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Sample records for rat mastomys natalensis

  1. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa fever, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Emilie; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kouassi Kan, Stéphane; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-12-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans. PMID:17326956

  2. Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Fever, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Daffis, Stéphane; Koulémou, Kékoura; Sylla, Oumar; Kourouma, Fodé; Doré, Amadou; Soropogui, Barré; Aniskin, Vladimir; Allali, Bernard; Kan, Stéphane Kouassi; Lalis, Aude; Koivogui, Lamine; Günther, Stephan; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PCR screening of 1,482 murid rodents from 13 genera caught in 18 different localities of Guinea, West Africa, showed Lassa virus infection only in molecularly typed Mastomys natalensis. Distribution of this rodent and relative abundance compared with M. erythroleucus correlates geographically with Lassa virus seroprevalence in humans. PMID:17326956

  3. Comparative pathogenicity of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strains in Swiss white mice and Mastomys natalensis rats.

    PubMed

    Muchiri, Margaret Wanjiku; Ndung'u, Kariuki; Kibugu, James Karuku; Thuita, John Kibuthu; Gitonga, Purity Kaari; Ngae, Geoffrey Njuguna; Mdachi, Raymond Ellie; Kagira, John Maina

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated Mastomys natelensis rat as an animal model for Rhodesian sleeping sickness. Parasitaemia, clinical and pathological characteristics induced by T. b. rhodesiense isolates, KETRI 3439, 3622 and 3637 were compared in Mastomys rats and Swiss white mice. Each isolate was intra-peritonially injected in mice and rat groups (n=12) at 1×10(4) trypanosomes/0.2mL. Pre-patent period (PP) range for KETRI 3439 and KETRI 3622-groups was 3-6 days for mice and 4-5 days for rats while for KETRI 3637-infected mice and rats was 5-9 and 4-12 days, respectively. Pairwise comparison between PP of mice and rats separately infected with either isolate showed no significant difference (p>0.05). The PP's of KETRI 3637-infected mice were significantly (p>0.01) longer than those infected with KETRI 3439 or KETRI 3622, a trend also observed in rats. The second parasitaemic wave was more prominent in mice. Clinical signs included body weakness, dyspnoea, peri-orbital oedema and extreme emaciation which were more common in rats. Survival time for KETRI 3439 and 3622-infected groups was significantly (p<0.05) longer in mice than rats but similar in KETRI 3637-infected groups. Inflammatory lesions were more severe in rats than mice. All mice and KETRI 3622-infected rats had splenomegaly, organ congestion with rats additionally showing prominent lymphadenopathy. KETRI 3439-infected rats showed hemorrhagic pneumonia, enteritis with moderate splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. KETRI 3637-infected rats had the most severe lesions characterized by prominent splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, enlarged adrenal glands, organ congestion, generalized oedemas, gastroenteritis, pneumonia and brain congestion. KETRI 3637-infected Mastomys is a suitable model for studying pathophysiology of HAT. PMID:26099681

  4. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria. PMID:26982388

  5. The ecology of Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis in southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Isaäcson, Margaretha

    1975-01-01

    The only non-human host of Lassa virus so far identified is the multimammate mouse, Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis, but its precise role in the natural Lassa fever cycle remains to be determined. This species is also an important link in the plague cycle in southern Africa and is one of the commonest rodents of Africa. It is a prolific breeder and can be kept and bred easily in captivity. It is thus an excellent laboratory animal, although it needs to be handled with care because it is aggressive towards man and bites readily. The current status of knowledge of its taxonomy, ecology, distribution, and role as a disease vector is reviewed, but attention is drawn to the possibly disastrous consequences of attempting to eradicate a vector species before the natural cycle of the disease and the ecology of the vector are fully understood. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:1085218

  6. Chemotherapeutic studies on Litomosoides carinii infection of Mastomys natalensis*

    PubMed Central

    Lämmler, Georg; Herzog, Heike; Saupe, Eberhard; Schütze, Hans Rudolf

    1971-01-01

    The antifilarial action of 2-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-6-benzimidazolyl]-6-(1-methyl-4-piperazyl) benzimidazole (HOE 33258) was investigated in Mastomys natalensis infected with Litomosoides carinii. The subcutaneous administration of HOE 33258 in a single daily dose for 5 consecutive days, or at other intervals, produced, depending on the dosage, a rapid reduction in the number of microfilariae in the circulating blood. The reduction amounted to more than 90% within 7-14 days after the treatment was started or at the end of the dosage schedule. The small, slow increase in the microfilarial count during a period of 6-7 weeks after treatment ended reached not more than half the number present before treatment. HOE 33258 showed marked activity on the reproductive system of mature female worms, although only few macrofilariae were killed by the drug. The results also demonstrated the usefulness of L. carinii infection of M. natalensis as a model for the evaluation of the filaricidal activity of drugs. PMID:5317445

  7. Spontaneous diseases in a closed colony of Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis

    PubMed Central

    Snell, K. C.; Stewart, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    In comparison with other rodents, the mastomys is unique as regards the patterns of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases that it develops, some of which may constitute suitable animal models for corresponding diseases of man. Among the spontaneous diseases commonly encountered in necropsies of 600 mastomys maintained in a closed colony were: (1) degenerative joint disease of diarthroses and interventricular disks, which develops regularly in the second year of life; (2) renal disease, a type of immune-complex glomerulonephritis, affecting approximately 80% of mastomys in the age bracket 18-36 months; (3) thymomas and thymic hyperplasia affecting 30% of mastomys by the time they are 2 years old or older; (4) a combination of thymoma and polymyositis in a mastomys showing serum-globulin reactivity, presumably auto-antibody against striated muscle; (5) beginning before the age of 1 year, replacement of the normal cell population of the lymphoid tissues by plasma cells, and intense plasma cell infiltration at many other organ and tissue sites; (6) haematopoietic neoplasms, without leukaemic blood, in 10% of mastomys; and (7) histamine-producing argyrophilic carcinoid tumours of the glandular stomach in approximately 60% of old male and 30% of old female mastomys. Additionally, other neoplasms not infrequently encountered in mastomys rarely occur in other rodent species; conversely some neoplasms commonly found in other rodents, including especially tumours of the lung and mammary gland and leukaemia, are rare or absent in mastomys. PMID:1085220

  8. Laboratory test of seven rodenticides for the control of Mastomys natalensis.

    PubMed

    Gill, J E; Redfern, R

    1979-10-01

    Laboratory feeding tests were carried out to assess the efficacy of seven rodenticides against Mastomys natalensis. The poisons (warfarin, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, calciferol and zinc phosphide) were all toxic at the concentrations normally used against Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), although several were unpalatable. Trials are now needed to demonstrate the relative efficacy of these poisons in the field, but it is likely that, given suitable bait formulations, they would all be useful as practical control agents. PMID:489963

  9. Laboratory test of seven rodenticides for the control of Mastomys natalensis.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, J. E.; Redfern, R.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory feeding tests were carried out to assess the efficacy of seven rodenticides against Mastomys natalensis. The poisons (warfarin, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, calciferol and zinc phosphide) were all toxic at the concentrations normally used against Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), although several were unpalatable. Trials are now needed to demonstrate the relative efficacy of these poisons in the field, but it is likely that, given suitable bait formulations, they would all be useful as practical control agents. PMID:489963

  10. Host evolution in Mastomys natalensis (Rodentia: Muridae): An integrative approach using geometric morphometrics and genetics.

    PubMed

    Lalis, Aude; Evin, Allowen; Janier, Marc; Koivogui, Lamine; Denys, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The commensal rodent Mastomys natalensis is the natural reservoir of Lassa arenavirus (LASV), which causes hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. To study a possible effect of the virus on phenotypic and genotypic variation of its persistently infected host, we compared LASV-positive and non-infected wild-caught M. natalensis. The LASV effects on the phenotypic variation were explored using standard external morphometric measurements, geometric morphometric analyses of the cranial size and shape, and brain case volume. The genetic variability of M. natalensis specimens was assessed using 9 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Independent of sex and age, LASV-infected animals had smaller external body measurements, reproductive organs, skull size and brain case volume. Cranial shape differences between the 2 groups are represented by a lateral constriction of the entire skull. The genetic variability revealed consanguinity only among the LASV-positive rodents. We hypothesize that growth impairment may result in a selective disadvantage for LASV-infected M. natalensis, leading to a preferably commensal lifestyle in areas where the LAVS is endemic and, thereby, increasing the risk of LASV transmission to humans. PMID:26331855

  11. Transcriptome analysis of Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus in productive lesions after natural infection.

    PubMed

    Salvermoser, Melanie; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Hasche, Daniel; Rösl, Frank; Vinzón, Sabrina E

    2016-07-01

    Mastomys coucha, an African rodent, is a useful animal model of papillomavirus infection, as it develops both premalignant and malignant skin tumors as a consequence of a persistent infection with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). In this study, we mapped the MnPV transcriptome in productive lesions by both classical molecular techniques and high-throughput RNA sequencing. Combination of these methods revealed a complex and comprehensive transcription map, with novel splicing events not described in other papillomaviruses. Furthermore, these splicing occurrences could potentially lead to the expression of novel E2, E1∧E4, E7 and L2 isoforms. Expression level estimation of each transcript showed that late-region mRNAs considerably outnumber early transcripts, with species coding for L1 and E1∧E4 being the most abundant. In summary, the full transcription map assembled in this study will allow us to further understand MnPV gene expression and the mechanisms that lead to natural tumour development. PMID:27043420

  12. Trichuris spp. (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from two rodents, Mastomys natalensis and Gerbilliscus vicinus in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Alexis; López, Sergi; Makundi, Rhodes H; Leirs, Herwig; de Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy

    2013-10-01

    During a survey of the helminth community of several rodent species in the Morogoro region (Tanzania), Trichuris whipworms (Nematoda: Trichuridae) were found in the ceca of the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis and a gerbil, Gerbilliscus vicinus (both Rodentia: Muridae). The taxonomic literature regarding Trichuris from African native rodents describes 10 species, but includes few metric and morphologic characters that discriminate between some of the pairs. The whipworms we sampled in Tanzanian Natal multimammate mice and gerbils were morphologically identified, respectively, as Trichuris mastomysi Verster, 1960 and Trichuris carlieri Gedoelst, 1916 sensu lato, but with characters that overlap or partially overlap with the cosmopolitan Murinae whipworm, Trichuris muris , already reported from several rodents in Africa. To clarify our identification, we sequenced the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 ribosomal DNA region of the worms' nuclear genome. The genetic analyses clearly distinguish the whipworms we found in M. natalensis from those found in the gerbil, and both of these from T. muris whipworm reference sequences. The overlap of morphological characters between rodent whipworms suggests that reports of T. muris from rodent species not closely related to Murinae in other parts of Africa should be treated with caution. PMID:23560615

  13. The Impact of Human Conflict on the Genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Virus in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease. PMID:22615894

  14. Chemotherapeutic studies on Litomosoides carinii infection of Mastomys natalensis. 8. The action of furazolidone on adult worms and microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Wegerhof, P H; Lämmler, G; Sänger, I; Zahner, H

    1979-09-01

    After oral administration of furazolidone in doses of 5 x 50 mg/kg and 1 x 100 mg/kg body weight to Litomosoides carinii--infected Mastomys natalensis microfilaraemia decreased continuously and was reduced by more than 98% 42 days after start of treatment. After the 5-day treatment all adult female and male worms were found dead and encapsulated within 2 weeks, whereas after the single dose 100% of the female parasites were encapsulated 28 days after treatment. In untreated animals quantiative examinations of the intrauterine stages showed an average number of 500 x 103 embryos per adult female worm. Following the 5-day treatment the number of embryos per female parasite was reduced after 42 days to 12.5 x 103, and after the single treatment to 26.9 x 103. By classification into 5 different stages (2- and 4-cell stages, Morula stage, "Horse-shoe" stage, "Ring" and "Brezel" stages, and intruterine microfilariae) an embryogram showed a continuous increase in pathologically-altered embryos during the whole observation period. The 2- and 4-cell stages suffered the most damaged. By 16 days after the end of the 5-day treatment and by 28 days after the single treatment all embryonic stages in the uteri were found to be pathologically altered. Furazolidone possessess high macrofilaricidal activity together with a considerable adverse effect on embryognesis and some delayed effect on microfilaraemia. PMID:543002

  15. Increased Incidence of Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Mastomys natalensis Papillomavirus E6 Transgenic Mice during Two-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Helfrich, Iris; Chen, Min; Schmidt, Rainer; Fürstenberger, Gerhard; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Trick, David; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; zur Hausen, Harald; Rösl, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Papillomaviruses cause certain forms of human cancers, most notably carcinomas of the uterine cervix. In contrast to the well-established involvement of papillomavirus infection in the etiology of cervical carcinomas and in carcinomas of a rare hereditary condition, epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a causative role for cutaneous human papillomavirus types in the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer has not been proven. In order to better understand the functions of individual genes of cutaneous papillomavirus types, we generated transgenic mice carrying oncogene E6 of the Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV), which causes keratoacanthomas of the skin in its natural host. In the present study, we demonstrate that under conditions of experimental two-stage skin carcinogenesis, fast-paced squamous cell carcinomas develop in nearly 100% of MnPV E6 transgenic mice in comparison to 10% in their nontransgenic littermates (log rank test; P < 0.0001). Therefore, we conclude that the MnPV E6 transgene favors the malignant progression of chemically induced tumors. Whereas an activating H-ras mutation is a consistent feature in benign and malignant tumors in wild-type mice, the majority of papillomas and keratoacanthomas and all squamous cell carcinomas obtained in MnPV E6 transgenic mice contain nonmutated ras alleles. These results indicate that the development of squamous cell carcinomas in MnPV E6 transgenic mice does not depend on an activated H-ras oncogene. PMID:15078961

  16. The impact of human conflict on the genetics of Mastomys natalensis and Lassa virus in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lalis, Aude; Leblois, Raphaël; Lecompte, Emilie; Denys, Christiane; Ter Meulen, Jan; Wirth, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes have been shown to play an important role in the emergence of new human diseases of zoonotic origin. The contribution of social factors to their spread, especially conflicts followed by mass movement of populations, has not been extensively investigated. Here we reveal the effects of civil war on the phylogeography of a zoonotic emerging infectious disease by concomitantly studying the population structure, evolution and demography of Lassa virus and its natural reservoir, the rodent Mastomys natalensis, in Guinea, West Africa. Analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences enabled us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Lassa virus, which appeared 750 to 900 years ago in Nigeria and only recently spread across western Africa (170 years ago). Bayesian demographic inferences revealed that both the host and the virus populations have gone recently through severe genetic bottlenecks. The timing of these events matches civil war-related mass movements of refugees and accompanying environmental degradation. Forest and habitat destruction and human predation of the natural reservoir are likely explanations for the sharp decline observed in the rodent populations, the consequent virus population decline, and the coincident increased incidence of Lassa fever in these regions. Interestingly, we were also able to detect a similar pattern in Nigeria coinciding with the Biafra war. Our findings show that anthropogenic factors may profoundly impact the population genetics of a virus and its reservoir within the context of an emerging infectious disease. PMID:22615894

  17. Effect of aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis (Baker) stem on the sexual behaviour of male rats.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, M T; Afolayan, A J

    2009-12-01

    The phytochemical constituents of aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis (Baker) stem and its effect on male rat sexual behaviour were evaluated for 7 days. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, cardiac glycoside, tannins, alkaloids and anthraquinones. Administration of the extract at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight resulted in the significant increase (p < 0.05) in mount frequency, intromission frequency, ejaculatory latency, ejaculation frequency, serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone concentrations, computed indices of sexual behaviour, erection, quick flips, long flips and total penile reflexes whereas the mount latency, intromission latency and post-ejaculatory interval were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) throughout the experimental period. The 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract produced contrasting pattern to the lower doses of the extract in all the parameters of sexual behaviour monitored throughout the experimental period. The results are indicative of prosexual stimulatory potentials of Bulbine natalensis in male rats. The aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis stem at these doses (25 and 50 mg/kg body weight) may be used in the management of disorders of desire/libido, premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction in males. PMID:18710410

  18. Immune responses of two Mastomys sibling species to Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Arntzen, L; Wadee, A A; Isaäcson, M

    1991-01-01

    This study assessed the in vitro cell-mediated immune responses of Mastomys natalensis, with a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 32, and Mastomys coucha, with a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 36, to Yersinia pestis. Splenic mononuclear (MN) cells of uninfected M. natalensis proliferated in response to crude fraction 1 of Y. pestis and two subfractions derived from fraction 1 in vitro. Proliferation was dose dependent and followed the time kinetics of other well-known mitogens. Further characterization of the two fractions revealed similar protein profiles in sodium dodecyl sulfide-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and indicated a heat-stable protein of 25 kDa responsible for the mitogenic activity. No such response was observed with MN cells from M. coucha. The unresponsiveness of M. coucha-derived MN cells appears to be related to an inability to respond to Y. pestis organisms. The results may help explain the relative resistance and susceptibility of M. natalensis and M. coucha to Y. pestis infection. Images PMID:2037358

  19. Care of Mastomys in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jodi; Wilson, Steven

    2016-05-20

    Mastomys rodents occupy a valuable niche in biomedical research, but there is very little published information regarding how to care for them in the laboratory. Here we provide information about the physical and behavioral characteristics of this unusual laboratory rodent, its taxonomic history, common diseases that affect it, and its use in research. We also provide housing recommendations based upon almost 15 years of experience successfully maintaining a colony of Mastomys coucha at our institution. PMID:27203263

  20. Antimicrobial activity of the solvent fractions from Bulbine natalensis Tuber.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, M T; Mostafa, M; Ashafa, A O T; Afolayan, A J

    2012-01-01

    Bulbine natalensis Baker has been acclaimed to be used as an antimicrobial agent in the folklore medicine of South Africa without scientific evidence to substantiate or refute this claim. In view of this, the in vitro antimicrobial activity of solvent fractions (ethanol, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water) from Bulbine natalensis Tuber against 4 Gram positive and 12 Gram negative bacteria as well as 3 fungal species were investigated using agar dilution. The ethanolic extract, n-butanol and ethyl acetate fractions inhibited 75, 87.5 and 100% respectively of the bacterial species in this study. The ethanolic, n-butanol and ethyl acetate fractions produced growth inhibition at MIC range of 1-10, 3-10 as well as 1 and 5 mg/ml respectively whereas the water fraction did not inhibit the growth of any of the bacterial species. Again, it was only the ethyl acetate fraction that inhibited the growth of Shigelli flexneri, Staphyloccus aureus and Escherichia coli. The ethanolic, ethyl acetate and n-butanolic fractions dose dependently inhibited the growth of Aspergillus niger and A. flavus whereas the water fraction produced 100% growth inhibition of the Aspergillus species at all the doses investigated. In contrast, no growth inhibition was produced on Candida albicans. The growth inhibition produced by the solvent fractions of B. natalensis Tuber in this study thus justifies the acclaimed use of the plant as an antimicrobial agent. The ethyl acetate fraction was the most potent. PMID:23983381

  1. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha

    PubMed Central

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  2. Establishment of an Immortalized Skin Keratinocyte Cell Line Derived from the Animal Model Mastomys coucha.

    PubMed

    Hasche, Daniel; Stephan, Sonja; Savelyeva, Larissa; Westermann, Frank; Rösl, Frank; Vinzón, Sabrina E

    2016-01-01

    In the present report we describe the establishment of a spontaneous immortalized skin keratinocyte cell line derived from the skin of the multimammate rodent Mastomys coucha. These animals are used in preclinical studies for a variety of human diseases such as infections with nematodes, bacteria and papillomaviruses, especially regarding cutaneous manifestations such as non-melanoma skin cancer. Here we characterize the cells in terms of their origin and cytogenetic features. Searching for genomic signatures, a spontaneous mutation in the splicing donor sequence of Trp53 (G to A transition at the first position of intron 7) could be detected. This point mutation leads to alternative splicing and to a premature stop codon, resulting in a truncated and, in turn, undetectable form of p53, probably contributing to the process of immortalization. Mastomys coucha-derived skin keratinocytes can be used as an in vitro system to investigate molecular and immunological aspects of infectious agent interactions with their host cells. PMID:27533138

  3. Activity of Redox Enzymes in the Thallus of Anthoceros natalensis.

    PubMed

    Chasov, A V; Beckett, R P; Minibayeva, F V

    2015-09-01

    Anthocerotophyta (hornworts) belong to a group of ancient nonvascular plants and originate from a common ancestor with contemporary vascular plants. Hornworts represent a unique model for investigating mechanisms of formation of stress resistance in higher plants due to their high tolerance to the action of adverse environmental factors. In this work, we demonstrate that the thallus of Anthoceros natalensis exhibits high redox activity changing under stress. Dehydration of the thallus is accompanied by the decrease in activities of intracellular peroxidases, DOPA-peroxidases, and tyrosinases, while catalase activity increases. Subsequent rehydration results in the increase in peroxidase and catalase activities. Kinetic features of peroxidases and tyrosinases were characterized as well as the peroxidase isoenzyme composition of different fractions of the hornwort cell wall proteins. It was shown that the hornwort peroxidases are functionally similar to peroxidases of higher vascular plants including their ability to form superoxide anion-radical. The biochemical mechanism was elucidated, supporting the possible participation of peroxidases in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via substrate-substrate interactions in the hornwort thallus. It has been suggested that the ROS formation by peroxidases is an evolutionarily ancient process that emerged as a protective mechanism for enhancing adaptive responses of higher land plants and their adaptation to changing environmental conditions and successful colonization of various ecological niches. PMID:26555468

  4. Susceptibility of two-week old Lymnaea natalensis to some plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Kela, S L; Ogunsusi, R A; Ogbogu, V C; Nwude, N

    1989-01-01

    The molluscacidal potency of 17 Nigerian plants extracted by the unevaporated crude water (UECW) method was evaluated on two-week old Lymnaea natalensis Krauss. Five extracts were not active but extracts of Balanites aegytiaca, Blighia sapida, Boswellia dalzielii, Cissampelos mucronata, Detarium microcarpum, Kigelia africana, Opilia celtidifolia, Parkia clappertoniana, Polygonum limbatum, Pseudocedrela kotschyi, Nauclea latifolia and Securidaca longipedunculata were molluscacidal. There is potential for their future use in the integrated control of Lymnaea natalensis, as well as other snails. Mortality data for lethal concentration values for all extracts were analysed by use of probit transformation. The upper and lower fiducial limits of the LC50 (P = 0.05) were also determined. PMID:2626571

  5. Comparative toxicity of Paraquat herbicide and some plant extracts in Lymnaea natalensis snails.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Eleiwa, Mona E; Taha, Samir A; Ismil, Somya M

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat has been shown to be a highly toxic compound for humans and animals, and many cases of acute poisoning and death have been reported over the past few decades. The present study was undertaken to evaluate comprehensively herbicides (Paraquat) and some plant extracts to biochemical aspects of Lymnaea natalensis snails. It was found that the exposure of L. natalensis to Paraquat and plant extracts led to a significant reduction in the infectivity of Fasciola gigantica miracidia to the snail. The glucose level in hemolymph of exposed snails was elevated, while the glycogen showed a decrease in soft tissues when compared with the control group. In addition, the activity level of some enzymes representing glycolytic enzymes as hexokinase (HK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) in snail's tissues were reduced in response to the treatment. It was concluded that the pollution of the aquatic environment by herbicide would adversely affect the metabolism of the L. natalensis snails. Snails treated with Agave attenuate, Ammi visnaga, and Canna iridiflora plant had less toxic effect compared to snails treated with Paraquat. PMID:24081640

  6. Reflecting optics in the diverticular eye of a deep-sea barreleye fish (Rhynchohyalus natalensis)

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, J. C.; Douglas, R. H.; Marshall, N. J.; Chung, W.-S.; Jordan, T. M.; Wagner, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the bi-directed eyes of a mesopelagic teleost fish, Rhynchohyalus natalensis, that possesses an extensive lateral diverticulum to each tubular eye. Each diverticulum contains a mirror that focuses light from the ventro-lateral visual field. This species can thereby visualize both downwelling sunlight and bioluminescence over a wide field of view. Modelling shows that the mirror is very likely to be capable of producing a bright, well focused image. After Dolichopteryx longipes, this is only the second description of an eye in a vertebrate having both reflective and refractive optics. Although superficially similar, the optics of the diverticular eyes of these two species of fish differ in some important respects. Firstly, the reflective crystals in the D. longipes mirror are derived from a tapetum within the retinal pigment epithelium, whereas in R. natalensis they develop from the choroidal argentea. Secondly, in D. longipes the angle of the reflective crystals varies depending on their position within the mirror, forming a Fresnel-type reflector, but in R. natalensis the crystals are orientated almost parallel to the mirror's surface and image formation is dependent on the gross morphology of the diverticular mirror. Two remarkably different developmental solutions have thus evolved in these two closely related species of opisthoproctid teleosts to extend the restricted visual field of a tubular eye and provide a well-focused image with reflective optics. PMID:24648222

  7. Reflecting optics in the diverticular eye of a deep-sea barreleye fish (Rhynchohyalus natalensis).

    PubMed

    Partridge, J C; Douglas, R H; Marshall, N J; Chung, W-S; Jordan, T M; Wagner, H-J

    2014-05-01

    We describe the bi-directed eyes of a mesopelagic teleost fish, Rhynchohyalus natalensis, that possesses an extensive lateral diverticulum to each tubular eye. Each diverticulum contains a mirror that focuses light from the ventro-lateral visual field. This species can thereby visualize both downwelling sunlight and bioluminescence over a wide field of view. Modelling shows that the mirror is very likely to be capable of producing a bright, well focused image. After Dolichopteryx longipes, this is only the second description of an eye in a vertebrate having both reflective and refractive optics. Although superficially similar, the optics of the diverticular eyes of these two species of fish differ in some important respects. Firstly, the reflective crystals in the D. longipes mirror are derived from a tapetum within the retinal pigment epithelium, whereas in R. natalensis they develop from the choroidal argentea. Secondly, in D. longipes the angle of the reflective crystals varies depending on their position within the mirror, forming a Fresnel-type reflector, but in R. natalensis the crystals are orientated almost parallel to the mirror's surface and image formation is dependent on the gross morphology of the diverticular mirror. Two remarkably different developmental solutions have thus evolved in these two closely related species of opisthoproctid teleosts to extend the restricted visual field of a tubular eye and provide a well-focused image with reflective optics. PMID:24648222

  8. Evaluation of an Experimental Gel Containing Euclea natalensis: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho; Brianezzi, Letícia Ferreira de Freitas; Marsicano, Juliane Avansini; Forim, Moacir Rossi; da Silva, Maria Fatima das Graças Fernandes; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of an experimental gel containing Euclea natalensis extract on dentin permeability. Methods. Thirty-six dentin discs, 1-mm-thick. The discs were prepared from the coronal dentin of extracted human third molars that were divided into 3 groups (n = 10). The dentin discs in each group were treated with the groups following experimental materials: (FG): 1.23% fluoride gel, pH 4.1; (EG): Euclea natalensis extract gel, pH 4.1; (CG): control gel, pH 4.1. The gels were applied to the occlusal slide of the dentin under the following conditions: after 37% phosphoric acid and before 6% citric acid. The hydraulic conductance (HC) of each condition was determined four times using a fluid flow apparatus (Flodec). The data were analyzed using Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Results. The greatest mean reduction in HC was produced in group EG dentin discs (61.2%; P < 0.05). Even after acid challenge with 6% citric acid the great reduction occurred in group EG (66.0%; P < 0.05) than other groups (CG-77.1%, FG-90.8%). Conclusion. E. natalensis gel not only reduced dentin permeability, but also resisted posttreatment citric acid challenge without changing its permeability. Further research has to confirm this promising result in the clinical situation. PMID:23243432

  9. Erosion and abrasion-inhibiting in situ effect of the Euclea natalensis plant of African regions.

    PubMed

    Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Xavier, Cheila Nilza Hamina; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Forim, Moacir Rossi; Silva, Maria de Fatima; Sales-Peres, Arsenio

    2016-06-14

    This study evaluated the effect of Euclea natalensis gel on the reduction of erosive wear with or without abrasion, in enamel and dentin. During two five-day experimental crossover phases, volunteers (n = 10) wore palatal devices containing human enamel and dentin blocks (E = 8 and D = 8). The gel was applied in a thin layer in the experimental group, and was not applied in the control group. In the intraoral phase, volunteers used the palatal appliance for 12 h before the gel treatment, and were instructed to start the erosive challenges 6 h after the gel application. Erosion was performed with Coca-Cola® (for 5 min) 4 times/day. The appliance was then put back into the mouth and was brushed after 30 minutes. After intraoral exposure, the appliances were removed and the specimens were analyzed using profilometry (mean ± SD, μm). The Euclea natalensis gel caused less wear in enamel in the experimental group (EROS = 12.86 ± 1.75 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 12.13 ± 2.12 µm) than in the control group (EROS = 14.12 ± 7.66 µm; EROS + ABRAS = 16.29 ± 10.72 µm); however, the groups did not differ from each other significantly. A statistically significant value was found for erosion and eros + abrasion in dentin (p = 0.001). Euclea natalensis may play a role in the prevention of dentin loss under mild erosive and abrasive conditions. A clinical trial is required to confirm these promising results in a clinical situation. PMID:27305512

  10. Setaria digitata microfilaraemia in Mastomys coucha: an animal model for chemotherapeutic and immunobiological studies.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, S; Dash, A P; Ravindran, B

    1996-10-01

    Intraperitoneal implantation of adult gravid females of the bovine filarial parasite, Setaria digitata in Mastomys coucha was found to induce microfilaraemia lasting for about 125 days. The microfilariae (mf) could be detected as early as 4 days post-implantation (p.i.) and peak levels of about 30 mf in 20 microliters of blood were observed by 21 days. A significant positive correlation was found between mf density and the body weight of recipients pre-implantation. The implanted adult worms were generally viable only for less than 1 week. Implantation resulted in a significant decrease in total leucocytes and erythrocytes, induction of eosinophilia, splenomegaly and anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies. The microfilariae in circulation developed into 3rd-stage infective larvae (L3) when fed onto Aedes aegypti (refm, Liverpool strain). The mf in circulation were found to be eliminated by oral administration of diethylcarbamazine citrate, indicating the usefulness of this model for screening potential anti-microfilarial drugs. During the microfilaraemic phase, priming with tetanus toxoid (TT) resulted in significantly decreased production of anti-toxin levels indicating a state of generalized immunosuppression. Induction of antibodies to various fractionated antigenic components of adult parasites could be demonstrated by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in M. coucha implanted with live or cold-stunned adult worms. The S. digitata-M. coucha model thus is found amenable to perform chemotherapeutic and immunobiological investigations in experimental filariasis. PMID:8873474

  11. Streptomyces natalensis programmed cell death and morphological differentiation are dependent on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Beites, Tiago; Oliveira, Paulo; Rioseras, Beatriz; Pires, Sílvia D. S.; Oliveira, Rute; Tamagnini, Paula; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Manteca, Ángel; Mendes, Marta V.

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces are aerobic Gram-positive bacteria characterized by a complex life cycle that includes hyphae differentiation and spore formation. Morphological differentiation is triggered by stressful conditions and takes place in a pro-oxidant environment, which sets the basis for an involvement of the oxidative stress response in this cellular process. Characterization of the phenotypic traits of Streptomyces natalensis ΔkatA1 (mono-functional catalase) and ΔcatR (Fur-like repressor of katA1 expression) strains in solid medium revealed that both mutants had an impaired morphological development process. The sub-lethal oxidative stress caused by the absence of KatA1 resulted in the formation of a highly proliferative and undifferentiated vegetative mycelium, whereas de-repression of CatR regulon, from which KatA1 is the only known representative, resulted in the formation of scarce aerial mycelium. Both mutant strains had the transcription of genes associated with aerial mycelium formation and biosynthesis of the hyphae hydrophobic layer down-regulated. The first round of the programmed cell death (PCD) was inhibited in both strains which caused the prevalence of the transient primary mycelium (MI) over secondary mycelium (MII). Our data shows that the first round of PCD and morphological differentiation in S. natalensis is dependent on oxidative stress in the right amount at the right time. PMID:26256439

  12. Crosstalk between ROS Homeostasis and Secondary Metabolism in S. natalensis ATCC 27448: Modulation of Pimaricin Production by Intracellular ROS

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Catarina L.; Osório, Hugo; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Mendes, Marta V.

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces secondary metabolism is strongly affected by oxygen availability. The increased culture aeration enhances pimaricin production in S. natalensis, however the excess of O2 consumption can lead to an intracellular ROS imbalance that is harmful to the cell. The adaptive physiological response of S. natalensis upon the addition of exogenous H2O2 suggested that the modulation of the intracellular ROS levels, through the activation of the H2O2 inducible catalase during the late exponential growth phase, can alter the production of pimaricin. With the construction of defective mutants on the H2O2 related enzymes SodF, AhpCD and KatA1, an effective and enduring modulation of intracellular ROS was achieved. Characterization of the knock-out strains revealed different behaviours regarding pimaricin production: whilst the superoxide dismutase defective mutant presented low levels of pimaricin production compared to the wild-type, the mutants defective on the H2O2-detoxifying enzymes displayed a pimaricin overproducer phenotype. Using physiological and molecular approaches we report a crosstalk between oxidative stress and secondary metabolism regulatory networks. Our results reveal that the redox-based regulation network triggered by an imbalance of the intracellular ROS homeostasis is also able to modulate the biosynthesis of pimaricin in S. natalensis. PMID:22114674

  13. The Effect of Different Host Plants on Development and Survival of Nysius natalensis (Hemiptera: Orsillidae).

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Hannalene; Byrne, Marcus; Van Den Berg, Johnnie

    2015-02-01

    Nysius natalensis Evans (Hemiptera: Orsillidae) is a pest of sunflower in South Africa. Adults invade sunflower fields from their weedy hosts. The host plant suitability for development and survival and the effect of between-generation host switching were studied on different wild host plants and sunflower. Parameters used to assess host plant suitability were nymphal development, head widths, mean mass, and survival. Nymphs and adults were provided with crushed seed of five host plants, as well as a combination of seeds of the five species. Duration of the nymphal stage, development and mortality, and mean development time to adult were recorded. Between-generation host switching was studied by providing first-instar nymphs (F2) with seed of either the same plant species or transferred to different ones. Mean mass and mean head widths of adults (F2) were determined. The food source during the first and second generation, as well as the interaction thereof, has a significant effect on head widths of resultant males and females, as well as on female mass, but first-generation food did not have a significant effect on male mass. Feeding the F2 on sunflower proved to be beneficial to the false chinch bug, as it provided the heaviest males and females as well as females with the biggest head widths. Lack of constant availability of moisture had a detrimental effect on longevity. Host plant switching to sunflower likely happens as a result of senescence of wild host plants prior to winter. PMID:26308814

  14. Antioxidant study of flavonoid derivatives from the aerial parts of Rhus natalensis growing in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alqasoumi, Saleh Ibrahim; Basudan, Omer Ahmed; Alam, Prawez; Abdel-Kader, Maged Saad

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical study of the CH(2)Cl(2) soluble fraction of the aerial parts of R. natalensis resulted in the isolation and identification of six flavonoid derivatives, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol glucoside (daucosterol). The isolated compounds were identified utilizing physical, chemical and different spectral methods including UV, 1D- 2D-NMR and MS. The compounds were identified as four flavanones; 7-O-methyl hesperetin (1), 7-O-methyl naringenin (4), (-)-homoeriodictyol (eriodictyonone) (5), eriodictyol-7-methyl ether (6) and two flavones; 7-O-methyl isokaemferide (2) and genkwanin (3). The isolated compounds as well as some available standards representing structurally similar flavones and flavanones were used to study their antioxidant potential using DPPH and try to explore the impact of structures on the antioxidant activity. In other assays flavanones were less active than flavones as antioxidant due to lack of the C-4 carbonyl group in conjugation with 2,3-double bond. However, in DPPH assay based on the ability of molecules to donate hydrogen flavanones were found more active than flavones. PMID:26826843

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of fungus-growing termite, Macrotermes natalensis (Isoptera: Macrotermitinae).

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziye; Jiang, Shihong; Chen, Xiaoqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of a fungus-growing termite, Macrotermes natalensis, with the total length of 16,325 bp, is reported for the first time. This mtgenome harbors 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). The total base composition is 44.1% of A, 21.5% of T, 11.5% of G, and 22.9% of C, so the percentage of A and T (65.6%) is much higher than that of G and C. Most of the genes are distributed on H-strand, except for four subunit genes (ND1, ND4, ND4L, ND5) and eight tRNA genes. All protein-coding genes start with an ATN codon, and terminate with the canonical stop codon (TAA/TAG) or a single T (T- -). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here adds a new genetic resource for the genus Macrotermes and might be useful for phylogenetic and systematic analyses within the genus Macrotermes. PMID:25259453

  16. Development of cycad ovules and seeds. 2. Histological and ultrastructural aspects of ontogeny of the embryo in Encephalartos natalensis (Zamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Woodenberg, Wynston Ray; Berjak, Patricia; Pammenter, N W; Farrant, Jill M

    2014-07-01

    Development of the embryo of Encephalartos natalensis from a rudimentary meristematic structure approximately 700 μm in length extends over 6 months after the seed is shed from the strobilus. Throughout its development, the embryo remains attached to a long suspensor. Differentiation of the shoot meristem flanked by two cotyledonary protuberances occurs over the first 2 months, during which peripheral tannin channels become apparent. Tannins, apparently elaborated by the endoplasmic reticulum, first accumulate in the large central vacuole and ultimately fill the channel. By the fourth month of development, the root meristem is apparent and procambial tissue forming discrete vascular bundles can be discerned in the elongating cotyledons. Between 4 and 6 months, mucilage ducts differentiate; after 6 months, when the seed becomes germinable, the embryo is characterised by cotyledons far longer than the axis. Shoot and root meristem cells remain ultrastructurally similar throughout embryo ontogeny, containing small vacuoles, many well-differentiated mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) profiles, abundant polysomes, plastids containing small starch deposits and Golgi bodies. Unusually, however, Golgi bodies are infrequent in other cells including those elaborating mucilage which is accumulated in distended ER and apparently secreted into the duct lumen directly by ER-derived vesicles. The non-meristematic cells accumulate massive starch deposits to the exclusion of any protein bodies and only very sparse lipid, features which are considered in terms of the prolonged period of embryo development and the high atmospheric oxygen content of the Carboniferous Period, when cycads are suggested to have originated. PMID:24240517

  17. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N'Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II &III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  18. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N’Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II & III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  19. Rat-atouille: A Mixed Method Study to Characterize Rodent Hunting and Consumption in the Context of Lassa Fever.

    PubMed

    Bonwitt, Jesse; Kelly, Ann H; Ansumana, Rashid; Agbla, Schadrac; Sahr, Foday; Saez, Almudena Mari; Borchert, Matthias; Kock, Richard; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Lassa fever is a zoonotic hemorrhagic illness predominant in areas across Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and southern Mali. The reservoir of Lassa virus is the multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis), a highly commensal species in West Africa. Primary transmission to humans occurs through direct or indirect contact with rodent body fluids such as urine, feces, saliva, or blood. Our research draws together qualitative and quantitative methods to provide a fuller and more nuanced perspective on these varied points of human-animal contact. In this article, we focus on the hunting, preparation, and consumption of rodents as possible routes of exposure in Bo, Sierra Leone. We found that the consumption of rodents, including the reservoir species, is widespread and does not neatly tally against generational or gender lines. Further, we found that the reasons for rodent consumption are multifactorial, including taste preferences, food security, and opportunistic behavior. We argue that on certain topics, such as rodent consumption, establishing trust with communities, and using qualitative research methods, is key to investigate sensitive issues and situate them in their wider context. To conclude, we recommend ways to refine sensitization campaigns to account for these socio-cultural contexts. PMID:26895631

  20. Immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti Glutathione-S-transferase Elicits a Mixed Th1/Th2 Type of Protective Immune Response Against Filarial Infection in Mastomys.

    PubMed

    Andure, Dhananjay; Pote, Kiran; Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Padalkar, Ramchandra; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2016-10-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito borne parasitic infection and can severely affect the normal working ability of an individual. Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent this infection and the development of a potential vaccine could effectively support the on-going mass drug administration program by World Health Organization (WHO). Filarial parasites have complex mechanisms to modulate the host immune responses against them. The glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are the important enzymes effectively involved to counteract the oxidative free radicals produced by the host. In the present study, we have shown that the mastomys which are fully permissible rodents for Brugia malayi when immunized with Wuchereria bancrofti recombinant GST (rWbGST) could induce 65.5 % in situ cytotoxicity against B. malayi infective (L3) larvae. There was a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response in the vaccinated animals, characterized by higher levels of WbGST-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and pronounced IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 cytokines production by the spleen cells. PMID:27605739

  1. Elimination of Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Bulinus tropicus and Lymnaea natalensis by the ampullarid snail, Marisa cornuarietis, in a man-made dam in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Nguma, J F; McCullough, F S; Masha, E

    1982-03-01

    Marisa cornuarietis is a well known ampullarid competitor/predator of Biomphalaria glabrata in Puerto Rico. For the first time in Africa a flourishing population of Marisa has been established in a small, permanent, man-made dam at Kisangara, near Moshi, Tanzania. Prior to the release of M. cornuarietis in June 1977, this dam supported thriving populations of the pulmonate snail hosts Biomphalaria pfeifferi and Lymnaea natalensis; Bulinus tropicus and the melaniid Melanoides tuberculata were also common. Some 24 months after the establishment of Marisa the three pulmonate species had been eliminated; only M. tuberculata remained at about the same population density as originally recorded. Marisa has not caused any obvious adverse environmental impact in the dam. There is at present no valid evidence that this ampullarid would be a threat to local rice production, which is the only crop at risk, but carefully designed field trials should be undertaken to confirm or refute this view. In view of the vast number of permanent, lentic habitats throughout the Afrotropical region, which act as important transmission sites of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis, the role of Marisa cornuarietis as a cost-effective biological control agent in integrated control operations deserves henceforth to be energetically explored. PMID:6122367

  2. Sequence Variability and Geographic Distribution of Lassa Virus, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Stockelman, Michael G.; Moses, Lina M.; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A.; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G.; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone. PMID:25811712

  3. Lassa Virus Seroprevalence in Sibirilia Commune, Bougouni District, Southern Mali

    PubMed Central

    Sogoba, Nafomon; Rosenke, Kyle; Adjemian, Jennifer; Diawara, Sory Ibrahim; Maiga, Ousmane; Keita, Moussa; Konaté, Drissa; Keita, Abdoul Salam; Sissoko, Ibrahim; Boisen, Matt; Nelson, Diana; Oottamasathien, Darin; Millett, Molly; Garry, Robert F.; Branco, Luis M.; Traoré, Sékou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to several nations in West Africa. In Mali, LASV was unknown until an exported case of Lassa fever was reported in 2009. Since that time, rodent surveys have found evidence of LASV-infected Mastomys natalensis rats in several communities in southern Mali, near the border with Côte d’Ivoire. Despite increased awareness, to date only a single case of Lassa fever has been confirmed in Mali. We conducted a survey to determine the prevalence of LASV exposure among persons in 3 villages in southern Mali where the presence of infected rodents has been documented. LASV IgG seroprevalence ranged from 14.5% to 44% per village. No sex bias was noted; however, seropositivity rates increased with participant age. These findings confirm human LASV exposure in Mali and suggest that LASV infection/Lassa fever is a potential public health concern in southern Mali. PMID:26981786

  4. Poor housing quality increases risk of rodent infestation and Lassa fever in refugee camps of Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Phillip Cullison; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Belmain, Steven R; Oshin, Babafemi; Baglole, Debbie; Borchert, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in parts of West Africa, is a severe febrile illness transmitted to humans by the rodent Mastomys natalensis. To determine risk of Lassa fever in households in Sierra Leonean refugee camps, we analyzed the spatial relationships between households with a Lassa case and focal locations of potential rodent habitats. Quality and hygiene factors of households were assessed to determine possible risk factors for household rodent infestation and occurrence of Lassa fever. The odds to have a rat burrow were higher in case houses than in control houses (OR 24, 95% CI 6.0-93). Case houses scored significantly worse in the quality of housing and external hygiene. These findings suggest that risk of Lassa fever in refugee camps depends on individual housing quality and the hygiene of the immediate surrounding environment. PMID:17620650

  5. Observations on the food habits of some African rodents.

    PubMed

    Iwuala, M O; Braide, E I; Maduka, N

    1980-12-01

    Food habits of four common species of African rodents: the giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus), the black house rat (Rattus rattus), the multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) and the pygmy mouse (Mus minutoides) were studied on the basis of stomach content analysis, habitat sampling and experimental trials with caged animals. Vegetable items (especially grass, grains and tubers) formed the bulk of the food of all the species. Oil-palm nuts and kernels were also common in the guts of C. gambianus and M. natalensis. Animal food components of all the rodent species comprised mainly insects (especially ants, crickets etc.). Vertebrate flesh and scales were also well represented in the guts of C. gambianus. Domestic and miscellaneous food items were recorded from R. rattus, most of which were trapped in human and animal shelters. Inorganic gut contents, primarily sand grains, were found in sizeable quantities in more than 70% of the rodents examined. Results of experimental feeding trials with caged rodents showed close correlation with those recorded from field samples, especially in terms of food choices and the relative quantities consumed. The ecological and practical implications of these observations are discussed in the light of the importance of the rodents as agricultural and domestic pests. PMID:7323341

  6. μ-Theraphotoxin-An1a: primary structure determination and assessment of the pharmacological activity of a promiscuous anti-insect toxin from the venom of the tarantula Acanthoscurria natalensis (Mygalomorphae, Theraphosidae).

    PubMed

    Rates, Breno; Prates, Maura V; Verano-Braga, Thiago; da Rocha, Angela P; Roepstorff, Peter; Borges, Carlos L; Lapied, Bruno; Murillo, Laurence; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Biondi, Ilka; De Lima, Maria Elena

    2013-08-01

    Tarantulas are included in the mygalomorph spider family Theraphosidae. Although the pharmacological diversity of theraphosid toxins (theraphotoxins) is broad, studies dedicated to the characterization of biologically active molecules from the theraphosid genus Acanthoscurria have been restricted to the investigation of antimicrobial peptides and polyamines produced by the hemocytes of Acanthoscurria gomesiana. The present study reports the purification, primary structure determination and electrophysiological effects of an anti-insect toxin, named μ-theraphotoxin-An1a (μ-TRTX-An1a), from the venom of Acanthoscurria natalensis - a tarantula species occurring in the Brazilian biomes caatinga and cerrado. The analysis of the primary structure of μ-TRTX-An1a revealed the similarity of this toxin to theraphosid toxins bearing a huwentoxin-II-like fold. Electrophysiological experiments showed that μ-TRTX-An1a (100 nM) induces membrane depolarization, increases the spontaneous firing frequency and reduces spike amplitude of cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. In addition, under voltage-clamp conditions, μ-TRTX-An1a (100 nM) only partially blocks voltage-dependent sodium current amplitudes in DUM neurons without any effect on their voltage dependence. This effect correlates well with the reduction of the spontaneous action potential amplitudes. Altogether, these last results suggest that μ-TRTX-An1a affects insect neuronal voltage-dependent sodium channels, which are among possible channels targeted by this promiscuous toxin. PMID:23651762

  7. The effect of diethylcarbamazine on microfilariae of Litomosoides carinii in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weiner, D J; Abraham, D; D'Antonio, R

    1986-01-01

    Culture-derived Litomosoides carinii microfilariae (MFF) were used in in vitro and in vivo systems to investigate the effect of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) on these MFF. In vivo: Male rats, Mastomys natalensis, all of the same age, were injected intrathoracically (12) or intraperitoneally (36) with 10(3) or 10(4) MFF. After 30 min one half of each group of rats was given DEC per os. At 30, 60, and 120 min after DEC administration, two rats from the treated and two from the untreated group were bled and killed. The pleural or peritoneal cavities were rinsed with warm saline (0.15 M NaCl) to recover MFF. In both the intrathoracic and intraperitoneal experiments, equal numbers of MFF were recovered from treated and control rats at 30 and 120 min. However, at 60 min 85.5% fewer were recovered from the treated than from the nontreated animals. MFF were not found in the blood. In vitro: MFF were added to tissue culture dish wells (Linbro Div., Flow Labs, Hamden, Conn) prepared as follows: DEC-Serum (serum from normal rats given DEC at 500 mg/kg), DEC + Serum (serum with added DEC), serum only, RPMI 1640 only, and RPMI 1640 + DEC. Furthermore, the five treatments were prepared either with or without unstimulated peritoneal exudate (PE) cells. At 30 min in the DEC-Serum wells 45% of the MFF had adherent PE cells; in the remaining wells these cells adhered to 11% or fewer MFF. We interpret the aforementioned phenomena as representing the first step in the trapping and elimination of MFF after DEC treatment of L. carinii-infected M. natalensis. PMID:3799010

  8. Viremia and antibody response of small African and laboratory animals to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A J; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R

    1989-05-01

    Eleven species of small African wild mammals, laboratory rabbits, guinea pigs, and Syrian hamsters were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus. Low-titered viremia followed by development of antibody was observed in scrub hares (Lepus saxatilis), Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris), red veld rats (Aethomys chrysophilus), white tailed rats (Mystromys albicaudatus), bushveld gerbils (Tatera leucogaster), striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), and guinea pigs. The maximum viremic titer in 4 scrub hares was 10(1.7-4.2) 50% mouse lethal doses/ml. Viremia was detected in 1/17 infected laboratory rabbits. Antibody response was only detected in South African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis), highveld gerbils (T. brantsii), Namaqua gerbils (Desmodillus auricularis), 2 species of multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis and M. coucha), and Syrian hamsters. The results of the study indicate that a proportion of infected scrub hares develop CCHF viremia of an intensity shown in the Soviet Union to be sufficient for infection of feeding immature ixodid ticks, but that South African hedgehogs and wild rodents are unlikely to be of importance as maintenance hosts of the virus in southern Africa. PMID:2499205

  9. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in urban rodents: a survey in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Aurélien; Garba, Madougou; Bonnabau, Henri; Kane, Mamadou; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2013-01-01

    A serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii was conducted on 766 domestic and peridomestic rodents from 46 trapping sites throughout the city of Niamey, Niger. A low seroprevalence was found over the whole town with only 1.96% of the rodents found seropositive. However, differences between species were important, ranging from less than 2% in truly commensal Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus and Mus musculus, while garden-associated Arvicanthis niloticus displayed 9.1% of seropositive individuals. This is in line with previous studies on tropical rodents - that we reviewed here - which altogether show that Toxoplasma seroprevalence in rodent is highly variable, depending on many factors such as locality and/or species. Moreover, although we were not able to decipher statistically between habitat or species effect, such a contrast between Nile grass rats and the other rodent species points towards a potentially important role of environmental toxoplasmic infection. This would deserve to be further scrutinised since intra-city irrigated cultures are extending in Niamey, thus potentially increasing Toxoplasma circulation in this yet semi-arid region. As far as we are aware of, our study is one of the rare surveys of its kind performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the first one ever conducted in the Sahel. PMID:23828008

  10. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leirs, H.; Stenseth, N.C.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Verhagen, R.; Verheyen, W.

    1997-01-01

    Ecology has long been troubled by the controversy over how populations are regulated. Some ecologists focus on the role of environmental effects, whereas others argue that density-dependent feedback mechanisms are central. The relative importance of both processes is still hotly debated, but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare. Keyfactor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide no information on actual demographic rates. Here we report on both density-dependent and density-independent effects in a murid rodent pest species, the multimammate rat Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834), using statistical capture-recapture models. Both effects occur simultaneously, but we also demonstrate that they do not affect all demographic rates in the same way. We have incorporated the obtained estimates of demographic rates in a population dynamics model and show that the observed dynamics are affected by stabilizing nonlinear density-dependent components coupled with strong deterministic and stochastic seasonal components.

  11. Housing equity for health equity: a rights-based approach to the control of Lassa fever in post-war Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J Daniel; Barrie, M Bailor; Ross, Rachel A; Temple, Brian A; Moses, Lina M; Bausch, Daniel G

    2013-01-01

    Poor quality housing is an infringement on the rights of all humans to a standard of living adequate for health. Among the many vulnerabilities of those without adequate shelter is the risk of disease spread by rodents and other pests. One such disease is Lassa fever, an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. Lassa virus is maintained in the rodent Mastomys natalensis, commonly known as the "multimammate rat," which frequently invades the domestic environment, putting humans at risk of Lassa fever. The highest reported incidence of Lassa fever in the world is consistently in the Kenema District of Sierra Leone, a region that was at the center of Sierra Leone's civil war in which tens of thousands of lives were lost and hundreds of thousands of dwellings destroyed. Despite the end of the war in 2002, most of Kenema's population still lives in inadequate housing that puts them at risk of rodent invasion and Lassa fever. Furthermore, despite years of health education and village hygiene campaigns, the incidence of Lassa fever in Kenema District appears to be increasing. We focus on Lassa fever as a matter of human rights, proposing a strategy to improve housing quality, and discuss how housing equity has the potential to improve health equity and ultimately economic productivity in Sierra Leone. The manuscript is designed to spur discussion and action towards provision of housing and prevention of disease in one of the world's most vulnerable populations. PMID:23282054

  12. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  13. Plague in Africa from 1935 to 1949

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D. H. S.

    1953-01-01

    The history of plague in Africa during the period 1935-49 is reviewed. Much of the information derives from a questionnaire sent to all African territories in 1950. The annual incidence of plague in Africa declined, particularly from 1946 onwards. In 1949, under 400 cases were reported, as compared with over 6,000 in 1935. By the end of 1949, plague was still active in the Belgian Congo, Kenya and Tanganyika, Madagascar, and southern Africa. No cases were reported from Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Senegal, or Uganda during 1949. A comparison of the seasonal incidence of plague with prevailing atmospheric conditions (temperature and rainfall) in African territories shows that human plague is more frequent in warm moist weather—60°-80°F (15°-27°C)—than in hot dry, or cold, weather—over 80°F (27°C) or under 60°F (15°C). The highlands of equatorial Africa and of Madagascar appear to provide the optimum environment for the persistence of plague on the domestic (murine) plane and the high-veld and Kalahari of southern Africa on the sylvatic plane. The rat (Rattus rattus) and the multimammate mouse (R. (Mastomys) natalensis) and their fleas Xenopsylla brasiliensis and X. cheopis appear to be mainly responsible for the persistence of the reservoir in the East African highlands; R. rattus and X. cheopis play this role in Madagascar. The gerbils (Tatera and Desmodillus) and their burrow fleas X. philoxera and X. piriei are the main reservoirs of plague in southern Africa. Within these areas, Pasteurella pestis finds an environment suitable for its continued survival; the conditions seem to be comparable to those defined as obtaining in endemic centres in India. Elsewhere in Africa such endemic centres do not appear to exist. PMID:13115987

  14. Housing equity for health equity: a rights-based approach to the control of Lassa fever in post-war Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Poor quality housing is an infringement on the rights of all humans to a standard of living adequate for health. Among the many vulnerabilities of those without adequate shelter is the risk of disease spread by rodents and other pests. One such disease is Lassa fever, an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. Lassa virus is maintained in the rodent Mastomys natalensis, commonly known as the “multimammate rat,” which frequently invades the domestic environment, putting humans at risk of Lassa fever. The highest reported incidence of Lassa fever in the world is consistently in the Kenema District of Sierra Leone, a region that was at the center of Sierra Leone’s civil war in which tens of thousands of lives were lost and hundreds of thousands of dwellings destroyed. Despite the end of the war in 2002, most of Kenema’s population still lives in inadequate housing that puts them at risk of rodent invasion and Lassa fever. Furthermore, despite years of health education and village hygiene campaigns, the incidence of Lassa fever in Kenema District appears to be increasing. We focus on Lassa fever as a matter of human rights, proposing a strategy to improve housing quality, and discuss how housing equity has the potential to improve health equity and ultimately economic productivity in Sierra Leone. The manuscript is designed to spur discussion and action towards provision of housing and prevention of disease in one of the world’s most vulnerable populations. PMID:23282054

  15. Understanding and managing sanitary risks due to rodent zoonoses in an African city: beyond the Boston Model.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter J; Arntzen, Lorraine; Hayter, Mel; Iles, Malcolm; Frean, John; Belmain, Steven

    2008-03-01

    The Boston Model describes a successful rodent management plan that succeeded in a first-world city in the USA. In third-world cities, which often contain informal shack settlements, it is debatable whether the Boston Model would apply. In Durban, a major harbor city of three million people on the east coast of South Africa, we investigated the sanitary risks due to rodents in both formal (residential and commercial) and informal (shacks) sectors, and we evaluated the relative merits of different management interventions suggested by the Boston Model. Blood and tissue samples of six species (Rattus norvegicus, R. tanezumi, R. rattus, Mus musculus, Mastomys natalensis, Tatera brantsi) from 262 live-trapped rodents from 54 localities were tested for antibodies or DNA for plague (n= 193: antibody test), leptospirosis (n= 221 for antibody test; n= 69 for polymerase chain reaction test for DNA) and toxoplasmosis (n= 217: antibody test). We conducted a socioeconomic survey of 90 household to determine environmental and socioeconomic disease risk factors in the shack settlement of Cato Crest. No rodents were seropositive for plague, but nine Norway rats, R. norvegicus (4.1% of the sample tested) were seropositive for toxoplasmosis, and 22 R. norvegicus (10.0% of sample tested) were seropositive for leptospirosis. Disease endemic areas were concentrated in Cato Crest and the commercial district of Durban. Serology tests of humans living in Cato Crest (n= 219) showed 0% exposure to plague, 23% to leptospirosis and 35% to toxoplasmosis. Compared with shack-dwellers, the residents of brick houses had slightly lower levels of exposure to leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis. Based on our results, environmental hygiene and rodent-trapping campaigns were launched in Cato Crest. The initiative owes much of its current success to implementation of the principles inherent in the Boston Model, even though certain elements were lacking. PMID:21396050

  16. Geographic Distribution and Genetic Characterization of Lassa Virus in Sub-Saharan Mali

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Sogoba, Nafomon; Lopez, Job E.; Maiga, Ousmane; Dahlstrom, Eric; Zivcec, Marko; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Munster, Vincent J.; Branco, Luis; Garry, Robert; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is an acute viral illness characterized by multi-organ failure and hemorrhagic manifestations. Lassa fever is most frequently diagnosed in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea, although sporadic cases have been recorded in other West African countries, including Mali. The etiological agent of Lassa fever is Lassa virus (LASV), an Arenavirus which is maintained in nature and frequently transmitted to humans by Mastomys natalensis. The purpose of this study was to better define the geographic distribution of LASV-infected rodents in sub-Saharan Mali. Methodologies/Principal Findings Small mammals were live-trapped at various locations across Mali for the purpose of identifying potential zoonotic pathogens. Serological and molecular assays were employed and determined LASV infected rodents were exclusively found in the southern Mali near the border of Côte d'Ivoire. Overall, 19.4% of Mastomys natalensis sampled in this region had evidence of LASV infection, with prevalence rates for individual villages ranging from 0 to 52%. Full-length genomic sequences were determined using high throughput sequencing methodologies for LASV isolates generated from tissue samples of rodents collected in four villages and confirmed the phylogenetic clustering of Malian LASV with strain AV. Conclusions/Significance The risk of human infections with LASV is greatest in villages in southern Mali. Lassa fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis for febrile individuals and appropriate diagnostic techniques need to be established to determine the incidence of infection and disease in these regions. PMID:24340119

  17. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and ...

  18. Urban Rat Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littig, K. S.; And Others

    This guide is for use in the classroom and field training of inspection and operational personnel who serve in planned community rodent-control programs. The urban rat survey may be used as the primary means of obtaining information on rat infestations and the conditions favoring rat populations in urban communities. It provides the data necessary…

  19. Rat-bite fever.

    PubMed

    van Nood, E; Peters, S H A

    2005-09-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with fever, arthralgias and a skin rash. She possessed nine pet rats, and denied that she had been bitten. Blood culture was positive for Streptobacillus moniliformis, which can cause rat-bite fever. The patient fully recovered after treatment with clarithromycin. PMID:16186643

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Lassa Seropositivity in Inhabitants of the Forest Region of Guinea: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kernéis, Solen; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, N'Faly; Koulemou, Kekoura; Lewis, Rosamund; Aplogan, Aristide; Grais, Rebecca F.; Guerin, Philippe J.; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The reservoir host of the virus is a multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis. Prevalence estimates of Lassa virus antibodies in humans vary greatly between studies, and the main modes of transmission of the virus from rodents to humans remain unclear. We aimed to (i) estimate the prevalence of Lassa virus–specific IgG antibodies (LV IgG) in the human population of a rural area of Guinea, and (ii) identify risk factors for positive LV IgG. Methods and Findings A population-based cross-sectional study design was used. In April 2000, all individuals one year of age and older living in three prefectures located in the tropical secondary forest area of Guinea (Gueckedou, Lola and Yomou) were sampled using two-stage cluster sampling. For each individual identified by the sampling procedure and who agreed to participate, a standardized questionnaire was completed to collect data on personal exposure to potential risk factors for Lassa fever (mainly contact with rodents), and a blood sample was tested for LV IgG. A multiple logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors for positive LV IgG. A total of 1424 subjects were interviewed and 977 sera were tested. Prevalence of positive LV Ig was of 12.9% [10.8%–15.0%] and 10.0% [8.1%–11.9%] in rural and urban areas, respectively. Two risk factors of positive LV IgG were identified: to have, in the past twelve months, undergone an injection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8 [1.1–3.1]), or lived with someone displaying a haemorrhage (OR = 1.7 [1.1–2.9]). No factors related to contacts with rats and/or mice remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our study underlines the potential importance of person-to-person transmission of Lassa fever, via close contact in the same household or nosocomial exposure. PMID:19924222

  1. Rat-bite fever

    MedlinePlus

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  2. What is Desert RATS?

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mission manager and test coordinators for the 2011 mission explain why Desert RATS was started 14 years ago, questions being studied in this year's activities, technologies being tested and the...

  3. Cryptosporidia: epicellular parasites embraced by the host cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Valigurová, Andrea; Jirků, Miloslav; Koudela, Bretislav; Gelnar, Milan; Modrý, David; Slapeta, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The ultrastructure of two gastric cryptosporidia, Cryptosporidium muris from experimentally infected rodents (Mastomys natalensis) and Cryptosporidium sp. 'toad' from naturally infected toads (Duttaphrynus melanostictus), was studied using electron microscopy. Observations presented herein allowed us to map ultrastructural aspects of the cryptosporidian invasion process and the origin of a parasitophorous sac. Invading parasites attach to the host cell, followed by gradual envelopment, with the host's cell membrane folds, eventually forming the parasitophorous sac. Cryptosporidian developmental stages remain epicellular during the entire life cycle. The parasite development is illustrated in detail using high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy. This provides a new insight into the ultrastructural detail of host-parasite interactions and species-specific differences manifested in frequency of detachment of the parasitophorous sac, radial folds of the parasitophorous sac and stem-formation of the parasitised host cell. PMID:18158154

  4. Diversity and habitat association of small mammals in Aridtsy forest, Awi Zone, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    BANTIHUN, Getachew; BEKELE, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Here, we conducted a survey to examine the diversity, distribution and habitat association of small mammals from August 2011 to February 2012 incorporating both wet and dry seasons in Aridtsy forest, Awi Zone, Ethiopia. Using Sherman live traps and snap traps in four randomly selected trapping grids, namely, natural forest, bushland, grassland and farmland, a total of 468 individuals comprising eight species of small mammals (live traps) and 89 rodents of six species (snap traps) were trapped in 2352 and 1200 trap nights, respectively. The trapped small mammals included seven rodents and one insectivore: Lophuromys flavopuntatus (30.6%), Arvicanthis dembeensis (25.8%), Stenocephalemys albipes (20%), Mastomys natalensis (11.6%), Pelomys harringtoni (6.4%), Acomys cahirinus (4.3%), Lemniscomys zebra (0.2%) and the greater red musk shrew (Crocidura flavescens, 1.1%). Analysis showed statistically significant variations in the abundance and habitat preferences of small mammals between habitats during wet and dry seasons. PMID:25855227

  5. Diversity and habitat association of small mammals in Aridtsy forest, Awi Zone, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bantihun, Getachew; Bekele, Afework

    2015-03-18

    Here, we conducted a survey to examine the diversity, distribution and habitat association of small mammals from August 2011 to February 2012 incorporating both wet and dry seasons in Aridtsy forest, Awi Zone, Ethiopia. Using Sherman live traps and snap traps in four randomly selected trapping grids, namely, natural forest, bushland, grassland and farmland, a total of 468 individuals comprising eight species of small mammals (live traps) and 89 rodents of six species (snap traps) were trapped in 2352 and 1200 trap nights, respectively. The trapped small mammals included seven rodents and one insectivore: Lophuromys flavopuntatus (30.6%), Arvicanthis dembeensis (25.8%), Stenocephalemys albipes (20%), Mastomys natalensis (11.6%), Pelomys harringtoni (6.4%), Acomys cahirinus (4.3%), Lemniscomys zebra (0.2%) and the greater red musk shrew (Crocidura flavescens, 1.1%). Analysis showed statistically significant variations in the abundance and habitat preferences of small mammals between habitats during wet and dry seasons. PMID:25855227

  6. Lewis rats have greater response impulsivity than Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Potenza, Marc N; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity, a tendency toward immediate action without consideration of future consequences, is associated with a wide array of problematic behaviors. Response impulsivity, a type of behaviorally-assessed impulsivity characterized by behavioral disinhibition, is also associated with health risk behaviors. Response impulsivity is distinct from choice impulsivity, which is characterized by intolerance for delay. Lewis rats have higher levels of choice impulsivity than Fischer rats (Anderson & Woolverton, 2005; Madden et al., 2008; Stein et al., 2012). However, no studies have examined whether Lewis and Fischer rats have different levels of response impulsivity. The present research examined response impulsivity in the two rat strains. Subjects were 16 male Lewis and Fischer rats. Rats' response impulsivity was measured using the Five Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT). In addition, their locomotor activity was measured in locomotor activity chambers. Lewis rats had more premature responses than Fischer rats during the 5-CSRTT assessment [F(1, 14)=5.34, p<0.05], indicating higher levels of response impulsivity. Locomotor activity did not differ between rat strain groups [F(1, 14)=3.05, p=.10], suggesting that overall movement did not account for group differences in response impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT. It can be concluded from this research that Lewis rats have higher levels of response impulsivity than Fischer rats, and therefore provide a valid rat model of individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:24613059

  7. Risk Maps of Lassa Fever in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Rogers, David John

    2009-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is caused by a viral haemorrhagic arenavirus that affects two to three million people in West Africa, causing a mortality of between 5,000 and 10,000 each year. The natural reservoir of Lassa virus is the multi-mammate rat Mastomys natalensis, which lives in houses and surrounding fields. With the aim of gaining more information to control this disease, we here carry out a spatial analysis of Lassa fever data from human cases and infected rodent hosts covering the period 1965–2007. Information on contemporary environmental conditions (temperature, rainfall, vegetation) was derived from NASA Terra MODIS satellite sensor data and other sources and for elevation from the GTOPO30 surface for the region from Senegal to the Congo. All multi-temporal data were analysed using temporal Fourier techniques to generate images of means, amplitudes and phases which were used as the predictor variables in the models. In addition, meteorological rainfall data collected between 1951 and 1989 were used to generate a synoptic rainfall surface for the same region. Methodology/Principal Findings Three different analyses (models) are presented, one superimposing Lassa fever outbreaks on the mean rainfall surface (Model 1) and the other two using non-linear discriminant analytical techniques. Model 2 selected variables in a step-wise inclusive fashion, and Model 3 used an information-theoretic approach in which many different random combinations of 10 variables were fitted to the Lassa fever data. Three combinations of absence∶presence clusters were used in each of Models 2 and 3, the 2 absence∶1 presence cluster combination giving what appeared to be the best result. Model 1 showed that the recorded outbreaks of Lassa fever in human populations occurred in zones receiving between 1,500 and 3,000 mm rainfall annually. Rainfall, and to a much lesser extent temperature variables, were most strongly selected in both Models 2 and 3, and neither vegetation nor

  8. [Fatal rat bites].

    PubMed

    Yanai, O; Goldin, L; Hiss, J

    1999-04-15

    We present a rare case of infant death due to blood loss resulting from multiple rat bites. Domestic dogs and cats cause most animal bites. Bites of a house rat usually cause bacterial infection, successfully treated with antibiotics. There is little information about death due to house rat bites. Since the wounds they cause tend to occur post-mortem, they are usually wedged, clean and without subcutaneous bleeding. An 11-week-old, malnourished infant girl was bitten to death while sleeping in her mother's bed in a rat-infested home. The infant's clothing was covered with blood, parts of her face were missing and marks of gnawing were present on her neck and extremities. There was subcutaneous bleeding around the wounds indicating that they were inflicted while the child was alive. Autopsy findings revealed profound blood loss. We conclude that a combination of low socio-economic status, severe failure to thrive, and poor hygiene in a rat-infested environment contributed to the fatal outcome in this attack. PMID:10955069

  9. Intercepting the first rat ashore.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Towns, David R; Anderson, Sandra H; Clout, Mick N

    2005-10-20

    A single Norway rat released on to a rat-free island was not caught for more than four months, despite intensive efforts to trap it. The rat first explored the 9.5-hectare island and then swam 400 metres across open water to another rat-free island, evading capture for 18 weeks until an aggressive combination of detection and trapping methods were deployed simultaneously. The exceptional difficulty of this capture indicates that methods normally used to eradicate rats in dense populations are unlikely to be effective on small numbers, a finding that could have global implications for conservation on protected islands. PMID:16237434

  10. Rat on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  11. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups. PMID:26414400

  12. Immunocytochemical studies on several developmental stages of Dipetalonema viteae (Filarioidea).

    PubMed

    Prüsse, A; Vollmer, S; Diesfeld, H J

    1983-09-01

    The binding of antibodies to infective larvae (L3), eggs, uterine contents and blood microfilariae was demonstrated by light microscopy employing the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method. Antigen-antibody reactions were located on the shell of filarial eggs as well as on the cuticle and the interior of L3 and microfilariae. Using sera from Meriones unguiculatus, Mastomys natalensis and golden hamsters infected with D. viteae obtained at 7, 14, 21 and 28 weeks p.i. it was observed that the intensity of the immunostaining on several developmental stages of the filariae decreased with increasing duration of infection. This effect was more pronounced in the case of M. unguiculatus and M. natalensis than in the case of golden hamsters. For detection of surface antigenicity the simple procedure of drying the test material on microscopic slides proved to be time saving and equally specific as compared to the embedding in Epon of the filarial stages and the successive preparation of semithin sections. However, embedded filarial stages presented more intensive immunostaining than nonembedded stages. Moreover, sections allowed to demonstrate antigen-antibody reactions on the cuticle as well as inside the body cavity of the stages. PMID:6685362

  13. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  14. Landscape determinants of fine-scale genetic structure of a small rodent in a heterogeneous landscape (Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa).

    PubMed

    Russo, Isa-Rita M; Sole, Catherine L; Barbato, Mario; von Bramann, Ullrich; Bruford, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Small mammals provide ecosystem services, acting, for example, as pollinators and seed dispersers. In addition, they are also disease reservoirs that can be detrimental to human health and they can also act as crop pests. Knowledge of their dispersal preferences is therefore useful for population management and landscape planning. Genetic data were used alongside landscape data to examine the influence of the landscape on the demographic connectedness of the Natal multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis) and to identify landscape characteristics that influence the genetic structure of this species across a spatially and temporally varying environment. The most significant landscape features shaping gene flow were aspect, vegetation cover, topographic complexity (TC) and rivers, with western facing slopes, topographic complexity and rivers restricting gene flow. In general, thicket vegetation was correlated with increased gene flow. Identifying features of the landscape that facilitate movement/dispersal in M. natalensis potentially has application for other small mammals in similar ecosystems. As the primary reservoir host of the zoonotic Lassa virus, a landscape genetics approach may have applications in determining areas of high disease risk to humans. Identifying these landscape features may also be important in crop management due to damage by rodent pests. PMID:27406468

  15. [The mammals of Guinea as reservoirs and carriers of arboviruses].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, O K; Diallo, S M; Inapogi, A P; Ba, A; Kamara, S K

    2006-01-01

    A great body of data on the fauna and ecology of wild mammals and their participation in the circulation of arboviruses were collected when the ecology of the latter of the Republic of Guinea was studied in 1978 to 1989. A hundred and eighteen species belonging to 10 orders were identified. Over 2,000 biological specimens were virologically and serologically examined. Six arboviruses were isolated. These included Dugbe virus (from the hussar monkey Cercopithecus (Erythrocebus patas) and 5 viruses from chiropters: Rift valley fever, from Micropteropus pusillus, Miniopterus schreibersi, and Hipposideros caffer, Saboya, Fomede, and Ank 6909 from Nycteris gambiensis and Kolenter from Hipposideros sp. Fomede, Kolente, and Ank 6909 viruses turned out to be new species for science. Rodents were found to have viral antigens of Lass fever (Mastomys natalensis, Tatera valida kempi and Rattus rattus), Dugbe and Chikungunya fevers (M. natalensis) and West Nile fever (Mus sp.). A serological survey of mammals revealed that the latter had antibodies to 12 arboviruses. Thus, the mammals of Guinea participate in the circulation of 18 arboviruses, 13 of them are pathogenic for man. PMID:16562748

  16. Landscape determinants of fine-scale genetic structure of a small rodent in a heterogeneous landscape (Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Isa-Rita M.; Sole, Catherine L.; Barbato, Mario; von Bramann, Ullrich; Bruford, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Small mammals provide ecosystem services, acting, for example, as pollinators and seed dispersers. In addition, they are also disease reservoirs that can be detrimental to human health and they can also act as crop pests. Knowledge of their dispersal preferences is therefore useful for population management and landscape planning. Genetic data were used alongside landscape data to examine the influence of the landscape on the demographic connectedness of the Natal multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis) and to identify landscape characteristics that influence the genetic structure of this species across a spatially and temporally varying environment. The most significant landscape features shaping gene flow were aspect, vegetation cover, topographic complexity (TC) and rivers, with western facing slopes, topographic complexity and rivers restricting gene flow. In general, thicket vegetation was correlated with increased gene flow. Identifying features of the landscape that facilitate movement/dispersal in M. natalensis potentially has application for other small mammals in similar ecosystems. As the primary reservoir host of the zoonotic Lassa virus, a landscape genetics approach may have applications in determining areas of high disease risk to humans. Identifying these landscape features may also be important in crop management due to damage by rodent pests. PMID:27406468

  17. Variable effects of host characteristics on species richness of flea infracommunities in rodents from three continents.

    PubMed

    Kiffner, Christian; Stanko, Michal; Morand, Serge; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Hawlena, Hadas; Krasnov, Boris R

    2014-08-01

    We studied the effect of host gender and body mass on species richness of flea infracommunities in nine rodent host species from three biomes (temperate zone of central Europe, desert of the Middle East and the tropics of East Africa). Using season- and species-specific generalized linear mixed models and controlling for year-to-year variation, spatial clustering of rodent sampling and over-dispersion of the data, we found inconsistent associations between host characteristics and flea species richness. We found strong support for male-biased flea parasitism, especially during the reproductive period (higher species richness in male hosts than in females) in all considered European rodents (Apodemus agrarius, Myodes glareolus and Microtus arvalis) and in one rodent species from the Middle East (Dipodillus dasyurus). In contrast, two of three African rodent species (Lophuromys kilonzoi and Praomys delectorum) demonstrated a trend of female-biased flea species richness. Positive associations between body mass and the number of flea species were detected mainly in males (five of nine species: A. agrarius, M. glareolus, M. arvalis, D. dasyurus and Mastomys natalensis) and not in females (except for M. natalensis). The results of this study support earlier reports that gender-biased, in general, and male-biased, in particular, infestation by ectoparasites is not a universal rule. This suggests that mechanisms of parasite acquisition by an individual host are species-specific and have evolved independently in different rodent host-flea systems. PMID:24820040

  18. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  19. Laughing rats are optimistic.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Pluta, Helena; Popik, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Emotions can bias human decisions- for example depressed or anxious people tend to make pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Several studies have reported that affect contingent judgement biases can also be produced in animals. The animals, however, cannot self-report; therefore, the valence of their emotions, to date, could only be assumed. Here we present the results of an experiment where the affect-contingent judgement bias has been produced by objectively measured positive emotions. We trained rats in operant Skinner boxes to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a food reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment by electric foot shock. After attaining a stable level of discrimination performance, the animals were subjected to either handling or playful, experimenter-administered manual stimulation - tickling. This procedure has been confirmed to induce a positive affective state in rats, and the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (rat laughter) emitted by animals in response to tickling have been postulated to index positive emotions akin to human joy. During the tickling and handling sessions, the numbers of emitted high-frequency 50-kHz calls were scored. Immediately after tickling or handling, the animals were tested for their responses to a tone of intermediate frequency, and the pattern of their responses to this ambiguous cue was taken as an indicator of the animals' optimism. Our findings indicate that tickling induced positive emotions which are directly indexed in rats by laughter, can make animals more optimistic. We demonstrate for the first time a link between the directly measured positive affective state and decision making under uncertainty in an animal model. We also introduce innovative tandem-approach for studying emotional-cognitive interplay in animals, which may be of great value for understanding the emotional-cognitive changes

  20. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  1. Sugar bingeing in rats.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Rada, Pedro; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2006-08-01

    Bingeing behavior is characteristic of many eating disorders. This unit describes an animal model of sugar bingeing. This model has been used successfully to elicit behavioral and neurochemical signs of sugar dependence in rats, e.g., indices of bingeing, withdrawal, increased intake after abstinence (deprivation effect), cross-sensitization with amphetamine, and increases in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens due to repeated bingeing. PMID:18428651

  2. Sex-biased parasitism is not universal: evidence from rodent-flea associations from three biomes.

    PubMed

    Kiffner, Christian; Stanko, Michal; Morand, Serge; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Hawlena, Hadas; Krasnov, Boris R

    2013-11-01

    The distribution of parasites among individual hosts is characterised by high variability that is believed to be a result of variations in host traits. To find general patterns of host traits affecting parasite abundance, we studied flea infestation of nine rodent species from three different biomes (temperate zone of central Europe, desert of Middle East and tropics of East Africa). We tested for independent and interactive effects of host sex and body mass on the number of fleas harboured by an individual host while accounting for spatial clustering of host and parasite sampling and temporal variation. We found no consistent patterns of the effect of host sex and body mass on flea abundance either among species within a biome or among biomes. We found evidence for sex-biased flea infestation in just five host species (Apodemus agrarius, Myodes glareolus, Microtus arvalis, Gerbillus andersoni, Mastomys natalensis). In six rodent species, we found an effect of body mass on flea abundance (all species mentioned above and Meriones crassus). This effect was positive in five species and negative in one species (Microtus arvalis). In M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis, and M. arvalis, the relationship between body mass and flea abundance was mediated by host sex. This was manifested in steeper change in flea abundance with increasing body mass in male than female individuals (M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis), whereas the opposite pattern was found in M. arvalis. Our findings suggest that sex and body mass are common determinants of parasite infestation in mammalian hosts, but neither of them follows universal rules. This implies that the effect of host individual characteristics on mechanisms responsible for flea acquisition may be manifested differently in different host species. PMID:23636459

  3. Infectious sialodacryoadenitis and rat breeding.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, K; Ishikawa, T; Maeda, T; Shimizu, S; Tatsumi, H; Fujiwara, K

    1980-10-01

    The littering rate of female rats was significantly lowered when they had been exposed to sialodacryoadenitis early in pregnancy. Rats of 8 weeks or more of age were highly susceptible to contact infection, showing marked decrease in bodyweight gain, whereas those of 5-6 weeks of age were resistant. PMID:7464018

  4. War on Rats, 1972 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Dept. of Environmental Services, Washington, DC.

    The City of Washington, D.C., with federal funding, declared war on one of the city's most pressing problems--rats. The War on Rats Program, in conjunction with Operation Clean Sweep, made a city-wide survey of rat infestations and recorded the areas of heavy rat infestation. After the problem areas had been identified, community organizations…

  5. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Marina R.; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  6. Electroejaculation of chimeric rats.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Marina R; Montonye, Daniel; Bryda, Elizabeth C

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering of rodents came the need to assess fertility and germline competency, especially in chimeric rodents generated using embryonic stem cells. Traditional methods rely on natural mating and progeny testing, which is time- and cost-intensive. Electroejaculation is a faster method of collecting sperm for genetic analysis and offers the additional benefit of using fewer animals. This column describes a refined electroejaculation technique for chimeric rats using light gas anesthesia and a custom-made platform for sperm collection. PMID:23689457

  7. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  8. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras.

    PubMed

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  9. Postural development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lelard, T; Jamon, M; Gasc, J-P; Vidal, P-P

    2006-11-01

    Mammals adopt a limited number of postures during their day-to-day activities. These stereotyped skeletal configurations are functionally adequate and limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by the central nervous system. The temporal pattern of emergence of these configurations in altricial mammals is unknown. We therefore carried out an X-ray study in unrestrained rats from birth (P0) until postnatal day 23 (P23). The X-rays showed that many of the skeletal configurations described in adult rodents were already present at birth. By contrast, limb placement changed abruptly at around P10. These skeletal configurations, observed in anesthetized pups, required the maintenance of precise motor control. On the other hand, motor control continued to mature, as shown by progressive changes in resting posture and head movements from P0 to P23. We suggest that a few innate skeletal configurations provide the necessary frames of reference for the gradual construction of an adult motor repertoire in altricial mammals, such as the rat. The apparent absence of a requirement for external sensorial cues in the maturation of this repertoire may account for the maturation of postural and motor control in utero in precocial mammals (Muir et al., 2000 for a review on the locomotor behavior of altricial and precocial animals). PMID:16814770

  10. Male rat sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Agmo, A

    1997-05-01

    The male rat's sexual behavior constitutes a highly ordered sequence of motor acts involving both striate and smooth muscles. It is spontaneously displayed by most adult made rats in the presence of a sexually receptive female. Although the behavior is important for the survival of the species it is not necessary for survival of the individual. In that way it is different from other spontaneous behaviors such as eating, drinking, avoidance of pain, respiration or thermoregulation. Among other things, this means that it is difficult to talk about sexual deprivation or need. Nevertheless, studies of male sex behavior distinguish sexual motivation (the ease by which behavior is activated, "libido") from the execution of copulatory acts (performance, "potency") (Meisel, R.L. and Sachs, B.D., The physiology of male sexual behavior. In: E. Knobil and J.D. Neill (Eds.), The Physiology of Reproduction, 2nd Edn., Vol. 2, Raven Press, New York, 1994, pp. 3-105 [13]). The hormonal control of male sexual behavior has been extensively studied. It is clear that steroid hormones, androgens and estrogens, act within the central nervous system, modifying neuronal excitability. The exact mechanism by which these hormones activate sex behavior remains largely unknown. However, there exists a considerable amount of knowledge concerning the brain structures important for sexual motivation and for the execution of sex behavior. The modulatory role of some non-steroid hormones is partly known, as well as the consequences of manipulations of several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:9385085

  11. Stress-reactive rats (high-avoidance female rats) have a shorter lifespan than stress-nonreactive rats (low-avoidance female rats)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Marumo, Hideki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Although Hatano high-avoidance and low-avoidance rats (HAA and LAA, respectively) have been selectively bred for good versus poor avoidance learning, HAA rats are known to be more reactive to stress than LAA rats. In this study, HAA and LAA female rats were compared during reproductive aging by observing estrous cycles from 8 to 11 months of age. Furthermore, these rats were allowed to live out their natural lifespans, that is, until 24 months of age, in order to compare their survival and to clarify the relationship between reproductive aging and tumor development. At eight months of age, 2 of 35 HAA rats and 20 of 35 LAA rats had abnormal estrous cycles. The median lifespan of the HAA rats (673 days) was shorter than that of the LAA rats (733 days). The incidence of pituitary neoplasia was higher in the HAA rats than in the LAA rats. These results suggest that HAA female rats (i.e., stress-reactive rats) have a shorter lifespan than LAA female rats (i.e., stress-nonreactive rats) and develop pituitary neoplasia, which was one of the causal factors in their accelerated mortality. However, the onset of an age-matched abnormal cycle did not correspond with their lifespan. PMID:27182111

  12. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  13. Rat liver imidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Ramaswamy, S; Jakoby, W B

    1993-05-25

    Imidase, an enzyme variously identified as dihydropyrimidinase (EC 3.5.2.2), hydantoinase, dihydropyrimidine hydrase, and dihydropyrimidine amidohydrolase, has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from rat liver. Although a component in the chain of pyrimidine catabolism, imidase is capable of serving in a broader role that includes detoxication of xenobiotics. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of imides that range from the linear to the heterocyclic and that include hydantoins, dihydropyrimidines, and phthalimide. For some substrates, the reaction is experimentally reversible. The pH activity curves are a function of the pKa of the individual substrate's imino group, with cleavage favored at a pH near the respective pKa value. There is evidence for stereoselectivity and for stereospecificity. A mechanism is proposed for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:8388376

  14. Autoshaping in micrencephalic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.H.; Oakley, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    An autoshaping procedure in which the illumination of a lever was predictive of food reinforcement was used to compare learning in rats with micrencephaly induced by irradiation on the 16th day of gestation and in sham-irradiated controls. Both groups showed equivalent levels of lever-directed activity, and the micrencephalic animals differentiated as well as the control animals between the predictive lever and a nonpredictive lever. The micrencephalic animals were able to redistribute their lever-directed activity when the significance of the levers was reversed and did so more readily than the control animals. Results support the claim that association learning survives either traumatic or developmental neocortical damage and have implications for remedial procedures following both head injury and developmental cerebral pathology in humans.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS

    PubMed Central

    LOTH, Eduardo Alexandre; CECATTO, Vanessa; BIAZIM, Samia Khalil; FERREIRA, José Henrique Fermino; DANIELLI, Caroline; GENSKE, Rodrigo Daniel; GANDRA, Rinaldo Ferreira; de FRANCO, Marcello Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring. PMID:27049707

  16. Sevoflurane-induced pica in female rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Emiri; Sugimoto, Toru; Sagakami, Takuya; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of volatile anesthetics on pica, which can be used to assess nausea and vomiting in rats. We found that inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane significantly induced pica in female but not male rats. Among the female rats, young rats (8 weeks old) were more susceptible to its induction than adult rats (20 weeks old) with ovariectomy or sham-surgery. Anti-emetic drugs that are used to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) inhibited the pica. These results suggest that sevoflurane-induced pica in young female rats has the potential to be an animal model of PONV in humans. PMID:27156008

  17. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  18. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  19. Hematopoiesis in antiorthostatic, hypokinesic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinesia showed the following effects which are comparable to those seen in man during or after space flight: weight loss, reduced food and water consumption, transient increases in peripheral hematocrit and RBC count, decreasing MCV and reduced reticulocyte count. In addition, the hemoglobin P50 was shifted to the right. A significant shortening of RBC t1/2 was only seen after suspension. Changes in leukocyte and platelet numbers in suspended rats were also comparable to those in man during space flight, but leukocyte PHA sensitivity in rats showed no consistent alteration. The results demonstrate that this model reproduces many of the hematological effects of space flight and has potential as a tool in understanding the hematopoietic response to zero gravity.

  20. Rats are sensitive to ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Fast, Cynthia D; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated response decisions made under conditions of incomplete information in rats. In Experiment 1, rats were trained on either a positive patterning (PP; A-, B-, AB+) or a negative patterning (NP; A+, B+, AB-) instrumental lever-press discrimination. Subjects that had learned an NP discrimination responded less to Cue A when Cue B was covered at test. The cover did not, however, affect test responses to Cue A in the PP condition. In Experiment 2, rats received concurrent training on both PP and NP discriminations. After concurrent training, responses to Cue A were different with B covered versus uncovered for both NP and PP discriminations. We discuss possible accounts for why exposure to a nonlinearly soluble discrimination (NP) may have affected sensitivity to cue ambiguity produced by the cover. These results have interesting implications for representational processes engaged in problem solving. PMID:21968926

  1. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats. PMID:27370361

  2. Gender differences in ondansetron pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si H; Yang, Kyung H; Lee, Myung G

    2008-10-01

    It has been reported that ondansetron is primarily metabolized via hepatic CYP2D and 3A1/2 in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and CYP2D1 and 3A2 are male dominant and male specific isozymes, respectively, in rats. Thus, it could be expected that the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron would be changed in male rats compared with those in female rats. Thus, gender-different ondansetron pharmacokinetics were evaluated after its intravenous or oral administration at a dose of 8 mg/kg to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. After intravenous administration of ondansetron to male rats, the AUC and time-averaged non-renal clearance (Clnr) of the drug were significantly smaller (22.6% decrease) and faster (27.3% increase), respectively, than those in female rats. This probably could be due to faster hepatic blood flow rate in male rats. After oral administration of ondansetron to male rats, the AUC of the drug was also significantly smaller (58.8% decrease) than that in female rats, and this could have been due mainly to increased intestinal metabolism of ondansetron in addition to increased hepatic metabolism of the drug in male rats. PMID:18696412

  3. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long–Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola MA; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  4. Rat spermatogenesis in mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    Clouthier, David E.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Maika, Shanna D.; Hammer, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, transplantation of mouse donor spermatogonial stem cells from a fertile testis to an infertile recipient mouse testis was described1,2. The donor cells established spermatogenesis in the seminiferous tubules of the host, and normal spermatozoa were produced. In the most successful transplants, the recipient mice were fertile and sired up to 80 per cent of progeny from donor cells2. Here we examine the feasibility of transplanting spermatogonial stem cells from other species to the mouse seminiferous tubule to generate spermatogenesis. Marked testis cells from transgenic rats were transplanted to the testes of immunodeficient mice, and in all of 10 recipient mice (in 19 of 20 testes), rat spermatogenesis occurred. Epididymides of eight mice were examined, and the three from mice with the longest transplants (≥110 days) contained rat spermatozoa with normal morphology. The generation of rat spermatogenesis in mouse testes suggests that spermatogonial stem cells of many species could be transplanted, and opens the possibility of xenogeneic spermatogenesis for other species. PMID:8632797

  5. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  6. Ontogeny of rat hepatic adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    McMillian, M.K.; Schanberg, S.M.; Kuhn, C.M.

    1983-10-01

    Hepatic alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta-2 adrenoceptors were characterized during development of the rat through Scatchard analysis of (3H)prazosin, (3H)rauwolscine and (125I)pindolol binding to liver membrane preparations. Major changes in adrenoceptor numbers occur shortly before birth at weaning. The fetal rat liver is characterized by a large number of alpha-2 adrenoceptors, which falls 10-fold by birth. The number of hepatic beta-2 adrenoceptors decreases gradually during development, and is lower at all times than the number of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors. The developmental profile of the hepatic alpha-1 adrenoceptor is biphasic: there is a 2 to 3-fold fall in alpha-1 adrenoceptor number at birth and a 3- to 5-fold rise at weaning. While absolute numbers of alpha-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors do not correlate precisely with reported actions of epinephrine and norepinephrine on hepatic metabolism during ontogeny, the increasing ratio of alpha-1/beta-2 hepatic adrenoceptors may contribute to the conversion from predominantly beta effects of catecholamines reported in fetal and suckling rat liver to the predominantly alpha-1 effects that are well documented in the adult male rat.

  7. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan S W; Graff, Matthew M; Bresee, Chris S; Man, Yan B; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-08-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  8. TUMOR PROMOTION IN RAT LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An initiation promotion bioassay for chemical carcinogens and tumor promoters has been developed in rat liver using presumed preneoplastic lesions, foci of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGTase)-positive hepatocytes, as the endpoint. To evaluate the tumor-promoting activity of phe...

  9. Whiskers aid anemotaxis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan S. W.; Graff, Matthew M.; Bresee, Chris S.; Man, Yan B.; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Observation of terrestrial mammals suggests that they can follow the wind (anemotaxis), but the sensory cues underlying this ability have not been studied. We identify a significant contribution to anemotaxis mediated by whiskers (vibrissae), a modality previously studied only in the context of direct tactile contact. Five rats trained on a five-alternative forced-choice airflow localization task exhibited significant performance decrements after vibrissal removal. In contrast, vibrissal removal did not disrupt the performance of control animals trained to localize a light source. The performance decrement of individual rats was related to their airspeed threshold for successful localization: animals that found the task more challenging relied more on the vibrissae for localization cues. Following vibrissal removal, the rats deviated more from the straight-line path to the air source, choosing sources farther from the correct location. Our results indicate that rats can perform anemotaxis and that whiskers greatly facilitate this ability. Because air currents carry information about both odor content and location, these findings are discussed in terms of the adaptive significance of the interaction between sniffing and whisking in rodents. PMID:27574705

  10. Transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hully, J. R.; Su, Y.; Lohse, J. K.; Griep, A. E.; Sattler, C. A.; Haas, M. J.; Dragan, Y.; Peterson, J.; Neveu, M.; Pitot, H. C.

    1994-01-01

    Although transgenic hepatocarcinogenesis has been accomplished in the mouse with a number of genetic constructs targeting the oncogene to expression primarily in the liver, no example of this process has yet been developed in the rat. Because our understanding of the multistage nature of hepatocarcinogenesis is most advanced in the rat, we have developed a strain of transgenic rats carrying the promoter-enhancer sequences of the mouse albumin gene linked 5' to the simian virus-40 T antigen gene. A line of transgenic rats bearing this transgene has been developed from a single founder female. Five to six copies of the transgene, possibly in tandem, occur within the genome of the transgenic animals, which are maintained by heterozygous matings. Livers of transgenic animals are histologically normal after weaning; at 2 months of age, small foci of vacuolated cells appear in this organ. By 4 months of age, all animals exhibit focal lesions and nodules consisting primarily of small basophilic cells, many of which exhibit considerable cytoplasmic vacuolization. Mating of animals each bearing the transgene results in rats with a demyelinating condition that develops acutely in pregnant females and more chronically in males. Ultrastructural studies of these cells indicate that the vacuoles contain substantial amounts of glycogen, with the cells resembling hepatoblasts. Malignant neoplasms with both a glandular and a hepatoblastoma/hepatocellular carcinoma pattern arise from the nodules. Enzyme and immunohistochemical studies of all lesions reveal many similarities in gene expression to comparable lesions in rats subjected to chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, with certain exceptions. The placental form of glutathione-S-transferase is absent from all lesions in the transgenic animal, as is the expression of connexin 32. A significant number of lesions express serum albumin, and many, but not all, exhibit the T antigen. Lesions expressing the T antigen also contain

  11. Early life stress induces renal dysfunction in adult male rats but not female rats

    PubMed Central

    Loria, Analia S.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Pollock, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal separation (MatSep) is a model of behavioral stress during early life. We reported that MatSep exacerbates ANG II-induced hypertension in adult male rats. The aims of this study were to determine whether exposure to MatSep in female rats sensitizes blood pressure to ANG II infusion similar to male MatSep rats and to elucidate renal mechanisms involved in the response in MatSep rats. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) pups were exposed to MatSep 3 h/day from days 2 to 14, while control rats remained with their mothers. ANG II-induced mean arterial pressure (MAP; telemetry) was enhanced in female MatSep rats compared with control female rats but delayed compared with male MatSep rats. Creatinine clearance (Ccr) was reduced in male MatSep rats compared with control rats at baseline and after ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion significantly increased T cells in the renal cortex and greater histological damage in the interstitial arteries of male MatSep rats compared with control male rats. Plasma testosterone was greater and estradiol was lower in male MatSep rats compared with control rats with ANG II infusion. ANG II infusion failed to increase blood pressure in orchidectomized male MatSep and control rats. Female MatSep and control rats had similar Ccr, histological renal analysis, and sex hormones at baseline and after ANG II infusion. These data indicate that during ANG II-induced hypertension, MatSep sensitizes the renal phenotype in male but not female rats. PMID:23174859

  12. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  13. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  14. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  15. Histomorphometric analysis of rat skeleton following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.; Doty, S. B.; Maese, A. C.; Walsh, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in orbit for 7 days aboard the space shuttle. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the long bones and lumbar vertebrae of flight rats and compared with data derived from ground-based control rats. Trabecular bone mass was not altered during the 1st wk of weightlessness. Strong trends were observed in flight rats for decreased periosteal bone formation in the tibial diaphysis, reduced osteoblast size in the proximal tibia, and decreased osteoblast surface and number in the lumbar vertebra. For the most part, histological indexes of bone resorption were normal in flight rats. The results indicate that 7 days of weightlessness are not of sufficient duration to induce histologically detectable loss of trabecular bone in rats. However, cortical and trabecular bone formation appear to be diminished during the 1st wk of spaceflight.

  16. False context fear memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sarah E; Holmes, Nathan M; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control rats in A. In Experiment 2, rats were pre-exposed to A or C, subjected to an immediate shock in B and tested in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze when tested in A but did not freeze when tested in B and control rats did not freeze in either A or B. The false fear memory to the pre-exposed A was contingent on its similarity with the shocked B. In Experiment 3, rats pre-exposed to A and subjected to immediate shock in B froze when tested in A but did not freeze when tested in C and rats pre-exposed to C did not freeze when tested either in A or C. In Experiment 4, rats pre-exposed to A and subjected to immediate shock in B froze more when tested in A than rats whose pre-exposure to A began with an immediate shock. The results were discussed in terms of a dual systems explanation of context fear conditioning: a hippocampal-dependent process that forms a unitary representation of context and an amygdala-based process which associates this representation with shock. PMID:26373831

  17. Renal kallikrein in chronic hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, L W; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Tsai, T J

    1996-09-01

    1. We have studied the role of kallikrein (KK) in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats (high altitude; HA), compared with control rats kept at sea level (SL). Hypoxia was induced by placing female Wistar rats (198-290 g) in an altitude chamber (5500 m) 15 h/day for 4 weeks. Experiments were also conducted to study the interaction of KK with renal nerve activity and endothelin (ET), two parameters previously shown to be altered in this model. 2. It was found that renal cortex tissue KK activity (TKA) was not significantly different in 10 SL and 10 HA rats. However, the urinary KK activity (UKA) was reduced nearly to half (from 35.2 +/- 4.6 to 18.5 +/- 1.7 pkat/min) in HA rats after 4 weeks of chronic hypoxia. 3. Acute renal denervated diuresis was accompanied by a significant increase in UKA (from 9 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 2 pkat/min in HA and denervated HA rats, respectively; P < 0.05) in HA rats. Intrarenal arterial pretreatment of aprotinin reduced the denervated diuresis. 4. Endothelin (600 ng/kg per h) reduced urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion in the ipsilateral kidney in another 10 SL and 10 HA rats. The extent of the drop of these parameters was significantly less in HA rats. Urinary KK activity was correlated significantly with the measured renal functional parameters (r ranging from 0.472 to 0.612) in SL rats, but was insignificant in HA rats (r ranging from 0.032 to 0.192). 5. We have demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia decreases urinary KK excretion and that KK is involved in acute renal denervated diuresis generated in these animals. The present study suggests that KK plays a partial role in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats. PMID:8911720

  18. Protective Vaccination against Papillomavirus-Induced Skin Tumors under Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressive Conditions: A Preclinical Study Using a Natural Outbred Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Braspenning-Wesch, Ilona; Müller, Martin; Geissler, Edward K.; Nindl, Ingo; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Certain cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which are ubiquitous and acquired early during childhood, can cause a variety of skin tumors and are likely involved in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, the burden of these clinical manifestations demands for a prophylactic approach. To evaluate whether protective efficacy of a vaccine is potentially translatable to patients, we used the rodent Mastomys coucha that is naturally infected with Mastomys natalensis papillomavirus (MnPV). This skin type papillomavirus induces not only benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas, thereby allowing a straightforward read-out for successful vaccination in a small immunocompetent laboratory animal. Here, we examined the efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine on either previously or newly established infections. VLPs raise a strong and long-lasting neutralizing antibody response that confers protection even under systemic long-term cyclosporine A treatment. Remarkably, the vaccine completely prevents the appearance of benign as well as malignant skin tumors. Protection involves the maintenance of a low viral load in the skin by an antibody-dependent prevention of virus spread. Our results provide first evidence that VLPs elicit an effective immune response in the skin under immunocompetent and immunosuppressed conditions in an outbred animal model, irrespective of the infection status at the time of vaccination. These findings provide the basis for the clinical development of potent vaccination strategies against cutaneous HPV infections and HPV-induced tumors, especially in patients awaiting organ transplantation. PMID:24586150

  19. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  20. Modeling nicotine addiction in rats.

    PubMed

    Caille, Stephanie; Clemens, Kelly; Stinus, Luis; Cador, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Among the human population, 15% of drug users develop a pathological drug addiction. This figure increases substantially with nicotine, whereby more than 30% of those who try smoking develop a nicotine addiction. Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors (craving), and loss of control over intake despite impairment in health, social, and occupational functions. This behavior can be accurately modeled in the rat using an intravenous self-administration (IVSA) paradigm. Initial attempts at establishing nicotine self-administration had been problematic, yet in recent times increasingly reliable models of nicotine self-administration have been developed. The present article reviews different characteristics of the nicotine IVSA model that has been developed to examine nicotine reinforcing and motivational properties in rats. PMID:22231818

  1. Toxicity and repellency to rats of actidione

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Traub, R.; DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Newman, D.

    1950-01-01

    The antibiotic actidione was found to be highly repellent to laboratory rats and to significantly reduce gnawing attacks upon treated paperboards. Rats refused to accept food or water containing this material even under conditions of acute starvation and died of starvation and thirst,rather than accept water containing l.0 mg. of actidione per liter. The compound is highly toxic to .rats with the minimum .lethal dose by oral administration being approximately l.0 mg./Kg body weight. Paperboard treated with the compound resisted gnawing attacks by specially trained and motivated rats for periods of two hundred hours, although similar .untreated boards were pierced within thirty-to sixty minutes.

  2. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.T.; Cao, L.; Nelson, J.L.; Foley-Nelson, T.; Fischer, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  3. Automatic Training of Rat Cyborgs for Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yipeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Xu, Kedi; Gong, Yongyue; Zheng, Nenggan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A rat cyborg system refers to a biological rat implanted with microelectrodes in its brain, via which the outer electrical stimuli can be delivered into the brain in vivo to control its behaviors. Rat cyborgs have various applications in emergency, such as search and rescue in disasters. Prior to a rat cyborg becoming controllable, a lot of effort is required to train it to adapt to the electrical stimuli. In this paper, we build a vision-based automatic training system for rat cyborgs to replace the time-consuming manual training procedure. A hierarchical framework is proposed to facilitate the colearning between rats and machines. In the framework, the behavioral states of a rat cyborg are visually sensed by a camera, a parameterized state machine is employed to model the training action transitions triggered by rat's behavioral states, and an adaptive adjustment policy is developed to adaptively adjust the stimulation intensity. The experimental results of three rat cyborgs prove the effectiveness of our system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to tackle automatic training of animal cyborgs. PMID:27436999

  4. Lead induced testicular hypersensitivity in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D K; Lal, B; Srivastava, R S; Chandra, S V

    1990-01-01

    Rats were immobilized for 2 h and treated i.p. with lead Pb2+ (8 mg/kg/day) for 45 d to investigate the testicular effects of lead on rats kept under immobilization stress. Marked alteration in SDH. G6PDH activity, cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents and reduced sperm counts associated with marked pathological changes in the testis of rats were observed after combined treatment with lead and immobilization stress in comparison to either alone. An increase in the disturbances of testicular androgen synthesis seems to be responsible for enhanced testicular injury in lead induced stressed rats. PMID:2401350

  5. Methanethiol metabolism in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, R.F.; Draves, K.

    1983-03-01

    Methanethiol is associated with hepatic failure in humans and the synergistic action of methanethiol, ammonia and octanoate is sufficient to account for the coma of experimental hepatic necrosis. The sulfur atom of methanethiol is eliminated from the body as urinary sulfate at a rate which is approximated by a hyperbola such that 94% is excreted within 21 h after administration. Rats in octanoate or hepatic coma excreted only little sulfate in their urine.

  6. Pathophysiology of the Belgrade rat

    PubMed Central

    Veuthey, Tania; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The Belgrade rat is an animal model of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) deficiency. This strain originates from an X-irradiation experiment first reported in 1966. Since then, the Belgrade rat’s pathophysiology has helped to reveal the importance of iron balance and the role of DMT1. This review discusses our current understanding of iron transport homeostasis and summarizes molecular details of DMT1 function. We describe how studies of the Belgrade rat have revealed key roles for DMT1 in iron distribution to red blood cells as well as duodenal iron absorption. The Belgrade rat’s pathology has extended our knowledge of hepatic iron handling, pulmonary and olfactory iron transport as well as brain iron uptake and renal iron handling. For example, relationships between iron and manganese metabolism have been discerned since both are essential metals transported by DMT1. Pathophysiologic features of the Belgrade rat provide us with a unique and interesting animal model to understand iron homeostasis. PMID:24795636

  7. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  8. EYEBLINK CONDITIONING IN THE DEVELOPING RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans rat pups, 17-18 or 24 days of age, wore trained with an eyeblink conditioning (EBC) procedure that has recently been used with adult rats (Skelton, 1988, Beh, Neurosci., 102, 586-590). ups received 3 sessions of delay conditioning in a single day, at about 4 hour inter...

  9. Synthesis of HDL apolipoproteins by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.M.; Kelley, M.; Zannis, V.I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have used 2D-PAGE to study the synthesis, intracellular modification, and secretion of rat HDL apolipoproteins by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. ApoA-IV, apoA-II and apoE synthesized after a 10 min pulse with /sup 35/S-methionine coincided on 2D-gels with their corresponding plasma forms and they were not modified further intracellularly or following secretion. A fraction (< 10%) of apoE was modified intracellularly to minor isoprotein forms that were insensitive to neuraminidase treatment. These later forms also constituted a minor component of the secreted and plasma rat apoE. The intracellular and newly secreted apoA-I differed from its plasma counterpart by -1 charge as described previously. The intracellular forms of rat apoA-I, apoA-IV and unmodified apoE differed from the products of cell free translation of rat liver mRNA by +1 charge. Their findings (a) establish the charge relationship between nascent and plasma rat apolipoproteins, (b) indicate that rat apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-IV are not modified intracellularly, (c) suggest that there is a difference in the post-translational modification patterns between the rat and human hepatic apoE.

  10. Stimulus Over-Selectivity in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Evelyn; Reed, Phil

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored whether a similar phenomenon to stimulus over-selectivity occurred in rats, in the hope of establishing a non-human model for the autism. Rats were serially presented with two-15 seconds, two-element compound stimuli prior to the delivery of food, in an appetitive classical conditioning procedure. Each compound stimulus…

  11. Distal axonopathy in streptozotocin diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Chokroverty, S; Seiden, D; Navidad, P; Cody, R

    1988-05-15

    We noted the earliest morphological changes in the motor endplates 8 weeks after the induction of streptozotocin diabetes in rats. Morphometric measurements showed reduced axonal areas of the lateral plantar and the sciatic nerves in the diabetic rats 28 but not 2 and 8 weeks after the experiment. These findings suggested distal axonopathy. PMID:3371449

  12. ALLYLISOPROPYLACETAMIDE INDUCES RAT HEPATIC ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In rat liver, allylisopropylacetamide (AIA) treatment strongly induced (25-fold) the activity of rat hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). y either the oral or the subcutaneous routes, AIA produced a long-lasting induction (30 to 4O hours) of hepatic ODC activity. hree analogs o...

  13. Spatial Memory in Rats after 25 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Babb, Stephanie J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the time course of spatial-memory decay in rats using an eight-arm radial maze. It is well established that performance remains high with retention intervals as long as 4 h, but declines to chance with a 24-h retention interval (Beatty, W. W., & Shavalia, D. A. (1980b). Spatial memory in rats: time course of working memory and…

  14. THERMAL BIOLOGY OF THE LABORATORY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In view of the array of thermal interactions commonly reported in physiological, pharmacological and behavioral studies of the rat, it would be timely to thoroughly review and develop a data base of the basic thermoregulatory parameters of the laboratory rat. his review contains ...

  15. PBPK MODELING OF DELTAMETHRIN IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin is cleared nearly twice as rapidly in human liver microsomes compared to rat liver microsomes. A species difference such as this could influence the toxic potency of deltamethrin between rats and humans. PBPK modeling is a tool that can be ut...

  16. GLUTAMINE CYCLING IN ISOLATED WORKING RAT HEART

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To what extent does glutamine turnover keep pace with oxidative metabolism in the rat heart? To address this question, the following substrates were presented to the isolated, working rat heart: (1) glucose (5 mM), insulin (40 mU/ml) and [2-13C]acetate (5mM) (high workload, n= 5); (2) pyruvate (2....

  17. Same-Different Categorization in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Edward A.; Castro, Leyre; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Same-different categorization is a fundamental feat of human cognition. Although birds and nonhuman primates readily learn same-different discriminations and successfully transfer them to novel stimuli, no such demonstration exists for rats. Using a spatial discrimination learning task, we show that rats can both learn to discriminate arrays of…

  18. Cryopreservation and orthotopic transplantation of rat ovaries.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, Martina; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The number of rat strains increased considerably in the last decade and will increase continuously during the next years. This requires enough space for maintaining vital strains and techniques for cryobanking, which can be applied not only in specialised rat resource centres but also in regular animal houses. Here we describe an easy and fast method for the cryopreservation and transplantation of frozen-thawed ovaries of the rat. With dimethyl sulfoxide as cryoprotectant rat ovaries can be stored at -196 degrees C for unlimited time. For revitalisation thawed ovaries have to be orthotopically transplanted into appropriate ovarectomised recipients. Reestablishment of the reproductive cycle in the recipients can be confirmed by vaginal cytology shortly after transplantation. The recipients are able to produce 2-3 litters after mating with males of an appropriate strain. Cyropreservation of ovaries thus can be considered a reliable method to preserve scientifically and economically important stocks and strains of rats that are currently not required. PMID:20013242

  19. Glycine metabolism in rat kidney cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Rowsell, E V; Al-Naama, M M; Rowsell, K V

    1982-04-15

    When rat kidney cortex slices were incubated with glycine or [1-14C]glycine, after correcting for metabolite changes with control slices, product formation and glycine utilization fitted the requirements of the equation: 2 Glycine leads to ammonia + CO2 + serine. Evidence is presented that degradation via glyoxylate, by oxidation or transamination, is unlikely to have any significant role in kidney glycine catabolism. It is concluded that glycine metabolism in rat kidney is largely via glycine cleavage closely coupled with serine formation. 1-C decarboxylation and urea formation with glycine in rat hepatocyte suspensions were somewhat greater than decarboxylation or ammonia formation in kidney slices, showing that in the rat, potentially, the liver is quantitatively the more important organ in glycine catabolism. There was no evidence of ammonia formation from glycine with rat brain cortex, heart, spleen or diaphragm and 1-C decarboxylation was very weak. PMID:6810880

  20. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  1. Is fructose sweeter than glucose for rats?

    PubMed

    Ramirez, I

    1996-11-01

    Because it is generally thought that the intensity of the taste of fructose is greater than that of glucose for rats, it seemed surprising when sham-fed rats drank substantially less of a mixture of 6% fructose plus saccharin than of a mixture of 6% glucose plus saccharin. At least 3 different factors contribute to this effect. First, the taste of fructose is less attractive to rats than is the taste of glucose; sham-fed rats strongly preferred glucose over fructose (no saccharin was used in this experiment). The second factor is experience. Rats having substantial previous experience with glucose, but not with fructose, consistently preferred glucose over fructose. Conversely, rats having substantial previous experience with fructose, but not with glucose, initially showed no consistent preference but subsequently tended to prefer glucose. The third factor is an interaction between saccharin and the type of sugar. Rats given only one solution at a time drink approximately as much fructose as glucose when the solutions contain no saccharin. The addition of 0.25% saccharin to 6% glucose stimulated intake, whereas the addition of the same amount of saccharin to 6% fructose did not stimulate intake. As a result, rats ingested substantially more of a mixture of 0.25% saccharin plus 6% glucose than they did of a comparable mixture of saccharin and fructose, even though rats ingest similar amounts of fructose and glucose without saccharin in single-bottle tests. Because the differential effect of saccharin on intake appeared within 2 h in naive rats, and did not greatly change over a 3-day period, it is probably not attributable to conditioning. These results suggest that these sugars have qualitatively different tastes. PMID:8916185

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  3. Social exclusion intensifies anxiety-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunchan; Noh, Jihyun

    2015-05-01

    Social connection reduces the physiological reactivity to stressors, while social exclusion causes emotional distress. Stressful experiences in rats result in the facilitation of aversive memory and induction of anxiety. To determine the effect of social interaction, such as social connection, social exclusion and equality or inequality, on emotional change in adolescent distressed rats, the emotional alteration induced by restraint stress in individual rats following exposure to various social interaction circumstances was examined. Rats were assigned to one of the following groups: all freely moving rats, all rats restrained, rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats and freely moving rats with a restrained rat. No significant difference in fear-memory and sucrose consumption between all groups was found. Change in body weight significantly increased in freely moving rats with a restrained rat, suggesting that those rats seems to share the stressful experience of the restrained rat. Interestingly, examination of the anxiety-like behavior revealed only rats restrained in the presence of freely moving rats to have a significant increase, suggesting that emotional distress intensifies in positions of social exclusion. These results demonstrate that unequally excluded social interaction circumstances could cause the amplification of distressed status and anxiety-related emotional alteration. PMID:25680679

  4. Identity Matching-to-Sample with Olfactory Stimuli in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Tracy; Pitts, Raymond C.; Galizio, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Identity matching-to-sample has been difficult to demonstrate in rats, but most studies have used visual stimuli. There is evidence that rats can acquire complex forms of olfactory stimulus control, and the present study explored the possibility that identity matching might be facilitated in rats if olfactory stimuli were used. Four rats were…

  5. Glucagon Metabolism in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouel, D. S.; Jaspan, J. B.; Rubenstein, A. H.; Huen, A. H-J.; Fink, E.; Katz, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    The renal handling of the biologically active glucagon component (the 3,500-mol wt fraction of immunoreactive glucagon [IRG]) and the contribution of the kidney to its overall peripheral metabolism were studied in normal and uremic rats. The metabolic clearance rate of glucagon was 31.8 ± 1.2 ml/min per kg in normal animals and was diminished by approximately one-third in each of three groups of rats with compromized renal function: 22.3±1.6 ml/min per kg in partially (70%) nephrectomized; 22.9±3.3 ml/min per kg in bilaterally ureteral ligated; and 23.2±1.2 ml/min per kg in bilaterally nephrectomized animals. In normal rats the kidney contributed 30% to the overall metabolic clearance of the hormone and the renal extraction of endogenous and exogenous glucagon was similar, averaging 22.9±1.6% and was independent of plasma IRG levels over a wide range of arterial concentrations. The remnant kidney of partially (70%) nephrectomized animals continued to extract substantial amounts (16.6±4.2%) of the hormone, but accounted for only 8% of the total peripheral catabolism of IRG. In the two groups of animals with filtering kidneys, renal glucagon uptake was linearly related to its filtered load and could be accounted for by glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. However, the kidneys of animals with both ureters ligated (renal extraction of inulin = 3.2±1.8%) and hence virtual absence of glomerular filtration, continued to extract 11.5±1.9% of the renal arterial glucagon, contributing by 9% to its overall metabolic clearance, indicating that IRG uptake occurs also from the post glomerular capillaries. PMID:659638

  6. Retained folates in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barford, P A; Staff, R J; Blair, J A

    1977-01-01

    The retention of radioactivity after doses of 14C- and 3H-labelled folic acid is described. Radioactivity was retained in liver, kidney and gut of rats for some time after administration of the dose. The retained radioactivity could not be displaced by large doses of unlabelled folic acid or unlabelled 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. 14C- and 3H-labbelled folates showed similar chromatographic behaviour onion-exchange chromatography to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, and on ion-exchange and gel-permeation chromatography to synthetic pteroylhepta-gamma-glutamate. PMID:883955

  7. Anxiolytic Treatment Impairs Helping Behavior in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami Bartal, Inbal; Shan, Haozhe; Molasky, Nora M R; Murray, Teresa M; Williams, Jasper Z; Decety, Jean; Mason, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research with humans, the biological mechanisms that motivate an individual to help others remain poorly understood. In order to investigate the roots of pro-sociality in mammals, we established the helping behavior test, a paradigm in which rats are faced with a conspecific trapped in a restrainer that can only be opened from the outside. Over the course of repeated test sessions, rats exposed to a trapped cagemate learn to open the door to the restrainer, thereby helping the trapped rat to escape (Ben-Ami Bartal et al., 2011). The discovery of this natural behavior provides a unique opportunity to probe the motivation of rodent helping behavior, leading to a deeper understanding of biological influences on human pro-sociality. To determine if an affective response motivates door-opening, rats receiving midazolam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic, were tested in the helping behavior test. Midazolam-treated rats showed less helping behavior than saline-treated rats or rats receiving no injection. Yet, midazolam-treated rats opened a restrainer containing chocolate, highlighting the socially specific effects of the anxiolytic. To determine if midazolam interferes with helping through a sympatholytic effect, the peripherally restricted beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist nadolol was administered; nadolol did not interfere with helping. The corticosterone response of rats exposed to a trapped cagemate was measured and compared to the rats' subsequent helping behavior. Rats with the greatest corticosterone responses showed the least helping behavior and those with the smallest responses showed the most consistent helping at the shortest latency. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the interaction between stress and pro-social behavior. Finally, we observed that door-opening appeared to be reinforcing. A novel analytical tool was designed to interrogate the pattern of door-opening for signs that a rat's behavior on one session

  8. The long pursued Holy Grail of the true "alcoholic" rat.

    PubMed

    Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2016-08-15

    An anthology of microdialysis and electrophysiological studies on ethanol effect on mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons is presented. The usefulness of rats with innate preference for ethanol, such as the Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP), in studying ethanol rewarding and reinforcing effects is signaled. The generation of the long sought "alcoholics rat" from sP rats is announced. Rats of the sP line avoid the shortcomings of using rats non selected for ethanol preference. PMID:26867703

  9. Electroencephalographic changes in albino rats subjected to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercier, J.; Assouline, G.; Fondarai, J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty one albino Wistar rats were subjected to stress for 7 hours. There was a significant difference in the slopes of regression lines for 7 nonulcerous rats and those for 14 ulcerous rats. Nonulcerous rats subjected to stress showed greater EEG curve synchronization than did ulcerous rats. If curve synchronization can be equated to a relaxed state, it may therefore be possible to explain the protective action of hypnotics, tranquilizers and analgesics on ulcers.

  10. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). Results We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Conclusion Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations

  11. Metabolism of ochratoxin A by rats.

    PubMed Central

    Støren, O; Holm, H; Størmer, F C

    1982-01-01

    Albino rats were given ochratoxin A (6.6 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally or per os. Independent of route administration, 6% of a given dose was excreted as the toxin, 1 to 1.5% as (4R)-4-hydroxyochratoxin A, and 25 to 27% as ochratoxin alpha in the urine. The metabolite (4S)-4-hydroxyochratoxin A, which is formed by rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH, was not detected. Only traces of ochratoxins A and alpha were found in feces. Identical experiments were carried out with brown rats, since the Km value for the formation of the 4S epimer was considerably lower when brown rat microsomes were used. About the same ratios of metabolites and metabolite recoveries as those found for albino rats were found for brown rats. Brown rats were also given the two hydroxylated metabolites and ochratoxin alpha (0.66 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally. The three compounds were excreted in the urine; within 48 h, 90% recovery of ochratoxin alpha and 54 and 35%, respectively, of the 4R and 4S isomers were observed. PMID:7149712

  12. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  13. Radiation and G tolerance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, J.L.; Cordts, R.E.; Deyak, R.R. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Male hooded rats were exposed to 2100 rad 60Co radiation and 18 h later were exposed to +Gz acceleration until heart rate was reduced to 50% of baseline rate. G tolerance was 9.2% less in irradiated rats than in controls. Although small, this difference was significant at p less than 0.05. A similar group of rats was anesthetized 18 h postirradiation and carotid mean arterial pressures were measured. Mean arterial pressure was 122.1 torr for controls and 114.5 for irradiated. This difference was not significant.

  14. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  15. Rats are the smart choice: Rationale for a renewed focus on rats in behavioral genetics

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Clarissa C.; Chen, Hao; Flagel, Shelly B.; Geurts, Aron M.; Richards, Jerry B.; Robinson, Terry E.; Solberg Woods, Leah C.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2013-01-01

    Due in part to their rich behavioral repertoire rats have been widely used in behavioral studies of drug abuse-related traits for decades. However, the mouse became the model of choice for researchers exploring the genetic underpinnings of addiction after the first mouse study was published demonstrating the capability of engineering the mouse genome through embryonic stem cell technology. The sequencing of the mouse genome and more recent re-sequencing of numerous inbred mouse strains has further cemented the status of mice as the premier mammalian organism for genetic studies. As a result, many of the behavioral paradigms initially developed and optimized for rats have been adapted to mice. However, numerous complex and interesting drug abuse-related behaviors that can be studied in rats are very difficult or impossible to adapt for use in mice, impeding the genetic dissection of those traits. Now, technological advances have removed many of the historical limitations of genetic studies in rats. For instance, the rat genome has been sequenced and many inbred rat strains are now being re-sequenced and outbred rat stocks are being used to fine-map QTLs. In addition, it is now possible to create “knockout” rats using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and related techniques. Thus, rats can now be used to perform quantitative genetic studies of sophisticated behaviors that have been difficult or impossible to study in mice. PMID:23791960

  16. Hypergravity induced prolactin surge in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megory, E.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Acute initial exposure to hypergravity (HG) was previously found to induce prolonged diestrous in rats, which was followed by return to normal estrous cycling upon more prolonged exposure to continuous HG. Bromergocryptine was found to prevent this prolonged diestrous. In this study it is found that in female rats 20 h of 3.14 G exposure (D-1 1200 h until D-2 0800 h) can induce prolactin surge at D-2 1600 h. Shorter exposure time (8 h), or exposure during a different part of the estrous cycle (19 h: from D-1 0700 h until D-2 0200 h) could not elicit this prolactin surge. Similar exposure of male rats of HG did not alter significantly their prolactin levels. It is possible that the hypothalamus of male and female rats responds differently to stimulation by HG.

  17. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  18. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  19. Rat preference for food-related odors.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, E; Ono, T; Uwano, T; Takashima, Y; Kawasaki, M

    1991-01-01

    Preferences for food-related odors and the effects of fasting on those preferences were investigated during rat bar pressing for brief odor presentation. A rat was housed in an equilateral octagonal cage and had free access to food and water, except during fasting. Among 8 food-related odor substances (black pepper, cheese, coffee, milk, nut, peppermint, plum and orange), black pepper, milk and coffee were most preferred, and cheese was least preferred, but even the bar pressing rate for cheese was above the operant level. This data indicates that all 8 odors were preferred by rats, although there were different degrees of preference in individual animals. Fasting substantially increased the rate of bar pressing for odors and changed the odors preferences. This result was probably due to increased search for food and water. Since bar pressing was reinforced by nothing other than odor presentation, the results reveal inherent odor preferences of rats. PMID:1959035

  20. RAT SPERM MOTILITY ANALYSIS: METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. ethodological issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample ...

  1. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  2. 2011 Desert RATS Sights and Sounds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Watch scenes from the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test, as NASA scientists and engineers drive the Space Exploration Vehicle, assemble equipment in the Habitat D...

  3. Rat sperm motility analysis: methodologic considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these studies was to optimize conditions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of rat epididymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues addressed include sample collection technique, sampling region within the epididymis, type of diluent medium used, and sample c...

  4. Anxiolytic Treatment Impairs Helping Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami Bartal, Inbal; Shan, Haozhe; Molasky, Nora M. R.; Murray, Teresa M.; Williams, Jasper Z.; Decety, Jean; Mason, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research with humans, the biological mechanisms that motivate an individual to help others remain poorly understood. In order to investigate the roots of pro-sociality in mammals, we established the helping behavior test, a paradigm in which rats are faced with a conspecific trapped in a restrainer that can only be opened from the outside. Over the course of repeated test sessions, rats exposed to a trapped cagemate learn to open the door to the restrainer, thereby helping the trapped rat to escape (Ben-Ami Bartal et al., 2011). The discovery of this natural behavior provides a unique opportunity to probe the motivation of rodent helping behavior, leading to a deeper understanding of biological influences on human pro-sociality. To determine if an affective response motivates door-opening, rats receiving midazolam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic, were tested in the helping behavior test. Midazolam-treated rats showed less helping behavior than saline-treated rats or rats receiving no injection. Yet, midazolam-treated rats opened a restrainer containing chocolate, highlighting the socially specific effects of the anxiolytic. To determine if midazolam interferes with helping through a sympatholytic effect, the peripherally restricted beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist nadolol was administered; nadolol did not interfere with helping. The corticosterone response of rats exposed to a trapped cagemate was measured and compared to the rats’ subsequent helping behavior. Rats with the greatest corticosterone responses showed the least helping behavior and those with the smallest responses showed the most consistent helping at the shortest latency. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the interaction between stress and pro-social behavior. Finally, we observed that door-opening appeared to be reinforcing. A novel analytical tool was designed to interrogate the pattern of door-opening for signs that a rat’s behavior on one

  5. Sleep Homeostasis in Infant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Mark S.; Middlemis-Brown, Jessica E.; Johnson, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation is a defining characteristic of sleep but has rarely been examined in infants. This study presents an automated method of sleep deprivation in which 5-day-old rats were shocked whenever the nuchal muscle became atonic. The intensity of shock was always set at the minimal level required to maintain arousal. Deprived pups exhibited rapid increases in sleep pressure, as evidenced by increased attempts to enter sleep and subsequent increases in sensory threshold; this increased sensory threshold was not due to sensory adaptation of peripheral receptors. In addition, myoclonic twitching was suppressed during the 30-min deprivation period, leading to rebound twitching during recovery sleep. These results provide the earliest demonstration of the homeostatic regulation of sleep in an altricial mammal. PMID:15598134

  6. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-01

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders. PMID:15797529

  7. Rats and Humans Paying Attention

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Elise; Sarter, Martin; Lustig, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Substantial gains have been made on the neurobiology of attention from systems neuroscience work in animal models and human cognitive neuroscience. However, the integration of rodent-based research on the specific neurotransmitter systems that subserve attention with the results from human behavioral and neuroimaging studies has been hampered by the lack of tasks that validly assess attention in both species. To address this issue, an operant sustained attention task that has been extensively used in research on the neurobiology of attention in rats was re-designed and validated for use in humans. Although humans showed better performance overall, the two species showed similar effects of several attention-related variables, including the introduction of distractor-related challenge. This task provides a useful tool for integrative, cross-species research, and may help to determine how specific neurotransmitter systems contribute to the hemodynamic changes observed in human functional neuroimaging experiments. PMID:18999353

  8. How rats combine temporal cues.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Keen, Richard; MacInnis, Mika L M; Church, Russell M

    2005-05-31

    The procedures for classical and operant conditioning, and for many timing procedures, involve the delivery of reinforcers that may be related to the time of previous reinforcers and responses, and to the time of onsets and terminations of stimuli. The behavior resulting from such procedures can be described as bouts of responding that occur in some pattern at some rate. A packet theory of timing and conditioning is described that accounts for such behavior under a wide range of procedures. Applications include the food searching by rats in Skinner boxes under conditions of fixed and random reinforcement, brief and sustained stimuli, and several response-food contingencies. The approach is used to describe how multiple cues from reinforcers and stimuli combine to determine the rate and pattern of response bouts. PMID:15845307

  9. Tracheal tissue engineering in rats.

    PubMed

    Jungebluth, Philipp; Haag, Johannes C; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Ylva; Beltrán Rodríguez, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bianco, Alessandra; Dehnisch, Ivar; Uhlén, Per; Baiguera, Silvia; Lemon, Greg; Lim, Mei Ling; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered tracheal transplants have been successfully performed clinically. However, before becoming a routine clinical procedure, further preclinical studies are necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of in situ tissue regeneration. Here we describe a protocol using a tissue engineering strategy and orthotopic transplantation of either natural decellularized donor tracheae or artificial electrospun nanofiber scaffolds into a rat model. The protocol includes details regarding how to assess the scaffolds' biomechanical properties and cell viability before implantation. It is a reliable and reproducible model that can be used to investigate the crucial aspects and pathways of in situ tracheal tissue restoration and regeneration. The model can be established in <6 months, and it may also provide a means to investigate cell-surface interactions, cell differentiation and stem cell fate. PMID:25122525

  10. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  11. Maturation of Jejunum and Ileum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Younoszai, M. K.; Sapario, R. S.; Laughlin, M.

    1978-01-01

    During osmotic diarrhea, loss of water and electrolytes appears to be greater in infants than in adults. In 2-, 3-, and 7-wk-old rats, we studied net transport of H2O, Na, and Cl, during in vivo perfusion of segments of the jejunum and ileum, from solutions with osmolalities of 300, 375, 500, or 700 mosmol/kg. In the jejunal segments, from the hypertonic solutions net transport of H2O, Na, and Cl was into the lumen and greater in the 2- than 7-wk-old rats. In the ileal segments, transport of water was into the lumen, transport of Na was minimal and variable, whereas transport of Cl was usually out the lumen. In 3-wk-old rats, transport rates were intermediate between those in 2- and 7-wk-old rats. The calculated filtration coefficient (microliters of H2O transported per hour per unit osmolality gradient—lumen-serum—per gram dry weight) of water suggested that the resistance to water flow did not increase with rise in luminal hypertonicity in the jejunum of the 2- and 3-wk-old rats, whereas in jejunum of the 7-wk-old rats and in ileum of rats in all three ages, the resistance to water flow increased with the rise in luminal osmolality. The differences in the transport rates and the resistance to water flow, between segments of the 2-, 3-, and 7-wk-old rats, suggested a maturational phenomenon that appears to continue beyond the 3rd wk of life and could have been due to differences in some physical property of the mucosal membrane. PMID:670394

  12. Hindlimb unweighting affects rat vascular capacitance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Tamhidi, L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired stroke volume and, therefore, cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. We hypothesized that a decreased venous filling pressure due to increased venous compliance may be an important contributing factor in this response. We used a constant flow, constant right atrial pressure cardiopulmonary bypass procedure to measure total systemic vascular compliance (C(T)), arterial compliance (C(A)), and venous compliance (C(V)) in seven control and seven 21-day hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats. These compliance values were calculated under baseline conditions and during an infusion of 0.2 microg*kg(-1)*min(-1) norepinephrine (NE). The change in reservoir volume, which reflects changes in unstressed vascular volume (DeltaV(0)) that occurred upon infusion of NE, was also measured. C(T) and C(V) were larger in HLU rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion (P < 0.05). Infusion of NE decreased C(T) and C(V) by 20% in both HLU and control rats (P < 0.01). C(A) was also significantly decreased in both groups of rats by NE (P < 0.01), but values of C(A) were similar between HLU and control rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion. Additionally, the NE-induced DeltaV(0) was attenuated by 53% in HLU rats compared with control rats (P < 0.05). The larger C(V) and attenuated DeltaV(0) in HLU rats could contribute to a decreased filling pressure during orthostasis and thus may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in stroke volume and cardiac output seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  13. Quantity Discrimination in Domestic Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura; Montrose, V. Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Quantity discrimination involves distinguishing which of two quantities is greater. This discrimination between larger and smaller quantities has only been demonstrated in rats post extensive training. We tested whether domestic rats could perform quantity discrimination without explicit training. We found that rats could distinguish the greater amount in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. Rats could not distinguish between 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. We also found that as the ratio between quantities became finer the choice of the larger quantity decreased. We conclude that rats can perform quantity discrimination without extensive training and that their quantity discrimination ability is influenced by the ratio between quantities. Abstract Quantity discrimination is a basic form of numerical competence where an animal distinguishes which of two amounts is greater in size. Whilst quantity discrimination in rats has been investigated via training paradigms, rats’ natural quantity discrimination abilities without explicit training for a desired response have not been explored. This study investigated domestic rats’ ability to perform quantity discrimination. Domestic rats (n = 12) were examined for their ability to distinguish the larger amount under nine quantity comparisons. One-sample t-tests identified a significant preference for the larger quantity in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. No preference between quantities was found for comparisons of 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. Overall, this study drew two key conclusions. Firstly, that domestic rats are capable of performing quantity discrimination without extensive training. Secondly, as subjects adhered to Weber’s law, it was concluded that the approximate number system underpins domestic rats’ ability to perform spontaneous quantity discrimination. PMID:27527223

  14. Traumatic arteriogenic erectile dysfunction: a rat model.

    PubMed

    El-Sakka, A; Yen, T S; Lin, C S; Lue, T F

    2001-06-01

    We developed a rat model of traumatic arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) for the study of vasculogenic ED. Bilateral ligation of the internal iliac artery was performed on 30 three-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats as an experimental group. The control group consisted of 12 rats which underwent dissection of the internal iliac artery without ligation. Before their euthanization at 3 days, 7 days, and 1 month (10 rats in the experimental group and four rats in the control group at each time point), erectile function was assessed by electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves. Penile tissues were collected for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase staining, trichrome staining, electron microscopy and RT-PCR for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and fibroblast growth factors (FGF) mRNA expression. Electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves revealed a highly significant declining of the intracavernous pressure after 3 and 7 days. No significant recovery of erectile function was noted at 1 month. Histology showed degeneration of the dorsal nerve fibers in all experimental rats. There was little decrease in the bulk of intracavernous smooth muscle in the experimental rats euthanazed 7 and 30 days. NADPH diaphorase staining revealed a significant decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) containing nerve fibers in the dorsal and intracavernosal nerves in all rats in the experimental group. Electron microscopy showed a variety of changes such as collapse of sinusoids, increased cell debris, fibroblast and myofibroblast loss, intracellular deposition of fat and collagen and fatty degeneration. RT-PCR revealed up-regulation of TGF-beta1 after 3 days but not after 7 days or 1 month. There is no significant difference in IGF-I or FGF expression between the experimental and control group. Bilateral ligation of internal iliac arteries produces a reliable animal model for traumatic arteriogenic ED. Further

  15. Can You Find the Rat Holes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Using its rock abrasion tool, otherwise known as 'Rat,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity dotted the slope of 'Endurance Crater' with dimples that give scientists a glimpse into its layered geologic history. This image from the rover's navigation camera, taken on sol 169 (July 15, 2004), highlights the prolific work of the robotic 'rodent.' How many Rat holes can you identify? You will be able to check your answer against an image to be posted soon with all the holes identified.

  16. Finding prefrontal cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Christiana M

    2016-08-15

    The prefrontal cortex of the rat. I. Cortical projection of the mediodorsal nucleus. II. Efferent connections The cortical projection field of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD) was identified in the rat using the Fink-Heimer silver technique for tracing degenerating fibers. Small stereotaxic lesions confined to MD were followed by terminal degeneration in the dorsal bank of the rhinal sulcus (sulcal cortex) and the medial wall of the hemisphere anterior and dorsal to the genu of the corpus callosum (medial cortex). No degenerating fibers were traced to the convexity of the hemisphere. The cortical formation receiving a projection from MD is of a relatively undifferentiated type which had been previously classified as juxtallocortex. A study of the efferent fiber connections of the rat׳s MD-projection cortex demonstrated some similarities to those of monkey prefrontal cortex. A substantial projection to the pretectal area and deep layers of the superior colliculus originates in medial cortex, a connection previously reported for caudal prefrontal (area 8) cortex in the monkey. Sulcal cortex projects to basal olfactory structures and lateral hypothalamus, as does orbital frontal cortex in the monkey. The rat׳s MD-projection cortex differs from that in the monkey in that it lacks a granular layer and appears to have no prominent direct associations with temporal and juxtahippocampal areas. Furthermore, retrograde degeneration does not appear in the rat thalamus after damage to MD-projection areas, suggesting that the striatum or thalamus receives a proportionally larger share of the MD-projection in this animal than it does in the monkey. Comparative behavioral investigations are in progress to investigate functional differences between granular prefrontal cortex in the primate and the relatively primitive MD-projection cortex in the rat. © 1969. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26867704

  17. EVOLUTION: Parasites Make Scaredy-Rats Foolhardy.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, C

    2000-07-28

    In the 7 August issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, researchers offer a striking demonstration of the ability of some parasites to alter the behavior of their hosts for their own benefit. Rats, the intermediate hosts of the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, appear to lose their fear of cats, Toxoplasma's final host, when the parasite infects them. By precisely altering rat brains, the parasite potentially increases its chances of completing its life cycle. PMID:17832058

  18. Marginal Hepatectomy in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Madrahimov, Nodir; Dirsch, Olaf; Broelsch, Christoph; Dahmen, Uta

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Based on the 3-dimensional visualization of vascular supply and drainage, a vessel-oriented resection technique was optimized. The new surgical technique was used to determine the maximal reduction in liver mass enabling a 50% 1-week survival rate. Background Data: Determination of the minimal liver mass is necessary in clinical as well as in experimental liver surgery. In rats, survival seems to depend on the surgical technique applied. Extended hepatectomy with removal of 90% of the liver mass was long regarded as a lethal model. Introduction of a vessel-oriented approach enabled long-term survival in this model. Methods: The lobar and vascular anatomy of rat livers was visualized by plastination of the whole organ, respectively, by corrosion casts of the portal vein, hepatic artery and liver veins. The three-dimensional models were used to extract the underlying anatomic structure. In 90% partial hepatectomy, the liver parenchyma was clamped close to the base of the respective liver lobes (left lateral, median and right, liver lobe). Piercing sutures were placed through the liver parenchyma, so that the stem of portal vein and the accompanying hepatic artery but also the hepatic vein were included. Results: A 1-week survival rate of 100% was achieved after 90% hepatectomy. Extending the procedure to 95% resection by additional removal of the upper caudate lobe led to a 1-week survival rate of 66%; 97% partial hepatectomy, accomplished by additional resection of the lower caudate lobe only leaving the paracaval parts of the liver behind, resulted in 100% lethality within 4 days. Conclusions: Using a anatomically based, vessel-oriented, parenchyma-preserving surgical technique in 95% liver resections led to long-term survival. This represents the maximal reduction of liver mass compatible with survival. PMID:16794393

  19. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sien; Huang, Jianping; Zheng, Liang; Liu, Yanzhi; Liu, Guihua; Li, Nan; Wang, Kuixing; Zou, Liyi; Wu, Tie; Qin, Ling; Cui, Liao; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated whether growing rats were appropriate animal models of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The 3-month-old male rats were treated with either vehicle or prednisone acetate at 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 mg/kg/day by oral gavage, respectively. All rats were injected with tetracycline and calcein before sacrificed for the purpose of double in vivo labeling. Biochemistry, histomorphometry, mechanical test, densitometry, micro-CT, histology, and component analysis were performed. We found that prednisone treatments dose dependently decreased body weight, serum biomarkers, biomechanical markers, bone formation, and bone resorption parameters in both tibial and femoral trabecular bone without trabecular bone loss. We also found that significant bone loss happened in femoral cortical bone in the glucocorticoid-treated rats. The results suggested that prednisone not only inhibited bone formation, but also inhibited bone resorption which resulted in poor bone strength but with no cancellous bone loss in growing rats. These data also suggested that the effects of glucocorticoid on bone metabolism were different between cortical bone and trabecular bone, and different between tibia and femur. Growing rats may be a glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis animal model when evaluated the effects of drugs upon juvenile patients exposed to GC for a long time. PMID:25086673

  20. Vitamin C modulates lead excretion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lihm, Hoseob; Kim, Hyun; Chang, Heekyung; Yoon, Myunghee; Lee, Kayoung

    2013-01-01

    Lead, one of the most toxic heavy metals, takes longer time to be excreted from the body than other heavy metals. The purpose of this study is, by measuring lead excretion via urine and feces, to find out the effect of vitamin C in lead chelation. Thirty-six rats were randomly assorted into four groups. All 33 rats except for the control group were administered with lead, before orally administered with different doses of vitamin C per kilogram of body weight. The lead excretion levels in urine and feces as well as the survival rate were then measured for each group. The rats with lead administrations (10/13, 76.9%) with lead administrations only, 10/11 rats (90.9%) with lead administrations and low dose of vitamin C, 9/9 rats (100%) with lead administrations and high dose of vitamin C survived. Among the 29 surviving rats, low vitamin C intake group exhibited higher urinary excretion than the lead only group. The urinary excretion level in high dose vitamin C intakegroup was significantly higher than the lead only group. In addition, fecal lead excretion seemed to be increased in the high dose vitamin C intake group, compared to the group with lead administrations only with statistical significance. Through animal experiment, it was found out that administrating high dose of vitamin C accelerated the excretion of lead in body compared to low dose of vitamin C. PMID:24386596

  1. Calcitonin treatment of immobilization osteoporosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tuukkanen, J; Jalovaara, P; Väänänen, K

    1991-01-01

    We studied changes in bone mass induced by immobilization and the ability of salmon calcitonin to inhibit immobilization osteoporosis in rat. The bone mass of the immobilized hind leg of rat was compared with the contralateral non-treated leg. Neurectomy and cast immobilization reduced the bone mineral mass to an equal extent. However, the dose-response of calcitonin was different with these immobilization techniques. Calcitonin 15 IU kg-1 administered once daily reduced bone ash weight difference significantly after 2 weeks' neurectomy (P less than 0.001). This had no significant effect on the bone loss induced by cast immobilization, but the dose had to be delivered as two injections given every 12 h. Two weeks' immobilization decreased the incorporation of 45Ca into bones. Calcitonin could not prevent this. However, calcitonin tended to inhibit the overall incorporation of 45Ca into bones in immobilized rats but yet had no effect on 45Ca incorporation in non-immobilized rats. Immobilization decreased serum alkaline phosphatase activity in cast-immobilized animals. Neurectomy did not change serum alkaline phosphatase activity from a sham operation level. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase to total acid phosphatase ratio in the serum increased significantly in neurectomized rats and in cast-immobilized calcitonin-treated rats. PMID:2053438

  2. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed during the conversion of (1 beta-/sup 3/H)androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats.

  3. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  4. Thermoregulation in hypergravity-acclimated rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Conrad B.; Patterson, Susan L.; Horowitz, John M.; Oyama, Jiro

    1989-01-01

    The effect of acclimation to hypergravity on thermoregulatory responses of rats was determined by comparing data on core temperature, T(c), tail temperature, and O2 consumption in rats raised at 1 G (C) and at 2.1 G. It was found that, when C rats were exposed to an ambient temperature of 9 C concurrently with exposure to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell by about 6 C, while in rats acclimated to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell only by 1 C. Results of O2 consumption measurements showed that C rats exposed simultaneously to cold and hypergravity were not activating their thermogenic mechanism sufficiently to prevent a fall in T(c). In other experiments, rats acclimated to either 1 or 2.1 G were found to lack the ability to maintain their T(c) when exposed to a 5.8-G field or when cold-stressed at 1 G for extended times.

  5. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  6. Hematological Characteristics of the BB Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Wright, J R; Yates, A J; Shah, N T; Neff, J C; Covey, D W; Thibert, P

    1983-01-01

    Complete blood counts, differential white blood cell and platelet counts were performed on male and female BB Wistar diabetic rats (BBWd), their nondiabetic siblings (BBWnd) and outbred Wistar rats of the line from which the BB Wistar rats were derived. Most of the observed changes were strain-related (those present in both BBWd and BBWnd but not in control rats) rather than diabetes-related (those in BBWd but neither BBWnd nor control rats) and therefore probably due to the inbreeding process. The BBW strain had significantly lower numbers of white cells and platelets, as well as markedly changed differential white cell counts. Differential counts showed a pattern of lymphopenia, neutrophilia, monocytosis and eosinophilia. It is possible that these white blood cell changes contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection reported for the BBW strain. No significant difference in serum immunoglobulin concentrations was found in any of these three groups of rats. There- fore, hypogammaglobutinemia cannot account for the increased susceptibility to infections, but it is not possible to rule out an abnormality in the distribution of immunoglobulin fractions as an etiological factor. PMID:15311399

  7. Hypergravity modulates behavioral nociceptive responses in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumei, Y.; Shimokawa, R.; Toda, K.; Kawauchi, Y.; Makita, K.; Terasawa, M.; Ohya, K.; Shimokawa, H.

    Hypergravity (2G) exposure elevated the nociceptive threshold (pain suppression) concomitantly with evoked neuronal activity in the hypothalamus. Young Wistar male rats were exposed to 2G by centrifugal rotation for 10 min. Before and after 2G exposure, the nociceptive threshold was measured as the withdrawal reflex by using the von Frey type needle at a total of 8 sites of each rat (nose, four quarters, upper and lower back, tail), and then rats were sacrificed. Fos expression was examined immunohistochemically in the hypothalamic slices of the 2G-treated rats. When rats were exposed to 2G hypergravity, the nociceptive threshold was significantly elevated to approximately 150 to 250% of the 1G baseline control levels in all the examination sites. The 2G hypergravity remarkably induced Fos expression in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei of the hypothalamus. The analgesic effects of 2G hypergravity were attenuated by naloxone pretreatment. Data indicate that hypergravity induces analgesic effects in rats, mediated through hypothalamic neuronal activity in the endogenous opioid system and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  8. Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats Exposed to Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Nigel A.; Lopez, Veronica L.; Bautista, Arjel D.; Mizisin, Leah M.; Torres, Brenda R.; Shroads, Albert L.; Mizisin, Andrew P.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of dichloroacetate (DCA) for treating patients with mitochondrial diseases is limited by the induction of peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms of DCA-induced neuropathy are not known. Oral DCA treatment (50–500 mg/kg/day for up to 16 weeks) induced tactile allodynia in both juvenile and adult rats; concurrent thermal hypoalgesia developed at higher doses. Both juvenile and adult rats treated with DCA developed nerve conduction slowing that was more pronounced in adult rats. No overt axonal or glial cell abnormalities were identified in peripheral nerves or spinal cord of any DCA-treated rats but morphometric analysis identified a reduction of mean axonal caliber of peripheral nerve myelinated fibers. DCA treatment also caused accumulation of oxidative stress markers in the nerves. These data indicate that behavioral, functional and structural indices of peripheral neuropathy may be induced in both juvenile and adult rats treated with DCA at doses similar to those in clinical use. DCA-induced peripheral neuropathy primarily afflicts axons and involves both metabolic and structural disorders. The DCA-treated rat may provide insight into the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy and facilitate development of adjuvant therapeutics to prevent this disorder that currently restricts the clinical use of DCA. PMID:19680144

  9. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  10. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  11. Hemagglutination by Pasteurellaceae isolated from rodents.

    PubMed

    Boot, R; Thuis, H; Teppema, J S

    1993-06-01

    Pasteurellaceae notably P. pneumotropica, have been associated with severe outbreaks of respiratory disease in several species of rodents. Host-specific parasitism of Pasteurellaceae in rodents has hardly been studied. Since host tropism in many bacteria involves adhesive mechanisms, we examined the hemagglutinating (HA) properties of 44 isolates from different rodent species (mouse (15) rat (8), hamster (9), gerbil (10) and Mastomys (2)). Only 13 mouse isolates and the 2 Mastomys isolates hemagglutinated human (type O Rh+) and canine red blood cells (RBCs). No HA was found using RBCs from 10 other animal species. HA was not inhibited by simple sugars and glycoconjugates, but was completely inhibited by heating of bacterial cells for 10 min at 80 or 100 degrees C, partially inhibited by glutaraldehyde and inhibited in a dose-dependent mode by NaIO4, suggesting the involvement of bacterial polysaccharide structures in the HA process. Enrichment procedures did not reveal the presence of HA- subpopulations in HA+ isolates or the presence of HA+ subpopulations in HA- isolates. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of fimbriae both in HA+ and HA- isolates. A regularly structured (RS) layer was detected on cells of part of the HA+ isolates only. Our results suggest that Pasteurellaceae of mice and Mastomys may be related and differ from isolates isolated from other rodent species. PMID:8219497

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN RATS FOLLOWING NEONATAL INOCULATION WITH A RAT-ADAPTED INFLUENZA VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal F344 rats were infected with a rat-adapted influenza virus (RAIV) as a potential model to study the combined effects of early life viral respiratory infection with air pollutant dosimetry and toxic responses, as well as on the development of respiratory disease and incre...

  13. Effects of land use on plague (Yersinia pestis) activity in rodents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Douglas J; Salkeld, Daniel J; Young, Hillary S; Makundi, Rhodes; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Eckerlin, Ralph P; Lambin, Eric F; Gaffikin, Lynne; Barry, Michele; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of land-use change on zoonotic disease risk is a pressing global health concern. Here, we compare prevalence of Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, in rodents across two land-use types-agricultural and conserved-in northern Tanzania. Estimated abundance of seropositive rodents nearly doubled in agricultural sites compared with conserved sites. This relationship between land-use type and abundance of seropositive rodents is likely mediated by changes in rodent and flea community composition, particularly via an increase in the abundance of the commensal species, Mastomys natalensis, in agricultural habitats. There was mixed support for rodent species diversity negatively impacting Y. pestis seroprevalence. Together, these results suggest that land-use change could affect the risk of local transmission of plague, and raise critical questions about transmission dynamics at the interface of conserved and agricultural habitats. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding disease ecology in the context of rapidly proceeding landscape change. PMID:25711606

  14. Effects of Land Use on Plague (Yersinia pestis) Activity in Rodents in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Douglas J.; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Young, Hillary S.; Makundi, Rhodes; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Eckerlin, Ralph P.; Lambin, Eric F.; Gaffikin, Lynne; Barry, Michele; Helgen, Kristofer M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of land-use change on zoonotic disease risk is a pressing global health concern. Here, we compare prevalence of Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, in rodents across two land-use types—agricultural and conserved—in northern Tanzania. Estimated abundance of seropositive rodents nearly doubled in agricultural sites compared with conserved sites. This relationship between land-use type and abundance of seropositive rodents is likely mediated by changes in rodent and flea community composition, particularly via an increase in the abundance of the commensal species, Mastomys natalensis, in agricultural habitats. There was mixed support for rodent species diversity negatively impacting Y. pestis seroprevalence. Together, these results suggest that land-use change could affect the risk of local transmission of plague, and raise critical questions about transmission dynamics at the interface of conserved and agricultural habitats. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding disease ecology in the context of rapidly proceeding landscape change. PMID:25711606

  15. Novel Arenavirus Sequences in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus from Côte d'Ivoire: Implications for Evolution of Arenaviruses in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Stéphane K.; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Rieger, Toni; Ölschläger, Stephan; Dosso, Hernri; Denys, Christiane; ter Meulen, Jan; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify new arenaviruses and gather insights in the evolution of arenaviruses in Africa. During 2003 through 2005, 1,228 small mammals representing 14 different genera were trapped in 9 villages in south, east, and middle west of Côte d'Ivoire. Specimens were screened by pan-Old World arenavirus RT-PCRs targeting S and L RNA segments as well as immunofluorescence assay. Sequences of two novel tentative species of the family Arenaviridae, Menekre and Gbagroube virus, were detected in Hylomyscus sp. and Mus (Nannomys) setulosus, respectively. Arenavirus infection of Mus (Nannomys) setulosus was also demonstrated by serological testing. Lassa virus was not found, although 60% of the captured animals were Mastomys natalensis. Complete S RNA and partial L RNA sequences of the novel viruses were recovered from the rodent specimens and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Gbagroube virus is a closely related sister taxon of Lassa virus, while Menekre virus clusters with the Ippy/Mobala/Mopeia virus complex. Reconstruction of possible virus–host co-phylogeny scenarios suggests that, within the African continent, signatures of co-evolution might have been obliterated by multiple host-switching events. PMID:21695269

  16. Lassa fever: review of epidemiology and epizootiology

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic ecology of Lassa fever appears to involve enzootic transmission of virus in commensal populations of a single murine species, Mastomys natalensis. Virus may spill over from the rodent cycle to man by various routes. Secondary spread between humans may occur within domiciliary groups, and persons infected within the community who develop clinical disease may introduce the virus into hospital and begin a cycle of nosocomial infection. Between 1969, when Lassa fever was first described, and June 1975, the disease was recognized on 9 discrete occasions, affecting 114 persons. Over one-third of these infections were acquired by person-to-person spread within hospitals. In only one outbreak (in Sierra Leone) were the majority of cases acquired in the community. Recent observations have indicated hyperendemic disease in eastern Sierra Leone. Cases have occurred in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and serological evidence exists for activity of the virus elsewhere in West and Central Africa. Seasonal factors appear to play a role in the appearance of human cases. Attack rates have been higher in adults than in children. The source of infection and potential routes of virus transmission in the various epidemics are discussed, and perspectives for future epidemiological research are presented. PMID:782738

  17. Spatial Segregation between Invasive and Native Commensal Rodents in an Urban Environment: A Case Study in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Garba, Madougou; Dalecky, Ambroise; Kadaoure, Ibrahima; Kane, Mamadou; Hima, Karmadine; Veran, Sophie; Gagare, Sama; Gauthier, Philippe; Tatard, Caroline; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2014-01-01

    Invasive rodents have been responsible for the diffusion worldwide of many zoonotic agents, thus representing major threats for public health. Cities are important hubs for people and goods exchange and are thus expected to play a pivotal role in invasive commensal rodent dissemination. Yet, data about urban rodents' ecology, especially invasive vs. native species interactions, are dramatically scarce. Here, we provide results of an extensive survey of urban rodents conducted in Niamey, Niger, depicting the early stages of rodent bioinvasions within a city. We explore the species-specific spatial distributions throughout the city using contrasted approaches, namely field sampling, co-occurrence analysis, occupancy modelling and indicator geostatistics. We show that (i) two species (i.e. rural-like vs. truly commensal) assemblages can be identified, and that (ii) within commensal rodents, invasive (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) and native (Mastomys natalensis) species are spatially segregated. Moreover, several pieces of arguments tend to suggest that these exclusive distributions reflect an ongoing native-to-invasive species turn over. The underlying processes as well as the possible consequences for humans are discussed. PMID:25379785

  18. Lassa virus isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast represent an emerging fifth lineage

    PubMed Central

    Manning, John T.; Forrester, Naomi; Paessler, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Previous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus (LASV) among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for LF is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each LASV isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200–300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa. PMID:26483768

  19. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens. PMID:15457145

  20. Advanced vaccine candidates for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  1. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF). LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever) with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered. PMID:23202493

  2. Mapping the zoonotic niche of Lassa fever in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mylne, Adrian Q. N.; Pigott, David M.; Longbottom, Joshua; Shearer, Freya; Duda, Kirsten A.; Messina, Jane P.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Golding, Nick; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa fever is a viral haemorrhagic illness responsible for disease outbreaks across West Africa. It is a zoonosis, with the primary reservoir species identified as the Natal multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis. The host is distributed across sub-Saharan Africa while the virus' range appears to be restricted to West Africa. The majority of infections result from interactions between the animal reservoir and human populations, although secondary transmission between humans can occur, particularly in hospital settings. Methods Using a species distribution model, the locations of confirmed human and animal infections with Lassa virus (LASV) were used to generate a probabilistic surface of zoonotic transmission potential across sub-Saharan Africa. Results Our results predict that 37.7 million people in 14 countries, across much of West Africa, live in areas where conditions are suitable for zoonotic transmission of LASV. Four of these countries, where at-risk populations are predicted, have yet to report any cases of Lassa fever. Conclusions These maps act as a spatial guide for future surveillance activities to better characterise the geographical distribution of the disease and understand the anthropological, virological and zoological interactions necessary for viral transmission. Combining this zoonotic niche map with detailed patient travel histories can aid differential diagnoses of febrile illnesses, enabling a more rapid response in providing care and reducing the risk of onward transmission. PMID:26085474

  3. Lassa fever in West African sub-region: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, O; Ajuluchukwu, E; Uneke, C J

    2007-03-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral zoonotic illness caused by Lassa virus, an arenavirus known to be responsible for a severe haemorrhagic fever characterised by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and, chest and abdominal pain. The virus exhibits persistent, asymptomatic infection with profuse urinary virus excretion in the ubiquitous rodent vector, Mastomys natalensis. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and has been reported from Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and Nigeria. Some studies indicate that 300,000 to 500,000 cases of Lassa fever and 5000 deaths occur yearly across West Africa. Studies reported in English, that investigated Lassa fever with reference to West Africa were identified using the Medline Entrez-PubMed search and were used for this review. The scarcity of resources available for health care delivery system and the political instability that characterise the West African countries would continue to impede efforts for the control of Lassa fever in the sub-region. There is need for adequate training of health care workers regarding diagnostics, intensive care of patients under isolation, contact tracing, adequate precautionary measures in handling infectious laboratory specimens, control of the vector as well as care and disposal of infectious waste. PMID:17378212

  4. Sequence homology between RNAs encoding rat alpha-fetoprotein and rat serum albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Jagodzinski, L L; Sargent, T D; Yang, M; Glackin, C; Bonner, J

    1981-01-01

    We have determined the sequences of the recombinant DNA inserts of three bacterial plasmid cDNA clones containing most of the rat alpha a-fetoprotein mRNA. The resultant nucleotide sequence of alpha-fetoprotein was exhaustively compared to the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA encoding rat serum albumin. These two mRNAs have extensive homology (50%) throughout and the same intron locations. The amino acid sequence of rat alpha-fetoprotein has been deduced from the nucleotide sequence, and its comparison to rat serum albumin's amino acid sequence reveals a 34% homology. The regularly spaced positions of the cysteines found in serum albumin are conserved in rat alpha-fetoprotein, indicating that these two proteins may have a similar secondary folding structure. These homologies indicate that alpha-fetoprotein and serum albumin were derived by duplication of a common ancestral gene and constitute a gene family. PMID:6167988

  5. Social Structure Predicts Genital Morphology in African Mole-Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seney, Marianne L.; Kelly, Diane A.; Goldman, Bruce D.; Šumbera, Radim; Forger, Nancy G.

    2009-01-01

    Background African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) exhibit a wide range of social structures, from solitary to eusocial. We previously found a lack of sex differences in the external genitalia and morphology of the perineal muscles associated with the phallus in the eusocial naked mole-rat. This was quite surprising, as the external genitalia and perineal muscles are sexually dimorphic in all other mammals examined. We hypothesized that the lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats might be related to their unusual social structure. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genitalia and perineal muscles in three African mole-rat species: the naked mole-rat, the solitary silvery mole-rat, and the Damaraland mole-rat, a species considered to be eusocial, but with less reproductive skew than naked mole-rats. Our findings support a relationship between social structure, mating system, and sexual differentiation. Naked mole-rats lack sex differences in genitalia and perineal morphology, silvery mole-rats exhibit sex differences, and Damaraland mole-rats are intermediate. Conclusions/Significance The lack of sex differences in naked mole-rats is not an attribute of all African mole-rats, but appears to have evolved in relation to their unusual social structure and reproductive biology. PMID:19829697

  6. Intermittent heat exposure and thirst in rats.

    PubMed

    Barney, Christopher C; Kuhrt, David M

    2016-04-01

    Adequate water intake, supporting both cardiovascular function and evaporative cooling, is a critical factor in mitigating the effects of heat waves, which are expected to increase with global warming. However, the regulation of water intake during periods of intermittent heat exposure is not well understood. In this study, the effects of access to water or no access during intermittent heat exposure were assessed using male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 37.5°C for 4 h/day. After 7 days of intermittent heat exposure, reductions in evaporative water loss were observed in all animals and reductions in water intake following heat exposure occurred as the days of heat exposure increased. Rats that were not allowed water during the 7 days of exposure had decreased rehydration levels, however, rats allowed access to water increased water intake during exposure and exhibited higher overall rehydration levels over the same time period. Peripheral administration of angiotensinII, mimicking activation of volemic thirst, or hypertonic saline solution, activating intracellular thirst, did not result in alteration of water intake in rats exposed to heat with access to water compared to control rats. In contrast, rats exposed to heat without access to water had reduced water intake after administration of hypertonic saline and increased water intake after administration of angiotensinIIcompared to control rats. These experiments demonstrate that thirst responses to intermittent heat exposure are altered by providing water during heat exposure and that intermittent heat exposure without access to water alters drinking responses to both intracellular and extracellular thirst challenges. PMID:27095836

  7. Neighborhood Rats as Depressing as Crime, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157831.html Neighborhood Rats as Depressing as Crime, Study Finds Research suggests ... 17, 2016 THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rat infestations may harm the mental health of people ...

  8. Effect of simulated weightlessness on energy metabolism in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. P.; Sykes, H. A.; Crownover, J. C.; Schatte, C. L.; Simmons, J. B., II; Jordan, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Results of measurements of food uptake and body weight changes occurring in rats suspended from a harness so that the antigravity muscles were not used for locomotion are presented. The rats were tested in pairs, with both in a harness but only one suspended off its hind legs; this section lasted 7 days. A second phase of the experiment involved feeding the nonsuspended rat the same amount of food the experimental rat had consumed the previous day. All rats experienced decreased in body weight and food intake in the first stage, while in the second stage the suspended rat lost more weight. The total oxygen uptake, CO2 output, and rate of C-14O2 production were depressed in the suspended rats, then returned to normal levels once the rats were back on the ground. It is concluded that the gross metabolic processes are unaffected by simulated weightlessness.

  9. High prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus in wild rats in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Guan, Dawei; Su, Juan; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Li, Tian-Cheng; Ke, Chang Wen

    2013-08-30

    Serum samples from a total of 713 wild rats captured in Zhanjiang city in China from December 2011 to September 2012 were investigated for the prevalence of rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) by exploring rat HEV-specific antibodies and RNA. By an ELISA based on recombinant rat HEV-like particles (HEV-LPs), 23.3% (166/713) of the rats were positive for anti-HEV IgG, and 8.3% (59/713) were positive for anti-HEV IgM. The IgG-positive rates in Rattus norvegicus, Bandicota indica, Rattus flavipectus, Rattus rattoides losea, and Rattus rattus hainanus, were 27.8% (64/230), 23.0% (40/174), 19.9% (34/171), 21.5% (26/121), and 11.8% (2/17), while the IgM-positive rates were 8.3% (19/230), 6.9% (12/174), 8.2% (14/171), 10.7% (13/121), and 5.9% (1/17), respectively. The IgG-positive rate of the rats captured in rural areas, 24.1% (84/348), was higher than that in the central area of Zhanjiang city, 15.1% (32/212). The highest IgG-positive rates, as high as 45.3% (39/86), were detected in wild rats trapped in the garbage dump. Twelve of the 59 IgM-positive serum samples were positive for HEV RNA, which was detected in all of the wild rat species except R. rattus hainanus. A phylogenetic analysis of the partial genome of rat HEV ORF1 indicated that all of the 12 HEV strains belong to rat HEV, and no other genotype HEV were detected. The rat HEV from Zhangjiang city could be classified into three separated clusters, suggesting that the infection due to rat HEV with a variety of genome entities occurs extensively among wild rats in China. PMID:23623690

  10. An experimental task to examine the mirror system in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yuji; Ukezono, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    The mirror system in the brain is considered to be a neural basis of sociality, but previous studies have been limited to primates. Here we report an experimental task to examine the mirror system in rats. We show that a rat could reach to a pellet and grasp and eat it in front of another rat that was observing the reaching, which indicates that the task will enable us to start exploring the rat mirror system. PMID:25323637

  11. Urea synthesis in rats fed diet containing kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Scislowski, P W; Grant, G; Harris, I; Pickard, K; Pusztai, A

    1992-10-01

    When rats were fed a diet containing kidney bean (Phaesolus vulgaris) urea excretion was increased 3-5 fold. Isolated liver mitochondria from rats fed the kidney bean diet produced 40% more citrulline in the presence of arginine than mitochondria isolated from control rats. Mitochondrial activities of urea cycle enzymes and N-acetylglutamate synthetase were similar in animals fed diets containing kidney bean or lactalbumin. The possible mechanisms causing acute urea production in rats fed with kidney bean are discussed. PMID:1445392

  12. Nigella Sativa reverses osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis poses a significant public health issue. It is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to increased risk of fracture. There is a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. About 33% of women over 50 will experience bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Nigella Sativa (NS) has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone and joint diseases. The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of Nigella Sativa on osteoporosis produced by ovariectomy in rats. Methods Female Wistar rats aged 12–14 months were divided into three groups: sham-operated control (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized supplemented with nigella sativa (OVX-NS) orally for 12 weeks; 4 weeks before ovariectomy and 8 weeks after. After 12 weeks, plasma levels of calcium (Ca+2), phosphorous (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrates, nitric oxide surrogate, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Histological examination of the liver and the tibia was conducted. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia was also performed. Results OVX rats showed significant decrease in plasma Ca+2, accompanied by a significant increase in plasma ALP, amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, MDA, nitrates, TNF-α and IL-6. These changes were reversed by NS supplementation in OVX-NS group to be near SHAM levels. Histological examination of the tibias revealed discontinuous eroded bone trabeculae with widened bone marrow spaces in OVX rats accompanied by a significant decrease in both cortical and trabecular bone thickness compared to Sham rats. These parameters were markedly reversed in OVX-NS rats. Histological examination of the liver showed mononuclear cellular infiltration and congestion of blood vessels at the portal area in OVX rats which were not found

  13. Opioids and rat erythrocyte deformability.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D L; Wei, L X; Lin, E T; Rezvani, A; Way, E L

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was noted that opioids in vitro reduced human red blood cell deformability. The effect was found to be dose-dependent, naloxone reversible and preferentially selective kappa ligands exhibited the highest potency. To extend these findings studies were carried out using rat erythrocytes. The time required for erythrocytes to pass through a 5.0 um pore membrane was determined and used as an index of deformability. Opioids added in vitro produced inhibition of deformability in a dose-dependent, naloxone reversible manner. Injecting naive animals with morphine or nalbuphine also produced dose related reductions in red cell deformability. The degree of inhibition produced by nalbuphine correlated well with its plasma concentrations as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chronic morphine treatment by pellet implantation resulted in the development of tolerance as evidenced by a loss in the ability of morphine in vitro to inhibit red cell deformability. Addition of naloxone resulted in a decrease in filtration time. Thus, the data confirm and extend previous findings on human red blood cells. In as much as previous data from this laboratory demonstrated that opioids inhibit calcium flux from erythrocytes by inhibiting calcium-ATPase and calcium efflux is necessary for normal deformability, it is concluded that opioids act to reduce red cell deformability by inhibition of the calcium pump. PMID:3123933

  14. Opiates and cerebral functional activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trusk, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral activity was measured using the free-fatty acid (1-/sup 14/C) octanoate as a fast functional tracer in conscious, unrestrained rats 5 minutes after intravenous injection of heroin, cocaine or saline vehicle. Regional changes of octanoate labeling density in the autoradiograms relative to saline-injected animals were used to determine the functional activity effects of each drug. Heroin and cocaine each produced a distinctive pattern of activity increases and suppression throughout the rat brain. Similar regional changes induced by both drugs were found in limbic brain regions implicated in drug reinforcement. Labeled octanoate autoradiography was used to measure the cerebral functional response to a tone that had previously been paired to heroin injections. Rats were trained in groups of three consisting of one heroin self-administration animal, and two animals receiving yoked infusion of heroin or saline. A tone was paired with each infusion during training. Behavioral experiments in similarly trained rats demonstrated that these training conditions impart secondary reinforcing properties to the tone in animals previously self-administering heroin, while the tone remains behaviorally neutral in yoked-infusion rats. Cerebral functional activity was measured during presentation of the tone without drug infusion. Octanoate labeling density changed in fifteen brain areas in response to the tone previously paired to heroin without response contingency. Labeling density was significantly modified in sixteen regions as a result of previously pairing the tone to response-contingent heroin infusions.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Shepard, R M; Falkner, F C

    1990-01-01

    After intravenous or oral administration to rats and dogs, azithromycin was rapidly distributed into the tissues, where concentrations frequently exceeded those in serum by 100-fold or more within 24 h of a single dose. Tissue concentrations were proportional to the dose following single administrations of 10 to 40 mg/kg in rats and dogs. Tissue concentrations were higher after multiple dosing and became greater as the dose was increased from 10 to 40 mg/kg. Elimination half-lives were similar in most tissues and were about 40 h in rats after seven doses of 20 mg/kg and about 90 h in dogs after five doses of 30 mg/kg. Serum concentrations declined in a multi-exponential manner, reflecting initial rapid distribution into tissues and then slow return to serum from tissues. Azithromycin had good oral bioavailability in rats and dogs (46% and 97%, respectively). Rapid uptake of azithromycin by tissues from serum and slow redistribution from tissues to serum are apparently factors governing the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in rats and dogs. Serum concentrations do not reflect the availability of azithromycin in tissues. PMID:2154438

  16. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  17. Glutathione system in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Arunkumar, Sundaram; Sirajudeen, K N S; Singh, H J

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) forms a part of the antioxidant system that plays a vital role in preventing oxidative stress, and an imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system has been linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the GSH system in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Components of the GSH system, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and total GSH content, were measured in the kidneys of 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Systolic blood pressure of SHR was significantly higher from the age of 6 weeks onwards compared with age-matched WKY rats. GPx activity in the SHR was significantly lower from the age of 8 weeks onwards when compared to that in age-matched WKY rats. No significant differences were evident in the GPx-1 protein abundance, and its relative mRNA levels, GR, GST activity, and total GSH content between SHR and age-matched WKY rats. The lower GPx activity suggests of an impairment of the GSH system in the SHR, which might be due to an abnormality in its protein rather than non-availability of a cofactor. Its role in the development of hypertension in SHR however remains unclear. PMID:20680541

  18. Radioimmunoimaging of pneumocystis carinii infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Shane, L.B.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Lipszyc, H.; Walzer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinil pneumonia (PCP) is seen in patients with impaired immunity due to chemotherapeutic suppression or to a primary disorder, congenital or AIDS. Although radiogallium imaging has been helpful in the workup of PCP, it is non-specific. Since there is no early specific non-invasive method to diagnose PCP, the authors are developing an imaging technique using radiolabeled antibodies. Fulminant PCP was induced in rats by injecting cortisone, 20mg 2-3 times/wk for 8 wks. PC cells isolated from rat lung were injected into rabbits. The antiserum thus derived was separated and purified using Protein-A bound sepharose column with identification of IgG by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both rabbit antipneumocystis antibodies and purified IgG(Sigma) were iodinated with I-131 to a high specific activity (3-5..mu..Ci/ug) using a lactoperoxidase method. /sup 131/I-labeled specific and non-specific IgG were injected into rats with PC infection and imaged with an Anger camera. After sacrifice, I-131 activity/gram tissue (lung, liver, heart) was determined and expressed as organ ratios. An increased uptake of specific antibody in lungs of rats with PCP was demonstrated by organ counting and imaging. This increase was not seen in normal controls or rats injected with non-specific IgG. These data provide a basis for radioimmunoimaging of infectious diseases.

  19. Group G streptococcal lymphadenitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Corning, B F; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    1991-12-01

    Group G streptococci which have been isolated from the oral flora of rats are also normal inhabitants of the human skin, oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. This group of streptococci can cause a wide variety of clinical diseases in humans, including septicemia, pharyngitis, endocarditis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Ten days after oral gavage with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, 12 of 22 two-month-old, female, outbred, viral-antibody-free rats presented with red ocular and nasal discharges and marked swelling of the cervical region. Various degrees of firm, nonpitting edema in the region of the cervical lymph nodes and salivary glands as well as pale mucous membranes and dehydration were observed. Pure cultures of beta-hemolytic streptococci were obtained from the cervical lymph nodes of three rats that were necropsied. A rapid latex test system identified the isolates to have group G-specific antigen. These streptococcal isolates fermented trehalose and lactose but not sorbitol and inulin and did not hydrolize sodium hippurate or bile esculin. A Voges-Proskauer test was negative for all six isolates. Serologic tests to detect the presence of immunoglobulin G antibody to rat viral pathogens and Mycoplasma pulmonis were negative. Histopathologic changes included acute necrotizing inflammation of the cervical lymph nodes with multiple large colonies of coccoid bacteria at the perimeter of the necrotiz zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring disease attributed to group G streptococci in rats. PMID:1757539

  20. On the rat model of human osteopenias and osteoporoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Harold M.; Jee, Webster S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The idea that rats cannot model human osteopenias errs. The same mechanisms control gains in bone mass (longitudinal bone growth and modeling drifts) and losses (BMU-based remodeling), in young and aged rats and humans. Furthermore, they respond similarly in rats and man to mechanical influences, hormones, drugs and other agents.

  1. Estimation of restraint stress in rats using salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Takimura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    The rat is an ideal model animal for studying physical and psychological stresses. Recent human studies have shown that salivary amylase activity is a useful biomarker of stress in our social life. To estimate the usefulness of amylase activity as a biomarker of stress in rats, we analyzed changes in physiological parameters including amylase activity and anatomical variables, which were induced by a mild restraint of paws (10 min, 3 times/week, 9 weeks). The quantities of food and water intake and excretion amount of the stress rats were smaller than those of the control rats during the experimental period (5-13 weeks). The body weight of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats. Moreover, the enlargement of the adrenal gland was confirmed in the stress rats, indicating that the mild restraint caused a chronic stress response. The amylase activities of the stress rats were significantly greater than those of the control rats at 5 weeks of age. However, the amylase activity of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats after 6 weeks of age. These results indicate that amylase activity is increased by acute stress and reduced by chronic stress, which is caused by repeated restraint stress. In conclusion, amylase activity is a useful biomarker of acute and chronic stresses in rats. PMID:22753135

  2. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  3. Deficits in reproductive behaviour in septally lesioned female rats.

    PubMed

    Gogate, M G; Brid, S V; Wingkar, K C

    1991-12-01

    Estrous cycle and sexual behaviour were studied in septally lesioned female albino Wistar rats. In lesioned rats the vaginal smears showed continuous diestrus and the females failed to exhibit sexual receptivity during the postoperative period. Ovarian and uterine weights in lesioned rats were also significantly decreased. The results suggest that the septal nuclei exert a modulatory influence on female sexual behaviour. PMID:1816101

  4. Fetal rat pancreas transplantation in BB rats: immunohistochemical and functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yderstraede, K B; Starklint, H; Steinbruchel, D; Jørgensen, T W; Gotfredsen, C F

    1993-01-01

    Spontaneously diabetic BB/Wor rats received either a syngeneic fetal pancreas transplant or adult islets. In the former, 4-8 fetal pancreases were transplanted, and in the latter, 3-5000 islets. Transplantation was performed by transferring a blood clot containing the pancreases or islets to the renal subcapsular space. Insulin therapy was undertaken postoperatively, except in one experiment with adult islets. Of the fetal pancreas transplanted BB rats, 52% became normoglycaemic, and 21% remained so throughout an observation period of 10 months. Nephrectomy caused a prompt return of diabetes. The histological appearance of the grafts transplanted to the diabetic animals closely resembled that of grafts transplanted to normal rats in a parallel series. For comparison a group of BB rats received a syngeneic transplant of isolated adult islets from WF rats or BBW rats. Following adult islet transplantation, 5 out of 6 animals became hyperglycaemic after a median of 20.5 days when no insulin was given post-transplantation. Four out of 5 animals became hyperglycaemic after a median of 23 days when supportive insulin therapy was administered after the transplantation. The results indicate that recurrent diabetes is not inevitable following syngeneic fetal pancreas transplantation to spontaneously diabetic BB rats. Recurrent diabetes was only occasionally associated with mononuclear cell infiltration. Transplanted tissue was well-preserved and vascularized; mega-islets were a constant finding. PMID:8401812

  5. Rat sequences of the Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma virus genomes: nature, origin, and expression in rat tumor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G R; Robbins, K C

    1976-01-01

    Two murine sarcoma viruses, the Kirsten and the Harvey, were isolated by passage of mouse type C leukemia viruses through rats. These sarcoma viruses have genomes containing portions of their parental type C mouse leukemia virus genomes, in stable association with specific rat cellular sequences that we find to be quite likely not those of a rat type C leukemia virus. To determine if these murine sarcoma viruses provide a model relevant to the events occurring in spontaneous tumors, we have hybridized DNA and RNA prepared from rat tumors and normal rat tissues to [3H]DNA prepared from the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. We have also hybridized these rat tissue nucleic acids to [3H]DNA prepared from a respresentative endogenous rat type C leukemia virus, the WFU (Wistar-Furth). Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected in the DNA of both tumor and normal tissues, with no evidence of either gene amplification or additional sequences being present in tumor DNA. Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected at elevated concentrations in the RNA of many rat tumors and in specific groups of normal tissues. PMID:176419

  6. Metabolic neural mapping in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    DiRocco, R.J.; Hall, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Functional neural mapping by /sup 14/C-deoxyglucose autoradiography in adult rats has shown that increases in neural metabolic rate that are coupled to increased neurophysiological activity are more evident in axon terminals and dendrites than neuron cell bodies. Regions containing architectonically well-defined concentrations of terminals and dendrites (neuropil) have high metabolic rates when the neuropil is physiologically active. In neonatal rats, however, we find that regions containing well-defined groupings of neuron cell bodies have high metabolic rates in /sup 14/C-deoxyglucose autoradiograms. The striking difference between the morphological appearance of /sup 14/C-deoxyglucose autoradiograms obtained from neonatal and adult rats is probably related to developmental changes in morphometric features of differentiating neurons, as well as associated changes in type and locus of neural work performed.

  7. Small intestine biopotentials in rats after hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Stanciu, C.

    To study the effect of hypokinesia on rats small intestine (jejunum and ileum) biopotentials it was first necessary to characterize it. Biopotentials were recorded by intracellular placed microelectrodes from oral and caudal segments of the small intestine. The character of rats small intestine biopotentials differs from that of other species (man, cat, rabbit, dog, e.a.), the slow waves (SW) being smaller and the frequency of basal electrical rhythm higher (31.23 c/min orally and 24.50 caudally). Spike potentials are inscribed on the descending slope of SW but frequently delayed in each successive wave with a regular interval. Hypokinesia obtained by keeping rats in small cages for two weeks create only little changes in intestine biopotentials. The only clear difference was the increase of the slow waves amplitude. The other parameters were not specifically changed.

  8. Placentophagia in Weanling Female Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kaitlyn M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Placentophagia is common in parturient mammals and offers physiological and behavioral advantages for mothers. In natural environments, weanlings are often present during the birth of younger siblings, but it is unknown if weanling rats are placentophagic or prefer placenta over other substances. To examine this, primiparous rats were remated during the postpartum estrus and weanling females remained in the nest during their mother’s next parturition. Continuous observation revealed that 58% of weanlings were placentophagic. To determine if this placentophagia occurs away from parturient mothers, weanling females still living in their natal nest were offered placenta, liver, or cake frosting in a novel chamber. They ingested more placenta and liver than frosting. Thus, many weanling female laboratory rats are placentophagic during birth of younger siblings but do not selectively prefer placenta when tested outside their natal nest. Consequences of placentophagia by weanlings are unknown, but it may promote their alloparenting or postpartum mothering. PMID:24604548

  9. Body temperature regulation and thermoneutrality in rats.

    PubMed

    Poole, S; Stephenson, J D

    1977-04-01

    Various concepts of thermoneutrality were considered for a proposed study of the role of hypothalamic amines in temperature regulation of rats. The classic definition, the ambient temperature over which metabolic rate is minimum and constant, gave a range of approximately 28 to 32 degrees C. However, within this temperature range rats were inactive, the inactivity apparently representing a behavioural response to heat stress and itself responsible for the reduced metabolic rate; certain thermoregulatory effectors were also activated to increase heat loss. Therefore an alternative range, 18.0 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.D.) to 28.1 +/- 1.0 degrees C, was defined in which rats displayed normal activity, behavioural thermoregulations being absent. PMID:585477

  10. Vitelline cyst in the rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Oshikata, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Azusa; Kumabe, Shino; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Katoku, Koshirou; Mitsuishi, Mikio; Kanno, Takeshi; Hamamura, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Congenital vitelline duct anomalies other than Meckel’s diverticulum are rare in animals. A cyst of approximately 8 mm in diameter was observed on the antimesenteric surface of the ileal serosa in a 10-week-old female Crl:CD(SD) rat. Microscopically, the cyst closely resembled the ileum, but it did not communicate with the ileal lumen. We diagnosed this case as a vitelline cyst derived from the vitelline duct based on the location where it developed and its histological behavior. In rats, only Meckel’s diverticulum has been reported with a congenital anomaly of the vitelline duct, and no other spontaneous anomalies including a vitelline cyst have been reported. This case may be the first report concerning a vitelline cyst in the rat ileum. PMID:26538812

  11. Opportunity Leaves a Trail of 'Rat' Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool, known informally as the 'Rat,' has nibbled seven holes into the slope of 'Endurance Crater.' This image from the rover's navigation camera was released previously (PIA06716) without the Rat holes labeled so that viewers could try to find the holes themselves. Here, the holes have been identified. Starting from the uppermost pictured (closest to the crater rim) to the lowest, the Rat hole targets are: 'Tennessee,' 'Cobblehill,' 'Virginia,' 'London,' 'Grindstone,' 'Kettlestone,' and 'Drammensfjorden.' These holes were drilled on sols 138 (June 13, 2004), 143 (June 18), 145 (June 20), 148 (June 23), 151 (June 26), 153 (June 28) and 161 (July 7), respectively. Each hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

  12. Weight control and restraint of laboratory rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Van Breda Kolff, K.

    1979-01-01

    The use of restrained and confined rats in some procedures used in combustion toxicology introduces the problems of obtaining rats of the appropriate size for the apparatus, and of identifying any artifacts resulting from the use of restraint alone. Feeding studies indicate that controlled feeding of fast-growing strains such as the Sprague-Dawley can hold rat size essentially constant for significant periods of time. The undesirable aspects are the need to cage the animals individually, with resultant psychological as well as metabolic effects. Restraint studies of slow-growing strains such as the Fischer 344 indicate that denying access to food and water for periods of several hours at a time interrupts normal gain only temporarily.

  13. Ozone dosimetry predictions for humans and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C.; McCurdy, T.R.; Richmond, H.M.

    1990-11-01

    The report summarizes ozone (O3) dosimetry model predictions for rats and humans under several different scenarios based on the most recent empirical data and theoretical considerations in the field of O3 dosimetry. The report was prepared at the request of the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as an input to be considered by scientists participating in a chronic lung injury risk assessment project for O3. As indicated in the report a number of judgments and assumptions had to be made to obtain the dosimetry predictions. In addition to presenting the simulation results, the O3 dosimetry model used to make the predictions is discussed and the choice or method of selecting important physiological parameters explained. This includes anatomical dimensions, choices of rat and human ventilatory parameters, and the method of estimating human and rat upper respiratory tract uptake. Finally, a comparison of simulation results to recent experimental dosimetry results is discussed.

  14. Rats exhibit reference-dependent choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Mehwish; Jang, Hyeran; Kralik, Jerald D; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-07-01

    Human preferences depend on whether a chosen outcome appears to be a loss or a gain compared with what had been expected, i.e., in comparison to a reference point. Because reference dependence has such a strong influence on human decision-making, it is important to uncover its origins, which will in turn help delineate the underlying mechanisms. It remains unknown whether rats use reference points in decision-making, and yet, the study of rats could help address the question of whether reference dependence is evolutionarily conserved among mammals and could provide a nonhuman animal model to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this important cognitive process. The aim of the current study was to determine whether rats show reference-dependent choice behavior. We developed a novel paradigm by modifying the "T" maze by installing "pockets" to the left and right of the "T" stem that held reward pellets so rats would potentially develop reference values for each option prior to choice. We found that the rats were indeed sensitive to the way alternatives were presented. That is, they exhibited reference-dependent choice behavior by avoiding the choice option framed as a loss (e.g., having four reward pellets in the pocket, but receiving only one), at least under conditions with certain outcomes and clear differences between the reference and outcome quantities. Despite the small number of rats in this study, this species-level capacity suggests that reference dependence in general and loss aversion in particular may be conserved traits that evolved at or before the emergence of mammals. PMID:24657593

  15. Toxicity of oleic acid anilide in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, M F; Kaphalia, B S; Palafox, A; Jerrells, T R; Ansari, G A

    1991-11-01

    In the present investigation, we have studied the toxic potential of oleic acid anilide (OAA) and heated oleic acid anilide (HOAA) in relation to the toxic oil syndrome (TOS). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 250 mg/kg of OAA or HOAA in mineral oil by gavage, on alternate days for 2 weeks (total 7 doses). The control rats received an equal volume of mineral oil only. The animals were sacrificed at days 1, 7, and 28 following the last dose. Ratio of organ-to-body weight showed increases in spleen and kidney of HOAA and OAA treated rats, respectively, at day 1 while this ratio for liver in HOAA treated group showed a decrease at day 1. Among blood parameters, white blood cells increased in HOAA treated group at day 1 and in both OAA and HOAA groups at day 28. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and mean cell volume (MCV) also showed increases in the HOAA treated rats at days 7 and 28. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased in both OAA and HOAA treated rats at day 1, while at day 7 the decrease was confined only to the HOAA group. Serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) activities also decreased at most of the time points. Liver mitochondrial ATPase activity decreased in the HOAA group at day 7 and in the OAA group at day 28. Among serum immunoglobulins, IgA levels increased throughout the study but the changes were more pronounced in HOAA treated rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1759851

  16. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. PMID:2464204

  17. Glucose transporter expression in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, A F; Leturque, A; Loizeau, M; Postic, C; Girard, J

    1990-01-01

    The expression of different glucose transporter isoforms was measured during the development and differentiation of the rat mammary gland. Before conception, when the mammary gland is mainly composed of adipocytes, Glut 4 and Glut 1 mRNAs and proteins were present. During pregnancy, the expression of Glut 4 decreased progressively, whereas that of Glut 1 increased. In the lactating mammary gland only Glut 1 was present, and was expressed at a high level. The absence of Glut 4 suggests that glucose transport is not regulated by insulin in the lactating rat mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2396989

  18. Subchronic oral toxicity of zinc in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Llobet, J.M.; Domingo, J.L.; Colomina, M.T.; Mayayo, E.; Corbella, J.

    1988-07-01

    It is well known that zinc has important biological functions. Clinical manifestations in zinc-deficient animals include growth retardation, testicular atrophy, skin changes, and poor appetite. On the other hand, high levels of dietary zinc have been shown to induce copper deficiency in rats and to interfere with the metabolism of calcium and iron. Little is known on the oral toxicity of zinc in mammals. However, some toxic effects in human subjects, rodents, and sheep have been reported. In order to extend the information about the oral toxicity of zinc, a semichronic toxicity study of zinc acetate in rats has been carried out in this paper.

  19. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. SCFA transport in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Izumi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Akiba, Yasutada

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial or ingested food-derived short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are present in the duodenal lumen. Acetate, the most abundant SCFA in the foregut lumen, is absorbed immediately after ingestion, although the mechanism by which this absorption occurs is not fully understood. We investigated the distribution and function of candidate SCFA transporters in rat duodenum. The Na+-coupled monocarboxylate transporter-1 (SMCT1) was localized to the brush border, whereas the pH-dependent monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and MCT4 were localized to the duodenocyte basolateral membrane. In Ussing chambered duodenal mucosa, luminal acetate dose-dependently increased short-circuit current (Isc) in the presence of serosal bumetanide and indomethacin by a luminal Na+-dependent, ouabain-sensitive mechanism. The Isc response was inhibited dose-dependently by the SMCT1 nonsubstrate inhibitor ibuprofen, consistent with net electrogenic absorption of acetate via SMCT1. Other SCFAs and lactate also increased Isc. Furthermore, duodenal loop perfusion of acetate increased portal venous acetate concentration, inhibited by coperfusion of ibuprofen or a MCT inhibitor. Luminal acetate perfusion increased duodenal HCO3− secretion via capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerve activation and cyclooxygenase activity, consistent with absorption-mediated HCO3− secretion. These results suggest that absorption of luminal SCFA via SMCT1 and MCTs increases duodenal HCO3− secretion. In addition to SCFA sensing via free fatty acid receptors, the presence of rapid duodenal SCFA absorption may be important for the suppression of luminal bacterial colonization and implicated in the generation of functional dyspepsia due to bacterial overgrowth. PMID:25394661

  1. Purinoceptors in the rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, G.; Gordon, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of an intracoronary bolus of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), alpha, beta-methylene ATP (APCPP), beta, gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine on coronary tone and ventricular myocardial contraction were investigated in the perfused rat heart. Adenine nucleotides, given by bolus injection were negatively inotropic in amounts greater than 3 X 10(-7) mol. The potency order was ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP. Adenosine (less than 1 X 10(-5)mol) had no effect on ventricular myocardial contraction. Adenine nucleotides and adenosine (1 X 10(-10)-1 X 10(-7) mol) reduced coronary tone. The potency order was ATP greater than ADP greater than AMP = adenosine. The ATP analogue APPCP was less active than ATP at reducing coronary tone, and APCPP had no vasodilator effect. This suggests the presence of a P2-purinoceptor, subclass P2Y, which mediates vasodilation. ATP and ADP increased the concentration of prostacyclin (measured as 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha) in the perfusate, but only after injection of greater than 3 X 10(-7) mol, suggesting that the vasodilator responses to ATP and ADP were not mediated by prostacyclin. AMP and adenosine had no effect, even at 1 X 10(-5) mol. At a dose of 3 X 10(-9) mol, approximately 40% of ATP and 70% of ADP was converted to AMP and adenosine whilst passing through the heart. The amounts of AMP and adenosine formed, however, were insufficient to account for the vasodilator effects of ATP and ADP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3814919

  2. Metabolism of pyridalyl in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagahori, Hirohisa; Saito, Koichi; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Naohiko; Kaneko, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    Metabolism of pyridalyl [2,6-dichloro-4-(3,3-dichloroallyloxy)phenyl 3-[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyloxy]propyl ether] was examined in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. After a single oral administration of [dichlorophenyl-(14)C]pyridalyl at 5 or 500 mg/kg, the (14)C concentration in blood reached maxima at 2 to 10 h and then decreased rapidly with a biological half-life of approximately 11 to 12 h. (14)C concentrations in liver, fat, adrenal gland, and spleen were relatively high at a low dose, reaching 2.3 to 2.7, 1.9 to 2.3, 1.1 to 1.9, and 1.4 ppm, respectively, in these tissues at 2 to 24 h after administration. Although (14)C elimination from fat and hair and skin was relatively slow compared with that from other tissues, the total residue on the 7th day was low, in the range of 1.3 to 2.3% of the dose. The (14)C distribution in tissues with a high dose, as examined by whole-body autoradiography, was similar to that observed for the low dose. Results revealed that more than 88% of the dosed radiocarbon was excreted within 1 day after administration, with cumulative (14)C excretion into urine and feces 7 days after administration of 1.7 to 2.6 and 98.7 to 101.7%, respectively. One urinary and fecal major metabolite (resulting from O-dealkylation) and two minor metabolites were identified by NMR and mass spectrometry. Residual (14)C in fat was extracted, and analysis by thin-layer chromatography showed it to be due to pyridalyl itself. No marked sex-related differences were observed in (14)C elimination, (14)C distribution, and metabolites. PMID:19773539

  3. Glycoconjugate in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kano, K; Ube, M; Taniguchi, K

    2001-05-01

    The taste buds of the fungiform papillae, circumvallate papilla, foliate papillae, soft palate and epiglottis of the rat oral cavity were examined by lectin histochemistry to elucidate the relationships between expression of glycoconjugates and innervation. Seven out of 21 lectins showed moderate to intense staining in at least more than one taste bud. They were succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA). Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). UEA-I and BSL-I showed moderate to intense staining in all of the taste buds examined. They strongly stained the taste buds of the epiglottis, which are innervated by the cranial nerve X. UEA-I intensely stained the taste buds of the fungiform papillae and soft palate, both of which are innervated by the cranial nerve VII. The taste buds of circumvallate papilla and foliate papillae were innervated by the cranial nerve IX and strongly stained by BSL-I. Thus, UEA-I and BSL-I binding glycoconjugates, probably alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose, respectively, might be specific for taste buds. Although the expression of these glycoconjugates would be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve X, the differential expression of alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose might be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve VII and IX, respectively. PMID:11411494

  4. Cecal infusion of nutrients improves nutritional status of rats.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, E; Raina, N; Allard, J P

    1995-11-01

    The role of colonic fermentation in providing energy was investigated in rats with small bowel transection (T) or 80% resection (SBR). Rats were randomized to receive for 12 d either saline (S) or the enteral solution (E) through a cecostomy to meet 30% of energy requirement; the rest (70%) was provided by parenteral nutrition. Although SBR-S rats lost weight significantly compared with d 1 of the study, SBR-E rats gained. Significantly greater carcass wet weight and fat were found in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. SBR-E and T-E rats had significantly greater colonic mucosal dry weight and protein compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. Cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) contents were also significantly higher in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. There was no significant effect of surgery (T vs. SBR) on any of the variables studied. These results suggest that the products of fermentation of an enteral solution infused through a cecostomy contribute substantially to energy requirement, maintenance of body composition and nutritional status of rats. PMID:7472670

  5. Erythrocyte Flow in Choriocapillaris of Normal and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rod D.; Wienczewski, Christopher A.; Abbas, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The choriocapillaris is a unique capillary bed that provides nutrients to the retinal photoreceptors. It changes anatomically in diabetes, but the impact of these changes on blood flow is unknown. In this study hemodynamic parameters in individual choriocapillaris vessels were compared in normal and diabetic rats. Three groups were studied: normal buffer-injected control rats, streptozotocin (STZ)-injected mildly hyperglycemic (STZ-MH) rats, and STZ-injected diabetic (STZ-D) rats. 7-8 weeks after STZ injection, the rats were anesthetized, and epifluorescent, intravital microscopy was used to record the flow of fluorescent red blood cells (RBC) in the choriocapillaris. Diameter, RBC flux, and RBC velocity were measured in 153 capillary pathways in five control rats, 98 pathways in four STZ-MH rats, and 153 pathways in seven STZ-D rats. There was no difference in capillary diameter among the groups. RBC flux and velocity were lower in the STZ-injected rats compared to the controls (p≤0.023), which is similar to changes found in other capillary beds. RBC velocity and flux were significantly correlated in all three groups, but the correlations in the STZ-injected rats were much stronger than in the controls. This indicates a more heterogeneous distribution of RBCs at upstream arteriolar branchpoints in hyperglycemic rats, which could lead to a decrease in choriocapillaris hematocrit. These changes in the hyperglycemic choriocapillaris could contribute to impaired oxygen delivery to the photoreceptors in diabetic retina. PMID:19269298

  6. Inhibition of Mitosis and Macromolecular Synthesis in Rat Embryo Cells by Kilham Rat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Raymond W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of Kilham rat virus multiplication were studied in cultured rat embryo cells to examine the mechanisms by which virus infection might be related to developmental defects in rats and hamsters. The virus was found to inhibit motosis and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis within 2 to 10 hr after infection. However, total ribonucleic acid synthesis was relatively unaffected until about 20 hr after infection, and total protein synthesis did not decline significantly until loss of viable cells was apparent in the cultures. No effect on chromosomes was detected. The effect of Kilham rat virus on DNA synthesis appears to be due to inhibition of macromolecular synthesis rather than to an inhibition of uptake of precursors into cells. The effect of the virus on mitosis may be an addition to the effect on DNA synthesis, since mitosis is inhibited even in cultures in which cells are able to divide at the time of infection and which have presumably completed DNA synthesis. PMID:5167023

  7. [Foci of the rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti (Mesostigmata, Macronyssidae) and rat-mite dermatitis in Moscow].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Iu V; Sokolova, T V; Niiazova, M V

    1992-01-01

    High density of the rat population in Moscow in 1990-1991 resulted in the appearance of Ornithonyssus bacoti foci and of cases of the rat-mite dermatitis in humans. A total of 36 foci of the disease were examined and eradicated. A method for the detection of such foci has been developed. Two types of foci are distinguished, communal and industrial, and their specific features as regards the rodent and mite populations and clinical features of dermatitis in humans are described. A system of measures for liquidation of foci of rat mites is suggested, including rat and mite eradication and treatment of the patients. Specific features of these measures for various types of foci and in case of a focus reappearance are enumerated. PMID:1299760

  8. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  9. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Wild Rats, United States

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  10. Core temperature of tailless rats exposed to centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1984-01-01

    The role of the tail in the altered thermoregulation of rats during acute exposure to hypergravity was investigated, using groups of rats of two ages: 55 days (young) and 138 days (old). Rectal and foot temperature changes were measured in intact and tailless rats subjected to 1 h centrifugation of 2.8 G, with preceding (1 h) and following (1-3 h) 1 G periods. At 22 C, the loss of body heat from the tail per se does not measurably contribute to the hypothermia induced by hypergravity. However, the heat loss from the feet was greater in the tailless rats than in the intact rats from the young group of animals, although there was no significant difference between the tailless and intact rats in the old animal group. It is concluded that the inhibition of heat production is a significant factor in the hypothermia of centrifuged tailless rats, as it has been previously shown to be in the intact animals.