular markers in a rat model of mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vinothini, G; Murugan, R Senthil; Nagini, S

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the molecular markers involved in breast tumorigenesis in a rat model that mimics many essential elements of human breast cancer. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 were given a single dose of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) (20 mg/rat) dissolved in 1 ml of sesame oil by intragastric intubation. Group 2 animals received basal diet and served as control. We analyzed DMBA-induced changes in the expression of CYP isoforms (CYP1A1 and 1B1) involved in DMBA metabolism, markers of oxidative stress (4HNE, HEL, and 8-OHdG), cell survival and proliferation (PCNA, NF-kappaB-p50, NF-kappaB-p65, GST-P, and p53), apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspases, Apaf-1, cytochrome C, and Fas), invasion (uPA, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-2, and RECK), and angiogenesis (VEGF, VEGF-R1, HIF-1alpha, and PLGF) by immunohistochemical localization, Western blot, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The present study demonstrates increased carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress, cell proliferation, together with apoptosis evasion, invasion, metastasis, and neovascularization that may confer a selective growth advantage to DMBA-induced mammary tumors. Aberrant expression of multiple molecules in key signaling pathways in Sprague-Dawley rat mammary tumors renders this model as an important tool for monitoring carcinogenic progression and chemointervention. PMID:19725228

  15. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27OHC and E2 in the absence or presence of ICI was conducted. In ER-positive mammary tumor cells, we detected the blocking of 27OHC proliferation-stimulatory activity by simvastatin, as well as the inhibition of E2-stimulated proliferation by an α-fetoprotein-derived cyclic nonapeptide. The effects reported herein may be extrapolated to infiltrating mammary cancer, where the activity of local macrophages may stimulate tumor growth. We suggest that increased breast cancer growth in obese patients may be related to increased 27OHC circulatory levels. PMID:22993572

  16. Effects of Ginkgo biloba on chemically-induced mammary tumors in rats receiving tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) is used extensively by breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with Tamoxifen (TAM). Thus, the present study investigated the effects of GbE in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats bearing chemically-induced mammary tumors and receiving TAM. Methods Animals bearing mammary tumors (≥1 cm in diameter) were divided into four groups: TAM [10 mg/kg, intragastrically (i.g.)], TAM plus GbE [50 and 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] or an untreated control group. After 4 weeks, the therapeutic efficacy of the different treatments was evaluated by measuring the tumor volume (cm3) and the proportions of each tumor that were alive, necrotic or degenerative (mm2). In addition, labeling indexes (LI%) were calculated for cell proliferation (PCNA LI%) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3 LI%), expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and p63 biomarkers. Results Overall, the tumor volume and the PCNA LI% within live tumor areas were reduced by 83% and 99%, respectively, in all TAM-treated groups when compared to the untreated control group. GbE treatment (100 mg/kg) reduced the proportions of live (24.8%) and necrotic areas (2.9%) (p = 0.046 and p = 0.038, respectively) and significantly increased the proportion of degenerative areas (72.9%) (p = 0.004) in mammary tumors when compared to the group treated only with TAM. The expression of ER-α, p63 and cleaved caspase-3 in live tumor tissues was not modified by GbE treatment. Conclusions Co-treatment with 100 mg/kg GbE presented a slightly beneficial effect on the therapeutic efficacy of TAM in female SD rats bearing mammary tumors. PMID:23634930

  17. Chemoprevention of heterocyclic amine-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masao; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Shibutani, Makoto; Imai, Toshio; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2002-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is one of the most prevalent carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in the environment, targeting the colon, prostate, pancreas, and mammary gland in rodents. Chemopreventive effects of synthetic and naturally occurring compounds on PhIP-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis were investigated in a series of experiments. In a PhIP feeding model, groups of 20-21 female F344 rats each, were treated with 0.02% PhIP alone or PhIP plus 0.5% 1-O-hexyl-2,3,5-trimethylhydroquinone (HTHQ), 1% green tea catechins, 1% alpha-tocopherol, 0.1% ellagic acid, or 1% chlorophyllin, each in the diet, or 0.1% caffeine in drinking water for 52 weeks. To assess the mechanism of HTHQ and caffeine inhibition of PhIP-induced carcinogenesis, effects of these compound on the in vitro metabolic activation of PhIP were examined in the presence of S9 mix. In the next series of experiments, the PhIP intragastric dose model was applied to allow separate investigation of the effects of chemicals during the initiation and postinitiation periods. In these experiments, female Sprague-Dawley rats were given eight intragastric doses of 100 mg/kg body weight during the first 4-8 weeks for initiation. Either during initiation or after initiation, or only after initiation, animals were treated with either corn or perilla oil at doses of 5 and 20%, conjugated fatty acid derived from safflower oil (CFA-S) or perilla oil (CFA-P) at a dose of 1%, arctiin at doses of 0.02 and 0.2% in the diet, or sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) at a dose of 0.2% in drinking water. In the PhIP feeding model, administration of PhIP alone for 52 weeks induced adenocarcinomas in 40% of rats, but the incidence was remarkably reduced to 5% by the simultaneous treatment with 0.5% HTHQ, a strong lipophilic phenolic antioxidant, or to 10% by 0.1% caffeine. Administration of 1% chlorophyllin exerted similar, albeit weaker, effects. alpha-Tocopherol at a dose of 0.5% only reduced the multiplicity of

  18. Influence of chronic prolactin suppression during puberty on the development of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors (41163). [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, L.A.

    1981-06-01

    In order to assess the effect of early prolactin suppression on the subsequent development of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary cancers, the dopamine agonist, CB-154, was chronically administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats from Day 35 to Day 50 of age. DMBA was then administered and tumor development assessed over a 25-week period. It was found that animals treated with CB-154 exhibited decreased tumor incidence, a longer latent period, and fewer tumors/animal, when compared to vehicle controls. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the sensitivity of the mammary gland to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) carcinogenesis is determined by the level of differentiation of the gland at the time of carcinogen administration. Accordingly, perturbations in prolactin secretion patterns, early in life, may accelerate or retard the differentiation of the mammary gland thereby rendering it less susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of PAH.

  19. Studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase from rat mammary gland and mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, P M; Feltman, D S; Ahmad, F

    1982-01-01

    The activities of two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, were determined in two transplantable mammary adenocarcinomas (13762 and R3230AC) carried by non-pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats, and in mammary tissue of control animals (non-tumour-carrying) of comparable physiological states. During mammary-gland differentiation of control or tumour-carrying animals, the activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in the lactating gland increased by about 40--50-fold over the values found in non-pregnant animals. On the other hand, in tumours carried by lactating dams there were only modest increases (1.5--2-fold) in acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase compared with the neoplasms carried by non-pregnant animals. On the basis of the Km values for different substrates and immunodiffusion and immunotitration data, the fatty acid synthase of neoplastic tissues appeared to be indistinguishable from the control mammary-gland enzyme. However, a comparison of the immunotitration and immunodiffusion experiments indicated that the mammary-gland acetyl-CoA carboxylase might differ from the enzyme present in mammary neoplasms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6130760

  20. Exposure to the Endocrine Disruptor Bisphenol A Alters Susceptibility for Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lamartiniere, Coral A.; Jenkins, Sarah; Betancourt, Angela M.; Wang, Jun; Russo, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetically made chemical used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Recent studies have shown over ninety percent of humans investigated have detectable BPA concentrations. Yet, the biggest concern for BPA is exposure during early development because BPA has been shown to bind to the estrogen receptors (ER) and cause developmental and reproductive toxicity. We have investigated the potential of perinatal BPA to alter susceptibility for chemically-induced mammary cancer in rats. We demonstrate that prepubertal exposure to low concentrations of orally administered BPA given to lactating dams resulted in a significantly decreased tumor latency and increased tumor multiplicity in the dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) model of rodent mammary carcinogenesis. Our data suggested that the mechanism of action behind this carcinogenic response was mediated through increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and centered on an up-regulation of steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) 1–3, erbB3, and increased Akt signaling in the mammary gland. Also, we demonstrate that prenatal exposure to BPA shifts the time of susceptibility from 50 days to 100 days for chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Proteomic data suggest that prenatal BPA exposure alters the expression of several proteins involved in regulating protein metabolism, signal transduction, developmental processes, and cell cycle and proliferation. Increases in ER-alpha, SRCs 1–3, Bcl-2, epidermal growth factor–receptor (EGFR), phospho-IGF-1R, phospho-c-Raf, phospho-ERKs 1/2, phospho-ErbB2 and phospho-Akt are accompanied by increase in cell proliferation. We conclude that exposure to low concentrations of BPA during the prenatal and early postnatal periods of life can predispose for chemically-induced mammary cancer. PMID:21687816

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  2. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Maternal Exercise During Pregnancy Reduces Risk of Mammary Tumorigenesis In Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo, Ignacio; Clah, Leon; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Xuanzhu; Larrick, Brienna; Blaize, Nicole; Breslin, Emily; Patel, Neal; Johnson, Diamond; Teegarden, Dorothy; Donkin, Shawn S.; Gavin, Timothy P.; Newcomer, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Emerging research indicates that modifying lifestyle factors during pregnancy may convey long-term health benefits to offspring. This study was designed to determine whether maternal exercise during pregnancy leads to reduced mammary tumorigenesis in female offspring. Pregnant rats were randomly assigned to exercised and sedentary groups, with the exercised group having free access to a running wheel and the sedentary group housed with a locked wheel during pregnancy. Female pups from exercised or sedentary dams were weaned at 21 days of age and fed a high fat diet without access to a running wheel. At 6 weeks, all pups were injected with the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). Mammary tumor development in all pups was monitored for 15 weeks. Pups from exercised dams had a substantially lower tumor incidence (42.9%) compared to pups from sedentary dams (100%). Neither tumor latency nor histological grade differed between the two groups. These data are the first to demonstrate that exercise during pregnancy potentiates reduced tumorigenesis in offspring. This study provides an important foundation towards developing more effective modes of behavior modification for cancer prevention. PMID:24950432

  4. Maternal exercise during pregnancy reduces risk of mammary tumorigenesis in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Ignacio G; Clah, Leon; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Xuanzhu; Larrick, Brienna; Blaize, Nicole; Breslin, Emily; Patel, Neal; Johnson, Diamond; Teegarden, Dorothy; Donkin, Shawn S; Gavin, Timothy P; Newcomer, Sean

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Emerging research indicates that modifying lifestyle factors during pregnancy may convey long-term health benefits to offspring. This study was designed to determine whether maternal exercise during pregnancy leads to reduced mammary tumorigenesis in female offspring. Pregnant rats were randomly assigned to exercised and sedentary groups, with the exercised group having free access to a running wheel and the sedentary group housed with a locked wheel during pregnancy. Female pups from exercised or sedentary dams were weaned at 21 days of age and fed a high fat diet without access to a running wheel. At 6 weeks, all pups were injected with the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Mammary tumor development in all pups was monitored for 15 weeks. Pups from exercised dams had a substantially lower tumor incidence (42.9%) compared with pups from sedentary dams (100%). Neither tumor latency nor histological grade differed between the two groups. These data are the first to demonstrate that exercise during pregnancy potentiates reduced tumorigenesis in offspring. This study provides an important foundation towards developing more effective modes of behavior modification for cancer prevention. PMID:24950432

  5. Isolation of Cancer Epithelial Cells from Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of cancer epithelial cells from mouse mammary tumor is accomplished by digestion of the solid tumor. Red blood cells and other contaminates are removed using several washing techniques such that primary epithelial cells can further enriched. This procedure yields primary tumor cells that can be used for in vitro tissue culture, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and a wide variety of other experiments (Lo et al., 2012).

  6. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. exerts chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh

    2014-10-01

    Due to limited treatment options for advanced-stage metastatic breast cancer, a high priority should be given to develop non-toxic chemopreventive drugs. The value of various natural and dietary agents to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer is well established. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. (Aizoaceae), a dietary and medicinal plant, has been found to exert antihepatotoxic and antihepatocarcinogenic properties in rodents. This study was initiated to investigate mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of an ethanolic extract of T. portulacastrum (TPE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated rat mammary gland carcinogenesis, an experimental tumor model that closely resembles human breast cancer. Rats had access to a basal diet supplemented with TPE to yield three dietary doses of the extract, i.e., 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight. Following two weeks of TPE treatment, mammary tumorigenesis was initiated by oral administration of DMBA (50 mg/kg body weight). At the end of the study (16 weeks after DMBA exposure), TPE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden and average tumor weight and reversed intratumor histopathological alterations. TPE dose-dependently suppressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1 expression, induced apoptosis, upregulated proapoptotic protein Bax, downregulated antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and diminished the expression of nuclear and cytosolic β-catenin in mammary tumors. Our results clearly provide the first experimental evidence that TPE exerts chemopreventive effect in the classical DMBA model of breast cancer by suppressing abnormal cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Mechanistically, TPE is capable of diminishing activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to exhibit antiproliferative, proapoptotic and oncostatic effects during an early-stage breast cancer. These results may encourage further

  7. /sup 20/neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to /sup 20/Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for /sup 20/Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that /sup 20/Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  8. Adolescent vitamin A intake alters susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis in the Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Metz, Richard P; Kaeck, Mark; Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, Maria; Mitrenga, Terry; McCarty, Heidi; Schedin, Pepper

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adolescent dietary vitamin A intake impacts mammary gland development and subsequent sensitivity to carcinogenesis. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a purified diet that was vitamin A deficient, adequate (2.2 mg retinyl palmitate/kg diet), or supranutritional (16 mg retinyl palmitate/kg diet) from 21 to 63 days of age, the period of adolescent mammary gland development. At 73 days of age, rats were given 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (25 mg/kg body wt i.p.) and monitored for mammary tumors. Tumors appeared earlier and more frequently in rats fed vitamin A-deficient or -supplemented diets. Vitamin A deficiency during adolescence was associated with alveolar mammary gland development and precocious milk protein expression, while supplementation was associated with ductal gland development and suppression of milk protein expression. Differences in circulating estradiol and mammary gland estrogen receptor-alpha, and estrogen-responsive progesterone receptor mRNA were not observed, suggesting that the effects of vitamin A on mammary gland development and carcinogenesis are estrogen independent. Mammary expression of another hormone receptor that regulates milk protein expression, the glucocorticoid receptor, was also unaffected. These results demonstrate that vitamin A intake during adolescence alters mammary gland differentiation and indicate that a narrow range of vitamin A intake during adolescence protects against carcinogenesis. PMID:12235654

  9. Regulation of mevalonate synthesis in rat mammary glands by dietary n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    El-Sohemy, A; Archer, M C

    1997-09-01

    It is well established that dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PU-FAs) enhance rat mammary tumor development whereas n-3 PUFAs inhibit it, yet the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate a mechanism by which n-3 and n-6 PUFAs could modulate mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing either menhaden (n-3) or safflower oil (n-6) in a 7% fat diet for 1 week. In comparison to the n-6 diet, the n-3 diet significantly reduced the activity and levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase in mammary glands, thereby suppressing the formation of mevalonate. In addition to being essential for cholesterol biosynthesis, mevalonate is also required for DNA synthesis and may be involved in malignant transformation. Serum cholesterol was lower in the n-3 group than in the n-6 group (1.91 +/- 0.18 versus 2.61 +/- 0.37 mM; P < 0.01). Extrahepatic tissues meet most of their cholesterol requirements from circulating cholesterol, and the internalized cholesterol down-regulates HMG-CoA reductase. Thus, the concomitant decrease in serum cholesterol and mammary gland HMG-CoA reductase levels suggests that changes in circulating cholesterol levels do not solely determine the activity of extrahepatic reductase. We conclude that the mevalonate pathway may be a mechanism through which different types of dietary fat modulate breast cancer development. PMID:9288773

  10. Sialomucin and lytic susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, J; Skelly, C M; Bharathan, S; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-11-01

    The potential role of cell surface sialomucin in preventing natural killer (NK)-mediated lysis of tumor cell targets has been addressed by comparing the properties of 2 NK-resistant [ascites (ASC) and short-term cultured (STC)] and 2 NK-susceptible [tunicamycin-treated (TUN) and long-term cultured (LTC)] preparations of 13762 MAT-B1 rat mammary tumor cells. Both the ASC and STC cell preparations contain elevated levels of the sialomucin ASGP-1 relative to TUN and LTC preparations as determined by [3H]glucosamine labeling and by binding of peanut agglutinin. The major difference in the susceptibility to NK-mediated lysis appeared to be due to the differences in the susceptibility to lysis by lytic granules, rather than to differences in the ability to bind or trigger effector cells, since TUN and LTC cells were approximately 10-fold more sensitive to lysis by lytic granules than were ASC and STC cells. All preparations inhibited the lysis of the susceptible target YAC-1 by normal rat splenocytes, indicating an ability to bind these effector cells. Triggering of effectors, as monitored either by incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol or by transmethylation of phosphatidylcholine, was similar for the positive control YAC-1, STC, TUN, and LTC, whereas ASC appeared to be defective in triggering effectors. These results suggest that tumor sialomucin blocks the final phase of lysis, but not the initial recognition of tumor cells by NK effectors. PMID:2208144

  11. Pesticide chlorpyrifos acts as an endocrine disruptor in adult rats causing changes in mammary gland and hormonal balance.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Clara; Nieto, María Rosa Ramos; Bourguignon, Nadia; Lux-Lantos, Victoria; Rodriguez, Horacio; Cao, Gabriel; Randi, Andrea; Cocca, Claudia; Núñez, Mariel

    2016-02-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are compounds that interfere with hormone regulation and influence mammary carcinogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) acts as an ED in vitro, since it induces human breast cancer cells proliferation through estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) pathway. In this work, we studied the effects of CPF at environmental doses (0.01 and 1mg/kg/day) on mammary gland, steroid hormone receptors expression and serum steroid hormone levels. It was carried out using female Sprague-Dawley 40-days-old rats exposed to the pesticide during 100 days. We observed a proliferating ductal network with a higher number of ducts and alveolar structures. We also found an increased number of benign breast diseases, such as hyperplasia and adenosis. CPF enhanced progesterone receptor (PgR) along with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in epithelial ductal cells. On the other hand, the pesticide reduced the expression of co-repressors of estrogen receptor activity REA and SMRT and it decreased serum estradiol (E2), progesterone (Pg) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. Finally, we found a persistent decrease in LH levels among ovariectomized rats exposed to CPF. Therefore, CPF alters the endocrine balance acting as an ED in vivo. These findings warn about the harmful effects that CPF exerts on mammary gland, suggesting that this compound may act as a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:26518068

  12. Primary cancer cell culture: mammary-optimized vs conditional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Ahmad M; Kang, Keunsoo; Groeneveld, Svenja; Wang, Weisheng; Zhong, Xiaogang; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hennighausen, Lothar; Liu, Xuefeng; Furth, Priscilla A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of different culture conditions on biology of primary cancer cells is not always addressed. Here, conditional reprogramming (CRC) was compared with mammary-optimized EpiCult-B (EpiC) for primary mammary epithelial cell isolation and propagation, allograft generation, and genome-wide transcriptional consequences using cancer and non-cancer mammary tissue from mice with different dosages of Brca1 and p53 Selective comparison to DMEM was included. Primary cultures were established with all three media, but CRC was most efficient for initial isolation (P<0.05). Allograft development was faster using cells grown in EpiC compared with CRC (P<0.05). Transcriptome comparison of paired CRC and EpiC cultures revealed 1700 differentially expressed genes by passage 20. CRC promoted Trp53 gene family upregulation and increased expression of epithelial differentiation genes, whereas EpiC elevated expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes. Differences did not persist in allografts where both methods yielded allografts with relatively similar transcriptomes. Restricting passage (<7) reduced numbers of differentially expressed genes below 50. In conclusion, CRC was most efficient for initial cell isolation but EpiC was quicker for allograft generation. The extensive culture-specific gene expression patterns that emerged with longer passage could be limited by reducing passage number when both culture transcriptomes were equally similar to that of the primary tissue. Defining impact of culture condition and passage on the transcriptome of primary cells could assist experimental design and interpretation. For example, differences that appear with passage and culture condition are potentially exploitable for comparative studies targeting specific biological networks in different transcriptional environments. PMID:27267121

  13. Chemoprevention of DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats by low-dose EPA and DHA.

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, M.; Minami, M.; Yagasaki, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Earashi, M.; Kitagawa, H.; Taniya, T.; Miyazaki, I.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the incidence and growth of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary carcinoma in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet. We also examined the effects of these treatments on the fatty acid composition of tumour and serum. Tumour incidence was significantly decreased by the administration of low-dose EPA and DHA, whereas their inhibitory effects on tumour growth did not reach significance. Serum arachidonic acid (AA) level was decreased by the administration of low-dose EPA and tended to be decreased by the administration of low-dose DHA, whereas tumour AA levels were not changed. The administration of low-dose EPA and DHA may be useful for inhibiting the incidence of breast cancer. PMID:9020478

  14. Melatonin potentiates the anti-tumour effect of pravastatin in rat mammary gland carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Orendáš, Peter; Kubatka, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Kružliak, Peter; Péč, Martin; Adamkov, Marián; Kapinová, Andrea; Adamicová, Katarína; Sadloňová, Vladimíra; Chmelová, Martina; Stollárová, Nadežda

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in the field of cancer research have suggested a possible role for statins in the reduction of risk in certain malignancies. The purpose of these studies was to examine the chemopreventive effects of pravastatin alone and in combination with pineal hormone melatonin in the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis model. Pravastatin was given orally (1 00 mg/kg) and melatonin was added to the water (20 μg/ml). Chemoprevention began seven days prior to carcinogen administration and subsequently continued for 15 weeks until autopsy. At autopsy, mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, angiogenesis and proliferation) and side effects after long-term treatment in animals were assessed. Pravastatin alone suppressed tumour frequency by 20.5% and average tumour volume by 15% compared with controls. Combined administration of the drugs decreased tumour frequency by 69% and lengthened tumour latency by nine days compared with control animals. The ration between high and low grade carcinomas was apparently reduced in both treated groups. The analysis of carcinoma cells showed significant expression increase in caspase-3 and caspase-7 after pravastatin treatment; however, combined treatment even more pronounced increase in the expression of both caspases. Regarding VEGFR-2 expression, a small effect in carcinomas of both treated groups was found. In plasma metabolism evaluation, pravastatin alone significantly decreased levels of glucose and triacylglycerols. Our results suggest a mild anti-neoplastic effect of pravastatin in this rat mammary gland carcinoma model. Statins co-administered with other suitable drug (e.g. melatonin) should be further evaluated for tumour-preventive properties. PMID:25270735

  15. Prolactin Suppression of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Initiation of Mammary Gland Involution in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Rieanrakwong, Duangjai; Laoharatchatathanin, Titaree; Terashima, Ryota; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Kurusu, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2016-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that mammary gland involution after lactation is initiated by accumulation of milk in alveoli after weaning. Here, we report that involution is also dependent on mammary GnRH expression that is suppressed by PRL during lactation. Reduction of plasma prolactin (PRL) by the withdrawal of suckling stimuli increased GnRH and annexin A5 (ANXA5) expression in the mammary tissues after lactation with augmentation of epithelial apoptosis. Intramammary injection of a GnRH antagonist suppressed ANXA5 expression and apoptosis of epithelial cells after forcible weaning at midlactation, whereas local administration of GnRH agonist (GnRHa) caused apoptosis of epithelial cells with ANXA5 augmentation in lactating rats. The latter treatment also decreased mammary weight, milk production, and casein accumulation. Mammary mast cells were strongly immunopositive for GnRH and the number increased in the mammary tissues after weaning. GnRHa was shown to be a chemoattractant for mast cells by mammary local administration of GnRHa and Boyden chamber assay. PRL suppressed the mammary expression of both ANXA5 and GnRH mRNA. It also decreased mast cell numbers in the gland after lactation. These results are the first to demonstrate that GnRH, synthesized locally in the mammary tissues, is required for mammary involution after lactation. GnRH is also suggested to introduce mast cells into the regressing mammary gland and would be in favor of tissue remodeling. The suppression of these processes by PRL is a novel physiological function of PRL. PMID:27175971

  16. Altered Carcinogenesis and Proteome in Mammary Glands of Rats after Prepubertal Exposures to the Hormonally Active Chemicals Bisphenol A and Genistein123

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Angela M.; Wang, Jun; Jenkins, Sarah; Mobley, Jim; Russo, Jose; Lamartiniere, Coral A.

    2012-01-01

    Through our diet, we are exposed to numerous natural and man-made chemicals, including polyphenols with hormone-like properties. The most abundant hormonally active polyphenols are characterized as weak estrogens. These chemicals are hypothesized to interfere with signaling pathways involved in important diseases such as breast cancer, which in most cases is initially estrogen dependent. Two such chemicals are bisphenol A (BPA), a plasticizer, and genistein, a component of soy. In spite of both possessing estrogenic properties, BPA and genistein yield different health outcomes. The exposure of rats during the prepubertal period to BPA increases the susceptibility of adult animals for mammary cancer development, whereas genistein decreases this susceptibility in a chemically induced model. Because both BPA and genistein possess estrogenic properties, it is certainly plausible that additional mechanisms are affected by these chemicals. Hence, it was our goal to investigate at the protein level how exposure to these 2 chemicals can contribute to mammary cancer causation as opposed to cancer chemoprevention. Using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MS analysis, we identified differentially regulated proteins from the mammary glands of rats prepubertally exposed to BPA and genistein. Following protein identification, we used immunoblotting techniques to validate the identity and regulation of these proteins and to identify downstream signaling proteins. Our studies highlight the importance of proteomics technology in elucidating signaling pathways altered by exposure to hormonally active chemicals and its potential value in identifying biomarkers for mammary cancer. PMID:22649256

  17. Tumor suppressor pten signaling is up-regulated in mammary epithelial cells by soy isoflavone genistein: implications for breast cancer protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological studies have shown lower occurrence of breast cancer in Asian women whose early intake of soy products is higher than their American counterparts. In a previous work, we showed protection against NMU-induced mammary tumors in rats exposed to dietary soy protein isolate (SPI) or casei...

  18. Remodeling of Endogenous Mammary Epithelium by Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A.; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R.; Habte, Frezghi G.; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R.; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L.; Clarke, Michael F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-01-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  19. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC. PMID:22899386

  20. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO NONYLPHENOL CAUSES PRECOCIOUS MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN FEMALE RAT OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether or not exposure to 4-nonylphenol (NP) during late gestation affects reproductive and mammary development in the offspring of female rats. Time pregnant Long Evans rats were gavaged with NP (10 or 100 mg/kg), atrazine (ATR, 100 mg/kg), or corn oil on ge...

  1. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF TCDD ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG EVANS RATS: A TWO GENERATIONAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated variable effects on mammary gland development in rat offspring exposed to TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1 ug/kg, gavage) on day 15 of gestation. We have characterized these effects in Long Evans rats, in both one and two-generational...

  2. In Utero Exposure to Bisphenol A Shifts the Window of Susceptibility for Mammary Carcinogenesis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Angela M.; Eltoum, Isam A.; Desmond, Renee A.; Russo, Jose; Lamartiniere, Coral A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous environmental chemical with reported endocrine-disrupting properties. Objective Our goal in this study was to determine whether prenatal exposure to BPA predisposes the adult rat mammary gland to carcinogenesis. Methods Pregnant rats were treated orally with 0, 25, or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight (BW) from gestation day (GD) 10 to GD21. For tumorigenesis experiments, prenatally exposed female offspring received a single gavage of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA; 30 mg/kg BW) on postnatal day (PND) 50, or PND100. Results Prenatal exposure of the dam to 250 μg BPA/kg BW combined with a single exposure of female offspring to DMBA on PND100, but not on PND50, significantly increased tumor incidence while decreasing tumor latency compared with the control group. Prenatal exposure of the dam to 250 μg BPA/kg BW, in the absence of DMBA to the female offspring, increased cell proliferation and elicited differential effects at the protein level at PND100 compared with PND50. Differentially regulated proteins in the mammary gland included estrogen receptor-α, progesterone receptor-A, Bcl-2, steroid receptor coactivators, epidermal growth factor receptor, phospho-insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, and phospho-Raf. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that oral prenatal exposure to BPA increases mammary cancer susceptibility in offspring and shifts the window of susceptibility for DMBA-induced tumorigenesis in the rat mammary gland from PND50 to PND100. These changes are accompanied by differential effects of prenatal BPA exposure on the expression of key proteins involved in cell proliferation. PMID:20675265

  3. Mammary cancer prevention by regular garlic and selenium-enriched garlic.

    PubMed

    Ip, C; Lisk, D J; Stoewsand, G S

    1992-01-01

    The anticarcinogenic activities of regular (soil-grown) garlic and selenium-enriched garlic (cultivated in the greenhouse) were evaluated using the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-(DMBA) induced mammary tumor model in rats. In Experiment 1, milled regular garlic powder was added to the basal AIN-76A diet at 20 g/kg. The results from different schedules of supplementation suggested that a continuous treatment, which started before DMBA and persisted for the entire duration of the study, was most effective in tumor suppression. In Experiment 2, selected allyl group-containing sulfides that are normal constituents of garlic extract were given by gavage in three single doses immediately before DMBA. Several structurally related compounds were found to be protective during the initiation phase in the mammary cancer model. Although the present study was not designed specifically to elucidate the structure-activity relationship with respect to sulfur chain length or alkyl versus alkenyl substitution, our data showed that diallyl disulfide was more active than diallyl sulfide or allyl methyl sulfide. In Experiment 3, the anticarcinogenic activity of selenium-enriched garlic (containing 150 ppm Se dry weight from growth in a selenium-fertilized medium) was compared with that of regular garlic as well as selenite. Animals given the selenium-enriched garlic (final concentration 3 ppm Se in the diet) developed the fewest mammary tumors. Tissue selenium levels, however, were lower in these animals than in those fed the same amount of selenium from selenite. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving cancer prevention with the use of a selenium-rich food system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1437646

  4. Influence of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T.P.; Peterson, F.; Campbell, T.C.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of dietary menhaden oil on 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) induced mammary tumorigenesis was examined in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were obtained at age 28 days and acclimated until age 50 days when they received a single i.g. dose of 5 mg DMBA dissolved in 1 ml corn oil. Rats were then randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups with 25 rats per group. One group was fed a diet based on fish protein (freeze-dried cod) and corn oil (F/C). The second group received a diet based on fish protein and menhaden oil (F/M). The third group received a casein based diet with corn oil as the lipid source (C/C). The fourth group was fed a casein based diet with menhaden oil as the lipid source (C/M). Both the protein and lipid sources were fed at a level of 20% by weight of the diets. Rats were palpated weekly to check for mammary tumor development and the experiment was terminated 24 weeks after DMBA administration. Rats fed menhaden oil as a lipid source (F/M and C/M groups) developed significantly fewer mammary tumors than animals on the corn oil based diets (F/C and C/C groups, respectively). Thus, menhaden oil, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, significantly inhibited the development of DMBA induced mammary tumors in this experiment.

  5. The effect of zinc and phytoestrogen supplementation on the changes in mineral content of the femur of rats with chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Korczak, Barbara Bobrowska-; Tokarz, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Agata; Klepacz, Marta; Makowska, Justyna; Gadzinski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess skeletal effects of zinc or zinc with phytoestrogen (resveratrol or genistein) supplementation in an animal model of rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The changes in bone parameters such as the length and mass were examined, as well as the changes in concentrations of selected minerals: calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and phosphorus. Moreover, the investigations focused on finding the differences between the levels of iron and zinc in other tissues: the liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. Fifty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats, 40 days old, were divided into four groups, regardless of the diets: standard (77mg Zn kg/food), zinc (4.6mg/mL via gavage), zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus resveratrol (0.2mg/kgbw), and zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus genistein (0.2mg/kgbw) for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The study rats were also treated with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The applied diet and the advanced mammary cancer did not affect macrometric parameters of the rats' bones, but they strongly affected their mineral content. It was found that mammary cancer, irrespectively of the applied diet, significantly modified the iron level in the femur, liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. In addition, zinc supplementation significantly lowered the levels of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the femur of rats with mammary cancer as compared with respective levels in the control group. So, it was found that additional supplementation with zinc, which is generally considered to be an antioxidant, with the co-existing mammary carcinoma, increased the unfavorable changes as concerns the stability of bone tissue. The appropriate combination of zinc and phytoestrogens (resveratrol or genistein) could help prevent or slow bone loss associated with a range of skeletal disorders in breast cancer. PMID:26302916

  6. Exposure to estrogen and ionizing radiation causes epigenetic dysregulation, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and genome instability in the mammary gland of ACI rats

    PubMed Central

    Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The impact of environmental mutagens and carcinogens on the mammary gland has recently received a lot of attention. Among the most generally accepted carcinogenic agents identified as factors that may increase breast cancer incidence are ionizing radiation and elevated estrogen levels. However, the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland aberrations associated with radiation and estrogen exposure still need to be further elucidated, especially the interplay between elevated hormone levels and radiation. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated molecular changes induced in rat mammary gland tissue by estrogen, ionizing radiation, and the combined action of these two carcinogens using a well-established ACI rat model. We found that continuous exposure of intact female ACI rats to elevated levels of estrogen or to both estrogen and radiation resulted in significant hyperproliferative changes in rat mammary glands. In contrast, radiation exposure alone did not induce hyperplasia. Interestingly, despite the obvious disparity in mammary gland morphology, we did not detect significant differences in the levels of genomic methylation among animals exposed to estrogen, radiation, or both agents together. Specifically, we observed a significant global genomic hypomethylation at 6 weeks of exposure. However, by 12 and 18 weeks, the levels of global DNA methylation returned to those of age-matched controls. We also found that combined exposure to radiation and estrogen significantly altered the levels of histone H3 and H4 methylation and acetylation. Most importantly, we for the first time demonstrated that estrogen and radiation exposure caused a significant induction of p42/44 MAPK and p38 pathways that was paralleled by elevated levels of H3S10 phosphorylation, a well-established biomarker of genome and chromosome instability. The precise role of MAPK pathways and their inter-relationship with H3S10 phosphorylation and genome instability in mammary gland tissues needs

  7. Salvia officinalis L. induces alveolar bud growing in adult female rat mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Monsefi, Malihezaman; Abedian, Mehrnaz; Azarbahram, Zahra; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In traditional medicine Salvia officinalis (sage) has been used as menstrual cycle regulator. In the present study the effects of sage extract on breast tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: Fourteen female rats were divided into two groups: 1) Distilled water-treated rats (Con) that were gavaged with 1ml distilled water and 2) Saliva officinalis hydroalcoholic extract (SHE)-treated rats that were gavaged with 30mg/kg/body weight of sage extract for 30 days. The estrus cycle changes were monitored by daily examination of vaginal smear. Whole mounts of right pelvic breast were spread on the slide and stained by carmine. The number of alveolar buds (ABs) type 1 and 2 and lobules of mammary gland were scored. Tissue sections of left pelvic mammary gland were prepared and its histomorphometrical changes were measured. Blood samples were taken from dorsal aorta and estradiol and progesterone concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay. Results: Estrous cycles decreased significantly in SHE-treated animals. The number of alveolar buds and lobules in mammary gland whole mount of SHE-treated group were higher than the Con group. The number and diameter of ducts in histological section of mammary gland in SHE-treated group increased as compared to the Con group. Conclusion: Sage promotes alveologenesis of mammary glands and it can be used as a lactiferous herb. PMID:26693413

  8. Charles River Sprague Dawley Rats Lack Early Age-Dependent Susceptibility to DMBA-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gear, R.B.; Yan, M.; Schneider, J.; Succop, P.; Heffelfinger, S.C.; Clegg, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental stages of mammary glands influence their susceptibility to initiating events related to carcinogenesis. The “window of susceptibility” to mammary carcinogenesis is classically defined as the time in early puberty when the mammary gland morphology is most sensitive to initiation events. Administration of the polyaromatic hydrocarbon, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), in a single oral dose yields maximal mammary tumor formation when administered in this “window”. We examined the DMBA treated mammary glands, precursor lesions, and morphology of the uninvolved mammary epithelium for the first 100 days of life for Charles River Sprague Dawley CDR IGS. Our goal was to determine the DMBA dose at which 50% of the rats (IC50) developed carcinoma in situ (CIS) within three months of dosing. Here we demonstrate, rather than the classical U-shaped dose curve in which there is maximum sensitivity for DMBA at 50 days, there is an increasing degree of sensitivity with age in the CDR IGS rat. Additionally, we report that vehicle-treated animals developed mammary CIS without any known initiator, and 100 day virgin animals demonstrated lactational changes, independent of DMBA exposure or dose. Lastly, we demonstrate this strain of virgin female rats has elevated pituitary prolactin immunoreactivity independent of the level of mammary differentiation. We conclude this strain of Charles River Sprague Dawley rats has prolactin-induced pituitary stimulation, and therefore, the window of susceptibility for mammary tumorigenesis is absent. PMID:17940635

  9. Effect of elevated selenium intakes on mammary cell proliferation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salbe, A.D.; Albanes, D.; Winick, M.; Taylor, P.R.; Levander, O.A. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Elevated selenium (Se) intakes and calorie restriction (CR) inhibit mammary tumorigenesis in experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate cell proliferation in the mammary tissue gland. Female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control, 40% CR, 4 or 6 ppm Se in water as selenate. Control rats and Se rats were fed a control diet ad lib. CR rats were pair-fed 40% less than controls with a diet providing equal nutrients except carbohydrate calories. After 3 weeks, rats were injected with ({sup 3}H)-thymidine and killed 1 hr later. Se at 4 ppm significantly decreased only the number of ducts, whereas 6 ppm Se decreased both the number of ducts as well as the number and percent of labeled cells. CR had no effect on mammary cell proliferation. These results suggest that elevated Se intakes may protect against mammary tumorigenesis by decreasing cell proliferation, a mechanism which may affect the dose-response of the genotoxic chemicals frequently used as initiating agents in animal experiments.

  10. Low-dose effects of bisphenol A on mammary gland development in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandrup, K; Boberg, J; Isling, L K; Christiansen, S; Hass, U

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in food contact materials, toys, and other products. Several studies have indicated that effects observed at doses near human exposure levels may not be observed at higher doses. Many studies have shown effects on mammary glands at low doses of BPA, however, because of small number of animals or few doses investigated these data have not been used by EFSA as point of departure for the newly assessed tolerable daily intake (TDI). We performed a study with perinatal exposure to BPA (0, 0.025, 0.25, 5, and 50 mg/kg bw/day) in rats (n = 22 mated/group). One of the aims was to perform a study robust enough to contribute to the risk assessment of BPA and to elucidate possible biphasic dose-response relationships. We investigated mammary gland effects in the offspring at 22, 100, and 400 days of age. Male offspring showed increased mammary outgrowth on pup day (PD) 22 at 0.025 mg/kg BPA, indicating an increased mammary development at this low dose only. Increased prevalence of intraductal hyperplasia was observed in BPA females exposed to 0.25 mg/kg at PD 400, but not at PD 100, and not at higher or lower doses. The present findings support data from the published literature showing that perinatal exposure to BPA can induce increased mammary growth and proliferative lesions in rodents. Our results indicate that low-dose exposure to BPA can affect mammary gland development in male and female rats, although higher doses show a different pattern of effects. The observed intraductal hyperplasia in female rats could be associated with an increased risk for developing hyperplastic lesions, which are parallels to early signs of breast neoplasia in women. Collectively, current knowledge on effects of BPA on mammary gland at low doses indicates that highly exposed humans may not be sufficiently protected. PMID:27088260

  11. In vivo mammary tumourigenesis in the Sprague Dawley rat and microdosimetric correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicello, J. F.; Christian, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gridley, D. S.; Kathirithamby, R.; Mann, J.; Markham, A. R.; Moyers, M. F.; Novak, G. R.; Piantadosi, S.; Ricart-Arbona, R.; Simonson, D. M.; Strandberg, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Williams, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Huso, D.

    2004-08-01

    Standard methods for risk assessments resulting from human exposures to mixed radiation fields in Space consisting of different particle types and energies rely upon quality factors. These are generally defined as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) and are assumed to be proportional to the risk. In this approach, it is further assumed that the risks for single exposures from each of the radiation types add linearly. Although risks of cancer from acute exposures to photon radiations have been measured in humans, quality factors for protons and ions of heavier atomic mass are generally inferred from animal and/or cellular data. Because only a small amount of data exists for such particles, this group has been examining tumourigenesis initiated by energetic protons and iron ions. In this study, 741 female Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated or sham irradiated at approximately 60 days of age with 250 MeV protons, 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions or both protons and iron ions. The results suggest that the risk of mammary tumours in the rats sequentially irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions and 250 MeV protons is less than additive. These data in conjunction with earlier results further suggest that risk assessments in terms of only mean LETs of the primary cosmic rays may be insufficient to accurately evaluate the relative risks of each type of particle in a radiation field of mixed radiation qualities.

  12. Molecular homology and difference between spontaneous canine mammary cancer and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E; Northrup, Nicole C; Rodriguez, Carlos O; O'Regan, Ruth M; Dalton, Stephen; Zhao, Shaying

    2014-09-15

    Spontaneously occurring canine mammary cancer represents an excellent model of human breast cancer, but is greatly understudied. To better use this valuable resource, we performed whole-genome sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, RNA-seq, and/or high-density arrays on twelve canine mammary cancer cases, including seven simple carcinomas and four complex carcinomas. Canine simple carcinomas, which histologically match human breast carcinomas, harbor extensive genomic aberrations, many of which faithfully recapitulate key features of human breast cancer. Canine complex carcinomas, which are characterized by proliferation of both luminal and myoepithelial cells and are rare in human breast cancer, seem to lack genomic abnormalities. Instead, these tumors have about 35 chromatin-modification genes downregulated and are abnormally enriched with active histone modification H4-acetylation, whereas aberrantly depleted with repressive histone modification H3K9me3. Our findings indicate the likelihood that canine simple carcinomas arise from genomic aberrations, whereas complex carcinomas originate from epigenomic alterations, reinforcing their unique value. Canine complex carcinomas offer an ideal system to study myoepithelial cells, the second major cell lineage of the mammary gland. Canine simple carcinomas, which faithfully represent human breast carcinomas at the molecular level, provide indispensable models for basic and translational breast cancer research. PMID:25082814

  13. Peroral Estradiol Is Sufficient to Induce Carcinogen-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis in Ovariectomized Rats without Progesterone.

    PubMed

    Stires, Hillary; Saboya, Mariana; Globerman, Samantha P; Cohick, Wendie S

    2016-01-01

    A role for estrogens in breast cancer is widely accepted, however, recent evidence highlights that timing and exposure levels are important in determining whether they elicit harmful versus beneficial effects. The rat chemical carcinogen model has been widely used to study the effects of estrogens but conclusions on the levels that lead to tumor development and an absolute requirement for progesterone (P4) are lacking. A newer method of hormone administration mixes hormones with nut butter for peroral consumption allowing for a less stressful method of long-term administration with lower spikes in serum estradiol (E2) levels. The present study was designed to determine if estrogens alone at a physiological dose can drive carcinogen-induced tumors in ovariectomized (OVX) rats or if P4 is also required using this method of hormone administration. Short-term studies were conducted to determine the dose of estrogen (E) that would lead to increased uterine weight following OVX. Subsequently, rats were OVX on postnatal day (PND) 40 then treated daily with E (600 μg/kg/day), P4 (15 mg/kg/day), or the combination. On PND 50, all rats were injected with nitrosomethylurea to induce mammary tumors. Uterine weights, body weights, and serum E2 levels were measured to demonstrate the efficacy of the method for increasing E2 levels during long-term treatment. After 26 weeks, tumor incidence was similar in Sham, E, and E + P4 animals indicating that E was sufficient to induce tumorigenesis when hormone levels were normalized by this method. This study demonstrates peroral administration can be used in long-term studies to elucidate relationships between different types and levels of steroid hormones. PMID:27611094

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells promote mammary cancer cell migration in vitro via the CXCR2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jennifer L.; Kilbarger, Amy; Lynch, Conor C.

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a common event during breast cancer progression. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been implicated in the metastasis of primary mammary cancer. Given that bone is the native environment for MSCs, we hypothesized MSCs facilitate the homing of circulating mammary cancer cells to the bone. To test this hypothesis, we examined in vitro whether bone derived MSCs from FVB mice could influence the migration of syngeneic murine mammary cancer cell lines derived from the polyoma virus middle-T (PyMT) model of mammary gland tumorigenesis. Our data show that conditioned media derived from MSCs significantly enhanced the migration of PyMT mammary cancer cell lines. Analysis of conditioned media using a cytokine array revealed the presence of numerous cytokines in the MSC conditioned media, most notably, the murine orthologs of CXCL1 and CXCL5 that are cognate ligands of the CXCR2 receptor. Further investigation identified that; 1) CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCR2 mRNA and protein were expressed by the MSCs and PyMT cell lines and; 2) neutralizing antibodies to CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCR2 or a CXCR2 small molecule inhibitor (SB265610) significantly abrogated the migratory effect of the MSC conditioned media on the PyMT cells. Therefore, in vitro evidence demonstrates that bone derived MSCs play a role in the migration of mammary cancer cells, a conclusion that has potential implications for breast to bone metastasis in vivo. PMID:21601983

  15. Biosynthesis of medium-chain fatty acids by mammary epithelial cells from virgin rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S; Pasco, D; Nandi, S

    1983-01-01

    Epithelial cells were isolated from the undifferentiated mammary glands of mature virgin female rats, and their lipogenic characteristics were studied. These cells synthesized predominantly medium-chain fatty acids, albeit at a low rate. In contrast, whole tissue from mammary glands of virgin rats synthesized predominantly long-chain fatty acids at a relatively higher rate, indicating that the lipogenic activity is dominated by the adipocyte component of the gland. Enzyme assays revealed that thioesterase II, the enzyme which regulates production of medium-chain fatty acids by the fatty acid synthetase, was present at a high activity in the undifferentiated mammary epithelial cells of virgin rats. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed this observation and showed that the regulatory enzyme was present exclusively in the epithelial cells lining the alveolar and ductal elements of the undifferentiated gland. This study demonstrates that the potential to elaborate tissue-specific medium-chain fatty acids is already expressed in the undifferentiated tissue of virgin rats and is not acquired as a result of the differentiation associated with the lactogenic phase of development. In this species mammary epithelial cells apparently synthesize predominantly medium-chain fatty acids at all stages of development, and only the overall rate of synthesis is increased on induction of the fatty acid synthetase during lactogenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6409098

  16. DETECTION OF A CRITICAL PERIOD NECESSARY FOR ATRAZINE-INDUCED MAMMARY GLAND DELAYS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of a Critical Period Necessary for Atrazine-Induced Mammary Gland Delays in Rats.

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 Reproductive Toxicology Division, USEPA, NHEERL/ORD, R...

  17. NONYLPHENOL AND ATRAZINE INDUCE INVERSE EFFECTS ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN FEMALE RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonylphenol and Atrazine Induce Inverse Effects on Mammary Gland Development in Female Rats Exposed In Utero.
    HJ Moon1, SY Han1, CC Davis2, and SE Fenton2
    1 Department of Toxicology, NITR, Korea FDA, 5Nokbun-Dong, Eunpyung-Gu, Seoul, Korea and 2 Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  18. Effects of maternal exposure to cow's milk high or low in isoflavones on carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis among rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Purup, Stig; Wärri, Anni; Godschalk, Roger W; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2011-05-01

    We investigated whether maternal exposure during pregnancy to cow's milk containing endogenous estrogens and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and either high or low levels of isoflavones from dietary legumes (HIM and LIM, respectively) affected carcinogen-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given HIM, LIM, or tap water (control) from gestational day (GD) 11 until birth; hereafter all rats received tap water. Mammary tumorigenesis was induced by administrating 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) on postnatal day 50. No differences in maternal serum estradiol (P = 0.19) and IGF-1 levels (P = 0.15) at GD 19 or birth weight among the milk and water groups were seen, but estradiol, and IGF-1 levels and birth weight were numerically higher in the LIM group than in the HIM group. Puberty onset occurred earlier in the LIM offspring than in controls (P = 0.03). Although the high isoflavone content seemed to prevent the effect on circulating estradiol and IGF-1 levels and advanced puberty onset seen in the LIM group, HIM increased DMBA-DNA adducts in the mammary gland and tended to increase mammary tumorigenesis. In contrast, offspring exposed to LIM in utero, did not exhibit increased breast cancer risk, despite having higher estradiol and IGF-1 environment and consequently earlier puberty onset. These results indicate that the phytochemical content in the cow's milk, consumed by a pregnant dam, determines how milk affects the offspring. PMID:21467133

  19. Adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy in bitches with mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Karayannopoulou, M; Kaldrymidou, E; Constantinidis, T C; Dessiris, A

    2001-03-01

    The survival time in a group of eight bitches with malignant mammary tumours given adjuvant post-operative chemotherapy was compared with survival in another group of eight bitches with mammary cancer which were treated by surgical excision alone. The same surgical procedure was used in both groups. All bitches had stage III disease according to the World Health Organization clinical staging system. Histologically, 10 of the bitches had complex carcinomas (carcinomatous mixed tumours), the remaining six bitches had carcinosarcomas. The chemotherapeutic protocol used was a combination of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/m2 of body surface area) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/m2) given on the same day, intravenously, every week for four consecutive weeks. Chemotherapy was started one week post-surgery. Selected haematological parameters (packed cell volume, white blood cell count, platelet count and differential white blood cell count) and serum biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) were measured before and during chemotherapy. Survival analysis indicated that the chemotherapeutic regimen had a positive influence on the disease-free interval and the survival time of the eight bitches (P < 0.05). Although leucocyte numbers were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) during chemotherapy, the mean leucocyte counts remained within normal limits. Temporary leukopenia was noted only in one bitch. Packed cell volume and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly (P < 0.05) but within normal limits. Creatinine was also increased significantly (P < 0.01) but the mean creatinine concentrations were within normal limits, although in half of the bitches the concentrations occasionally rose above normal. PMID:11315572

  20. Characterization of methylaminoisobutyric acid transport by system A in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Tovar, A R; Avila, E; DeSantiago, S; Torres, N

    2000-07-01

    During lactation, the mammary gland has a large demand for amino acids for the synthesis of milk proteins and fatty acids. Arteriovenous differences in amino acids across the mammary gland show an elevated uptake of small neutral amino acids that are mainly transported via system A. The purpose of this study was to characterize the transport of methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), an amino acid analog used to model transport by system A in lactating rat mammary gland explants. MeAIB accumulation in mammary gland cells increased steadily, and after 3 hours of incubation, the intracellular concentration of the analog was 8-fold higher than the concentration in the medium. MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants showed a Km of 3.3 +/- 0.4 mmol/L and a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 555 +/- 23 pmol/microL intracellular fluid (ICF) x min, indicating a system with high capacity but low affinity for its substrate. MeAIB transport into mammary tissue depended highly on Na+, and the uptake was inhibited by addition of natural and analog small neutral amino acids. Cationic, anionic, and large neutral amino acids did not reduce MeAIB transport into mammary gland explants. Preincubation of mammary gland explants in an amino acid-free medium stimulated MeAIB transport, suggesting an adaptive regulation. The addition of an equimolar mixture of alanine, glycine, and serine to the preincubation medium inhibited stimulation of MeAIB transport. Furthermore, stimulation of MeAIB uptake by amino acid starvation was also prevented by the addition of actinomycin D, cycloheximide, tunicamycin, and colchicine. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increased MeAIB uptake, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) did not stimulate MeAIB transport. During the first postweaning days, kinetic analyses showed a decrease of 27% in the Vmax. Injection of rat lactating mammary gland mRNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes induced expression of the MeAIB transport system; however, the

  1. Mitigation of DMBA-induced mammary carcinoma in experimental rats by antiangiogenic property of Kalpaamruthaa.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Sivaprakasam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2011-06-01

    Extra cellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane (BM) are important layers that regulate cell structure, cell migration, and cellular proliferation. Degradation of both ECM and BM mediated by proteases favors the tumor invasion and promotes angiogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 180 ± 10 g were categorized into 6 groups. Group-1 animals served as vehicle control. Group-2 to Group-4 animals were administered with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (25 mg/rat dissolved in olive oil, orally) on day 1 of experimental period to induce mammary carcinoma. (After 90 days, mammary carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination). Group-3 and Group-4 rats were subsequently treated with Semecarpus anacardium nut milk extract (SA) and Kalpaamruthaa (KA), respectively. Group-5 and Group-6 animals served as drug control for SA and KA, respectively. Pro-angiogenic factors like proteases, cyclooxygenase-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in tumor-bearing animals and decreased in SA- and KA-supplemented rats. Increased levels of these angiogenic factors in tumor-bearing rats indicate the progression of mammary tumor. The decreased levels of these angiogenic in SA- and KA-treated rats may be due to the ameliorative effect of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, tannins, and other compounds present in the drug. PMID:22432686

  2. Developmental regulation of cytokeratins in cells of the rat mammary gland studied with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R; Dulbecco, R; Syka, P; Bowman, M; Armstrong, B

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated two monoclonal antibodies to cytokeratins and determined their cell specificities. They display interesting localization within the rat mammary gland. One (1A10) shows specificity for myoepithelial cells; the other (24B42) is specific for lumenal cells at various stages of development. These two monoclonal antibodies and three others to cytokeratin previously isolated were used in conjunction with antibodies to myosin and collagen IV to confirm and extend our previous findings on epithelial cell types and development within the mammary gland. Images PMID:6199793

  3. A Surprising Link Between the Energetics of Ovariectomy-induced Weight Gain and Mammary Tumor Progression in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Paul S.; Giles, Erin D.; Johnson, Ginger C.; McDaniel, Shauntae M.; Fleming-Elder, Brooke K.; Gilman, Kaite A.; Andrianakos, Anna G.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Schedin, Pepper J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. We have modeled this metabolic context using female Wistar rats that differ in their polygenic predisposition for obesity under conditions of high-fat feeding and limited physical activity. At 52 days of age, rats were injected with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU, 50 mg/kg) and placed in an obesogenic environment. At 19 weeks of age, the rats were separated into lean, mid-weight, and obese rats, based upon their weight gained during this time. The rats were ovariectomized (OVX) at ~24 weeks of age and the change in tumor multiplicity and burden, weight gain, energy intake, tumor estrogen receptor (ER) status, and humoral metabolite and cytokine profiles were examined. The survival and growth of tumors increased in obese rats in response to OVX. OVX induced a high rate of weight gain during post-OVX weeks 1–3, compared to SHAM-operated controls. During this time, feed efficiency (mg gain/kcal intake) was lower in obese rats, and this reduced storage efficiency of ingested fuels predicted the OVX-induced changes in tumor multiplicity (r = −0.64, P < 0.001) and burden (r = −0.57, P < 0.001). Tumors from obese rats contained more cells that expressed ERα, and post-OVX plasma from rats with the lowest feed efficiency had lower interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 levels. Our observations suggest a novel link between obesity and mammary tumor promotion that involves impaired fuel metabolism during OVX-induced weight gain. The metabolically inflexible state of obesity and its inability to appropriately respond to the OVX-induced energy imbalance provides a plausible explanation for this relationship and the emergence of obesity’s impact on breast cancer risk after menopause. PMID:19798068

  4. Lack of effects of postnatal exposure to a mixture of aryl hydrocarbon-receptor agonists on the development of methylnitrosourea-induced mammary tumors in sprague-dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Desaulniers, Daniel; Leingartner, Karen; Musicki, Biljana; Cole, Jonathan; Li, Ming; Charbonneau, Michel; Tsang, Benjamin K

    2004-09-24

    There are concerns that early life exposure to organochlorines, including aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, may lead to long-term effects and increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Our objective was to test if postnatal exposure to a mixture of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD)-like chemicals would modulate the development of methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary tumors. Females received by gavage a mixture containing 3 non-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 6 polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and 7 polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20d of age. The doses were equivalent to 0, 1, 10, 100, or 1000 times the amount ingested through breast milk by a human infant during its first 24 d of life. Subgroups of 1000 x reated rats and controls were sacrificed at 21 d of age for assessment of mammary-gland development, cell death, and proliferation. Mammary-tumor development was assessed in MNU (30 mg/kg body weight ip at 50 days of age)-induced rats pre-exposed to the mixture (MNU-0, MNU-1, MNU-10, MNU-100, MNU-1000). Rats were sacrificed when their mammary tumors reached 1 cm in diameter, or when the rats reached > or = 32 wk of age. Mammary-gland whole mounts were analyzed with all palpable and microscopic lesions (n = 1563) histologically classified and grouped as benign, intraductal proliferations, or malignant. There were no marked effects on age at onset of puberty (vaginal opening) and estrous cyclicity. Despite a significant decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive mammary cells in 1000 x treated 21-d-old rats, there were no long-term dose-response effects on mammary-gland morphology and tumor development. In conclusion, postnatal exposure to the mixture of AhR agonists had no significant effects on the development of MNU-initiated mammary tumors. PMID:15371232

  5. Mammary fat of breast cancer: gene expression profiling and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengliang; Gao, Sheng; Chen, Fei; Fu, Ziyi; Yin, Hong; Lu, Xun; Yu, Jing; Lu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolated and cultured the stromal vascular cell fraction from mammary fat. The expression of genes related to adipose function (including adipogenesis and secretion) was detected at both the tissue and the cellular level. We also studied mammary fat browning. The results indicated that fat tissue close to malignant and benign lesions exhibited distinctive gene expression profiles and functional characteristics. Although the mammary fat of breast tumors atrophied, it secreted tumor growth stimulatory factors. Browning of mammary fat was observed and browning activity of fat close to malignant breast tumors was greater than that close to benign lesions. Understanding the diversity between these two fat depots may possibly help us improve our understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and find the key to unlock new anticancer therapies. PMID:25291184

  6. Protective role of fish oil (Maxepa) on early events of rat mammary carcinogenesis by modulation of DNA-protein crosslinks, cell proliferation and p53 expression

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Sangita; Chakraborty, Tridib; Damodaran, Suresh; Samanta, Kartick; Rana, Basabi; Chatterjee, Malay

    2007-01-01

    Background Fish oil is known to protect from many types of cancers of the colon, liver, breast, prostate and lung [1-3]. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of fish oil [Maxepa, supplemented at a dose of 0.5 ml is equivalent to 90 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 60 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] on cell proliferation, expression of p53 tumor suppressor protein and DNA protein crosslinks (DPCs) in a defined model of chemical rat mammary carcinogenesis. Mammary carcinogenesis was initiated by a single, intravenous (i.v.) tail vein injection of 7,12 dimethylbenz(α)anthracene (DMBA) at a dose of 5 mg DMBA/2 ml corn oil/kg body weight in female Sprague-Dawley rats at 7 weeks of age. Fish oil supplementation was started daily, 2 weeks prior to DMBA injection and continued for 24 (31 weeks of animal age) weeks and 35 (42 weeks of animal age) weeks of post DMBA injection, for histopathological and immunohistochemical and for morphological studies, respectively. Results Our results indicate the chemopreventive effect of fish oil (Maxepa) on DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis. Administration of fish oil further showed a prominent reduction of cell proliferation (24.34%, P = 0.001); DPCs (25%, P < 0.001) and an increased expression of p53 protein (4.636 ± 0.19, P < 0.001) in preneoplastic mammary tissue when compared to carcinogen control counterpart. Histopathological and morphological analyses were carried out as end-point biomarkers. Conclusion Our study thus provides evidence for the anticarcinogenic effect of fish oil (Maxepa) in limiting mammary preneoplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:17470299

  7. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  8. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  9. Estrogens in the wrong place at the wrong time: fetal BPA exposure and mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Tessie; Speroni, Lucia; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced alterations of the genital tract and predisposed individuals to develop clear cell carcinoma of the vagina as well as breast cancer later in life. Gestational exposure of rodents to a related compound, the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) increases the propensity to develop mammary cancer during adulthood, long after cessation of exposure. Exposure to BPA during gestation induces morphological alterations in both the stroma and the epithelium of the fetal mammary gland at 18 days of age. We postulate that the primary target of BPA is the fetal stroma, the only mammary tissue expressing estrogen receptors during fetal life. BPA would then alter the reciprocal stroma-epithelial interactions that mediate mammogenesis. In addition to this direct effect on the mammary gland, BPA is postulated to affect the hypothalamus and thus in turn affect the regulation of mammotropic hormones at puberty and beyond. PMID:25277313

  10. Perinatally Administered Bisphenol A as a Potential Mammary Gland Carcinogen in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Nicole; Davis, Barbara; Schaeberle, Cheryl M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) affects mammary gland development in rodents and primates. Prenatal exposure to environmentally relevant doses of BPA increased the number of intraductal hyperplasias and ductal carcinomas in situ by 50 days of age in Wistar-Furth rats. Objective: We aimed to determine whether BPA exposure of dams during gestation only or throughout lactation affects the incidence of mammary gland neoplasia in female offspring. Methods: We treated pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats with BPA at 0, 0.25, 2.5, 25, or 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day from gestational day (GD) 9 to birth and from GD9 to postnatal day (PND) 21. Mammary glands from BPA-exposed offspring were examined at four time points for preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. To assess circulating BPA levels, we exposed pregnant rats to vehicle or 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day during gestation only or during gestation/lactation and analyzed sera from dams, fetuses, and nursing pups for total and unconjugated BPA. Results: Total and unconjugated BPA were detected in sera from 100% of dams and fetuses and 33% of pups exposed to 250 μg BPA/kg BW/day. Unconjugated BPA levels in exposed dams and fetuses (gestational) and in exposed dams and pups (gestational/lactational) were within levels found in humans. Preneoplastic lesions developed in BPA-exposed female offspring across all doses as early as PND50. Unexpectedly, mammary gland adenocarcinomas developed in BPA-exposed offspring by PND90. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that developmental exposure to environmentally relevant levels of BPA during gestation and lactation induces mammary gland neoplasms in the absence of any additional carcinogenic treatment. Thus, BPA may act as a complete mammary gland carcinogen. Citation: Acevedo N, Davis B, Schaeberle CM, Sonnenschein C, Soto AM. 2013. Perinatally administered bisphenol A acts as a mammary gland carcinogen in rats. Environ Health Perspect 121:1040–1046; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  11. Dietary beta-carotene inhibits mammary carcinogenesis in rats depending on dietary alpha-linolenic acid content.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Virginie; Hoinard, Claude; Arab, Khelifa; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Bougnoux, Philippe; Chajès, Véronique

    2006-07-01

    To investigate whether dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content alters the effect of beta-carotene on mammary carcinogenesis, we conducted a chemically induced mammary tumorigenesis experiment in rats randomly assigned to four nutritional groups (15 rats per group) varying in beta-carotene supplementation and ALA content. Two oil formula-enriched diets (15 %) were used: one with 6 g ALA/kg diet in an essential fatty acids (EFA) ratio of linoleic acid:ALA of 5:1 w/w (EFA 5 diet), the other with 24 g ALA/kg diet in an EFA ratio of 1:1 w/w (EFA 1 diet), both designed with a similar linoleic acid content. beta-Carotene was either added (10 mg/kg diet per d) or not added to these diets. beta-Carotene supplementation led to decreased tumour incidence and tumour growth when added to the EFA 5 diet, whereas it had no effect when added to the EFA 1 diet. The decreased tumour growth did not result from an involvement of lipoperoxidation (tumour malondialdehyde content being similar between the groups) or from an inhibition of tumour cell proliferation (as there was an unchanged S phase fraction in the tumours). We concluded that an adequate content of ALA in the diet is required to allow a protective effect of beta-carotene in mammary carcinogenesis. Whether such an interaction between ALA and beta-carotene influences the risk of breast cancer in women needs to be investigated. PMID:16869986

  12. Energetics and mammary carcinogenesis: effects of moderate-intensity running and energy intake on cellular processes and molecular mechanisms in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N.; Thompson, Henry J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects on mammary carcinogenesis of similar limitations in energy availability either by energy expenditure due to moderate-intensity running (physical activity, PA) or by regulating dietary energy (RE) intake relative to a sedentary control (SC) group that ate ad libitum. A total of 90 female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (50 mg/kg) and 7 days thereafter were randomized to either SC, a PA group given free access to a motorized running wheel, or a RE group whose food intake limited growth to the rate observed in PA. Compared with SC, mammary carcinogenesis was inhibited by RE or PA. Cancer incidence, 92.6%, 77.8%, and 66.7% (P = 0.06), and cancer multiplicity, 3.44, 2.11, and 1.62 cancers/rat (P = 0.006), in SC, RE, and PA, respectively, were reduced to a similar extent by RE and PA. Histological and Western blot analyses of mammary carcinomas provided evidence that RE and PA induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, that cell cycle progression was suppressed at the G1/S transition, and that intratumoral blood vessel density was reduced, although it remains to be determined whether PA and RE exert these effects via the same mechanisms. PMID:19095749

  13. Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Fluorescence as a Biomarker to Monitor the Anticancer Effect of Semecarpus Anacardium in DMBA Induced Mammary Carcinoma Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haseena Banu Hedayathullah; Vani, S; Palanivelu, Shanthi; Panchanadham, Sachdanandam

    2015-07-01

    Endogenous fluorescence has been proposed as a means of aiding the diagnosis of various malignancies. It has been suggested that erythrocytes may be the carriers of fluorophors that accumulate in cancer tissue and may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies. Hence, the present study was designed to explore the spectrofluorimetric analysis of blood components as a marker for the analysis of mammary carcinoma treatment and also to bring about the protective effect of the drug Semecarpus anacardium on oxidative stress mediated damage of erythrocytes. Fluorescence spectra of the blood components were studied and also the level of lipid per oxides and antioxidant enzymes status in erythrocytes were determined in DMBA induced mammary carcinoma rats treated with Semecarpus anacardium Linn nut milk extract. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy of blood components are altered under cancer conditions and the drug effectively ameliorated these alterations in mammary carcinoma induced rats. The drug also effectively reduced the oxidative stress induced erythrocyte damage thereby restoring the erythrocytes antioxidant status. These results suggest that erythrocytes may be the carriers of fluorophors that accumulate in cancer tissue and hence acts as new biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25943985

  14. Energetics and mammary carcinogenesis: effects of moderate-intensity running and energy intake on cellular processes and molecular mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongjian; Jiang, Weiqin; McGinley, John N; Thompson, Henry J

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects on mammary carcinogenesis of similar limitations in energy availability either by energy expenditure due to moderate-intensity running (physical activity, PA) or by regulating dietary energy (RE) intake relative to a sedentary control (SC) group that ate ad libitum. A total of 90 female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (50 mg/kg) and 7 days thereafter were randomized to either SC, a PA group given free access to a motorized running wheel, or a RE group whose food intake limited growth to the rate observed in PA. Compared with SC, mammary carcinogenesis was inhibited by RE or PA. Cancer incidence, 92.6%, 77.8%, and 66.7% (P = 0.06), and cancer multiplicity, 3.44, 2.11, and 1.62 cancers/rat (P = 0.006), in SC, RE, and PA, respectively, were reduced to a similar extent by RE and PA. Histological and Western blot analyses of mammary carcinomas provided evidence that RE and PA induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, that cell cycle progression was suppressed at the G(1)/S transition, and that intratumoral blood vessel density was reduced, although it remains to be determined whether PA and RE exert these effects via the same mechanisms. PMID:19095749

  15. The effect of physical training on the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Malicka, Iwona; Siewierska, Katarzyna; Pula, Bartosz; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Haus, Dominik; Paslawska, Urszula; Cegielski, Marek; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Wozniewski, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The impact of physical activity on carcinogenesis has been demonstrated in many studies. Taking into account the discrepant results of physical exercise on the cell proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer, we aimed to examine the impact of physical training on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-(MNU)-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Fifty female rats were divided into four groups according to the intensity of physical activity they undertook. The number of developed tumors, tumor volume, and histopathological diagnoses were noted. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were studied by the number of TUNEL-positive and Ki-67-expressing cells. We demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in the tumor number between all trained groups and the control group. The results were most pronounced in the group with a moderate intensity of training. Moreover, we showed a decrease in tumor volume as training intensity increased, though the differences were not statistically significant. The mean number of TUNEL-positive cancer cells was significantly higher in the training groups than in the control group. These data suggest that physical training, especially of moderate intensity, may alleviate MNU-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The results could suggest that physical exercise-induced apoptosis may be a protective mechanism. PMID:25990440

  16. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse mammary, Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral glands.

    PubMed

    Rudmann, Daniel; Cardiff, Robert; Chouinard, Luc; Goodman, Dawn; Küttler, Karin; Marxfeld, Heike; Molinolo, Alfredo; Treumann, Silke; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2012-08-01

    The mammary gland of laboratory rodents is an important organ for the evaluation of effects of xenobiotics, especially those that perturb hormonal homeostasis or are potentially carcinogenic. Mammary gland cancer is a leading cause of human mortality and morbidity worldwide and is a subject of major research efforts utilizing rodent models. Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral glands are standard tissues that are evaluated in animal models that enable human risk assessment of xenobiotics. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature for mammary, Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral gland lesions in laboratory animals will improve diagnostic alignment among regulatory and scientific research organizations and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:22949413

  17. New methods in mammary gland development and cancer: proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The European Network for Breast Development and Cancer (ENBDC) meeting on 'Methods in Mammary Gland Development and Cancer' has become an annual international rendezvous for scientists with interests in the normal and neoplastic breast. The fourth meeting in this series, held in April in Weggis, Switzerland, focused on proteomics, epigenetics, symmetric division, and metastasis. PMID:22809213

  18. Effects of 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals on DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da; Shen, Yonghao; Kuster, Niels; Fu, Yiti; Chiang, Huai

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether exposure to 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals enhances mammary tumor development and growth induced by low-dose DMBA. Five hundred female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a single dose of 35 mg/kg DMBA and then divided into five groups in a blinded fashion: one cage control group and four exposure groups, including three microwave exposure groups and one sham exposure with specific absorption rates (SARs) of 4.0, 1.33, 0.44 and 0 W/kg, respectively. Exposure started on the day after DMBA administration and lasted 4 h/day, 5 days/week for 26 weeks. Rats were weighed and palpated weekly for the presence of tumors and were killed humanely at the end of the 26-week exposure period. All mammary glands were examined histologically. There were no statistically significant differences in body weight between sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. No significant differences in overall mammary tumor incidence, latency to tumor onset, tumor multiplicity, or tumor size were observed between microwave- and sham-exposed groups. There was a tendency for reduction of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence in the lowest microwave exposure group (0.44 W/ kg) compared with the sham-exposed group (P = 0.058). Additionally, a higher incidence of adenocarcinoma was noticed in the 4.0 W/kg group from the 15th to 26th weeks, especially in the 19th week (P = 0.358 compared to sham). However, neither tendency was statistically significant; thus this study does not provide evidence that GSM microwave exposure promotes mammary tumor development in rats. In the present study there were significant differences between the cage controls and the experimental groups (sham and exposure). Body weight and mammary tumor (malignant plus benign) incidence in the cage control group were significantly higher than in the sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. The latency to the mammary tumor onset was significantly shorter in the cage control

  19. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)phenylalanine. At both PF100 and PF85, fractional and absolute rates of mammary gland protein synthesis were two- to three-fold higher in rats fed C than in those fed WG. Pup weights showed similar treatment effects. Both mammary protein synthesis rates and pup weights were significantly higher in rats fed C at PF85 than rats fed WG ad libitum. Food restriction from PF100 to PF85 depressed pup weights and mammary protein synthesis rates in rats fed WGLT, but had no effect in rats fed WG. These results demonstrate that when food intake is restricted, improvement of protein quality of the maternal diet increases milk output in the rat in association with increased rates of mammary protein synthesis.

  20. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  1. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  2. Collagen-binding proteins of rat mammary tumor epithelial cells: A biochemical and immunological study

    SciTech Connect

    Wirl, G.; Pfaeffle, M. )

    1988-05-01

    Collagen-binding proteins were studied in mammary epithelial cells of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced rat mammary tumors. Using affinity chromatography on type I collagen-Sepharose and polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis, three major proteins of 34,000, 36,000, and 38,000 Da were found. Pulse-chase experiments did not indicate a precursor-product relationship of these proteins. Tryptic/chymotryptic peptide maps, however, revealed that the 36,000- and 38,000-Da proteins are very similar but are quite different from the 34,000-Da molecular form. The distribution and function of these proteins were then analyzed by using polyclonal antibodies directed against the entire set of major proteins. In immunofluorescence studies the authors observed a dense, punctate distribution of fluorescence on the cell surface of isolated and unfixed epithelial organoids and a bright pericellular staining in cultures after fixation. Treatment with the antiserum did not affect attachment and spreading of cuboidal mammary cells to plastic or to a collagen substratum. However, when the antiserum was added to the medium of growing cuboidal cells, it caused the formation of duct-like structures. These studies indicate that collagen-binding proteins may play a role in mammary gland morphology.

  3. Effect of protein quality on /sup 14/C glucose utilization in isolated rat mammary acini

    SciTech Connect

    Masor, M.L.; Grundleger, M.L.; Jansen, G.R.

    1986-03-01

    Poor protein quality has a deleterious effect on lactation in rats. Dams consuming a 13% wheat gluten (WG) diet are unable to maintain litters. Glucose utilization in isolated mammary acini taken from dams at either day 20 of gestation (G20) or day 4 of lactation (L4) was examined in dams consuming 13% WG vs 13% casein-methionine (CM) diets from day of breeding. Dams consuming WG had significantly smaller inguinal-abdominal mammary glands than CM dams at both G20 and L4, and mammary glands of CM but not WG dams were larger at L4 than G20. Both average pup weight and pup daily gain were smaller in WG litters. Basal levels of /sup 14/C glucose oxidation (GO) and /sup 14/C glucose incorporation into lipid (GL) and lactose were examined. A large significant increase in GO and GL occurred in CM dams from G20 to L4 but not in WG dams. Both GO and GL were higher in CM dams on L4 but not at G20. The ratio of GO:GO+GL changed at parturition in CM but not WG dams. The normal changes in glucose utilization by mammary epithelial cells which occur at parturition were impaired by the WG diet.

  4. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  5. Revisiting a role for a mammary tumor retrovirus in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Brian; Gunzburg, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    There remains great controversy as to whether mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), the etiological agent of mammary cancer in mice, or a closely related human retrovirus, plays a role in the development of breast cancer in humans. On one hand, retroviruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known causative agents of cancer (in the case of HIV, albeit, indirectly), but attempts to associate other retroviruses with human cancers have been difficult. A recent, high profile, example has been the postulated involvement of another mouse virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, in human prostate cancer, which is now thought to be due to contamination. Here, we review some of the more recent evidence for and against the involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer and suggest future studies that may allow a definitive answer to this conundrum. PMID:23580334

  6. β-Glucan modulates the lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response in rat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Haitian; Miao, Jinfeng; Huang, Guoqing; Tong, Mingqing; Zou, Sixiang

    2013-02-01

    Mastitis, caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria which are frequent implications of Escherichia coli, is an important disease affecting women and dairy animals worldwide. The β-glucan binding of dectin-1 can induce its own intracellular signaling and can mediate a variety of cellular responses. This work was to investigate the effect of β-glucan on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response and related innate immune signaling in primary rat mammary epithelial cells. Cells were treated with serum-free medium added with a DMSO solution containing β-glucans at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, 25 μmol/L for 12h, and then exposed to 10 μg/mL LPS for 40 min. Moreover, cells were pretreated with BAY 11-7082 to inhibit NF-κB and then successively exposed to 5 μmol/L β-glucan, 10 μg/mL LPS, 5 μmol/L β-glucan and 10 μg/mL LPS, according to the specific experimental design. Normal control cultures contained an equal volume of DMSO, which was collected at the same time. After incubating rat mammary epithelial cells for 40 min with 10 μg/mL LPS, TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression all increased (P<0.05), as did the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β (P<0.05), but IκB and β-casein expression both decreased (P<0.05). Treatment with different concentrations of β-glucan for 12h activated Dectin1/Syk, which subsequently suppressed TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. However, it restored the IκB and β-casein expression that had been induced by the 40 min incubation with 10 μg/mL LPS. Pretreatment with BAY 11-7082 at 10 µmol/L for 2h partially prevented NF-κB induction by LPS, but the presence of β-glucan prevented this inactivation. BAY 11-7082 could not simultaneously inhibit LPS induction of TLR4, MyD88 and β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk in rat mammary epithelial cells. These findings demonstrated that β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk attenuated LPS induction of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB and inhibited the LPS

  7. Experimental diets for the study of lipid influence on the induced mammary carcinoma in rats: I--Diet definition.

    PubMed

    Escrich, E; Solanas, M; Segura, R

    1994-01-01

    There is a considerable variation in the diets used in studies on the influence of dietary fat on rat mammary cancer. In view of the fact that diet is the most remarkable factor in these studies, the aim of this work was to define two experimental diets, one of them normal (N3) and another hyperlipidic (HL20), both allowing the normal growth of the rat and neither of them containing factors that could unspecifically affect mammary carcinogenesis. Semisynthetic diets were selected instead of natural ones. A normal diet (3% corn oil, 18% casein, 67.9% dextrose) and a hyperlipidic diet (20% corn oil, 23% casein, 45.9% dextrose) were defined for the rat. Both diets also contain 5% cellulose, 5.9% salt mix and 0.24% vitamin mix. In order to avoid the influence of the above mentioned unspecific factors, the control of specificity and quality of nutrients is proposed as an essential measure. Moreover, it is also necessary to adopt measures to avoid the presence of fatty acid metabolites, including the calculation of the necessary vitamin E, selenium and sulfur amino acid and the determination of factors potentially able to stimulate or inhibit carcinogenesis such as phenolic antioxidants, retinoids or the trans isomer of fatty acids. On the other had, casein, dextrose, choline and folic acid contents were modified in order to equilibrate the lipid increase experimentally introduced in the HL20 diet or to ensure the normal maintenance of the animals' metabolism. The method used is based on the concept of quality assurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7772745

  8. Chemopreventive efficacy of naproxen and nitric oxide-naproxen in rodent models of colon, urinary bladder, and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Zhang, Yuting; Patlolla, Jagan; Boring, Daniel; Kopelovich, Levy; Juliana, M Margaret; Grubbs, Clinton J; Lubet, Ronald A

    2009-11-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have been highly effective in preventing colon, urinary bladder, and skin cancer preclinically, and also in clinical trials of colon adenoma formation. However, certain NSAIDs cause gastrointestinal ulceration and may increase cardiovascular events. Naproxen seems to cause the lowest cardiovascular events of the common NSAIDs other than aspirin. Nitric oxide (NO)-naproxen was tested based on the finding that adding a NO group to NSAIDs may help alleviate GI toxicity. In the azoxymethane-induced rat colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) model, naproxen administered at 200 and 400 ppm in the diet reduced mean ACFs in the colon by about 45% to 60%, respectively. NO-naproxen was likewise administered in the diet at roughly equimolar doses (300 and 600 ppm) and reduced total ACF by 20% to 40%, respectively. In the hydroxybutyl (butyl) nitrosamine rat urinary bladder cancer model, NO-naproxen was given at 183 or 550 ppm in the diet, and naproxen at 128 ppm. The NO-naproxen groups had 77% and 73% decreases, respectively, in the development of large urinary bladder tumors, whereas the 128 ppm naproxen group also showed a strong decrease (69%). If treatments were started 3 months after hydroxybutyl (butyl) nitrosamine, NO-naproxen (550 ppm) and naproxen (400 ppm) were also highly effective (86-94% decreases). In the methylnitrosourea-induced mammary cancer model in rats, NO-naproxen and naproxen showed nonsignificant inhibitions (12% and 24%) at 550 and 400 ppm, respectively. These data show that both naproxen and NO-naproxen are effective agents against urinary bladder and colon, but not mammary, carcinogenesis. PMID:19892664

  9. CHEMOPREVENTIVE EFFICACY OF NAPROXEN AND NO-NAPROXEN IN RODENT MODELS OF COLON, URINARY BLADDER, AND MAMMARY CANCERS

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Zhang, Yuting; Patlolla, Jagan; Boring, Daniel; Kopelovich, Levy; Juliana, M. Margaret; Grubbs, Clinton J.; Lubet, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been highly effective in preventing colon, urinary bladder, and skin cancer preclinically; and also in clinical trials of colon adenoma formation. However, certain NSAIDs cause gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and may increase cardiovascular (CV) events. Naproxen appears to cause the lowest CV events of the common NSAIDs other than aspirin. NO-naproxen was tested based on the finding that adding a nitric oxide (NO) group to NSAIDs may help alleviate GI toxicity. In the azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) model, naproxen administered at 200 and 400 ppm in the diet reduced mean ACFs in the colon by about 45–60%, respectively. NO-naproxen was likewise administered in the diet at roughly equimolar doses (300 and 600 ppm), and reduced total ACF by 20–40%, respectively. In the hydroxybutyl (butyl) nitrosamine (OH-BBN) rat urinary bladder cancer model, NO-naproxen was given at 183 ppm or 550 ppm in the diet, and naproxen at 128 ppm. The NO-naproxen groups had 77% and 73% decreases, respectively, in the development of large urinary bladder tumors, while the 128 ppm naproxen group also showed a strong decrease (69%). If treatments were started three months after OH-BBN, NO-naproxen (550 ppm) and naproxen (400 ppm) were also highly effective (86–94% decreases). In the methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancer model in rats, NO-naproxen and naproxen showed non-significant inhibitions (12 and 24%) at 550 and 400 ppm, respectively. These data show that both naproxen and NO-naproxen are effective agents against urinary bladder and colon, but not mammary, carcinogenesis. PMID:19892664

  10. Regulation of Mammary and Adipose Tissue Lipoprotein Lipase and Blood Triacylglycerol in Rats during Late Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, Peter M.; Garrison, Mary M.; Scow, Robert O.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of several prostaglandins on lipoprotein lipase activity of mammary gland and adipose tissue and serum triacylglycerol were studied during late pregnancy in rats. Prostaglandins were injected twice daily for 2 days before and once on the day of analysis. In rats pregnant 20 days, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) increased the activity of lipoprotein lipase in mammary gland fourfold, reduced the activity in adipose tissue about 60%, and decreased serum concentration of triacylglycerol 50%. PGF2α also reduced serum concentration of progesterone 90% and increased that of prolactin fivefold, but had no effect on serum concentrations of either immuno-reactive insulin or 17β-estradiol. Injections of 13,14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2α, a metabolite of PGF2α, had similar effects in rats pregnant 20 days, whereas prostaglandins E1 and E2 did not. In rats pregnant 16 days, PGF2α did not affect lipoprotein lipase activity in the tissues or the concentration of triacylglycerol and prolactin in serum, although it decreased serum progesterone 80%. 2-Br-α-ergocryptine prevented the increase in serum prolactin in response to PGF2α, but did not alter the effect of PGF2α on lipoprotein lipase activity or serum triacylglycerol. Progesterone completely blocked the effects of PGF2α on lipoprotein lipase activity and serum triacylglycerol and prolactin concentrations. These findings indicate that the changes in lipoprotein lipase activity and serum triacylglycerol in PGF2α-treated rats are probably related to the inhibitory action of PGF2α on progesterone secretion. They also suggest that endogenous F prostaglandins may play a role in the regulation of lipoprotein lipase activity in mammary gland and adipose tissue near parturition. PMID:893673

  11. Functional interaction between mouse erbB3 and wild-type rat c-neu in transgenic mouse mammary tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Aeree; Liu, Bolin; Ordonez-Ercan, Dalia; Alvarez, Kathy M; Jones, Lynn D; McKimmey, Christine; Edgerton, Susan M; Yang, XiaoHe; Thor, Ann D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Co-expression of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including erbB2 and erbB3, is frequently identified in breast cancers. A member of the RTK family, the kinase-deficient erbB3 can activate downstream signaling via heterodimer formation with erbB2. We studied the expression of RTK receptors in mammary tumors from the wild-type (wt) rat c-neu transgenic model. We hypothesized that physical and functional interactions between the wt rat neu/ErbB2 transgene and mouse ErbB3-encoded proteins could occur, activating downstream signaling and promoting mammary oncogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed to study the expression of rat c-neu/ErbB2 and mouse erbB3 in mammary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines from the wt rat c-neu transgenic mice. Co-immunoprecipitation methods were employed to quantitate heterodimerization between the transgene-encoded protein erbB2 and the endogenous mouse erbB3. Tumor cell growth in response to growth factors, such as Heregulin (HRG), epidermal growth factor (EGF), or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), was also studied. Post-HRG stimulation, activation of the RTK downstream signaling was determined by Western blot analyses using antibodies against phosphorylated Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), respectively. Specific inhibitors were then used with cell proliferation assays to study the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K)/Akt and MAPK kinase (MEK)/MAPK pathways as possible mechanisms of HRG-induced tumor cell proliferation. Results Mammary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines frequently exhibited elevated co-expression of erbB2 and erbB3. The transgene-encoded protein erbB2 formed a stable heterodimer complex with endogenous mouse erbB3. HRG stimulation promoted physical and functional erbB2/erbB3 interactions and tumor cell growth, whereas no response to EGF or IGF-1 was observed. HRG treatment activated both the Akt and MAPK pathways in a dose- and time

  12. Iodine and doxorubicin, a good combination for mammary cancer treatment: antineoplastic adjuvancy, chemoresistance inhibition, and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although mammary cancer (MC) is the most common malignant neoplasia in women, the mortality for this cancer has decreased principally because of early detection and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of several preparations that cause MC regression, doxorubicin (DOX) is the most active, first-line monotherapeutic. Nevertheless, its use is limited due to the rapid development of chemoresistance and to the cardiotoxicity caused by free radicals. In previous studies we have shown that supplementation with molecular iodine (I2) has a powerful antineoplastic effect in methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced experimental models of MC. These studies also showed a consistent antioxidant effect of I2 in normal and tumoral tissues. Methods Here, we analyzed the effect of I2 in combination with DOX treatment in female Sprague Dawley rats with MNU-induced MC. In the first experiment (short) animals were treated with the therapeutic DOX dose (16 mg/kg) or with lower doses (8 and 4 mg/Kg), in each case with and without 0.05% I2 in drinking water. Iodine treatment began on day 0, a single dose of DOX was injected (ip) on day 2, and the analysis was carried out on day 7. In the second experiment (long) animals with and without iodine supplement were treated with one or two injections of 4 mg/kg DOX (on days 0 and 14) and were analyzed on day 56. Results At all DOX doses, the short I2 treatment induced adjuvant antineoplastic effects (decreased tumor size and proliferating cell nuclear antigen level) with significant protection against body weight loss and cardiotoxicity (creatine kinase MB, cardiac lipoperoxidation, and heart damage). With long-term I2, mammary tumor tissue became more sensitive to DOX, since a single injection of the lowest dose of DOX (4 mg/Kg) was enough to stop tumor progression and a second DOX4 injection on day 14 caused a significant and rapid decrease in tumor size, decreased the expression of chemoresistance markers (Bcl2 and survivin), and increased

  13. Estimation of rat mammary tumor volume using caliper and ultrasonography measurements.

    PubMed

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana; Oliveira, Paula A; Pinho-Oliveira, Jacinta; Teixeira-Guedes, Catarina; Soares-Maia, Ruben; da Costa, Rui Gil; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Colaço, Jorge; Ferreira, Rita; Ginja, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Mammary tumors similar to those observed in women can be induced in rats by intraperitoneal administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Determining tumor volume is a useful and quantitative way to monitor tumor progression. In this study, the authors measured dimensions of rat mammary tumors using a caliper and using real-time compound B-mode ultrasonography. They then used different formulas to calculate tumor volume from these tumor measurements and compared the calculated tumor volumes with the real tumor volume to identify the formulas that gave the most accurate volume calculations. They found that caliper and ultrasonography measurements were significantly correlated but that tumor volumes calculated using different formulas varied substantially. Mammary tumors seemed to take on an oblate spheroid geometry. The most accurate volume calculations were obtained using the formula V = (W(2) × L)/2 for caliper measurements and the formula V = (4/3) × π × (L/2) × (L/2) × (D/2) for ultrasonography measurements, where V is tumor volume, W is tumor width, L is tumor length and D is tumor depth. PMID:23689461

  14. Circadian disruption-induced microRNAome deregulation in rat mammary gland tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, David Z.; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Golubov, Andrey; Deibel, Scott H.; McDonald, Robert J.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women worldwide, and evidence is mounting that circadian-disruption-induced breast cancer is a warranted concern. Although studies on the role of epigenetics have provided valuable insights, and although epigenetics has been increasingly recognized in the etiology of breast cancer, relatively few studies have investigated the epigenetic link between circadian disruption (CD) and breast cancer. Using a proven photoperiod-shifting paradigm, differing degrees of CD, various tissue-extraction time points, and Illumina sequencing, we investigated the effect of CD on miRNA expression in the mammary tissues of a rodent model system. To our knowledge, our results are the first to illustrate CD-induced changes in miRNA expressions in mammary tissues. Furthermore, it is likely that these miRNA expression changes exhibit varying time frames of plasticity linked to both the degree of CD and length of reentrainment, and that the expression changes are influenced by the light and dark phases of the 24-hour circadian cycle. Of the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in the present study, all but one have been linked to breast cancer, and many have predicted circadian-relevant targets that play a role in breast cancer development. Based on the analysis of protein levels in the same tissues, we also propose that the initiation and development of CD-induced breast cancer may be linked to an interconnected web of increased NF-κB activity and increased levels of Tudor-SN, STAT3, and BCL6, with aberrant CD-induced downregulation of miR-127 and miR-146b potentially contributing to this dynamic. This study provides direct evidence that CD induces changes in miRNA levels in mammary tissues with potentially malignant consequences, thus indicating that the role of miRNAs in CD-induced breast cancer should not be dismissed. PMID:26097876

  15. Circadian disruption-induced microRNAome deregulation in rat mammary gland tissues.

    PubMed

    Kochan, David Z; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Golubov, Andrey; Deibel, Scott H; McDonald, Robert J; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women worldwide, and evidence is mounting that circadian-disruption-induced breast cancer is a warranted concern. Although studies on the role of epigenetics have provided valuable insights, and although epigenetics has been increasingly recognized in the etiology of breast cancer, relatively few studies have investigated the epigenetic link between circadian disruption (CD) and breast cancer. Using a proven photoperiod-shifting paradigm, differing degrees of CD, various tissue-extraction time points, and Illumina sequencing, we investigated the effect of CD on miRNA expression in the mammary tissues of a rodent model system. To our knowledge, our results are the first to illustrate CD-induced changes in miRNA expressions in mammary tissues. Furthermore, it is likely that these miRNA expression changes exhibit varying time frames of plasticity linked to both the degree of CD and length of reentrainment, and that the expression changes are influenced by the light and dark phases of the 24-hour circadian cycle. Of the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in the present study, all but one have been linked to breast cancer, and many have predicted circadian-relevant targets that play a role in breast cancer development. Based on the analysis of protein levels in the same tissues, we also propose that the initiation and development of CD-induced breast cancer may be linked to an interconnected web of increased NF-κB activity and increased levels of Tudor-SN, STAT3, and BCL6, with aberrant CD-induced downregulation of miR-127 and miR-146b potentially contributing to this dynamic. This study provides direct evidence that CD induces changes in miRNA levels in mammary tissues with potentially malignant consequences, thus indicating that the role of miRNAs in CD-induced breast cancer should not be dismissed. PMID:26097876

  16. Mammary gland development and response to prenatal atrazine exposure in the Sprague Dawley and Long-Evans rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary gland (MG) tumor development in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats is increased by longterm dietary exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR). ATR is proposed to cause these changes in the adult SD rat by altering hormonally-regulated estrous cyclicity. In Long-Evans...

  17. Effect of tunicamycin on sialomucin and natural killer susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, S; Moriarty, J; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-09-01

    The MAT-B1 and MAT-C1 ascites sublines of the 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma contain a dominant cell surface "complex" consisting of two glycoproteins: ascites sialoglycoprotein (ASGP)-1, a Mr 600,000-700,000 peanut agglutinin-binding sialomucin, and ASGP-2, a Mr 120,000 concancavalin A-binding glycoprotein (Sherblom et al., J. Biol. Chem., 255: 783-790, 1980; Sherblom and Carraway, J. Biol. Chem., 255: 12051-12059, 1980). Although both cell lines are resistant to lysis by natural killer cells, treatments which result in loss of cell surface ASGP-1 render the cells susceptible to natural killer cell lysis (Sherblom and Moody, Cancer Res., 46:4543-4546, 1986). Treatment of the ascites cells with 5 micrograms/ml tunicamycin for 24 h effectively inhibits glycosylation of ASGP-2 without affecting cell viability or total protein synthesis. Under these conditions, expression of ASGP-1 is depressed by at least 50% in both cell lines, as monitored by [3H]glucosamine incorporation and by binding of peanut agglutinin to intact cells. The size distribution of O-linked oligosaccharides in ASGP-1 from tunicamycin-treated versus control MAT-B1 cells is indistinguishable, as determined by Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography following alkaline-borohydride treatment. Complex isolated from either treated or control cells bands at the same density in a CsCl gradient containing Triton X-100 and contains a diffuse band corresponding to ASGP-2 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Tunicamycin-treated cells, consistent with the reduced expression of ASGP-1, are significantly more susceptible to natural killer cell-mediated lysis, when compared to untreated controls. The results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is a prerequisite for sialomucin synthesis and/or complex formation. PMID:2386935

  18. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  19. Influence of Age on the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ion Radiation for Induction of Rat Mammary Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Doi, Kazutaka; Iizuka, Daisuke; Nishimura, Yukiko; Okutani, Tomomi; Takabatake, Masaru; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The risk of developing secondary cancer after radiotherapy, especially after treatment of childhood cancers, remains a matter of concern. The high biological effects of carbon-ion radiation have enabled powerful radiotherapy, yet the approach is commonly restricted to the treatment of adults. Susceptibility of the fetus to particle radiation–induced cancer is also unclear. The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of carbon-ion irradiation in childhood on breast carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: We irradiated female Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages (embryonic days 3, 13, and 17 and 1, 3, 7, and 15 weeks after birth) with {sup 137}Cs γ rays or a 290-MeV/u monoenergetic carbonion beam (linear energy transfer, 13 keV/μm). All animals were screened weekly for mammary carcinoma by palpation until they were 90 weeks old. Results: Irradiation of fetal and mature (15-week-old) rats with either radiation source at a dose of 0.2 or 1 Gy did not substantially increase the hazard ratio compared with the nonirradiated group. Dose responses (0.2-2.0 Gy) to γ rays were similar among the groups of rats irradiated 1, 3, and 7 weeks after birth. The effect of carbon ions increased along with the age at the time of irradiation, indicating relative biological effectiveness values of 0.2 (−0.3, 0.7), 1.3 (1.0, 1.6), and 2.8 (1.8, 3.9) (mean and 95% confidence interval) for animals that were 1, 3, and 7 weeks of age, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings imply that carbonion therapy may be associated with a risk of secondary breast cancer in humans, the extent of which may depend on the age of the patient at the time of irradiation.

  20. Apigenin prevents development of medroxyprogesterone acetate-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Mafuvadze, Benford; Benakanakere, Indira; Lopez, Franklin; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Hyder, Salman M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of progestins as a component of hormone replacement therapy has been linked to an increase in breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. We have previously shown that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), a commonly administered synthetic progestin, increases production of the potent angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by tumor cells, leading to the development of new blood vessels and tumor growth. We sought to identify nontoxic chemicals that would inhibit progestin-induced tumorigenesis. We used a recently developed progestin-dependent mammary cancer model in which tumors are induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) treatment. The flavonoid apigenin, which we previously found to inhibit progestin-dependent VEGF synthesis in human breast cancer cells in vitro, significantly delayed the development of, and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of, MPA-accelerated DMBA-induced mammary tumors in this animal model. Whereas apigenin decreased the occurrence of such tumors, it did not block MPA-induced intraductal and lobular epithelial cell hyperplasia in the mammary tissue. Apigenin blocked MPA-dependent increases in VEGF, and suppressed VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) but not VEGFR-1 in regions of hyperplasia. No differences were observed in estrogen or progesterone receptor levels, or the number of estrogen receptor-positive cells, within the mammary gland of MPA-treated animals administered apigenin, MPA-treated animals, and placebo treated animals. However, the number of progesterone receptor-positive cells was reduced in animals treated with MPA or MPA and apigenin compared with those treated with placebo. These findings suggest that apigenin has important chemopreventive properties for those breast cancers that develop in response to progestins. PMID:21505181

  1. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  2. Effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate on the response of the rat mammary gland to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I. H.; Gimotty, P.; Dupuis, M.; Russo, J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to determine whether mammary gland differentiation, which is known to protect this organ from chemically induced carcinogenesis, can be stimulated in virgin rats by administration of a progestagenic agent, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) was given to 300 Sprague-Dawley virgin rats, which at the ages of 45, 55, 65 and 75 days, groups I, II, III and IV respectively, had implanted an MPA pellet of 0.5 mg (low dose-LD) or 5.0 mg (high dose-HD). Pellets were removed after 21 days, and 21 days later five animals per group were killed for evaluation of mammary gland development. The remaining animals received 8 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene (DMBA) per 100 g body weight, and were killed after 24 weeks for evaluation of tumour incidence. Both age and treatment affected mammary gland structure and had a significant interaction in the proportion of terminal end buds (TEBs) present. The number of TEBs decreased as a function of age; treatment at both LD and HD did not modify the proportion of TEBs in groups I and III; LD decreased their percentage in group II, and both doses markedly increased TEB percentage in group IV animals. MPA LD treatment did not affect overall tumour and adenocarcinoma incidence although group IV animals developed greater incidences than their respective controls. MPA HD treated rats were 2.45 times more likely to develop tumours than their respective controls. Adenocarcinoma incidence had a significant positive correlation with the percentage of TEBs present. It was concluded that this progestagenic agent did not increase the risk of carcinoma development when administered to virgin rats at the clinical dose used for contraception. However, a 10-fold dose increase resulted in a higher tumorigenic response. PMID:2522791

  3. The growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant blocks both mammary gland development and MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft growth.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary gland development is dependent upon the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis, this same axis has also been implicated in breast cancer progression. In this study we investigated the effect of a GH antagonist, pegvisomant (Somavert((R)), Pfizer), on normal mammary gla...

  4. Carcinogenic responses to chemicals applied directly to rat mammary glands in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.; Meade, M.; Stone, J.P.; Shellabarger, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    In four experiments, concentrated glycerin suspensions of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), or the water-soluble compounds, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) were delivered into pockets in the mammary fat pads in female Sprague-Dawley rats. In a 90-day experiment, each of three groups of 20-22 rats were treated with either 25, 50, or 100 ..mu..g DMBA delivered to each of four sites in each rat per group. Dose-related responses were detected for incidence of rats with mammary adenocarcinoma (MAC), and for number of MAC per treated site. In a 120-day study, each of three groups of 20 animals were treated with either 250, 500, or 1000 ..mu..g MNU at each of 80 sites per group. Dose-related MAC responses were detected for incidence of rats with MAC, number of MAC per treated site, and time to detection of MAC. In two experiments of 90 days duration, groups of 20 females were treated with either 1000 ..mu..g ENU or 1000 ..mu..g 4-NQO at each of 80 sites per group. ENU produced a total of 27 MAC sites in 65% of the rats, and 4-NQO produced a total of 26 MAC in 60% of the rats. A comparison of the time to detection of all MAC data for the three water-soluble compounds at the 1000 ..mu..g treatment level, or on the basis of moles per treatment, yielded a carcinogenic potency relationship of 4-NQO > ENU > MNU. 21 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. [Biological implant in single-stage reconstruction of mammary gland for cancer].

    PubMed

    Zikiriakhodzhaev, A D; Ermoshchenkova, M V

    2015-01-01

    Brief literature review about features of biological implants application for mammary gland reconstruction is presented in the article. Possible complications after such materials use, first experience of acellular dermal matrix administration for single-stage mammary gland reconstruction in 6 patients with breast cancer are also described. We offered surgical techniques, complications and methods of its treatment. We presented advantages of biological implant use which are consisted in decrease of surgical damage and duration of surgery, opportunity for enlargement of pocket for implant, decrease of pain syndrome. PMID:25909549

  6. Field cancerization in mammary carcinogenesis - Implications for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of breast cancer unfolds with the development of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in normal breast tissue, and evolution of this pre-invasive neoplasm into invasive cancer. The mechanisms that drive these processes are poorly understood, but evidence from the literature suggests that mammary carcinogenesis may occur through the process of field cancerization. Clinical observations are consistent with the idea that (i) DCIS may arise in a field of altered breast epithelium, (ii) narrow surgical margins do not remove the entire altered field (contributing to recurrence and/or disease progression), and (iii) whole-breast radiation therapy is effective in elimination of the residual field of altered cells adjacent to the resected DCIS. Molecular studies suggest that the field of altered breast epithelial cells may carry cancer-promoting genetic mutations (or other molecular alterations) or cancer promoting epimutations (oncogenic alterations in the epigenome). In fact, most breast cancers develop through a succession of molecular events involving both genetic mutations and epimutations. Hence, in hereditary forms of breast cancer, the altered field reflects the entire breast tissue which is composed of cells with a predisposing molecular lesion (such as a BRCA1 mutation). In the example of a BRCA1-mutant patient, it is evident that local resection of a DCIS lesion or localized but invasive cancer will not result in elimination of the altered field. In sporadic breast cancer patients, the mechanistic basis for the altered field may not be so easily recognized. Nonetheless, identification of the nature of field cancerization in a given patient may guide clinical intervention. Thus, patients with DCIS that develops in response to an epigenetic lesion (such as a hypermethylation defect affecting the expression of tumor suppressor genes) might be treated with epigenetic therapy to normalize the altered field and reduce the risk of secondary occurrence of

  7. Male breast cancer originating in an accessory mammary gland in the axilla: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Jun; Masuda, Norikazu; Kodama, Yoshinori; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Nakamori, Shoji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoma of an accessory mammary gland is an extremely rare tumor. A 61-year-old male patient presented with a hard mass measuring 85 mm × 51 mm in the left axilla. Incisional biopsy histopathologically showed an adenocarcinoma compatible with breast carcinoma originating in an accessory mammary gland. Systemic examinations revealed no evidence of malignant or occult primary lesion in the bilateral mammary glands or in other organs. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was performed for the locally advanced axillary tumor and reduced the tumor to 55 mm in size, and, then, he could undergo complete resection with a negative surgical margin in combination with reconstructive surgery to fill the resulting skin defect with a local flap of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The patient has presented with no metastatic lesion in four years since the operation. This unusual case shows that neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an effective and tolerated therapy for advanced accessory breast cancer in the axilla. PMID:23251170

  8. Stress and morphine affect survival of rats challenged with a mammary ascites tumor (MAT 13762B).

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Shavit, Y; Terman, G W; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    We have previously shown that exposure to inescapable footshock stress decreases survival of rats injected with a mammary ascites tumor (MAT 13762B). This increased vulnerability to the tumor challenge was prevented by an opiate antagonist, naltrexone, suggesting mediation by opioid peptides. Supporting this hypothesis, we now report that a high dose of an opiate agonist, morphine, also reduces survival of rats given the same tumor. This effect shows tolerance after 14 daily injections. The adverse effect of stress, however, did not show other signs of opioid involvement: it manifested neither tolerance with repeated stress exposures nor cross-tolerance in morphine-tolerant rats. Our recent findings that stress and morphine reduce natural killer cell cytotoxicity in a similar fashion suggest an immune mechanism that may explain the present results. PMID:6678390

  9. The gene for the neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone is expressed in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

    PubMed Central

    Palmon, A; Ben Aroya, N; Tel-Or, S; Burstein, Y; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1994-01-01

    The high concentration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in milk of several species implies that the mammary gland is either a site of synthesis for this neuropeptide or that it is efficiently concentrated from plasma by this organ. By PCR amplification of mammary gland cDNA, we have demonstrated expression of the mRNA for GnRH. The GnRH mRNA was present in the mammary gland of pregnant and lactating rats but not of virgin rats, implying that expression of the GnRH gene is activated during pregnancy, probably by prolactin. In contrast, actin mRNA was evident in all the preparations of mammary glands. Since GnRH is also known to be synthesized by the placenta, it is likely that the placenta and the mammary gland are complementary units by which the mother exercises control over the development and the metabolism of the infant during pregnancy as well as after parturition. In addition, GnRH synthesized by the mammary gland may also affect the mother by a paracrine and/or an endocrine mechanism. Images PMID:8197170

  10. Induction of mammary tumors in aging rats by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene: role of DNA synthesis during carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.K.; Dao, T.L.

    1980-03-01

    Two routes of administration were used to test the susceptibility of the mammary gland of the rat to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) carcinogenesis in relation to age of the tissue. In one series of experiments, 60-, 70-, 90-, 120-, 150-, and 200-day-old female nonbred Sprague-Dawley rats were given DMBA iv. In parallel experiments, rats of the same ages as those above were given DMBA by local application. Mammary tumors developed in 89 to 90% of the 60- and 70-day-old rats and in 40% of the 90-day-old rats. Rats 120 days old and older were completely refractory to DMBA. In contrast, all rats, irrespective of their ages, developed tumors when DMBA was applied locally. DMBA given iv significantly inhibited DNA synthesis in mammary glands, but DMBA applied locally significantly increased the Li of the mammary glands.

  11. Does cancer start in the womb? altered mammary gland development and predisposition to breast cancer due to in utero exposure to endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Soto, Ana M; Brisken, Cathrin; Schaeberle, Cheryl; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    We are now witnessing a resurgence of theories of development and carcinogenesis in which the environment is again being accepted as a major player in phenotype determination. Perturbations in the fetal environment predispose an individual to disease that only becomes apparent in adulthood. For example, gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol resulted in clear cell carcinoma of the vagina and breast cancer. In this review the effects of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A (BPA) on mammary development and tumorigenesis in rodents is used as a paradigmatic example of how altered prenatal mammary development may lead to breast cancer in humans who are also widely exposed to it through plastic goods, food and drink packaging, and thermal paper receipts. Changes in the stroma and its extracellular matrix led to altered ductal morphogenesis. Additionally, gestational and lactational exposure to BPA increased the sensitivity of rats and mice to mammotropic hormones during puberty and beyond, thus suggesting a plausible explanation for the increased incidence of breast cancer. PMID:23702822

  12. Mammary Gland Growth Factors: Roles in Normal Development and in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Nancy E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    Normal development of the mammary gland proceeds via interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme that start during embryogenesis and continue during pubertal outgrowth and differentiation. The function of specific peptide growth factors that bind members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family and the cytokine receptor family are required at each stage. In many cases the peptides are produced in one compartment and act on receptors in the other compartment. One of the striking differences between normal development and cancer is the loss of this cross-talk. Mammary tumor cells often produce a peptide and express the receptor on the same cell leading to autocrine activation of signaling pathways, a mechanism that is characteristic for cancer cells. We will discuss different peptides in the context of normal development and cancer in this review. PMID:20554705

  13. Pseudophosphorylated prolactin (S179D PRL) inhibits growth and promotes beta-casein gene expression in the rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C Benson; Wu, Wei; Xu, Xiaolei; Yang, Lili; Chen, Cyndi; Coss, Djurdjica; Birdsall, Ben; Nasseri, Dorsa; Walker, Ameae M

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated the individual roles of unmodified prolactin (U-PRL) and a mimic of phosphorylated PRL (S179D PRL) in mammary development. Recombinant versions of the PRLs were delivered to rats throughout pregnancy at a rate of 6 microg/24 h per rat and to non-pregnant females at a rate of 24 microg/24 h per rat. Measurement of progesterone, corticosterone, and estradiol showed no effect of the administered PRLs on the levels of these other mammotropic hormones. Histological and morphometric analysis showed U-PRL to cause mammary growth, whereas S179D PRL inhibited growth. Molecular analysis demonstrated decreased beta-casein expression in the mammary glands of the U-PRL-treated animals at term and increased beta-casein expression in the mammary glands of the S179D PRL-treated animals. Superior beta-casein gene expression in response to S179D PRL versus U-PRL was confirmed in HC11 cells. We conclude that U-PRL is important for growth, whereas S179D PRL promotes at least one measure of differentiated function in the mammary gland. PMID:12195299

  14. Isoflavone intake inhibits the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene(DMBA)-induced mammary tumors in normal and ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Defu; Zhang, Yumei; Yang, Titi; Xue, Yong; Wang, Peiyu

    2014-01-01

    To determine the associations between isoflavone (49.72% genistin, 5.32% daidzin, 34.54% glycitin) and breast cancer risk, 150 rats were given 5 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and half of them were ovariectomized. Then normal rats and ovariectomized rats were divided into 5 groups: control group, isoflavone high (HI), middle (MI), or low (LI) dose group consuming 100, 500, or 1000 mg isoflavones/kg diet, estrogen group (2.5 mg stilboestrol/kg diet). After 24 weeks, tumor incidences were 73% in control group, 7% in HI, 7% in MI, 27% in LI, and 80% in estrogen group for normal rats; 60% in control group, 13% in HI, 7% in MI, 13% in LI, and 73% in estrogen group for ovariectomized rats. Isoflavone treatment decreased tumor incidence and mean tumor number per rat and increased mean latent period compared with those in control group and estrogen group group significantly (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein expression of estrogen receptor β were significantly higher in isoflavone treatment groups than those in control group group. Moreover, isoflavone treatment significantly decreased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine content and increased superoxide dismutase level in normal rats and decreased malondialdehyde concentrations in ovariectomized rats compared with control group. In conclusions, isoflavone intake significantly inhibited the development of premenopausal and postmenopausal mammary tumors. PMID:24426188

  15. Genotoxic effects of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human and rat mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.S.; Purnell, D.M.; Hsu, Ih-chang )

    1990-01-01

    Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of different carcinogenic activities were evaluated for their effects on DNA synthesis ({sup 3}HTdR labeling index (L.I.)) of rat and human mammary epithelial cells (MEC) and for their effects on chromosomes in MEC-mediated sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays. When compared with DMSO-treated cells, exposures of rat MEC to the two most potent carcinogens, i.e., 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), resulted in a 45-62% reduction in the L.I. of rat MEC. Another carcinogen, 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA), produced a 35-48% reduction in L.I., while the noncarcinogenic PAHs, 1,2-benzanthracene (BA) and benzo(e)pyrene (B(e)P), showed no effect. Similarly, exposures of human MEC to DMBA and B(a)P resulted in a 50-90% depression in L.I. while BA was significantly less effective. When co-cultivated with Chinese hamster V-79 cells in the presence of PAH, both rat and human MEC can activate and release the active metabolites to induce SCE in V-79 cells. Comparing depression of L.I., SCE, and in vivo carcinogenicity for the 5 PAHs, SCE mediated by rat MEC is better correlated with carcinogenicity in rat than L.I. depression.

  16. Regulation of mammary stem cell population with dietary intake of soy protein isolate reveals novel mechanisms for diet-mediated control of mammary tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer risk is highly modified by environmental factors including diet. Previously, we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) decreased mammary tumor incidence and increased mammary tumor latency in rats relative to those fed a control casein (CAS) diet, when exposed to the c...

  17. Early soy exposure via maternal diet regulates rat mammary epithelial differentiation by paracrine signaling from stromal adipocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diet-mediated changes in transcriptional programs that promote the early differentiation of the mammary gland may lead to reduced breast cancer risk. The disparity in adult breast cancer incidence between Asian women and Western counterparts is attributed partly to high soy food intake. Here, we con...

  18. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-04-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenesis and cell fate specification in the embryo through fetal mammary stem cells (fMaSC) and in the adult organism particularly within the adult mammary stem cells (aMaSC), which determine mammary progenitor cell lineages that generate the basal/myoepithelial and luminal compartments of the adult mammary gland. Together with recognized transcription factors and embryonic stem cell markers, these embryonic regulatory molecules can be inappropriately augmented during tumorigenesis to support the tumor-initiating cell (TIC)/cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment, and the effects of their deregulation may contribute for the etiology of BC, in particular the most aggressive subtype of BC, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This in depth review will present evidence of the involvement of Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin in the normal mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis, from fMaSC/aMaSC regulation to TIC generation and maintenance in TNBC. Specific therapies for treating TNBC by targeting these embryonic pathways in TICs will be further discussed, providing new opportunities to destroy not only the bulk tumor, but also TICs that initiate and promote the metastatic spread and recurrence of this aggressive subtype of BC. PMID:26968398

  19. Soy protein isolate and estradiol differ in their effects on the mammary gland of weanling male and female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones are phytochemical components of soy diets that bind weakly to estrogen receptors (ERs). To study potential estrogen-like actions of soy in the mammary gland, we fed weanling male and female Sprague-Dawley rats a casein diet from PND21 to PND33, the same diet substituting soy protein isol...

  20. Gamma-glutamyltransferase activity in mammary gland of pregnant rats and its regulation by ovarian hormones, prolactin and placental lactogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, L E; Deis, R P

    1984-01-01

    Ovariectomy and ovariectomy plus hysterectomy on day 18 of pregnancy increased gamma-glutamyltransferase activity in the mammary gland. The withdrawal of progesterone and the subsequent release of prolactin are responsible for the rise in enzyme activity. Rat placental lactogen in the absence of prolactin and progesterone is able to induce gamma-glutamyltransferase activity. PMID:6149746

  1. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 UNC-Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 RTD, USEPA, NHEERL/ORD, RTP,NC

    Prenatal exposure ...

  2. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS NECESSARY FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters Necessary For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1, 2, Carmen Wood2, and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Public Heal...

  3. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nicholas J.; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer. PMID:26884646

  4. Susceptibility of fetal, virgin, pregnant and lactating rats for the induction of mammary tumors by gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inano, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Heiko; Onoda, Makoto; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi

    1996-06-01

    Pregnant Wistar-MS rats received a whole-body irradiation of 0-2.6 Gy {gamma} rays at day 20 of pregnancy. The mother rats were implanted with a diethylstilbestrol (DES) pellet 30 days after weaning, and the female pups delivered by the irradiated mother were treated with DES after maturation. Lactating rats were irradiated with {gamma} rays 21 days after parturition and then treated with DES. Virgin rats 70 days of age were also irradiated and then administered DES. The rats which received intrauterine irradiation did not develop mammary tumors in the mother rats and lactating rats increased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing doses of {gamma} rays up to 2.1 Gy. With 0.1-1 Gy, the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the mother rats was significantly lower than that observed in the lactating rats. However, the incidence in the mother rats irradiated with 1.0-1.5 Gy was significantly higher than that of virgin rats treated with the corresponding {gamma}-ray doses. These findings suggest that the susceptibility of the mammary glands to radiation depends upon the differentiation at the time of exposure. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Assessment of the proliferative capacity of the flavanones 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-(1.1-dimethylallyl)naringenin and naringenin in MCF-7 cells and the rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Helle, Janina; Kräker, Kristin; Bader, Manuela I; Keiler, Annekathrin M; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Welsh, JoEllen; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2014-07-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and naringenin (Nar) are phytoestrogens found in food items and nutritional supplements, while 6-(1.1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6-DMAN) is a component of an African plant. Besides their assumed beneficial effects they may promote mammary and endometrial cancer. We therefore assessed their proliferative and estrogenic potential on the mammary gland in vitro and in vivo. In competitive estrogen receptor (ER) ligand binding assays 8-PN displayed a high relative binding affinity for both ERs with a preference for ERα and had the strongest mitotic effect on MCF-7 cells among the test substances. In a three day exposure in young adult ovariectomized female rats 15 mg/kg 8-PN had the highest capacity to increase the number of terminal end buds (TEB) in the mammary gland and stimulated expression of proliferation markers in epithelial ductal cells, followed by 6-DMAN and Nar, but overall their capacity to stimulate proliferation was weak in comparison to 17β-Estradiol (E2). PMID:24859648

  6. Biochemical characteristics of cytosolic and particulate forms of protein tyrosine kinases from methyl nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.K.; Chiasson, J.C.; Chiasson, J.L.; Lacroix, A.; Windisch, L. )

    1991-03-11

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activities in MNU-induced rat mammary carcinoma has been investigated by using poly (glu: tyr; 4:1) as an exogenous substrate. The PTK activity of the mammary carcinoma was about equally distributed between the particulate and cytosolic fractions at 110 000 x g. Both particulate and cytosolic PTKs catalyzed the phosphorylation of several tyrosine containing synthetic substrates to various degrees, however, poly (glu: tyr; 4:1) was the best substrate. Both the forms utilized ATP as the phosphoryl group donor. Among various divalent cations tested, Co{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} were able to fulfill the divalent cation requirement. Poly-lysine exerted a stimulatory effect on the particulate, but not on the cytosolic form. On the other hand, though heparin and quercetin inhibited both the forms in a concentration dependent manner, the particulate form was more sensitive to inhibition. These data indicate that MNU-induced rat mammary carcinoma expresses both particulate and cytosolic forms of PTKs and that there are significant differences in the properties of the two forms. Differential differences in the properties of the two forms. Differential effects of some agents on mammary carcinoma PTKs suggest that these enzymes may be acutely regulated in vivo and could play important role in mammary carcinogenesis.

  7. 4-Vinylcyclohexene Diepoxide (VCD) Inhibits Mammary Epithelial Differentiation and Induces Fibroadenoma Formation in Female Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Laura E.; Frye, Jennifer B.; Lukefahr, Ashley L.; Marion, Samuel L.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Besselsen, David G.; Funk, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), an occupational chemical that targets ovarian follicles and accelerates ovarian failure in rodents, was used to test the effect of early-onset reproductive senescence on mammary fibroadenoma formation. One-month female Sprague Dawley rats were dosed with VCD (80 mg/kg or 160 mg/kg) and monitored for 22 months for persistent estrus and tumor development. Only high-dose VCD treatment accelerated the onset of persistent estrus relative to controls. However, both doses of VCD accelerated mammary tumor onset by 5 months, increasing incidence to 84% (vs. 38% in controls). Tumor development was independent of time in persistent estrus, 17β-estradiol, androstenedione and prolactin. Delay in VCD administration until after completion of mammary epithelial differentiation (3 months) did not alter tumor formation despite acceleration of ovarian senescence. VCD administration to 1-month rats acutely decreased mammary alveolar bud number and expression of β-casein, suggesting that VCD’s tumorigenic effect requires exposure during mammary epithelial differentiation. PMID:21621605

  8. 4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) inhibits mammary epithelial differentiation and induces fibroadenoma formation in female Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wright, Laura E; Frye, Jennifer B; Lukefahr, Ashley L; Marion, Samuel L; Hoyer, Patricia B; Besselsen, David G; Funk, Janet L

    2011-07-01

    4-Vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), an occupational chemical that targets ovarian follicles and accelerates ovarian failure in rodents, was used to test the effect of early-onset reproductive senescence on mammary fibroadenoma formation. One-month female Sprague Dawley rats were dosed with VCD (80 mg/kg or 160 mg/kg) and monitored for 22 months for persistent estrus and tumor development. Only high-dose VCD treatment accelerated the onset of persistent estrus relative to controls. However, both doses of VCD accelerated mammary tumor onset by 5 months, increasing incidence to 84% (vs. 38% in controls). Tumor development was independent of time in persistent estrus, 17 β-estradiol, androstenedione and prolactin. Delay in VCD administration until after completion of mammary epithelial differentiation (3 months) did not alter tumor formation despite acceleration of ovarian senescence. VCD administration to 1-month rats acutely decreased mammary alveolar bud number and expression of β-casein, suggesting that VCD's tumorigenic effect requires exposure during mammary epithelial differentiation. PMID:21621605

  9. Strain Differences in Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-Induced Mammary Tumor Incidence in Long Evans and Sprague Dawley Rat Offspring Following Prenatal Atrazine Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that prenatal exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR) during mammary bud outgrowth (late gestation) delays postnatal mammary epithelial progression in Long Evans (LE) rats. Our laboratory has recently found that prenatal exposure to ATR also effe...

  10. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Hadsell, Darryl L.; Hadsell, Louise A.; Olea, Walter; Rijnkels, Monique; Creighton, Chad J.; Smyth, Ian; Short, Kieran M.; Cox, Liza L.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetic diversity in mammary gland development is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structural variation in mammary ductal development, and determined if these QTL correlated with genomic intervals conferring breast cancer susceptibility in humans. For about half of the traits, the observed variation among the complete set of strains in this study was greater (P<0.05) than that observed with previously studied strains or with strains that are in current common use for mammary gland biology. Correlations were also detected with previously reported variation in mammary tumor latency and metastasis. In silico genome-wide association (GWAS) identified 20 mammary development QTL (Mdq). Of these, 5 were syntenic with previously reported human BrCa loci. The most highly significant (P=1×10−11) association of the study was on MMU6 and contained the genes Plxna4, Plxna4os1, and Chchd3. On MMU5, a QTL was detected (p=8×10−7) that was syntenic to a human BrCa locus on h12q24.5 containing the genes Tbx3 and Tbx5. Intersection of high-association SNP (r2 >0.8) with genomic and epigenomic features, and intersection of candidate genes with gene expression and survival data from human BrCa highlighted several for further study. These results support the conclusion that genetic variation in mammary ductal development is greater than previously appreciated. They also suggest that mammary tumor latency and metastatic index may be influenced by variations in the same factors that control normal mammary ductal development and that further studies of genetically diverse mice can improve our understanding of the connection between breast development and breast cancer in humans by identifying novel susceptibility genes. PMID:25552398

  11. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  12. Expression and role of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in multidrug resistance of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In both women and female dogs, the most prevalent type of malignant neoplasm is the spontaneous mammary tumor. In dogs, half of these are malignant. The treatment of choice for the canine patients is surgical mastectomy. Unfortunately, it often fails in high-risk, locally invasive mammary tumors as of during the time of the surgery the micro-metastases are present. Moreover, there are neither large studies conducting to prove of the benefit from the chemotherapy in dogs nor established chemotherapy treatment protocols available. Additionally, the effectiveness of each individual chemotherapeutic agent and drug resistance of canine mammary cancer have not yet been characterized. That has become the aim of our study, to assess the expression of PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3 in canine mammary cancer cell lines and to investigate their role in cancer resistance to vinblastine, cisplatin and cyclophosphamide with using RNAi approach. Results The results suggested that in canine mammary cancer, the vinblastine efflux was mediated by PGP and MRP1 proteins, cisplatin efflux was mediated by all four examined efflux pumps (PGP, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP3), whereas cyclophosphamide resistance was related to BCRP activity. RNAi silencing of these efflux pumps significantly decreased IC50 doses of the examined drugs in canine mammary carcinoma cells. Conclusions Our results have indicated the treatment of cells involving use of the siRNA targeting efflux pumps could be a beneficial approach in the future. PMID:23773525

  13. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore investigated a congenic C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT model. In the absence of MGAT3, C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT females exhibited accelerated tumor appearance and increased tumor burden, glucose uptake in tumors and lung metastasis. Nevertheless, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 or protein kinase B (AKT) was reduced in ∼20-week C57BL/6 MMTV-PyMT tumors lacking MGAT3. Activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein tyrosine kinase Src, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar to that of controls. All the eight mouse galectin genes were expressed in mammary tumors and tumor epithelial cells (TECs), but galectin-2 and -12 were not detected by western analysis in tumors, and galectin-7 was not detected in 60% of the TEC lines. From microarray data reported for human breast cancers, at least 10 galectin and 7 N-glycan N-acetylglucosaminyl (GlcNAc)-transferase (MGAT) genes are expressed in tumor tissue, and expression often varies significantly between different breast cancer subtypes. Thus, in summary, while MGAT3 and bisected complex N-glycans retard mouse mammary tumor progression, genetic background may modify this effect; identification of key galectins that promote mammary tumor progression in mice is not straightforward because all the eight galectin genes are expressed; and high levels of MGAT3, galectin-4, -8, -10, -13 and -14 transcripts correlate with better relapse-free survival in human breast cancer. PMID:24037315

  14. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  15. Vanadium chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis: probable involvement of representative hepatic phase I and II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, A; Oinam, S; Basu, M; Chatterjee, M

    2000-09-01

    Vanadium, a non-platinum group metal and dietary micronutrient, is now proving to act as a promising antitumor agent. The present study was conducted to ascertain its antineoplastic potential against an experimental mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats, at 50 days of age, were treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (0.5 mg/100 g body weight) by a single tail vein injection in an oil emulsion. Vanadium (ammonium monovanadate) at the concentration of 0.5 ppm was supplemented in drinking water and given ad libitum to the experimental group immediately after the carcinogen treatment and it continued until the termination of the study (24 weeks for histological and biochemical observations and 35 weeks for morphological findings). It was found that vanadium treatment brought about a substantial protection against DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. This was evident from histological findings that showed no sign of hyperplasia or abnormality after vanadium treatment. There was a significant reduction in incidence (P < 0.05), total number, multiplicity (P < 0.01) and size of palpable mammary tumors and delay in mean latency period of tumor appearance (P < 0.001) following vanadium supplementation compared to DMBA control. From the cumulative results of various hepatic biochemical indices namely, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione level, superoxide dismutase activity, cytochrome P450 content and glutathione S-transferase activity, the anticarcinogenic potential of vanadium was well reflected through stabilization of these parameters. Results of the study indicate that the anticarcinogenic activity of vanadium during DMBA-initiated mammary carcinogenesis is mediated through alteration of hepatic antioxidant status as well as modulation of phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes. On the basis of the observed results, vanadium can be considered as a readily available, promising and novel cancer chemopreventive agent. PMID:11097089

  16. Soy isoflavone exposure through all life stages accelerates 17β-estradiol-induced mammary tumor onset and growth, yet reduces tumor burden, in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Möller, Frank Josef; Pemp, Daniela; Soukup, Sebastian T; Wende, Kathleen; Zhang, Xiajie; Zierau, Oliver; Muders, Michael H; Bosland, Maarten C; Kulling, Sabine E; Lehmann, Leane; Vollmer, Günter

    2016-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether the intake of soy-derived isoflavones (sISO) mediates beneficial or adverse effects with regard to breast cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated whether nutritional exposure to a sISO-enriched diet from conception until adulthood impacts on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced carcinogenesis in the rat mammary gland (MG). August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats were exposed to dietary sISO from conception until postnatal day 285. Silastic tubes containing E2 were used to induce MG tumorigenesis. Body weight, food intake, and tumor growth were recorded weekly. At necropsy, the number, position, size, and weight of each tumor were determined. Plasma samples underwent sISO analysis, and the morphology of MG was analyzed. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were reduced by 20 and 56 %, respectively, in the sISO-exposed rats compared to the control rats. Time-to-tumor onset was shortened from 25 to 20 weeks, and larger tumors developed in the sISO-exposed rats. The histological phenotype of the MG tumors was independent of the sISO diet received, and it included both comedo and cribriform phenotypes. Morphological analyses of the whole-mounted MGs also showed no diet-dependent differences. Lifelong exposure to sISO reduced the overall incidence of MG carcinomas in ACI rats, although the time-to-tumor was significantly shortened. PMID:26861028

  17. Establishment and characterization of a new feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana; Adega, Filomena; Chaves, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Studies on tumours in domestic animals are believed to greatly contribute to a better understanding of similar diseases in humans. Comparative studies have shown that feline mammary carcinomas share important features with human breast cancers, including a similar biological behaviour and histological appearance. In the present study we have established and characterized at different cellular levels one feline mammary cancer cell line, FkMTp, derived from a cat mammary carcinoma. The FkMTp cell line revealed to be a promising resource and tool to study tumour microevolution and all the mechanisms and processes involved in carcinogenesis from the tumour (primary culture) to the immortalized cell line. Several assays were conducted to assess the growth behaviour, differentiated morphology, anchorage independent growth in soft agar, wound-healing invasion and migration of the cell line across time (from the primary culture until the 160th passage). FkMTp revealed increased levels of anchorage independence, migration and invasion according to the course of time as well as different numbers of ploidy. These results demonstrate and validate the in vitro tumorigenicity of the FkMTp cell line. During the cell line establishment, it was cryopreserved approximately every six passages, including the tumour primary culture, allowing now the possibility to access almost any specific momento of the tumour progression. PMID:26883919

  18. An Herbal Galactagogue Mixture Increases Milk Production and Aquaporin Protein Expression in the Mammary Glands of Lactating Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haibin; Hua, Ying; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhaojun; Tao, Xuejiao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Herbal galactagogues have been increasingly used to treat postpartum hypogalactia. The mechanism of action of herbal galactagogues remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an herbal galactagogue mixture on milk production and aquaporin (AQP) expression in lactating rats. Methods. Thirty female Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into virgin, lactating + H2O, and lactating + galactagogue groups (n = 10 per group). Lactating rats were administered the decoction of an herbal galactagogue mixture by oral gavage or the same amount of distilled water. Results. The herbal decoction significantly increased milk production in lactating rats (P < 0.05). Both immunohistochemical staining and western blot showed that protein levels of AQP-3 and AQP-5 were significantly increased during lactation compared with virgin stage and the herbal decoction further elevated their expression (P < 0.05). AQP-1 was predominantly expressed in the capillaries whereas AQP-3 and AQP-5 were mainly detected in the epithelial cells and ducts of the mammary glands. Conclusion. The expression of AQPs in the mammary glands of rats was developmentally regulated. Herbal galactagogues might have increased milk secretion by regulating the expression and function of AQPs in the mammary glands. PMID:26075000

  19. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  20. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer - Effects on Disease Prognosis and Therapeutic Protocols - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojanoski, Sinisa; Ristevska, Nevena; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Antevski, Borce; Petrushevska, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main prognostic factor in early staged breast cancer is the axillary lymph node metastatic affection. Sentinel lymph node biopsy, as a staging modality, significantly decreases surgical morbidity. The status of internal mammary lymph nodes gains an increased predictive role in grading breast carcinomas and modulation of postoperative therapeutic protocols. If positive, almost always are associated with worse disease outcome. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of internal mammary lymph node micrometastases has not been up to date precisely defined. AIM: To present a case of female patient clinically diagnosed as T1, N0, M0 (clinical TNM) ductal breast carcinoma with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. METHODS: Dual method of scintigraphic sentinel lymph node detection using 99mTc-SENTI-SCINT and blue dye injection, intraoperative gamma probe detection, radioguided surgery and intraoperative ex tempore biopsy were used. CASE REPORT: We present a case of clinically T1, N0, M0 ductal breast cancer with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative ex tempore biopsy revealed micrometastases in the internal mammary node and no metastatic involvement of the axillary sentinel lymph node. CONCLUSION: Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastases improves N (nodal) grading of breast cancer by selecting a high risk subgroup of patients that require adjuvant hormone therapy, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  1. The phytoestrogenic Cyclopia extract, SM6Met, increases median tumor free survival and reduces tumor mass and volume in chemically induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Visser, Koch; Zierau, Oliver; Macejová, Dana; Goerl, Florian; Muders, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B; Vollmer, Günter; Louw, Ann

    2016-10-01

    SM6Met, a phytoestrogenic extract of Cyclopia subternata indigenous to the Western Cape province of South Africa, displays estrogenic attributes with potential for breast cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we report that SM6Met, in the presence of estradiol, induces a significant cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, in the N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis model, SM6Met increases tumor latency by 7days and median tumor free survival by 42 days, while decreasing palpable tumor frequency by 32%, tumor mass by 40%, and tumor volume by 53%. Therefore, the current study provides proof of concept that SM6Met has definite potential as a chemopreventative agent against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:27142456

  2. Rat mammary cell survival following irradiation with 14. 3-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, P.A.; Gould, M.N.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Clifton, K.H.

    1982-08-01

    The survival of rat mammary gland cells irradiated in situ with either single or split doses of 14.3-MeV neutrons was determined by an in vivo transplantation assay. The single-dose data are best fit to the multitarget single-hit model by the parameters D/sub o/ = 97 cGy and n = 0.6 while the split-dose data are best fit by the parameters D/sub o/ = 100 cGy and n = 1.2.Analysis of the combined data sets suggests that the two survival curves are not identical. Comparison of these data with previously published results following irradiation with 250-kVp X rays is reported.

  3. Rat mammary-cell survival following irradiation with 14. 3-MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, P.A.; Gould, M.N.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Clifton, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The survival of rat mammary gland cells irradiated in situ with either single or split doses of 14.3-MeV neutrons was determined by an in vivo transplantation assay. The single-dose data are best fit to the multitarget single-hit model by the parameters D/sub 0/ = 97 cGy and n = 0.6 while the split-dose data are best fit by the parameters D/sub 0/ = 100 cGy and n = 1.2. Analysis of the combined data sets suggests that the two survival curves are not identical. Comparison of these data with previously published results following irradiation with 250-kVp x-rays is reported.

  4. The increase of apoptosis and the decrease of proliferation by angiogenesis inhibitor in rat mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Saji, S; Toi, M; Yamamoto, Y; Tominaga, T

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the change of balance between proliferating and apoptotic tumor cells in dimethylebenz(a)-anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumors by using anti-angiogenic drug, AGM-1470 and anticancer drug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-DFUR). The rate of PCNA positive proliferating cells was decreased in the tretment groups, especially in AGM-1470 and in the combination of AGM-1470 and 5'-DFUR. And apoptotic index evaluated by TUNEL method was increased in 5'-DFUR and in the combination group. The ratio of proliferating cells/apoptotic cells was markedly decreased in AGM-1470 and AGM+5'-DFUR group compared to control group. These data suggested that anti-angiogenic drugs might regulate the growth behavior of tumor cells by changing the microenvironments. PMID:21590022

  5. Dietary compound isoliquiritigenin prevents mammary carcinogenesis by inhibiting breast cancer stem cells through WIF1 demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Xie, Xiaoming; Shen, Jiangang; Peng, Cheng; You, Jieshu; Peng, Fu; Tang, Hailin; Guan, Xinyuan; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered as the root of mammary tumorigenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated that ISL efficiently limited the activities of breast CSCs. However, the cancer prevention activities of ISL and its precise molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we report a novel function of ISL as a natural demethylation agent targeting WIF1 to prevent breast cancer. ISL administration suppressed in vivo breast cancer initiation and progression, accompanied by reduced CSC-like populations. A global gene expression profile assay further identified WIF1 as the main response gene of ISL treatment, accompanied by the simultaneous downregulation of β-catenin signaling and G0/G1 phase arrest in breast CSCs. In addition, WIF1 inhibition significantly relieved the CSC-limiting effects of ISL and methylation analysis further revealed that ISL enhanced WIF1 gene expression via promoting the demethylation of its promoter, which was closely correlated with the inhibition of DNMT1 methyltransferase. Molecular docking analysis finally revealed that ISL could stably dock into the catalytic domain of DNMT1. Taken together, our findings not only provide preclinical evidence to demonstrate the use of ISL as a dietary supplement to inhibit mammary carcinogenesis but also shed novel light on WIF1 as an epigenetic target for breast cancer prevention. PMID:25918249

  6. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  7. Prenatal Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Preneoplastic Lesions in the Mammary Gland in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Durando, Milena; Kass, Laura; Piva, Julio; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.; Luque, Enrique H.; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica

    2007-01-01

    Background Humans are routinely exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic compound that leaches from dental materials, food and beverage containers, and other consumer products. Prenatal exposure to BPA has produced long-lasting and profound effects on rodent hormone-dependent tissues that are manifested 1–6 months after the end of exposure. Objective The aim of the present work was to examine whether in utero exposure to BPA alters mammary gland development and increases its susceptibility to the carcinogen N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to BPA (25 μg/kg body weight per day) or to vehicle. Female offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day (PND) 30, 50, 110, or 180. On PND50 a group of rats received a single subcarcinogenic dose of NMU (25 mg/kg) and they were sacrificed on either PND110 or PND180. Results At puberty, animals exposed prenatally to BPA showed an increased proliferation/apoptosis ratio in both the epithelial and stromal compartments. During adulthood (PND110 and PND180), BPA-exposed animals showed an increased number of hyperplastic ducts and augmented stromal nuclear density. Moreover, the stroma associated with hyperplastic ducts showed signs of desmoplasia and contained an increased number of mast cells, suggesting a heightened risk of neoplastic transformation. Administration of a subcarcinogenic dose of NMU to animals exposed prenatally to BPA increased the percentage of hyperplastic ducts and induced the development of neoplastic lesions. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the prenatal exposure to low doses of BPA perturbs mammary gland histoarchitecture and increases the carcinogenic susceptibility to a chemical challenge administered 50 days after the end of BPA exposure. PMID:17366824

  8. In utero and lactational exposure to blueberry via maternal diet promotes mammary epithelial differentiation in prepubescent female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early developmental events influence the fine tuning of later susceptibility to adult diseases. Diet is a determinant of breast cancer risk, and our previous studies showed that diet-mediated changes in transcriptional programs promote early mammary gland differentiation. While consumption of fruits...

  9. SOY AND WHEY PROTEINS DOWNREGULATE DMBA-INDUCED LIVER AND MAMMARY GLAND CYP1 EXPRESSION IN FEMALE RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One possible mechanism by which diet may reduce cancer risk is through enhancement of metabolic systems that prevent activation of carcinogens or accelerate carcinogen inactivation. We studied the effects of diet and 7/12-dimethylbenz-(a)anthracene (DMBA) on hepatic and mammary gland CYP1A1, CYP1A2...

  10. Comparison of ovariectomy and retinyl acetate on the growth of established 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gandlihon, P.; Melancon, R.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1982-08-01

    Prolonged exposure to retinyl acetate (RA) in the diet inhibits the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary cancers in rats. The effectiveness of RA was examined when given 6 months after the administration of DMBA. Non-inbred female Sprague-Dawley rats with DMBA-induced mammary tumors were divided into 3 groups and treated for 4 weeks as follows: Group 1 served as controls, group 2 was ovariectomized, and group 3 received 328 mg RA/kg diet. Ovariectomy (OVX) markedly reduced both the number and size of the tumors. RA administration failed to induce any significant regression in tumor number but significantly retarded tumor growth when compared to tumor growth in group 1 controls. The levels of estradiol, progestin, and prolactin (PRL) receptors were significantly reduced after OVX, whereas only the levels of PRL receptors declined significantly after RA administration. Circulating progesterone concentrations were not affected in the RA-treated group but the plasma PRL level was significantly increased. The present studies show that if treatment with RA is delayed until 6 months after carcinogen administration, the protective effect of RA can still be observed although its effectiveness is less dramatic than when it is administered earlier.

  11. Inhibitory effects of Bifidobacterium-fermented soy milk on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis, with a partial contribution of its component isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Ohta, T; Nakatsugi, S; Watanabe, K; Kawamori, T; Ishikawa, F; Morotomi, M; Sugie, S; Toda, T; Sugimura, T; Wakabayashi, K

    2000-05-01

    High consumption of soybean and soybean-related products is hypothesized to contribute to protection against breast cancer. Soybean is a rich source of genistein, a putative cancer chemopreventive agent. Fermented soy milk (FSM), which is made of soy milk fermented with the Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult, contains larger amounts of the isoflavone aglycones genistein and daidzein than unfermented soy milk. In the present study, we examined the effects of FSM and its component isoflavone mixture (genistein:daidzein 4:1) on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4, 5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rats. Starting at 7 weeks of age, female Sprague-Dawley rats were given PhIP at a dose of 85 mg/kg body wt by intragastric administration four times a week for 2 weeks. They were fed control high fat basal diet or experimental high fat diet containing 10% FSM or 0.02 or 0.04% isoflavone mixture during and after carcinogen exposure. The incidences (percentage of rats with tumors) of mammary gland tumors were 71% in the control diet group, 51% in the FSM group and 68 and 61% in the groups treated with isoflavone mixture at 0.02 and 0.04%, respectively. Mammary tumor multiplicities (number of tumors per rat) were 1.2 +/- 0.2 for 10% FSM, 2.2 +/- 0.4 for 0.02% isoflavone mixture and 1.5 +/- 0.3 for 0.04% isoflavone mixture, being clearly smaller than the control diet value (2.6 +/- 0.5). Furthermore, feeding of FSM and the isoflavone mixture at both doses reduced the sizes of mammary tumors. Since the amounts of isoflavones in 10% FSM are approximately equivalent to those in the 0.02% isoflavone mixture, the chemopreventive activity of FSM could be partly attributable to the presence of isoflavones such as genistein and daidzein. PMID:10783315

  12. Cx26 knockout predisposes the mammary gland to primary mammary tumors in a DMBA-induced mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael K.G.; Bechberger, John F.; Welch, Ian; Naus, Christian C.; Laird, Dale W.

    2015-01-01

    Down-regulation of the gap junction protein connexin26 (Cx26) is an early event following breast cancer onset and has led to Cx26 being classically described as a tumor suppressor. Interestingly, mutations in theCx26 gene (GJB2) reduce or ablate Cx26 gap junction channel function and are the most common cause of genetic deafness. It is unknown if patients with loss-of-function GJB2 mutations have a greater susceptibility to breast tumorigenesis or aggressive breast cancer progression. To investigate these possibilities, 7, 12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor development was evaluated in BLG-Cre; Cx26fl/fl mice expressing Cre under the β-Lactoglobulin promoter (Cre+) compared to Cx26fl/fl controlmice (Cre-) following pituitary isograft driven Cx26 knockout. A significantly increased number of DMBA-treated Cre+ mice developed primary mammary tumors, as well as developed multiple tumors, compared to Cre- mice. Primary tumors of Cre+ mice were of multiple histological subtypes and had similar palpable tumour onset and growth rate compared to tumors from Cre- mice. Lungs were evaluated for evidence of metastases revealing a similar percentage of lung metastases in Cre+ and Cre- mice. Together, our results suggest that loss of Cx26 predisposes the mammary gland to chemically induced mammary tumour formation which may have important implications to patients with GJB2 mutations. PMID:26439696

  13. Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Assessment of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Status in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of malignant internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) and benign IMLNs in breast cancer patients. Methods From 2009 to 2014, the records of 85 patients with IMLNs were archived using MRI report data; 26 patients with small size (long axis diameter <5 mm) nodes were subsequently excluded. The current study evaluated internal mammary lymph nodes in 59 patients who underwent breast MRI for breast cancer staging and for posttherapy follow-up. All MRI findings were retrospectively evaluated. Malignancy was determined based on pathologic examination and positron emission tomography computed tomography findings. Independent t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, chi-square tests, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis were used. Results Among MRI features, there were statistically significant differences between benign and malignant IMLN groups, in short axis length (3.6±1.3 vs. 8.2±2.9 mm, respectively), long axis length (8.1±2.4 vs. 14.5±4.8 mm, respectively), short/long axis ratio (0.45±0.10 vs. 0.59±0.17, respectively), absent fatty hilum (mean, 0% vs. 95%, respectively), and restricted diffusion (15.8% vs. 85.0%, respectively) (p<0.050). Multiplicity and location of intercostal spaces was not different between the two groups. Short axis length was the most discriminative variable for predicting metastatic nodes (area under the ROC curve, 0.951; threshold, 4 mm; sensitivity, 92.5%; specificity, 84.2%). Conclusion Conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI are helpful to detect metastasis of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer. PMID:27382396

  14. Beneficial bacteria stimulate host immune cells to counteract dietary and genetic predisposition to mammary cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, Jessica R; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Levkovich, Tatiana; Varian, Bernard J; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Chatzigiagkos, Antonis; Mirabal, Sheyla; Alm, Eric J; Erdman, Susan E

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies suggest health benefits including protection from cancer after eating fermented foods such as probiotic yogurt, though the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we tested mechanistic hypotheses using two different animal models: the first model studied development of mammary cancer when eating a Westernized diet, and the second studied animals with a genetic predilection to breast cancer. For the first model, outbred Swiss mice were fed a Westernized chow putting them at increased risk for development of mammary tumors. In this Westernized diet model, mammary carcinogenesis was inhibited by routine exposure to Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC-PTA-6475 in drinking water. The second model was FVB strain erbB2 (HER2) mutant mice, genetically susceptible to mammary tumors mimicking breast cancers in humans, being fed a regular (non-Westernized) chow diet. We found that oral supplement with these purified lactic acid bacteria alone was sufficient to inhibit features of mammary neoplasia in both models. The protective mechanism was determined to be microbially-triggered CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes. When isolated and transplanted into other subjects, these L. reuteri-stimulated lymphocytes were sufficient to convey transplantable anti-cancer protection in the cell recipient animals. These data demonstrate that host immune responses to environmental microbes significantly impact and inhibit cancer progression in distal tissues such as mammary glands, even in genetically susceptible mice. This leads us to conclude that consuming fermentative microbes such as L. reuteri may offer a tractable public health approach to help counteract the accumulated dietary and genetic carcinogenic events integral in the Westernized diet and lifestyle. PMID:24382758

  15. Sentinel nodes scintigraphy of the internal mammary chain in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; Viale, Giuseppe; Veronesi, Umberto

    2003-01-01

    Internal mammary chain lymphnodes (IMNs) were studied by lymphoscintigraphy and biopsy in 100 breast cancer patients to assess: (i) if a deep injection can visualize the IMNs in a high percentage of cases (ii) to determine how often IMNs are metastatic. More than 60% of patients showed IMNs uptake. Surgical sampling proved simple and risks insignificant. Five positive IMN cases migrated from NO/N1 to N3, prompting treatment modification. It is unclear whether this additional information can lead to better survival.

  16. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Koichiro; Yoneda, Misako; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Ogihara, Kikumi; Naya, Yuko; Ikeda, Fusako; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind) that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4) receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs). We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm). In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33). Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs. PMID:27119113

  17. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Koichiro; Yoneda, Misako; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Ogihara, Kikumi; Naya, Yuko; Ikeda, Fusako; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind) that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4) receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs). We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm). In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33). Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs. PMID:27119113

  18. Multi-modality imaging of a murine mammary window chamber for breast cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Rachel; Leung, Hui Min; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Window chamber models have been developed and utilized as a means to study the complex microenvironment in which cancers develop, proliferate, and metastasize in small animals. Here we utilize rapid prototyping printer technology to construct a new plastic orthotopic mammary window chamber that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, and optical imaging. Optical imaging allows for high-resolution cellular and molecular level analysis of tissues; magnetic resonance imaging provides quantitative measures of tumor size, perfusion, diffusion, fat/water content relaxation parameters; and a nuclear imaging technique, called the Beta Imager, supports functional and metabolic imaging. Our demonstration of the multiple imaging capabilities of this model suggests that it can be used as a powerful platform for studying basic cancer biology and developing new cancer therapies. PMID:25005693

  19. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Benjamin; Kang, Yibin

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy. In recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer. In particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ER/PR(−) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/PR(+) tumors. PMID:21243011

  20. Alcohol drinking and mammary cancer: Pathogenesis and potential dietary preventive alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Gerardo Daniel; Castro, José A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, increasing linearly even with a moderate consumption and irrespectively of the type of alcoholic beverage. It shows no dependency from other risk factors like menopausal status, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, or genetic history of breast cancer. The precise mechanism for the effect of drinking alcohol in mammary cancer promotion is still far from being established. Studies by our laboratory suggest that acetaldehyde produced in situ and accumulated in mammary tissue because of poor detoxicating mechanisms might play a role in mutational and promotional events. Additional studies indicated the production of reactive oxygen species accompanied of decreases in vitamin E and GSH contents and of glutathione transferase activity. The resulting oxidative stress might also play a relevant role in several stages of the carcinogenic process. There are reported in literature studies showing that plasmatic levels of estrogens significantly increased after alcohol drinking and that the breast cancer risk is higher in receptor ER-positive individuals. Estrogens are known that they may produce breast cancer by actions on ER and also as chemical carcinogens, as a consequence of their oxidation leading to reactive metabolites. In this review we introduce our working hypothesis integrating the acetaldehyde and the oxidative stress effects with those involving increased estrogen levels. We also analyze potential preventive actions that might be accessible. There remains the fact that alcohol drinking is just one of the avoidable causes of breast cancer and that, at present, the suggested acceptable dose for prevention of this risk is of one drink per day. PMID:25300769

  1. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Methods Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Results Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Conclusions Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic targets. Furthermore, dogs

  2. Prognostic significance of tissue and serum HER2 and MUC1 in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Campos, Liliane C; Silva, Juliana O; Santos, Fabiana S; Araújo, Marina R; Lavalle, Gleidice E; Ferreira, Enio; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study was to compare serum levels and protein tissue of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 proto-oncogene (HER2) and mucin 1 (MUC1) using an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in canine mammary carcinomas and investigate how the 2 markers correlate with dogs with metastasis and without metastasis to a regional lymph node. Forty-eight female dogs were selected, including 14 with non-metastatic cancer, 14 with lymph node metastasis, and 20 healthy animals. Serum samples were collected from all the animals and tissues from 28 dogs with malignant mammary tumor with or without metastasis for evaluated HER2 and MUC1 expression. Tissue sample were evaluated for MUC1 and HER2 immunoexpression by IHC. The results showed measurable serum levels of MUC1 and HER2 in all groups. While serum MUC1 levels were significantly higher in animals with metastasis than the other 2 groups, no increase was observed in HER2 serum levels. The MUC1 IHC results showed that only membrane immunostaining was significantly different between the groups. Statistically, there was an association between immunostaining and the serum HER2 levels. Our results indicate that serum concentrations of HER2 and the IHC staining pattern for HER2 in primary tumor do not correlate with the presence of regional metastasis. However, increased concentrations of MUC1 in the serum of dogs with mammary cancer are associated with the presence of metastasis to regional lymph nodes. A membrane pattern of IHC staining for MUC1 in the primary tumor suggests that metastases to regional lymph node are present. PMID:26179096

  3. The plasticizer butyl benzyl phthalate induces genomic changes in rat mammary gland after neonatal/prepubertal exposure

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Raquel; Wang, Richard; Russo, Irma H; Mailo, Daniel A; Lamartiniere, Coral A; Russo, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Background Phthalate esters like n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) are widely used plasticizers. BBP has shown endocrine-disrupting properties, thus having a potential effect on hormone-sensitive tissues. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of neonatal/prepubertal exposure (post-natal days 2–20) to BBP on maturation parameters and on the morphology, proliferative index and genomic signature of the rat mammary gland at different ages of development (21, 35, 50 and 100 days). Results Here we show that exposure to BBP increased the uterine weight/body weight ratio at 21 days and decreased the body weight at time of vaginal opening. BBP did not induce significant changes on the morphology of the mammary gland, but increased proliferative index in terminal end buds at 35 days and in lobules 1 at several ages. Moreover, BBP had an effect on the genomic profile of the mammary gland mainly at the end of the exposure (21 days), becoming less prominent thereafter. By this age a significant number of genes related to proliferation and differentiation, communication and signal transduction were up-regulated in the glands of the exposed animals. Conclusion These results suggest that BBP has an effect in the gene expression profile of the mammary gland. PMID:18062813

  4. Mammary gland morphology and gene expression signature of weanling male and female rats following exposure to exogenous estradiol.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Hennings, Leah; Shankar, Kartik; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2013-09-01

    In order to characterize the actions of xenoestrogens, it is essential to possess a solid portrait of the physiological effects of exogenous estradiol. We assessed effects of three doses of exogenous estradiol (E2) (0.1, 1.0 and 10 µg/kg/day) given between postnatal days 21 and 33 on the mammary gland morphology and gene expression profiles of male and female rats compared to vehicle-treated controls. The male mammary gland was more responsive to E2 treatment than in females, with 509 genes regulated >2-fold in a dose-dependent manner in males and only 174 in females. In males, E2 treatment significantly (P < 0.01) increased the number of terminal end buds (TEBs) and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein (P < 0.05), both of which are indicators of proliferation. This change was linked to a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the expression of the gene encoding amphiregulin, which is known to induce TEB formation. There was also a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.001) in the estrogen-regulated gene encoding the progesterone receptor. In intact females, despite lack of changes in mammary morphology, we observed a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.05) in the expression of genes encoding three milk proteins: whey acidic protein, casein beta and casein kappa. There was a significant (P < 0.05) downregulation of both estrogen receptors in response to E2 treatment. These results suggest that mammary glands of male rats are very sensitive to exogenous E2 during development post-weaning. The dose-dependent increase observed in amphiregulin and progesterone receptor gene expression was linked to morphological changes and represents a reliable and sensitive tool to evaluate estrogenicity. In contrast, intact weanling female rats were less responsive. PMID:23925648

  5. A mammary adenocarcinoma murine model suitable for the study of cancer immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer immunoediting is a dynamic process composed of three phases: elimination (EL), equilibrium (EQ) and escape (ES) that encompasses the potential host-protective and tumor-sculpting functions of the immune system throughout tumor development. Animal models are useful tools for studying diseases such as cancer. The present study was designed to characterize the interaction between mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 and CBi, CBi− and CBi/L inbred mice lines. Results The mammary adenocarcinoma M-406 developed spontaneously in a CBi mouse. CBi/L and CBi− mice were artificially selected for body conformation from CBi. When CBi mice are s.c. challenged with M-406, tumor growths exponentially in 100% of animals, while in CBi− the tumor growths briefly and then begins a rejection process in 100% of the animals. In CBi/L the growth of the tumor shows the three phases: 51.6% in ES, 18.5% in EQ and 29.8% in EL. Conclusions The results obtained support the conclusion that the system M-406 plus the inbred mouse lines CBi, CBi− and CBi/L, is a good murine model to study the process of tumor immunoediting. PMID:24885995

  6. Controlled release low dose medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) inhibits the development of mammary tumors induced by dimethyl-benz(a) anthracene in the rat.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Li, S; Bélanger, A; Côté, J; Mérand, Y; Lepage, M

    1993-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is well recognized to have beneficial effects for the treatment of advanced breast cancer which are comparable to those achieved with other forms of endocrine therapy. Using mammary tumors induced in the rat by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as a model, we have studied the possibility that low dose MPA could prevent the development of these tumors. Single subcutaneous injection of Depo-Provera (crystalline suspension of MPA) or MPA encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres of 50:50 poly[DL-lactide-co-glycolide] was given 7 days before oral DMBA. While 63% of intact animals developed palpable mammary tumors within 85 days after DMBA administration, tumor incidence decreased to 28% and 23% in animals who had received 30 mg and 100 mg of Depo-Provera, respectively. The same amounts of MPA delivered in microspheres caused a further decrease in tumor incidence to respective values of 7% and 6%. Average tumor area, on the other hand, decreased from 4.89 cm2 in intact rats to about 0.75 (0.57-0.88) cm2 and approximately 0.20 (0.14-0.22) cm2 in the Depo-Provera and microsphere-treated groups, respectively. Using the 50:50 formulation of poly[DL-lactide-co-glycolide] designed to release MPA at a constant rate for a 4-month period, the serum MPA concentration at 3 months was measured at 4.99 +/- 0.43 ng/ml. Such data suggest that administration of a low dose controlled-release formulation of MPA in 50:50 poly[DL-lactide-co-glycolide] microspheres could well be an efficient and well tolerated approach for the prevention of breast cancer in women. PMID:8251650

  7. Luteolin suppresses development of medroxyprogesterone acetate-accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matthew T; Mafuvadze, Benford; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Ellersieck, Mark R; Goyette, Sandy; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women undergoing hormone-replacement therapy containing both progestins and estrogens are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women taking estrogen alone. We recently demonstrated that medroxyprogesterone acetate, a progestin commonly used for hormone-replacement therapy, accelerates development of mammary carcinogenesis in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene‑treated Sprague-Dawley rats. Synthetic antiprogestins used to block the deleterious effects of progestins, are themselves associated with toxic side-effects. In order to circumvent this, we used the aforementioned model to identify less toxic natural compounds that may prevent the development of progestin-accelerated tumors. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, has previously been shown to possess anticancer properties. In our studies, both low (1 mg/kg) and high (25 mg/kg) doses of luteolin significantly suppressed progestin-dependent increases in tumor incidence, while increasing tumor latency and reducing the occurrence of large (>300 mm3) mammary tumors. However, an intermediate dose of luteolin (10 mg/kg), while suppressing the development of large tumors, did not affect either tumor incidence or latency. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues revealed that all concentrations of luteolin (1, 10, and 25 mg/kg) significantly reduced levels of VEGF within tumors. The suppressive effects of luteolin on tumor incidence and volume, together with its ability to reduce VEGF and blood vessels, persisted even after treatment was terminated. This suggests that luteolin possesses anti‑angiogenic properties which could mechanistically explain its capacity to control tumor progression. Thus luteolin may be a valuable, non-toxic, naturally-occurring anticancer compound which may potentially be used to combat progestin-accelerated mammary tumors. PMID:26719029

  8. Expression Profiling of Rat Mammary Epithelial Cells Reveals Candidate Signaling Pathways in Dietary Protection from Mammary Tumors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of diet in the prevention of breast cancer is widely accepted, yet little is known on how early dietary effects mitigate adult cancer risk. Soy consumption is associated with reduced breast cancer risk in women, an effect largely attributed to the soy isoflavone genistein (GEN). We previous...

  9. Neurochemical evidence for the presence of sympathetic nerve terminals in the rat mammary gland: Changes during the lactogenic cycle.

    PubMed

    Donoso, E A; Sapag-Hagar, M; Lara, H E

    1992-02-01

    Experiments were undertaken to obtain neurochemical evidence of the presence of sympathetic nerve terminals in the rat mammary gland and the changes occurring in them during the lactogenic cycle. The norepinephrine (NE) content of the gland changed during the lactogenic cycle. Higher levels of NE were found during virginity and involution, whereas a lower level was found at 14 days of lactation. Surgical and chemical (with 6-hydroxydopamine) denervation reduced the norepinephrine content of the gland by 61 and 90%, respectively. Uptake of [(3)H]norepinephrine by the mammary gland was saturable and specifically blocked by cocaine. No changes in the maximal capacity of incorporation during the lactogenic cycle were found, but the affinity of NE for the transmembrane carrier was low during lactation, as was the NE content, suggesting a decrease in the sympathetic nerve activity during this stage of the lactogenic cycle. In support of this, we found a decrease in total NE released after stimulation with 80 mM KCI. The neurochemical evidence obtained during this research strongly suggests that rat mammary gland is innervated by sympathetic nerves and that their activity changes during the lactogenic cycle. PMID:19912841

  10. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  11. Celecoxib and fish oil: a combination strategy for decreased inflammatory mediators in early stages of experimental mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Negi, Anjana Kumari; Renuka; Bhatnagar, Archana; Agnihotri, Navneet

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation has been directly linked to cancer progression. Therefore, current study was designed to understand the mechanism of action of chemo-preventive effect of celecoxib and fish oil on inflammatory mediators in experimental mammary carcinoma. Female Wistar rats were distributed into control and DMBA treated groups and further subdivided based on pretreatment with celecoxib and/or fish oil. Inflammation was measured by assessing expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines. The results indicated an elevation in expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines' levels (IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10) in DMBA group as compared to controls. On pretreatment with celecoxib and/or fish oil in DMBA treated animals, a significant reduction in expression of NF-κB, COX-2 and cytokines' levels was observed. The decrease was more pronounced with combinatorial regimen than either celecoxib or fish oil alone. To conclude, a combinatorial strategy of celecoxib and fish oil may generate an immune response against the tumor cell by altering cytokine repertoire and decrease the tendency of tumor cells to escape immune surveillance. PMID:26749133

  12. A study of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine transport in the perfused rat mammary gland: possible involvement of LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Shennan, D B; Calvert, D T; Travers, M T; Kudo, Y; Boyd, C A R

    2002-08-19

    The transport of L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-alanine by the perfused lactating rat mammary gland has been examined using a rapid, paired-tracer dilution technique. The clearances of all three amino acids by the mammary gland consisted of a rising phase followed by a rapid fall-off, respectively, reflecting influx and efflux of the radiotracers. The peak clearance of L-leucine was inhibited by BCH (65%) and D-leucine (58%) but not by L-proline. The inhibition of L-leucine clearance by BCH and D-leucine was not additive. L-leucine inhibited the peak clearance of radiolabelled L-leucine by 78%. BCH also inhibited the peak clearance of L-phenylalanine (66%) and L-alanine (33%) by the perfused mammary gland. Lactating rat mammary tissue was found to express both LAT1 and LAT2 mRNA. The results suggest that system L is situated in the basolateral aspect of the lactating rat mammary epithelium and thus probably plays a central role in neutral amino acid uptake from blood. The finding that L-alanine uptake by the gland was inhibited by BCH suggests that LAT2 may make a significant contribution to neutral amino acid uptake by the mammary epithelium. PMID:12101005

  13. Differential subcellular localization renders HAI-2 a matriptase inhibitor in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25786220

  14. The serine protease inhibitor protease nexin-1 controls mammary cancer metastasis through LRP-1-mediated MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Fayard, Bérengère; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Dey, Julien; Moreno, Eliza; Djaffer, Sabrina; Hynes, Nancy E; Monard, Denis

    2009-07-15

    Through their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix, proteases mediate cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Paradoxically, some serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are often overexpressed in human tumors. Using computational analysis, we found that the RNA level of protease nexin-1 (PN-1), a serpin that blocks numerous proteases activity, is significantly elevated in estrogen receptor-alpha-negative and in high-grade breast cancer. The in silico approach was complemented by mechanistic studies on two mammary cancer cell lines, the PN-1-negative 168FARN cells and the PN-1-positive 4T1 cells, both of which form primary mammary tumors, but only 4T1 tumors are able to metastasize to the lungs. We show that treatment of 168FARN cells with PN-1 stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation via low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) binding, resulting in increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 RNA, protein, and secreted activity. PN-1-silenced 4T1 cells express low MMP-9 levels. Moreover, injection of PN-1-silenced cells into mice did not affect 4T1 primary mammary tumor outgrowth; however, the tumors had impaired metastatic potential, which could be restored by reexpressing soluble MMP-9 in the PN-1-silenced 4T1 cells. Thus, using mammary tumor models, we describe a novel pathway whereby the serpin PN-1 by binding LRP-1 stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling, MMP-9 expression, and metastatic spread of mammary tumors. Importantly, an analysis of 126 breast cancer patients revealed that those whose breast tumors had elevated PN-1 levels had a significantly higher probability to develop lung metastasis, but not metastasis to other sites, on relapse. These results suggest that PN-1 might become a prognostic marker in breast cancer. PMID:19584287

  15. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  16. Mammary tissue microenvironment determines T cell-dependent breast cancer-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kei; Nagai, Nao; Ogura, Keisuke; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Saiki, Ikuo; Irimura, Tatsuro; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    Although the importance of the host tissue microenvironment in cancer progression and metastasis has been established, the spatiotemporal process establishing a cancer metastasis-prone tissue microenvironment remains unknown. In this study, we aim to understand the immunological character of a metastasis-prone microenvironment in a murine 4T1 breast tumor model, by using the activation of nuclear factor-κb (NF-κB) in cancer cells as a sensor of inflammatory status and by monitoring its activity by bioluminescence imaging. By using a 4T1 breast cancer cell line stably expressing an NF-κB/Luc2 reporter gene (4T1 NF-κB cells), we observed significantly increased bioluminescence approximately 7 days after metastasis-prone orthotopic mammary fat-pad inoculation but not ectopic s.c. inoculation of 4T1 NF-κB cells. Such in vivo NF-κB activation within the fat-pad 4T1 tumor was diminished in immune-deficient SCID or nude mice, or T cell-depleted mice, suggesting the requirement of host T cell-mediated immune responses. Given the fat-pad 4T1 tumor expressed higher inflammatory mediators in a T cell-dependent mechanism compared to the s.c. tumor, our results imply the importance of the surrounding tissue microenvironment for inflaming tumors by collaborating with T cells to instigate metastatic spread of 4T1 breast cancer cells. PMID:25940224

  17. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  18. Anti-Tumor Action, Clinical Biochemistry Profile and Phytochemical Constituents of a Pharmacologically Active Fraction of S. crispus in NMU-Induced Rat Mammary Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Yankuzo, Hassan Muhammad; Devaraj, Sutha; Wong, Jimmy Ka Ming; Lai, Choon-Sheen

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients seek alternative remedies such as traditional medicinal plants for safe and effective treatment and help overcome the side effects of conventional therapy. Current knowledge indicates that extracts of Strobilanthes crispus of the Acanthaceae family exhibit potent anticancer properties in vitro and are non-toxic in vivo. S. crispus was also reported to be protective against chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously showed that a bioactive fraction of S. crispus leaves also synergized with tamoxifen to cause apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines without damaging non-malignant epithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor effect of S. crispus dichloromethane fraction (F3) using N-methyl-N-Nitrosourea (NMU)-induced rat mammary tumor model. Tumor regression was observed in 75% of the rats following 8-week oral administration of F3 with no secondary tumour formation and no signs of anemia or infection. However, no improvement in the liver and renal function profiles was observed. Major constituents of F3 were identified as lutein, 131-hydroxy-132-oxo-pheophytin a, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, pheophytin a and 132-hydroxy-pheophytin a. These compounds however, may not significantly contribute to the antitumor effect of F3. PMID:26000968

  19. A cyclized peptide derived from alpha fetoprotein inhibits the proliferation of ER-positive canine mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian Gabriel; Pino, Ana María; Sierralta, Walter Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The effects of estradiol (E2) and of an AFP-derived cyclized peptide (cP) on the proliferation of primary cultures of cancer cells isolated from spontaneous canine mammary tumors were studied. The cellular response to E2 and cP was related to the expression of estradiol receptor (isoforms alpha and beta). In ER-positive cells, 2 nM estradiol increased cell proliferation and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2; 2 microg/ml cP inhibited all these effects. Estradiol also increased HER2 immunoreactivity in ER-positive cells, an effect that was reverted to its basal values by cP. Estradiol stimulated in these cells the release of MMP2 and MMP9 and the shedding of HB-EGF, effects that the cP did not affect. ER-negative cells were refractory to estradiol or cP. All canine mammary tumor cells in culture responded to treatments analogously to human mammary cancer cells. Our results support the proposal of cP as a new, potentially effective therapeutic agent for the management of mammary cancer. PMID:19424616

  20. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions. PMID:23425702

  1. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit B.; Wang, Qingde; Khillan, Jaspal S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  2. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  3. CSF-1R as an inhibitor of apoptosis and promoter of proliferation, migration and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have high impact on the cancer development because they can facilitate matrix invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor cell motility. It gives cancer cells the capacity to invade normal tissues and metastasize. The signaling of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) which is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation of monocytes and macrophages regulates most of the tissue macrophages. However, CSF-1R is expressed also in breast epithelial tissue during some physiological stages i.g.: pregnancy and lactation. Its expression has been also detected in various cancers. Our previous study has showed the expression of CSF-1R in all examined canine mammary tumors. Moreover, it strongly correlated with grade of malignancy and ability to metastasis. This study was therefore designed to characterize the role of CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. As far as we know, the study presented hereby is a pioneering experiment in this field of veterinary medicine. Results We showed that csf-1r silencing significantly increased apoptosis (Annexin V test), decreased proliferation (measured as Ki67 expression) and decreased migration (“wound healing” assay) of canine mammary cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with CSF-1 caused opposite effect. Moreover, csf-1r knock-down changed growth characteristics of highly invasive cell lines on Matrigel matrix, and significantly decreased the ability of these cells to invade matrix. CSF-1 treatment increased invasion of cancer cells. Conclusion The evidence of the expression and functional role of the CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells indicate that CSF-1R targeting may be a good therapeutic approach. PMID:23561040

  4. The calcineurin/NFAT pathway is activated in diagnostic breast cancer cases and is essential to survival and metastasis of mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran Quang, C; Leboucher, S; Passaro, D; Fuhrmann, L; Nourieh, M; Vincent-Salomon, A; Ghysdael, J

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression has been associated with increased migratory/invasive properties of mammary tumor-derived cell lines in vitro. It is unknown, however, if NFAT activation actually occurs in breast cancer cases and whether the calcineurin/NFAT pathway is important to mammary tumorigenesis. Using a cohort of 321 diagnostic cases of the major subgroup of breast cancer, we found Cn/NFAT pathway activated in ER−PR−HER2− triple-negative breast cancer subtype, whereas its prevalence is less in other subgroups. Using a small hairpin RNA-based gene expression silencing approach in murine mammary tumor cell line (4T1), we show that not only NFAT1 but also NFAT2 and their upstream activator Cn are essential to the migratory and invasive properties of mammary tumor cells. We also demonstrate that Cn, NFAT1 and NFAT2 are essential to the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of these cells in mice, a phenotype which coincides with increased apoptosis in vivo. Finally, global gene expression analyses identified several NFAT-deregulated genes, many of them being previously associated with mammary tumorigenesis. In particular, we identified the gene encoding a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombonspondin motifs 1, as being a potential direct target of NFAT1. Thus, our results show that the Cn/NFAT pathway is activated in diagnostic cases of breast cancers and is essential to the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of mammary tumor cell line. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the Cn/NFAT pathway at different levels could be of therapeutical interest for breast cancer patients. PMID:25719243

  5. Establishment and characterization of a new cell line of canine inflammatory mammary cancer: IPC-366.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J; Illera, Maria J; Lopez, Mirtha S; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  6. Assessment of contralateral mammary gland dose in the treatment of breast cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Foteineas, Andreas; Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Caimi, Mariangela; Margari, Niki; Dilvoi, Maria; Pantelakos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To measure the dose distribution, related to the treatment planning calculations, in the contralateral mammary gland of breast cancer patients treated with accelerated hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. METHODS: Thirty-four prospectively selected female patients with right breast cancer (pN0, negative surgical margins) were treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy/fraction) was prescribed; it was requested that planning target volumes be covered by the 95% isodose line. The contralateral mammary gland was defined on CT simulation. The dose received was evaluated by dose volume histograms. RESULTS: The measured contralateral breast doses were: (1) Dose maximum: 290-448 cGy [Equivalent (Eq) 337-522 cGy]; (2) Mean dose: 45-70 cGy (Eq 524-815 cGy); and (3) Median dose: 29-47 cGy (337-547 cGy) for total primary breast dose of 42.5 Gy in 16 equal fractions. The spearman rho correlation showed statistical significance between the contralateral breast volume and maximum dose (P = 0.0292), as well as mean dose (P = 0.0025) and median dose (P = 0.046) to the breast. CONCLUSION: Minimizing the dose to the contralateral breast has to be one of the priorities of the radiation oncologist when using short schedules because of the radiosensitivity of this organ at risk. Further study is necessary to assess the long-term clinical impact of this schedule. PMID:22013502

  7. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  8. Establishment and Characterization of a New Cell Line of Canine Inflammatory Mammary Cancer: IPC-366

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; de Andres, Paloma J.; Illera, Maria J.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares epidemiologic, histopathological and clinical characteristics with the disease in humans and has been proposed as a natural model for human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The aim of this study was to characterize a new cell line from IMC (IPC-366) for the comparative study of both IMC and IBC. Tumors cells from a female dog with clinical IMC were collected. The cells were grown under adherent conditions. The growth, cytological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics of IPC-366 were evaluated. Ten female Balb/SCID mice were inoculated with IPC-366 cells to assess their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Chromosome aberration test and Karyotype revealed the presence of structural aberration, numerical and neutral rearrangements, demonstrating a chromosomal instability. Microscopic examination of tumor revealed an epithelial morphology with marked anysocytosis. Cytological and histological examination of smears and ultrathin sections by electron microscopy revealed that IPC-366 is formed by highly malignant large round or polygonal cells characterized by marked atypia and prominent nucleoli and frequent multinucleated cells. Some cells had cytoplasmic empty spaces covered by cytoplasmic membrane resembling capillary endothelial cells, a phenomenon that has been related to s vasculogenic mimicry. IHC characterization of IPC-366 was basal-like: epithelial cells (AE1/AE3+, CK14+, vimentin+, actin-, p63-, ER-, PR-, HER-2, E-cadherin, overexpressed COX-2 and high Ki-67 proliferation index (87.15 %). At 2 weeks after inoculating the IPC-366 cells, a tumor mass was found in 100 % of mice. At 4 weeks metastases in lung and lymph nodes were found. Xenograph tumors maintained the original IHC characteristics of the female dog tumor. In summary, the cell line IPC-366 is a fast growing malignant triple negative cell line model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma that can be used for the comparative

  9. Cross-Talk in the Female Rat Mammary Gland: Influence of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor on Estrogen Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Helle, Janina; Bader, Manuela I.; Keiler, Annekathrin M.; Zierau, Oliver; Vollmer, Günter; Chittur, Sridar V.; Tenniswood, Martin; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cross-talk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) plays a major role in signaling processes in female reproductive organs. Objectives: We investigated the influence of the AHR ligand 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) on ER-mediated signaling in mammary gland tissue of ovariectomized (ovx) rats. Methods: After 14 days of hormonal decline, ovx rats were treated for 3 days with 4 μg/kg 17β-estradiol (E2), 15 mg/kg 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), 15 mg/kg 3-MC, or a combination of these compounds (E2 + 3-MC, 8-PN + 3-MC). Whole-mount preparations of the mammary gland were used to count terminal end buds (TEBs). Protein expression studies (immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence), a cDNA microarray, pathway analyses, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to evaluate the interaction between AHR- and ER-mediated signaling pathways. Results: E2 treatment increased the number of TEBs and the levels of Ki-67 protein and progesterone receptor (PR); this treatment also changed the expression of 325 genes by more than 1.5-fold. Although 3-MC treatment alone had marginal impact on gene or protein expression, when rats were co-treated with 3-MC and E2, 3-MC strongly inhibited E2-induced TEB development, protein synthesis, and the expression of nearly half of E2-induced genes. This inhibitory effect of 3-MC was partially mirrored when 8-PN was used as an ER ligand. The anti-estrogenicity of ligand-activated AHR was at least partly due to decreased protein levels of ERα in ductal epithelial cells. Conclusion: Our data show transcriptome-wide anti-estrogenic properties of ligand-activated AHR on ER-mediated processes in the mammary gland, thereby contributing an explanation for the chemopreventive and endocrine-disrupting potential of AHR ligands. Citation: Helle J, Bader MI, Keiler AM, Zierau O, Vollmer G, Chittur SV, Tenniswood M, Kretzschmar G. 2016. Cross-talk in the female rat mammary gland: influence

  10. Consumption of silibinin, a flavonolignan from milk thistle, and mammary cancer development in the C3(1) SV40 T,t antigen transgenic multiple mammary adenocarcinoma (TAg) mouse.

    PubMed

    Verschoyle, Richard D; Brown, Karen; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J

    2008-07-01

    Silibinin is a flavonolignan extracted from milk thistle with cancer chemopreventive activity in preclinical models of prostate and colorectal cancer. A milk thistle extract, of which silibin is a major component, has recently been shown to exacerbate mammary carcinogenesis in two rodent models. We tested the hypothesis that consumption of silibinin or silipide, a silibinin formulation with pharmaceutical properties superior to the unformulated agent, affect breast cancer development in the C3(1) SV40 T,t antigen transgenic multiple mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model. Mice received silibinin or silipide (0.2% silibinin equivalents) with their diet from weaning, and tumour development was monitored by weekly palpation and the number and weight of neoplasms at the end of the experiment. Intervention neither promoted, nor interfered with, tumour development. The result suggests that promotion of carcinogenesis is not a feature of silibinin consistent across rodent models of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:17909802

  11. Curcumin Implants, not Curcumin Diet Inhibits Estrogen-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis in ACI Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shyam S.; kausar, Hina; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Ravoori, Srivani; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is widely known for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities in cell culture studies. However, poor oral bioavailability limited its efficacy in animal and clinical studies. Recently, we developed polymeric curcumin implants that circumvents oral bioavailability issues, and tested their potential against 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. Female ACI rats were administered curcumin either via diet (1,000 ppm) or via polymeric curcumin implants (two 2-cm; 200 mg each; 20% drug load) 4 days prior to grafting a subcutaneous E2 silastic implant (1.2 cm, 9 mg E2). Implants were changed after 4½ months to provide higher curcumin dose at the appearance of palpable tumors. The animals were euthanized after 3 weeks, 3 months and after the tumor incidence reached >80% (~6 months) in control animals. The curcumin administered via implants resulted in significant reduction in both the tumor multiplicity (2±1 vs 5±3; p=0.001) and tumor volume (184±198 mm3 vs 280±141 mm3; p=0.0283); the dietary curcumin, however, was ineffective. Dietary curcumin increased hepatic CYP1A and CYP1B1 activities without any effect on CYP3A4 activity whereas curcumin implants increased both CYP1A and CYP3A4 activities but decreased CYP1B1 activity in presence of E2. Since CYP1A and 3A4 metabolize most of the E2 to its non-carcinogenic 2-OH metabolite and CYP1B1 produces potentially carcinogenic 4-OH metabolite, favorable modulation of these CYPs via systemically delivered curcumin could be one of the potential mechanisms. The analysis of plasma and liver by HPLC showed substantially higher curcumin levels via implants versus the dietary route despite substantially higher dose administered. PMID:24501322

  12. CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACIDS (CLA) DECREASE THE BREAST CANCER RISK IN DMBA-TREATED RATS.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej; Zagrodzki, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how supplementation of diet of female Sprague-Dawley rats with different doses of conjugated linoleic acids and for a varied period of time influences breast cancer risk, fatty acids profile and lipids peroxidation in chemically induced mammary tumors. Animals were divided into nine groups with different modifications of diet (vegetable oil, 1.0 or 2.0% of CLA) and period of supplementation, which lasted after (A), before (B) and before and after (BA) carcinogenic agent--7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene administration at 50th day of life. Mammary adenocarcinomas occurred in all groups, but CLA supplementation decreased the cancer morbidity. Two percent CLA seems to be excessive because of the coexisting cachexia. Two CLA isomers (9-cis, 11-trans and 10-trans, 12-cis) were detected in tumors but content of rumenic acid was higher. Dietary supplementation significantly influenced some unsaturated fatty acids content (C18:2 n-6 trans, C20:1, C20:5 n-3, C22:2), but the anti- or prooxidant properties of CLA were not confirmed. CLA can inhibit chemically induced mammary tumors development in female rats, but their cytotoxic action seems not to be connected with lipids peroxidation. CLA isomers differ with their incorporation into cancerous tissues and they influence the content of some other fatty acids. PMID:27180424

  13. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Castadot, Pierre; MacDermed, Dhara; Vandekerkhove, Christophe; Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  14. 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced DNA binding and repair synthesis in susceptible and nonsusceptible mammary epithelial cells in culture. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, L.K.; Russo, J.

    1981-07-01

    The effect of age and parity on the binding of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to DNA and the repair of DMBA-damaged DNA have been demonstrated in logarithmic phase and confluent mammary epithelial cell cultures from young virgin (YV), old virgin (OV), and parous (P) noninbred and inbred Sprague-Dawley rats. Excision repair was determined by measuring, in the presence of hydroxyurea and 5-bromodeoxyuridine, tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA during the repair process. These results suggest that age and parity not only lower the binding of DMBA to mammary epithelial cell DNA but also increase the efficiency of DNA repair processes, which may explain the lower susceptibility of OV and P rats to DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis.

  15. Activation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor by TCDD Inhibits Mammary Tumor Metastasis in a Syngeneic Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wyrick, Katie L.; Meadows, Gary G.; Wills, Tamara B.; Vorderstrasse, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists can slow or reverse the growth of primary mammary tumors in rodents, which has fostered interest in developing selective AhR modulators for treatment of breast cancer. However, the major goal of breast cancer therapy is to inhibit metastasis, the primary cause of mortality in women with this disease. Studies conducted using breast cancer cell lines have demonstrated that AhR agonists suppress proliferation, invasiveness, and colony formation in vitro; however, further exploration using in vivo models of metastasis is warranted. To test the effect of AhR activation on metastasis, 4T1.2 mammary tumor cells were injected into the mammary gland fat pad of syngeneic Balb/c mice treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Primary tumor growth was monitored for 4 weeks, at which time metastasis was determined. TCDD treatment suppressed metastasis by approximately 50%, as measured both in the lung and in mammary glands at sites distant from the primary tumor. Primary tumor growth was not suppressed by TCDD exposure nor was proliferation of 4T1.2 cells affected by TCDD treatment in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that the protective effect of AhR activation was selective for the metastatic process and not simply the result of a direct decrease in tumor cell proliferation or survival at the primary site. These observations in immunologically intact animals warrant further investigation into the mechanism of the protective effects of AhR activation and support the promise for use of AhR modulators to treat breast cancer. PMID:21948867

  16. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs. PMID:26124697

  17. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  18. PERSISTENT ABNORMALITIES IN THE RAT MAMMARY GLAND FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure during gestation has revealed reproductive anomalies in rat offspring, including inconclusive reports of stunted mammary development in females (Brown et al., 1998, Lewis et al., 2001). The current studies wer...

  19. Feeding soy protein isolate and treatment with estradiol have different effects on mammary gland morphology and gene expression in weanling male and female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones are phytochemical components of soy diets that bind weakly to estrogen receptors (ERs). To study potential estrogen-like actions of soy in the mammary gland during early development, we fed weanling male and female Sprague-Dawley rats a semi-purified diet with casein as the sole protein ...

  20. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  1. Induction of apoptosis and downregulation of ERα in DMBA-induced mammary gland tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats by synthetic 3,5-disubstituted isoxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Hanumappa; Kumar, Kothanahally S Sharath; Hegde, Mahesh; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2016-09-01

    Isoxazole derivatives are an important group of chemotherapeutic prototypes. In the current study, we have synthesized few isoxazole derivatives and tested them for their antiproliferative properties in cancer cell lines such as MCF7 and HeLa. The lead compound, 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-(thiophen-2-yl)isoxazole (2b), showed considerable inhibition of proliferation of MCF7 and HeLa cells with the IC50 values of 19.5 and 39.2 µM, respectively. Cell cycle analyses and annexin-FITC staining in 2b-treated breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) showed increased sub-G1 population and apoptosis. Furthermore, we tested the tumor inhibitory effect of 2b and estrogen receptor expression profile in DMBA-induced mammary tumors in Sprague-Dawley rats. The gross morphology of tumor studies was investigated by histopathology and ERα protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, which showed tumor regression and downregulation of ERα in tumor cells. The present results implicate that compound 2b could be used for the further derivatization for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27473146

  2. Combination between Taxol-Encapsulated Liposomes and Eruca sativa Seed Extract Suppresses Mammary Tumors in Female Rats Induced by 7,12 Dimethylbenz(α)anthracene.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Nadia; Abdel-Rahman, Salah; Haggag, Amany; Awad, Doaa; Bassiouny, Ahmad; Talaat, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is a powerful anti-cancer drug widely used against several types of malignant tumors. Because Taxol may exert several side effects, a variety of formulations have been developed. One of these features liposomes, regarded as one of the most promising drug carriers, biocompatible and best able to reduce drug toxicity without changing efficacy against tumor cells. Eruca sativa seed extract (SE) is considered a promising natural product from cruciferous vegetables against breast cancer, increasing chemotherapeutic and eliminating harmful side effects. The effects of Taxol-encapsulated liposomes (T) alone and in combination between Eruca sativa seed extract on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) gene expression levels were investigated in rat mammary gland carcinogenesis induced by 7,12 dimethylbenz(α) anthracene (DMBA) using qRT-PCR. The results showed that DMBA increased NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and lipid peroxidation (LP), while decreasing glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and total antioxidant concentration (TAC) compared to the control group. T and T-SE treatment reduced NF-κB, COX-2 and Bcl-2 gene expression levels and LP. Hence, T and T-SE treatment appeared to reduce inflammation and cell proliferation, while increasing apoptosis, GST and SOD activities and TAC. PMID:26838195

  3. Evidence that an early pregnancy causes a persistent decrease in the number of functional mammary epithelial stem cells—implications for pregnancy-induced protection against breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siwko, Stefan K.; Dong, Jie; Lewis, Michael T.; Liu, Hao; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Li, Yi

    2009-01-01

    A completed pregnancy at a young age reduces a woman’s lifetime risk of breast cancer by up to 50%. A similar protective effect of an early pregnancy has been observed in rodent models using chemical carcinogens. However, the mechanisms responsible for this protective effect remain unclear. Stem cells have been proposed to be the cells of origin for breast cancer. We hypothesized that an early pregnancy reduces adult levels of either mammary stem cells or mammary multipotent progenitor cells. Unsorted mammary cells from adult mice that had undergone an early parity had the same mammosphere formation efficiency as cells from age-matched virgin mice. However, when we transplanted adult mammary cells in limiting dilutions into cleared fat pads of syngeneic mice, we found a significant reduction in the outgrowth potential of the cells from early parous mice as compared with age-matched virgin mice. The extent of fat pad filling in successful outgrowths did not change, suggesting that while mammary stem cells in parous mice retained their functional competence, the number of mammary stem cells was reduced. Our results provide the first direct evidence that an early pregnancy has an effect on mammary stem cells. PMID:18787212

  4. Whey Protein Hydrolysate but not Whole Whey Protein Protects Against 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-Induced Mammary Tumors in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J; Hakkak, Reza; Korourian, Soheila; Badger, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of intact and processed bovine milk proteins on development of chemically induced mammary tumors in female rats were compared. AIN-93G diets were made with 20% casein (CAS), casein hydrolysate (CASH), intact whey protein (IWP), or whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the diets starting at Gestational Day 4. Offspring were fed the same diet. At 50 days, female offspring (44-49/group) were gavaged with sesame oil containing 80 mg/kg of the mammary carcinogen dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and euthanized 62 days posttreatment. Rats fed WPH had an adenocarcinoma incidence of 17% compared to the rats fed CAS, CASH, and IWP diets (34%, 33%, and 36% respectively) (P < 0.001). Median palpable tumor latency for rats fed WPH was greater (61 days, P < 0.001) compared to CAS (44 days), CASH (42 days) and IWP (45 days). Tumor multiplicity was also lower (1.5 vs. 3.0, P < 0.05) in rats fed WPH than in CAS and CASH fed groups. Results demonstrate that hydrolytic processing of whey protein is required for this diet to be effective in reducing DMBA-induced mammary tumors. The bioactive compounds produced during whey protein processing and mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of WPH are yet to be identified. PMID:26168336

  5. Mammary gland cancer in a colony of beagle dogs: Inheritance, and p53 & erbB-2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, G.; Griffith, W.C.; Muggenburg, Tierney, L.A.; Lechner, J.F.; Hahn, F.F.

    1994-11-01

    One American woman in nine will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. This somber statistic translates into 182,000 new diagnoses and 46,000 deaths per year. Efforts to decrease breast cancer mortality have focused on early detection and improved treatment. Such efforts would be facilitated by the identification of individuals predisposed to the disease. A family history of the disease can increase a woman`s risk for developing breast cancer by two- to six-fold. Inheritance of this disease is consistent with at least one susceptibility locus on chromosome 17 (17q12-21) with incomplete penetrance. However, other mechanisms of inherited susceptibility also contribute to the high incidence of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to characterize familial pattern of mammary cancer development in the dog colony. In addition, the expression of the p53 tumor supressor gene and c-erbB2 (p185{sup erbB2}) oncogene proteins, which are frequently altered in human breast cancer, were examined in dogs susceptible and resistant to mammary cancer.

  6. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Aeed, P A; Welch, D R

    1988-12-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all cells generally resistant to specific PMN cytolysis. LPS-activated macrophages caused 25.1%, 38.7% and 58.8% specific cytolysis in MTF7, sc1 and LR1 cells, respectively at E:T of 20:1 and 72 h co-incubation. LR1a, sc3 and LR3 lysis ranged from 0-4.4% under the same conditions. Non-activated macrophages did not lyse any of the cell lines. Locally recurrent and 'primary' tumour cell lines were also not lysed by naive NK cells (range 0.5-4.0% cytolysis). NK cells activated with bropirimine, a potent immunomodulator currently being studied in clinical trials, and/or interleukin-2 were mildly more effective at killing LR cells. Our results show that locally recurrent tumours exhibit heterogeneous sensitivities and are different from 'primary' tumour cells in sensitivities to immune cell killing, but they are not necessarily more or less sensitive. Results with bropirimine-activated or IL-2-activated NK cells emphasize that nonspecific activation is insufficient to eliminate all tumour subpopulations. PMID:3224080

  7. Factors affecting mammary tumor incidence in chlorotriazine-treated female rats: hormonal properties, dosage, and animal strain.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, J C; Tennant, M K; Wetzel, L T; Breckenridge, C B; Stevens, J T

    1994-01-01

    Chlorotriazines are widely used in agriculture as broadleaf herbicides. The compounds specifically inhibit photosynthesis, and, as such, display little interaction with animal systems. However, a 24-month feeding study with atrazine (ATR) revealed a significant dose-related increase of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Because numerous studies indicated that ATR had a low mutagenic and oncogenic potential, it was decided to test a hypothesis that the herbicide possessed endocrine activity. Among tests for estrogenic action, oral dosing of ATR up to 300 mg/kg did not stimulate uterine weight of ovariectomized rats. However, ATR administration did reduce estrogen-stimulated uterine weight gain. Further evidence of inhibition came from measures of [3H]-thymidine incorporation into uterine DNA of ATR-treated immature rats. Again, no intrinsic estrogenic activity was observed up to a 300-mg/kg dose. In vitro, ATR competed poorly against estradiol binding to cytosolic receptors, with an approximate IC50 of 10(-5) M. Atrazine administration to SD and Fischer-344 (F-344) rats for 12 months, up to 400 ppm in food, was correlated with significant alterations of estrous cycling activity; but there was a divergent strain response. SD rats showed an increased number of days in vaginal estrus, increased plasma estradiol, and decreased plasma progesterone by 9 to 12 months of treatment. F-344 rats did not demonstrate treatment-related affects. A study of ultrastructure in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of female SD rats that were fed diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), an ATR metabolite, suggested that age-associated glial pathology was enhanced by treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 8. PMID:7737039

  8. Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase the efficacy of docetaxel in mammary cancer cells by downregulating Akt and PKCε/δ-induced ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Lucie; Goupille, Caroline; Blanc, Charly; Pinault, Michelle; Domingo, Isabelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Bougnoux, Philippe; Chevalier, Stephan; Mahéo, Karine

    2016-04-01

    Taxanes can induce drug resistance by increasing signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and ERK, which promote survival and cell growth in human cancer cells. We have previously shown that long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) decrease resistance of experimental mammary tumors to anticancer drugs. Our objective was to determine whether DHA could increase tumor sensitivity to docetaxel by down-regulating these survival pathways. In docetaxel-treated MDA-MB-231 cells, phosphorylated-ERK1/2 levels were increased by 60% in membrane and nuclear compartments, compared to untreated cells. Our data showed that ERK1/2 activation depended on PKC activation since: i) enzastaurin (a pan-PKC inhibitor) blocked docetaxel-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation ii) docetaxel increased PKC activity by 30% and phosphatidic acid level by 1.6-fold iii) inhibition of PKCε and PKCδ by siRNA resulted in reduced phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. In DHA-supplemented cells, docetaxel was unable to increase PKCε and δ levels in membrane and nuclear fractions, resulting in diminished ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased docetaxel efficacy. Reduced membrane level of PKCε and PKCδ was associated with significant incorporation of DHA in all phospholipids, including phosphatidylcholine which is a major source of phosphatidic acid. Additionally, examination of the Akt pathway showed that DHA could repress docetaxel-induced Ser473Akt phosphorylation. In rat mammary tumors, dietary DHA supplementation during docetaxel chemotherapy repressed ERK and Akt survival pathways and in turn strongly improved taxane efficacy. The P-ERK level was negatively correlated with tumor regression. These findings are of potential clinical importance in treating chemotherapy-refractory cancer. PMID:26821209

  9. Morphometric studies of age related changes in normal human breast and their significance for evolution of mammary cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, S W; Cowen, P N; Bird, C C

    1985-01-01

    Ageing changes in the normal human female breast were studied to determine their significance for the evolution of mammary cancer. Employing the morphometric techniques of point counting and planimetry, objective quantitative measurements were made of the structure of the normal female breast in 58 subjects from the prepubertal to late postreproductive period. The relative amounts of epithelial and connective tissue varied with age, and the epithelial elements (combined lobular and extralobular) were unevenly distributed within the gland, with lower containing more than upper quadrants. The upper outer quadrant, however, usually contained the largest proportion of lobular units, which may relate to the higher incidence of lobular carcinoma found in this quadrant. Involution was shown to be a premenopausal rather than postmenopausal phenomenon. Mammary dysplastic changes were uncommon in all age groups. Images PMID:3973052

  10. Axillary Staging in Breast Cancer Patients with Exclusive Lymphoscintigraphic Drainage to the Internal Mammary Chain

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Eva V. E.; van Dalen, Thijs; Koelemij, Ron; van Rossum, Peter S. N.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Witkamp, Arjen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the need of axillary staging in breast cancer patients showing exclusive lymphatic drainage to the internal mammary chain (IMC). Methods A total of 2203 patients treated for breast carcinoma in three participating hospitals between July 2001 and July 2008 were analyzed. Only patients showing drainage to the IMC on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy were included. The number of harvested IMC sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs), axillary SLNs, and metastases were recorded. Finally, the follow-up of this group of patients was analyzed. Results In 25/426 patients, drainage was exclusively to the IMC. Exploration of the axilla resulted in the harvesting of blue SLNs in 9 patients (36%) and the retrieval of an enlarged lymph node in 1 patient. In 4 of the remaining 15 patients, an axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was done. Lymph node metastases were found in 3 patients who had blue axillary SLNs and in 1 patient who underwent ALND. In the 11 patients who had no blue SLNs and no ALND, no axillary recurrences were observed during follow-up (median = 26 months). Conclusions Proper staging of the axilla remains crucial in patients showing exclusive drainage to the IMC. When no axillary node can be retrieved, ALND remains subject to discussion. PMID:20936283